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Sample records for monoclonal antibodies mab

  1. Antigen identification and characterization of lung cancer specific monoclonal antibodies produced by mAb proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Guergova-Kuras, Mariana; Kadas, Janos; Takacs, Laszlo; Karger, Barry L

    2010-04-01

    A mass spectrometric (MS)-based strategy for antigen (Ag) identification and characterization of globally produced monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is described. Mice were immunized with a mixture of native glycoproteins, isolated from the pooled plasma of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), to generate a library of IgG-secreting hybridomas. Prior to immunization, the pooled NSCLC plasma was subjected to 3-sequential steps of affinity fractionation, including high abundant plasma protein depletion, glycoprotein enrichment, and polyclonal antibody affinity chromatography normalization. In this paper, to demonstrate the high quality of the globally produced mAbs, we selected 3 mAbs of high differentiating power against a matched, pooled normal plasma sample. After production of large quantities of the mAbs from ascites fluids, Ag identification was achieved by immunoaffinity purification, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and MS analysis of in-gel digest products. One antigen was found to be complement factor H, and the other two were mapped to different subunits of haptoglobin (Hpt). The 2 Hpt mAbs were characterized in detail to assess the quality of the mAbs produced by the global strategy. The affinity of one of the mAbs to the Hpt native tetramer form was found to have a K(D) of roughly 10(-9) M and to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the reduced form, demonstrating the power of the mAb proteomics technology in generating mAbs to the natural form of the proteins in blood. The binding of this mAb to the beta-chain of haptoglobin was also dependent on glycosylation on this chain. The characterization of mAbs in this work reveals that the global mAb proteomics process can generate high-quality lung cancer specific mAbs capable of recognizing proteins in their native state. PMID:20146545

  2. Antigen Identification and Characterization of Lung Cancer Specific Monoclonal Antibodies Produced by mAb Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Guergova-Kuras, Mariana; Kadas, Janos; Takacs, Laszlo; Karger, Barry L.

    2010-01-01

    A mass spectrometric (MS)-based strategy for antigen (Ag) identification and characterization of globally produced monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is described. Mice were immunized with a mixture of native glycoproteins, isolated from the pooled plasma of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), to generate a library of IgG-secreting hybridomas. Prior to immunization, the pooled NSCLC plasma was subjected to 3-sequential steps of affinity fractionation, including high abundant plasma protein depletion, glycoprotein enrichment and polyclonal antibody affinity chromatography normalization. In this paper, in order to demonstrate the high quality of the globally produced mAbs, we selected 3 mAbs of high differentiating power against a matched, pooled normal plasma sample. After production of large quantities of the mAbs from ascites fluids, Ag identification was achieved by immunoaffinity purification, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and MS analysis of in-gel digest products. One antigen was found to be complement factor H, and the other two were mapped to different subunits of haptoglobin (Hpt). The 2 Hpt mAbs were characterized in detail in order to assess the quality of the mAbs produced by the global strategy. The affinity of one of the mAbs to the Hpt native tetramer form was found to have a KD of roughly 10−9 M and to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the reduced form, demonstrating the power of the mAb proteomics technology in generating mAbs to the natural form of the proteins in blood. The binding of this mAb to the β-chain of haptoglobin was also dependent on glycosylation on this chain. The characterization of mAbs in this work reveals that the global mAb proteomics process can generate high-quality lung cancer specific mAbs capable of recognizing proteins in their native state. PMID:20146545

  3. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody LpMab-3 Recognizing Sialylated Glycopeptide of Podoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Hiroharu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Takagi, Michiaki; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN/Aggrus/T1α/gp36/OTS-8), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is involved in platelet aggregation, cell invasion, and cancer metastasis. Podoplanin expression in cancer cells or cancer-associated fibroblasts was reported to be involved in poor prognosis of several cancers. Furthermore, podoplanin is expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells or lung type I alveolar cells. Although many anti-podoplanin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), such as NZ-1 and D2–40, have been established, almost all anti-podoplanin MAbs are produced against a platelet aggregation-inducing (PLAG) domain. In this study, we produced and characterized a novel anti-podoplanin monoclonal antibody, LpMab-3, the epitope of which is a sialylated glycopeptide of podoplanin. We identified the minimum epitope of LpMab-3 as Thr76–Glu81 of human podoplanin, which is different from PLAG domain, using Western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LpMab-3 is useful for detecting lung type I alveolar cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. Because LpMab-3 detects only sialylated podoplanin, it could be useful for uncovering the physiological function of sialylated human podoplanin. PMID:25723283

  4. Establishment of a multi-specific monoclonal antibody MsMab-1 recognizing both IDH1 and IDH2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kato Kaneko, Mika; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) have been reported in gliomas, cartilaginous tumors, and acute myeloid leukemias. IDH mutations are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important arginine 132 residue (R132) of IDH1 or arginine 172 residue (R172) of IDH2 in gliomas. Although IDH1 and IDH2 catalyze the oxidative carboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in cytosol and mitochondria, respectively, mutated IDH1/2 proteins can possess the ability to change α-ketoglutarate to an oncometabolite R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate. We have established several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for IDH1/2 mutations. However, no multi-specific mAb against IDH1/2 mutations has been reported. For this study, we immunized mice with an IDH1-R132G peptide of 19 amino acids (GGVKPIIIGGHAYGDQYRA), and established a novel mAb MsMab-1 that recognizes IDH1-R132G, but not wild type IDH1 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It is particularly interesting that MsMab-1 recognizes all IDH1 mutants (R132H, R132C, R132S, R132G, R132L) in ELISA. Western blot analysis also revealed that MsMab-1 reacted with recombinant proteins of IDH1-R132H, IDH1-R132S, and IDH1-R132G, but not with wild type IDH1 and other IDH1 mutations, indicating that MsMab-1 is a multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1 mAb. Unexpectedly, MsMab-1 recognizes IDH2-R172M protein, despite that the IDH1-R132G peptide shows only 73.7% identity with the equivalent portion of IDH2-R172M (GGTKPITIGMHAHGDQYKA). Moreover, MsMab-1 stained the IDH1-R132S or IDH1-R132G-expressing glioma cells in immunohistochemistry. This report is the first to establish a multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1/2 mAb, that is expected to be useful for immunohistochemical determination of IDH1/2 mutation-bearing tumors. PMID:23782684

  5. Development, characterization, and technical applications of a fish lysozyme-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb M24-2)

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Marlee B.; Rice, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    Lysozyme is one of several humoral and cellular factors associated with front line, innate immunity in all vertebrates. Historically, circulating lysozyme has been quantified in teleosts by measuring enzymatic activity against heat-killed Mycococcus lysodieticus using whole serum or plasma at a low pH. However, the amount of serum or plasma required for standard lysozyme activity exceeds that which can be easily acquired from small fish, thus making lysozyme a difficult endpoint to measure in limited sample volumes. Moreover, while circulating lysozyme is considered to be an indicator of proinflammatory phagocyte activity, the cellular source of this protein is not easily detected in fish. While several antibodies against lysozyme are commercially available for use in higher vertebrates, neither reacts with lysozyme in fish. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) for detecting and quantifying lysozyme was developed from mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, myeloid cells that also recognizes hen egg lysozyme (HEL), then tested for cross-reactivity in different species of teleosts, A single protein of ≈ 14–15 kDa mass was identified by the mAb in fish cell lysates and plasma samples, as well as denatured HEL. Total circulating lysozyme protein was compared to lysozyme activity using standard ELISA procedures and was found to correlate with enzymatic activity. Using mAb M24-2, intracellular lysozyme protein was detected in formalin-fixed and permeabilized lymphoid cells adhered to glass cover slips. Moreover, mAb M24-2 localizes lysozyme to myeloid cells. Finally, it was demonstrated that mAb M24-2 is suitable for immunohistochemistry in that lysozyme could be detected in plastic-embedded lymphoid tissues. PMID:19900707

  6. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  7. Intracellular Signaling Transduction Pathways Triggered by a Well-Known Anti-GHR Monoclonal Antibody, Mab263, in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hainan; Li, Wei; Jiang, Hailong; Yang, Yanhong; Zheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A series of studies have reported that monoclonal antibody 263 (Mab263), a monoclonal antibody against the growth hormone receptor (GHR), acts as an agonist in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular signaling pathways triggered by Mab263 have not yet been delineated. Therefore, we examined the intracellular signaling pathways induced by Mab263 in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results show that this antibody activated janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), STAT1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not STAT5. The phosphorylation kinetics of JAK2, STAT3/1 and ERK1/2 induced by Mab263 were subsequently analyzed in dose-response and time course experiments. Our observations indicate that Mab263 induced different intracellular signaling pathways than GH, which indicates that Mab263 is a signal-specific molecule and that Mab263 may be a valuable biological reagent to study the mechanism(s) of GHR-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:25391041

  8. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutation is a frequent event in osteosarcoma detected by a multi-specific monoclonal antibody MsMab-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Sugawara, Masato; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Naganuma, Yasushi; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Takagi, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and IDH2 occur in gliomas, acute myeloid leukemia, and cartilaginous tumors. Somatic mosaic IDH1/2 mutations are also reported in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, which are characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors. Although IDH1/2 mutation analysis against osteosarcoma has been performed in several studies, no IDH1/2 mutation has been reported. Herein, we newly report the IDH2-R172S mutation in three of 12 (25%) osteosarcoma patients, which was detected by direct DNA sequencing. No monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been reported against IDH2-R172S mutation. However, we demonstrate that the IDH2-R172S peptide was recognized by our established multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1/2 mAb, MsMab-1, in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot analysis revealed that MsMab-1 reacts with PA tag combined recombinant proteins of IDH2-R172S. Furthermore, MsMab-1 stained IDH2-R172S-expressing osteosarcoma tissues in immunohistochemistry. The MsMab-1 stained nine of 32 (28.1%) osteosarcomas in a tissue microarray. This report is the first describing IDH2 mutations in osteosarcoma, which can be detected by MsMab-1 mAb. Taken together, these results show that MsMab-1 can be anticipated for use in immunohistochemical determination of IDH1/2 mutation-bearing osteosarcoma. PMID:24403254

  9. ING-1(heMAb), a Monoclonal Antibody to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule, Inhibits Tumor Metastases in a Murine Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Harry H.; Scott, Kristen R.; Bautista, Eddie; Ammons, W. Steve

    2003-01-01

    Abstract ING-1(heMAb), a human-engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb) that specifically targets the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM), kills adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of ING-1(heMAb) in a murine model of cancer metastases. Mice received intravenous dosing of 1 mg/kg ING-1(heMAb), twice a week, starting on day 2 or day 5. A negative control group received 1 mg/kg human immunoglobulin G with the same dose frequency starting on day 2. A positive control group received weekly 100 mg/kg 5-flurouracil/leucovorin starting on day 2. ING-1(heMAb)/day 2 treatment significantly reduced both the number of visible tumor nodules in body cavities (P < .01) and the number of metastases on lung surfaces (P < .005). The treatment also resulted in a 91% reduction of micrometastases in lung tissues (P < .0001). Delaying ING-1(heMAb) treatment until day 5 caused 54% reduction in micrometastases (P < .005). Our results indicate that a number of parameters, including treatment starting day, dose level, and dose frequency, are critical in achieving the optimal efficacy of ING-1(heMAb). We conclude that ING-1(heMAb) effectively reduced tumor metastases in a murine cancer model. Immunotherapy with ING-1(heMAb) may be beneficial in treating human metastatic diseases. PMID:14965442

  10. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of intravenous Lu-177 CC49 murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) in patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo, J.; Mulligan, T.; Chung, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of Lu-177 labeled CG49, a murine monoclonal antibody that is undergoing testing for radioimmunotherapy, was evaluated. CC49 is a second generation murine MAb that recognizes TAG-72, a pan-carcinoma tumor associated antigen. Labeling of CC49 MAb with Lu-177, a beta emitter was performed by first labeling a derivative of 1,4,5,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (PA-DOTA) with Lu-177 and then attaching the Lu-177 labeled PA-DOTA to CC49. CC49 was labeled with Lu-177 at a maximum specific activity of 185 MBq/mg. HPLC showed 96-100% protein bound Lu-177 and <4% aggregate formation. A Phase I dose escalation study was performed. Nine patients with TAG-72 positive, advanced metastatic adenocarcinoma (5- breast, 3- colorectal and 1- lung) were treated with escalating iv doses of Lu-177-(PA-DOTA) CC49: 370 MBq/m2, 555 MBq/m2 and 925 MBq/m2 (range 560-1575 MBq). Pharmacokinetics showed that the plasma cleared with a T1/2 of {approximately}67 hrs which is in the range seen with I-131 CC49. The whole body retention of Lu-177 was prolonged with a biological T1/2 of 223 hr. Urinary excretion ranged from 7 to 26% in the first 96 hrs. Serial images showed early blood pool distribution with prominent uptake in the liver, spleen and marrow. Some intestinal excretion was noted. Tumor imaging was seen in all patients although riot all tumors were visualized. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained in all patients and suggested that the accumulation seen on scan was predominantly in the marrow rather than the bone. MIRDOSE estimates from the first 6 patients suggested doses to the marrow in the range of {approximately}4 cG/37 MBq. This study indicated that while the serum pharmacokinetics of Lu-177-(PA-DOTA)-CC49 are similar to those seen with I-131 CC49, the whole body retention and bone marrow accumulation are different and therefore require further investigation to minimize the bone marrow accumulation.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  12. The Anti-(+)-Methamphetamine Monoclonal Antibody mAb7F9 Attenuates Acute (+)-Methamphetamine Effects on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew C.; LeSage, Mark G.; Shelley, David; Perry, Jennifer L.; Pentel, Paul R.; Owens, S. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against (+)-methamphetamine (METH) is being evaluated for the treatment of METH addiction. A human/mouse chimeric form of the murine anti-METH mAb7F9 has entered clinical trials. This study examined the effects of murine mAb7F9 on certain addiction-related behavioral effects of METH in rats as measured using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Initial studies indicated that acute METH (0.1-0.56 mg/kg, s.c.) lowered the minimal (threshold) stimulation intensity that maintained ICSS. METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) also blocked elevations in ICSS thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior) during spontaneous withdrawal from a chronic METH infusion (10 mg/kg/day x 7 days). In studies examining effects of i.v. pretreatment with mAb7F9 (at 30, 100, or 200 mg/kg), 200 mg/kg blocked the ability of an initial injection of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) to reduce baseline ICSS thresholds, but was less capable of attenuating the effect of subsequent daily injections of METH. MAb7F9 (200 mg/kg) also produced a small but significant reduction in the ability of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) to reverse METH withdrawal-induced elevations in ICSS thresholds. These studies demonstrate that mAb7F9 can partially attenuate some addiction-related effects of acute METH in an ICSS model, and provide some support for the therapeutic potential of mAb7F9 for the treatment of METH addiction. PMID:25742165

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sondergeld, Pia; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Richardson, Paul G; Plesner, Torben

    2015-09-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium. The incorporation of mAbs into current treatment strategies is hoped to enable more effective and targeted treatment, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. A number of targets have been identified, including molecules on the surface of the myeloma cell and components of the bone marrow microenvironment. Our review focuses on a small number of promising mAbs directed against molecules on the surface of myeloma cells, including CS1 (elotuzumab), CD38 (daratumumab, SAR650984, MOR03087), CD56 (lorvotuzumab mertansine), and CD138/syndecan-1 (BT062/indatuximab ravtansine). PMID:26452191

  14. Reactivity of anti-glycophorin monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) in tests with red cells of non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Blancher, A; Socha, W W; Reid, M E

    1997-01-01

    Seventy Mabs against human glycophorins (GP) and band 3 were tested with red blood cells (RBCs) of various non-human primates, from anthropoid apes to monkeys. Differences among Mabs reactivity in tests with non-human primate RBCs reflect the complexity of the immune reactions to human GPs and provide insights into aspects of evolution and a tool to epitope map. PMID:9095507

  15. Authorized manufacturing changes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) documents.

    PubMed

    Vezér, Balázs; Buzás, Zsuzsanna; Sebeszta, Miklós; Zrubka, Zsombor

    2016-05-01

    Background The quality of biologicals, including biosimilars, is subject to change as a result of manufacturing process modifications following initial authorization. It is important that such product changes have no adverse impact on product efficacy or safety, including immunogenicity. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the number and types of manufacturing changes for originator mAbs (the reference for the comparability exercise to confirm biosimilarity) according to European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) documentation and to ascertain the level of risk these changes might impart. The extensive body of evidence contained in the EPAR documents can help support the EMA during the EC marketing authorization approval process for biosimilars, since it provides a broad base of scientific experience. Research designs and methods For EPAR-listed mAbs, details of all changes listed chronologically in the EPAR were evaluated and described. Based on these descriptions the manufacturing changes can be categorized by risk status (low, moderate or high). Results Entries for 29 mAbs with publicly available EPAR reports were reviewed. These contained details of 404 manufacturing changes authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA): 22 were categorized as high risk, 286 as moderate risk and 96 as low risk manufacturing changes. A limitation of this analysis is that it only summarizes publicly available data from EPAR documents. Conclusions Manufacturing change data indicate that the EMA has significant experience of process changes for originator mAbs, and the impact they may have on the efficacy and safety of biologicals. This experience will be useful in biosimilar product development to ensure adherence to sound scientific principles. Compared with the established manufacturing process for a reference product, the production of biosimilars will usually be different. Consequently, in addition to a comprehensive comparative functional and physicochemical

  16. Augmenting tumor uptake of Tc-99m monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with biological response modifiers: Influence of interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Thakur, M.L.; Wilder, S.

    1994-05-01

    Following the evaluation of radiolabeled MAbs for scintigraphic imaging or therapy, low tumor uptake emerged as one of the most prominent problems. The aim of this investigation was to examine the influence of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}2b in augmenting uptake of Tc-99m labeled antimelanoma MAb 31.3 in nude mice bearing experimental human melanoma. MAb was labeled with Tc-99m by our ascorbic acid mediated reduction technique, analyzed and 20 {mu}g containing 40-120 {mu}Ci Tc-99m were administered i.v., 1 hr following i.m. or i.v. administration of 10K, 20K, or 100K i.u. IFN-{alpha}2b. Animals receiving 0.9% saline similarly served as controls. 4 and 24 hrs later, animals were sacrificed, imaged, and dissected for tissue distribution studies. Tumor blood flow was measured before and after administration of IFN by color Doppler imaging technique, intratumoral temperature was recorded using thermocouples, and tumor histology was performed to visualize tumor lymphocytic infiltration. Although no excessive lymphocytic infiltration was seen within 72 hr post-injection of IFN, and only a modest increase in tumor temperature was noted, a significant increase in blood flow was observed within 45 min. as differentiated by amplitudes at peak systolic and end diastolic cardiac cycles. The best tumor uptake enhancement was noted at 24 hr following i.m. administration of 20K i.u. IFN and measured greater than 300% of the control value (7.2{plus_minus}1.2%/g vs. 2.2{plus_minus}1.4%/g). IFN-{alpha}2b enhances tumor blood flow in experimental tumors and significantly augments the uptake of radiolabeled MAbs.

  17. Comparison of P-glycoprotein expression in cell lines and xenogragraft sections using I-125 MRK-16 monoclonal antibody (MAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, B.M.; Kostakoglu, L.; Levchenko, A.

    1994-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is known to be associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). Quantitation of P-glycoprotein expression may permit appropriate therapy depending on Pgp expression in tumors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of quantitative autoradiography (QAR) in the quantification of MDR using MRK-16, a murine IgG mAb reactive against Pgp. Balb/c mice were xenografted with colchicine resistant BE(2)C/CHC cells. Animals with established tumors were sacrificed, and 8 {mu}m tumor sections were prepared. Mab MRK-16 was labeled with I-125 (150 {mu}Ci/0.625 nmole) by the iodogen method and subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. Consecutive tumor sections were incubated overnight at 4{degrees}C with serial dilutions of I-125 MRK-16. Similarly cell suspensions containing 1 X 10{sup 7} cells per ml were also incubated with serial dilutions. QAR analysis of tissue sections of BE(2)C/CHC tumors growing as xenografts in nude mice, determined the binding affinity (K{sub a}) for MRK-16 to be 1 x 10{sup 9} L/M and the number of binding sites (B{sub max}) to be 137, 700 per cell (222 picomols/g); it compared very well with the K{sub a} value of 5 x 10{sup 8} L/M and the B{sub max} value of 130,000 per cell (217 picomols/g) obtained from binding analysis with cell suspensions.

  18. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein. PMID:21337095

  19. Simplified solid-phase membrane immunobead assay (MIA) with monoclonal anti-ciguatoxin antibody (MAb-CTX) for detection of ciguatoxin and related polyether toxins.

    PubMed

    Hokama, Y; Nishimura, K; Takenaka, W; Ebesu, J S

    1998-02-01

    The development of a simplified and modified procedure for the assessment of ciguatoxin (CTX) and related polyethers from ciguateric contaminated fish tissues is presented in this study. The previous method, stick-enzyme immunoassay (S-EIA) used an organic correction fluid-coated bamboo paddle stick for the solid phase; this new procedure, membrane immunobead assay (MIA), uses a plastic stick with a synthetic membrane laminated onto one end. The membrane is hydrophobic and serves as the solid-phase receptor for the binding of methanol-extracted CTX or its related polyether lipids from fish tissues. Detection of the bound polyether toxin(s) on the membrane is carried out with colored polystyrene beads coated with monoclonal antibody to CTX (MAb-CTX). Intensity of the color on the membrane is proportional to the amount of toxic polyethers on the membrane. The MIA is compared with previous procedures developed for CTX detection (S-EIA and solid-phase immunobead assay, SPIA) using State of Hawaii Department of Health (DOH) implicated ciguateric fishes, and reef fishes from Hawaii and Kwajalein. The data presented show good correlation between the three test systems, especially with ciguatera implicated fish and toxic, routinely assessed fishes in the mouse toxicity (MT) bioassay. Variations between MT results and those of the S-EIA, SPIA, and MIA of routine fishes are generally attributable to diverse toxins present in the fish species examined. The MIA is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific detection method for CTX and its related polyethers, with no reported false negative results. The test is useful for field and personal use and can be adapted to the laboratory for large-scale screening of potentially ciguateric fishes. PMID:9689599

  20. Immunotoxicity of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are large molecules intended to bind to specific targets often expressed on the immune system, and to treat various immunopathological conditions. Therefore, mAbs can be considered to have a high potential for immunotoxicity, which is reflected in the clinical experience accumulated on mAbs-induced adverse effects related to immunosuppression, immunostimulation and hypersensitivity (immunogenicity). So far, non clinical immunotoxicity studies have been inadequate to address all safety issues in relation to the possible immunotoxicity of mAbs, because they are fraught with limitations and pitfalls primarily related to the lack of relevant animal species. In addition, clinical studies rarely include validated end-points dedicated to the prediction of immunotoxicity. With the ongoing development of mAbs as novel therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases, efforts should be paid to improve our understanding of mAbs-induced immunotoxic effects and design dedicated strategies to assess their immunological safety, both non clinically and clinically. PMID:20061816

  1. Oregovomab: anti-CA-125 monoclonal antibody B43.13--AltaRex, B43.13, MAb B43.13, monoclonal antibody B43.13.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    ViRexx Medical Corp is developing the murine monoclonal antibody oregovomab [OvaRex, MAb B43.13] for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Oregovomab targets the circulating tumour-associated antigen CA 125, which is shed from the surface of human ovarian cancer cells; the antibodies induce broad cellular and humoral immune responses against CA 125 via complex formation. Unlike free CA 125, CA 125-oregovomab complexes can prime dendritic cells, leading to downstream activation of T cells. The antibody is undergoing advanced clinical development. AltaRex, the originator of oregovomab, was acquired by, and merged into, ViRexx Medical Corp in December 2004. AltaRex (now ViRexx Medical Corp) has established several strategic corporate alliances for the development and/or commercialisation of oregovomab. Unither Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of United Therapeutics Corporation, entered into a licensing agreement with ViRexx in April 2002. The agreement covers most territories worldwide, except Europe and the Middle East, which are covered by other agreements (see below); ViRexx did retain the rights to most member nations of the EU and certain other countries. In August 2003, the agreement was extended, granting United Therapeutics Corporation development rights for Germany. AltaRex and Dompe entered into a distribution agreement for oregovomab in July 2004. Territories included in the agreement are Italy, Spain, Portugal, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic, Switzerland, Austria and certain other Eastern European countries. Under the terms of the agreement, ViRexx retains responsibility for product development and registration of the antibody, upon commercialisation in the agreed territory. The two companies will work closely to achieve product registration throughout Europe. In June 2001, Dompe entered into a sublicensing agreement with FAES for the commercialisation of oregovomab in Spain and Portugal. ViRexx is also seeking collaboration partners for Northern European markets

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against chicken interleukin-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against a recombinant (r) chicken interleukin-6 (IL-6). Eight mAbs that were produced were tested for isotype; ability to inhibit recombinant forms of chicken (ch), human (h) and murine (m) IL-6; and recognition of rchIL-6 by Western immunoblotting. The mA...

  3. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  4. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  5. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  6. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  8. Flow cytometric assessment of the reactivity of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against two populations of human dendritic cells (DC)

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Rafael; Filgueira, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Background The identification of antigens on human DC has been a very difficult and elusive task because of the lack of appropriate reagents. Therefore, we evaluated by flow cytometry a panel of mAb that recognize antigens on human DC, aiming to determine the kinetics of DC antigen expression at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days in (i) Dermal DC like cells (Mo-DC) and (ii) Langerhans cell like DC (Mo-LC). In addition we aimed to identify markers for DC subpopulations. Results It was found at day 7, that mAb BG6, HP-F1, BU10, RFD-1, CMRF-44 recognized <20% of Mo-DC. In contrast, 7H5, ZM3.8, CDlb/c, 55K-2, MMR1.16, MMR190.BB3 and L25 reacted with >50% of Mo-DC. Moreover, 7H5, ZM3.8, CMRF-56, CDlb/c, 55K-2, MMR1.16, MMR190.BB3 and L25 showed increased MFI reactivity against Mo-DC. mAb BG6, BU10 and CMRF-44 recognized <20% Mo-LC while RFD-1 reacted with 21% of Mo-LC. In contrast, HP-F1 showed 87% of Mo-LC positive. Also, 7H5, ZM3.8, RFD-7, MR15-2, CDlb/c, 55K-2, MMR1.16, MMR190.BB3 and L25 reacted with >50% of Mo-LC. The increase in % of positive cells was paralleled by MFI increases. At day 14, fourteen mAb recognized >50% of the Mo-DC, while five recognized 20-50% of Mo-DC. BG6 reacted with 7% of the Mo-DC. Nineteen mAb recognized >48% of Mo-LC while BG6 had negative reactivity. At day 21 and 28, all mAb reacted with >20% of Mo-DC and yielded a significant MFI with Mo-DC. Also nineteen mAb yielded significant MFI with Mo-LC while RFD-7 did not. Conclusions The immunophenotyping assays demonstrated differences between the two DC populations as well as variations in the reactivity of the mAb at diverse time points, suggesting the existence of subpopulations within the Mo-DC and Mo-LC. PMID:11504561

  9. Detection of enterovirus 70 with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L J; Hatch, M H; Flemister, M R; Marchetti, G E

    1984-09-01

    To improve the ability to identify enterovirus-70 (EV-70) from patients with acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, we developed four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to EV-70. We reacted the four MAbs against nine previously characterized strains of EV-70 and heterologous viruses by virus neutralization, indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two of the MAbs neutralized all nine strains of EV-70 and none of the other enterovirus types tested. Two of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with all nine strains by indirect immunofluorescence, and three reacted with all nine strains by ELISA. None of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with heterologous viruses, including those associated with eye disease, by indirect immunofluorescence or ELISA. The two neutralizing MAbs failed to give a positive reaction with some of the strains of EV-70 by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, yet they neutralized these viruses. By ELISA with a polyclonal serum as capture antibody and a mixture of MAbs as detector antibody, we were able to detect from 10(2.2) to 10(5.8) 50% tissue culture infective doses of virus and to type lyophilized isolates of EV-70 sent from Taiwan from which we could not recover infectious virus. By choosing the appropriate MAb, or mixture of MAbs, we could construct a test which had the type specificity and strain sensitivity needed to type isolates of EV-70. PMID:6092426

  10. Detection of enterovirus 70 with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L J; Hatch, M H; Flemister, M R; Marchetti, G E

    1984-01-01

    To improve the ability to identify enterovirus-70 (EV-70) from patients with acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, we developed four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to EV-70. We reacted the four MAbs against nine previously characterized strains of EV-70 and heterologous viruses by virus neutralization, indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two of the MAbs neutralized all nine strains of EV-70 and none of the other enterovirus types tested. Two of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with all nine strains by indirect immunofluorescence, and three reacted with all nine strains by ELISA. None of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with heterologous viruses, including those associated with eye disease, by indirect immunofluorescence or ELISA. The two neutralizing MAbs failed to give a positive reaction with some of the strains of EV-70 by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, yet they neutralized these viruses. By ELISA with a polyclonal serum as capture antibody and a mixture of MAbs as detector antibody, we were able to detect from 10(2.2) to 10(5.8) 50% tissue culture infective doses of virus and to type lyophilized isolates of EV-70 sent from Taiwan from which we could not recover infectious virus. By choosing the appropriate MAb, or mixture of MAbs, we could construct a test which had the type specificity and strain sensitivity needed to type isolates of EV-70. PMID:6092426

  11. Preparation and near-quantitative Y-90 labelings of monoclonal antibody-macrocylic chelator (MAb-DOTA) conjugates for radioimmunotherapy (RAIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Govindan, S.V.; Griffiths, G.L.; Losman, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    The importance of kinetically inert Y-90-DOTA chelate for RAIT is well recognized. The aim of this study was to adapt a published procedure to overcome long-standing problems related to practical preparation of DOTA-MAb conjugates and poor Y-90 incorporation, and further improve upon labeling efficiencies. Using monoactivated DOTA, we have prepared conjugates of a CEA MAb (MN-14), a lymphoma MAb (LL2), their humanized versions (hMN-14 and hLL2), and the respective divalent fragments, and systematically examined the Y-90-labeling parameters. The DOTA/Mab ratios in conjugates were in the 3.0-6.8 range. In competitive CEA-binding assays, unmodified MN-14, MN-14-DOTA (6.8 chelators) and hMN-14-DOTA (4.4 chelators) exhibited very similar binding patterns. Y-90 labeling yields of >90% were obtained using a labeling time of 2 h at 40-45{degrees}C, pH {approximately}5.5, and DOTA/MAb ratio >3. Incorporations (specific activities):>99%for hMN-14-DOTA (103-170 MBa/mg), 94-97% for hLL2-DOTA (107-185 MBa/mg), 93-98%for hLL2F(ab`){sub 2}-DOTA (111 MBa/mg), and >90% for MN14-DOTA (37-185 MBq/mg). Aggregate content was usually less than 5%. Observed high incorporations are due both to the higher temperature used and DOTA/Y-90 molar ratios which readily exceeded a threshold requirement of three. Labeling efficiencies also depended upon the level of trace metal contaminants in the Y-90 shipment. Incubations of Y-90 labeled DOTA conjugates of hMN-14 and hLL2 in serum and in 1 mM DTPA at 37{degrees}C showed no detectable loss of metal over a 10-day period. These results should allow us to routinely use Y-90-DOTA-MAb conjugates in future preclinical and clinical RAIT studies.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) made against insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes (IMT) of Trypanosoma cruzi (TC) cross-react with other parasite forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchhoff, L.V.; Gilliam, F.C.

    1986-03-05

    Considerable information has been generated in recent years about stage-specific surface membrane antigens of a number of protozoa, and this phenomenon has been observed among several stages of TC as well. However, little is known about the surface antigens of IMT, the true infective stage of TC, because of the difficulty of obtaining sufficient numbers of these organisms for analysis. The Tulahuen strain of TC was maintained in the reduviid vector Dipetalogaster maximus by repeated feeding on mice with high parasitemias. IMT collected with insect urine were irradiated (150 krad) and used to immunize a BALB/c mouse for hybridoma production. Supernatants were screened by immunofluorescence assay for the presence of IgG MAb that react with methanol-fixed IMT, epimastogotes (EPI) and culture-derived metacyclic trypomastigoes (CMT). Of 41 MAb obtained, 40 reacted with IMT, 37 with EPI and 38 with CMT. Four MAb immunoprecipitated radioiodinated proteins or protein conjugates of M/sub r/ 80, 72, 45 and 45 from lysates of /sup 125/I surface-labeled EPI. These results indicate that, at least at the epitopic level, there is considerable overlap among IMT, EPI and CMT surface antigens. This finding suggests that analysis of surface proteins of the latter 2 parasite forms may lead to identification of molecules useful for vaccine development.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with chicken interleukin-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our previous study chicken interleukin -17 (chIL-17) gene was cloned from the expressed sequence tag (EST) cDNA library and initially analyzed. To further investigate biological properties of chicken IL-17, six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against bacterially expressed protein were produced and c...

  14. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  15. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  16. Building better monoclonal antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, George J.

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been a standard component of cancer therapy, yet there is still much room for improvement. Efforts continue to build better cancer therapeutics based on mAbs. Anti-cancer mAbs function via a variety of mechanisms including directly targeting the malignant cells, modifying the host response to the malignant cells, delivering cytotoxic moieties to the malignant cells or retargeting cellular immunity towards the malignant cells. Characteristics of mAbs that affect their efficacy include antigen specificity, overall structure, affinity for the target antigen and how a mAb component is incorporated into a construct that can trigger target cell death. This article reviews the various approaches to using mAb-based therapeutics to treat cancer, the strategies used to take advantage of the unique potential of each approach, and provides examples of current mAb-based treatments. PMID:25998715

  17. Chemoenzymatic Glyco-engineering of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Giddens, John P; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  18. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies produced against Avian metapneumovirus Sybtype C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared against avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype C (aMPV/Minnesota/turkey/1a/97). Six MAbs were selected based on ELISA activities and characterized by isotyping, neutralization test, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. The results show...

  19. Licensed monoclonal antibodies and associated challenges.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad Hayat; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2015-12-23

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are the leading class of targeted therapeutics and remarkably effective in addressing autoimmune diseases, inflammations, infections, and various types of cancer. Several mAbs approved by US food and drug administration (FDA), are available on the market and a number are pending for approval. Luckily, FDA approved mAbs have played a pivotal role in the treatment and prevention of lethal diseases. However, claiming that licensed mAbs are 100% safe is still debatable, because infections, malignancies, anaphylactoid, and anaphylactic reactions are the more frequently associated adverse events. To evaluate benefit to risk ratio of mAbs, it is important for the clinical research staff or physicians to monitor and follow-up the patients who are receiving mAbs dozes. It is recommended that patients, physicians, biopharmaceutical companies, and researchers should keep in touch to highlight and resolve antibody-based adverse events. In this review we underscore the associated challenges of mAbs, approved by FDA from 2007-2014. PMID:27472864

  20. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs. PMID:24237029

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  2. A novel monoclonal antibody specific for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Detection systems for the illegal drug cocaine need to have a high sensitivity and specificity for cocaine and to be relatively easy to use. In the current study, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) with a high specificity for cocaine was produced. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quenching immunoassay were used to screen the hybridomas. The MAb S27Y (IgG1) was shown to be sensitive and specific for cocaine and quenched fluorescence. Thus, S27Y has the potential to be used in screening assays for the rapid and sensitive detection of cocaine. PMID:23909419

  3. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, H A; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a Mr 95,000 antigen. Images PMID:3898084

  4. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics. PMID:27342605

  5. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is... relates to the development of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  7. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  8. Monoclonal antibodies produced by muscle after plasmid injection and electroporation.

    PubMed

    Tjelle, Torunn Elisabeth; Corthay, Alexandre; Lunde, Elin; Sandlie, Inger; Michaelsen, Terje E; Mathiesen, Iacob; Bogen, Bjarne

    2004-03-01

    Antibodies are useful for the treatment of a variety of diseases. We here demonstrate that mouse muscle produced monoclonal antibodies (mAb) after a single injection of immunoglobulin genes as plasmid DNA. In vivo electroporation of muscle greatly enhanced antibody production. For chimeric antibodies, levels of 50-200 ng mAb/ml serum were obtained but levels declined after 7-14 days due to an immune response against the xenogeneic parts of the antibody. By contrast, fully mouse antibodies persisted in serum for at least 7 months. mAb produced by the muscle had correct structure, specificity, and biological effector functions. The findings were extended to a larger animal, the sheep, in which mAb serum levels of 30-50 ng/ml were obtained. Sustained levels of serum mAb, induced by single injection of Ig genes and electroporation of muscle cells, may offer significant advantages in the treatment of human diseases. PMID:15006599

  9. Preparation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Bovine Haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caihong; Gu, Cheng; Guo, Donghua; Gao, Jing; Li, Chunqiu; Liu, Na; Geng, Yufei; Su, Mingjun; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Female, 8-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp). Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), named 1B3 and 6D6, were prepared by conventional B lymphocyte hybridoma technique. Titers of ascitic fluid and cell culture supernatant of MAb 1B3 were 1:9.6×108 and 1:8.2×104, respectively, and that of MAb 6D6 were 1:4.4×105 and 1:1.0×104, respectively. The subtype of MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 was IgG1κ. In Western blot analysis, MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 could recognize the α-chain of native BoHp from plasma of dairy cows. These data indicated that MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 have a potential use for developing diagnostic reagents of BoHp. PMID:25358005

  10. Development of monoclonal antibodies in China: overview and prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao-Yu; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Liang; Gao, Zi-Chao; Hu, Hao; Ung, Carolina Oi Lam; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become increasingly important as human therapeutic agents. Yet, current research concentrates on technology itself and pays attention to developed countries. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of mAbs development in China through systematic analysis of drug registry, patent applications, clinical trials, academic publication, and ongoing R&D projects. The trends in therapeutic areas and industrialization process are also highlighted. Development and research trends of mAbs are analyzed to provide a future perspective of mAbs as therapeutic agents in China. PMID:25811022

  11. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies in China: Overview and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao-Yu; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Liang; Gao, Zi-Chao; Ung, Carolina Oi Lam; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become increasingly important as human therapeutic agents. Yet, current research concentrates on technology itself and pays attention to developed countries. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of mAbs development in China through systematic analysis of drug registry, patent applications, clinical trials, academic publication, and ongoing R&D projects. The trends in therapeutic areas and industrialization process are also highlighted. Development and research trends of mAbs are analyzed to provide a future perspective of mAbs as therapeutic agents in China. PMID:25811022

  12. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  13. Monoclonal antibodies for medical oncology: a few critical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Ibáñez de Cáceres, Inmaculada; de Castro, Javier

    2011-02-01

    Incorporation of antibodies as weapons for cancer therapy has meant a turning point in the survival, clinical and radiological response of many oncology patients. These drugs are effective, well designed missiles that either alone or in combination with chemotherapy are unavoidable weapons for breast, lung and colon cancer as well as for haematological tumours. In addition, incoming monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and folder-like proteins will be incorporated into clinical practice in the near future. This review aims to discuss a few imminent indications of current mAbs that are used for solid tumours and to briefly introduce future mAbs to the reader. PMID:21324795

  14. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibody therapy for experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, J E; Small, G J; Lostrom, M E; Pier, G B

    1986-01-01

    A human immunoglobulin G preparation, enriched in antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens (PA-IGIV) and murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to P. aeruginosa Fisher immunotype-1 (IT-1) LPS antigen and outer membrane protein F (porin), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in a guinea pig model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The concentration of antibodies to IT-1 LPS was 7.6 micrograms/ml in PA-IGIV and 478 micrograms/ml in the IT-1 MAb preparation. No antibody to IT-1 was detected in MAb to porin. For study, animals were infected by intratracheal instillation of IT-1 P. aeruginosa and then treated 2 h later with intravenous infusions of PA-IGIV, IT-1 MAb, or porin MAb. Control groups received intravenous albumin, and routinely died from pneumonia. Both PA-IGIV (500 mg/kg) and IT-1 MAb (greater than or equal to 2.5 mg/kg) treatment resulted in increased survival (P less than 0.01 to 0.001), and also improved intrapulmonary killing of bacteria. Porin MAb failed to protect from fatal pneumonia. IT-1 MAb treatment produced more survivals than did PA-IGIV treatment but only at dosages of MAb resulting in serum antibody concentrations greater than those achieved with PA-IGIV. PA-IGIV and IT-1 MAb demonstrated in vitro and in vivo (posttreatment guinea pig serum) opsonophagocytic activity for the IT-1 challenge strain. However, the polyclonal preparation required complement, whereas the MAb did not. We conclude that passive immunization with polyclonal hyperimmune P. aeruginosa globulin or with MAb to LPS antigens may be useful in the treatment of acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The relative efficacies of such preparations may be limited, however, by their type-specific LPS antibody concentrations. PMID:3093385

  15. Monoclonal Antibody Purification (Nicotiana benthamiana Plants)

    PubMed Central

    Husk, Adam; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems provide an alternative biomanufacturing platform for recombinant proteins (Matoba et al., 2011). In particular, plant virus-based vectors can overexpress proteins within days in the leaf tissue of Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana). To overcome the issues of genetic instability and limited infectivity of recombinant viruses, Agrobacterium-mediated delivery of “deconstructed” virus vectors has become the mainstay for the production of large and/or multicomponent proteins, such as immunoglobulin (Ig)G monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Here, we describe a method of producing human IgG mAbs in N. benthamiana using the tobamoviral replicon vector magnICON®. The vector can express up to a few hundred mg of a mAb per kg of leaf material in 7 days. A representative case for the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV and anti-influenza mAbs, VRC01 and CR6261 respectively, is shown (Hamorsky et al., 2013). Leaf tissue is homogenized and the extract is clarified by filtration and centrifugation. The mAb is purified by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) using Protein A affinity and Phenyl HP hydrophobic interection resins.

  16. Production of monoclonal antibodies against canine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Borges dos Santos, Roberto Robson; Lima, Carla Andrade; Rios de Sousa Gomes, Hilton; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Santos, Patrícia Meira; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Conrado dos-Santos, Washington Luis; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2004-04-01

    A panel of anti-canine leukocyte monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), either resting or stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA). Three out of 28 clones-IH1, AB6, and HG6-screened by ELISA and producing antibody with the highest specificity for canine cell immunostaining, were subjected to three subsequent subcloning steps by limiting dilution, and selected for further characterization. These MAbs belonged to IgG1 (HG6 and IH1) and IgG2a (AB6) isotypes. The distribution of cell populations expressing the antigen recognized by the antibodies was identified by indirect immunoflorescence on canine PBMC and on tissue sections of lymph node, spleen, liver and skin. The possible crossreactivity with human PBMC was also examined in immunocytochemistry. One of the antibodies specifically recognized macrophages. The MAbs presented here can be foreseen as possible valuable diagnostic and research tools to study immune functions in dogs. PMID:15165486

  17. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies and the transformation of blood typing

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Today, when monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most important classes of therapeutic drugs, it is easy to forget how much they have transformed our healthcare in other ways. One of the first clinical areas, as this paper shows, where mAbs made their mark was in the field of blood typing. The adoption of mAbs for this purpose was done with little public fanfare or funding. Nonetheless, it radically transformed the accuracy and cost of blood typing and shifted the procedure away from a dependence on reagents made from human blood donated by volunteers. This paper argues that the development of mAbs as reagents for blood typing laid the foundation for the first large-scale production of mAbs thereby paving the way to the advent of mAb diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25484059

  19. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  20. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  1. Considerations for the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Swann, Patrick G; Tolnay, Mate; Muthukkumar, Subramanian; Shapiro, Marjorie A; Rellahan, Barbara L; Clouse, Kathleen A

    2008-08-01

    An increasing number of Investigational New Drug (IND) applications for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been submitted to US FDA over the past several years. Monoclonal antibodies and related products are under development for a wide range of indications. In addition, the diversity of antibody-related products is increasing including IgG2/IgG4 subclasses and engineered Fc regions to enhance or reduce antibody effector functionality. Recent findings highlight the need to more fully characterize these products and their activity. Advances in product characterization tools, immunogenicity assessments, and other bioanalytical assays can be used to better understand product performance and facilitate development. PMID:18586093

  2. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  3. Development and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for paxilline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrati...

  4. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-12-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of labeled MAbs could be improved as a result of knowledge obtained through the exploitation of the advantageous imaging characteristics associated with PET. By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long-term goals are to apply this approach. 3 tabs.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Mycobacteria spp., they have the potential for use as reagents in the purification of Nocardia antigens. Images PMID:2405017

  6. [Production of the monoclonal antibodies to the rabies virus nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Gribencha, S V; Kozlov, A Iu; Kostina, L V; Elakov, A L; Losich, M A; Tsibezov, V V; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I

    2013-01-01

    Five hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for the nucleocapsid protein of the rabies virus were obtained through the fusion of the SP2/0 murine myeloma cells with splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with fixed rabies virus (CVS strain). All hybridomas secret MAbs of the IgG class that display different specificity to the nucleocapsids of rabies and rabies-related viruses. MAbs 2ell showed the specificity for the prevalent in Russia rabies viruses that are similar to commercially available anti-rabies conjugate. PMID:24640170

  7. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and derivatives: Historical perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kyla R; Chou, Richard C

    2016-11-01

    Biologics, both monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and fusion proteins, have revolutionized the practice of medicine. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Food and Drug Administration approval of the first mAb for human use. In this review, we examine the biotechnological breakthroughs that spurred the explosive development of the biopharmaceutical mAb industry, as well as how critical lessons learned about human immunology informed the development of improved biologics. We also discuss the most common mechanisms of action of currently approved biologics and the indications for which they have been approved to date. PMID:27460206

  8. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against listeriolysin: mapping of epitopes involved in pore formation.

    PubMed Central

    Darji, A; Niebuhr, K; Hense, M; Wehland, J; Chakraborty, T; Weiss, S

    1996-01-01

    Six different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and a specific rabbit polygonal antibody were raised against listeriolysin. Four of the MAbs also recognized seeligeriolysin, and five cross-reacted with ivanolysin. The hemolytic activity could be neutralized by the polygonal antibody as well as by five of the MAbs. None of the neutralizing antibodies interfered with the binding of listeriolysin to the cellular membrane. The epitopes recognized by the MAbs were localized by using overlapping synthetic peptides between positions 59 and 279, a region hitherto not implicated in mediating hemolytic activity. PMID:8675351

  9. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N; Kuehne, Ana I; Aman, M Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2016-04-19

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  10. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B.; Deer, Daniel J.; Fenton, Karla A.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J.; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Aman, M. Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies for Specific Detection of Encephalitozoon cuniculi

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Lan; Drancourt, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Seven species-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against Encephalitozoon cuniculi and characterized. The MAbs were immunoglobulin G, and when used for indirect microimmunofluorescence microscopy and Western immunoblot assays, they detected E. cuniculi originating from clinical samples. They did not cross-react with other Encephalitozoon species (E. intestinalis and E. hellem) or with a collection of gram-negative bacteria, yeast, and other parasites. The MAbs reacted primarily with 121-, 56-, 45-, 43-, and 41-kDa protein epitopes of E. cuniculi. These epitopes were demonstrated to be E. cuniculi species specific by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We developed MAbs to strains of E. cuniculi that can be used successfully to distinguish E. cuniculi from other microsporidial species in cultures established from clinical specimens. These MAbs may provide a specific, simple, rapid, and low-cost tool for the identification and diagnosis of infections due to microsporidia. PMID:15539506

  12. Monoclonal anti-idiotypes induce neutralizing antibodies to enterovirus 70 conformational epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, J A; Hamel, J; Brodeur, B R

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the prototype enterovirus 70 (EV-70) strain J670/71 were generated and characterized in order to produce anti-idiotypic MAbs (MAb2s) for use as surrogate immunogens. Western immunoblot and radioimmunoprecipitation assays suggested that all the MAbs recognize conformational epitopes on the virion surface. An EV-70-neutralizing antibody, MAb/ev-12 (MAb1), was selected for the production of MAb2s. Five MAb2s were selected for their capacities to inhibit the interaction of MAb/ev-12 with EV-70 in dot immunobinding inhibition and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, these five MAb2s inhibited virus neutralization mediated by MAb/ev-12, suggesting that they recognize paratope-associated idiotopes. In competition enzyme immunosorbent assays, none of the five MAb2s recognized other neutralizing and nonneutralizing EV-70-specific MAbs, demonstrating that the MAb2s were specific for private idiotopes. Immunization with each of the MAb2s was carried out for the production of anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab3). All five MAb2s induced an immune response. Moreover, results suggested that they share idiotopes, since MAb2-MAb/ev-12 binding could be inhibited by homologous as well as heterologous Ab3s. Ab3 sera were shown to possess antibodies capable of immunoprecipitating 35S-labeled viral proteins in the same manner as MAb/ev-12. Nine of 15 mice immunized with MAb2s demonstrated Ab3 neutralizing activity specific for the prototype EV-70 strain, J670/71. The potential application of MAb2s to serve as surrogate immunogens for conformational epitopes is substantiated by the results presented in this report. Images PMID:1382141

  13. A new tool for monoclonal antibody analysis

    PubMed Central

    An, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Mueller, Hans-Martin; Shameem, Mohammed; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) products are extraordinarily heterogeneous due to the presence of a variety of enzymatic and chemical modifications, such as deamidation, isomerization, oxidation, glycosylation, glycation, and terminal cyclization. The modifications in different domains of the antibody molecule can result in different biological consequences. Therefore, characterization and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications are essential to ensure the quality of the therapeutic antibody products. For this purpose, a rapid and informative methodology was developed to examine the heterogeneity of individual domains in mAb products. A recently discovered endopeptidase, IdeS, cleaves heavy chains below the hinge region, producing F(ab')2 and Fc fragments. Following reduction of disulfide bonds, three antibody domains (LC, Fd, and Fc/2) can be released for further characterization. Subsequent analyses by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, capillary isoelectric focusing, and glycan mapping enable domain-specific profiling of oxidation, charge heterogeneity, and glycoform distribution. When coupled with reversed phase chromatography, the unique chromatographic profile of each molecule offers a simple strategy for an identity test, which is an important formal test for biopharmaceutical quality control purposes. This methodology is demonstrated for a number of IgGs of different subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG4), as well as an Fc fusion protein. The presented technique provides a convenient platform approach for scientific and formal therapeutic mAb product characterization. It can also be applied in regulated drug substance batch release and stability testing of antibody and Fc fusion protein products, in particular for identity and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications. PMID:24927271

  14. Evidence of a saturable hepatic receptor for mouse monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, G.L.; De Nardo, S.J.; Peng, J.S.; O'Grady, L.F.; Mills, S.L.; Epstein, A.L.; Cardiff, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) can be labeled with I-123 at high specific activities, so that large amounts of radioactivity attached to small amounts of protein can be injected for radioimmunoimaging. This conserves antibody and decreases the opportunity for foreign protein reactions and target tissue binding site saturation. In order to assess the effects on pharmacokinetics and imaging, the authors administered microgram amounts of I-123-MAb (Lyn-1, IgG2a or B6.01, IgGl with and following 4-5 milligram preloading with MAb on separate occasions to 4 patients with a target tumor (B cell lymphoma) and 2 patients without a target tumor (breast cancer). Pharmacokinetics were observed in blood and urine by counting whole samples and HPLC fractions of these samples and in organs by serial imaging. Early blood clearance and urinary excretion were faster after injection of microgram amounts of MAb, but subsequently were comparable to those obtained after preload. This paper concludes that the amount of administered MAb dramatically influences the pharmacokinetics of mouse MAb. Saturable hepatic Fc receptors are probably the source of these observations. Reports of accelerated deiodination of MAb are related to this phenomenon. Optimal imaging and treatment with MAb requires saturation of these hepatic receptors.

  15. Recovery and purification process development for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfen; Winter, Charles; Bayer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hundreds of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently in development, and many companies have multiple antibodies in their pipelines. Current methodology used in recovery processes for these molecules are reviewed here. Basic unit operations such as harvest, Protein A affinity chromatography and additional polishing steps are surveyed. Alternative processes such as flocculation, precipitation and membrane chromatography are discussed. We also cover platform approaches to purification methods development, use of high throughput screening methods, and offer a view on future developments in purification methodology as applied to mAbs. PMID:20647768

  16. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Ko, Kisung; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choo, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants. PMID:26550566

  17. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  18. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-09-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using /sup 125/T-antibodies were done.

  19. Development of antibody arrays for monoclonal antibody Higher Order Structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Li, Qing; Davies, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Antibody arrays were developed to probe a monoclonal antibody's three-dimensional structure (3-D structure). Peptides with overlapping regions were designed to cover the whole mAb light chain and heavy chain, respectively, and used to generate polyclonal antibodies after the conjugation of the peptides to a carrier protein, KLH. It was shown that good peptide specificity was achieved from the antibodies generated. Using more than 30 different polyclonal antibodies to measure the surface epitope distribution, it was shown that the mAb antibody array can detect epitope exposure as low as 0.1% of defined mAb populations. This ELISA-based analysis of mAb epitope exposure can be considered as a measurement of “conformational impurity” in biologics development, similar to the analysis of other product-related impurities such as different forms of glycosylation, deamidation, and oxidation. This analysis of “conformational impurity” could provide valuable information on the mAb conformational comparability for biosimilar mAbs as well as novel mAbs, especially in the area of protein immunogenicity. Furthermore, stability studies indicated that there are several conformational “hot spots” in many mAbs tested, especially in the hinge region. This antibody array technology can be used for novel mAb Higher Order Structure (HOS) analysis during process and formulation development. Another important area of application is for biosimilar mAb development where the innovator molecule and biosimilar molecule could be compared based on their systemic “fingerprint” from the 30 plus antibodies. PMID:23970865

  20. Technological progresses in monoclonal antibody production systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become vitally important to modern medicine and are currently one of the major biopharmaceutical products in development. However, the high clinical dose requirements of mAbs demand a greater biomanufacturing capacity, leading to the development of new technologies for their large-scale production, with mammalian cell culture dominating the scenario. Although some companies have tried to meet these demands by creating bioreactors of increased capacity, the optimization of cell culture productivity in normal bioreactors appears as a better strategy. This review describes the main technological progresses made with this intent, presenting the advantages and limitations of each production system, as well as suggestions for improvements. New and upgraded bioreactors have emerged both for adherent and suspension cell culture, with disposable reactors attracting increased interest in the last years. Furthermore, the strategies and technologies used to control culture parameters are in constant evolution, aiming at the on-line multiparameter monitoring and considering now parameters not seen as relevant for process optimization in the past. All progresses being made have as primary goal the development of highly productive and economic mAb manufacturing processes that will allow the rapid introduction of the product in the biopharmaceutical market at more accessible prices. PMID:20043321

  1. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by dot-blotting using monoclonal antibodies to CPV40 capsid protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were prepared against the 40 kDa capsid protein of Cryptosporidium parvum virus (CPV) by immunizing mice with purified recombinant CPV40 protein. By immunoblotting analysis, one MAb, designated MAbCPV40-1, bound to a 40 kDa protein in extracts of C. parvum oocysts, which...

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  4. Pharmacological effects of two anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Stevens, Misty W; Frank, John C; Hambuchen, Michael D; Hendrickson, Howard P; White, Sarah J; Williams, D Keith; Owens, S Michael; Gentry, W Brooks

    2014-01-01

    This lead candidate selection study compared two anti-(+)-methamphetamine (METH) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to determine their ability to reduce METH-induced locomotor effects and redistribute METH and (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in a preclinical overdose model. Both mAbs have high affinity for METH, but mAb4G9 has moderate and mAb7F9 has low affinity for AMP. In the placebo-controlled behavioral experiment, the effects of each mAb on the locomotor response to a single 1 mg/kg intravenous (IV) METH dose were determined in rats. The doses of mAb binding sites were administered such that they equaled 1, 0.56, 0.32, and 0.1 times the molar equivalent (mol-eq) of METH in the body 30 min after the METH dose. METH disposition was determined in separate animals that similarly received either a 1 or 0.32 mol-eq dose of mAb binding sites 30 min after a 1 mg/kg METH dose. Total METH-induced distance traveled was significantly reduced in rats that received the highest three doses of each mAb compared with saline. The duration of METH effects was also significantly reduced by mAb7F9 at the highest dose. The disposition of METH was altered dose-dependently by both mAbs as shown in reductions of volume of distribution and total clearance, and increases in elimination half-life. These data indicate that both mAbs are effective at reducing METH-induced behavior and favorably altering METH disposition. Both were therefore suitable for further preclinical testing as potential human medications for treating METH use; however, due to results reported here and in later studies, mAb7F9 was selected for clinical development. PMID:25483484

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency. PMID:27280622

  6. High-throughput assay for measuring monoclonal antibody self-association and aggregation in serum.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Geng, Steven B; Chiu, Mark L; Saro, Dorina; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-03-18

    Subcutaneous delivery is one of the preferred administration routes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). High antibody dosing requirements and small injection volumes necessitate formulation and delivery of highly concentrated mAb solutions. Such elevated antibody concentrations can lead to undesirable solution behaviors such as mAb self-association and aggregation, which are relatively straightforward to detect using various biophysical methods because of the high purity and concentration of antibody formulations. However, the biophysical properties of mAbs in serum can also impact antibody activity, but these properties are less well understood because of the difficulty characterizing mAbs in such a complex environment. Here we report a high-throughput assay for directly evaluating mAb self-association and aggregation in serum. Our approach involves immobilizing polyclonal antibodies specific for human mAbs on gold nanoparticles, and then using these conjugates to capture human antibodies at a range of subsaturating to saturating mAb concentrations in serum. Antibody aggregation is detected at subsaturating mAb concentrations via blue-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to the reduced efficiency of capturing mAb aggregates relative to monomers, which reduces affinity cross-capture of mAbs by multiple conjugates. In contrast, antibody self-association is detected at saturating mAb concentrations via red-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to attractive interparticle interactions between immobilized mAbs. The high-throughput nature of this assay along with its compatibility with unusually dilute mAb solutions (0.1-10 μg per mL) should make it useful for identifying antibody candidates with high serum stability during early antibody discovery. PMID:25714504

  7. Characterization of anti-channel catfish MHC class II monoclonal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study characterizes four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) developed against the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II beta chain of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Immunoprecipitations using catfish clonal B cells revealed that each of these mAbs immunoselected proteins of appro...

  8. Production, characterization and application of monoclonal antibody to spherulocytes: A subpopulation of coelomocytes of Apostichopus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One monoclonal antibody (mAb 3F6) against coelomocytes of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus was developed by immunization of Balb/C mice. Analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay test (IIFAT), immunocytochemical assay (ICA),Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), mAb 3...

  9. [Monoclonal antibody for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Achiwa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2002-04-01

    Antibodies have for many decades been viewed as ideal molecules for cancer therapy. Although promising from the start, it has taken much of more than two decades to reach the level of clinical application. Genetic engineering of antibodies; that is novel technologies for chimeric or humanizing monoclonal antibodies, has greatly advanced their utility in molecular targeting therapies, and in the past four years some therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, such as Rituximab for B-cell lymphoma and Trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer, have provided sufficient efficacy and safety to support regulatory approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. They were subsequently approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 2001. Many molecular biological and immunological studies have revealed the targeting properties of the host immune system and the biological mechanism of cancer cells for a more specific anticancer effect. Many clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies as a single agent, or in combination protocol with current standard chemotherapy or immunoconjugates have shown promise in the treatment of specific diseases. Furthermore, novel antibody designs and improved understanding of the mode of action of current antibodies lend great hope to the future of this therapeutic approach. The accumulating results from many basic, clinical and translational studies may lead to more individualized therapeutic strategies using these agent directed at specific genetic and immunologic targets. PMID:11977531

  10. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Louis M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Ferrone, Soldano

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as effective therapeutic agents for many human malignancies. However, the ability of antibodies to initiate tumor antigen-specific immune responses has not received as much attention as other mechanisms of antibody action. Here we describe the rationale and evidence for developing anti-cancer antibodies that can stimulate host tumor antigen-specific immune responses. This may be accomplished by inducing antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, by promoting antibody-targeted cross-presentation of tumor antigens or by triggering the idiotypic network. Future treatment modifications or combinations should be able to prolong, amplify and shape these immune responses to increase the clinical benefits of antibody therapy of human cancer. PMID:19304016

  12. Enhancing tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies therapy by PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yélamos, José; Galindo, Miguel; Navarro, Judith; Albanell, Joan; Rovira, Ana; Rojo, Federico; Oliver, Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a successful therapeutic approach in cancer. However, some patients do not achieve long-term clinical benefit and most mAbs only exert modest effects as monotherapies. Therefore, combinations with chemotherapy are currently being investigated. Emerging studies have shown a synergistic therapeutic effect of PARP inhibitors and mAbs in cancer. PARP enzymes catalytically cleave β-NAD+ and transfer the ADP-ribose moiety to acceptor proteins, modifying their function. In here, we update recent data about the therapeutic effect of the combination of PARP inhibitors with mAbs in cancer treatment and discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in this synergy. PMID:26942084

  13. Characterization of a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizing clumping factor A expressed by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Paul J; Patel, Pratiksha R; Bayer, Arnold S; Zhang, Li; Hall, Andrea E; Syribeys, Peter J; Gorovits, Elena L; Bryant, Dawn; Vernachio, John H; Hutchins, Jeff T; Patti, Joseph M

    2005-08-01

    We report the humanization and characterization of monoclonal antibody (MAb) T1-2 or tefibazumab, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes clumping factor A expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate that the binding kinetics of MAb T1-2 is indistinguishable compared to that of its murine parent. Furthermore, MAb T1-2 is shown to enhance the opsonophagocytic uptake of ClfA-coated latex beads, protect against an intravenous challenge in a prophylactic model of rabbit infective endocarditis, and enhance the efficacy of vancomycin therapy in a therapeutic model of established infective endocarditis. PMID:16041045

  14. Murine Monoclonal Antibodies against Escherichia coli O4 Lipopolysaccharide and H5 Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Betancourt, Mildred; Keen, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb), 2C5-F10 and 8D1-H10, reactive with Escherichia coli O4 and H5 antigens, respectively, were generated and characterized. Enzyme immunoassays and immunoblots demonstrated that MAb 2C5-F10 reacted specifically with lipopolysaccharide O antigen of E. coli O4 isolates, while MAb 8D1-H10 reacted with E. coli strains expressing H5 flagella. PMID:11526192

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fattaey, A.; Lenz, L.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against intact budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) virions were produced and characterized. These antibodies were selected for their ability to react with BFD virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these antibodies was reactive in the immunofluorescent detection of BFD virus-infected cells. These antibodies immunoprecipitated intact virions and specifically recognized the major capsid protein, VP1, of the dissociated virion. The MAbs were found to preferentially recognize native BFD virus capsid protein when compared with denatured virus protein. These MAbs were capable of detecting BFD virus protein in chicken embryonated cell-culture lysates by dot-blot analysis.

  16. Mass Spectrometry for the Biophysical Characterization of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are powerful therapeutics, and their characterization has drawn considerable attention and urgency. Unlike small-molecular drugs (150-600 Da) that have rigid structures, mAbs (~150 kDa) are engineered proteins that undergo complicated folding and can exist in a number of low-energy structures, posing a challenge for traditional methods in structural biology. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based biophysical characterization approaches can provide structural information, bringing high sensitivity, fast turnaround, and small sample consumption. This review outlines various MS-based strategies for protein biophysical characterization and then reviews how these strategies provide structural information of mAbs at the protein level (intact or top-down approaches), peptide, and residue level (bottom-up approaches), affording information on higher order structure, aggregation, and the nature of antibody complexes. PMID:24291257

  17. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  18. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  19. Veterinary sources of nonrodent monoclonal antibodies: interspecific and intraspecific hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Groves, D J; Morris, B A

    2000-06-01

    The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice has developed slowly over the last 20 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of nonmurine antibodies, in terms of their superior affinities and specificities, and their potential as components of human and veterinary therapeutics has increased their relevance recently. There have been significant advances in the development of myeloma and heteromyeloma fusion partners. This is an opportune moment to consolidate experiences of MAb production across the range of species of veterinary interest and place it into context with other developments in the field of monoclonal antibodies. The background to the development of antibodies from species other than the mouse is discussed. The species and antigens used to date are reviewed, as are the methods and results reported. A suggested protocol is provided for first attempts to exploit the huge potential of this aspect of hybridoma technology and suggestions are made for its further expansion. PMID:10952409

  20. Production of a Chaetomium globosum Enolase Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Lemons, Angela R.; Rittenour, William R.; Hettick, Justin M.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Chaetomium globosum is a hydrophilic fungal species and a contaminant of water-damaged building materials in North America. Methods to detect Chaetomium species include subjective identification of ascospores, viable culture, or molecular-based detection methods. In this study, we describe the production and initial characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) for C. globosum enolase. MAb 1C7, a murine IgG1 isotype MAb, was produced and reacted with recombinant C. globosum enolase (rCgEno) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a putative C. globosum enolase in a Western blot. Epitope mapping showed MAb 1C7 specific reactivity to an enolase decapeptide, LTYEELANLY, that is highly conserved within the fungal class Sordariomycetes. Cross-reactivity studies showed MAb 1C7 reactivity to C. atrobrunneum but not C. indicum. MAb 1C7 did not react with enolase from Aspergillus fumigatus, which is divergent in only two amino acids within this epitope. The results of this study suggest potential utility of MAb 1C7 in Western blot applications for the detection of Chaetomium and other Sordariomycetes species. PMID:25495488

  1. Monoclonal antibody characterization of a leukoagglutinin produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Wiens, G D; Kaattari, S L

    1991-02-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum causes a chronic disease of salmonid fish known as bacterial kidney disease. High concentrations of bacterially produced extracellular protein (ECP) are present in plasma, kidney, and spleen tissue of naturally and experimentally infected fish. ECP agglutinated salmonid leukocytes in vitro at concentrations which correspond to levels found in highly infected fish. Association of biological activity with the structure of the major protein constituent of ECP, p57, was accomplished by monoclonal antibody (MAb) analysis. Location of the antigenic binding sites recognized by the MAbs was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting of the proteolytic breakdown fragments of p57. Eight MAbs have been classified into three groups on the basis of their differential recognition of these proteolytic breakdown products. Group I MAbs bound a region proximal to the amino terminus of the protein. Two of these MAbs were also able to block leukoagglutinating activity. Group III MAbs bound to a region associated with the bacterial cell surface, while group II MAbs bound a region between group I and group III. These analyses have allowed the identification of potential structural and functional regions of p57. PMID:1987079

  2. Monoclonal antibody characterization of a leukoagglutinin produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, G D; Kaattari, S L

    1991-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum causes a chronic disease of salmonid fish known as bacterial kidney disease. High concentrations of bacterially produced extracellular protein (ECP) are present in plasma, kidney, and spleen tissue of naturally and experimentally infected fish. ECP agglutinated salmonid leukocytes in vitro at concentrations which correspond to levels found in highly infected fish. Association of biological activity with the structure of the major protein constituent of ECP, p57, was accomplished by monoclonal antibody (MAb) analysis. Location of the antigenic binding sites recognized by the MAbs was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting of the proteolytic breakdown fragments of p57. Eight MAbs have been classified into three groups on the basis of their differential recognition of these proteolytic breakdown products. Group I MAbs bound a region proximal to the amino terminus of the protein. Two of these MAbs were also able to block leukoagglutinating activity. Group III MAbs bound to a region associated with the bacterial cell surface, while group II MAbs bound a region between group I and group III. These analyses have allowed the identification of potential structural and functional regions of p57. Images PMID:1987079

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Diagnosis of Borrelia crocidurae.

    PubMed

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Mediannikov, Oleg; Nappez, Claude; Azza, Saïd; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae, produced by ectoparasite-borne Borrelia species, cause mild to deadly bacteremia and miscarriage. In the perspective of developing inexpensive assays for the rapid detection of relapsing fever borreliae, we produced 12 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Borrelia crocidurae and characterized the two exhibiting the highest titers. P3A10 MAb reacts with the 35.6-kDa flagellin B (flaB) of B. crocidurae while P6D9 MAb recognizes a 35.1-kDa variable-like protein (Vlp) in B. crocidurae and a 35.2-kDa Vlp in Borrelia duttonii. Indirect immunofluorescence assay incorporating relapsing fever and Lyme group borreliae and 11 blood-borne organisms responsible for fever in West Africa confirmed the reactivity of these two MAbs. Combining these two MAbs in indirect immunofluorescence assays detected relapsing fever borreliae including B. crocidurae in ticks and the blood of febrile Senegalese patients. Both antibodies could be incorporated into inexpensive and stable formats suited for the rapid point-of-care diagnosis of relapsing fever. These first-ever MAbs directed against African relapsing fever borreliae are available for the scientific community to promote research in this neglected field. PMID:26598566

  4. Trimerization Dictates Solution Opalescence of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng-Chieh; Langford, Alex Jacob; Kumar, Sandeep; Ruesch, John Carl; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Opalescence, sometimes observed in antibody solutions, is thought to be mediated by light scattering of soluble oligomers or insoluble particulates. However, mechanistic features, such as stoichiometry and self-association affinity of oligomeric species related to opalescence, are poorly understood. Here, opalescence behavior of a monoclonal antibody (mAb-1) solution was studied over a wide range of solution conditions including different protein concentrations, pH, and in the presence or absence of salt. Hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of mAb-1 solutions were studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and dynamic light scattering. Opalescence in mAb-1 solutions is pH and concentration dependent. The degree of opalescence correlates with reversible monomer-trimer equilibrium detected by analytical ultracentrifugation. Increased trimer formation corresponds to increased opalescence in mAb-1 solutions at higher pH and protein concentrations. Addition of NaCl shifts this equilibrium toward monomer and reduces solution opalescence. This study demonstrates that opalescence in mAb-1 solutions does not arise from the light scattering of monomer or random molecular self-associations but is strongly correlated with a specific self-association stoichiometry and affinity. Importantly, at pH 5.5 (far below isoelectric point of mAb-1), the solution is not opalescent and with nonideal behavior. This study also dissects several parameters to describe the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic nonideality. PMID:27373839

  5. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  6. Kinetic epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies raised against the Yersinia pestis virulence factor LcrV.

    PubMed

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2014-10-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies, mAb7.3, mAb29.3, mAb46.3, mAb12.3 and mAb36.3, raised to the LcrV virulence factor from Yersinia pestis were characterised for their Fab affinity against the purified protein and their Fc affinity to Protein A/G as a proxy for the FcγR receptor. Kinetic measurements were performed label-free in a localised particle plasmon array reader. The Fc-ProteinA/G complex first-order half-life was determined for each antibody and fell in the range of 0.8-3.8h. The Fab first-order half-lives had ranged from 3.4 to 9.2h although two antibodies, mAb12.3 and mAb36.3, showed low affinity interactions. Competitive binding studies of mixtures of the Fab-active antibodies were performed to measure the relative binding efficiency of one antibody in the presence of the other. A geometric relative positioning of the epitopes of mAb7.3, mAb29.3 and mAb46.3 was determined based on the footprint locus of the antibody and the percentage of competitive binding. The two known protective antibodies mAb7.3 and mAb29.3 showed greater interference, indicating epitopes close to one another compared to the non-protective mAb46.3 antibody. The Fab-Fc complex half-life screen and epitope mapping are potentially useful tools in the screening of therapeutic antibodies or vaccine candidates. PMID:25461137

  7. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  8. Characterization of Cross-Reactive Norovirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Baijun; Crawford, Sue E.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Czakó, Rita; Neill, Frederick H.; Tanaka, Tomoyuki N.; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Palzkill, Timothy G.; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) commonly cause acute gastroenteritis outbreaks. Broadly reactive diagnostic assays are essential for rapid detection of NoV infections. We previously generated a panel of broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). We characterized MAb reactivities by use of virus-like particles (VLPs) from 16 different NoV genotypes (6 from genogroup I [GI], 9 from GII, and 1 from GIV) coating a microtiter plate (direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) and by Western blotting. MAbs were genotype specific or recognized multiple genotypes within a genogroup and between genogroups. We next applied surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis to measure MAb dissociation constants (Kd) as a surrogate for binding affinity; a Kd level of <10 nM was regarded as indicating strong binding. Some MAbs did not interact with the VLPs by SPR analysis. To further assess this lack of MAb-VLP interaction, the MAbs were evaluated for the ability to identify NoV VLPs in a capture ELISA. Those MAbs for which a Kd could not be measured by SPR analysis also failed to capture the NoV VLPs; in contrast, those with a measurable Kd gave a positive signal in the capture ELISA. Thus, some broadly cross-reactive epitopes in the VP1 protruding domain may be partially masked on intact particles. One MAb, NV23, was able to detect genogroup I, II, and IV VLPs from 16 genotypes tested by sandwich ELISA, and it successfully detected NoVs in stool samples positive by real-time reverse transcription-PCR when the threshold cycle (CT) value was <31. Biochemical analyses of MAb reactivity, including SPR analysis, identified NV23 as a broadly reactive ligand for application in norovirus diagnostic assays. PMID:25428247

  9. Monoclonal Antibody Cross-Reactions between Drosophila and Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carol A.; Benzer, Seymour

    1983-12-01

    A panel of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), obtained with Drosophila melanogaster tissue as primary immunogen, was tested for cross-reactivity with the human central nervous system. Sites examined included spinal cord, cerebellum, hippocampus, and optic nerve. Nonnervous tissues tested were liver and lymph node. Approximately half of the antibodies reacted with one or more sites in the human central nervous system, identifying regional, cell class, and subcellular antigens. Some recognized neuronal, glial, or axonal subsets. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some antibodies reacted with similar antigen patterns in both species.

  10. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against a type SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, J. R.; Rowe, C. A.; Butcher, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the first to describe characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against a South African Territories 2 (SAT 2) foot-and-mouth disease virus (isolate Rho 1/48). Twelve MAbs which neutralized homologous virus were characterized in indirect and sandwich ELISA using purified Rho 1/48 virus particles, subunits, trypsin-treated, and chemically denatured virus. All the MAbs inhibited haemagglutination by parental virus. Binding of the MAbs to 73 SAT 2 field isolates was measured in a sandwich ELISA and defined four distinct antigenic regions. Preliminary characterization of escape mutants selected with some of the MAbs using virus neutralization tests, ELISA, and amino acid sequencing is included. MAbs 2, 25, 40, 48 and 64, reacted with a linear epitope on the VP1 loop region. An amino acid change at position 149 (valine to glutamic acid) was detected in mutants selected by MAb 2 and 40 and this eliminated binding and neutralization by all the other MAb. This epitope was conformation-dependent and was conserved in all 73 isolates of SAT 2 examined. Escape mutants isolated with MAb 41 and 44, had changes at positions 156 (glycine to aspartic acid), or 158 (serine to leucine) respectively. These MAbs bound with Rho 1/48 only out of 73 field strain viruses studies and the reactions of MAbs from the other groups was unaltered. MAb 27, 28 and 37 reacted with a conformation-dependent epitope on VP1 which was not conserved in field isolates. All mutants selected by these MAbs had a single amino acid substitution at position 149 (valine to alanine). The same change was always found in field isolates which did not bind MAbs from this group. MAb 11 reacted with a linear epitope associated with amino acids 147 or 148 on VP1 and showed similar binding characteristics to a conformation dependent MAb 7, no amino acid residue changes were found within VP1 for monoclonal antibody 7 mutants. PMID:7691630

  11. The chimeric antibody chLpMab-7 targeting human podoplanin suppresses pulmonary metastasis via ADCC and CDC rather than via its neutralizing activity

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Oki, Hiroharu; Fukayama, Masashi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Mika K.

    2015-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN/Aggrus/T1α) binds to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) and induces platelet aggregation. PDPN is associated with malignant progression, tumor metastasis, and poor prognosis in several types of cancer. Although many anti-human PDPN (hPDPN) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), such as D2-40 and NZ-1, have been established, these epitopes are limited to the platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domain (amino acids 29-54) of hPDPN. Recently, we developed a novel mouse anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-7, which is more sensitive than D2-40 and NZ-1, using the Cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) method. The epitope of LpMab-7 was shown to be entirely different from that of NZ-1, a neutralizing mAb against the PLAG domain according to an inhibition assay and lectin microarray analysis. In the present study, we produced a mouse-human chimeric anti-hPDPN mAb, chLpMab-7. ChLpMab-7 showed high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). Furthermore, chLpMab-7 inhibited the growth of hPDPN-expressing tumors in vivo. Although chLpMab-7 recognizes a non-PLAG domain of hPDPN, it suppressed the hematogenous metastasis of hPDPN-expressing tumors. These results indicated that chLpMab-7 suppressed tumor development and hematogenous metastasis in a neutralization-independent manner. In conclusion, hPDPN shows promise as a target in the development of a novel antibody-based therapy. PMID:26416352

  12. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Ravi; Saxena, Shikha; Sahoo, A P; Chaturvedi, Uttara; Kumar, Satish; Santra, Lakshman; Desai, G S; Singh, Lakshyaveer; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2016-03-01

    Newcastle Disease (ND) is one of the major causes of economic loss in the poultry industry. Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) is a single-stranded, negative-sense enveloped RNA virus (Fam. Paramyxoviridae; Order Mononegavirales). In the present study three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced by polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated fusion of lymphocytes sensitized to NDV Bareilly strain and myeloma cells. NDV possesses ability to agglutinate erythrocytes of avian species. All the three MAbs designated as 2H7, 3E9 and 3G6 caused hemagglutination inhibition of NDV by specifically binding to NDV. The reactivity for all the 3 MAbs on indirect ELISA was found to be significantly higher than the antibody and antigen controls. On flowcytometry of HeLa cells infected with NDV using the MAbs as primary antibodies, there was a significant difference in the percentage of cells showing positive fluorescence compared to the mock control. One of the MAbs (3E9) was found to react with hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein on western blot. PMID:27145631

  13. Improved iodine radiolabels for monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Rhona; Govindan, Serengulam V; Mattes, M Jules; Chen, Susan; Reed, Linda; Newsome, Guy; McBride, Bill J; Griffiths, Gary L; Hansen, Hans J; Goldenberg, David M

    2003-01-01

    A major disadvantage of (131)iodine (I)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy has been the rapid diffusion of iodotyrosine from target cells after internalization and catabolism of the radioiodinated MAbs. We recently reported that a radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide, designated immunomedics' residualizing peptide 1 (IMP-R1), was a residualizing iodine label that overcame many of the limitations that had impeded the development of residualizing iodine for clinical use. To determine the factors governing the therapeutic index of the labeled MAb, as well as the factors required for production of radioiodinated MAb in high yield and with high specific activity, variations in the peptide structure of IMP-R1 were evaluated. A series of radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide moieties (IMP-R1 through IMP-R8) that differed in overall hydrophilicity and charge were compared. Radioiodinations of the peptides followed by conjugations to disulfide-reduced RS7 (an anti-epithelial glycoprotein-1 MAb) furnished radioimmunoconjugates in good overall incorporations, with immunoreactivities comparable to that of directly radioiodinated RS7. Specific activities of up to 8 mCi/mg and yields > 80% have been achieved. In vitro processing experiments showed marked increases in radioiodine retention with all of the adducts; radioiodine retention at 45 h was up to 86% greater in cells than with directly iodinated RS7. Each of the (125)I-peptide-RS7 conjugates was compared with (131)I-RS7 (labeled by the chloramine-T method) in paired-label biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. All of the residualizing substrates exhibited significantly enhanced retention in tumor in comparison to directly radioiodinated RS7, but the nontarget uptakes differed significantly among the residualizing labels. The best labels were IMP-R4 and IMP-R8, showing superior tumor-to-non-tumor ratios

  14. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-na; He, Shuang; Wang, Yu-tang; Yang, Li-ming; Liu, Si-yu; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories. Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, cancer, and other immune-associated diseases. This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis, an inflammatory disease of the heart, could be a novel approach in the future. In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis, we, through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad, developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies, pathogenesis of myocarditis, and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis. This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future. Under conventional therapy, myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome, indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results. Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis, we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above. However, several issues remain. The technology on how to make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues. If we are to

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  16. Long-term radioimmunotherapy studies of Cu-64 anti-colon carcinoma monoclonal antibody (MAb)-1A3, intact and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} singly and in combination, in the GW39-hamster model

    SciTech Connect

    Connett, J.M.; Anderson, C.J.; Guo, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    In previous studies we have shown that Cu-64 has potential for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The present study was undertaken to examine the therapeutic potential of Cu-64-benzyl-TETA-MAb 1A3, intact and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments, injected single or in combination. Using the model of hamsters carrying the GW39 human colon carcinoma in their thighs, we were interested in whether injecting Cu-64-MAb 1A3 intact and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments together would give improved RIT results compared to either agent alone due to the better tumor penetrating properties of F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments and the higher uptake and long tumor residence time of intact MAbs. Hamsters were injected with either 1.5 mCi Cu-64-1A3, 1.5 mCi Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2} or a combination of 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 intact and 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2}. These suboptimal doses of Cu-64 were administered in order to detect any enhanced RIT effects with the combination of Cu-64-labeled MAb and fragments. Control groups received saline along. Hamsters were sacrificed when tumors were > 10 g or after surviving for 6 months. Mean lifespans for hamsters treated with Cu-64-1A3 intact, F(ab{prime}){sub 2}, and the combination were 92 {plus_minus} 44 days, 104 {plus_minus} 54 days and 129 {plus_minus} 48 days respectively, compared to 32 {plus_minus} 5 days for the saline controls (p,0.001). 6 months following treatment 43% of the hamsters (3/7) treated with 1.5 mCi Cu-64 1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2}, and 50% of hamsters (5/10) treated with 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 and 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2} in combination were alive and tumor free. Although tumor grown inhibition was also seen in the group receiving 1.5 mCi Cu-64 1A3 intact, only one hamster (1/7) survived tumor free to 6 months. Results show that Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2} as well as intact Cu-64-1A3 can increase survival and effect long term tumor inhibition.

  17. Monoclonal antibody-directed radioimmunoassay of specific cytochromes P-450

    SciTech Connect

    Song, B.J.; Fujino, T.; Park, S.S.; Friedman, F.K.; Gelboin, H.V.

    1984-02-10

    A rapid solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) for cytochromes P-450 has been developed utilizing specific monoclonal antibodies to major forms of rat liver cytochrome P-450 that are induced by 3-methylcholanthrene (MC-P-450) and phenobarbital (PB-P-450). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that were endogenously labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine were used to detect MAb-specific cytochromes P-450 in liver microsomes from untreated rats and rats pretreated with 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) or phenobarbital. The competitive binding assays are rapid and can detect cytochrome P-450 in less than 100 ng of microsomal protein. Tthe RIA was used to examine the distribution of MAb-specific cytochromes P-450 in extrahepatic tissues of MC-treated rats; an approximately 30- to 50-fold greater amount of MC-P-450 in liver relative to lung and kidney was observed, which corresponds well with aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in these tissues. The inducibility of MAb-specific cytochromes P-450 were observed in MC-treated rats, guinea pigs, and C57BL/6 mice, all highly inducible for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase; little increase was observed for the relatively noninducible DBA/2 mouse strain.

  18. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  19. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-10-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  20. Antigenic heterogeneity in Mycoplasma iowae demonstrated with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panangala, V S; Gresham, M M; Morsy, M A

    1992-01-01

    Western blots of proteins of 14 Mycoplasma iowae strains and isolates resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were probed with three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), MI6, MI7, and MI8. MAb MI6 reacted with one or more antigens with apparent molecular weights of 60,000, 70,000, and 94,000. In three strains (N-PHN-D13, R-D2497, and K 1805), antigens located on a single peptide band were recognized, while in others additional epitopes at different molecular-weight positions were revealed. A similar pattern was observed with MAb MI7, although it reacted with fewer antigens than did MAb MI6 and failed to recognize antigens in strains N-PHN-D13 and R-D2497. MAb MI8 reacted with an antigen at an apparent molecular-weight position of 28,000 in four of the 14 strains and isolates. The diverse reaction patterns observed with the MAbs in the 14 M. iowae strains and isolates confirms the occurrence of antigenic variation within this species. Antigenic variation in M. iowae may be pivotal in determining host-parasite interactions, pathogenesis, and the outcome of disease. PMID:1373600

  1. Trial Watch: Immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Marabelle, Aurélien; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) differ from their tumor-targeting counterparts because they exert therapeutic effects by directly interacting with soluble or (most often) cellular components of the immune system. Besides holding promise for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, immunomodulatory mAbs have recently been shown to constitute a potent therapeutic weapon against neoplastic conditions. One class of immunomodulatory mAbs operates by inhibiting safeguard systems that are frequently harnessed by cancer cells to establish immunological tolerance, the so-called “immune checkpoints.” No less than 3 checkpoint-blocking mAbs have been approved worldwide for use in oncological indications, 2 of which during the past 12 months. These molecules not only mediate single-agent clinical activity in patients affected by specific neoplasms, but also significantly boost the efficacy of several anticancer chemo-, radio- or immunotherapies. Here, we summarize recent advances in the development of checkpoint-blocking mAbs, as well as of immunomodulatory mAbs with distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26137403

  2. Monoclonal antibody: the corner stone of modern biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi-nan; Cai, Xue-ting; Cao, Peng

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide sales of biologic drugs exceeded 100 billion USD in 2011. About 32% is from therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb). With many blockbuster biopharmaceutical patents expiring over the next decade, there is a great opportunity for biosimilar to enter the worldwide especially emerging market. Both European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have introduced regulatory frameworks for the potential approval of biosimilar mAb therapeutics. Rather than providing a highly abbreviated path, as in the case for small molecule chemical drug, approval for biosimilar mAb will require clinical trial and the details will be very much on a case-by-case basis. Since mAb is the dominant category of biologic drugs, mAb will be the focus of this review. First, the United States (US) and European Union (EU) approved mAb and those in phase 3 trials will be reviewed, then strategies on how to win biosimilar competition will be reviewed. PMID:23289138

  3. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology. PMID:25894652

  4. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  5. Monoclonal antibody purification with hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Pete

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been used for IgG purification since its introduction in the 1950s. Applications expanded to include IgA and IgM in the 1980s, along with elucidation of its primary binding mechanisms and the development of ceramic HA media. With the advent of recombinant monoclonal antibodies, HA was demonstrated to be effective for removal of antibody aggregates, as well as host cell proteins and leached protein A. HA's inherent abilities have been enhanced by the development of elution strategies that permit differential control of its primary binding mechanisms: calcium metal affinity and phosphoryl cation exchange. These strategies support reduction of antibody aggregate content from greater than 60% to less than 0.1%, in conjunction with enhanced removal of DNA, endotoxin, and virus. HA also has a history of discriminating various immunological constructs on the basis of differences in their variable regions, or discriminating Fab fragments from Fc contaminants in papain digests of purified monoclonal IgG. Continuing development of novel elution strategies, alternative forms of HA, and application of robotic high throughput screening systems promise to expand HA's utility in the field. PMID:19491046

  6. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers Against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne’s disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced fr...

  7. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for respiratory diseases: Current challenges and perspectives, March 31 - April 1, 2016, Tours, France.

    PubMed

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Reichert, Janice M; Sleeman, Matthew; Reckamp, Karen L; Ryffel, Bernhard; Adamczewski, Jörg P; Sweeney, Theresa D; Vanbever, Rita; Diot, Patrice; Owen, Caroline A; Page, Clive; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Le Pape, Alain; Heuze-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics have tremendous potential to benefit patients with lung diseases, for which there remains substantial unmet medical need. To capture the current state of mAb research and development in the area of respiratory diseases, the Research Center of Respiratory Diseases (CEPR-INSERM U1100), the Laboratory of Excellence "MAbImprove," the GDR 3260 "Antibodies and therapeutic targeting," and the Grant Research program ARD2020 "Biotherapeutics" invited speakers from industry, academic and government organizations to present their recent research results at the Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies for Respiratory Diseases: Current challenges and perspectives congress held March 31 - April 1, 2016 in Tours, France. PMID:27266390

  8. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin I.

    PubMed

    Stiles, B G; Sexton, F W; Guest, S B; Olson, M A; Hack, D C

    1994-10-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed against neurotoxin I (NT-1), a protein from central Asian cobra (Naja naja oxiana) venom which binds specifically to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR). All of the mAbs cross-reacted with another long-chain post-synaptic neurotoxin, Bungarus multicinctus alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT), but not Naja naja kaouthia alpha-cobratoxin, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (e.l.i.s.a.). Short-chain post-synaptic neurotoxins like Naja naja atra cobrotoxin, Laticauda semifasciata erabutoxin b, or N. n. oxiana neurotoxin II did not cross-react with the NT-1 mAbs, but an antigen(s) found in Dendroaspis polylepis, Acanthophis antarcticus and Pseudechis australis venoms was immunoreactive. The e.l.i.s.a. readings for dithiothreitol-reduced NT-1 and NT-1 mAbs ranged from 13 to 27% of those for native toxin but reduced alpha-BT was not immunoreactive. Synthetic NT-1 peptides were used in epitope-mapping studies and two, non-contiguous regions (Cys15-Tyr23 and Lys25-Gly33 or Pro17-Lys25 and Asp29-Lys37) were recognized by the NT-1 mAbs. The NT-1 mAbs individually inhibited 31-71% of alpha-BT binding to AchR in vitro and afforded a slight protective effect in vivo with a toxin: antibody mole ratio of 1:1.5. This report is the first to describe mAbs which recognize and protect against a heterologous, long-chain, post-synaptic neurotoxin from snake venom. PMID:7945236

  9. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin I.

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, B G; Sexton, F W; Guest, S B; Olson, M A; Hack, D C

    1994-01-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed against neurotoxin I (NT-1), a protein from central Asian cobra (Naja naja oxiana) venom which binds specifically to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR). All of the mAbs cross-reacted with another long-chain post-synaptic neurotoxin, Bungarus multicinctus alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT), but not Naja naja kaouthia alpha-cobratoxin, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (e.l.i.s.a.). Short-chain post-synaptic neurotoxins like Naja naja atra cobrotoxin, Laticauda semifasciata erabutoxin b, or N. n. oxiana neurotoxin II did not cross-react with the NT-1 mAbs, but an antigen(s) found in Dendroaspis polylepis, Acanthophis antarcticus and Pseudechis australis venoms was immunoreactive. The e.l.i.s.a. readings for dithiothreitol-reduced NT-1 and NT-1 mAbs ranged from 13 to 27% of those for native toxin but reduced alpha-BT was not immunoreactive. Synthetic NT-1 peptides were used in epitope-mapping studies and two, non-contiguous regions (Cys15-Tyr23 and Lys25-Gly33 or Pro17-Lys25 and Asp29-Lys37) were recognized by the NT-1 mAbs. The NT-1 mAbs individually inhibited 31-71% of alpha-BT binding to AchR in vitro and afforded a slight protective effect in vivo with a toxin: antibody mole ratio of 1:1.5. This report is the first to describe mAbs which recognize and protect against a heterologous, long-chain, post-synaptic neurotoxin from snake venom. PMID:7945236

  10. Safety and immunotoxicity assessment of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Laura Dill; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kiessling, Andrea; Allenspach, Roy; Hey, Adam; Muller, Patrick Y; Frings, Werner; Sims, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) licensed for human use or in clinical development are indicated for treatment of patients with cancer and inflammatory/autoimmune disease and as such, are designed to directly interact with the immune system. A major hurdle for the development and early clinical investigation of many of these immunomodulatory mAbs is their inherent risk for adverse immune-mediated drug reactions in humans such as infusion reactions, cytokine storms, immunosuppression and autoimmunity. A thorough understanding of the immunopharmacology of a mAb in humans and animals is required to both anticipate the clinical risk of adverse immunotoxicological events and to select a safe starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) clinical studies. This review summarizes the most common adverse immunotoxicological events occurring in humans with immunomodulatory mAbs and outlines non-clinical strategies to define their immunopharmacology and assess their immunotoxic potential, as well as reduce the risk of immunotoxicity through rational mAb design. Tests to assess the relative risk of mAb candidates for cytokine release syndrome, innate immune system (dendritic cell) activation and immunogenicity in humans are also described. The importance of selecting a relevant and sensitive toxicity species for human safety assessment in which the immunopharmacology of the mAb is similar to that expected in humans is highlighted, as is the importance of understanding the limitations of the species selected for human safety assessment and supplementation of in vivo safety assessment with appropriate in vitro human assays. A tiered approach to assess effects on immune status, immune function and risk of infection and cancer, governed by the mechanism of action and structural features of the mAb, is described. Finally, the use of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicity data in determining a minimum anticipated biologic effect Level (MABEL) and in the selection of safe human

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9. PMID:27221501

  12. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  13. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, B; Rosén, A; Holme, T

    1982-01-01

    A cell line producing monoclonal antibodies directed against the core region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide has been established. These antibodies were inhibited by lipopolysaccharide preparations of both O-group 1 vibrios and some non-O-group 1 vibrios as detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-inhibition experiments. Coagglutination experiments with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies adsorbed to protein A-carrying staphylococci were performed. All V. cholerae strains tested, regardless of serotype, were agglutinated when mixed with staphylococci coated with the monoclonal antibodies, whereas staphylococci coated with group-specific (O1) polyclonal antibodies only agglutinated with O-group 1 vibrios. Images PMID:6183214

  15. Combination of monoclonal antibodies improves immunohistochemical diagnosis of Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Uzêda, R S; Schares, G; Ortega-Mora, L M; Madruga, C R; Aguado-Martinez, A; Corbellini, L G; Driemeier, D; Gondim, L F P

    2013-11-01

    Histological analysis is commonly used for a conclusive diagnosis of neosporosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) using monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal (pAb) antibodies can improve diagnosis; however, the use of pAb may induce cross-reactivity with other related parasites. The aims of this study were to compare the performance of mAbs and their combinations with that of pAb in IHC and evaluate the usefulness of mAb to identify Neospora caninum infection in aborted bovine fetal tissues. For this purpose, mAbs targeting NcSRS2 (4.15.15) or NcGRA7 (4.11.5 and 1/24-12) and one pAb collected from a rabbit inoculated with N. caninum tachyzoites were tested by IHC. Artificial standardized tissue sections were prepared as positive controls using homogenized bovine brain spiked with cultured tachyzoites of N. caninum. The numbers of labeled parasites were counted in each positive control section. In addition, four equal proportional combinations of the mAbs were also analyzed in the IHC. Finally, the pAb and the best combination of mAbs obtained in the positive control experiments were tested with tissue sections of naturally-infected cattle. To confirm analytical specificity, mAbs and a pAb were tested with Toxoplasma gondii and Besnoitia besnoiti positive control slides and tissues sections from naturally infected cattle containing Sarcocystis spp. and B. besnoiti antigens. The mAb 4.15.15 detected 57% of the total parasites in sections while 4.11.5 and 1/24-12 were able to detect 49% and 41%, respectively. For the mAb combinations (I: 1/24-12+4.11.5, II: 1/24-12+4.15.15, III: 4.15.15+4.11.5, IV: 1/24-12+4.11.5+4.15.15), the detection capacity was 32.4%, 79.4%, 66.6% and 60.7% for each combination, respectively. The best mAb combination (1/24-12 and 4.15.15) and the pAb serum detected 100% (18/18) of naturally-infected animals. Sarcocystis spp. or B. besnoiti were not detected by mAb combinations in IHC, however the pAb cross-reacted with Sarcocystis spp. cysts. These results

  16. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects. PMID:24293819

  17. Three dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships of sulfonamides binding monoclonal antibody by comparative molecular field analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of sulfonamide analogs, binding a monoclonal antibody (MabSMR) produced against sulfamerazine was carried out by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). The affinities of MabSMR, expressed as Log10IC50, for 17 ...

  18. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  19. The use of CrossMAb technology for the generation of bi- and multispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christian; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Regula, Jörg T

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge in the generation of bispecific IgG antibodies is enforcement of the correct heavy and light chain association. The correct association of generic light chains can be enabled using immunoglobulin domain crossover, known as CrossMAb technology, which can be combined with approaches enabling correct heavy chain association such as knobs-into-holes (KiH) technology or electrostatic steering. Since its development, this technology has proven to be very versatile, allowing the generation of various bispecific antibody formats, not only heterodimeric/asymmetric bivalent 1+1 CrossMAbs, but also tri- (2+1), tetravalent (2+2) bispecific and multispecific antibodies. Numerous CrossMAbs have been evaluated in preclinical studies, and, so far, 4 different tailor-made bispecific antibodies based on the CrossMAb technology have entered clinical studies. Here, we review the properties and activities of bispecific CrossMAbs and give an overview of the variety of CrossMAb-enabled antibody formats that differ from heterodimeric 1+1 bispecific IgG antibodies. PMID:27285945

  20. The use of CrossMAb technology for the generation of bi- and multispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christian; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Regula, Jörg T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major challenge in the generation of bispecific IgG antibodies is enforcement of the correct heavy and light chain association. The correct association of generic light chains can be enabled using immunoglobulin domain crossover, known as CrossMAb technology, which can be combined with approaches enabling correct heavy chain association such as knobs-into-holes (KiH) technology or electrostatic steering. Since its development, this technology has proven to be very versatile, allowing the generation of various bispecific antibody formats, not only heterodimeric/asymmetric bivalent 1+1 CrossMAbs, but also tri- (2+1), tetravalent (2+2) bispecific and multispecific antibodies. Numerous CrossMAbs have been evaluated in preclinical studies, and, so far, 4 different tailor-made bispecific antibodies based on the CrossMAb technology have entered clinical studies. Here, we review the properties and activities of bispecific CrossMAbs and give an overview of the variety of CrossMAb-enabled antibody formats that differ from heterodimeric 1+1 bispecific IgG antibodies. PMID:27285945

  1. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  2. Production of a diagnostic monoclonal antibody in perennial alfalfa plants.

    PubMed

    Khoudi, H; Laberge, S; Ferullo, J M; Bazin, R; Darveau, A; Castonguay, Y; Allard, G; Lemieux, R; Vézina, L P

    1999-07-20

    The increasing use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in diagnostic reagents necessitates efficient and cost-effective mAb production methods. In blood banks, one of the most routinely used reagents is the anti-human IgG reagent used for the detection of non-agglutinating antibodies. Here we report the production of a functional, purified anti-human IgG, through the expression of its encoding genes in perennial transgenic alfalfa. Transgenic plants expressing the light- and heavy-chain encoding mRNAs were obtained, and plants from crosses were found to express fully assembled C5-1. The purification procedure yielded mainly the H2L2 form with specificity and affinity identical to those of hybridoma-derived C5-1. The ability to accumulate the antibody was maintained both in parental F1 lines during repeated harvesting and in clonal material; the antibody was stable in the drying hay as in extracts made in pure water. Also, plant and hybridoma-derived C5-1 had similar in vivo half-lives in mice. These results indicate that plant C5-1 could be used in a diagnostic reagent as effectively as hybridoma-derived C5-1, and demonstrates the usefulness of perennial systems for the cost-effective, stable, and reliable production of large amounts of mAbs. PMID:10397849

  3. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  4. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (approximately 10(5) cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1-3 d (9-12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  5. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    PubMed

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors. PMID:11001403

  6. Monoclonal antibodies that detect live salmonellae.

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, R; Visser, M J; Aarsman, C J; Poppelier, M J; van Beurden, R; Fluit, A C; Verhoef, J

    1992-01-01

    Nine immunoglobulin G and nine immunoglobulin M murine monoclonal antibody-producing hybridomas reactive with live Salmonella bacteria were obtained from several fusions of immune spleen cells and Sp2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were selected by the magnetic immunoluminescence assay. The monoclonal antibodies were reactive with serogroups A, B, C1, C2, D, E, and K and Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. diarizonae. Each monoclonal antibody proved to be reactive with a distinct serotype. Clinical isolates belonging to these Salmonella serogroups could be detected. Reactivity with non-Salmonella bacteria proved to be minor. Images PMID:1476430

  7. Should Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Monoclonal Antibodies Remain the Exception or Become the Norm?

    PubMed

    Stroh, M; Lum, B L

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aims to maintain circulating drug concentrations at a desired level to optimize clinical outcome. The vast majority of marketed drugs do not require TDM, suggesting the clinical benefit of TDM has not been sufficiently demonstrated in most cases. With the continued emergence and prominence of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as drugs, especially in inflammation and cancer therapeutic areas, we are at a juncture to consider applicability of TDM for mAbs. PMID:26971373

  8. Expression of POTE protein in human testis detected by novel monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ise, Tomoko; Das, Sudipto; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Lee, Yoomi; Onda, Masanori; Anver, Miriam R.; Pastan, Ira

    2008-01-25

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 highly homologous paralogs preferentially expressed in prostate, ovary, testis, and placenta. We produced 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three representative POTE paralogs: POTE-21, POTE-2{gamma}C, and POTE-22. One reacted with all three paralogs, six MAbs reacted with POTE-2{gamma}C and POTE-22, and three MAbs were specific to POTE-21. Epitopes of all 10 MAbs were located in the cysteine-rich repeats (CRRs) motifs located at the N-terminus of each POTE paralog. Testing the reactivity of each MAb with 12 different CRRs revealed slight differences among the antigenic determinants, which accounts for differences in cross-reactivity. Using MAbs HP8 and PG5 we were able to detect a POTE-actin fusion protein in human testis by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. By immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the POTE protein is expressed in primary spermatocytes, implying a role in spermatogenesis.

  9. Mechanistic considerations for the use of monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glassman, Patrick M.; Balthasar, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Since the approval of rituximab in 1997, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become an increasingly important component of therapeutic regimens in oncology. The success of mAbs as a therapeutic class is a result of great strides that have been made in molecular biology and in biotechnology over the past several decades. Currently, there are 14 approved mAb products for oncology indications, and there are ten additional mAbs in late stages of clinical trials. Compared to traditional chemotherapeutic agents, mAbs have several advantages, including a long circulating half-life and high target specificity. Antibodies can serve as cytotoxic agents when administered alone, exerting a pharmacologic effect through several mechanisms involving the antigen binding (Fab) and/or Fc domains of the molecule, and mAbs may also be utilized as drug carriers, targeting a toxic payload to cancer cells. The extremely high affinity of mAbs for their targets, which is desirable with respect to pharmacodynamics (i.e., contributing to the high therapeutic selectivity of mAb), often leads to complex, non-linear, target-mediated pharmacokinetics. In this report, we summarize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of mAbs that have been approved and of mAbs that are near approval for oncology indications, with particular focus on the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for their disposition and efficacy. PMID:24738036

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  11. Quality Control of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies at the Hospital After Their Compounding and Before Their Administration to Patients.

    PubMed

    Jaccoulet, Emmanuel; Smadja, Claire; Taverna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are widely used in cancer therapy and recently many new mAbs have gained EMA and FDA approvals for oncology indications. Here we describe a highly reproducible CZE method, relying on a cationic coating allowing separation and identification of a complex mixture of four compounded mAbs widely used in cancer therapy (cetuximab, rituximab, bevacizumab, and trastuzumab). PMID:27473490

  12. Diagnostic methods for African horsesickness virus using monoclonal antibodies to structural and non-structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Ranz, A I; Miguet, J G; Anaya, C; Venteo, A; Cortés, E; Vela, C; Sanz, A

    1992-11-01

    A panel of 32 hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive with African horsesickness virus serotype 4 (AHSV-4) has been developed. Four of the MAbs recognized the major core antigen VP7, twenty recognized the outer capsid protein VP2 and eight reacted with the non-structural protein NS1. With the VP7-specific MAbs a rapid and sensitive double antibody sandwich immunoassay has been developed to detect viral antigen in infected Vero cells and in spleen tissue from AHSV-infected horses. The sensitivity of the assay is 10 ng viral antigen per 100 microliters. The NS1-specific MAbs allowed visualization by immunofluorescence of tubule-like structures in the cytoplasm of infected Vero cells. This can be very useful as a confirmatory diagnostic procedure. The antigenic map of the outer capsid VP2 protein with MAbs is also reported. PMID:1481354

  13. Monoclonal anti-vasopressin (VP) antibodies penetrate into VP neurons, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A J; Leon-Henri, B P; Robert, F R; Arahmani, A; Fernette, B M; Burlet, C R

    1987-01-01

    The fate of monoclonal anti-vasopressin antibodies (VP-MAbs) injected in vivo into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the rat brain was studied by immunocytochemistry. Depending on the post survival time, VP-MAbs contained in an ascites fluid were stained at different levels of the VP neurons: the cytoplasm of the PVN neurons, the fibres of the median eminence and the granular layer of the Gyrus Dentatus. The identification of endogenous peptides synthesized by PVN neurons showed that the VP-MAbs uptake was specific: it did not appear either in the oxytocinergic neurons or in the non immunoreactive neurons of the Brattleboro rat brain, this rat being genetically incapable of synthesizing central VP. Conversely, VP-MAbs only penetrated into the VP neurons: ascites fluid containing monoclonal antibodies prepared against bovine thyroglobulin (the carrier conjugated to VP in our immunizations) was neither stained in magnocellular neurons nor carried in nerve fibres. The neuronal uptake and transport of VP-MAbs occurred in vivo: they were totally inhibited by heating of the ascites fluid at 56 degrees C for 30 min; this treatment did not alter the VP-MAbs themselves but probably destroyed some thermic sensitive component essential to the macromolecule internalization. The biological effects of antibodies injected in vivo have been reported. The results described here suggest that some specific antibodies passively transferred into the brain could act directly on the peptide synthesis recognized by the antibodies. PMID:3556490

  14. [The development of methods for obtaining monoclonal antibody-producing cells].

    PubMed

    Skowicki, Michał; Lipiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are biomolecules of great scientific and practical significance. In contrast to polyclonal antibodies from immune sera, they are homogeneous and monospecific, since they are produced by hybridoma cells representing a clone arising from a single cell. The successful technology was described for the first time in 1975; the inventors were later awarded the Nobel Prize. Currently, mAbs are broadly used as a research tool, in diagnostics and medicine in particular for the treatment of cancer or in transplantology. About 47 therapeutics based on monoclonal antibodies are now available in the US and Europe, and the number is still growing. Production of monoclonal antibodies is a multistage, time-consuming and costly process. Growing demand for these molecules creates space for research focused on improvements in hybridoma technology. Lower costs, human labor, and time are important goals of these attempts. In this article, a brief review of current methods and their advances is given. PMID:27117113

  15. Tumor-associated hyaluronan limits efficacy of monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Singha, Netai C; Nekoroski, Tara; Zhao, Chunmei; Symons, Rebecca; Jiang, Ping; Frost, Gregory I; Huang, Zhongdong; Shepard, H Michael

    2015-02-01

    Despite tremendous progress in cancer immunotherapy for solid tumors, clinical success of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy is often limited by poorly understood mechanisms associated with the tumor microenvironment (TME). Accumulation of hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the TME, occurs in many solid tumor types, and is associated with poor prognosis and treatment resistance in multiple malignancies. In this study, we describe that a physical barrier associated with high levels of HA (HA(high)) in the TME restricts antibody and immune cell access to tumors, suggesting a novel mechanism of in vivo resistance to mAb therapy. We determined that approximately 60% of HER2(3+) primary breast tumors and approximately 40% of EGFR(+) head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are HA(high), and hypothesized that HA(high) tumors may be refractory to mAb therapy. We found that the pericellular matrix produced by HA(high) tumor cells inhibited both natural killer (NK) immune cell access to tumor cells and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Depletion of HA by PEGPH20, a pegylated recombinant human PH20 hyaluronidase, resulted in increased NK cell access to HA(high) tumor cells, and greatly enhanced trastuzumab- or cetuximab-dependent ADCC in vitro. Furthermore, PEGPH20 treatment enhanced trastuzumab and NK cell access to HA(high) tumors, resulting in enhanced trastuzumab- and NK cell-mediated tumor growth inhibition in vivo. These results suggest that HA(high) matrix in vivo may form a barrier inhibiting access of both mAb and NK cells, and that PEGPH20 treatment in combination with anticancer mAbs may be an effective adjunctive therapy for HA(high) tumors. PMID:25512619

  16. Preclinical development of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Nick; Coney, Lee; Dempster, Maggie; Andrews, Laura; Bajramovic, Jeffrey; Baldrick, Paul; Buckley, Lorrene; Jacobs, Abby; Hale, Geoff; Green, Colin; Ragan, Ian; Robinson, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    The development of mAbs remains high on the therapeutic agenda for the majority of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Often, the only relevant species for preclinical safety assessment of mAbs are non-human primates (NHPs), and this raises important scientific, ethical and economic issues. To investigate evidence-based opportunities to minimize the use of NHPs, an expert working group with representatives from leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, contract research organizations and institutes from Europe and the USA, has shared and analyzed data on mAbs for a range of therapeutic areas. This information has been applied to hypothetical examples to recommend scientifically appropriate development pathways and study designs for a variety of potential mAbs. The addendum of ICHS6 provides a timely opportunity for the scientific and regulatory community to embrace strategies which minimize primate use and increase efficiency of mAb development. PMID:20065651

  17. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  18. Antibody purification using affinity chromatography: a case study with a monoclonal antibody to ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liang, Qi; Wen, Kai; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-11-15

    The application of antibodies to small molecules in the field of bioanalytics requires antibodies with stable biological activity and high purity; thus, there is a growing interest in developing rapid, inexpensive and effective procedures to obtain such antibodies. In this work, a ractopamine (RAC) derivative, N-4-aminobutyl ractopamine (ABR), was synthesized for preparing new specific affinity chromatography to purify a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against RAC from ascites. The performance of the new specific chromatography was compared with four other purification methods in terms of recovery, purity and biological activity of mAb. These four purification methods were prepared by using specific ligands (RAC and RAC-ovalbumin) and commercial ligands (protein G and protein A), respectively. The results showed that the highest recovery (88.1%) was achieved using the new chromatography; in comparison, the recoveries from the other methods were all below 70%. The purity of the mAbs from the new chromatography was 88.3%, while, the highest purity of 97.6% was from protein G chromatography and the lowest purity of 84.7% was from protein A chromatography. The biological activity of the purified mAb from all of the chromatography methods was comparable in enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA). PMID:25261834

  19. Monoclonal antibody capture and viral clearance by cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Miesegaes, G R; Lute, S; Strauss, D M; Read, E K; Venkiteshwaran, A; Kreuzman, A; Shah, R; Shamlou, P; Chen, D; Brorson, K

    2012-08-01

    Traditionally, post-production culture harvest capture of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is performed using Protein A chromatography. We investigated the efficiency and robustness of cation exchange chromatography (CEX) in an effort to evaluate alternative capture methodologies. Up to five commercially available CEX resins were systematically evaluated using an experimentally optimized buffer platform and a design-of-experiment (DoE) approach for their ability to (a) capture a model mAb with a neutral isoelectric point, (b) clear three model viruses (porcine parvovirus, CHO type-C particles, and a bacteriophage). This approach identified a narrow operating space where yield, purity, and viral clearance were optimal under a CEX capture platform, and revealed trends between viral clearance of PPV and product purity (but not yield). Our results suggest that after unit operation optimization, CEX can serve as a suitable capture step. PMID:22488719

  20. Production of monoclonal antibodies against avidin.

    PubMed

    Ashorn, R; Ashorn, P; Kulomaa, M; Tuohimaa, P; Krohn, K

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of the IgG1 subclass were generated against chicken avidin. These antibodies were shown to be as sensitive as polyclonal antiserum in detecting avidin by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Furthermore, the monoclonal antibodies were considerably more specific. Our results with a monoclonal anti-avidin RIA support previous findings that in inflammatory conditions avidin is synthesized also in other organs than the oviduct, although in the liver a major part of the activity detected by polyclonal anti-avidin RIA or biotin-bentonite assay was not due to avidin. PMID:4053566

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dog immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Arce, C; Moreno, A; Millán, Y; Martín de las Mulas, J; Llanes, D

    2002-09-01

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing antigenic determinants on canine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy or light chains was produced and characterized. All monoclonals recognized the IgG(2) subclass, although only two were subclass-specific (CA3H1 and CA4F1). The CA3B8 mAb was found to be specific for an epitope on canine immunoglobulin G heavy chain, (IgG(1) and IgG(2) subclasses). Two mAbs (CA2E9 and CA5B2) reacted with an epitope on the heavy chain of canine IgG and IgM and another, CA4E7, bound to canine IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes; CA4E7 recognized an epitope on canine immunoglobulin light chain. CA4E7, CA4F1 and CA5B2 recognized an epitope in the Fab region. Three mAbs, CA3B8, CA4E7 and CA5B2, showed much lower reactivity with canine IgG by ELISA when IgG was periodate-treated, suggesting that they recognized a carbohydrate determinant. Cross-reactivity analysis of these mAbs with sera from horse, goat, cow, sheep, pig, cat, rabbit, hamster, rat, mouse and human indicated that two mAbs, CA3B8 and CA5B2, recognized a canine IgG-specific epitope; two others, CA3H1 and CA4E7, recognized an epitope also present in rabbit and sheep immunoglobulin respectively; and the remaining two (CA2E9 and CA4F1) recognized an epitope broadly present on the Igs of the species analyzed. This panel of antibodies will be a useful tool for future canine immunodiagnosis tests. With the exception of CA2E9, all mAbs were able to recognize plasma cells on paraffin-embedded tissues, and will thus be useful for immunohistochemical assays. PMID:12088642

  2. [Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against His-tag and epitope analysis of cross antigens].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangrong; Zhang, Haixiang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Guanghua; Qi, Zongli; Li, Yuan; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Objective To explore the influence of His-tag on recombinant proteins in vaccination, immunization and pathogenesis. Methods Multiple mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against His-tag were prepared. The biological and immunoreactive characteristics of these mAbs and their cross-reactivity with the normal human tissues were investigated by ELISA, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Results The binding activity of these anti-His mAbs was associated with the steric configuration of the his-tagged antigen. In addition, most of these mAbs reacted with human hemoglobin and some normal human tissues. Conclusion Anti-His antibodies could be elicited by His-tagged recombinant proteins in vivo experiments. Moreover, the functional studies of the His-tagged recombinant proteins might be affected by the reactions of anti-His6 antibodies with human hemoglobin and normal human tissues. PMID:27126949

  3. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  4. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  5. Characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Shewanella marisflavi, a novel pathogen of Apostichopus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella marisflavi strain AP629 was certified as a novel pathogen of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. In this study, four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (3C1, 3D9, 2F2, 2A8) against strain AP629 were developed by immunizing Balb/C mice. 3C1 and 3D9 recognized S. marisflavi only, showing no ...

  6. Development of human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for prevention and therapy of MERS-CoV infections

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Li, Haoyang; Lu, Lu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-01-01

    The recent Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak poses a serious threat to public health. Here, we summarize recent advances in identifying human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MERS-CoV, describe their mechanisms of action, and analyze their potential for treatment of MERS-CoV infections. PMID:25456101

  7. Development and Characterization of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Chicken CD83

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was carried out to develop and characterize mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against chicken CD83 (chCD83), a membrane-bound glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily that is primarily expressed on mature dendritic cells (DCs). A recombinant chCD83/IgG4 fusion protein con...

  8. INITIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE FUNGAL HEMOLYSIN STACHYLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is known to produce the hemolysin stachylysin and its detection in human serum has been proposed as a biomarker for exposure to the fungus. In this study we report the initial characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against stachylysin and the dev...

  9. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies specific for human monocytes, granulocytes and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, N; MacDonald, S; Slusarenko, M; Beverley, P C

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against antigens of human myeloid cells have been produced and thoroughly characterized in terms of their reactions with peripheral blood cells, cell lines, nine lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the polypeptides with which they react. UCHM1 and SmO identify antigens present on the majority of blood monocytes and a variable, but lower, proportion of tissue macrophages. From their morphology and location in tissues, these cells appear to be recirculating monocytes. SMO antigen is also present on platelets. In addition, both antibodies stained endothelial cells, SMO in all tissues examined and UCHM1 variably. Biochemical investigation indicated that the UCHM1 antigen is a protein of 52,000 MW while the SMO antigen could not be indentified. The antibodies TG1 and 28 identify antigens mainly present on granulocytes. While mAb 28 reacted with neutrophils, TG1 also stained eosinophils and stained strongly a proportion of monocytes. TG1 also reacted variably with some non-haemopoietic cell lines. Both antibodies reacted predominantly with granulocytes in tissue sections. MAb TG1 precipitated a single polypeptide of 156,000 MW from monocytes and granulocytes, while mAb 28 precipitated non-convalently associated polypeptides of 83,000 and 155,000 MW from granulocytes but only a single molecule from monocytes, corresponding to the lower MW chain of 83,000. The epitope with which mAb 28 reacts appears not to be exposed on the surface of intact monocytes. This suggests that a similar or identical 83,000 MW molecule is made by both neutrophils and monocytes, but that its expression differs according to cell type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6389324

  11. (Investigations into the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for selective cell labeling in whole blood):

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 7 specific for human platelets and 10 specific for human polumorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) have been evaluated. One MAb has been identified as the antibody most suitable for canine platelets and another has been evaluted as the best among the group, for human neutrophil studies. Indium-111, Tc-99m, and I-125 have been used as the tracers. Six bifunctional chelating agents (BFCAs) were evaluated in order to determine the most efficient agent for maximal cell labeling efficiency. Among these, the DTPA has given us the best results. (4) To botain maximum In-111 chelation and minimum loss of the MAb affinity, the optimal BFCA to MAb ratios for both IgG and IgM type of MAbs were determined. Four different substances, stannous chloride, ascorbic acid, sodium dithionite and sodium borohydride, were evaluated as reducing agents for Tc-99m reduction and its optimal binding to MAbs. Dithionite at the concentration of 200 ug/ml DTPA-MAb solution provides greater than 50% Tc-99m labeling efficiency and maintains its immunospecificity equal to that of In-111-DTPA-MAb. The ability of radiolabeled MAb to interact with blood cells selectively in whole blood and with isolated blood cells was assessed and compared.

  12. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  13. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  14. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  15. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  16. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  17. Trial watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    An expanding panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically target malignant cells or intercept trophic factors delivered by the tumor stroma is now available for cancer therapy. These mAbs can exert direct antiproliferative/cytotoxic effects as they inhibit pro-survival signal transduction cascades or activate lethal receptors at the plasma membrane of cancer cells, they can opsonize neoplastic cells to initiate a tumor-targeting immune response, or they can be harnessed to specifically deliver toxins or radionuclides to transformed cells. As an indication of the success of this immunotherapeutic paradigm, international regulatory agencies approve new tumor-targeting mAbs for use in cancer patients every year. Moreover, the list of indications for previously licensed molecules is frequently expanded to other neoplastic disorders as the results of large, randomized clinical trials become available. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of tumor-targeting mAbs for oncological indications. PMID:25949870

  18. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Monoclonal Antibodies Approved to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ternant, David; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Passot, Christophe; Mulleman, Denis; Paintaud, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are increasingly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At present, anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs (infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab), rituximab, and tocilizumab are approved for RA treatment. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mAbs approved in RA. Being large proteins, mAbs exhibit complex pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. In particular, owing to the interactions of mAbs with their antigenic targets, the pharmacokinetics of mAbs depends on target turnover and exhibits non-specific (linear) and target-mediated (often nonlinear) clearances. Their volume of distribution is low (3-4 L) and their elimination half-life usually ranges from 2 to 3 weeks. The inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability of mAbs is usually large and is partly explained by differences in antigenic burden or by anti-drug antibodies, which accelerate mAb elimination. The inter-individual variability of clinical response is large and influenced by the pharmacokinetics. The analysis of mAbs concentration-effect relationship relies more and more often on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling; these models being suitable for dosing optimization. Even if adverse effects of mAbs used in RA are well known, the relationship between mAb concentration and adverse effects is poorly documented, especially for anti-tumor necrosis factor-α mAbs. Overall, RA patients treated with mAbs should benefit from individualized dosing strategies. Because of the complexity of their pharmacokinetics and mechanisms of action, the current dosing strategy of mAbs is not based on sound knowledge. New studies are needed to assess individual dosing regimen, adjusted notably to disease activity. PMID:26123705

  19. Characterization and Formulation of Multiple Epitope-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies for Passive Immunization against Cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Deborah A.; Auerbach-Dixon, Beth A.; Riggs, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    The coccidian parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes diarrhea in humans, calves, and other mammals. Neither immunization nor parasite-specific pharmaceuticals that are consistently effective against this organism are available. While polyclonal antibodies against whole C. parvum reduce infection, their efficacy and predictability are suboptimal. We hypothesized that passive immunization against cryptosporidiosis could be improved by using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting functionally defined antigens on the infective stages. We previously reported that the apical complex and surface-exposed zoite antigens CSL, GP25-200, and P23 are critical in the infection process and are therefore rational targets. In the present study, a panel of 126 MAbs generated against affinity-purified CSL, GP25-200, and P23 was characterized to identify the most efficacious neutralizing MAb formulation targeting each antigen. To identify neutralizing MAbs, sporozoite infectivity following exposure to individual MAbs was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of 126 MAbs evaluated, 47 had neutralizing activity. These were then evaluated individually in oocyst-challenged neonatal mice, and 14 MAbs having highly significant efficacy were identified for further testing in formulations. Epitope specificity assays were performed to determine if candidate MAbs recognized the same or different epitopes. Formulations of two or three neutralizing MAbs, each recognizing distinct epitopes, were then evaluated. A formulation of MAbs 3E2 (anti-CSL [αCSL]), 3H2 (αGP25-200), and 1E10 (αP23) provided highly significant additive efficacy over that of either individual MAbs or combinations of two MAbs and reduced intestinal infection by 86 to 93%. These findings indicate that polyvalent neutralizing MAb formulations targeting epitopes on defined antigens may provide optimal passive immunization against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10768951

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against ROR1 induce apoptosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    PubMed

    Daneshmanesh, A H; Hojjat-Farsangi, M; Khan, A S; Jeddi-Tehrani, M; Akhondi, M M; Bayat, A A; Ghods, R; Mahmoudi, A-R; Hadavi, R; Österborg, A; Shokri, F; Rabbani, H; Mellstedt, H

    2012-06-01

    ROR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) recently identified to be overexpressed at the gene and protein levels in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against RTKs have been successfully applied for therapy of solid tumors. We generated five MAbs against the Ig (n = 1), cysteine-rich (CRD) (n = 2) and kringle (KNG) (n = 2) domains, respectively, of the extracellular part of ROR1. All CLL patients (n = 20) expressed ROR1 on the surface of the leukemic cells. A significantly higher frequency of ROR1 expression was found in patients with progressive versus non-progressive disease, and in those with unmutated versus mutated IgVH genes. All five MAbs alone induced apoptosis in the absence of complement or added effector cells (Annexin-V and MTT, as well as cleavage of poly-(ADP ribose)-polymerase, caspase-8 and caspase-9) of CLL cells but not of normal B cells. Most effective were MAbs against CRD and KNG, significantly superior to rituximab (P < 0.005). Cross-linking of anti-ROR1 MAbs using the F(ab')(2) fragments of anti-Fc antibodies significantly augmented apoptosis. Two of the MAbs induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) similar to that of rituximab and one anti-ROR1 MAb (KNG) (IgG1) showed killing activity by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The identified ROR1 epitopes may provide a basis for generating human ROR1 MAbs for therapy. PMID:22289919

  1. Characterization of monoclonal antibody's binding kinetics using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Hongyan; Dai, Jun; Hu, Shaohu; Pino, Ignacio; Eichinger, Daniel J; Lyu, Huibin; Zhu, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human proteins are the primary protein capture reagents for basic research, diagnosis, and molecular therapeutics. The 2 most important attributes of mAbs used in all of these applications are their specificity and avidity. While specificity of a mAb raised against a human protein can be readily defined based on its binding profile on a human proteome microarray, it has been a challenge to determine avidity values for mAbs in a high-throughput and cost-effective fashion. To undertake this challenge, we employed the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) platform to characterize mAbs in a protein microarray format. We first systematically determined the Kon and Koff values of 50 mAbs measured with the OIRD method and deduced the avidity values. Second, we established a multiplexed approach that simultaneously measured avidity values of a mixture of 9 mono-specific mAbs that do not cross-react to the antigens. Third, we demonstrated that avidity values of a group of mAbs could be sequentially determined using a flow-cell device. Finally, we implemented a sequential competition assay that allowed us to bin multiple mAbs that recognize the same antigens. Our study demonstrated that OIRD offers a high-throughput and cost-effective platform for characterization of the binding kinetics of mAbs. PMID:25530170

  2. Development of monoclonal antibodies against polar filaments and spore valves of Myxobolus honghuensis (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida).

    PubMed

    Jia, Luo; Li, Dan; Gu, Zemao; Yuan, Junfa; Zhai, Yanhua

    2016-01-13

    Myxobolus honghuensis infects the pharynx of allogynogenetic gibel carp Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch) and can cause high mortality. Only morphology-based diagnostic methods are currently available for clinical samples, but these methods are laborious and have low efficiency of detection. To overcome this problem, we designed a more sensitive diagnostic method. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 1C7 and 3B7) were prepared by immunizing mice with soluble protein from sonicated M. honghuensis spores. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that MAb 1C7 specifically reacts with polar filaments from spores, whereas MAb 3B7 identified protein localized on the spore valves. The isotypes of MAb 1C7 and MAb 3B7 were IgM and IgG1, respectively. Results of Western blot analysis revealed that MAb 1C7 recognized 2 prominent protein bands with molecular weights of 130 and 180 kDa, while MAb 3B7 recognized a protein band of 28 kDa. Thus, in this study we have developed 2 MAbs that have the potential for efficient detection of M. honghuensis. Moreover, identification of MAb 1C7 and MAb 3B7 allows for further studies of the functions and biochemical composition of polar filament and spore surface antigens. PMID:26758653

  3. Monoclonal antibodies: Principles and applications of immmunodiagnosis and immunotherapy for hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Tabll, Ashraf; Abbas, Aymn T; El-Kafrawy, Sherif; Wahid, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major health problem worldwide. Early detection of the infection will help better management of the infected cases. The monoclonal antibodies (mAb) of mice are predominantly used for the immunodiagnosis of several viral, bacterial, and parasitic antigens. Serological detection of HCV antigens and antibodies provide simple and rapid methods of detection but lack sensitivity specially in the window phase between the infection and antibody development. Human mAb are used in the immunotherapy of several blood malignancies, such as lymphoma and leukemia, as well as for autoimmune diseases. In this review article, we will discuss methods of mouse and human monoclonal antibody production. We will demonstrate the role of mouse mAb in the detection of HCV antigens as rapid and sensitive immunodiagnostic assays for the detection of HCV, which is a major health problem throughout the world, particularly in Egypt. We will discuss the value of HCV-neutralizing antibodies and their roles in the immunotherapy of HCV infections and in HCV vaccine development. We will also discuss the different mechanisms by which the virus escape the effect of neutralizing mAb. Finally, we will discuss available and new trends to produce antibodies, such as egg yolk-based antibodies (IgY), production in transgenic plants, and the synthetic antibody mimics approach. PMID:26464752

  4. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  5. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  6. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Caterina; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies, by cloning hybridoma derived from the fusion of myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes, has allowed to obtain great advances in many fields of biological knowledge. The use of specific antibodies to the estrogen receptor, in fact, has been an invaluable method to bring out its mechanisms of action and its effects, both genomic and extra-genomic. Here we describe, step by step, the production of monoclonal antibodies, starting from protocol for antigen preparation to the selection of antibody-secreting hybridoma. PMID:25182770

  7. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. PMID:24037837

  8. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with K1-encapsulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide are opsonic and protect mice against lethal challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, B M; Cross, A S; Futrovsky, S L; Sidberry, H F; Sadoff, J C

    1986-01-01

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against O-side-chain determinants of the K1-encapsulated Bortolussi strain of Escherichia coli (O18:K1:H7) were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo activities. All the MAbs reacted well in Western blots against E. coli O18 lipopolysaccharide antigens. Two MAbs of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class promoted in vitro opsonophagocytosis and protected mice lethally challenged with bacteria. Two IgM MAbs showed partial protection, although they had no in vitro opsonic activity, and the remaining three IgM MAbs showed no apparent functional activities. Monoclonal IgG antibodies against bacterial lipopolysaccharide can be opsonic and protective in spite of the presence of the K1 capsule on the bacterium. Images PMID:3516883

  9. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based broad-specificity ELISA for fluroquinolone antibiotics in foods and molecular modeling studies of cross-reactive compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) with monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) having broad specificity for fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics is described. Four FQs, ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), enrofloxacin (ENR) and ofloxacin (OFL) were conjugated to...

  10. Interfacial dilatational deformation accelerates particle formation in monoclonal antibody solutions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gigi L; Pathak, Jai A; Kim, Dong Hyun; Carlson, Marcia; Riguero, Valeria; Kim, Yoen Joo; Buff, Jean S; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-04-14

    Protein molecules are amphiphilic moieties that spontaneously adsorb at the air/solution (A/S) interface to lower the surface energy. Previous studies have shown that hydrodynamic disruptions to these A/S interfaces can result in the formation of protein aggregates that are of concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Interfacial hydrodynamic stresses encountered by protein therapeutic solutions under typical manufacturing, filling, and shipping conditions will impact protein stability, prompting a need to characterize the contribution of basic fluid kinematics to monoclonal antibody (mAb) destabilization. We demonstrate that dilatational surface deformations are more important to antibody stability when compared to constant-area shear of the A/S interface. We have constructed a dilatational interfacial rheometer that utilizes simultaneous pressure and bubble shape measurements to study the mechanical stability of mAbs under interfacial aging. It has a distinct advantage over methods utilizing the Young-Laplace equation, which incorrectly describes viscoelastic interfaces. We provide visual evidence of particle ejection from dilatated A/S interfaces and spectroscopic data of ejected mAb particles. These rheological studies frame a molecular understanding of the protein-protein interactions at the complex-fluid interface. PMID:26891116

  11. Tregalizumab – A Monoclonal Antibody to Target Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Martin; Rharbaoui, Faiza; Aigner, Silke; Dälken, Benjamin; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells, which are essential for the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The absence or dysfunction of Tregs can lead to autoimmunity and allergies. The restoration of functional Tregs and/or Treg cell numbers represents a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, e.g., rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The CD4 cell surface receptor is a target for modulation of T cell function. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD4 have previously been tested for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including RA. Furthermore, in model systems, anti-CD4 antibodies are able to induce tolerance and mediate immunomodulatory effects through a variety of mechanisms. Despite the availability of innovative and effective therapies for RA, many patients still have persistently active disease or experience adverse events that can limit use. A growing body of evidence suggests that Treg modulation could offer a new therapeutic strategy in RA and other autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe tregalizumab (BT-061), which is a novel, non-depleting IgG1 mAb that binds to a unique epitope of CD4. Tregalizumab represents the first humanized anti-CD4 mAb that selectively induces Treg activation. PMID:26834751

  12. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Verhoef, Rene; Schols, Henk; Ulvskov, Peter; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Knox, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall glycans immobilized on nitrocellulose was assessed. Hierarchical clustering of microarray binding profiles from newly produced mAbs, together with the profiles for mAbs with previously defined specificities allowed the rapid assignments of mAb binding to antigen classes. mAb specificities were further investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in plant materials. PMID:17629746

  13. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  14. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: from uncertainties to promises.

    PubMed

    Bagacean, Cristina; Zdrenghea, Mihnea; Tempescul, Adrian; Cristea, Victor; Renaudineau, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy has improved patient outcome in B-cell malignancies, and confirmed CD20 as an important target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Until recently, the gold standard was based on the utilization of rituximab combined with chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide), but patients often relapse. Next, with our better understanding of mAb engineering, anti-CD20 mAb therapy has evolved with the development of new mAb permitting significant clinical responses by improving pharmacokinetics, safety, activity and immunogenicity. Last but not least, the development of key tumoral tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their association with anti-CD20 mAb is a work in progress with promising results. PMID:27140410

  15. Regulation of the contact sensitivity response to urushiol with anti-urushiol monoclonal antibody ALG 991.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R W; Clegg, J A; Curran, A C; Austin, E B; Khan, T; Ma, Y; Gunn, B; Hudecz, F; Byers, V S; Lepoittevin, J P; Price, M R

    1999-12-01

    The objective of the studies was to demonstrate that the contact sensitivity (CS) response to poison ivy/oak could be downregulated following treatment with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) reacting with the allergen urushiol. Conjugation of urushiol and its synthetic analogue 3-n-pentadecylcatechol (PDC) to N-acetylcysteine yielded hydrosoluble derivatives which induced humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice. Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) reacting with urushiol and PDC were generated by fusion of B lymphocytes from immunized mice with mouse myeloma P3NS0 cells. The specificity of mAb ALG 991 (IgM isotype) was defined by inhibition of antibody binding by PDC analogues. This demonstrated that mAb ALG 991 reacted with the catechol moiety of urushiol, the region of the allergen being critically important in the induction of contact dermatitis. The CS response to urushiol in BALB/c mice was suppressed by stimulation with mAb ALG 991 and the role of sensitized T cells, including suppressor T cells, has been considered. Suppression of CS was most effective with low doses (1 microg) of mAb incorporated into a vaccine with Freund's adjuvant. This treatment suppressed CS responses in BALB/c mice already sensitized to urushiol. PMID:10651166

  16. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori. PMID:25789225

  17. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Luciani, M; Armillotta, G; Magliulo, M; Portanti, O; Di Febo, T; Di Giannatale, E; Roda, A; Lelli, R

    2006-01-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7, one of the major causes of haemorrhagic colitis in humans, were produced by immunising Balb/c mice with the strain E. coli O157:H7. These monoclonal antibodies do not cross-react with other bacteria such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, E. coli O14, E. coli JM109, S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. panama, S. saintpaul, S. derby, S. muenchen, S. bredeney, S. hadar, Yersinia enterocolitica, Proteus vulgaris, Shigella flexneri, Listeria ivanovii, L. monocytogenes 13M, L. innocua, Enterobacter cloacae, E. agglomerans, E. amnigenus, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia fergussoni or Klebsiella pneumoniae. Of the seven MAbs obtained, MAb 8B8C3 was selected to prepare a high-sensitivity sandwich ELISA method specific for O157:H7. PMID:20429059

  18. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Susan; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    With modern intensive combination polychemotherapy, the complete response (CR) rate in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is 80% to 90%, and the cure rate is 40% to 50%. Hence, there is a need to develop effective salvage therapies and combine novel agents with standard effective chemotherapy. ALL leukemic cells express several surface antigens amenable to target therapies, including CD20, CD22, and CD19. Monoclonal antibodies target these leukemic surface antigens selectively and minimize off-target toxicity. When added to frontline chemotherapy, rituximab, an antibody directed against CD20, increases cure rates of adults with Burkitt leukemia from 40% to 80% and those with pre-B ALL from 35% to 50%. Inotuzumab ozogamicin, a CD22 monoclonal antibody bound to calicheamicin, has resulted in marrow CR rates of 55% and a median survival of 6 to 7 months when given to patients with refractory-relapsed ALL. Blinatumomab, a biallelic T cell engaging the CD3-CD19 monoclonal antibody, also resulted in overall response rates of 40% to 50% and a median survival of 6.5 months in a similar refractory-relapsed population. Other promising monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab) or CD19 or CD20 and bound to different cytotoxins or immunotoxins are under development. Combined modalities of chemotherapy and the novel monoclonal antibodies are under investigation. PMID:25999456

  20. Development of human monoclonal antibodies against diseases caused by emerging and biodefense-related viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Antony S; Chakraborti, Samitabh; Dimitrova, Dimana; Xiao, Xiaodong; Broder, Christopher C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2006-02-01

    Polyclonal antibodies have a century-old history of being effective against some viruses; recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have also shown success. The humanized mAb Synagis (palivizumab), which is still the only mAb against a viral disease approved by the US FDA, has been widely used as a prophylactic measure against respiratory syncytial virus infections in neonates and immunocompromised individuals. The first fully human mAbs against two other paramyxoviruses, Hendra and Nipah virus, which can cause high (up to 75%) mortality, were recently developed; one of them, m101, showed exceptional potency against infectious virus. In an amazing pace of research, several potent human mAbs targeting the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus S glycoprotein that can affect infections in animal models have been developed months after the virus was identified in 2003. A potent humanized mAb with therapeutic potential was recently developed against the West Nile virus. The progress in developing neutralizing human mAbs against Ebola, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, vaccinia and other emerging and biodefense-related viruses is slow. A major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies, is the viruses' heterogeneity and mutability. A related problem is the low binding affinity of crossreactive antibodies able to neutralize a variety of primary isolates. Combinations of mAbs or mAbs with other drugs, and/or the identification of potent new mAbs and their derivatives that target highly conserved viral structures, which are critical for virus entry into cells, are some of the possible solutions to these problems, and will continue to be a major focus of antiviral research. PMID:16441209

  1. Properties of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase Protein

    PubMed Central

    zu Putlitz, Jasper; Lanford, Robert E.; Carlson, Rolf I.; Notvall, Lena; de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Wands, Jack R.

    1999-01-01

    Hepadnavirus polymerases are multifunctional enzymes that play critical roles during the viral life cycle but have been difficult to study due to a lack of a well-defined panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). We have used recombinant human hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase (Pol) expressed in and purified from baculovirus-infected insect cells to generate a panel of six MAbs directed against HBV Pol protein. Such MAbs were subsequently characterized with respect to their isotypes and functions in analytical and preparative assays. Using these MAbs as probes together with various deletion mutants of Pol expressed in insect cells, we mapped the B-cell epitopes of Pol recognized by these MAbs to amino acids (aa) 8 to 20 and 20 to 30 in the terminal protein (TP) region of Pol, to aa 225 to 250 in the spacer region, and to aa 800 to 832 in the RNase H domain. Confocal microscopy and immunocytochemical studies using various Pol-specific MAbs revealed that the protein itself appears to be exclusively localized to the cytoplasm. Finally, MAbs specific for the TP domain, but not MAbs specific for the spacer or RNase H regions of Pol, appeared to inhibit Pol function in the in vitro priming assay, suggesting that antibody-mediated interference with TP may now be assessed in the context of HBV replication. PMID:10196315

  2. Species specificity of a monoclonal antibody produced to Naegleria fowleri and partial characterization of its antigenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Réveiller, F L; Marciano-Cabral, F; Pernin, P; Cabanes, P A; Legastelois, S

    2000-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5D12 against Naegleria fowleri was analyzed for species specificity. Mab 5D12 reacted with a ubiquitous epitope present on the membrane of N. fowleri but not with soluble antigens. The Mab did not react with N. lovaniensis, N. gruberi, N. australiensis, or Acanthamoeba castellanii. The decreased reactivity of Mab 5D12 with N. fowleri observed after periodate oxidation, after digestion of carbohydrate moieties by three glycosidases, or after treatment of amebas with tunicamycin strongly suggests that the antigenic determinant has a polysaccharide component. Inhibition of the reactivity of Mab 5D12 by soluble saccharides supports the idea that N-acetyl or amino groups may play an important role in the recognition of the carbohydrate component of the epitope by the Mab. The specificity of Mab 5D12 makes this an ideal reagent for the identification of N. fowleri in environmental samples or in clinical specimens. PMID:10952262

  3. A Murine, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Simultaneously Recognizing β-Glucan and MP65 Determinants in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Andrea; Bromuro, Carla; Mandili, Giorgia; Chiani, Paola; Horenstein, Alberto L.; Malavasi, Fabio; Cauda, Roberto; Cassone, Antonio; Torosantucci, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    There is a real medical need of new diagnostic tools for the early recognition of invasive Candida infections. We exploited a rather simple and rapid redox methodology to construct a bispecific monoclonal antibody (bsmAb) that combines a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against 1,3-β-D-glucan, a well-known, pan-fungal diagnostic biomarker, with a mAb recognizing MP65, a major immunogenic mannoprotein secreted by C.albicans and other Candida species. The bsmAb (MP65/bglu mAb) was successfully produced and purified at high yields and proved to bind and reveal simultaneously, with high sensitivity, the β-glucan and MP65 antigens in both purified and native forms. The MP65/bglu mAb is the first bispecific antibody generated against a fungal microorganism and may prove useful for the concurrent detection of different and clinically significant Candida biomarkers in patient sera. PMID:26859561

  4. Complement-Dependent Lysis of Influenza A Virus-Infected Cells by Broadly Cross-Reactive Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Cruz, John; Co, Mary Dawn T.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Kaur, Kaval; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ennis, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cloned from influenza virus-infected patients and from influenza vaccine recipients by complement-dependent lysis (CDL) assay. Most MAbs active in CDL were neutralizing, but not all neutralizing MAbs can mediate CDL. Two of the three stalk-specific neutralizing MAbs tested were able to mediate CDL and were more cross-reactive to temporally distant H1N1 strains than the conventional hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing MAbs. One of the stalk-specific MAbs was subtype cross-reactive to H1 and H2 hemagglutinins, suggesting a role for stalk-specific antibodies in protection against influenza illness, especially by a novel viral subtype which can cause pandemics. PMID:21994454

  5. A Novel Approach to Monitor Clearance of Host Cell Proteins Associated With Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Aboulaich, Nabila; Chung, Wai Keen; Thompson, Jenny Heidbrink; Larkin, Christopher; Robbins, David; Zhu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Co-purification of a subset of host cell proteins (HCPs) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during the capture of mAbs on Protein A affinity chromatography is primarily caused by interactions of HCPs with the mAbs. To date, there is limited information about the identity of those HCPs due to the difficulty in detecting low abundance HCPs in the presence of a large amount of the mAb. Here, an approach is presented that allows identification of HCPs that specifically associate with the mAb, while avoiding interference from the mAb itself. This approach involves immobilization of purified mAb onto chromatography resin via cross-linking, followed by incubation with HCPs obtained from supernatant of non-mAb producer cells that are representative of the expression systems used in mAb manufacturing. The HCPs that bind to the mAb are recovered and identified using mass spectrometry. This approach has not only allowed a comprehensive comparison of HCP subpopulations that associate with different mAbs, but also enabled monitoring of the effects of a variety of wash modifiers on the dissociation of individual HCP–mAb interactions. The dissociation of HCPs that associated with the mAb was monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and mass spectrometry. This approach can be utilized as a screening tool to assist the development of effective and targeted wash steps in Protein A chromatography that ensures not only reduction of HCP levels copurified with the mAb but also removal of specific HCPs that may have a potential impact on mAb structural stability and patient safety. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 30:1114–1124, 2014 PMID:25044920

  6. Capillary ion-exchange chromatography with nanogram sensitivity for the analysis of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rea, Jennifer C; Freistadt, Benny S; McDonald, Daniel; Farnan, Dell; Wang, Yajun Jennifer

    2015-12-11

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Despite good resolving power and robustness, ionic strength-based ion-exchange separations are generally product specific and can be time consuming to develop. In addition, conventional analytical scale ion-exchange separations require tens of micrograms of mAbs for each injection, amounts that are often unavailable in sample-limited applications. We report the development of a capillary IEC (c-IEC) methodology for the analysis of nanogram amounts of mAb charge variants. Several key modifications were made to a commercially available liquid chromatography system to perform c-IEC for charge variant analysis of mAbs with nanogram sensitivity. We demonstrate the method for multiple monoclonal antibodies, including antibody fragments, on different columns from different manufacturers. Relative standard deviations of <10% were achieved for relative peak areas of main peak, acidic and basic regions, which are common regions of interest for quantifying monoclonal antibody charge variants using IEC. The results herein demonstrate the excellent sensitivity of this c-IEC characterization method, which can be used for analyzing charge variants in sample-limited applications, such as early-stage candidate screening and in vivo studies. PMID:26596872

  7. Development and application of monoclonal antibodies for detection and analysis of aquareoviruses.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Chan; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) play an important role in detection of aquareoviruses. Three mAbs against grass carp reovirus (GCRV) were prepared. Isotyping revealed that all three mAbs were of subclass IgG2b. Western blot assay showed that all three mAbs reacted with GCRV 69 kDa protein (the putative VP5). In addition to the 69 kDa protein of GCRV, mAb 4B6 also recognize a 54 kDa protein. All three mAbs were used for detecting aquareovirus by Western blot assay and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). All of them reacted with GCRV, and mAb 4A3 could also react with turbot Scophthalmus maximus reovirus (SMReV) and largemouth bass Microptererus salmonides reovirus (MsReV). Viral antigens were only observed in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Finally, syncytia formation was observed with light microscopy and fluorescence microscopy using fluorescein labelled 4A3 mAb at various times post-infection. Syncytia were observed at 36 hr post-infection (hpi) by light microscopy and at 12 hpi by fluorescence microscopy. The immunofluorescence based assay allowed earlier detection of virus than observation of virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) assay in inoculated cell cultures. The sensitivity and specificity of these mAbs may be useful for diagnosis and monitoring of aquareoviruses. PMID:26889962

  8. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against poor immunogenic avian influenza virus proteins.

    PubMed

    He, Jie-Long; Hsieh, Ming-Shou; Chiu, Yi-Chung; Juang, Rong-Huay; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2013-01-31

    This study established a novel method of pre-screening peptides for monoclonal antibody (mAb) production. Whole virus particles were used as antigens to produce mAbs in the first stage. However, most mAbs obtained from this method were aimed toward hemagglutinin. For this reason, synthetic peptides were used as antigens for mAb production that aimed at the AIV proteins with low abundance or poor immunogenicity in the virus particle. The peptides that showed high immunogenicity were designed using bioinformatic tools for immunization. For high-throughput, a rabbit was used to screen the immunogenicities of the synthetic peptides. Those showed high immunity were used for mAb preparation in mice. Several new mAbs against PB2, PA, M1, M2, NS1 and NS2 proteins were successfully obtained in this study. Furthermore, the epitopes of M1 and NS1 mAbs were determined using competitive western blot assay and competitive ELISA. This study might simplify the mAb preparation and serves as the basis for developing mAb against poor immunogenic proteins. PMID:23022629

  9. Monoclonal antibody capture enzyme immunoassay for detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antibodies in paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Z P; Gesztesi, J L; Saraiva, E C; Taborda, C P; Vicentini, A P; Lopes, J D

    1994-01-01

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 17C, 21A, 21F, and 32B) raised against the 43-kDa glycoprotein of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were tested in a capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of specific human anti-gp43 immunoglobulin G in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). All MAbs reacted similarly in the assay. These MAbs, which detected anti-gp43 at levels of as low as 500 pg/ml, were demonstrated to specifically recognize at least two different epitopes in gp43 binding assays. Specific antibodies in the sera of patients with active PCM were detected at dilutions of as high as 1:819,200, and the reactivities of patient sera, as measured by optical densities, were found to be significantly higher than those of control sera. The comparison between classical ELISA and our capture enzyme immunoassay showed that both sensitivity and specificity were greatly improved by the latter. These MAbs represent the first specific reagents to P. brasiliensis described for use in serological tests for PCM. Images PMID:7814469

  10. Advective hydrogel membrane chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Brower, Mark; Pollard, David; Kanani, Dharmesh; Jacquemart, Renaud; Kachuik, Bradley; Stout, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is widely employed for the capture and purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because of the high cost of protein A resins, there is a significant economic driving force to seek new downstream processing strategies. Membrane chromatography has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional resin based column chromatography. However, to date, the application has been limited to mostly ion exchange flow through (FT) mode. Recently, significant advances in Natrix hydrogel membrane has resulted in increased dynamic binding capacities for proteins, which makes membrane chromatography much more attractive for bind/elute operations. The dominantly advective mass transport property of the hydrogel membrane has also enabled Natrix membrane to be run at faster volumetric flow rates with high dynamic binding capacities. In this work, the potential of using Natrix weak cation exchange membrane as a mAb capture step is assessed. A series of cycle studies was also performed in the pilot scale device (> 30 cycles) with good reproducibility in terms of yield and product purities, suggesting potential for improved manufacturing flexibility and productivity. In addition, anion exchange (AEX) hydrogel membranes were also evaluated with multiple mAb programs in FT mode. Significantly higher binding capacity for impurities (support mAb loads up to 10Kg/L) and 40X faster processing speed were observed compared with traditional AEX column chromatography. A proposed protein A free mAb purification process platform could meet the demand of a downstream purification process with high purity, yield, and throughput. PMID:26018631

  11. Monoclonal antibodies: longitudinal prescribing information analysis of hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, Konstantin; Weintraub, Debra S

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are known to cause hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs). The reactions pose a significant challenge to investigators, regulators, and health providers. Because HSRs cannot be predicted through the pharmacological basis of a therapy, clinical data are often relied upon to detect the reactions. Unfortunately, clinical studies are often unable to adequately characterize HSRs especially in therapies for orphan diseases. HSRs can go undetected until post-marketing safety surveillance when a large number of patients have been exposed to the therapy. The presented data demonstrates how hypersensitivity reaction warnings have changed over time in the prescribing information (PI), i.e., the drug package insert, through August 1, 2011 for 28 US-marketed mAbs. Tracking all PI revisions for each mAb over time revealed that hypersensitivity warning statements were expanded to include more severe manifestations. Over the course of a mAb therapy's life cycle, the hypersensitivity warning is twice more likely to be upgraded than downgraded in priority. Approximately 85% of hypersensitivity-associated fatality warnings were added in PI revisions as a result of post-marketing experience. Over 60% (20/33) of revisions to hypersensitivity warnings occurred within 3-4 y of product approval. While HSRs are generally recognized and described in the initial PI of mAbs, fatal HSRs are most commonly observed in post-marketing surveillance. Results of this study suggest that initial product labeling information may not describe rare but clinically significant occurrences of severe or fatal HSRs, but subsequent label revisions include rare events observed during post-marketed product use. PMID:22531444

  12. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  13. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  14. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    PubMed Central

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  15. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  16. Validation and comparison of anti-αvβ3 and anti-αvβ5 rabbit monoclonal versus murine monoclonal antibodies in four different tumor entities.

    PubMed

    Böger, Christine; Kalthoff, Holger; Goodman, Simon L; Röcken, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Integrins are pivotal in cancer biology and are putative candidates for cancer therapy. The investigation of integrins has been hampered by the lack of antibodies suitable for formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. Here, we validated monoclonal rabbit antibodies (RabMAbs) against integrins αvβ3 (EM22703) and αvβ5 (EM09902) with murine monoclonal antibodies (MuMabs) LM609 (against αvβ3) and P1F6 (against αvβ5), in immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was performed on sections of matching unfixed, cryoconserved (CC) and FFPE tissue from 19 colorectal, 20 lung, 17 breast, and 9 ovarian carcinomas. Sections were stained with LM609 and P1F6 and compared with the immunoreactions of the RabMAbs. The degree of concordance was assigned for staining patterns and intensity. Concordance between MuMAbs and RabMAbs ranged from weak, for anti-αvβ5 antibodies, to nearly complete for anti-αvβ3 antibodies. We confirmed that MuMAbs LM609 and P1F6 bound very weakly in FFPE tissue and no staining was seen. By contrast, RabMAbs EM22703 and EM09902 generally showed a high degree of agreement in staining patterns of CC and FFPE tissue. In summary, the RabMAbs had overlapping staining patterns that were generally more intense for CC when compared with FFPE material. This study suggests that EM22703 and EM09902 staining closely matches the staining of standard MuMAbs and also does so in archival FFPE tissue. PMID:23455183

  17. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  18. Characterization of a new monoclonal antibody against mercury (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, A.; Hock, B.

    1998-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mabs) were produced against mercury (II) and an enzyme immunoassay was developed for the detection of mercury (II) in water. Since mercury (II) ions are too small to elicit an immune response, they were coupled via glutathione (GSH) to the immunogenic carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Several mice were immunized with this KLH-GSH-Hg immunoconjugate. Spleen cells of immunized mice were fused with myeloma cells. The resulting hybridoma cells were screened for the production of specific anti-Hg mabs. Five positive cells were detected. The hybridoma cell line K3C6 was adjusted to protein free medium; it produced mabs with high selectivity and sensitivity. A detection limit of 2.8 {micro}g/L HgCl{sub 2} (= 2.1 {micro}g/L Hg{sup 2+}) was achieved with a non-competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Cross-reactivities with other metals were below 1%. Measurement of spiked water samples with this EIA showed good correlation with results obtained by mass spectrometry with inductive coupled plasma (ICP-MS).

  19. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis. PMID:25283551

  20. Isolation of HIV-1-Neutralizing Mucosal Monoclonal Antibodies from Human Colostrum

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, James; Alam, S. Munir; Shen, Xiaoying; Xia, Shi-Mao; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Pollara, Justin; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Yang, Guang; Kelsoe, Garnett; Ferrari, Guido; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Generation of potent anti-HIV antibody responses in mucosal compartments is a potential requirement of a transmission-blocking HIV vaccine. HIV-specific, functional antibody responses are present in breast milk, and these mucosal antibody responses may play a role in protection of the majority of HIV-exposed, breastfeeding infants. Therefore, characterization of HIV-specific antibodies produced by B cells in milk could guide the development of vaccines that elicit protective mucosal antibody responses. Methods We isolated B cells from colostrum of an HIV-infected lactating woman with a detectable neutralization response in milk and recombinantly produced and characterized the resulting HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Results The identified HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum mAbs, CH07 and CH08, represent two of the first mucosally-derived anti-HIV antibodies yet to be reported. Colostrum mAb CH07 is a highly-autoreactive, weakly-neutralizing gp140-specific mAb that binds to linear epitopes in the gp120 C5 region and gp41 fusion domain. In contrast, colostrum mAb CH08 is a nonpolyreactive CD4-inducible (CD4i) gp120-specific mAb with moderate breadth of neutralization. Conclusions These novel HIV-neutralizing mAbs isolated from a mucosal compartment provide insight into the ability of mucosal B cell populations to produce functional anti-HIV antibodies that may contribute to protection against virus acquisition at mucosal surfaces. PMID:22624058

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against Conserved Epitopes on the Nucleocapsid Protein and the Major Envelope Glycoprotein of Equine Arteritis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Emilie; Bolz, Sylvia; Weiland, Frank; Herbst, Werner; Raamsman, Martin J. B.; Rottier, Peter J. M.; De Vries, Antoine A. F.

    2000-01-01

    We recently developed a highly effective immunization procedure for the generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (E. Weiland, M. Wieczorek-Krohmer, D. Kohl, K. K. Conzelmann, and F. Weiland, Vet. Microbiol. 66:171–186, 1999). The same method was used to produce a panel of 16 MAbs specific for the equine arteritis virus (EAV). Ten MAbs were directed against the EAV nucleocapsid (N) protein, and five MAbs recognized the major viral envelope glycoprotein (GL). Two of the EAV GL-specific MAbs and one antibody of unknown specificity neutralized virus infectivity. A comparison of the reactivities of the MAbs with 1 U.S. and 22 newly obtained European field isolates of EAV demonstrated that all N-specific MAbs, the three nonneutralizing anti-GL MAbs, and the weakest neutralizing MAb (MAb E7/d15-c9) recognized conserved epitopes. In contrast, the two MAbs with the highest neutralization titers bound to 17 of 23 (MAb E6/A3) and 10 of 23 (MAb E7/d15-c1) of the field isolates. Ten of the virus isolates reacted with only one of these two MAbs, indicating that they recognized different epitopes. The GL-specific MAbs and the strongly neutralizing MAb of unknown specificity (MAb E6/A3) were used for the selection of neutralization-resistant (NR) virus variants. The observation that the E6/A3-specific NR virus variants were neutralized by MAb E7/d15-c1 and that MAb E6/A3 blocked the infectivity of the E7/d15-c1-specific NR escape mutant confirmed that these antibodies reacted with distinct antigenic sites. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed for the first time that the antigenic determinants recognized by the anti-GL MAbs were localized on the virion surface. Surprisingly, although the immunofluorescence signal obtained with the neutralizing antibodies was relatively weak, they mediated binding of about three times as much gold granules to the viral envelope than the nonneutralizing anti-GL MAbs. PMID

  2. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Shiga-like toxin from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Strockbine, N A; Marques, L R; Holmes, R K; O'Brien, A D

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies, designated MAb 16E6, MAb 13C4, and MAb 19G8, were produced which recognize Shiga-like toxin (SLT) from Escherichia coli. All three monoclonal antibodies neutralized the cytotoxicity of E. coli SLT and were able to immunoprecipitate intact labeled toxin with Staphylococcus aureus protein A. The three antibodies were of the G1 heavy and kappa light chain classes. MAb 16E6 bound to the B subunit of SLT in Western blots and also neutralized the lethality of the toxin for mice and the enterotoxicity of the toxin in ligate rabbit ileal loops. The ability of MAb 16E6 to neutralize the cytotoxicity, lethality, and enterotoxicity of E. coli confirms the hypothesis that all three activities are associated with a single toxin. MAb 16E6 and MAb 13C4 also neutralized the cytotoxicity of purified Shiga toxin from Shigella dysenteriae type 1 and Shiga-like toxic activities in crude cell extracts from Shigella flexneri, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, Shiga toxin and the SLTs from E. coli, Shigella flexneri, V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and Salmonella typhimurium share a common B subunit epitope that is involved in neutralization. MAb 13C4 has been successfully used in a colony blot assay for the detection of bacterial colonies which produce high levels of SLT. Sixty-two different strains of bacteria were tested by both the cytotoxicity and colony blot assays for the presence of SLT. The colony blot assay detected all strains of bacteria which produce greater than or equal to 10(5) 50% cytotoxic doses of SLT per ml of sonic lysate. There were no false-positive results among the 62 samples tested. Images PMID:3905611

  3. Structural Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody-Maytansinoid Immunoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Luo, Quanzhou; Chung, Hyo Helen; Borths, Christopher; Janson, Matthew; Wen, Jie; Joubert, Marisa K; Wypych, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Structural characterization was performed on an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), composed of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), mertansine drug (DM1), and a noncleavable linker. The DM1 molecules were conjugated through nonspecific modification of the mAb at solvent-exposed lysine residues. Due to the nature of the lysine conjugation process, the ADC molecules are heterogeneous, containing a range of species that differ with respect to the number of DM1 per antibody molecule. The DM1 distribution profile of the ADC was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF), which showed that 0-8 DM1s were conjugated to an antibody molecule. By taking advantage of the high-quality MS/MS spectra and the accurate mass detection of diagnostic DM1 fragment ions generated from the higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) approach, we were able to identify 76 conjugation sites in the ADC, which covered approximately 83% of all the putative conjugation sites. The diagnostic DM1 fragment ions discovered in this study can be readily used for the characterization of other ADCs with maytansinoid derivatives as payload. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis of the ADC indicated that the conjugation of DM1 destabilized the C(H)2 domain of the molecule, which is likely due to conjugation of DM1 on lysine residues in the C(H)2 domain. As a result, methionine at position 258 of the heavy chain, which is located in the C(H)2 domain of the antibody, is more susceptible to oxidation in thermally stressed ADC samples when compared to that of the naked antibody. PMID:26629796

  4. Parallel detection of Na,K-ATPase alpha subunit isoforms by pan-specific monoclonal mAb 9A7.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y; Dubel, S J; Pacioaiou, M L; Omori, A; Ito, T; Copeland, T D; Takahashi, M; McEnery, M W

    1997-08-01

    While emphasis has been placed upon those proteins which either mediate or respond to the rapid influx of calcium following depolarization, there has been little emphasis upon those proteins which aid in the reequilibration of the membrane potential. In an effort to identify presynaptic membrane proteins implicated in neurosecretion, monoclonal antibodies were screened against proteins which cosegregated with neuronal voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) following immunoprecipitation. One monoclonal antibody (mAb 9A7) identified a 110-kDa protein. Micropeptide sequencing of (i) the mAb 9A7 immunoaffinity purified antigen and (ii) the 110-kDa protein present in the neuronal (N-type) VDCC preparation (McEnery et al., 1991, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 88, 11095-11099) indicated identity with the alpha subunit(s) of the Na,K-ATPase. Further characterization by Western blotting, immunochemical localization, and immunoaffinity purification indicated that mAb 9A7 not only recognized the alpha3 isoform which is predominant in neuronal tissues but also identified the alpha1 and alpha2 isoforms. mAb 9A7 exhibited a wide cross-species reactivity and recognized human, rat, and mouse alpha subunit isoforms at an internal epitope. The pan-specificity of mAb 9A7 and the differential mobility of the alpha1 isoform relative to the alpha2 and alpha3 permitted parallel detection of multiple alpha isoforms. Western blot analysis of undifferentiated rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) and human neuroblastoma (IMR32) cells indicated coexpression of the alpha1 and alpha3 isozymes. Upon differentiation of IMR32 cells by dibutrylyl-cAMP, a substantial increase in the alpha3 relative to the alpha1 isoform was observed. While the enrichment of total Na,K-ATPase may reflect the increased demand for ATP-dependent ion transport as IMR32 cells become more excitable, the specific increase in the alpha3 isoform suggests a unique role of this isoform during IMR32 cell differentiation. PMID

  5. High-throughput identification of monoclonal antibodies after compounding by UV spectroscopy coupled to chemometrics analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaccoulet, Emmanuel; Boccard, Julien; Taverna, Myriam; Azevedos, Andrea Santos; Rudaz, Serge; Smadja, Claire

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) compounded into the hospital pharmacy are widely used nowadays. Their fast identification after compounding and just before administration to the patient is of paramount importance for quality control at the hospital. This remains challenging due to the high similarity of the structure between mAbs. Analysis of the ultraviolet spectral data of four monoclonal antibodies (cetuximab, rituximab, bevacizumab, and trastuzumab) using unsupervised principal component analysis led us to focus exclusively on the second-derivative spectra. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) applied to these data allowed us to build models for predicting which monoclonal antibody was present in a given infusion bag. The calibration of the models was obtained from a k-fold validation. A prediction set from another batch was used to demonstrate the ability of the models to predict well. PLS-DA models performed on the spectra of the region of aromatic amino acid residues presented high ability to predict mAb identity. The region corresponding to the tyrosine residue reached the highest score of good classification with 89 %. To improve the score, standard normal variate (SNV) preprocessing was applied to the spectral data. The quality of the optimized PLS-DA models was enhanced and the region from the tyrosine/tryptophan residues allowed us excellent classification (100 %) of the four mAbs according to the matrix of confusion. The sensitivity and specificity performance parameters assessed this excellent classification. The usefulness of the combination of UV second-derivative spectroscopy to multivariate analysis with SNV preprocessing demonstrated the unambiguous identification of commercially available monoclonal antibodies. Graphical abstract PLS-DA models on the spectra of the region of aromatic amino acid residues allows mAb identification with high prediction. PMID:27334717

  6. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for multiple myeloma: an update and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Yi, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) still remains incurable in most of the patients. Despite of treatments with high-dose chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and other novel therapies, most patients will become refractory to the therapies and relapse. Thus, it is urgent to develop new approaches for MM treatment. Currently, antibody-targeted therapy has been extensively utilized in hematological malignancies, including MM. Several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MM have been generated and developed over the past several years. These mAbs aim to target not only tumor cells alone but also tumor microenvironment, including interaction of tumor-bone marrow stromal cells and the components of bone marrow milieu, such as cytokines or chemokines that support myeloma cell growth and survival. These include mAbs specific for CD38, CS1, CD40, CD74, CD70, HM1.24, interleukin-6 and β2-microglobulin (β2M). We have shown that anti-β2M mAbs may be a potential antitumor agent for MM therapy due to their remarkable efficacy to induce myeloma cell apoptosis in tumor cell lines and primary myeloma cells from patients in vitro and in established myeloma mouse models. In this article, we will review advances in the development and mechanisms of MM-targeted mAbs and especially, anti-β2M mAbs. We will also discuss the potential application of the mAbs as therapeutic agents to treat MM. PMID:22065141

  7. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  8. [Current situations and the future prospect of monoclonal antibody products].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody products and monoclonal antibody-based biopharmaceuticals have shown considerable effectiveness in the treatment for variety of diseases; cancer, auto-immune/auto-inflammation diseases and so on. Significant advance in monoclonal antibody products for cancer treatments was made with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), and antibodies for blockade of immune checkpoints. Already 3 ADCs and 2 anti-immune-checkpoint antibodies products have been approved, and these monoclonal antibody-related product pipelines reach over 30. On the other hand, EU approved first monoclonal-antibody biosimilar, RemsimaTM (infliximab), suggesting that other monoclonal-antibody biosmilars will follow to the market. In this paper, several new issues about monoclonal antibody products will be discussed. PMID:25707201

  9. Endotoxin reduction in monoclonal antibody preparations using arginine.

    PubMed

    Ritzén, Ulrika; Rotticci-Mulder, Joke; Strömberg, Patrik; Schmidt, Stefan R

    2007-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody preparation was found to be contaminated with endotoxin. Several commercial endotoxin removal steps were attempted but failed to produce a significant reduction due to the fact that the endotoxin was associated with the antibody. Here, several methods for endotoxin removal based on immobilizing monoclonal antibodies to chromatographic media have been evaluated. A crucial step in this process was to dissociate the endotoxin from the protein surface for subsequent removal. This was accomplished by introducing different buffer additives in the mobile phase. In agreement with previous reports, non-ionic detergents efficiently removed endotoxin, but it was also found that 0.5M arginine performed equally well. Since arginine is a non-toxic common amino acid that can be readily removed, it was selected and successfully used in large-scale experiments. With this method, endotoxin could be reduced to <0.2 EU mg(-1) with recovery of the target protein being >95%. Since this procedure is easily integrated into the existing processes of mAb purification, it offers advantages in speed, cost and effort. PMID:17644450

  10. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies to West Nile Virus and Their Application in Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Jiro; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Isobe, Takashi; Yamada, Manabu; Tanimura, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is endemic throughout Africa, Eurasia, America, and Australia and has important implications for avian, horse, and human health. In these regions, dead birds are monitored for the presence of WNV through immunohistochemistry (IHC) and PCR. However, a number of the tools for IHC are inadequate owing to their cross-reactivity to other Japanese encephalitis serogroup viruses. Here we have established eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to WNV. Four of them bound to the envelope protein, three of them bound to nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), and one bound to precursor membrane protein (prM), as shown by Western blot analysis. The anti-NS1 MAbs and the anti-prM MAb did not cross-react with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), Murray valley encephalitis virus, or St. Louis encephalitis virus in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One NS1-specific MAb, SHW-32B1, and the previously reported NS1-specific MAb, SHW-7A11, were shown by IHC to specifically detect the cytoplasm of degenerated cells in the heart and brain of a WNV-infected goose. Neither of these MAbs were shown by IHC to cross-react with degenerated cells in the brain of a JEV-infected pig. These MAbs are the first reported anti-NS1 MAbs that can be used for WNV-specific IHC using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. They may be useful for WNV research and surveillance. PMID:22993408

  11. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    PubMed

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades. PMID:15640788

  12. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete “hot spots” with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  13. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete "hot spots" with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  14. Ontogenesis of coelomocytes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) studied with probes of monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Qi, Rui-rong; Wang, Yi-nan; Qiao, Guo; Ye, Shi-gen; Li, Hua

    2014-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specifically against coelomocytes of Apostichopus japonicus were employed to study the ontogenesis of coelomocytes by indirect immunofluorescence assay technique (IIFAT). Different developmental stages were identified by histochemical staining method. Stages including blastula, gastrula, auricularia (small-auricular larvae, mid-auricular larvae and big-auricular larvae), doliolaria, pentactula and juvenile were examined. The positive reactions with both MAb1C2 against all the types of coelomocytes and MAb3F6 specific to spherulocytes, were observed firstly at the blastula stage of the embryos. The positive reaction with MAb1E2 against lymphoid cells was observed from the big-auricular larvae, which indicated that lymphoid cells may not be progenitor cells or stem cells for A. japonicus. An increase of fluorescence intensity for each cell may imply a possible enhancement of the innate defensive mechanism as the embryogenesis progress. PMID:25218682

  15. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against the Nucleoprotein of Heartland Virus.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-12-01

    Heartland virus (HRTV), a phlebovirus first isolated from two Missouri farmers in 2009, has been proposed to be transmitted to humans by the bite of infected Amblyomma americanum ticks. It is closely related to severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) from China, another previously unrecognized phlebovirus that has subsequently been associated with hundreds of cases of severe disease in humans. To expand diagnostic capacity to detect HRTV infections, 20 hybridoma clones secreting anti-HRTV murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed using splenocytes from HRTV-inoculated AG129 alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptor-deficient mice. Nine of these MAbs were characterized herein for inclusion in future HRTV diagnostic assay development. All of the MAbs developed were found to be non-neutralizing and reactive to linear epitopes on HRTV nucleocapsid protein. MAb 2AF11 was found to be cross-reactive with SFTSV. PMID:26503274

  16. New frontiers in oncology: biosimilar monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thill, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Trastuzumab is a highly successful monoclonal antibody (mAb) that has been used primarily for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Because of its success and its impending patent expiry in Europe in 2014, a number of copy versions of trastuzumab have been developed and are currently undergoing a comparability exercise for marketing authorization. Although biosimilar products have been approved in Europe since 2006, including two biosimilar mAbs of infliximab approved in 2013, the use of mAbs such as trastuzumab in the cancer setting has raised a number of new concerns. The requirements for the approval of biosimilar mAbs published by the EMA will be discussed and examined in the context of trastuzumab biosimilars to highlight potential controversies. PMID:25539719

  17. Rapid quantitation of monoclonal antibody N-glyco-occupancy and afucosylation using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suli; Zang, Li

    2016-09-15

    N-glyco-occupancy and afucoslyation level are two important quality attributes associated with N-glycosylation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We report here a fast mass spectrometry-based workflow for quantification of N-glycan site-occupancy and afucoslyation level of mAbs with improved throughput, precision, sensitivity and robustness. This method uses the deglycosylation after the first GlcNAc and inter-chain reduction of the mAbs, followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The entire process can be completed within one hour, which provides a rapid quantitation of N-glyco-occupancy and afucosylation to support high-throughput cell line selection and process development for mAb biopharmaceuticals. PMID:27377969

  18. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  19. Protective efficacy of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in a nonhuman primate model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Ishijima, Mari; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Megumi; Matsuyama, Yukie; Igarashi, Manabu; Nakayama, Eri; Kuroda, Makoto; Saijo, Masayuki; Feldmann, Friederike; Brining, Douglas; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2012-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is the causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever in primates, with human case fatality rates up to 90%. Today, there is neither a licensed vaccine nor a treatment available for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF). Single monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) have been successfully used in passive immunization experiments in rodent models, but have failed to protect nonhuman primates from lethal disease. In this study, we used two clones of human-mouse chimeric MAbs (ch133 and ch226) with strong neutralizing activity against ZEBOV and evaluated their protective potential in a rhesus macaque model of EHF. Reduced viral loads and partial protection were observed in animals given MAbs ch133 and ch226 combined intravenously at 24 hours before and 24 and 72 hours after challenge. MAbs circulated in the blood of a surviving animal until virus-induced IgG responses were detected. In contrast, serum MAb concentrations decreased to undetectable levels at terminal stages of disease in animals that succumbed to infection, indicating substantial consumption of these antibodies due to virus replication. Accordingly, the rapid decrease of serum MAbs was clearly associated with increased viremia in non-survivors. Our results indicate that EBOV neutralizing antibodies, particularly in combination with other therapeutic strategies, might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and prolonging disease progression during EHF. PMID:22558378

  20. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based sandwich ELISA for peanut allergen Ara h 1 in food.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Song, Shanshan; Xu, Liguang; Ma, Wei; Liu, Liqiang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-07-01

    We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara h 1-specific antibody. Using mAb 6 as the capture antibody and HRP-labelled mAb 4 as the detection antibody, the limit of detection (LOD) the assay was 0.34 ng/mL. Cross-reaction analysis showed that this method was strongly specific and had no cross-reactions with Ara h 2, pea protein or soy protein. Sample analysis showed that this ELISA was a useful tool to monitor peanut allergens in food products by measuring Ara h 1 content. PMID:23880725

  1. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich ELISA for Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 in Food

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Song, Shanshan; Xu, Liguang; Ma, Wei; Liu, Liqiang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara h 1-specific antibody. Using mAb 6 as the capture antibody and HRP-labelled mAb 4 as the detection antibody, the limit of detection (LOD) the assay was 0.34 ng/mL. Cross-reaction analysis showed that this method was strongly specific and had no cross-reactions with Ara h 2, pea protein or soy protein. Sample analysis showed that this ELISA was a useful tool to monitor peanut allergens in food products by measuring Ara h 1 content. PMID:23880725

  2. Safe handling and administration of MABS: the guidance.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Donna

    2015-09-01

    While monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are not as hazardous as cytotoxic drugs, there is concern among health professionals about the potential risks and the limited evidence about this. Guidance on the safe use of MABs is mainly to be found in national documents covering all systemic anti-cancer therapies, with the only consensus guidelines specifically on MABs coming from Australia. This article therefore summarises the existing guidance relating to MABs. PMID:26946647

  3. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, April 15, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  4. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  5. Immunotherapy of cancer: from monoclonal to oligoclonal cocktails of anti-cancer antibodies: IUPHAR Review 18.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Silvia; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2016-05-01

    Antibody-based therapy of cancer employs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to soluble ligands, membrane antigens of T-lymphocytes or proteins located at the surface of cancer cells. The latter mAbs are often combined with cytotoxic regimens, because they block survival of residual fractions of tumours that evade therapy-induced cell death. Antibodies, along with kinase inhibitors, have become in the last decade the mainstay of oncological pharmacology. However, partial and transient responses, as well as emergence of tumour resistance, currently limit clinical application of mAbs. To overcome these hurdles, oligoclonal antibody mixtures are being tested in animal models and in clinical trials. The first homo-combination of two mAbs, each engaging a distinct site of HER2, an oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), has been approved for treatment of breast cancer. Likewise, a hetero-combination of antibodies to two distinct T-cell antigens, PD1 and CTLA4, has been approved for treatment of melanoma. In a similar vein, additive or synergistic anti-tumour effects observed in animal models have prompted clinical testing of hetero-combinations of antibodies simultaneously engaging distinct RTKs. We discuss the promise of antibody cocktails reminiscent of currently used mixtures of chemotherapeutics and highlight mechanisms potentially underlying their enhanced clinical efficacy. PMID:26833433

  6. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Shivangi M.; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  7. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shivangi M; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  8. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis. PMID:22247145

  9. Production of monoclonal antibodies specific for Haemophilus ducreyi: a screening method to discriminate specific and cross-reacting antibodies.

    PubMed

    Odumeru, J A; Alfa, M J; Martin, C F; Ronald, A R; Jay, F T

    1989-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiological agent of chancroid. The organism shares extensive immunological cross-reactivity with other Haemophilus species. This presents substantial difficulties for the production of specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A competition ELISA was devised for hybridoma screening which allowed the detection of H. ducreyi-specific antibody-producing hybridoma cultures during the initial screening process. With this screening method, seven MAbs specific for H. ducreyi were obtained in a single cell fusion exercise. The specificities of the 7 MAbs were demonstrated by direct ELISA and dot immunobinding assays against several strains each of H. influenzae, H. parainfluenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Five of the MAbs reacted against all ten strains of H. ducreyi. These MAbs may permit the development of rapid and efficient immunodiagnostics for chancroid. The principle of the competition ELISA for hybridoma screening should be widely applicable to the development of specific MAbs to other organisms in which immunological cross-reactivity is an impediment to hybridoma screening by conventional methods. PMID:2787274

  10. A novel 95-kilodalton antigen of Wuchereria bancrofti infective larvae identified by species-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Burkot, T R; Kwan-Lim, G E; Maizels, R M

    1996-01-01

    CBA and BALB/c mice produced polyspecific and monospecific polyclonal antibody responses, respectively, following immunization with Wuchereria bancrofti stage-3 larvae. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced from the immunized BALB/c mouse. These MAbs (both isotype M) recognized a previously undescribed highly expressed W. bancrofti antigen present in stage-3 larvae. The epitopes bound by the MAbs appear to be species specific for W. bancrofti since the MAbs did not bind to antigens of either nine other nematode species or two vector species in Western blots (immunoblots). Phosphorylcholine epitopes, responsible for immunological cross-reactivity among nematodes, were identified only on a 200-kDa antigen and not on the 95-kDa molecule. The targets of these immunoglobulin M MAbs are not carbohydrate epitopes. PMID:8550196

  11. Preparation and characterization of a new monoclonal antibody against CXCR4 using lentivirus vector.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyi; Kuang, Yu; Huang, Xiaojun; Zou, Linlin; Huang, Liuye; Yang, Ting; Li, Wanyi; Yang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    CXCR4 is a member of chemokine receptors and plays a vital role in numerous diseases and cancer processes, which makes the CXCR4/CXCL12 chemotactic axis a potential therapeutic target. In this study, we used lentiviral vectors as a novel technology to produce a monoclonal antibody against CXCR4. Lentivirus vector pLV-CXCR4-Puro was successfully constructed and a hybridoma cell line 1A4 was generated. The CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1A4 had high titer and affinity, and the isotype was identified as IgG1a. The recombinant lentivirus vector could effectively stimulate the production of 39kDa CXCR4 antibody in vivo after immunization. Western blot analysis showed that the MAb could recognize the CXCR4 antigen expressed on transfected 293T cells as well as various human cancer cell lines. Immunofluorescence assays showed that MAb 1A4 mainly localized and strongly stained on the membrane of transfected 293T cells. Immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that 1A4 could recognize strong expression of CXCR4 on the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thus, the method using lentiviral vectors may have application on effective and large-scale production of the CXCR4 monoclonal antibody, which will be a potential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. PMID:27124560

  12. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  13. Host cell protein impurities in chromatographic polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicholas E; Valente, Kristin N; Lee, Kelvin H; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-06-01

    Downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is normally performed using a platform process that is empirically tuned to optimize impurity removal for each new product. A more fundamental understanding of impurities and the product itself would provide insights into the rational design of efficient downstream processes. This work examines the chromatographic properties of Chinese hamster ovary host cell protein (HCP) impurities in non-affinity chromatographic resins commonly used in polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification: ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and multimodal. Using proteomic analysis, the specific HCP impurities that elute close to mAb products are identified for these resins at typical downstream processing conditions. Additionally, the interactions of HCP impurities with mAb products are profiled to determine the total extent of product association and the specific HCP species that form associative complexes under conditions encountered in polishing columns. Product association and co-elution were both identified as viable mechanisms of HCP retention for the non-affinity resins tested here. A relatively large sub-population of HCP impurities was found to co-elute or associate with mAbs in each polishing column, but only a small population of HCPs-including lipoprotein lipase, chrondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, nidogen-1, and SPARC-were identified as difficult to remove across an entire downstream mAb process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1260-1272. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26550778

  14. Monoclonal Antibody to Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Antigen 2 Protein of Swine.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ning; Meng, Qiong; Wu, Yongguang; Wang, Zhongze; Zuo, Yewen; Tong, Wu; Zheng, Hao; Li, Guoxin; Yang, Shen; Yu, Hai; Shan, Tongling; Zhou, En-Min; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-06-01

    The bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2) protein was identified as a novel virus restriction factor that potently restricts the replication and egress of enveloped viruses. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against porcine BST-2 encoding 34-112 aa of porcine BST-2, which was cloned and inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pCold-I to construct a recombinant plasmid pCold-pBST-2. The recombinant porcine BST-2 protein (rpBST-2 protein) was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Then, BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified rpBST-2 protein to prepare MAbs of BST-2. After subcloning, one strain of hybridoma cells named 1B2 secreting porcine BST-2 protein monoclonal antibody (MAb) was obtained. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the MAb was specifically reacted with the overexpressed porcine BST-2 protein in Vero cells. The specific MAb of porcine BST-2 provides a valuable tool for further studies of BST-2 to restrict virus infection. PMID:27148642

  15. Mechanistic Study of Broadly Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Dengue Virus That Target the Fusion Loop

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M.; Zaitseva, Elena; Kahle, Kristen M.; Nicholson, Cindo O.; Rowe, Dawne K.; Graham, Amanda S.; Bazzone, Lindsey E.; Hogancamp, Greg; Figueroa Sierra, Marielys; Fong, Rachel H.; Yang, Sung-Tae; Lin, Li; Robinson, James E.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Michael, Scott F.; Schieffelin, John S.

    2013-01-01

    There are no available vaccines for dengue, the most important mosquito-transmitted viral disease. Mechanistic studies with anti-dengue virus (DENV) human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) provide a rational approach to identify and characterize neutralizing epitopes on DENV structural proteins that can serve to inform vaccine strategies. Here, we report a class of hMAbs that is likely to be an important determinant in the human humoral response to DENV infection. In this study, we identified and characterized three broadly neutralizing anti-DENV hMAbs: 4.8A, D11C, and 1.6D. These antibodies were isolated from three different convalescent patients with distinct histories of DENV infection yet demonstrated remarkable similarities. All three hMAbs recognized the E glycoprotein with high affinity, neutralized all four serotypes of DENV, and mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in Fc receptor-bearing cells at subneutralizing concentrations. The neutralization activities of these hMAbs correlated with a strong inhibition of virus-liposome and intracellular fusion, not virus-cell binding. We mapped epitopes of these antibodies to the highly conserved fusion loop region of E domain II. Mutations at fusion loop residues W101, L107, and/or G109 significantly reduced the binding of the hMAbs to E protein. The results show that hMAbs directed against the highly conserved E protein fusion loop block viral entry downstream of virus-cell binding by inhibiting E protein-mediated fusion. Characterization of hMAbs targeting this region may provide new insights into DENV vaccine and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23077306

  16. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the ribosome inactivating proteins dianthin32 and momochin.

    PubMed

    Porro, G; Bonardi, M A; Giovanetti, E; Lento, P; Modena, D

    1994-04-01

    Female BALB/c mice were immunized with either dianthin32 or momochin, type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) derived from Dianthus charyophyllus and Momordica cochinchinensis, respectively. Five anti-dianthin32 and 6 anti-momochin secreting hybridomas were obtained by somatic fusion of lymphocytes with myeloma cell line NS0. The monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced were highly specific, as demonstrated by cross-reactivity assays performed with taxonomically related and unrelated type 1 RIPs, and recognized different epitopes of the antigen. The affinity constant of anti-RIPs MAbs ranged between 10(8) M-1 and 10(10) M-1. PMID:7519581

  17. How does mild hypothermia affect monoclonal antibody glycosylation?

    PubMed

    Sou, Si Nga; Sellick, Christopher; Lee, Ken; Mason, Alison; Kyriakopoulos, Sarantos; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-06-01

    The application of mild hypothermic conditions to cell culture is a routine industrial practice used to improve recombinant protein production. However, a thorough understanding of the regulation of dynamic cellular processes at lower temperatures is necessary to enhance bioprocess design and optimization. In this study, we investigated the impact of mild hypothermia on protein glycosylation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were cultured at 36.5°C and with a temperature shift to 32°C during late exponential/early stationary phase. Experimental results showed higher cell viability with decreased metabolic rates. The specific antibody productivity increased by 25% at 32°C and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular nucleotide sugar donor (NSD) concentrations and a decreased proportion of the more processed glycan structures on the mAb constant region. To better understand CHO cell metabolism at 32°C, flux balance analysis (FBA) was carried out and constrained with exometabolite data from stationary phase of cultures with or without a temperature shift. Estimated fluxomes suggested reduced fluxes of carbon species towards nucleotide and NSD synthesis and more energy was used for product formation. Expression of the glycosyltransferases that are responsible for N-linked glycan branching and elongation were significantly lower at 32°C. As a result of mild hypothermia, mAb glycosylation was shown to be affected by both NSD availability and glycosyltransferase expression. The combined experimental/FBA approach generated insight as to how product glycosylation can be impacted by changes in culture temperature. Better feeding strategies can be developed based on the understanding of the metabolic flux distribution. PMID:25545631

  18. Production of monoclonal antibodies against GPCR using cell-free synthesized GPCR antigen and biotinylated liposome-based interaction assay

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Tomio; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Jih, Pei-Ju; Morishita, Ryo; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most important drug targets, and anti-GPCR monoclonal antibody (mAb) is an essential tool for functional analysis of GPCRs. However, it is very difficult to develop GPCR-specific mAbs due to difficulties in production of recombinant GPCR antigens, and lack of efficient mAb screening method. Here we describe a novel approach for the production of mAbs against GPCR using two original methods, bilayer-dialysis method and biotinylated liposome-based interaction assay (BiLIA), both of which are developed using wheat cell-free protein synthesis system and liposome technology. Using bilayer-dialysis method, various GPCRs were successfully synthesized with quality and quantity sufficient for immunization. For selection of specific mAb, we designed BiLIA that detects interaction between antibody and membrane protein on liposome. BiLIA prevented denaturation of GPCR, and then preferably selected conformation-sensitive antibodies. Using this approach, we successfully obtained mAbs against DRD1, GHSR, PTGER1 and T1R1. With respect to DRD1 mAb, 36 mouse mAbs and 6 rabbit mAbs were obtained which specifically recognized native DRD1 with high affinity. Among them, half of the mAbs were conformation-sensitive mAb, and two mAbs recognized extracellular loop 2 of DRD1. These results indicated that this approach is useful for GPCR mAb production. PMID:26061673

  19. Production of monoclonal antibodies against GPCR using cell-free synthesized GPCR antigen and biotinylated liposome-based interaction assay.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Tomio; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Jih, Pei-Ju; Morishita, Ryo; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most important drug targets, and anti-GPCR monoclonal antibody (mAb) is an essential tool for functional analysis of GPCRs. However, it is very difficult to develop GPCR-specific mAbs due to difficulties in production of recombinant GPCR antigens, and lack of efficient mAb screening method. Here we describe a novel approach for the production of mAbs against GPCR using two original methods, bilayer-dialysis method and biotinylated liposome-based interaction assay (BiLIA), both of which are developed using wheat cell-free protein synthesis system and liposome technology. Using bilayer-dialysis method, various GPCRs were successfully synthesized with quality and quantity sufficient for immunization. For selection of specific mAb, we designed BiLIA that detects interaction between antibody and membrane protein on liposome. BiLIA prevented denaturation of GPCR, and then preferably selected conformation-sensitive antibodies. Using this approach, we successfully obtained mAbs against DRD1, GHSR, PTGER1 and T1R1. With respect to DRD1 mAb, 36 mouse mAbs and 6 rabbit mAbs were obtained which specifically recognized native DRD1 with high affinity. Among them, half of the mAbs were conformation-sensitive mAb, and two mAbs recognized extracellular loop 2 of DRD1. These results indicated that this approach is useful for GPCR mAb production. PMID:26061673

  20. 3AE8: monoclonal antibody defining inflammatory macrophages in three species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Yen, S E; Walker, W S

    1984-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb 3AE8) of the IgG1 isotype was prepared against rabbit splenocytes and was found by indirect immunofluorescence and direct binding assays to react, in the rabbit, primarily with oil-induced peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM phi). This MAb did not bind to rabbit T cells, B cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, or resident alveolar or peritoneal M phi but it did bind to a subpopulation of rabbit splenocytes with surface characteristics of null cells. The antibody also recognized mouse and rat PEM phi as well as the murine M phi cell lines P388D1 and IC-21. Consistent with findings in the rabbit, it did not bind to M phi obtained from the peritoneal cavities of rats or mice. The addition of MAb 3AE8 to mouse PEM phi caused a marked enhancement in the phagocytic uptake of erythrocyte target cells sensitized with a mouse antierythrocyte antiserum. PMID:6480022

  1. Generation and Identification of Peptide-Based Monoclonal Antibodies Against Vacuolar Proton Pyrophosphatase of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chengbi; Xiao, Bin; Cheng, Shasha; Li, Wei; Liao, Xiaoqing; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase (V-PPase), an electrogenic proton pump widely distributed in non-mammalian species, is one of the important targets for acidocalcisomes. In this study, a novel method of peptide-based antibody generation was performed to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Toxoplasma gondii V-PPase. Three hybridomas were identified and confirmed by ELISA, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. All of them can react with an 85 kDa band of T. gondii protein in purified acidocalcisomal fraction. The three MAbs were all specific to the synthetic peptide of YTKAADVGADLSGKNEYGMSEDDPRNPAC, corresponding to amino acids at the location of 292aa–320aa of TgVP1 amino acid sequence. These specific MAbs will be valuable tools for further study of T. gondii infection biology, pathogenesis, and host immune response. PMID:26090597

  2. Human monoclonal antibodies as candidate therapeutics against emerging viruses and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Broder, Christopher C; Gong, Rui; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2013-04-01

    More than 40 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for a number of disease indications with only one of these (Synagis) - for a viral disease, and not for therapy but for prevention. However, in the last decade novel potent mAbs have been discovered and characterized with potential as therapeutics against viruses of major importance for public health and biosecurity including Hendra virus (HeV), Nipah virus (NiV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus (EBOV), West Nile virus (WNV), influenza virus (IFV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we review such mAbs with an emphasis on antibodies of human origin, and highlight recent results as well as technologies and mechanisms related to their potential as therapeutics. PMID:23575729

  3. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics with up to five specificities

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, David W.; Abramyan, Donara; Kanakaraj, Palanisamy; Smith, Rodger G.; Shah, Rutul R.; Wang, Geping; Yao, Xiao-Tao; Kankanala, Spandana; Boyd, Ernie; Zaritskaya, Liubov; Nam, Viktoriya; Puffer, Bridget A.; Buasen, Pete; Kaithamana, Shashi; Burnette, Andrew F.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Patel, Dimki; Roschke, Viktor V.; Kiener, Peter A.; Hilbert, David M.; Barbas III, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition that few human diseases are thoroughly addressed by mono-specific, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) continues to drive the development of antibody therapeutics with additional specificities and enhanced activity. Historically, efforts to engineer additional antigen recognition into molecules have relied predominantly on the reformatting of immunoglobulin domains. In this report we describe a series of fully functional mAbs to which additional specificities have been imparted through the recombinant fusion of relatively short polypeptides sequences. The sequences are selected for binding to a particular target from combinatorial libraries that express linear, disulfide-constrained, or domain-based structures. The potential for fusion of peptides to the N- and C- termini of both the heavy and light chains affords the bivalent expression of up to four different peptides. The resulting molecules, called zybodies, can gain up to four additional specificities, while retaining the original functionality and specificity of the scaffold antibody. We explore the use of two clinically significant oncology antibodies, trastuzumab and cetuximab, as zybody scaffolds and demonstrate functional enhancements in each case. The affect of fusion position on both peptide and scaffold function is explored, and penta-specific zybodies are demonstrated to simultaneously engage five targets (ErbB2, EGFR, IGF-1R, Ang2 and integrin αvβ3). Bispecific, trastuzumab-based zybodies targeting ErbB2 and Ang2 are shown to exhibit superior efficacy to trastuzumab in an angiogenesis-dependent xenograft tumor model. A cetuximab-based bispecific zybody that targeting EGFR and ErbB3 simultaneously disrupted multiple intracellular signaling pathways; inhibited tumor cell proliferation; and showed efficacy superior to that of cetuximab in a xenograft tumor model. PMID:23575268

  4. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for respiratory diseases: Current challenges and perspectives, March 31 – April 1, 2016, Tours, France

    PubMed Central

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Reichert, Janice M.; Sleeman, Matthew; Reckamp, Karen L.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Adamczewski, Jörg P.; Sweeney, Theresa D.; Vanbever, Rita; Diot, Patrice; Owen, Caroline A.; Page, Clive; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Le Pape, Alain; Heuze-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics have tremendous potential to benefit patients with lung diseases, for which there remains substantial unmet medical need. To capture the current state of mAb research and development in the area of respiratory diseases, the Research Center of Respiratory Diseases (CEPR-INSERM U1100), the Laboratory of Excellence “MAbImprove,” the GDR 3260 “Antibodies and therapeutic targeting,” and the Grant Research program ARD2020 “Biotherapeutics” invited speakers from industry, academic and government organizations to present their recent research results at the Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies for Respiratory Diseases: Current challenges and perspectives congress held March 31 – April 1, 2016 in Tours, France. PMID:27266390

  5. Automated pipeline for rapid production and screening of HIV-specific monoclonal antibodies using pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kartik A; Clark, John J; Goods, Brittany A; Politano, Timothy J; Mozdzierz, Nicholas J; Zimnisky, Ross M; Leeson, Rachel L; Love, J Christopher; Love, Kerry R

    2015-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind and neutralize human pathogens have great therapeutic potential. Advances in automated screening and liquid handling have resulted in the ability to discover antigen-specific antibodies either directly from human blood or from various combinatorial libraries (phage, bacteria, or yeast). There remain, however, bottlenecks in the cloning, expression and evaluation of such lead antibodies identified in primary screens that hinder high-throughput screening. As such, "hit-to-lead identification" remains both expensive and time-consuming. By combining the advantages of overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) and a genetically stable yet easily manipulatable microbial expression host Pichia pastoris, we have developed an automated pipeline for the rapid production and screening of full-length antigen-specific mAbs. Here, we demonstrate the speed, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of our approach by generating several broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PMID:26032261

  6. Optimization of chemically defined feed media for monoclonal antibody production in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Kishishita, Shohei; Katayama, Satoshi; Kodaira, Kunihiko; Takagi, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Hiroki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takuma, Shinya; Hirashima, Chikashi; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian host for large-scale commercial production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Chemically defined media are currently used for CHO cell-based mAb production. An adequate supply of nutrients, especially specific amino acids, is required for cell growth and mAb production, and chemically defined fed-batch processes that support rapid cell growth, high cell density, and high levels of mAb production is still challenging. Many studies have highlighted the benefits of various media designs, supplements, and feed addition strategies in cell cultures. In the present study, we used a strategy involving optimization of a chemically defined feed medium to improve mAb production. Amino acids that were consumed in substantial amounts during a control culture were added to the feed medium as supplements. Supplementation was controlled to minimize accumulation of waste products such as lactate and ammonia. In addition, we evaluated supplementation with tyrosine, which has poor solubility, in the form of a dipeptide or tripeptide to improve its solubility. Supplementation with serine, cysteine, and tyrosine enhanced mAb production, cell viability, and metabolic profiles. A cysteine-tyrosine-serine tripeptide showed high solubility and produced beneficial effects similar to those observed with the free amino acids and with a dipeptide in improving mAb titers and metabolic profiles. PMID:25678240

  7. Production of a monoclonal antibody against oxytetracycline and its application for oxytetracycline residue detection in shrimp*

    PubMed Central

    Wongtangprasert, Tossapon; Natakuathung, Wirongrong; Pimpitak, Umaporn; Buakeaw, Anumart; Palaga, Tanapat; Komolpis, Kittinan; Khongchareonporn, Nanthika

    2014-01-01

    A novel monoclonal antibody (MAb) against oxytetracycline (OTC) was generated and characterized. The MAb was used in the development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA)-based detection system. An OTC-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate was prepared and used in the immunization of mice. A conventional somatic cell fusion technique was used to generate MAb-secreting hybridomas denoted 2-4F, 7-3G, and 11-11A. An indirect competitive ELISA (icELISA) was applied to measure the sensitivity and specificity of each MAb in terms of its 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) and percentage of cross-reactivity, respectively. MAb 2-4F exhibited the highest sensitivity, with an IC50 of 7.01 ng/ml. This MAb showed strong cross-reactivity to rolitetracycline, but no cross-reactivity to other unrelated antibiotics. When MAb 2-4F was used to detect OTC from shrimp samples, the recoveries were in the range of 82%–118% for an intra-assay and 96%–113% for an inter-assay. The coefficients of variation of the assays were 3.9%–13.9% and 5.5%–14.9%, respectively. PMID:24510709

  8. A Cancer-specific Monoclonal Antibody Recognizes the Aberrantly Glycosylated Podoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika Kato

    2014-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN/Aggrus/T1α), a platelet aggregation-inducing mucin-like sialoglycoprotein, is highly expressed in many cancers and normal tissues. A neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb; NZ-1) can block the association between podoplanin and C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) and inhibit podoplanin-induced cancer metastasis, but NZ-1 reacts with podoplanin-expressing normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells. In this study, we established a cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) against human podoplanin. Aberrantly glycosylated podoplanin including keratan sulfate or aberrant sialylation, which was expressed in LN229 glioblastoma cells, was used as an immunogen. The newly established LpMab-2 mAb recognized both an aberrant O-glycosylation and a Thr55-Leu64 peptide from human podoplanin. Because LpMab-2 reacted with podoplanin-expressing cancer cells but not with normal cells, as shown by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, it is an anti-podoplanin CasMab that is expected to be useful for molecular targeting therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers. PMID:25080943

  9. Immune electron microscopic characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles.

    PubMed Central

    Wrzolek, M. A.; Merz, P. A.; Kascsak, R.; Grundke-Iqbal, I.; Iqbal, K.; Rubenstein, R.; Tonna-DeMasi, M.; Goller, N. L.; Mehta, P.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Characterization of eleven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), raised to isolated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated Alzheimer's neurofibrillary tangles (ANT), has revealed the presence of at least two different epitopes. MAbs were tested for reactivity to ubiquitin and paired helical filaments (PHF) isolated by three different procedures. The effect of protease and/or alkaline phosphatase pretreatment on the reactivity of the MAbs with isolated PHF was also examined. All MAbs that had reacted strongly in the ELISA with sonicated SDS-treated ANT also immune decorated isolated PHF to varying degrees. Two MAbs exhibited a high reactivity to PHF: 3-39 and 5-25. MAb 3-39 was found to recognize a protease sensitive epitope. In contrast MAb 5-25 was found to consistently decorate isolated PHF in all preparations and exhibited a strong reactivity to ubiquitin, and the epitope in isolated PHF was not protease sensitive. Thus structural PHF after protease treatment and detergent treatment contain an antigenic site that is present in ubiquitin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1379780

  10. Production, characterization and applications of mouse anti-grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) growth hormone monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yiu-Kwong Leung, Michael; Kwok-Keung Ho, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Mouse anti-grass carp growth hormone (gcGH) monoclonal antibody (MAb) secretors were produced by PEG-mediated fusion of NS-1 myeloma cells and splenic B-lymphocytes of gcGH hyper-immunized mice. Positive secretors were screened by direct ELISA and cloned by limiting dilution. Three positive secretors, 21D3, 22G5 and 23B3, were obtained in a single fusion trial. Anti-gcGH MAbs were produced by growing hybridomas in the peritoneal cavity of pristane-primed mouse. The three MAbs were isotyped to be IgG2a, IgG2b and IgM, respectively. IgG MAbs were purified from ascitic fluid by Hitrap protein G column and IgM MAb was purified by gel filtration chromatography. The purified MAbs were highly specific and had moderate binding affinity. The MAbs were successfully used for the purification of native gcGH from mature grass carp pituitary extract by one-step immunoaffinity chromatography, for the quantification of gcGH by competitive sandwich ELISA, and for the probing of somatotropes in grass carp pituitary by immunohistochemistry. PMID:16352451

  11. Analysis of Kudoa thyrsites (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) spore antigens using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chase, J C; Dawson-Coates, J A; Haddow, J D; Stewart, M H; Haines, L R; Whitaker, D J; Ken, M L; Olafson, R W; Pearson, T W

    2001-06-20

    A method employing Percoll gradient centrifugation was developed to purify Kudoa thyrsites spores from somatic muscle tissue of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Highly purified spores were then used to immunize inbred BALB/c mice for derivation of hybridomas secreting Kudoa-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Analysis of mAbs by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that several were specific for antigens on the surface of K. thyrsites spores whereas other mAbs reacted with polar capsules or with polar filaments of spores of K. thyrsites, K. paniformis and K. crumena. Immunoblots on spore lysates using the surface-binding mAbs showed a broad band of 46 to > 220 kDa, whereas mAbs specific for antigens of polar capsules and polar filaments detected sharper bands of various molecular masses, depending on the Kudoa species. The dominant epitope of the K. thyrsites spore surface antigen was shown to be carbohydrate as determined by its sensitivity to treatment with anhydrous trifluoromethane sulfonic acid and by its resistance to treatment with Proteinase K. Immunofluorescence microscopy using the K. thyrsites-specific mAbs on isolated, intact, permeabilized plasmodia and on thin sections of somatic muscle tissue containing plasmodia revealed intense labeling of spores both within the spore-producing plasmodia and in the flesh of infected Atlantic salmon. As few as 100 spores were detected by immunoblotting, indicating that these mAbs have potential for use in developing a field-based diagnostic test. PMID:11463099

  12. New monoclonal antibodies specific for 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko

    2015-02-01

    1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole (AM694) is one of the synthetic cannabinoids and an illegal drug in Japan. It is important to generate a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against AM694 for use in the rapid and sensitive detection of the drug. Two monoclonal antibodies, named HN0124 (IgG1) and NK0504 (IgG1), were obtained, which were possibly effective for detecting AM694 and its derivatives. The cross-reactive ability of these MAbs was evaluated using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the results, both of these antibodies recognize 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole, 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(3-iodobenzoyl)indole, 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(4-iodobenzoyl)indole. Forty nmol/L AM694 can be detected using HN0124 MAb. Thus, MAbs produced in this study could be considered a useful tool for the detection of AM694. PMID:25723285

  13. Assessing kinetic and epitopic diversity across orthogonal monoclonal antibody generation platforms

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Harriman, Rian; Deng, Xiaodi; Yeung, Yik Andy; Miles, Adam; Morishige, Winse; Boustany, Leila; Zhu, Lei; Izquierdo, Shelley Mettler; Harriman, William

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to target specific antigens with high precision has led to an increasing demand to generate them for therapeutic use in many disease areas. Historically, the discovery of therapeutic mAbs has relied upon the immunization of mammals and various in vitro display technologies. While the routine immunization of rodents yields clones that are stable in serum and have been selected against vast arrays of endogenous, non-target self-antigens, it is often difficult to obtain species cross-reactive mAbs owing to the generally high sequence similarity shared across human antigens and their mammalian orthologs. In vitro display technologies bypass this limitation, but lack an in vivo screening mechanism, and thus may potentially generate mAbs with undesirable binding specificity and stability issues. Chicken immunization is emerging as an attractive mAb discovery method because it combines the benefits of both in vivo and in vitro display methods. Since chickens are phylogenetically separated from mammals, their proteins share less sequence homology with those of humans, so human proteins are often immunogenic and can readily elicit rodent cross-reactive clones, which are necessary for in vivo proof of mechanism studies. Here, we compare the binding characteristics of mAbs isolated from chicken immunization, mouse immunization, and phage display of human antibody libraries. Our results show that chicken-derived mAbs not only recapitulate the kinetic diversity of mAbs sourced from other methods, but appear to offer an expanded repertoire of epitopes. Further, chicken-derived mAbs can bind their native serum antigen with very high affinity, highlighting their therapeutic potential. PMID:26652308

  14. Monoclonal antibody identification of subpopulations of cerebral cortical neurons affected in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Rudnicka, M; Hinton, D R; Blanks, J C; Kozlowski, M

    1987-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). Given the paucity of molecular markers available for the identification of neuronal subtypes, the specificity of neuronal loss within the cerebral cortex has been difficult to evaluate. With a panel of four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) applied to central nervous system tissues from AD patients, we have immunocytochemically identified a population of vulnerable cortical neurons; a subpopulation of pyramidal neurons is recognized by mABs 3F12 and 44.1 in the hippocampus and neocortex, and clusters of multipolar neurons in the entorhinal cortex reactive with mAb 44.1 show selective degeneration. Closely adjacent stellate-like neurons in these regions, identified by mAB 6A2, show striking preservation in AD. The neurons recognized by mAbs 3F12 and 44.1, to the best of our knowledge, do not comprise a single known neurotransmitter system. mAb 3A4 identifies a phosphorylated antigen that is undetectable in normal brain but accumulates early in the course of AD in somas of vulnerable neurons. Antigen 3A4 is distinct from material reactive with thioflavin S or antibody generated against paired helical filaments. Initially, antigen 3A4 is localized to neurons in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum, later in the association neocortex, and, ultimately in cases of long duration, in primary sensory cortical regions. mAb 3F12 recognizes multiple bands on immunoblots of homogenates of normal and AD cortical tissues, whereas mAb 3A4 does not bind to immunoblots containing neurofilament proteins or brain homogenates from AD patients. Ultrastructurally, antigen 3A4 is localized to paired helical filaments. Using these mAbs, further molecular characterization of the affected cortical neurons is now possible. Images PMID:3120196

  15. Assessing kinetic and epitopic diversity across orthogonal monoclonal antibody generation platforms.

    PubMed

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Harriman, Rian; Deng, Xiaodi; Yeung, Yik Andy; Miles, Adam; Morishige, Winse; Boustany, Leila; Zhu, Lei; Izquierdo, Shelley Mettler; Harriman, William

    2016-01-01

    The ability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to target specific antigens with high precision has led to an increasing demand to generate them for therapeutic use in many disease areas. Historically, the discovery of therapeutic mAbs has relied upon the immunization of mammals and various in vitro display technologies. While the routine immunization of rodents yields clones that are stable in serum and have been selected against vast arrays of endogenous, non-target self-antigens, it is often difficult to obtain species cross-reactive mAbs owing to the generally high sequence similarity shared across human antigens and their mammalian orthologs. In vitro display technologies bypass this limitation, but lack an in vivo screening mechanism, and thus may potentially generate mAbs with undesirable binding specificity and stability issues. Chicken immunization is emerging as an attractive mAb discovery method because it combines the benefits of both in vivo and in vitro display methods. Since chickens are phylogenetically separated from mammals, their proteins share less sequence homology with those of humans, so human proteins are often immunogenic and can readily elicit rodent cross-reactive clones, which are necessary for in vivo proof of mechanism studies. Here, we compare the binding characteristics of mAbs isolated from chicken immunization, mouse immunization, and phage display of human antibody libraries. Our results show that chicken-derived mAbs not only recapitulate the kinetic diversity of mAbs sourced from other methods, but appear to offer an expanded repertoire of epitopes. Further, chicken-derived mAbs can bind their native serum antigen with very high affinity, highlighting their therapeutic potential. PMID:26652308

  16. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Radosevich, Thomas J.; Stabel, Judith R.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Kapur, Vivek; Paustian, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne's disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced from BALB/c mice immunized with a whole-cell extract of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A total of 10 hybridomas producing MAbs to proteins ranging from 25 to 85 kDa were obtained. All MAbs showed some degree of cross-reactivity when they were analyzed against a panel of whole-cell protein lysates comprising seven different mycobacterial species. The MAbs were characterized by several methods, which included isotype analysis, specificity analysis, epitope analysis, reactivity in immunoblot assays, and electron microscopy. The identities of the antigens that bound to two selected MAbs were determined by screening an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis lambda phage expression library. This approach revealed that MAb 9G10 detects MAP1643 (isocitrate lyase) and that MAb 11G4 detects MAP3840 (a 70-kDa heat shock protein), two proteins present in high relative abundance in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The epitopes for MAb 11G4 were mapped to the N-terminal half of MAP3840, whereas MAb 9G10 bound to the C-terminal half of MAP1643. Aptamers, nucleic acids that bind to specific protein sequences, against the hypothetical protein encoded by MAP0105c were also generated and tested for their binding to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis as well as other mycobacteria. These detection reagents may be beneficial in many JD research applications. PMID:17344350

  17. Radiolocalization of monoclonal antibodies in hepatic metastases from human colon cancer in congenitally athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Rivoire, M.; Divgi, C.; Welt, S.; Cohen, A.M.; Sigurdson, E.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Intrasplenic injection of the HT-29 LMM metastatic human colon cancer line reproducibly results in hepatic metastasis formation in congenitally athymic mice. HT-29-15, a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) of the IgG1 class reactive with the HT-29 LMM line, and BL-3, an isotype-matched control antibody, were labeled with 125I. Labeled mAbs were injected i.v. in mice with hepatic metastases, and animals were sacrificed on days 3, 5, and 7. Specific mAb uptake by tumor was significantly greater than nonspecific mAb uptake, as evidenced by specific/nonspecific tumor/blood ratios (radiolocalization indices) of 3.47/1-25.6/1. Relative mAb uptake was greater by the hepatic tumors than by the splenic tumors from day 3 to day 7, although this was significant (P less than 0.05) only on day 7 (5.12 {plus minus} 2.97 versus 1.79 {plus minus} 0.71). Tumor/uninvolved tissue ratios were also significantly greater (P less than 0.05) for the hepatic metastases than for the splenic tumors on day 7 (12.23 {plus minus} 3.85 versus 6.63 {plus minus} 2.63). This murine hepatic metastasis model appears useful for evaluation of localization of mAbs to hepatic metastases from human colon carcinoma.

  18. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  19. Plant-based Production of Two Chimeric Monoclonal IgG Antibodies Directed against Immunodominant Epitopes of Vibrio cholerae Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kara J.; Giffen, Samantha R.; Pauly, Michael H.; Kim, Do H.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Whaley, Kevin J.; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    We have produced and characterized two chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that bind different immunodominant epitopes on Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS). MAb 2D6 IgG1 recognizes Ogawa O-polysaccharide antigen, while mAb ZAC-3 IgG1 recognizes core/lipid A moiety of Ogawa and Inaba LPS. Both antibodies were expressed using a Nicotiana benthamiana-based rapid antibody-manufacturing platform (RAMP) and evaluated in vitro for activities associated with immunity to V. cholerae, including vibriocidal activity, bacterial agglutination and motility arrest. PMID:25865265

  20. Investigation of antigen-antibody interactions of sulfonamides with a monoclonal antibody in a fluorescence polarization immunoassay using 3D-QSAR models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of sulfonamide analogs binding a monoclonal antibody (MAbSMR) produced against sulfamerazine was carried out by Distance Comparison (DISCOtech), comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), and comparative molecular si...

  1. The present state of the art in expression, production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) have become one the most powerful therapeutic and diagnostic tools in modern medicine. Some estimates target the worldwide market of MAb's on the order of $125 billion in the next four years. Recent advances in molecular biology, immunology, and development of robust production platforms will drive the development of more MAb's suitable to treat an ever increasing number of disease states. This circumstance combined with the fact that many of the original antibody therapies from the 1980 s and 1990 s will soon be coming off patent will attract a great deal of investment in the development of larger industrial facilities to increase monoclonal antibody to meet increasing demand. In this review, the present state of the science that underlies the development of new antibodies therapies in Chinese hamster ovary cells combined with a description of the present challenges facing the industry in terms of the limitations of output and compliance with current good manufacturing practices and FDA regulations. Also addressed are future challenges to overcome production bottlenecks, description of critical quality control attributes particular to antibodies, and detailed treatment of scale-up considerations. PMID:26299798

  2. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline.

    PubMed

    Maragos, Chris M

    2015-10-01

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s) ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9) was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage. PMID:26426046

  3. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline

    PubMed Central

    Maragos, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s) ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9) was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage. PMID:26426046

  4. Monoclonal antibody to serum immunoglobulins of Clarias batrachus and its application in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Sood, Neeraj; Chaudhary, Dharmendra K; Singh, Akhilesh; Rathore, Gaurav

    2012-12-15

    Serum immunoglobulins of Clarias batrachus (Cb-Ig) were purified by affinity chromatography using bovine serum albumin as capture ligand. Under reducing conditions in SDS-PAGE, Cb-Ig was composed of a heavy (H) chain (68.7 kDa) and two light (L) chains (27.4 and 26.3 kDa). Purified Cb-Ig was used to produce a monoclonal antibody (MAb) designated E4 MAb that belonged to IgG1 subclass. In Western blotting, this MAb showed binding to H chain of purified Cb-Ig and putative H chains in reduced sera of C. batrachus, Clarias gariepinus and Heteropneustes fossilis. However, no binding was observed with serum protein of Labeo rohita and Channa striata. Cross-reactivity of anti-Cb-Ig MAb was observed with serum of C. batrachus, C. gariepinus and H. fossilis in competitive ELISA. In immunoblotting of non-reduced Cb-Ig with E4 MAb, four bands assumed to be tetrameric, trimeric, dimeric and monomeric form were observed. In flow cytometric analysis of the gated lymphocytes, the number of surface Ig-positive (Ig+) cells in blood, spleen, kidney and thymus of C. batrachus was determined to be 50.1 ± 3.1, 55.1 ± 3.36, 42.4 ± 4.81 and 5.1 ± 0.89%, respectively, using E4 MAb. Ig+ cells were also demonstrated in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections of spleen, kidney, thymus and smears of blood mononuclear cells in indirect immunoperoxidase test. The developed MAb was employed to detect pathogen-specific immunoglobulins in the sera of C. batrachus immunized with killed Edwardsiella tarda, by an indirect ELISA. This monoclonal antibody can be useful tool in immunological research and assays. PMID:23000018

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies against Accumulation-Associated Protein Affect EPS Biosynthesis and Enhance Bacterial Accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Lou, Qiang; Wang, Xueqin; Wu, Yang; Huang, Renzheng; Liu, Jingran; Liu, Huayong; Yu, Fangyou; Ding, Baixing; Huang, Yalin; Tong, Wenyan; Qu, Di

    2011-01-01

    Because there is no effective antibiotic to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm infections that lead to the failure of medical device implantations, the development of anti-biofilm vaccines is necessary. Biofilm formation by S. epidermidis requires accumulation-associated protein (Aap) that contains sequence repeats known as G5 domains, which are responsible for the Zn2+-dependent dimerization of Aap to mediate intercellular adhesion. Antibodies against Aap have been reported to inhibit biofilm accumulation. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the Aap C-terminal single B-repeat construct followed by the 79-aa half repeat (AapBrpt1.5) were generated. MAb18B6 inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis RP62A to 60% of the maximum, while MAb25C11 and MAb20B9 enhanced biofilm accumulation. All three MAbs aggregated the planktonic bacteria to form visible cell clusters. Epitope mapping revealed that the epitope of MAb18B6, which recognizes an identical area within AapBrpt constructs from S. epidermidis RP62A, was not shared by MAb25C11 and MAb20B9. Furthermore, all three MAbs were found to affect both Aap expression and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, including extracellular DNA and PIA) biosynthesis in S. epidermidis and enhance the cell accumulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and will help to develop epitope-peptide vaccines against staphylococcal infections. PMID:21687690

  6. Therapeutic effects of a human antiflagella monoclonal antibody in a neutropenic murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, K; Sonoda, F; Iwagaki, A; Ponglertnapagorn, P; Watanabe, K; Nagatake, T; Siadak, A; Pollack, M; Matsumoto, K

    1993-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive with type-specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagella were compared for their protective activities against Fisher immunotype 2 P. aeruginosa pneumonia in neutropenic mice. The activity of the antiflagella MAb at a dose of 500 micrograms per mouse was comparable to that of the anti-LPS MAb at the same dose. In vivo protection was correlated with bacterial density in the lung tissue and blood of infected mice. In vitro data suggested that the protective activity of the antiflagella MAb was due more to inhibition of bacterial motility than to opsonophagocytosis of bacteria by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, the protective activity of the anti-LPS MAb was primarily related to alveolar macrophage-mediated opsonophagocytosis. Antiflagella MAb at a dose of 500 micrograms combined with oral sparfloxacin at a subtherapeutic dose of 62.5 micrograms produced a significant increase in survival (P < 0.05) compared with that produced by either agent alone or no treatment. The additive effects between the antiflagella MAb and sparfloxacin at sub-MICs on the inhibitory effects of bacterial motility supported the in vivo effect of the combination. These data suggest that human isotype-matched antiflagella and anti-LPS MAbs have similar protective activities against Pseudomonas pneumonia in neutropenic mice, despite discrete mechanisms of antibody-matched protection. In addition, in vivo synergy was demonstrated between antiflagella MAb and sparfloxacin in this model. PMID:8383936

  7. Epitope analyses of pneumococcal surface protein A: a combination of two monoclonal antibodies detects 94% of clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, J; Aase, A; Michaelsen, T E; Rødal, G

    2001-10-01

    Immunisation of BALB/c mice with seven heat-treated Norwegian clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae of different serotypes elicited mainly monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). It was remarkable that the fusions resulted only in a few mAbs directed against other protein antigens. Dot blot analysis with 16 mAbs using clinical isolates representing 23 different capsular types and the uncapsulated reference strain R36A showed that some of the mAbs bound to PspA epitopes expressed by a low number of strains whereas others bound to broadly distributed epitopes. On the basis of their reactivities, seven of these mAbs could be divided into two groups recognising different subsets of pneumococci. The three mAbs in the narrow reacting group bound to epitopes found in 21-25% of the strains whereas the four mAbs in the broad reacting group detected more than 57% of the analysed strains. The epitopes for these seven antibodies were surface exposed on live exponential phase grown pneumococci as shown by flow cytometry. The finding that a combination of mAb 180,C-1 (IgG2a) from the first group and mAb 170,E-11 (IgG2a) from the second group detected 94% of the examined strains is interesting because PspA has been reported by others to be a serological highly variable protein. PMID:11720812

  8. Monoclonal antibodies: the promise and the reality.

    PubMed

    Coons, T

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, or "MoAbs," have revolutionized clinical approaches to diagnostic imaging and therapy of many diseases. The use of MoAbs for diagnosing and treating cancer has been especially promising. However, the full potential of these "magic bullets" has yet to be realized. This article examines the current and potential uses of MoAbs, describes problems with the technology and looks at potential solutions. Along with descriptions of how MoAbs are made and prepared for use in the clinic, the article provides examples of the ways in which MoAbs can be used to complement and expand the information obtained from standard diagnostic imaging modalities. Specific examples of the use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer and other diseases also are provided. PMID:7491408

  9. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  10. Prevention of Herpes Simplex Virus Induced Stromal Keratitis by a Glycoprotein B-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Adalbert; Dirks, Miriam; Kasper, Maren; Buch, Anna; Dittmer, Ulf; Giebel, Bernd; Wildschütz, Lena; Busch, Martin; Goergens, Andre; Schneweis, Karl E.; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Sodeik, Beate; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Roggendorf, Michael; Bauer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV) and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK) is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c) that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis) or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy). Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day) of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c) was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans. PMID:25587898

  11. Production and application of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against Spiroplasma eriocheiris

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bao, Haixun; Miao, Fengqin; Peng, Yaqin; Shen, Yuqing; Gu, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    A new species of spiroplasma, Spiroplasma eriocheiris (S. eriocheiris), was identified as a lethal pathogen of tremor disease (TD) in Chinese mitten crab recently. In order to acquire appropriate biological and diagnostic tools for characterizing this newly discovered pathogen, 5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a polyclonal antibody (pAb) against S. eriocheiris were produced. Among the mAbs, 6F5, 7C8 and 12H5 lead to the deformation of S. eriocheiris. A peptide sequence, YMRDMQSGLPRY was identified as a mimic motif of MreB that is the cell shape determining protein of S. eriocheiris interacting with 3 mAbs. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) for detection of S. eriocheiris was established using the mAb and pAb we prepared. It detected as low as 0.1 μg/mL of S. eriocheiris. No cross-reaction was observed with three other common bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis) and the hemolymph samples of healthy Eriocheir sinensis. Collectively, our results indicated that the mAbs and pAb we prepared could be used in the analysis of S. eriocheiris membrane proteins mimotope and development of a diagnostic kit for S. eriocheiris infections. PMID:26639364

  12. Production and characterization of neutralizing and nonneutralizing monoclonal antibodies against listeriolysin O.

    PubMed

    Nato, F; Reich, K; Lhopital, S; Rouyre, S; Geoffroy, C; Mazie, J C; Cossart, P

    1991-12-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a thiol-activated toxin secreted by the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. LLO is essential for the survival of the bacterium in the infected cell because it promotes lysis of the phagosome membrane and escape of the bacterium into the cytosol. LLO was used as an antigen for the production of nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in mice. Three of these could inhibit the hemolytic activity of LLO. One of them inhibited binding of LLO to erythrocyte membranes. The two other antibodies blocked the activity of LLO at a step subsequent to membrane binding. Only two of the nine MAbs recognized three other purified SH-activated toxins, streptolysin O, alveolysin, and pneumolysin. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of culture supernatants of Listeria ivanovii and Listeria seeligeri, two hemolytic species of the genus Listeria, revealed that two MAbs recognized ivanolysin and seeligerolysin. The latter was also recognized by two other MAbs, including one of the neutralizing antibodies. MAbs raised against a peptide, ECTG LAWEWWR, present in all thiol-activated toxins sequenced to date, recognized all toxins and were not neutralizing. Taken together, these results demonstrate the existence of regions important for hemolytic activity that are unique to hemolysins of the genus Listeria and show that regions outside the conserved peptide are important for activity of LLO. PMID:1937824

  13. Clinical development of monoclonal antibody-based drugs in HIV and HCV diseases.

    PubMed

    Flego, Michela; Ascione, Alessandro; Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Vella, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Today there are many licensed antiviral drugs, but the emergence of drug resistant strains sometimes invalidates the effects of the current therapies used in the treatment of infectious diseases. Compared to conventional antiviral drugs, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) used as pharmacological molecules have particular physical characteristics and modes of action, and, therefore, they should be considered as a distinct therapeutic class. Despite being historically validated, antibodies may represent a novel tool for combatting infectious diseases. The current high cost of mAbs' production, storage and administration (by injection only) and the consequent obstacles to development are outweighed by mAbs' clinical advantages. These are related to a low toxicity combined with high specificity and versatility, which allows a specific antibody to mediate various biological effects, ranging from the virus neutralization mechanisms to the modulation of immune responses.This review briefly summarizes the recent technological advances in the field of immunoglobulin research, and the current status of mAb-based drugs in clinical trials for HIV and HCV diseases. For each clinical trial the available data are reported and the emerging conceptual problems of the employed mAbs are highlighted.This overview helps to give a clear picture of the efficacy and challenges of the mAbs in the field of these two infectious diseases which have such a global impact. PMID:23289632

  14. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human alphafetoprotein, a hepatocellular tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hwang, Jing-Min; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce and purify monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against human alphafetoprotein (AFP). Hyperimmune ICR mice produced PAbs after injection with 0.5 mL pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of MAbs. Mice were immunized four times, given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the hypoxanthine, aminopterine, and thymidine (HAT)-RPMIX medium. Anti-AFP antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS), hypoxanthine, thymidine (HT)-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-AFP MAbs were obtained and designated as A73F3, A73E8, B73C5, A73G3, A73F8, 67B3, B73C2, B73E1, A73G2, B73G7, B73D7, and B73F4. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG(1) heavy chain and kappa light chain. The MAbs with high purity were obtained by affinity chromatography. The purity analysis of AFP and the MAbs was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:12193284

  15. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against prostate-specific antigen, a prostate cancer serum marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to produce monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer serum marker. Hyperimmune ICR mice produced polyclonal antibodies (PoAbs) after injection with 0.5 mL of pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Mice were immunized four times and given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the HAT-RPMIX medium. Anti-PSA antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS) HT-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-PSA MAbs were obtained and designated C3m1G11, B3m1E5, C3m1E8, C3m1C5, C3m2F4, C3m1F8, C3m2B3, C3m2E6, B3m2B11, B3m2F2, C3m2C7, and C3m2D9. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG2a heavy chain and kappa light chain. Hitrap Protein A column was used for the purification of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The purity analysis of MAb was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:15000852

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against the Outer Membrane Protein of Bordetella avium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanhua; Liang, Manfei; Zuo, Xuemei; Zhao, Xue; Guo, Fanxia; Yang, Shifa

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the etiologic agent of coryza and rhinotracheitis in poultry. This respiratory disease is responsible for substantial economic losses in the poultry industry. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. avium isolated from diseased chickens. BALB/c mice were immunized with the extracted B. avium OMPs. Then the splenocytes from immunized mice and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused using PEG 4000. Three stable hybridoma clones (designated as 3G10, 4A3, and 4E8) were produced via indirect ELISA and three rounds of subcloning. The MAbs were classified as IgG1, and can recognize the 58 kDa OMP band by Western blot assays. No MAb cross-reactivity with chicken Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella was observed. A double antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS-ELISA) was developed using the rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture antibody and MAb 4A3 as the detection antibody. Under the DAS-ELISA, the minimum detectable concentration of B. avium was 1×104 CFU/mL, and no cross-reactivity occurred with chicken Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Results showed that the DAS-ELISA has good sensitivity and specificity. Clinical application showed the DAS-ELISA was more sensitive than the plate agglutination test. This study may be used to develop a quick and specific diagnostic kit, analyze epitopes, and establish systems for typing B. avium. PMID:23909425

  17. A monoclonal antibody specific for 6-monoacetylmorphine reduces acute heroin effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Inger Lise; Boix, Fernando; Nerem, Elisabeth; Mørland, Jørg; Andersen, Jannike Mørch

    2014-06-01

    Immunotherapy against drugs of abuse is being studied as an alternative treatment option in addiction medicine and is based on antibodies sequestering the drug in the bloodstream and blocking its entry into the brain. Producing an efficient vaccine against heroin has been considered particularly challenging because of the rapid metabolism of heroin to multiple psychoactive molecules. We have previously reported that heroin's first metabolite, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), is the predominant mediator for heroin's acute behavioral effects and that heroin is metabolized to 6-MAM primarily prior to brain entry. On this basis, we hypothesized that antibody sequestration of 6-MAM is sufficient to impair heroin-induced effects and therefore examined the effects of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for 6-MAM. In vitro experiments in human and rat blood revealed that the antibody was able to bind 6-MAM and block the metabolism to morphine almost completely, whereas the conversion of heroin to 6-MAM remained unaffected. Mice pretreated with the mAb toward 6-MAM displayed a reduction in heroin-induced locomotor activity that corresponded closely to the reduction in brain 6-MAM levels. Intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of the anti-6-MAM mAb gave equivalent protection against heroin effects, and the mAb was estimated to have a functional half-life of 8 to 9 days in mice. Our study implies that an antibody against 6-MAM is effective in counteracting heroin effects. PMID:24700886

  18. [Preparation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against human tissue factor with anticoagulation activity].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Wang, Xinghua; He, Yongji; Pan, Weiwei; Cao, Pengcheng; Zhao, Fengmei; Zhang, Quanai; Zhao, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Objective To prepare and characterize a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human tissue factor (hTF) with anticoagulation activity. Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with truncated recombinant protein (rhTF243). Hybridoma cell lines were generated from cell fusion, and screened using indirect ELISA and prothrombin time (PT). After ascites was developed in BALB/c mice, antibody titers were determined using indirect ELISA. Western blotting was performed to study the antibody specificity. Anticoagulant activity of the antibody was detected by PT assay. Results A mAb to hTF with excellent anticoagulation activity was identified. Its immunoglobulin subclass belonged to IgG1. Titer of ascites fluid was 1:200 000. Western blotting and PT analysis confirmed the specificity and anticoagulant activity of the antibody. The mAb reacted specifically to both recombinant hTF243 and natural TF on SW620 colon cancer cell surface. Conclusion A hTF mAb with anticoagulation activity and high specificity has been successfully prepared. PMID:27053623

  19. A novel high affinity human monoclonal antibody to mesothelin

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mitchell; Feng, Mingqian; Fisher, Robert J.; Rader, Christoph; Pastan, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Mesothelin is a glycosylphosphatidylinisotol-anchored glycoprotein that is highly expressed on the cell surface of mesothelioma, ovarian cancer and other malignant tumors. The interaction between mesothelin and CA125 (also called MUC16) may facilitate the implantation and metastasis of tumors in the peritoneal cavity. A desirable therapeutic agent involves finding a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to mesothelin or CA125 and inhibits their interaction. Here we report the identification of a novel human mAb to mesothelin. HN1, a human single chain Fv specific for mesothelin, was isolated from a naïve human scFv phage display library. To investigate HN1 as a potential therapeutic, we generated a fully human IgG with the γ 1 heavy chain and the κ light chain, and an immuntoxin by fusing the HN1 scFv to a truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin A. The HN1 IgG kills cancer cells with very strong antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. HN1 binds a conformation-sensitive epitope in human mesothelin with high affinity (KD = 3 nM). The HN1 epitope is different from that of SS1, a mouse Fv used to develop therapeutic antibodies that are currently in clinical trials. HN1 binds to cell surface-associated mesothelin on human mesothelioma, ovarian cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, HN1 can functionally block the interaction of mesothelin and CA125 on cancer cells. Most importantly, because the HN1 immuntoxin kills mesothelin-expressing cancer cells with high cytotoxic activity, we believe that it has significant potential for mesothelin-expressing cancer treatment and diagnosis. PMID:20635390

  20. Preparation and Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Against ω-Conotoxin MVIIA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanling; Ma, Yanling; Li, Heng; Wang, Shihua

    2014-01-01

    ω-Conotoxins MVIIA (ω-CTX MVIIA) is a peptide with 25 amino acid residues. It is a selective and reversible N-type voltage-gated calcium channel blocker, which could be used as an analgesic for pain. To date, there are no monoclonal antibodies (MAb) for immunoassay against ω-conotoxin MVIIA. In this study, an MAb against ω-conotoxin MVIIA was prepared. The conotoxin-coding DNA sequence was chemically synthesized and cloned into expression vector pGEX-6p-1 and pET32a (+), respectively. The fusion protein GST-CTX was expressed and purified, and was used to immunize BALB/c mice for preparing the anti-CTX antibody. The spleen cells were fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells after the titer of antiserum was detected and qualified. After being screened by indirect ELISA and cloned by limiting dilution, a hybridoma named 4A12, which produces monoclonal antibody specifically against ω-CTX MVIIA, was successfully obtained. It was found that there are 102 chromosomes in the 4A12 cell, and the subclass for the MAb is IgM. The MAb affinity against ω-CTX MVIIA was 7.33×109 L/mol, and the cross-reaction test showed that the MAb specifically bound ω-CTX MVIIA. The MAb could be used as a specific antagonist for ω-CTX MVIIA in the physiological study on the CaV channels in the nervous system. PMID:25171005

  1. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against ω-conotoxin MVIIA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanling; Ma, Yanling; Li, Heng; Wang, Shihua; Zhuang, Zhenhong

    2014-08-01

    ω-Conotoxins MVIIA (ω-CTX MVIIA) is a peptide with 25 amino acid residues. It is a selective and reversible N-type voltage-gated calcium channel blocker, which could be used as an analgesic for pain. To date, there are no monoclonal antibodies (MAb) for immunoassay against ω-conotoxin MVIIA. In this study, an MAb against ω-conotoxin MVIIA was prepared. The conotoxin-coding DNA sequence was chemically synthesized and cloned into expression vector pGEX-6p-1 and pET32a (+), respectively. The fusion protein GST-CTX was expressed and purified, and was used to immunize BALB/c mice for preparing the anti-CTX antibody. The spleen cells were fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells after the titer of antiserum was detected and qualified. After being screened by indirect ELISA and cloned by limiting dilution, a hybridoma named 4A12, which produces monoclonal antibody specifically against ω-CTX MVIIA, was successfully obtained. It was found that there are 102 chromosomes in the 4A12 cell, and the subclass for the MAb is IgM. The MAb affinity against ω-CTX MVIIA was 7.33×10(9) L/mol, and the cross-reaction test showed that the MAb specifically bound ω-CTX MVIIA. The MAb could be used as a specific antagonist for ω-CTX MVIIA in the physiological study on the CaV channels in the nervous system. PMID:25171005

  2. Developing high-quality mouse monoclonal antibodies for neuroscience research - approaches, perspectives and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gong, Belvin; Murray, Karl D; Trimmer, James S

    2016-09-25

    High-quality antibodies (Abs) are critical to neuroscience research, as they remain the primary affinity proteomics reagent used to label and capture endogenously expressed protein targets in the nervous system. As in other fields, neuroscientists are frequently confronted with inaccurate and irreproducible Ab-based results and/or reporting. The UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab Facility was created with the mission of addressing the unmet need for high-quality Abs in neuroscience research by applying a unique approach to generate and validate mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) optimized for use against mammalian brain (i.e., NeuroMabs). Here we describe our methodology of multi-step mAb screening focused on identifying mAbs exhibiting efficacy and specificity in labeling mammalian brain samples. We provide examples from NeuroMab screens, and from the subsequent specialized validation of those selected as NeuroMabs. We highlight the particular challenges and considerations of determining specificity for brain immunolabeling. We also describe why our emphasis on extensive validation of large numbers of candidates by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry against brain samples is essential for identifying those that exhibit efficacy and specificity in those applications to become NeuroMabs. We describe the special attention given to candidates with less common non-IgG1 IgG subclasses that can facilitate simultaneous multiplex labeling with subclass-specific secondary antibodies. We detail our recent use of recombinant cloning of NeuroMabs as a method to archive all NeuroMabs, to unambiguously define NeuroMabs at the DNA sequence level, and to re-engineer IgG1 NeuroMabs to less common IgG subclasses to facilitate their use in multiplex labeling. Finally, we provide suggestions to facilitate Ab development and use, as to design, execution and interpretation of Ab-based neuroscience experiments. Reproducibility in neuroscience research will improve with enhanced Ab validation

  3. Characterizing monoclonal antibody structure by carboxyl group footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parminder; Tomechko, Sara E; Kiselar, Janna; Shi, Wuxian; Deperalta, Galahad; Wecksler, Aaron T; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Ling, Victor; Chance, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of proteins and their antigen complexes is essential to the development of new biologic-based medicines. Amino acid-specific covalent labeling (CL) is well suited to probe such structures, especially for cases that are difficult to examine by alternative means due to size, complexity, or instability. We present here a detailed account of carboxyl group labeling (with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) tagging) applied to a glycosylated monoclonal antibody therapeutic (mAb). The experiments were optimized to preserve the structural integrity of the mAb, and experimental conditions were varied and replicated to establish the reproducibility of the technique. Homology-based models were generated and used to compare the solvent accessibility of the labeled residues, which include aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the C-terminus (i.e., the target probes), with the experimental data in order to understand the accuracy of the approach. Data from the mAb were compared to reactivity measures of several model peptides to explain observed variations in reactivity. Attenuation of reactivity in otherwise solvent accessible probes is documented as arising from the effects of positive charge or bond formation between adjacent amine and carboxyl groups, the latter accompanied by observed water loss. A comparison of results with previously published data by Deperalta et al using hydroxyl radical footprinting showed that 55% (32/58) of target residues were GEE labeled in this study whereas the previous study reported 21% of the targets were labeled. Although the number of target residues in GEE labeling is fewer, the two approaches provide complementary information. The results highlight advantages of this approach, such as the ease of use at the bench top, the linearity of the dose response plots at high levels of labeling, reproducibility of replicate experiments (<2% variation in modification extent), the similar reactivity of the three target probes

  4. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium’s Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Harada, Tomoyuki; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kanehira, Katsushi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Matsui, Hidenori; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb)-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria. PMID:26986057

  5. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-07-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan.

  6. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  7. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Neisseria meningitidis Group B Polysaccharide and Their Peptide Mimotopes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, J. S.; Lin, J. S.; Anderson, P. W.; Insel, R. A.; Nahm, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    From five mice immunized with Escherichia coli K1 bacteria, we produced 12 immunoglobulin M hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that bind to Neisseria meningitidis group B (NMGB). The 12 MAbs also bound the capsular polysaccharide (PS) of E. coli K1 [which, like NMGB, is α(2-8)-linked polysialic acid (PSA)] and bound to EV36, a nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strain producing α(2-8) PSA. Except for HmenB5, which cross-reacted with N. meningitidis group C, none of the MAbs bound to N. meningitidis groups A, C, and Y. Of the 12 MAbs, 6 were autoantibodies as defined by binding to CHP-134, a neuroblastoma cell line expressing short-chain α(2-8) PSA; five of these MAbs killed NMGB in the presence of rabbit complement, and two also killed NMGB with human complement. The other six MAbs, however, were nonautoreactive; all killed NMGB with rabbit complement, and five killed NMGB with human complement. To obtain peptide mimotopes of NMGB PS, four of the nonautoreactive MAbs (HmenB2, HmenB3, HmenB13, and HmenB14) were used to screen two types of phage libraries, one with a linear peptide of 7 amino acids and the other with a circular peptide of 7 amino acids inserted between two linked cysteines. We obtained 86 phage clones that bound to the screening MAb in the absence but not in the presence of E. coli K1 PSA in solution. The clones contained 31 linear and 4 circular mimotopes expressing unique sequences. These mimotopes nonrandomly expressed amino acids and were different from previously described mimotopes for NMGB PS. The new mimotopes may be useful in producing a vaccine(s) capable of eliciting anti-NMGB antibodies not reactive with neuronal tissue. PMID:11292756

  9. A murine cytomegalovirus-neutralizing monoclonal antibody exhibits autoreactivity and induces tissue damage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, A J; Farrell, H E; Thomas, J A; Papadimitriou, J M; Garlepp, M J; Scalzo, A A; Shellam, G R

    1994-01-01

    The autoreactivity of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) AC1 was examined in vitro and in vivo. Both mAb AC1 and a human antiserum reactive with U1-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1-snRNP) stained uninfected mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) in a speckled nuclear pattern and reacted with 70,000 molecular weight (MW) MEF nuclear antigens by immunoblotting, suggesting that mAb AC1 cross-reacted with the 70,000 MW component of U1-snRNP. However, only mAb AC1 cross-reacted with an additional epithelial cytoplasmic autoantigen present in cultured HEp2 cells. On tissue sections from uninfected mice, mAb AC1 predominantly reacted with a component of central and peripheral nervous systems, although cross-reactivity with the stratum spinosum of the skin and the outer sheath of hair follicles was also observed. Immunoblotting revealed that mAb AC1 reacted with phosphorylated epitopes present on a 98,000 MW MCMV structural protein and the 200,000 MW mouse neurofilament protein (NFP). Treatment of uninfected mice with mAb AC1 resulted in a severe interstitial pneumonia with greatly thickened and congested alveolar septa. Severe oedema of the hypodermis and a mild mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis were also observed. These results demonstrate that a mAb reacting with a MCMV structural phosphoprotein which can protect mice against the dissemination of MCMV, can also promote the development of autoimmune disease. Therefore, the production of such cross-reactive antibodies may be an important mechanism in the development of autoimmunity following viral infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7515848

  10. Fate of inhaled monoclonal antibodies after the deposition of aerosolized particles in the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, L; Azzopardi, N; Arnoult, C; Sobilo, J; Hervé, V; Montharu, J; Guillon, A; Andres, C; Herault, O; Le Pape, A; Diot, P; Lemarié, E; Paintaud, G; Gouilleux-Gruart, V; Heuzé-Vourc'h, N

    2014-12-28

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion of the drug reaches the lung after intravenous injection. The inhalation route is an attractive alternative for the local delivery of mAbs to treat lung diseases, potentially improving tissue concentration and exposure to the drug while limiting passage into the bloodstream and adverse effects. Several studies have shown that the delivery of mAbs or mAb-derived biopharmaceuticals via the airways is feasible and efficient, but little is known about the fate of inhaled mAbs after the deposition of aerosolized particles in the respiratory system. We used cetuximab, an anti-EGFR antibody, as our study model and showed that, after its delivery via the airways, this mAb accumulated rapidly in normal and cancerous tissues in the lung, at concentrations twice those achieved after intravenous delivery, for early time points. The spatial distribution of cetuximab within the tumor was heterogeneous, as reported after i.v. injection. Pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses were carried out in both mice and macaques and showed aerosolized cetuximab bioavailability to be lower and elimination times shorter in macaques than in mice. Using transgenic mice, we showed that FcRn, a key receptor involved in mAb distribution and PK, was likely to make a greater contribution to cetuximab recycling than to the transcytosis of this mAb in the airways. Our results indicate that the inhalation route is potentially useful for the treatment of both acute and chronic lung diseases, to boost and ensure the sustained accumulation of mAbs within the lungs, while limiting their passage into the bloodstream. PMID:25451545

  11. Biokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in heterotransplanted nude rats: Evaluation of corrected specific tissue uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ingvar, C.; Norrgren, K.; Strand, S.E.; Brodin, T.; Joensson, P.E.S.; Sjoegren, H.O. )

    1989-07-01

    A tumor model is presented to study the biokinetics and localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the nude rat (Rowett RNu/RNu) heterotransplanted with human melanoma metastases. The nude rat is larger, less sensitive, and lives longer than the nude mouse. It is, therefore, well suited for in vivo studies of tumor localization with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The tumor-to-host weight ratio was closer to the human situation for the nude rat than for the mouse, and quantitative imaging could be performed with a parallel hole collimator. We followed the antibody biokinetics for as long as 8 days, with repeated blood sampling and imaging. Specific uptake of MAb was higher in tumor tissue than in all other tissues except blood. Initial high uptake was also recorded in the bone marrow. The lymph glands showed a slow uptake of specific and control antibody. A simple in vitro correction procedure is described to calculate the corrected specific tissue uptake (STUcorr) that takes the blood activity into account. Thus it was shown that 80% of the tissue uptake in the dissected liver at 30 hr was due to labeled antibodies circulating in the blood. The specific tissue uptake ratio of antibodies 96.5 and OKT3 (nonspecific control) was unity for all other organs except for tumor tissue, where the ratio was greater than two and even higher when correction for blood content of labeled antibody was made.

  12. In silico design, construction and cloning of Trastuzumab humanized monoclonal antibody: A possible biosimilar for Herceptin

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh-Sharbaf, Soudabeh; Yakhchali, Bagher; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Zeinali, Sirous

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a novel hypothesis in that antibodies may have specificity for two distinct antigens that have been named “dual specificity”. This hypothesis was evaluated for some defined therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Bevacizumab, and Cetuximab. In silico design and construction of expression vectors for trastuzumab monoclonal antibody also in this work were performed. Materials and Methods: First, in bioinformatics studies the 3D structures of concerned mAbs were obtained from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Three-dimensional structural alignments were performed with SIM and MUSTANG softwares. AutoDock4.2 software also was used for the docking analysis. Second, the suitable genes for trastuzumab heavy and light chains were designed, synthesized, and cloned in the prokaryotic vector. These fragments individually were PCR amplified and cloned into pcDNA™ 3.3-TOPO® and pOptiVEC™ TOPO® shuttle vectors, using standard methods. Results: First, many bioinformatics tools and softwares were applied but we did not meet any new dual specificity in the selected antibodies. In the following step, the suitable expression cascade for the heavy and light chains of Trastuzumab therapeutic mAb were designed and constructed. Gene cloning was successfully performed and created constructs were confirmed using gene mapping and sequencing. Conclusions: This study was based on a recently developed technology for mAb expression in mammalian cells. The obtained constructs could be successfully used for biosimilar recombinant mAb production in CHO DG44 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene deficient cell line in the suspension culture medium. PMID:23210080

  13. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven C L; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC were linked by different 2A peptides both in the absence and presence of GSG linkers. Insertion of a furin recognition site upstream of 2A allowed removal of 2A residues that would otherwise be attached to the HC. Different 2A peptides exhibited different cleavage efficiencies that correlated to the mAb expression level. The relative cleavage efficiency of each 2A peptide remains similar for expression of different IgG1 mAbs in different CHO cells. While complete cleavage was not observed for any of the 2A peptides, GSG linkers did enhance the cleavage efficiency and thus the mAb expression level. T2A with the GSG linker (GT2A) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency and mAb expression level. Stably amplified CHO DG44 pools generated using GT2A had titers 357, 416 and 600 mg/L for the 3 mAbs in shake flask batch cultures. Incomplete cleavage likely resulted in incorrectly processed mAb species and aggregates, which were removed with a chromatin-directed clarification method and protein A purification. The vector and methods presented provide an easy process beneficial for both mAb development and manufacturing. PMID:25621616

  14. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven CL; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC were linked by different 2A peptides both in the absence and presence of GSG linkers. Insertion of a furin recognition site upstream of 2A allowed removal of 2A residues that would otherwise be attached to the HC. Different 2A peptides exhibited different cleavage efficiencies that correlated to the mAb expression level. The relative cleavage efficiency of each 2A peptide remains similar for expression of different IgG1 mAbs in different CHO cells. While complete cleavage was not observed for any of the 2A peptides, GSG linkers did enhance the cleavage efficiency and thus the mAb expression level. T2A with the GSG linker (GT2A) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency and mAb expression level. Stably amplified CHO DG44 pools generated using GT2A had titers 357, 416 and 600 mg/L for the 3 mAbs in shake flask batch cultures. Incomplete cleavage likely resulted in incorrectly processed mAb species and aggregates, which were removed with a chromatin-directed clarification method and protein A purification. The vector and methods presented provide an easy process beneficial for both mAb development and manufacturing. PMID:25621616

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against horse immunoglobulins useful for the diagnosis of equine diseases.

    PubMed

    Di Febo, Tiziana; Luciani, Mirella; Ciarelli, Antonella; Bortone, Grazia; Di Pancrazio, Chiara; Rodomonti, Diamante; Teodori, Liana; Tittarelli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against horse IgG were produced by immunizing Balb/c mice with purified horse IgG and were characterized in indirect ELISA versus purified immunoglobulins from donkey, cow, buffalo, sheep, pig, and chicken. Three MAbs (1B10B6C9, 1B10B6C10, 1B10B6E9) reacted only with horse and donkey IgG and IgM and, in western blotting, were specific for the Fc fragment of equine IgG. MAb 1B10B6E9 was used in chemiluminescent immunoblotting assay for the diagnosis of dourine and in indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the diagnosis of African horse sickness and dourine. PMID:24905982

  16. A Monoclonal Antibody That Discriminates Between SNAP-Tagged and CLIP-Tagged Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bialon, Magdalena; Grezella, Clara; Friesen, Ludmila; Sieben, Thorsten; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    SNAP-tag technology allows recombinant proteins to be covalently labeled to O(6)-benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates with 1:1 stoichiometry. By attaching according fluorophores, this method is ideally suited for in vitro and in vivo imaging, as well as protein interaction analyses. Fluorophores modified with BG react with the SNAP-tag, whereas those modified with O(2)-benzylcytosine (BC) conjugate to a more recent derivative known as the CLIP-tag. The orthogonal substrate specificity of the SNAP- and CLIP-tags extends the range of applications by allowing double labeling. We previously developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes both tags. In this study, we describe a new mAb, which is specific for the SNAP-tag alone. Therefore, this mAb allows discrimination between SNAP- and CLIP-tags within a broad range of immunological methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. PMID:27187007

  17. Rapid assessment of the antigenic integrity of tetrameric HLA complexes by human monoclonal HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Eijsink, Chantal; Kester, Michel G D; Franke, Marry E I; Franken, Kees L M C; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Claas, Frans H J; Mulder, Arend

    2006-08-31

    The ability of tetrameric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-peptide complexes (tetramers) to detect antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses has yielded significant information about the generation of in vivo immunity in numerous antigenic systems. Here we present a novel method for rapid validation of tetrameric HLA molecules based on the presence of allodeterminants. Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing polymorphic determinants on HLA class I were immobilized on polystyrene microparticles and used to probe the structural integrity of tetrameric HLA class I molecules by flow cytometry. A total of 22 tetramers, based on HLA-A1, A2, A3, A24, B7 and B8 were reactive with their counterpart mAbs, thus confirming their antigenic integrity. A positive outcome of this mAb test ensures that tetrameric HLA class I can be used with greater confidence in subsequent functional assays. PMID:16973172

  18. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of multiple myeloma: current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lonial, S; Durie, B; Palumbo, A; San-Miguel, J

    2016-01-01

    The treatment landscape for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is constantly evolving. Over the past decade, the introduction of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs has led to notable changes in therapeutic strategy, and improvements in survival, yet MM remains incurable in the vast majority of cases. More recently, a targeted approach to MM treatment has emerged, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to target antigens expressed on the surface of MM cells. MAbs tested to date kill MM cells via the host's immune system and/or by promoting apoptosis, and appear to have generally improved tolerability compared with currently available treatments. Due to their distinct mode of action, mAbs are promising both for patients who have exhausted current regimens, and as part of first-line treatments in newly diagnosed patients. This review examines the recent developments in mAb-based therapy for MM, primarily focused on those agents in ongoing clinical testing. PMID:26265184

  19. Production of monoclonal antibody specific for bottlenose dolphin neutrophils and its application to cell separation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masako; Itou, Takuya; Nagatsuka, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    The authors produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dolphin neutrophils by fusing mouse myeloma cells with lymph node cells from a Wistar rat immunized with bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). This mAb (DN1) was reactive against 77.1 +/- 8.6% of dolphin peripheral blood PMN by flow cytometric analysis; furthermore, there was no cross-reactivity with human or bovine leukocytes. The DN1-positive cells isolated with a sorting cytometer were almost all (99.7%) neutrophils. By using DN1 in conjunction with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), the authors isolated neutrophils and eosinophils from density gradient-fractionated PMN with 100% and 95.6 +/- 4.8% purities, respectively. These results suggest that this mAb specific for bottlenose dolphin neutrophils is useful as a potential reagent to study bottlenose dolphin neutrophils and eosinophils. PMID:18773918

  20. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  1. Consistency of quality attributes for the glycosylated monoclonal antibody Humira® (adalimumab)

    PubMed Central

    Tebbey, Paul W; Varga, Amy; Naill, Michael; Clewell, Jerry; Venema, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Humira® (adalimumab) is a recombinant human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) glycoprotein consisting of 1330 amino acids that is specific for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The biological activity and clinical profile of mAb therapeutics, including adalimumab, is influenced by their protein structure and glycosylation patterns, which can be affected by the expression system, cell culture conditions and purification process methodology. While clinical outcome cannot yet be attributed to many of the individual structural features that constitute a mAb, it is evident that detailed structural attribute analysis is necessary if structural contributions to function are to be comprehensively defined. Adalimumab product quality data generated from over a decade of manufacturing across multiple production sites and through a series of manufacturing scale changes are presented here. These data reveal a consistent and tightly controlled profile for the product. PMID:26230301

  2. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics: the failure and legacy of Centoxin.

    PubMed

    Marks, Lara

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  3. Functionalization of scaffolds with chimeric anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies for osseous regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sahar; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Pi, Sung Hee; Han, Alexander; Abdelhamid, Alaa I.; Zadeh, Homayoun H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of murine anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) immobilized on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) to mediate de novo bone formation, a process termed antibody mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR). The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy of a newly generated chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb in mediating AMOR, as well as to evaluate the suitability of different biomaterials as scaffolds to participate in AMOR. Chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb was immobilized on 4 biomaterials, namely, titanium microbeads (Ti), alginate hydrogel, macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate (MBCP) and ACS, followed by surgical implantation into rat critical-size calvarial defects. Animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks and the degree of bone fill was assessed using micro-CT and histomorphometry. Results demonstrated local persistence of chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb up to 8 weeks, as well as significant de novo bone regeneration in sites implanted with chimeric anti-BMP-2 antibody immobilized on each of the 4 scaffolds. Ti and MBCP showed the highest volume of bone regeneration, presumably due to their resistance to compression. Alginate and ACS also mediated de novo bone formation, though significant volumetric shrinkage was noted. In vitro assays demonstrated cross-reactivity of chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb with BMP-4 and BMP-7. Immune complex of anti-BMP-2 mAb with BMP-2 induced osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells in vitro, involving expression of RUNX2 and phosphorylation of Smad1. The present data demonstrated the ability of chimeric anti- BMP-2 mAb to functionalize different biomaterial with varying characteristics to mediate osteogenesis. PMID:24055525

  4. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  5. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  6. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B–Specific Monoclonal Antibody 20B1 Successfully Treats Diverse Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Avanish K.; Wang, Xiaobo; Scharff, Matthew D.; MacIntyre, Jennifer; Zollner, Richard S.; Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Martinez, Luis R.; Byrne, Fergus R.; Fries, Bettina C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major health threat in the United States. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent superantigen that contributes to its virulence. High mortality and frequent failure of therapy despite available antibiotics have stimulated research efforts to develop adjunctive therapies. Methods. Treatment benefits of SEB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 20B1 were investigated in mice in sepsis, superficial skin, and deep-tissue infection models. Results. Mice challenged with a SEB-producing MRSA strain developed fatal sepsis, extensive tissue skin infection, and abscess-forming deep-seeded thigh muscle infection. Animals preimmunized against SEB or treated passively with mAb 20B1 exhibited enhanced survival in the sepsis model, whereas decrease of bacterial burden was observed in the superficial skin and deep-tissue models. mAb 20B1 bound to SEB in the infected tissue and decreased abscess formation and proinflammatory cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and neutrophil recruitment. Conclusions. mAb 20B1, an SEB-neutralizing mAb, is effective against MRSA infection. mAb 20B1 protects against lethal sepsis and reduces skin tissue invasion and deep-abscess formation. The mAb penetrates well into the abscess and binds to SEB. It affects the outcome of S. aureus infection by modulating the host's proinflammatory immune response. PMID:23922375

  7. CD16 polymorphisms and NK activation induced by monoclonal antibody-coated target cells.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Julie A; Weiner, George J

    2005-09-01

    CD16 and natural killer (NK) cells appear to play a central role in mediating the anti-tumor effects of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy, yet little is known about changes in NK cells that result from interaction of the NK cells with mAb-coated tumor cells under physiologic conditions. We developed a system using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and either transformed B cells or breast cancer cells to assess how mAbs impact on NK cell phenotype. Rituximab, apolizumab and trastuzumab induced modulation of CD16 and upregulation of CD54 on NK cells when the appropriate target cells were present. Higher concentrations of mAb were needed to induce these changes on NK cells from subjects with the lower affinity CD16 polymorphism. Phenotypic changes were greater in NK cells from subjects with the higher affinity polymorphism even when saturating concentrations of mAb were used, demonstrating increased concentration of mAb can overcome some, but not all, of the influence CD16 polymorphisms have on NK activation. These studies provide a straightforward and easily reproducible technique to measure the ability of mAb-coated tumor cells to activate NK cells in vitro which should be particularly useful as mAbs with varying affinity for both target antigen and Fc receptor (FcR) are developed. PMID:16109421

  8. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody in the myelin-associated protein CNP.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R; Kalbacher, H; Reiser, G

    1997-08-18

    The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAb-46-1) directed against the myelin-associated protein CNP (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase; EC 3.1.4.37) from several species was characterized. MAb-46-1 can be employed for immunoprecipitation, immunostaining in Western blots and in immunohistochemistry. Short peptides derived from the human CNP1 peptide sequence were synthesized and used in enzyme linked immunosorbent assays to test the reactivity of MAb-46-1. Coarse screening experiments enabled us to localize the epitope recognized by MAb-46-1 to the amino acid residues 9 to 19 close to the N-terminus. Further investigations using shorter peptides comprising this part of the protein allowed us to identify a 9 amino acid residue long peptide (amino acids 11 to 19: ELQFPFLQD) which represents the minimal epitope recognized by MAb-46-1, probably through a 3-dimensional structure and less likely a straight linear peptide. The epitope seems to be stabilized also by the attached amino acids 7 to 10 (KDKP). The peptide sequence 9-19 is conserved in all CNP sequences described so far. Thus, MAb-46-1 might be of general usefulness for further studies of the not yet identified function of the myelin-associated protein CNP. PMID:9268698

  9. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  10. Variable expression of epitopes on the surface of Mycoplasma gallisepticum demonstrated with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Kleven, S H; Elfaki, M G; Snoj, A; Dovc, P; Dorrer, D; Russ, I

    1994-03-01

    Twelve monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg) strains F, R, S6(208) and PET2 were used for analysis of epitopes of 22 Mg strains. Six Mabs recognized surface epitopes in the majority of strains, but did not react with variant strains like K 503 and K 703. Two Mabs reacted with epitopes on about 56 kilodalton (kDa) proteins and showing consistent expression on Mg colonies. Three Mabs recognized three different variable surface epitopes associated with about 67 kDa proteins and one Mab variable epitope on about 33 and 80 kDa proteins. Two-dimensional immunoblotting showed considerable differences in the charge of proteins bearing variable surface epitopes in different Mg strains. Subcloning of four low passage Mg strains using Mabs for screening populations that derived from a single colony with defined surface epitopes showed that some colonies may switch surface epitopes associated with 67 and 80 kDa proteins. This switching was reversible and generated subpopulations of Mg expressing different combinations of surface epitopes. Phenotypic switching of epitopes probably occurs also in vivo and may be the mechanism enabling Mg to evade the host immune response. PMID:18671069

  11. Regulation of complement and modulation of its activity in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Saskia; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Boross, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is a powerful tool of the innate immune system to eradicate pathogens. Both in vitro and in vivo evidence indicates that therapeutic anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can activate the complement system by the classical pathway. However, the contribution of complement to the efficacy of mAbs is still debated, mainly due to the lack of convincing data in patients. A beneficial role for complement during mAb therapy is supported by the fact that cancer cells often upregulate complement-regulatory proteins (CRPs). Polymorphisms in various CRPs were previously associated with complement-mediated disorders. In this review the role of complement in anti-tumor mAb therapy will be discussed with special emphasis on strategies aiming at modifying complement activity. In the future, clinical efficacy of mAbs with enhanced effector functions together with comprehensive analysis of polymorphisms in CRPs in mAb-treated patients will further clarify the role of complement in mAb therapy. PMID:25517299

  12. Investigating high-concentration monoclonal antibody powder suspension in nonaqueous suspension vehicles for subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Mayumi; Armstrong, Nick; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2012-12-01

    Developing high-concentration monoclonal antibody (mAb) liquid formulations for subcutaneous (s.c.) administration is challenging because increased viscosity makes injection difficult. To overcome this obstacle, we investigated a nonaqueous powder suspension approach. Three IgG1 mAbs were spray dried and suspended at different concentrations in Miglyol® 840, benzyl benzoate, or ethyl lactate. Suspensions were characterized for viscosity, particle size, and syringeability; physical stability was visually inspected. Suspensions generally outperformed liquid solutions for injectability despite higher viscosity at the same mAb concentrations. Powder formulations and properties had little effect on viscosity or injectability. Ethyl lactate suspensions had lowest viscosity (<20 cP) and lowest syringe injection glide force (<15 N) at mAb concentrations as high as 333 mg/mL (500 mg powder/mL). Inverse gas chromatography analysis indicated that the vehicle was the most important factor impacting suspension performance. Ethyl lactate rendered greater heat of sorption (suggesting strong particle-suspension vehicle interaction may reduce particle-particle self-association, leading to low suspension viscosity and glide force) but lacked the physical suspension stability exhibited by the other vehicles. Specific mixtures of ethyl lactate and Miglyol® 840 improved overall performance in high mAb concentration suspensions. This study demonstrated the viability of high mAb concentration (>300 mg/mL) in suspension formulations for s.c. administration. PMID:23001898

  13. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James E; Hastie, Kathryn M; Cross, Robert W; Yenni, Rachael E; Elliott, Deborah H; Rouelle, Julie A; Kannadka, Chandrika B; Smira, Ashley A; Garry, Courtney E; Bradley, Benjamin T; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Boisen, Matt L; Hartnett, Jessica N; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Rowland, Megan M; Heinrich, Megan L; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C; Andersen, Kristian G; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A; Okokhere, Peter O; Follarin, Onikepe A; Schieffelin, John S; Pitts, Kelly R; Geisbert, Joan B; Kulakoski, Peter C; Wilson, Russell B; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C; Gevao, Sahr M; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Geisbert, Thomas W; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  14. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Nuclear Protein FAM76B.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Human FAM76B (hFAM76B) is a 39 kDa protein that contains homopolymeric histidine tracts, a targeting signal for nuclear speckles. FAM76B is highly conserved among different species, suggesting that it may play an important physiological role in normal cellular functions. However, a lack of appropriate tools has hampered study of this potentially important protein. To facilitate research into the biological function(s) of FAM76B, murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against hFAM76B were generated by using purified, prokaryotically expressed hFAM76B protein. Six strains of MAbs specific for hFAM76B were obtained and characterized. The specificity of MAbs was validated by using FAM76B-/- HEK 293 cell line. Double immunofluorescence followed by laser confocal microscopy confirmed the nuclear speckle localization of hFAM76B, and the specific domains recognized by different MAbs were further elucidated by Western blot. Due to the high conservation of protein sequences between mouse and human FAM76B, MAbs against hFAM76B were shown to react with mouse FAM76B (mFAM76B) specifically. Lastly, FAM76B was found to be expressed in the normal tissues of most human organs, though to different extents. The MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating the biological function(s) of FAM76B. PMID:27018871

  15. Structure-function analyses of diphtheria toxin by use of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Rolf, J M; Eidels, L

    1993-01-01

    A large panel of hybridomas, secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for diphtheria toxin (DT) and prepared by immunization with either intact DT or its A or B fragment (DTA or DTB), have been isolated and characterized. The 213 MAbs were initially screened for reactivity to DT by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses and then were classified for their reactivity with DT, DTB, or DTA by solid-phase Western blot (immunoblot) analyses; 129 DTB-specific, 51 DTA-specific, and 33 non-fragment-assignable MAbs were obtained. Of the DTB MAbs, 118 recognize epitopes between residues 194 and 453, 10 recognize epitopes between residues 454 and 481, and 1 recognizes an epitope present in denatured toxin but not present in native DT located within the carboxyl-terminal receptor-binding region of DT (residues 482 to 535). Those MAbs that were the most protective in a cytotoxicity assay recognized native toxin in solution and inhibited binding of radiolabeled toxin to Vero cells to the greatest extent. A number of MAbs were able to detect epitopes that became more or less accessible when the toxin was preincubated at acidic (endosomal-mimicking) pH, suggesting that the epitopes they recognize may be important in the low-pH-induced insertion and/or translocation of DT across the endosomal membrane. Images PMID:7679377

  16. Converting monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapies from passive to active: bringing immune complexes into play.

    PubMed

    Lambour, Jennifer; Naranjo-Gomez, Mar; Piechaczyk, Marc; Pelegrin, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which currently constitute the main class of biotherapeutics, are now recognized as major medical tools that are increasingly being considered to fight severe viral infections. Indeed, the number of antiviral mAbs developed in recent years has grown exponentially. Although their direct effects on viral blunting have been studied in detail, their potential immunomodulatory actions have been overlooked until recently. The ability of antiviral mAbs to modulate antiviral immune responses in infected organisms has recently been revealed. More specifically, upon recognition of their cognate antigens, mAbs form immune complexes (ICs) that can be recognized by the Fc receptors expressed on different immune cells of infected individuals. This binding may be followed by the modulation of the host immune responses. Harnessing this immunomodulatory property may facilitate improvements in the therapeutic potential of antiviral mAbs. This review focuses on the role of ICs formed with different viral determinants and mAbs in the induction of antiviral immune responses in the context of both passive immunotherapies and vaccination strategies. Potential deleterious effects of ICs on the host immune response are also discussed. PMID:27530750

  17. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Nuclear Protein FAM76B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Human FAM76B (hFAM76B) is a 39 kDa protein that contains homopolymeric histidine tracts, a targeting signal for nuclear speckles. FAM76B is highly conserved among different species, suggesting that it may play an important physiological role in normal cellular functions. However, a lack of appropriate tools has hampered study of this potentially important protein. To facilitate research into the biological function(s) of FAM76B, murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against hFAM76B were generated by using purified, prokaryotically expressed hFAM76B protein. Six strains of MAbs specific for hFAM76B were obtained and characterized. The specificity of MAbs was validated by using FAM76B-/- HEK 293 cell line. Double immunofluorescence followed by laser confocal microscopy confirmed the nuclear speckle localization of hFAM76B, and the specific domains recognized by different MAbs were further elucidated by Western blot. Due to the high conservation of protein sequences between mouse and human FAM76B, MAbs against hFAM76B were shown to react with mouse FAM76B (mFAM76B) specifically. Lastly, FAM76B was found to be expressed in the normal tissues of most human organs, though to different extents. The MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating the biological function(s) of FAM76B. PMID:27018871

  18. Production and Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Plasmopara halstedii

    PubMed Central

    Bouterige, S.; Robert, R.; Bouchara, J. P.; Marot-Leblond, A.; Molinero, V.; Senet, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Sunflower downy mildew, caused by the fungus Plasmopara halstedii, is a potentially devastating disease. We produced two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (12C9 and 18E2) by immunizing mice with a partially purified extract of P. halstedii race 1. Both MAbs detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) all races of P. halstedii present in France. No cross-reactions were observed with Plasmopara viticola or with other fungi commonly associated with sunflowers. Both MAbs recognized the same three fungal antigens with molecular masses of 68, 140, and 192 kDa. However, the epitopes on the fungal antigens were distinct and repetitive. Seed homogenates from infected plants were incubated in wells coated with MAb 18E2. This resulted in the trapping of P. halstedii antigens that were identified with biotinylated MAb 12C9. No reactions were seen with seed homogenates from healthy plants. Thus, our results suggest that these MAbs might be used to develop a sandwich ELISA detection system for P. halstedii in infected seeds. PMID:10919781

  19. Production of a novel monoclonal antibody, JT-95, which can detect antigen of thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, H; Hosoya, T; Sakurai, K; Mori, Y; Watanabe, M; Kisaki, H; Ohno, T

    1996-04-15

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) JT-95 was produced by immunization of mice with membrane fractions of a human thyroid carcinoma. Immuno-histochemical staining has demonstrated that the antigen recognized by JT-95 is strongly expressed in 95 (95%) of 100 cases of papillary carcinomas and in 3 (75%) of 4 cases of follicular carcinomas. In benign diseases of the thyroid gland, MAb JT-95 reacted with 0 (0%) of 39 adenomas, 1 (4%) of 21 adenomatous goiters, 0 (0%) of 8 hyperthyroidism specimens, and 3 (38%) of 8 chronic thyroiditis specimens. The antigen detected by MAb JT-95 has an apparent Mr 250,000 in thyroid carcinomas. Moreover, circulating antigen in thyroid carcinoma patients was detected by MAb JT-95 in an ELISA and in Western blotting. The circulating antigen has a Mr 105,000. MAb JT-95 conjugated with (131) I was administrated to nude mice bearing a human thyroid carcinoma. JT-95 131I accumulation at the transplanted tumor was visualized by autoradiography with 2.68-14.75-fold higher levels detected at the xenograft compared to that for normal organs. Based on these data, MAb JT-95 may be useful in the diagnosis detection and therapy of thyroid carcinoma. PMID:8620498

  20. Monoclonal antibodies raised against 167-180 aa sequence of human carbonic anhydrase XII inhibit its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zilnyte, Milda; Petrikaite, Vilma; Jogaite, Vaida; Matuliene, Jurgita; Gudleviciene, Zivile; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Human carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII) is a single-pass transmembrane protein with an extracellular catalytic domain. This enzyme is being recognized as a potential biomarker for different tumours. The current study was aimed to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) neutralizing the enzymatic activity of CA XII. Bioinformatics analysis of CA XII structure revealed surface-exposed sequences located in a proximity of its catalytic centre. Two MAbs against the selected antigenic peptide spanning 167-180 aa sequence of CA XII were generated. The MAbs were reactive with recombinant catalytic domain of CA XII expressed either in E. coli or mammalian cells. Inhibitory activity of the MAbs was demonstrated by a stopped flow CO2 hydration assay. The study provides new data on the surface-exposed linear CA XII epitope that may serve as a target for inhibitory antibodies with a potential immunotherapeutic application. PMID:24400872

  1. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  2. Impact of Valency of a Glycoprotein B-Specific Monoclonal Antibody on Neutralization of Herpes Simplex Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Adalbert; Krauss, Jürgen; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Däumer, Martin P.; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Dittmer, Ulf; Schneweis, Karl E.; Jäger, Dirk; Roggendorf, Michael; Arndt, Michaela A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is an integral part of the multicomponent fusion system required for virus entry and cell-cell fusion. Here we investigated the mechanism of viral neutralization by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) 2c, which specifically recognizes the gB of HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Binding of MAb 2c to a type-common discontinuous epitope of gB resulted in highly efficient neutralization of HSV at the postbinding/prefusion stage and completely abrogated the viral cell-to-cell spread in vitro. Mapping of the antigenic site recognized by MAb 2c to the recently solved crystal structure of the HSV-1 gB ectodomain revealed that its discontinuous epitope is only partially accessible within the observed multidomain trimer conformation of gB, likely representing its postfusion conformation. To investigate how MAb 2c may interact with gB during membrane fusion, we characterized the properties of monovalent (Fab and scFv) and bivalent [IgG and F(ab′)2] derivatives of MAb 2c. Our data show that the neutralization capacity of MAb 2c is dependent on cross-linkage of gB trimers. As a result, only bivalent derivatives of MAb 2c exhibited high neutralizing activity in vitro. Notably, bivalent MAb 2c not only was capable of preventing mucocutaneous disease in severely immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice upon vaginal HSV-1 challenge but also protected animals even with neuronal HSV infection. We also report for the first time that an anti-gB specific monoclonal antibody prevents HSV-1-induced encephalitis entirely independently from complement activation, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and cellular immunity. This indicates the potential for further development of MAb 2c as an anti-HSV drug. PMID:21123390

  3. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) and Neu5Gc-α-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while α-gal attached to Fc glycans was not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Neu5Gc antibody resided in a small subset of mAbs carrying two or more Fc Neu5Gc, while mAbs harboring only one Neu5Gc showed no reactivity. Since most Neu5Gc epitopes were distributed singly on the Fc of mAbs, our results suggest that the potential antigenicity of Fc Neu5Gc is low. Our study could be referenced in the process design and optimization of mAb production in murine myeloma cells and in the quality control of mAbs for industries and regulatory authorities. PMID:26823113

  4. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) and Neu5Gc-α-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while α-gal attached to Fc glycans was not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Neu5Gc antibody resided in a small subset of mAbs carrying two or more Fc Neu5Gc, while mAbs harboring only one Neu5Gc showed no reactivity. Since most Neu5Gc epitopes were distributed singly on the Fc of mAbs, our results suggest that the potential antigenicity of Fc Neu5Gc is low. Our study could be referenced in the process design and optimization of mAb production in murine myeloma cells and in the quality control of mAbs for industries and regulatory authorities. PMID:26823113

  5. Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Pandemic 1957 H2N2 and Pandemic 1968 H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Jens C.; Tsibane, Tshidi; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Huffman, Chelsey J.; Albrecht, Randy; Blum, David L.; Ramos, Irene; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Edwards, Kathryn M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the human antibody response to the 1957 pandemic H2N2 influenza A virus has been largely limited to serologic studies. We generated five influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA)-reactive human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by hybridoma technology from the peripheral blood of healthy donors who were born between 1950 and 1968. Two MAbs reacted with the pandemic H2N2 virus, two recognized the pandemic H3N2 virus, and remarkably, one reacted with both the pandemic H2N2 and H3N2 viruses. Each of these five naturally occurring MAbs displayed hemagglutination inhibition activity, suggesting specificity for the globular head domain of influenza virus HA. When incubated with virus, MAbs 8F8, 8M2, and 2G1 each elicited H2N2 escape mutations immediately adjacent to the receptor-binding domain on the HA globular head in embryonated chicken eggs. All H2N2-specific MAbs were able to inhibit a 2006 swine H2N3 influenza virus. MAbs 8M2 and 2G1 shared the VH1-69 germ line gene, but these antibodies were otherwise not genetically related. Each antibody was able to protect mice in a lethal H2N2 virus challenge. Thus, even 43 years after circulation of H2N2 viruses, these subjects possessed peripheral blood B cells encoding potent inhibiting antibodies specific for a conserved region on the globular head of the pandemic H2 HA. PMID:22457520

  6. Novel monoclonal antibody against beta 1 integrin enhances cisplatin efficacy in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Young; Cho, Woon-Dong; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Choi, Da Bin; Hong, Jeong won; Kim, Soseul; Moon, Yoo Ri; Son, Seung-Myoung; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lee, Ho-Chang; Song, Hyung Geun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of anti-beta 1 integrin monoclonal antibody in lung cancer treatment has proven beneficial. Here, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), called P5, by immunizing mice with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Its anti-tumor effect is now being tested, in a clinical phase III trial, in combinatorial treatments with various chemical drugs. To confirm that P5 indeed binds to beta 1 integrin, cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with commercial anti-beta 1 integrin mAb (TS2/16) and immunoblotted against P5 to reveal a 140 kDa molecular weight band, as expected. Immunoprecipitation with P5 followed by LC/MS protein sequence analysis further verified P5 antigen to be beta 1 integrin. Cisplatin treatment upregulated cell surface expression of beta 1 integrin in A549 cells, while causing inhibition of cell growth. When cells were co-treated with different concentrations of P5 mAb, the cisplatin-mediated inhibitory effect was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show that a combinatorial treatment of P5 mAb and cisplatin in A549 cells resulted in a 30% increase in apoptosis, compared to baseline, and significantly more when compared to either the cisplatin or P5 alone group. The entire peptide sequences in CDR from variable region of Ig heavy and light chain gene for P5 mAb are also disclosed. Together, these results provide evidence of the beneficial effect of P5 mAb in combinatorial treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies reactive with chicken IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Jeong, M S; Del Cacho, E; Kim, J B; Kim, H R; Min, W; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-1β proteins from chicken, duck, goose, turkey, and pigeon share 77 to 99% amino acid sequence similarity among themselves, and only 31 to 35% sequence similarity is shared between avian and mammalian IL-1β. There have been no antibodies that specifically detect avian IL-1β, and the current study was conducted to develop mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against chicken IL-1β (chIL-1β) to further define its biochemical and immunological properties. In this study, 2 mouse mAb that are specific for chIL-1β were produced and characterized. Both mAb identified a 66.0 kDa recombinant chIL-1β protein expressed in Escherichia coli by Western blot analysis that corresponded to the expected molecular weight of a recombinant fusion protein containing the full-length 23.0 kDa chIL-1β protein and a 43.0 kDa maltose binding protein tag. Immunohistochemical analysis identified cells producing endogenous chIL-1β in the cecal tonsils, bursa of Fabricius, and spleen. Purified recombinant chIL-1β dose-dependently stimulated the proliferation and nitric oxide production by thymocytes, and both activities were inhibited by co-incubation with the 2 chIL-1β mAb described in this paper. These mAb will be important immune reagents for basic and applied poultry research of IL-1β in poultry. PMID:25037821

  8. Therapeutic effect of anti-feline TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody for feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Kawagoe, Kohei; Kito, Akihiko; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2016-02-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) replication in macrophages/monocytes induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production, and that the TNF-alpha produced was involved in aggravating the pathology of FIP. We previously reported the preparation of a feline TNF-alpha (fTNF-alpha)-neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody (anti-fTNF-alpha mAb). This anti-fTNF-alpha mAb 2-4 was confirmed to inhibit the following fTNF-alpha-induced conditions in vitro. In the present study, we investigated whether mAb 2-4 improved the FIP symptoms and survival rate of experimentally FIPV-inoculated SPF cats. Progression to FIP was prevented in 2 out of 3 cats treated with mAb 2-4, whereas all 3 cats developed FIP in the placebo control group. Plasma alpha1-glycoprotein and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were improved by the administration of mAb 2-4, and the peripheral lymphocyte count also recovered. These results strongly suggested that the anti-fTNF-alpha antibody is effective for the treatment of FIP. PMID:26850532

  9. Novel monoclonal antibodies to normal and pathologically altered human TDP-43 proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The RNA/DNA-binding protein, TDP-43, is the key component of ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the majority of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) referred to collectively as TDP-43 proteinopathies. To further elucidate mechanisms of pathological TDP-43 processing and identify TDP-43 epitopes that could be useful as potential biomarkers of TDP-43 proteinopathies, we developed a panel of novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed at regions extending across the length of TDP-43. Here, we confirm previous observations that there is no or minimal accumulation of TDP-43 N-terminal domains in neocortical inclusions in human TDP-43 proteinopathy tissues and we identify a subset of these MAbs that are specific for human versus mouse TDP-43. Notably, one of these MAbs recognized an epitope that preferentially detected pathological TDP-43 inclusions with negligible reactivity for normal nuclear TDP-43 resembling anti-phospho-TDP-43 specific antibodies that only bind pathological TDP-43. Hence, we infer that this new MAb recognizes a phosphorylation independent but disease-specific pathologic conformation in abnormal TDP-43. These data suggest that the novel MAbs reported here will be useful for patient-oriented research as well as for studies of animal and cell-based models of TDP-43 proteinopathies including ALS and FTLD-TDP. PMID:24690345

  10. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  11. Novel monoclonal antibodies to normal and pathologically altered human TDP-43 proteins.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Linda K; Irwin, David J; Walker, Adam K; Xu, Yan; Riddle, Dawn M; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2014-01-01

    The RNA/DNA-binding protein, TDP-43, is the key component of ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the majority of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) referred to collectively as TDP-43 proteinopathies. To further elucidate mechanisms of pathological TDP-43 processing and identify TDP-43 epitopes that could be useful as potential biomarkers of TDP-43 proteinopathies, we developed a panel of novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed at regions extending across the length of TDP-43. Here, we confirm previous observations that there is no or minimal accumulation of TDP-43 N-terminal domains in neocortical inclusions in human TDP-43 proteinopathy tissues and we identify a subset of these MAbs that are specific for human versus mouse TDP-43. Notably, one of these MAbs recognized an epitope that preferentially detected pathological TDP-43 inclusions with negligible reactivity for normal nuclear TDP-43 resembling anti-phospho-TDP-43 specific antibodies that only bind pathological TDP-43. Hence, we infer that this new MAb recognizes a phosphorylation independent but disease-specific pathologic conformation in abnormal TDP-43. These data suggest that the novel MAbs reported here will be useful for patient-oriented research as well as for studies of animal and cell-based models of TDP-43 proteinopathies including ALS and FTLD-TDP. PMID:24690345

  12. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O157.

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, R B; He, Y; Keen, J E; Littledike, E T; Kwang, J

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the O157 antigen is an essential part of the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7, which is recognized as a major etiologic agent of hemorrhagic colitis. However, polyclonal antibodies produced against E. coli O157:H7 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may react with several other bacteria including Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Escherichia hermannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We produced eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the LPS of E. coli O157. Western blots (immunoblots) of both the phenol phase (smooth) and the aqueous phase (rough) of hot phenol-water-purified LPS indicated that three of the MAbs were specific for the O antigen and five were reactive with the LPS core. The eight MAbs could be further differentiated by their reactivities to Salmonella O30 LPS (group N), which is reported to be identical to the E. coli O157 antigen. All eight MAbs reacted strongly to all of the 64 strains of E. coli O157 tested, which included 47 isolates of O157:H7 and 17 other O157 strains. None of the eight MAbs cross-reacted with any of the 38 other E. coli serotypes tested, which consisted of 29 different O-antigen serotypes, or with 38 strains (22 genera) of non-E. coli gram-negative enteric bacteria. PMID:9041412

  13. Production and characterization of domain-specific monoclonal antibodies against human ECM1.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-05-01

    Human extracellular matrix protein-1 (hECM1), a secreted glycoprotein, is widely expressed in different tissues and organs. ECM1 has been implicated in multiple biological functions, which are potentially mediated by the interaction of different ECM1 domains with its ligands. However, the exact biological functions of ECM1 have not been elucidated yet, and the functional study of ECM1 has been partially hampered by the lack of sensitive and specific antibodies, especially those targeting different ECM1 domains. In this study, six strains of monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hECM1 were generated using purified, prokaryotically-expressed hECM1 as an immunogen. The MAbs were shown to be highly sensitive and specific, and suitable for western blot, immunoprecipitation assays and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the particular ECM1 domains recognized by different MAbs were identified. Lastly, the MAbs were found to have neutralizing activities, inhibiting the proliferation, migration and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, the domain-specific anti-ECM1 MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating ECM1's biological functions, and cellular pathways in which it is involved. PMID:26826312

  14. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  15. Monoclonal antibody therapies for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: differentiating mechanisms and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lycke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) target immune cells or other molecules involved in pathogenic pathways with extraordinary specificity. Natalizumab and alemtuzumab are the only two currently approved mAbs for the treatment of MS, having demonstrated significant reduction in clinical and magnetic resonance imaging disease activity and disability in clinical studies. Ocrelizumab and daclizumab are in the late stages of phase III trials, and several other mAbs are in the early stages of clinical evaluation. mAbs have distinct structural characteristics (e.g. chimeric, humanized, fully human) and unique targets (e.g. blocking interactions, induction of signal transduction by receptor binding, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) conferring different mechanisms of action in MS. Because of these differences, mAbs for MS do not constitute a single treatment class; each must be considered individually when selecting appropriate therapy. Furthermore, in reviewing the data from clinical studies of mAbs, attention should be drawn to use of different comparators (e.g. placebo or interferon β-1a) and study designs. Each mAb treatment has a unique administration schedule. In the decision to select the appropriate treatment for each individual MS patient, careful review of the benefits relative to risks of mAbs is balanced against the risk of development of MS-associated disability. PMID:26600872

  16. Monoclonal antibody therapies for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: differentiating mechanisms and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lycke, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) target immune cells or other molecules involved in pathogenic pathways with extraordinary specificity. Natalizumab and alemtuzumab are the only two currently approved mAbs for the treatment of MS, having demonstrated significant reduction in clinical and magnetic resonance imaging disease activity and disability in clinical studies. Ocrelizumab and daclizumab are in the late stages of phase III trials, and several other mAbs are in the early stages of clinical evaluation. mAbs have distinct structural characteristics (e.g. chimeric, humanized, fully human) and unique targets (e.g. blocking interactions, induction of signal transduction by receptor binding, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) conferring different mechanisms of action in MS. Because of these differences, mAbs for MS do not constitute a single treatment class; each must be considered individually when selecting appropriate therapy. Furthermore, in reviewing the data from clinical studies of mAbs, attention should be drawn to use of different comparators (e.g. placebo or interferon β-1a) and study designs. Each mAb treatment has a unique administration schedule. In the decision to select the appropriate treatment for each individual MS patient, careful review of the benefits relative to risks of mAbs is balanced against the risk of development of MS-associated disability. PMID:26600872

  17. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  18. Taxonomic investigation of Legionella pneumophila using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brindle, R J; Bryant, T N; Draper, P W

    1989-03-01

    A panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies was used to produce patterns of immunofluorescent staining of 468 isolates of Legionella pneumophila. Twelve monoclonal antibodies were selected that divided L. pneumophila into 17 phenons which, in the majority of cases, conform to serogroup divisions. These phenons are more easily defined than the present serogroups, and isolates can be placed in them with little ambiguity. The standardized set of monoclonal antibodies was also used to define the subgroups of serogroup 1. PMID:2654183

  19. The clinical pharmacology of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of malignancy; have the magic bullets arrived?

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Barrett W; Ernstoff, Marc S

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are proteins in the immunoglobulin family that bind to specific protein epitope targets on cancer and stromal cells, allowing them to be successfully exploited as therapeutic agents. The prototype Mabs were produced from fusion of mouse B lymphocytes and mouse myeloma cells and were entirely murine in sequence. Subsequent advances in technology have allowed for humanized Mabs, which have different pharmacokinetic properties than murine Mabs in humans. Mabs antitumour activity is mediated through direct interaction with specific target molecules, deployment of immune cytotoxic pathways, or through chaperoning cytotoxic agents to tumour. Mabs are typically administered intravenously, are generally well tolerated and can have powerful anticancer activity. Humanized Mabs have a t1/2 in human sera of 2–3 weeks, which determines the frequency of administration. At present, nine clinically approved Mabs are used in the treatment of human cancer, and many others are in clinical trials. We discuss the pharmacology, clinical indications, and toxicity of the currently available anticancer Mabs in this review. PMID:18503606

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Human IgM Fc Receptor Inhibit Ligand-binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kubagawa, Yoshiki; Honjo, Kazuhito; Kang, Dong-Won

    2014-01-01

    A panel of six different murine hybridoma clones secreting IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the human IgM Fc receptor (FcμR) was generated. All MAbs specifically precipitated a major protein of ∼60 kDa from membrane lysates of FcμR-bearing, but not FcμR-negative, cells as did IgM-ligands. Pre-incubation of membrane lysate of FcμR-bearing cells with these MAbs completely removed the ∼60 kDa IgM-reactive protein. By using recombinant human/mouse chimeric FcμR proteins, the epitope recognized by HM7 and HM10 MAbs was mapped to the Ig-like domain of human FcμR, whereas the other MAbs recognized the stalk region. Pre-incubation of FcμR+ cells with the Ig-like domain-specific MAbs, but not with others, markedly inhibited subsequent IgM-ligand binding. A similar, but much weaker, inhibition was also observed when the incubation order was reversed. When FcμR+ cells were simultaneously incubated with both IgM-ligands and MAbs, HM7 MAb efficiently competed with IgM for FcμR binding. Unlike control Jurkat cells, FcμR-bearing cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by agonistic IgM anti-Fas MAb (CH11); however, addition of the HM7 MAb inhibited the interaction of the Fc portion of CH11 MAb with FcμR, thereby promoting apoptosis of FcμR-bearing Jurkat cells. The variable regions of the HM7 MAb were composed of Ighv14-3, Ighd1-2, and Ighj2 for the γ2b heavy chain and Igk3-4 and Igkj2 for the κ light chain. These findings suggest that HM7 MAb efficiently blocks the ligand-binding activity of FcμR. PMID:25545208

  1. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  2. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Luisa W.; Henderson, Thomas D.; Lam, Tina I.; Stanker, Larry H.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature’s most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism. PMID:26633496

  3. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Luisa W; Henderson, Thomas D; Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature's most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism. PMID:26633496

  4. Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana C

    2015-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are increasingly prevalent, although underrecognized and underreported. Platins induce immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization; taxenes and some monoclonal antibodies can induce reactions at first exposure. Severe hypersensitivity can preclude first-line therapy. Tryptase level at the time of a reaction is a useful diagnostic tool. Skin testing provides a specific diagnosis. Newer tests are promising diagnostic tools to help identify patients at risk before first exposure. Safe management includes rapid drug desensitization. This review provides information regarding the scope of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions induced by chemotherapy and biological drugs, as well as diagnosis, management, and treatment options. PMID:25841555

  5. Development, Characterization and Application of Monoclonal Antibodies against Brazilian Dengue Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bordignon, Juliano; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arboviral disease. The morbidity related to dengue infection supports the need for an early, quick and effective diagnostic test. Brazil is a hotspot for dengue, but no serological diagnostic test has been produced using Brazilian dengue virus isolates. This study aims to improve the development of immunodiagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) detection through the production and characterization of 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Brazilian isolates of DENV-1, -2 and -3. The mAbs include IgG2bκ, IgG2aκ and IgG1κ isotypes, and most were raised against the envelope or the pre-membrane proteins of DENV. When the antibodies were tested against the four DENV serotypes, different reactivity patterns were identified: group-specific, subcomplex specific (DENV-1, -3 and -4 and DENV-2 and -3) and dengue serotype-specific (DENV-2 or -3). Additionally, some mAbs cross-reacted with yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). None of the mAbs recognized the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Furthermore, mAbs D3 424/8G, D1 606/A12/B9 and D1 695/12C/2H were used to develop a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-dengue IgM detection in sera from patients with acute dengue. To our knowledge, these are the first monoclonal antibodies raised against Brazilian DENV isolates, and they may be of special interest in the development of diagnostic assays, as well as for basic research. PMID:25412181

  6. Development, characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Brazilian Dengue virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Zanluca, Camila; Mazzarotto, Giovanny Augusto Camacho Antevere; Bordignon, Juliano; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arboviral disease. The morbidity related to dengue infection supports the need for an early, quick and effective diagnostic test. Brazil is a hotspot for dengue, but no serological diagnostic test has been produced using Brazilian dengue virus isolates. This study aims to improve the development of immunodiagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) detection through the production and characterization of 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Brazilian isolates of DENV-1, -2 and -3. The mAbs include IgG2bκ, IgG2aκ and IgG1κ isotypes, and most were raised against the envelope or the pre-membrane proteins of DENV. When the antibodies were tested against the four DENV serotypes, different reactivity patterns were identified: group-specific, subcomplex specific (DENV-1, -3 and -4 and DENV-2 and -3) and dengue serotype-specific (DENV-2 or -3). Additionally, some mAbs cross-reacted with yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). None of the mAbs recognized the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Furthermore, mAbs D3 424/8G, D1 606/A12/B9 and D1 695/12C/2H were used to develop a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-dengue IgM detection in sera from patients with acute dengue. To our knowledge, these are the first monoclonal antibodies raised against Brazilian DENV isolates, and they may be of special interest in the development of diagnostic assays, as well as for basic research. PMID:25412181

  7. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  8. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  9. 125I-labeled anti-bFGF monoclonal antibody inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng-Hui; Pan, Lan-Hong; Wong, Patrick Ting-Yat; Chen, Wen-Hui; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Xu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory efficacy of 125I-labeled anti-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) monoclonal antibody (mAb) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: bFGF mAb was prepared by using the 1G9B9 hybridoma cell line with hybridization technology and extracted from ascites fluid through a Protein G Sepharose affinity column. After labeling with 125I through the chloramine-T method, bFGF mAb was further purified by a Sephadex G-25 column. Gamma radiation counter GC-1200 detected radioactivity of 125I-bFGF mAb. The murine H22 HCC xenograft model was established and randomized to interventions with control (phosphate-buffered saline), 125I-bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, bFGF mAb, or 125I. The ratios of tumor inhibition were then calculated. Expression of bFGF, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), platelet-derived growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The purified bFGF mAb solution was 8.145 mg/mL with a titer of 1:2560000 and was stored at -20 °C. After coupling, 125I-bFGF mAb was used at a 1: 1280000 dilution, stored at 4 °C, and its specific radioactivity was 37 MBq/mg. The corresponding tumor weight in the control, 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 1.88 ± 0.25, 1.625 ± 0.21, 1.5 ± 0.18, 1.41 ± 0.16, and 0.98 ± 0.11 g, respectively. The tumor inhibition ratio in the 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 13.6%, 20.2%, 25.1%, and 47.9%, respectively. Growth of HCC xenografts was inhibited significantly more in the 125I-bFGF mAb group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Expression of bFGF and FGFR mRNA in the 125I-bFGF mAb group was significantly decreased in comparison with other groups (P < 0.05). Groups under interventions revealed increased expression of VEGF mRNA (except for 125I group) compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: 125I-bFGF mAb

  10. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for 3-(1-naphthoyl) Indole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Ito, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    3-(1-naphthoyl) indole is one of the raw materials that synthesizes a synthetic cannabinoid such as 1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole (JWH-018) and 1-butyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole (JWH-073). It is important to detect the 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives rapidly, sensitively, and comprehensively. We developed two monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives, named NT1 (IgG1) and NT2 (IgG1), which were possibly effective for detecting 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives. The cross-reactive ability of these MAbs was evaluated using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the results, we found both of these antibodies recognize 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole and its derivatives. However neither of these antibodies recognize naphtoic acid, 4-methyl-naphtoic acid, and indole. Sixty to 100 nanomole per liter of 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives, such as 1-methyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, 1-ethyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, and 1-octyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, can be detected using both of the obtained MAbs. Thus, the MAbs produced in this study could be a useful tool for the detection of 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives. PMID:26871514

  11. Simulation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics in humans using a minimal physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhong; Gardner, Iain; Dostalek, Miroslav; Jamei, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    Compared to small chemical molecules, monoclonal antibodies and Fc-containing derivatives (mAbs) have unique pharmacokinetic behaviour characterised by relatively poor cellular permeability, minimal renal filtration, binding to FcRn, target-mediated drug disposition, and disposition via lymph. A minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the pharmacokinetics of mAbs in humans was developed. Within the model, the body is divided into three physiological compartments; plasma, a single tissue compartment and lymph. The tissue compartment is further sub-divided into vascular, endothelial and interstitial spaces. The model simultaneously describes the levels of endogenous IgG and exogenous mAbs in each compartment and sub-compartment and, in particular, considers the competition of these two species for FcRn binding in the endothelial space. A Monte-Carlo sampling approach is used to simulate the concentrations of endogenous IgG and mAb in a human population. Existing targeted-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models are coupled with the minimal PBPK model to provide a general platform for simulating the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies using primarily pre-clinical data inputs. The feasibility of utilising pre-clinical data to parameterise the model and to simulate the pharmacokinetics of adalimumab and an anti-ALK1 antibody (PF-03446962) in a population of individuals was investigated and results were compared to published clinical data. PMID:25004823

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongfeng; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Geren, Isin N; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Marks, James D

    2015-09-01

    Existing antibodies (Abs) used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC) domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM). Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors. PMID:26343720

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Geren, Isin N.; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Marks, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Existing antibodies (Abs) used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC) domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM). Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors. PMID:26343720

  14. Characterization of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody produced by transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori)

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Minoru; Tatematsu, Ken-Ichiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    In response to the successful use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of various diseases, systems for expressing recombinant mAbs using transgenic animals or plants have been widely developed. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly domesticated insect that has recently been used for the production of recombinant proteins. Because of their cost-effective breeding and relatively easy production scale-up, transgenic silkworms show great promise as a novel production system for mAbs. In this study, we established a transgenic silkworm stably expressing a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 mAb having the same amino acid sequence as rituximab, and compared its characteristics with rituximab produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (MabThera®). The anti-CD20 mAb produced in the transgenic silkworm showed a similar antigen-binding property, but stronger antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and weaker complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) compared to MabThera. Post-translational modification analysis was performed by peptide mapping using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. There was a significant difference in the N-glycosylation profile between the CHO− and the silkworm-derived mAbs, but not in other post-translational modifications including oxidation and deamidation. The mass spectra of the N-glycosylated peptide revealed that the observed biological properties were attributable to the characteristic N-glycan structures of the anti-CD20 mAbs produced in the transgenic silkworms, i.e., the lack of the core-fucose and galactose at the non-reducing terminal. These results suggest that the transgenic silkworm may be a promising expression system for the tumor-targeting mAbs with higher ADCC activity. PMID:26261057

  15. Characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed against tetanus toxin fragment C.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Mehdi; Tahmasebi, Fathollah; Younesi, Vahid; Razavi, Alireza; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Abbasi, Ebrahim; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium tetani causes a life-threatening infectious disease by production of tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), a 150 kDa molecule composed of light (LC) and heavy chain (HC) polypeptides. The TeNT HC contains an N-terminal domain critical for LC translocation and a C-terminal toxin receptor-binding domain known as fragment C. Despite extensive investigations on epitope specificity of anti-TeNT antibodies, the immunodominant neutralizing epitopes of the toxin are poorly defined. This study describes the generation and characterization of four monoclonal antibodies (MAb) specific for TeNT. The characteristics of each MAb were explored in terms of isotype, specificity, affinity, and immuno-globulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) gene usage using ELISA, Western blotting, and sequencing techniques. The toxin neutralizing activity of the MAbs was also investigated using the in vitro GT1b neutralizing assay. The data demonstrated that all MAbs bind to tetanus toxin and toxoid. Sub-fragments binding analysis showed that two MAbs react with fragment C, one with both fragment C and LC, and one with LC. Only the two fragment C-specific MAbs were able to neutralize the toxin. Sequencing of the expressed VH and VL genes revealed rearrangements of various VH and VL gene segments in all hybridoma clones. Clonality of the hybridomas was also confirmed by a competition assay that showed recognition of distinct epitopes by these MAbs. The results suggest the importance of TeNT fragment C in terms of immunogenicity and toxin neutralization activity. PMID:23369087

  16. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J.; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J.; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A.; Seaman, Michael S.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  17. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  18. Production and Characterization of IgM Monoclonal Antibodies Against Hyphal Antigens of Stachybotrys Species

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Janotka, Erika; Blachere, Francoise M.; Vesper, Stephen J.; Schmechel, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    Stachybotrys is a hydrophilic fungal genus that is well known for its ability to colonize water-damaged building materials in indoor environments. Personal exposure to Stachybotrys chartarum allergens, mycotoxins, cytolytic peptides, and other immunostimulatory macromolecules has been proposed to exacerbate respiratory morbidity. To date, advances in Stachybotrys detection have focused on the identification of unique biomarkers that can be detected in human serum; however, the availability of immunodiagnostic reagents to Stachybotrys species have been limited. In this study, we report the initial characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against a semi-purified cytolytic S. chlorohalonata preparation (cScp) derived from hyphae. BALB/c mice were immunized with cScp and hybridomas were screened against the cScp using an antigen-mediated indirect ELISA. Eight immunoglobulin M MAbs were produced and four were specifically identified in the capture ELISA to react with the cScp. Cross-reactivity of the MAbs was tested against crude hyphal extracts derived from 15 Stachybotrys isolates representing nine Stachybotrys species as well as 39 other environmentally abundant fungi using a capture ELISA. MAb reactivity to spore and hyphal antigens was also tested by a capture ELISA and by fluorescent halogen immunoassay (fHIA). ELISA analysis demonstrated that all MAbs strongly reacted with extracts of S. chartarum but not with extracts of 39 other fungi. However, four MAbs showed cross-reactivity to the phylogenetically related genus Memnoniella. fHIA analysis confirmed that greatest MAb reactivity was ultrastructurally localized in hyphae and phialides. The results of this study further demonstrate the feasibility of specific MAb-based immunoassays for the detection of S. chartarum. PMID:21466283

  19. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Ghods, Roya; Shabani, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Yeganeh, Omid; Hassannia, Hadi; Sadeghitabar, Ali; Balay-Goli, Leila; Noutash-Haghighat, Farzaneh; Sarrafzadeh, Ali reza; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is an important laboratory marker for diagnosis of prostatic cancer. Thus, development of diagnostic tools specific for PSA plays an important role in screening, monitoring and early diagnosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, the production and characterization of a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PSA have been presented. Methods Balb/c mice were immunized with PSA, which was purified from seminal plasma. Splenocytes of hyperimmunized mice were extracted and fused with Sp2/0 cells. By adding selective HAT medium, hybridoma cells were established and positive clones were selected by ELISA after four times of cloning. The isotypes of produced mAbs were determined by ELISA and then purified from ascitic fluids using Hi-Trap protein G column. The reactivities of the mAbs were examined with the purified PSA and seminal plasma by ELISA and western blot techniques. Furthermore, the reactivities of the mAbs were assessed in Prostate Cancer (PCa), Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and brain cancer tissues by Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Five anti-PSA mAbs (clones: 2G2-B2, 2F9-F4, 2D6-E8, IgG1/К) and clones (2C8-E9, 2G3-E2, IgG2a/К) were produced and characterized. All mAbs, except 2F9-F4 detected the expression of PSA in PCa and BPH tissues and none of them reacted with PSA in brain cancer tissue in IHC. Besides, all mAbs could detect a protein band around 33 kDa in human seminal plasma in western blot. Conclusion These mAbs can specifically recognize PSA and may serve as a component of PSA diagnostic kit in various biological fluids. PMID:25926946

  20. Antibody glycosylation and its impact on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impact of glycosylation and keeping a close control on glycosylation of product candidates are required for both novel and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fc-fusion protein development to ensure proper safety and efficacy profiles. Most therapeutic mAbs are of IgG class and contain a glycosylation site in the Fc region at amino acid position 297 and, in some cases, in the Fab region. For Fc-fusion proteins, glycosylation also frequently occurs in the fusion partners. Depending on the expression host, glycosylation patterns in mAb or Fc-fusions can be significantly different, thus significantly impacting the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of mAbs. Glycans that have a major impact on PK and PD of mAb or Fc-fusion proteins include mannose, sialic acids, fucose (Fuc), and galactose (Gal). Mannosylated glycans can impact the PK of the molecule, leading to reduced exposure and potentially lower efficacy. The level of sialic acid, N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), can also have a significant impact on the PK of Fc-fusion molecules. Core Fuc in the glycan structure reduces IgG antibody binding to IgG Fc receptor IIIa relative to IgG lacking Fuc, resulting in decreased antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities. Glycoengineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expression systems can produce afucosylated mAbs that have increased ADCC activities. Terminal Gal in a mAb is important in the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in that lower levels of Gal reduce CDC activity. Glycans can also have impacts on the safety of mAb. mAbs produced in murine myeloma cells such as NS0 and SP2/0 contain glycans such as Galα1-3Galβ1-4N-acetylglucosamine-R and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NGNA) that are not naturally present in humans and can be immunogenic when used as therapeutics. PMID:25872915

  1. Regulatable systemic production of monoclonal antibodies by in vivo muscle electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Norma; Bigey, Pascal; Scherman, Daniel; Danos, Olivier; Piechaczyk, Marc; Pelegrin, Mireia

    2004-01-01

    The clinical application of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potentially concerns a wide range of diseases including, among others, viral infections, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Although intravenous infusion appears to be the simplest and most obvious mode of administration, it is very often not applicable to long-term treatments because of the restrictive cost of mAbs certified for human use and the side effects associated with injection of massive doses of antibodies. Gene/cell therapies designed for sustained and, possibly, regulatable in vivo production and systemic delivery of mAbs might permit to advantageously replace it. We have already shown that several such approaches allow month- to year-long ectopic antibody production by non-B cells in living organisms. Those include grafting of ex vivo genetically modified cells of various types, in vivo adenoviral gene transfer and implantation of encapsulated antibody-producing cells. Because intramuscular electrotransfer of naked DNA has already been used for in vivo production of a variety of proteins, we have wanted to test whether it could be adapted to that of ectopic mAbs as well. We report here that this is actually the case since both long-term and regulatable production of an ectopic mAb could be obtained in the mouse taken as a model animal. Although serum antibody concentrations obtained were relatively low, these data are encouraging in the perspective of future therapeutical applications of this technology in mAb-based immunotherapies, especially in developing countries where cost-effective and easily implementable technologies would be required for large-scale applications in the context of severe chronic viral diseases such as HIV and HCV infections. PMID:15038826

  2. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG). PMID:27439498

  3. In vitro production of monoclonal antibodies to cultured embryonic chick limb mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Capehart, A A

    2000-01-01

    A simple, rapid protocol for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize native antigens in cultured chick limb mesenchyme during chondrogenic differentiation is described. Murine lymphocytes were stimulated by direct exposure to methanol-fixed micromass cultures of limb mesenchyme derived from the distal tip of stage 25 chick limb buds. Initial immunohistochemical characterization of two antibodies (DIDI and DIIA5) produced by this method showed preferential localization of reactivity with antigens in developing cartilage nodules during chondrogenesis in cultured chick limb mesenchyme. This study demonstrates the utility of in vitro immunization of lymphocytes for the production of MAbs to native antigens expressed by differentiating embryonic limb cells in culture. Immunohistochemical data provided by DIDI and DIIA5 suggest that antigens bearing these epitopes may be important in early morphogenetic events during limb skeletal development. PMID:11549945

  4. Preliminary characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Zimbabwe, with stage-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hove, T; Lind, P; Mukaratirwa, S

    2005-06-01

    Cell-culture-derived clones of eight Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Zimbabwe were characterised in IFAT with a panel of five monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Each clone had been established from a single murine brain cyst. The antibodies were bradyzoite-specific (4.3), tachyzoite-specific (4.25, 5.1 and anti-P(30)), or tachyzoite- and bradyzoite-specific (5.15). Their strong reactivity with the bradyzoite-specific mAb 4.3 and their weaker reactivity with the tachyzoite-specific 4.25, 5.1 and anti-P(30) indicated that all the isolates are probably of genetic type II. Each of the isolates reacted in the IFAT in a similar way to the Danish reference strain of T. gondii, SSI-119. PMID:15949185

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferripyochelin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, P A; Woods, D E

    1986-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferripyochelin-binding protein (FBP) were isolated. These monoclonal antibodies reacted with FBP in immunoblots of outer membrane preparations from all serotypes of P. aeruginosa. Two of the monoclonal antibodies also reacted with FBP in strains of P. putida, P. fluorescens, and P. stutzeri. These antibodies did not react with outer membranes of P. cepacia, "P. multivorans," P. maltophilia, or other gram-negative organisms. The monoclonal antibodies were opsonophagocytic and blocked the binding of [59Fe]ferripyochelin to isolated outer membranes of strain PAO. By indirect immunofluorescence techniques, the monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that FBP is present on the cell surface of P. aeruginosa cells grown in low-iron but not high-iron medium. These observations were confirmed by using 125I in surface-labeling techniques. Images PMID:3091506

  6. Development and Characterization of Three Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Against CA-125

    PubMed Central

    Michurina, Tatiana; Kerzhner, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) is the most widely used tumor marker for ovarian cancer. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against CA-125 are valuable reagents for the development of diagnostic tests and immunotherapy. We describe here the generation and characterization of three novel hybridoma cell lines producing MAbs against CA-125. CA-125 purified from culture supernatant of ovarian carcinoma cell line OVCAR-3 by affinity chromatography, was used for immunization of BALB/c mice. Three stable cell lines (3C8, 2B6, and 5A12) were selected for production of antibodies against CA-125 and were expanded in mass culture. All three antibodies were shown to recognize linear epitopes. Antibodies 2B6 and 5A12 were determined to recognize epitope cluster B (M 11-like); MAb 3C8 was classified as group A-epitope binders (OC 125-like). The antibodies produced may be used for the development and improvement of CA-125 immunoassays. PMID:25357999

  7. Protection against gram-negative bacteremia and endotoxemia with human monoclonal IgM antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Teng, N N; Kaplan, H S; Hebert, J M; Moore, C; Douglas, H; Wunderlich, A; Braude, A I

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas producing human monoclonal IgM antibodies (mAbs) against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were generated by fusion of B lymphocytes from sensitized human spleen with heteromyeloma cells. The splenocytes were from patients undergoing splenectomy during staging for Hodgkin disease after vaccination with the J5 mutant of Escherichia coli, which is deficient in O antigenic side chains. This deficiency exposes the core oligosaccharide, common to LPS of all Gram-negative bacteria. The mAbs cross-reacted strongly with endotoxins from a wide range of unrelated species of Gram-negative bacteria. The mAbs also gave strong protection against LPS in the dermal Shwartzman reaction and against lethal Gram-negative bacteremia in mice. These findings indicate that monoclonal IgM against LPS endotoxin can neutralize its toxicity in vivo and might be valuable for treatment of patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Analysis of one of the hybridoma clones, A6(H4C5), showed that the IgM mAb is directed against the covalently bound lipid A, which represents the most conservative and least variable structural element of LPS. Images PMID:3856860

  8. Kinetics of intralymphatically delivered monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.; Liebert, M.; Beers, B.; Jackson, G.; Laino, L.; Kronberg, S.; Wilson, B.S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) administration subcutaneously (sq), so that preferential uptake is to the lymphatics, holds significant promise for the detection of lymph node metastases. Only limited information is available about clearance rates of intralymphatically administered MoAbs. I-131 labeled intact IgG (225.28S), F(ab's)2 (225.28S) or IgM (FT162) were administered sq to anesthetized Balb/C mice. Eight mice were studied with each MoAb, 4 with a foot-pad injection, 4 with an anterior abdominal injection. Gamma camera images were collected into a computer, over the first 6 hrs after injection with the animals anesthetized and immobile. Animals were then allowed to move about freely. Additional images were then acquired out to 48 hrs. Regions of interest wre selected over the injection site and the kinetics of antibody egress determined. Clearance rates from local sq injection sites are influenced by motion and somewhat by location. The class and fragment status of the MoAb appear relatively less important in determining clearance rates from sq injections than they are in determining whole-body clearance after iv injections. Additional studies using Fab fragments and additional monoclonals will be useful in extending these observations.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reveal cell-type-specific antigens in the sexually dimorphic olfactory system of Manduca sexta. I. Generation of monoclonal antibodies and partial characterization of the antigens.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, A; Hockfield, S; McKay, R; Hildebrand, J G

    1988-01-01

    The olfactory system of the moth Manduca sexta is sexually dimorphic. Male moths possess a male-specific olfactory "subsystem," comprising olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) and CNS neurons and synaptic areas associated with the detection of female sex pheromones, in addition to elements common to males and females. In order to explore the molecular differences between cells that subserve the sexual dimorphism and odor-specificity of components of the olfactory system, we generated monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against tissue of the olfactory system of the moth. In 2 fusions, we screened 1105 hybridoma lines and obtained 272 lines that secreted antibodies against Manduca nervous tissue, as assayed immunocytochemically on sections of the primary olfactory center (the antennal lobe) in the brain of Manduca. We describe here 3 classes of Mabs exemplifying the several cell-type-specific antibodies obtained through the screening procedure. Seven hybridoma lines secrete antibodies that specifically recognize cell bodies, axons, and initial segments of dendrites of many or all ORCs of both males and females (classified as olfactory-specific antibodies, OSAs). Electron-microscopic studies of 2 of the Mabs in this class showed that they recognize antigens associated with the cell membrane and that the immunoreactive ORC axons are bundled together in fascicles in the antennal nerve. On immunoblots, one of the OSA Mabs recognizes 3 distinct protein bands of apparent Mrs 42,000, 59,000, and 66,000 Da. When tissue samples enriched in either receptor cell bodies, dendrites, and initial segments of axons or in distal segments of axons and their terminals and synapses were extracted separately, different patterns of bands were detected--42,000 and 59,000 Da bands from cell bodies and initial segments of axons and dendrites, and 42,000 and 66,000 Da bands from distal segments of axons and their terminals--suggesting that the 59,000 Da protein is modified to the 66,000 Da protein during

  10. Magnetic nanoparticle based purification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody against enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Gun; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Park, Young-Il; Jung, Tae-Sung; Son, Seong-Wan; So, ByungJae; Kang, Hwan-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-enrofloxacin antibody was prepared for a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and purification system using monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupled magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The IC50 values of the developed mAb for enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin were 5.0, 8.3, 9.7, 21.7, 36.0, and 63.7 ng/mL, respectively. The lowest detectable level of ENR was 0.7 ng/mL in the prepared ELISA system. To validate the developed ELISA in the food matrix, known amounts of ENR were spiked in meat and egg samples at 10, 20 and 30 ng/mL. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 72.9 to 113.16% with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.42 to 10.11%. The applicability of the mAb-MNP system was verified by testing the recoveries for ENR residue in three different matrices. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 75.16 to 86.36%, while the CV ranged from 5.08 to 11.53%. Overall, ENR-specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and developed for use in competitive to ELISAs for the detection of ENR in animal meat samples. Furthermore, we suggest that a purification system for ENR using mAb-coupled MNPs could be useful for determination of ENR residue in food. PMID:26040610

  11. Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus serotype 1: Genetic composition and envelope protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chem, Y K; Chua, K B; Malik, Y; Voon, K

    2015-06-01

    Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus type 1 (MabEV DEN-1) was discovered and isolated in an outbreak of dengue in Klang Valley, Malaysia from December 2004 to March 2005. This study was done to investigate whether DEN152 (an isolate of MabEV DEN-1) is a product of recombination event or not. In addition, the non-synonymous mutations that correlate with the monoclonal antibody-escape variant were determined in this study. The genomes of DEN152 and two new DEN-1 isolates, DENB04 and DENK154 were completely sequenced, aligned, and compared. Phylogenetic tree was plotted and the recombination event on DEN152 was investigated. DEN152 is sub-grouped under genotype I and is closely related genetically to a DEN-1 isolated in Japan in 2004. DEN152 is not a recombinant product of any parental strains. Four amino acid substitutions were unique only to DEN 152. These amino acid substitutions were (Ser)[326](Leu), (Ser)[340](Leu) at the deduced E protein, (Ile)[250](Thr) at NS1 protein, and (Thr)[41](Ser) at NS5 protein. Thus, DEN152 is an isolate of the emerging monoclonal antibody-escape variant DEN-1 that escaped diagnostic laboratory detection. PMID:26691263

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle based purification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody against enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gun; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Park, Young-Il; Jung, Tae-Sung; Son, Seong-Wan; So, ByungJae

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-enrofloxacin antibody was prepared for a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and purification system using monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupled magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The IC50 values of the developed mAb for enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin were 5.0, 8.3, 9.7, 21.7, 36.0, and 63.7 ng/mL, respectively. The lowest detectable level of ENR was 0.7 ng/mL in the prepared ELISA system. To validate the developed ELISA in the food matrix, known amounts of ENR were spiked in meat and egg samples at 10, 20 and 30 ng/mL. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 72.9 to 113.16% with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.42 to 10.11%. The applicability of the mAb-MNP system was verified by testing the recoveries for ENR residue in three different matrices. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 75.16 to 86.36%, while the CV ranged from 5.08 to 11.53%. Overall, ENR-specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and developed for use in competitive to ELISAs for the detection of ENR in animal meat samples. Furthermore, we suggest that a purification system for ENR using mAb-coupled MNPs could be useful for determination of ENR residue in food. PMID:26040610

  13. Native oligomeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein elicits diverse monoclonal antibody reactivities.

    PubMed Central

    Earl, P L; Broder, C C; Long, D; Lee, S A; Peterson, J; Chakrabarti, S; Doms, R W; Moss, B

    1994-01-01

    We synthesized and purified a recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein, lacking the gp120/gp41 cleavage site as well as the transmembrane domain, that is secreted principally as a stable oligomer. Mice were immunized with separated monomeric and oligomeric HIV-1 Env glycoproteins to analyze the repertoire of antibody responses to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the protein. Hybridomas were generated and assayed for reactivity by immunoprecipitation of nondenatured Env protein. A total of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and cloned, 123 of which were derived from seven animals immunized with oligomeric Env. Within this group, a significant response was obtained against the gp41 ectodomain; 49 MAbs recognized epitopes in gp41, 82% of which were conformational. The influence of conformation on gp120 antigenicity was less pronounced, with 40% of the anti-gp120 MAbs binding to conformational epitopes, many of which blocked CD4 binding. Surprisingly, less than 7% of the MAbs derived from mice immunized with oligomeric Env recognized the V3 loop. In addition, MAbs to linear epitopes in the C-terminal domain of gp120 were not obtained, suggesting that this region of the protein may be partially masked in the oligomeric molecule. A total of 15 MAbs were obtained from two mice immunized with monomeric Env. Nearly half of these recognized the V3 loop, suggesting that this region may be a less predominant epitope in the context of oligomeric Env than in monomeric protein. Thus, immunization with oligomeric Env generates a large proportion of antibodies to conformational epitopes in both gp120 and gp41, many of which may be absent from monomeric Env. Images PMID:7512157

  14. Production of a High-affinity Monoclonal Antibody Reactive with Folate Receptors Alpha and Beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Furusho, Yuko; Li, Hua; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Matsukita, Sumika; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Yanagi, Masakazu; Hatae, Masaki; Takao, Sonshin; Matsuyama, Takami

    2015-06-01

    Folate receptors α (FRα) and β (FRβ) are two isoforms of the cell surface glycoprotein that binds folate. The expression of FRα is rare in normal cells and elevated in cancer cells. Thus, FRα-based tumor-targeted therapy has been a focus area of laboratory research and clinical trials. Recently, it was shown that a significant fraction of tumor-associated macrophages expresses FRβ and that these cells can enhance tumor growth. Although FRα and FRβ share 70% identity in their deduced amino acid sequence, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) reactive with both receptors has not been developed. A MAb that can target both FRα-expressing cancer cells and FRβ-expressing tumor-associated macrophages may provide a more potent therapeutic tool for cancer than individual anti-FRα or anti-FRβ MAbs. In this study, we developed a MAb that recognizes both FRα and FRβ (anti-FRαβ). The anti-FRαβ specifically stained trophoblasts and macrophages from human placenta, synovial macrophages from rheumatoid arthritis patient, liver macrophages from cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset, and cancer cells and tumor-associated macrophages from ovary and lung carcinomas. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the anti-FRαβ bound to soluble forms of the FRα and FRβ proteins with high affinity (KD=6.26×10(-9) M and 4.33×10(-9) M, respectively). In vitro functional analysis of the anti-FRαβ showed that this MAb mediates complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of FRα-expressing and FRβ-expressing cell lines. The anti-FRαβ MAb is a promising therapeutic candidate for cancers in which macrophages promote tumor progression. PMID:26090596

  15. Selection of therapeutic H5N1 monoclonal antibodies following IgVH repertoire analysis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sean A; Moore, Margaret; VandenEkart, Emily J; Roque, Richard P; Bowen, Richard A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Wiley, Steven R; Clegg, Christopher H

    2016-07-01

    The rapid rate of influenza virus mutation drives the emergence of new strains that inflict serious seasonal epidemics and less frequent, but more deadly, pandemics. While vaccination provides the best protection against influenza, its utility is often diminished by the unpredictability of new pathogenic strains. Consequently, efforts are underway to identify new antiviral drugs and monoclonal antibodies that can be used to treat recently infected individuals and prevent disease in vulnerable populations. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and the analysis of antibody gene repertoires is a valuable tool for Ab discovery. Here, we describe a technology platform for isolating therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by analyzing the IgVH repertoires of mice immunized with recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin (rH5). As an initial proof of concept, 35 IgVH genes were selected using a CDRH3 search algorithm and co-expressed in a murine IgG2a expression vector with a panel of germline murine kappa genes. Culture supernatants were then screened for antigen binding. Seventeen of the 35 IgVH MAbs (49%) bound rH5VN1203 in preliminary screens and 8 of 9 purified MAbs inhibited 3 heterosubtypic strains of H5N1 virus when assayed by HI. Two of these MAbs demonstrated prophylactic and therapeutic activity in virus-challenged mice. This is the first example in which an NGS discovery platform has been used to isolate anti-influenza MAbs with relevant therapeutic activity. PMID:27109194

  16. Critical Epitopes in the Nucleocapsid Protein of SFTS Virus Recognized by a Panel of SFTS Patients Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Li; Sun, Lina; Lu, Jing; Wu, Wei; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quanfu; Zhang, Fushun; Jin, Cong; Wang, Xianjun; Bi, Zhenqiang; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-01-01

    Background SFTS virus (SFTSV) is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognized the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. Conclusions/Significance The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection. PMID:22719874

  17. Response of a Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulation to High Shear

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Jared S.; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Mehta, Bhavya; Svitel, Juraj; Pollastrini, Joey; Platz, Robert; Freund, Erwin; Carpenter, John F.

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that shear could cause protein unfolding or aggregation during commercial biopharmaceutical production. In this work we exposed two concentrated immunoglobulin-G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb, at >100 mg/mL) formulations to shear rates of between 20,000 and 250,000 s-1 for between 5 minutes and 30 ms using a parallel-plate and capillary rheometer respectively. The maximum shear and force exposures were far in excess of those expected during normal processing operations (20,000 s-1 and 0.06 pN respectively). We used multiple characterization techniques to determine if there was any detectable aggregation. We found that shear alone did not cause aggregation, but that prolonged exposure to shear in the stainless steel parallel-plate rheometer caused a very minor reversible aggregation (<0.3%). Additionally, shear did not alter aggregate populations in formulations containing 17% preformed heat-induced aggregates of a mAb. We calculate that that the forces applied to a protein by production shear exposures (<0.06 pN) are small when compared with the 140 pN force expected at the air-water interface or the 20 to 150 pN forces required to mechanically unfold proteins described in the atomic force microscope (AFM) literature. Therefore, we suggest that in many cases air-bubble entrainment, adsorption to solid surfaces (with possible shear synergy), contamination by particulates, or pump cavitation stresses could be much more important causes of aggregation than shear exposure during production. PMID:19370772

  18. Characteristics of 26 kDa antigen of H. Pylori by Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ghahremani, Hossein; Farshad, Shohreh; Amini Najafabadi, Hossein; Kashanian, Susan; Momeni Moghaddam, Mohammad Amin; Moradi, Nariman; Paknejad, Maliheh

    2015-02-01

    Alkylhydroperoxide reductase (AhpC, the 26 kDa antigen) is one of the abundant antioxidant enzymes in Helicobacter pylori and seems to have a good potential for use in development of immunoassays to detect H. pylori infection in clinical specimens. This study aimed to investigate some properties of this antigen by the produced monoclonal antibodies. Five established hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori were cultivated and MAbs were purified by affinity chromatography. Subsequently, MAbs were conjugated with biotin, and different combinations of capture and tracer antibodies used in sandwich ELISA. Immunoblotting of bacterial extracts were performed to estimate aggregation status of the antigen. Release of antigen from the cultivated bacteria on solid media was examined by sandwich ELISA, and also, existence of interference in fecal extract was investigated by immunoblotting and sandwich ELISA. Our findings showed that the MAbs against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori could recognize three bands of nearly 25 kDa, 50 kDa, and 75 kDa in immunoblotting. This study also indicated presence of more antigens in the culture medium around the bacteria than the bacterial extract itself. The results of sandwich ELISA and immunoblotting on fecal extracts suggest the presence of interfering agents that prevent detection of antigen by antibody in ELISA but not in immunoblotting. In this study the oligomerization of the 26 kDa antigen, presence of interfering agents in stool matrix, and release of antigen to outside of bacteria, were demonstrated. PMID:25530147

  19. A Monoclonal Antibody Toolkit for C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Gayla; Dour, Scott; Arur, Swathi; Fox, Paul; Nonet, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1), a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10), a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1), a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4), which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2), a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5); to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1); to EHD1 (RME-1) a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1), a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1), a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8) that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60) targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1), a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7) of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1) and to the α-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2) as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1) and cadherin (HMR-1), both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1), which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413) which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7) which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to working

  20. Giving monoclonal antibodies to healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: is it safe?

    PubMed Central

    Tranter, Elizabeth; Peters, Gary; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been studied in healthy volunteers in phase 1, but few data have been published on the safety of that practice. We aimed to review the available data, and thereby to estimate the risks of participation in phase 1 trials of MAbs. We searched PubMed, the ClinicalTrials.gov database and Google, using the search terms ‘monoclonal antibody’, ‘phase 1’ and ‘healthy volunteers’. We identified 70 completed trials of MAbs in healthy volunteers, but the published data were too sparse to allow confident assessment of the risks of MAbs in healthy volunteers. Our best estimate of risk of a life-threatening adverse event was between 1 : 425 and 1 : 1700 volunteer-trials, but all such events occurred in a single trial (of TGN1412). In a phase 1 trial of a small molecule, the risk of death or a life-threatening adverse event appears to be 1 : 100 000–1 000 000 volunteer-trials, which is similar to the risk of many ordinary daily activities. Most people would consider that level of risk to be ‘minimal’ or ‘negligible’ and, therefore, acceptable. On that basis, the safety record of MAbs in healthy volunteers has been ruined by the TGN1412 disaster. However, that experience is unlikely to be repeated, because of improvements in governance and practice of phase 1 trials. If the experience of TGN1412 is disregarded, it seems reasonable to continue using healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials of MAbs, provided that there are scientific and medical reasons to conclude that the risk is truly minimal. PMID:23438102

  1. Phage displayed peptides and anti-idiotype antibodies recognised by a monoclonal antibody directed against a diagnostic antigen of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bengurić, D R; Dungu, B; Thiaucourt, F; du Plessis, D H

    2001-07-26

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab 4.52) raised against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) cell lysate was used as a template to obtain substitute antigens recognised by its paratope. Two approaches were investigated: a 17-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of a filamentous phage was screened by panning on the immobilised Mab 4.52 and anti-idiotype antibodies were generated by immunising a chicken with the F(ab')(2) fragments of the antibody. Analysis of the peptide sequences displayed by the isolated phages identified two peptides. Both contained two cysteine residues and had identical or similar amino acids in positions 5 (P), 8 (I/L) and 13 (L). The fusion phages were also recognised by Mab 4.52 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and binding was shown by surface plasmon resonance. One of the peptides was a markedly better inhibitor (67%) of the binding of Mab 4.52 to its original antigen than the other (20%) at 1mg/ml. After absorption, to remove isotypic and allotypic reactivities, the anti-idiotype IgY was specifically recognised by Mab 4.52 in ELISA and was able to inhibit its binding to the original antigen, whereas anti-idiotype antibodies raised against a bluetongue virus-specific antibody had no effect. In spite of unequivocal binding of the anti-idiotype antibodies and the fusion phages to the paratope of Mab 4.52, goat antisera appeared not to react with either of the surrogate antigens. In contrast, the test sera bound to the original antigen suggesting that Mab 4.52 does not recognise exactly the same antigenic site as antibodies in the goat antisera. PMID:11376960

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Interactions with Micro- and Nanoparticles: Adsorption, Aggregation and Accelerated Stress Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Jared S.; Chiu, David; Sawicki, Suzanne; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Chatterjee, Koustuv; Freund, Erwin; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are exposed to various wetted surfaces that could shed sub-visible particles. In this work we measured the adsorption of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to various microparticles, characterized the adsorbed mAb secondary structure, and determined the reversibility of adsorption. We also developed and used a front-face fluorescence quenching method to determine that the mAb tertiary structure was near-native when adsorbed to glass, cellulose and silica. Initial adsorption to each of the materials tested was rapid. During incubation studies, exposure to the air-water interface was a significant cause of aggregation but acted independently of the effects of microparticles. Incubations with glass, cellulose, stainless steel or Fe2O3 microparticles gave very different results. Cellulose preferentially adsorbed aggregates from solution. Glass and Fe2O3 adsorbed the mAb but did not cause aggregation. Adsorption to stainless steel microparticles was irreversible, and caused appearance of soluble aggregates upon incubation. The secondary structure of mAb adsorbed to glass and cellulose was near-native. We suggest that the protocol described in this work could be a useful preformulation stress screening tool to determine the sensitivity of a therapeutic protein to exposure to common surfaces encountered during processing and storage. PMID:19492408

  3. Monoclonal antibody based immunodot for specific detection of proteins of the shrimp Penaeus species.

    PubMed

    Abhiman, P B; Shankar, K M; Patil, Rajreddy; Suresh Babu, P P; Sahoo, A K; Shamasundar, B A

    2014-05-01

    Frozen shrimp continued to be the single largest item of export from India in terms of value accounting for about 44% of the total marine export earnings. Headless, peeled frozen shrimp is a common and dominant item in the market and there is need for differentiating peeled Penaeus sp from Metapenaeus, Parapenopsis and Macrobrachium sp as consumer preference and price vary. Furthermore, there is need to find out original species used in value addition of shrimp products. Hence, it is essential for development of simple and consumer friendly technique for the identification of shrimp and their products in the market. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) C-15 (IgG3) and C-52 (IgG2a) reacting with 65 and 47 kD proteins of Penaeus monodon respectively in the Western blot were selected. In epitope analysis by immunodot, the two MAbs reacted and recognized specific proteins of P. monodon, Fenneropenaeus indicus and Littopenaeus vannamei and not that of Metapenaeus, Parapenopsis, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, crabs and fishes. The immunodot required 120 min for completion. The sensitivity of the immunodot to detect proteins of P. monodon was 0.225 mg with MAb C-15 and 0.028 mg with MAb C-52. The MAb based immunodot developed, could be used for identifying and differentiating meat of P. monodon, F. indicus, and L. vannamei from that of Metapenaeus, Parapenopsis, M. rosenbergii, crabs and fishes. PMID:24803705

  4. Enhancement of monoclonal antibody binding to melanoma with single dose radiation or hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, D.R.; Gridley, D.S.; Kirk, G.A.; Slater, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We undertook this study to determine whether radiation (10 Gray, single dose) or water bath hyperthermia (41 degrees C, 45 min) could enhance binding of /sup 111/In-labeled anti-p97a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to human melanoma tumors transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Sixty animals were given injections of 1-2 X 10(7) Brown C5513 melanoma cells. At 1-2 weeks postinjection, two-thirds of the mice were treated (one-third served as controls). Within 3 hours after treatment, each animal was given iv 2 muCi /sup 111/In-anti-p97a MAb. At 24 and 48 hours thereafter, whole-body scans were done with the use of a MaxiCamera 300 A/M unit, and the ratio of activity at the tumor and liver was determined. Some animals were kept for 7 days posttreatment, whereas others were taken after the 48-hour scan for determination of biodistribution of the radiolabeled complex. Enhancement of MAb binding was demonstrated by either modality, although enhancement was more consistent with radiation. The therapeutic efficacy of MAb may be enhanced with increased binding of radioactive MAb complexes through single dose radiation or hyperthermia.

  5. Production and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies reactive to Chikungunya envelope E2 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bréhin, Anne-Claire; Rubrecht, Laetitia; Navarro-Sanchez, Martha Erika; Maréchal, Valérie; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Lapalud, Priscilla; Laune, Daniel; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Desprès, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    Chikungunya fever is an arbovirosis of major impact in public health in Asia and Africa. Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is member of the genus Alphavirus and belongs to the Semliki Forest (SF) antigenic complex. We describe for the first time a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive to CHIK envelope E2 glycoprotein. For the screening of E2-specific MAbs, we expressed a recombinant soluble CHIK E2 protein in Drosophila S2 cells. Analyzed by immunological methods, MAbs 3C3, 3E4, and 8A4 were selected on the basis of their reactivity. Their epitopes are located to the outer surface of CHIK virion. These MAbs have no cross reactivity with related members of SF antigenic complex with the notable exception of Igbo-Ora virus. Anti-CHIK E2 MAbs 3C3, 3E4, and 8A4 should be helpful for studying the biology of CHIK virus and pathogenesis of disease. The combination of 8A4 and 3E4 is suitable for developing a specific antigen-capture ELISA. PMID:17949772

  6. Human monoclonal antibodies to West Nile virus identify epitopes on the prM protein

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, Amanda E.; Kalantarov, Gavreel F.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Trakht, Ilya; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2011-02-05

    Hybridoma cell lines (2E8, 8G8 and 5G12) producing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) specific for the pre-membrane (prM) protein of West Nile virus (WNV) were prepared using a human fusion partner cell line, MFP-2, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes from a blood donor diagnosed with WNV fever in 2004. Using site-directed mutagenesis of a WNV-like particle (VLP) we identified 4 amino acid residues in the prM protein unique to WNV and important in the binding of these hMAbs to the VLP. Residues V19 and L33 are important epitopes for the binding of all three hMAbs. Mutations at residue, T20 and T24 affected the binding of hMAbs, 8G8 and 5G12 only. These hMAbs did not significantly protect AG129 interferon-deficient mice or Swiss Webster outbred mice from WNV infection.

  7. Aggregation of macrophages and fibroblasts is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the hyaluronate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.J.; Underhill, C.B. ); Tarone, G. )

    1988-10-01

    To examine the role of the hyaluronate receptor in cell to cell adhesion, the authors have employed the K-3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) which specifically binds to the hyaluronate receptor and blocks its ability to interact with hyaluronate. In the first set of experiments, they investigated the spontaneous aggregation of SV-3T3 cells, which involves two distinct mechanisms, one of which is dependent upon the presence of divalent cation and the other is independent. The divalent cation-independent aggregation was found to be completely inhibited by both intact and Fab fragments of the K-3 MAb. In contrast, the K-3 MAb had no effect on the divalent cation-dependent aggregation of cells. In a second set of experiments, we examined alveolar macrophages. The presence of hyaluronate receptors on alveolar macrophages was demonstrated by the fact that detergent extracts of these cells could bind ({sup 3})hyaluronate, and this binding was blocked by the K-3 MAb. Immunoblot analysis of alveolar macrophages showed that the hyaluronate receptor had a M{sub r} of 99,500, which is considerably larger than the 85,000 M{sub r} for that on BHK cells. When hyaluronate was added to suspensions of alveolar macrophages, the cells were induced to aggregate. This effect was inhibited by the K-3 MAb, suggesting that the hyaluronate-induced aggregation was mediated by the receptor.

  8. High-throughput screening of formulations to optimize the thermal stability of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Weissburg, Perry; Mehra, Upasana; Sellers, Scott; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of biotherapeutics. Successful development of a mAb depends not only on its biological activity but also on its physicochemical properties, such as homogeneity and stability. mAb stability is affected by its formulation. Among the many techniques used to study the stability of mAbs, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) offers both excellent throughput and minimal material consumption. DSF measures the temperature of the protein unfolding transition (Tm) based on the change in fluorescence intensity of the environmentally sensitive dye SYPRO Orange. With DSF adapted to a 96-well plate format, we have shown that low-pH or high-salt concentrations decrease the thermal stability of mAb1, whereas some excipients, such as sucrose, polysorbate 80, and sodium phosphate, increase its stability. The basal fluorescence of SYPRO Orange was enhanced by the presence of detergents, limiting the use of this approach to diluted detergent solutions. Throughput of DSF can be increased further with the use of a 384-well plate. DSF thermograms are in good agreement with the melting profiles obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The Tms determined by DSF and DSC were well correlated, with the former being on average lower by 3 °C. PMID:25385011

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies as Pharmacokinetic Antagonists for the Treatment of (+)-Methamphetamine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Owens, S. Michael; Atchley, William T.; Hambuchen, Michael D.; Peterson, Eric C.; Gentry, W. Brooks

    2013-01-01

    Developing specific medications to treat (+)-methamphetamine (METH) addiction is a difficult challenge because METH has multiple sites of action that are intertwined with normal neurological function. As a result, no small molecule medication for the treatment of METH addiction has made it through the FDA clinical trials process. With the invention of a new generation of protein-based therapies, it is now possible to consider treating drug addiction by an entirely different approach. This new approach is based on the discovery of very high affinity anti-METH monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which are non-addictive and antagonize METH effects from the blood stream without entering the brain. Due to a very long biological half-life, anti-METH mAbs would only need to be administered once every 2-4 weeks, aiding in patient compliance. As a relapse prevention medication, anti-METH mAbs could reduce or prevent the rewarding effects of a relapse to METH use and thereby improve a patient's probability of remaining in therapy and recovering from their addiction. In this review, we discuss the discovery process of anti-METH mAbs, with a focus on the preclinical development leading to high affinity anti-METH mAb antagonists. PMID:22229314

  10. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  11. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  12. Anti-ErbB-2 monoclonal antibodies and ErbB-2-directed vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yip, Yum L; Ward, Robyn L

    2002-01-01

    The tumour antigen ErbB-2 belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family. Numerous studies have shown that ErbB-2 is overexpressed in many cancers and it is prognostically important in a subset of malignancies. It is well recognised that this receptor has many characteristics that make it an excellent target for tumour-specific immunotherapy. One anti-ErbB-2 monoclonal antibody, Herceptin or TrastuzuMab, has already shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, despite this success, it is still currently unclear how monoclonal antibodies inhibit tumour growth in vivo. This review will summarise the biological activities of a range of anti-ErbB-2 Mabs, as well as their possible mechanisms of action. In addition, as an active mode of immunotherapy, the current vaccine strategies for inducing or enhancing ErbB-2-specific immunity will also be discussed. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the activities of anti-ErbB-2 Mabs will aid in the development of both passive and active immunotherapies against this important receptor. PMID:11807621

  13. Monitoring duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy with epitope-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Morris, Glenn; Man, Nguyen thi; Sewry, Caroline A

    2011-01-01

    Several molecular approaches to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) therapy are at or near the point of clinical trial and usually involve attempts to replace the missing dystrophin protein. Although improved muscle function is the ultimate measure of success, assessment of dystrophin levels after therapy is essential to determine whether any improved function is a direct consequence of the treatment or, in the absence of improved function, to determine whether new dystrophin is present, though ineffective. The choice of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to distinguish successful therapy from naturally occurring "revertant" fibres depends on which dystrophin exons are deleted in the DMD patient. Over the past 20 years, we have produced over 150 "exon-specific" mAbs, mapped them to different regions of dystrophin and made them available through the MDA Monoclonal Antibody Resource for research and for clinical trials tailored to individual patients. In this protocol, we describe the use of these mAb to monitor DMD gene therapy. PMID:21194020

  14. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  15. Characterization of a Large Panel of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 gp120 and Isolation of Novel Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3 Loop.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yali; Banerjee, Saikat; Agrawal, Aditi; Shi, Heliang; Banasik, Marisa; Lin, Feng; Rohl, Kari; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Cho, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the induction of potent, cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) in rabbits using gp120 based on an M-group consensus sequence. To better characterize these antibodies, 93 hybridomas were generated, which represent the largest panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) ever generated from a vaccinated rabbit. The single most frequently recognized epitope of the isolated mAbs was at the very C-terminal end of the protein (APTKAKRRVVEREKR), followed by the V3 loop. A total of seven anti-V3 loop mAbs were isolated, two of which (10A3 and 10A37) exhibited neutralizing activity. In contrast to 10A3 and most other anti-V3 loop nAbs, 10A37 was atypical with its epitope positioned more towards the C-terminal half of the loop. To our knowledge, 10A37 is the most potent and broadly neutralizing anti-V3 loop mAb induced by vaccination. Interestingly, all seven anti-V3 loop mAbs competed with PGT121, suggesting a possibility that early induction of potent anti-V3 loop antibodies could prevent induction of more broadly neutralizing PGT121-like antibodies that target the conserved base of the V3 loop stem. PMID:26039641

  16. Second-generation minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang; Balthasar, Joseph P; Jusko, William J

    2013-01-01

    Minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (mPBPK) models provide a sensible modeling approach when fitting only plasma (or blood) data yielding physiologically-relevant PK parameters that may provide more practical value than parameters of mammillary models. We propose a second-generation mPBPK model specifically for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by including (lumping) several essential components of mAb PK used in full PBPK models. These components include convection as the primary mechanism of antibody movement from plasma into tissues and return to plasma with interstitial fluid as the major extravascular distribution space. The model divides tissue spaces into two groups according to their vascular endothelial structure, leaky and tight, which consequently allows discernment of two types and general sites of distribution. This mPBPK model was applied to two mAbs in mice and ten mAbs with linear kinetics in humans. The model captured their plasma PK profiles well with predictions of concentrations in interstitial fluid for two types of tissues. Predictions of tissue concentrations for mAb 7E3 and 8C2 were consistent with actual measurements in mice, indicating the feasibility of this model in assessing extravascular distribution in the two categories of tissues. The vascular reflection coefficients (σ1) of tight tissues (Vtight) ranged 0.883 to 0.987 and coefficients (σ2) for leaky tissues (Vleaky) ranged 0.311 to 0.837. The plasma clearance (CLp) varied among the mAbs in humans from 0.0054 to 0.03 L/hr. In addition, applying this model generates parameters for mAb transcapillary escape rates and assesses major sites of elimination. Four of ten mAbs exhibited better fitting statistics premised on elimination from interstitial fluid than from plasma. This approach allows comparisons of mAb PK when only plasma data are available, provides more realistic parameters and predictions than mammillary models, and may provide an intermediate step towards utilizing

  17. Characterization of Tritrichomonas foetus antigens by use of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, J L; Jones, D W; Widders, P R; Corbeil, L B

    1990-01-01

    The specificity for and function of monoclonal antibodies against Tritrichomonas foetus were characterized. Four monoclonal antibodies generated by immunization of mice with live T. foetus were selected on the basis of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactions. The approximate molecular masses of the predominant proteins were determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Monoclonal antibody TF3.8 recognized a predominant band at approximately 155 kilodaltons, whereas TF3.2 reacted with several bands. Monoclonal antibodies TF1.17 and TF1.15 recognized broad bands between 45 and 75 kilodaltons. The first two antibodies (TF3.8 and TF3.2) did not react with the surface of T. foetus, as determined by live-cell immunofluorescence, agglutination, and immobilization, whereas two other monoclonal antibodies (TF1.17 and TF1.15) did react with surface epitopes, as determined by these criteria. The latter two monoclonal antibodies also mediated complement-dependent killing of T. foetus and prevented of adherence of organisms to bovine vaginal epithelial cells. One antibody, TF1.15, also killed in the absence of complement. Since these functions are in vitro correlates of protection, the antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies may induce protective immunity. Images PMID:2201645

  18. A highly specific monoclonal antibody against monkeypox virus detects the heparin binding domain of A27.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Laura J; Goldstein, Jason; Pohl, Jan; Hooper, Jay W; Lee Pitts, R; Townsend, Michael B; Bagarozzi, Dennis; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L

    2014-09-01

    The eradication of smallpox and the cessation of global vaccination led to the increased prevalence of human infections in Central Africa. Serologic and protein-based diagnostic assay for MPXV detection is difficult due to cross-reactive antibodies that do not differentiate between diverse orthopoxvirus (OPXV) species. A previously characterized monoclonal antibody (mAb 69-126-3-7) against MPXV [1] was retested for cross-reactivity with various OPXVs. The 14.5 kDa band protein that reacted with mAb 69-126-3 was identified to be MPXV A29 protein (homolog of vaccinia virus Copenhagen A27). Amino acid sequence analysis of the MPXV A29 with other OPXV homologs identified four amino acid changes. Peptides corresponding to these regions were designed and evaluated for binding to mAb 69-126-3 by ELISA and BioLayer Interferometry (BLI). Further refinement and truncations mapped the specificity of this antibody to a single amino acid difference in a 30-mer peptide compared to other OPXV homologs. This particular residue is proposed to be essential for heparin binding by VACV A27 protein. Despite this substitution, MPXV A29 bound to heparin with similar affinity to that of VACV A27 protein, suggesting flexibility of this motif for heparin binding. Although binding of mAb 69-126-3-7 to MPXV A29 prevented interaction with heparin, it did not have any effect on the infectivity of MPXV. Characterization of 69-126-3-7 mAb antibody allows for the possibility of the generation of a serological based species-specific detection of OPXVs despite high proteomic homology. PMID:25108113

  19. Identification of a Human Monoclonal Antibody To Replace Equine Diphtheria Antitoxin for Treatment of Diphtheria Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sevigny, Leila M.; Booth, Brian J.; Rowley, Kirk J.; Leav, Brett A.; Cheslock, Peter S.; Garrity, Kerry A.; Sloan, Susan E.; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available alternative to DAT would be desirable. In the current study, we obtained human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) directly from antibody-secreting cells in the circulation of immunized human volunteers. We isolated a panel of diverse hMAbs that recognized diphtheria toxoid, as well as a variety of recombinant protein fragments of diphtheria toxin. Forty-five unique hMAbs were tested for neutralization of diphtheria toxin in in vitro cytotoxicity assays with a 50% effective concentration of 0.65 ng/ml for the lead candidate hMAb, 315C4. In addition, 25 μg of 315C4 completely protected guinea pigs from intoxication in an in vivo lethality model, yielding an estimated relative potency of 64 IU/mg. In comparison, 1.6 IU of DAT was necessary for full protection from morbidity and mortality in this model. We further established that our lead candidate hMAb binds to the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin and physically blocks the toxin from binding to the putative receptor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. The discovery of a specific and potent human neutralizing antibody against diphtheria toxin holds promise as a potential therapeutic. PMID:23940209

  20. Generation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to Avian Influenza H5N1 Hemagglutinin Protein.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ankita; Mallajosyula, V Vamsee Aditya; Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has in the past breached the species barrier from infected domestic poultry to humans in close contact. Although human-to-human transmission has previously not been reported, HPAI H5N1 virus has pandemic potential owing to gain of function mutation(s) and/or genetic reassortment with human influenza A viruses. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been used for diagnosis as well as specific therapeutic candidates in several disease conditions including viral infections in humans. In this study, we describe the preliminary characterization of four murine MAbs developed against recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) protein of avian H5N1 A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 virus that are either highly specific or broadly reactive against HA from other H5N1 subtype viruses, such as A/Hong Kong/213/03, A/Common magpie/Hong Kong/2256/2006, and A/Barheaded goose/Quinghai/14/2008. The antibody binding is specific to H5N1 HAs, as none of the antibodies bound H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, or B/Brisbane/60/2008 HAs. Out of the four MAbs, one of them (MA-7) also reacted weakly with the rHA protein of H7N9 A/Anhui/1/2013. All four MAbs bound H5 HA (A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005) with high affinity with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) ranging between 0.05 and 10.30 nM. One of the MAbs (MA-1) also showed hemagglutination inhibition activity (HI titer; 31.25 μg/mL) against the homologous A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 H5N1 virus. These antibodies may be useful in developing diagnostic tools for detection of influenza H5N1 virus infection. PMID:26683184

  1. An anti-human monocyte/macrophage monoclonal antibody, reacting most strongly with macrophages in lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hogg, N; Selvendran, Y

    1985-05-01

    In this report, we have described monoclonal antibody (mAb) 24 which bound specifically to a 174,000 polypeptide present on 45 +/- 16% of human monocytes. Expression of the 24 molecule increased on monocytes when they were cultured. When tissues were examined using immunohistochemical techniques, macrophages (Mph) associated with skin and with lymphoid organs strongly expressed the mAb 24 molecule, whereas, Mph in nonlymphoid organs were only weakly positive. mAb 24 reacted with cells of Mph morphology plus cells of interdigitating appearance in T-cell areas, suggesting that these cells might belong to the Mph cell lineage. There was no reaction with other types of cells, such as Langerhans cells, osteoclasts, dendritic reticulum cells, and endothelial cells. The fact that the molecule recognised by mAb 24 is particularly associated with Mph in lymphoid tissue suggests that it might have a function in immune responses. PMID:2581704

  2. The use of crossreactive monoclonal antibodies to characterize the immune system of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Davis, W C; Khalid, A M; Hamilton, M J; Ahn, J S; Park, Y H; Cantor, G H

    2001-08-01

    One of the major difficulties in studying the mechanisms of host defense in economically important species indigenous to Asia and the Middle East is the lack of monoclonal antibody (mAb) reagents that define the immune systems of species other than cattle, goats, sheep, and pigs. One strategy that could obviate this problem at minimal cost is to identify existing mAbs that recognize conserved epitopes on orthologous major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and leukocyte differentiation molecules. To explore the potential of this approach, we screened a large set of mAbs that recognize bovine MHC class I and II molecules and leukocyte differentiation molecules to identify mAbs that react with orthologous molecules in water buffalo. One hundred thirty eight were found that recognize conserved determinants on orthologous molecules. In addition to identifying a useful set of reagents, the study has provided insight into the composition of the immune system of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). PMID:14614279

  3. Human monoclonal antibodies targeting the haemagglutinin glycoprotein can neutralize H7N9 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Jianmin; Bao, Linlin; Guo, Li; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Zhou, Hongli; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Jianwei; Wu, Fan; Deng, Ying; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified avian-originated influenza H7N9 virus causes severe pulmonary disease and may lead to death in humans. Currently, treatment options for the prevention and control of fatal H7N9 infections in humans remain limited. Here we characterize two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGA6 and HNIgGB5, by screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infection. Both antibodies exhibit high neutralizing activity against H7N9 virus in cells. Two amino acids in the receptor-binding site, 186V and 226L, are crucial for the binding of these two HuMAbs to viral haemagglutinin antigens. Prophylaxis with HNIgGA6 and HNIgGB5 confers significant immunity against H7N9 virus in a mouse model and significantly reduces the pulmonary virus titre. When administered post infection, therapeutic doses of the HuMAbs also provide robust protection against lethality. These antibodies might represent a potential alternative or adjunct to H7N9 pandemic interventions. PMID:25819694

  4. High throughput peptide mapping method for analysis of site specific monoclonal antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Jia; Liu, Yan-Hui; Richardson, Daisy; Li, Huijuan; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-19

    Oxidation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often occurs on surface exposed methionine and tryptophan residues during their production in cell culture, purification, and storage, and can potentially impact the binding to their targets. Characterization of site specific oxidation is critical for antibody quality control. Antibody oxidation is commonly determined by peptide mapping/LC-MS methods, which normally require a long (up to 24h) digestion step. The prolonged sample preparation procedure could result in oxidation artifacts of susceptible methionine and tryptophan residues. In this paper, we developed a rapid and simple UV based peptide mapping method that incorporates an 8-min trypsin in-solution digestion protocol for analysis of oxidation. This method is able to determine oxidation levels at specific residues of a mAb based on the peptide UV traces within <1h, from either TBHP treated or UV light stressed samples. This is the simplest and fastest method reported thus far for site specific oxidation analysis, and can be applied for routine or high throughput analysis of mAb oxidation during various stability and degradation studies. By using the UV trace, the method allows more accurate measurement than mass spectrometry and can be potentially implemented as a release assay. It has been successfully used to monitor antibody oxidation in real time stability studies. PMID:27432793

  5. Development and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against Taura syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Côté, I; Poulos, B T; Redman, R M; Lightner, D V

    2009-12-01

    We produced a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from the fusion of Taura syndrome virus variants from Belize (TSV-BZ) immunized BALB/cJ mouse spleen cells and non-immunoglobulin secreting SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells. One antibody, 2C4, showed strong specificity and sensitivity for TSV in dot-blot immunoassay and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. The MAb reacted against native TSV-BZ, TSV variants from Sinaloa, Mexico (TSV-SI) and TSV variants from Hawaii (TSV-HI) in dot-blot immunoassay. By IHC, the antibody identified the virus in a pattern similar to the digoxigenin-labelled TSV-cDNA probe for the TSV-BZ, TSV-HI and TSV-SI variants, but not for the TSV variants from Venezuela (TSV-VE) and the TSV variants from Thailand (TSV-TH). MAb 2C4 did not react against other shrimp pathogens or with normal shrimp tissue. Western blot analysis showed a strong reaction against CP2, a region of high antigenic variability amongst TSV variants. This antibody has potential diagnostic application in detection and differentiation of certain TSV biotypes. PMID:19602090

  6. A monoclonal antibody to inclusion body disease of cranes virus enabling specific immunohistochemistry and competitive ELISA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letchworth, G.J.; Fishel, J.R.; Hansen, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of cranes (IBDC) herpesvirus kills some infected cranes and persists in convalescent animals. To enable further study and rapid identification of carrier animals, we developed a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to IBDC virus and used it in immunohistochemistry and a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We used conventional techniques to make murine MAbs directed against IBDC virus purified from infected duck embryo cells. Hybridomas reacting in an ELISA with IBDC virus but not uninfected duck embryo cells were characterized by radioimmunoprecipitation, in situ immunohistochemistry, and competitive ELISA with neutralizing and nonneutralizing crane sera. MAb 2C11 immunoprecipitated 59-, 61-, and 110-kD proteins from IBDC virus-infected but not uninfected cells and stained glutaraldehyde-fixed IBDC virus plaques but not surrounding uninfected duck embryo cells in vitro. Antibody 2C11 did not react with duck embryo cells infected with falcon herpesvirus, psittacine herpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis, pigeon herpesvirus, or duck plague virus. A competitive ELISA using antibody 2C11 identified most sera that were positive in the neutralization test. This antibody will be useful in further characterizing IBDC virus, its pathogenesis, and its natural history.

  7. A Humanized Anti-VEGF Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Angiogenesis and Blocks Tumor Growth in Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongke; Yu, Qiu; Lee, Jonathan; Li, Mingzhen; Song, Jialiang; Chen, Jungang; Dai, Jihong; Couto, Fernando Jose Rebelo Do; An, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Weimin; Yu, Guo-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies have been widely used in research and diagnostics due to their high antigen specificity and affinity. Though these properties are also highly desirable for therapeutic applications, rabbit antibodies have remained untapped for human disease therapy. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs), we generated a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs against human vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). These neutralizing RabMAbs are specific to VEGF and do not cross-react to other members of the VEGF protein family. Guided by sequence and lineage analysis of a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs, we humanized the lead candidate by substituting non-critical residues with human residues within both the frameworks and the CDR regions. We showed that the humanized RabMAb retained its parental biological properties and showed potent inhibition of the growth of H460 lung carcinoma and A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts in mice. These studies provide proof of principle for the feasibility of developing humanized RabMAbs as therapeutics. PMID:20140208

  8. Gastrointestinal stability of therapeutic anti-TNF α IgG1 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vipul; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Furrer, Esther; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-04-11

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are highly effective therapeutic agents, administered exclusively by the parenteral route owing to their previously-documented instability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract when delivered orally. To investigate the extent of the validity of this assumption, the stability of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) neutralizing IgG1 mAbs, infliximab and adalimumab, was studied in human GI conditions. In gastric fluid, infliximab and adalimumab degraded rapidly, with complete degradation occurring within 1min. In small intestinal fluid, the molecules were shown to be more stable, but nonetheless degraded within a short time frame of 30min. Investigations into the mechanisms responsible for infliximab and adalimumab instability in the small intestine revealed that the proteolytic enzyme elastase, and to a lesser extent the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, was responsible for their degradation. By contrast, in the human colon, 75% and 50% of the dose of infliximab and adalimumab, respectively, were intact after 60min, with conversion of mAbs into F(ab')2 Fab and Fc fragments detected in colonic conditions. These data indicate that therapeutic IgG1 antibodies are more stable in the colon than in the upper GI tract, therefore highlighting the potential for oral delivery of anti-TNF-α mAbs targeted to the colon. PMID:26892815

  9. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for the Glucoside of T-2 Toxin (T2-Glc)

    PubMed Central

    Maragos, Chris M.; Kurtzman, Cletus; Busman, Mark; Price, Neil; McCormick, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between fungi and plants can yield metabolites that are toxic in animal systems. Certain fungi are known to produce sesquiterpenoid trichothecenes, such as T-2 toxin, that are biotransformed by several mechanisms including glucosylation. The glucosylated forms have been found in grain and are of interest as potential reservoirs of T-2 toxin that are not detected by many analytical methods. Hence the glucosides of trichothecenes are often termed “masked” mycotoxins. The glucoside of T-2 toxin (T2-Glc) was linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and used to produce antibodies in mice. Ten monoclonal antibody (Mab)-producing hybridoma cell lines were developed. The Mabs were used in immunoassays to detect T2-Glc and T-2 toxin, with midpoints of inhibition curves (IC50s) in the low ng/mL range. Most of the Mabs demonstrated good cross-reactivity to T-2 toxin, with lower recognition of HT-2 toxin. One of the clones (2-13) was further characterized with in-depth cross-reactivity and solvent tolerance studies. Results suggest Mab 2-13 will be useful for the simultaneous detection of T-2 toxin and T2-Glc. PMID:23877196

  10. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  11. Use of monoclonal antibody B72. 3 in the management of gynecologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; Schlom, J.

    1988-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are currently used in the diagnosis of gynecologic malignancies by way of immunohistochemical assays, serum assays, and in situ radiolocalization of carcinoma lesions. Among them is MAb B72.3, generated against a human tumor-associated antigen (TAG-72). Using immunohistochemical techniques, MAb B72.3 has shown reactivity with 100 percent of common epithelial ovarian carcinomas and endometrial carcinomas and non-reactivity with normal adult tissues, with the exception of normal secretory endometrium. B72.3 appears to be a valuable immunocytologic adjunct, with greater than 90 percent of effusions and fine-needle aspiration biopsies from gynecologic carcinomas showing reactivity. Using a serum assay developed to detect the presence of the TAG-72 antigen, 48 percent of patients with ovarian carcinoma demonstrated TAG-72-positive sera versus 1 percent of control sera. /sup 131/I-labeled MAb B72.3 IgG and gamma scanning have been used for the in situ detection of metastatic carcinoma. Twelve of 15 patients with ovarian carcinoma showed positive gamma scans, and approximately 80 percent of the lesions demonstrated specific localization of the antibody. These studies indicate the potential utility of MAb B72.3 in the diagnosis of gynecologic carcinoma. 57 references.

  12. Epitope Characterization of Sero-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Ballegeer, Erin; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Elias, M.D.; Al-Saleem, Fetweh H.; Ancharski, Denise M.; Simpson, Lance L.; Berry, Jody D.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that can contaminate foods and are a public health concern. Anti-BoNT antibodies have been described that are capable of detecting BoNTs; however there still exists a need for accurate and sensitive detection capabilities for BoNTs. Herein, we describe the characterization of a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated to the non-toxic receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A (HC50/A) developed using a high-throughput screening approach. In two independent hybridoma fusions, two groups of four IgG MAbs were developed against recombinant HC50/A. Of these eight, only a single MAb, F90G5-3, bound to the whole BoNT/A protein and was characterized further. The F90G5-3 MAb slightly prolonged time to death in an in vivo mouse bioassay and was mapped by pepscan to a peptide epitope in the N-terminal subdomain of HC50/A (HCN25/A) comprising amino acid residues 985WTLQDTQEIKQRVVF999, an epitope that is highly immunoreactive in humans. Furthermore, we demonstrate that F90G5-3 binds BoNT/A with nanomolar efficiency. Together, our results indicate that F90G5-3 is of potential value as a diagnostic immunoreagent for BoNT/A capture assay development and bio-forensic analysis. PMID:22149274

  13. Purification of monoclonal antibody against Ebola GP1 protein expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Andrew; Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are one of the fastest growing drug molecules targeting the treatment of diseases ranging from arthritis, immune disorders, and infectious diseases to cancer. Due to its unique application principle, antibodies are commonly produced in large quantities. Plants, such as Nicotiana benthamiana, offer a unique production platform for bio-therapeutics due to their ability to produce large amounts of biomolecules in a relatively quick manner. However, purification of a target protein from plant is an arduous task due to the presence of toxic compounds in ground plant tissue and the large quantities of plant tissues to be processed. Here, a process was developed prior to the chromatographic purification of a mAb against Ebola GP1 protein expressed in N. benthamiana. The process includes a diafiltration step and a charged polyelectrolyte precipitation. The diafiltration step significantly improved the precipitation efficiency, reducing the usage of polyelectrolyte by more than 2000 fold while improving the native plant protein removed from 60% to 80%. The mAb can then be purified to near homogeneity judging from SDS-PAGE by either Protein A affinity chromatography or a tandem of hydrophobic interaction chromatography and a hydrophobic charge induction chromatography. The purified mAbs were shown to retain their binding specificity to irradiated Ebola virus. PMID:25746758

  14. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the two toxin-binding sites of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, A.J.; Hall, Z.W.

    1987-10-06

    The authors have isolated and characterized 12 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that block the binding of ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin (..cap alpha..-BuTx) to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of Torpedo californica. Two of the mAbs block ..cap alpha..-BuTx binding completely; the other 10 inhibit only about 50% of the binding. The mAbs that partially inhibit ..cap alpha..-BuTx binding can be divided into two groups by examination of the additive effect of pairs of mAbs on toxin binding, and by analysis of competition between mAbs for binding to the AChR. These two groups of mAbs, which we have termed A and B, appear to recognize different toxin-binding sites on the same receptor. A and B mAbs were used to determine the kinetic and pharmacological properties of the two sites. The site recognized by A mAbs binds ..cap alpha..-BuTx with a forward rate constant of 0.98 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, d-tubocurarine (dTC) with a K/sub D/ of (6.8 +/- 0.3) x 10/sup -8/ M, and pancuronium with a K/sub D/ of (1.9 +/- 1.0) x 10/sup -9/ M. The site recognized by B mAbs binds ..cap alpha..-BuTx with a forward rate constant of 9.3 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, dTC with a K/sub D/ of (4.6 +/- 0.3) x 10/sup -6/ M, and pancurionium with a K/sub D/ of (9.3 +/- 0.8) x 10/sup -6/ M. Binding of A and B mAbs to the AChR was variably inhibited by nicotinic cholinergic agonists and antagonists, and by ..cap alpha..-conotoxin. The observed pattern of inhibition is consistent with the relative affinity of the two sites for antagonists as given above but also indicates that the mAbs recognize a diversity of epitopes within each site.

  15. Role of Immunoglobulin A Monoclonal Antibodies against P23 in Controlling Murine Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, F. Javier; Riggs, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important diarrhea-causing protozoan parasite of immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) has been implicated in resistance to mucosal infections with bacteria, viruses, and parasites, but little is known about the role of IgA in the control of C. parvum infection. We assessed the role of IgA during C. parvum infection in neonatal mice. IgA-secreting hybridomas were developed by using Peyer’s patch lymphocytes from BALB/c mice which had been orally inoculated with viable C. parvum oocysts. Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were selected for further study based on indirect immunofluorescence assay reactivity with sporozoite and merozoite pellicles and the antigen (Ag) deposited on glass substrate by gliding sporozoites. Each MAb was secreted in dimeric form and recognized a 23-kDa sporozoite Ag in Western immunoblots. The Ag recognized comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with P23, a previously defined neutralization-sensitive zoite pellicle Ag. MAbs were evaluated for prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy against C. parvum, singly and in combinations, in neonatal BALB/c mice. A combination of two MAbs given prophylactically prior to and 12 h following oocyst challenge reduced the number of intestinal parasites scored histologically by 21.1% compared to the numbers in mice given an isotype-matched control MAb (P < 0.01). Individual MAbs given therapeutically in nine doses over a 96-h period following oocyst challenge increased efficacy against C. parvum infection. Four MAbs given therapeutically each reduced intestinal infection 34.4 to 42.2% compared to isotype-matched control MAb-treated mice (P < 0.05). One MAb reduced infection 63.3 and 72.7% in replicate experiments compared to isotype-matched control MAb-treated mice (P < 0.0001). We conclude that IgA MAbs directed to neutralization-sensitive P23 epitopes may have utility in passive immunization against murine C. parvum

  16. Production of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody conjugates by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Kuntz, R.R.; Holmes, R.A.; Mitchell, E.P. ); Feldbush, T.L. )

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses activities and progress that has occurred since initiation of this project on September 1, 1989. We have synthesized ethyl N,N{prime}-bis(benzoylmercaptoacetyl)-2,3-diaminopropanoate, a ligand to be used as a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA), to form {sup 186}Re or {sup 188}Re ({sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) complexes. {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, in reducing media, reacts with this ligand to form {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re-CO{sub 2}DADS chelates that will be used to formulate new radiolabeled photoaffinity labels (RPALs). Initial steps have been taken to synthesize R-As-dithiol compounds. This approach will be used to produce {sup 77}As-RPALs or covalently link {sup 77}As directly to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The R group will contain a group that can be used for conjugation reactions. Spectral and photochemical properties of various types of photoaffinity labels (PALs) have been studied. Acrylo-azido compounds and 9-azido acridine have been studied as well as several other photoprobes. The binding characteristics of the azido-based PALs to HSA have been studied and progress has been made on developing techniques for efficiently separating of non-covalently sound PALs. The Nd-YAG laser was purchased and arrived in 1990. It has been assembled and tested and is now operational.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  18. Intact mass analysis of monoclonal antibodies by capillary electrophoresis-Mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; Rock, Brooke M; Pearson, Josh T; Rock, Dan A

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics by intact mass analysis provides important information on sequence integrity and post-translational modifications. In order to obtain domain specific information, monoclonal antibodies are reduced to heavy and light chain components or enzymatically digested into smaller portions or peptides. Liquid chromatography (LC) is widely used for separation of the antibody fragments in line with mass spectrometry (MS) for characterization. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an analytical technique with high separation efficiency, high sensitivity, and minimal inter-run sample carryover. Combining the resolving power of CE with electrospray ionization (ESI) MS has great potential in regards to accurate mass characterization of protein therapeutics and has been a long sought-after approach. However, the intrinsic technical difficulty in coupling CE to MS has hindered the broad application of CE-MS across the biopharmaceutical industry. Recently, a CE-MS interface has been developed [1] and commercialized. Herein, we report implementation of this technology for coupling CE to an Agilent time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. CE-MS provides an attractive complement to LC-MS for separation and intact mass determination of mAbs and antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:26751590

  19. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

    PubMed Central

    Stanker, Larry H.; Scotcher, Miles C.; Cheng, Luisa; Ching, Kathryn; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hodge, David; Hnasko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A – H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture) ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s) for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D.), ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule) and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested. PMID:24253240

  20. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  1. Monitoring therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Berenguer, Caroline; Villard, Claude; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Beck, Alain; Chinot, Olivier; Lafitte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab induces normalization of abnormal blood vessels, making them less leaky. By binding to vascular endothelial growth factor, it indirectly attacks the vascular tumor mass. The optimal delivery of targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies or anti-angiogenesis drugs to the target tissue highly depends on the blood-brain barrier permeability. It is therefore critical to investigate how drugs effectively reach the tumor. In situ investigation of drug distribution could provide a better understanding of pharmacological agent action and optimize chemotherapies for solid tumors. We developed an imaging method coupled to protein identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This approach monitored bevacizumab distribution within the brain structures, and especially within the tumor, without any labeling. PMID:25484065

  2. A humanized monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Patti, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    This current presentation describes the in vitro and in vivo characterization of Aurexis (tefibazumab), a humanized monoclonal antibody that exhibits a high affinity and specificity and for the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) protein ClfA. Aurexis inhibited ClfA binding to human fibrinogen, and enhanced the opsonophagocytic uptake of ClfA-coated beads. Preclinical in vivo testing revealed that a single administration of Aurexis significantly protected against an IV challenge with a methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain in murine septicemia and rabbit infective endocarditis (IE) models. Safety and pharmacokinetic data from a 19-patient phase I study support continued evaluation of Aurexis in phase II studies. PMID:15576200

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Geren, Isin N.; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Marks, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC) of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10−11 M to 3.53×10−8 M (mean KD 5.38×10−9 M and median KD 1.53×10−9 M), as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10−9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors. PMID:26275214

  4. Human colonic goblet cells. Demonstration of distinct subpopulations defined by mucin-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, D K; Fournier, D A; Lynch, K E

    1986-01-01

    We studied glycoprotein content of human colonic goblet cells, using a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against purified human colonic mucin (HCM). Using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), we found that 17 of 23 anti-HCM MAbs stained some or all goblet cells of normal human colonic mucosa. We observed a variety of cellular staining patterns, including (a) diffuse (homogeneous) staining of intracellular mucin, (b) speckled (inhomogeneous) staining of mucin droplets, (c) peripheral staining of intracellular droplets, (d) cytoplasmic staining of goblet cells, and (e) apical (luminal) surface staining. Staining patterns were not associated with particular HCM species. In addition to variable patterns of IIF within individual cells, anti-HCM MAbs varied in the proportion of goblet cells stained. Some MAbs stained all goblet cells, while others stained a limited number of goblet cells. Although each goblet cell contained more than one type mucin, HCM species III, and IV and V appeared to exist in mutually exclusive goblet cell populations and it was possible to define at least seven subpopulations of goblet cells in colonic mucosa by their content of various combinations of HCM species. Anti-HCM MAbs stained goblet cells from other sites within the gastrointestinal tract to a varying extent. Anti-HCM MAbs also showed extensive cross-reactivity with rodent, rabbit, and monkey colonic mucosa. However, several anti-HCM MAbs stained only human colonic mucosa. These data show that human colonic mucosa contains discrete subpopulations of goblet cells that produce distinctive combinations of specific mucin glycoprotein species. Images PMID:2420829

  5. Topological analysis of the Escherichia coli ferrichrome-iron receptor by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Moeck, G S; Ratcliffe, M J; Coulton, J W

    1995-01-01

    Ferrichrome-iron transport in Escherichia coli is initiated by the outer membrane receptor FhuA. Thirty-five anti-FhuA monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were isolated to examine the surface accessibility of FhuA sequences and their contribution to ligand binding. The determinants of 32 of the MAbs were mapped to eight distinct regions in the primary sequence of FhuA by immunoblotting against (i) five internal deletion FhuA proteins and (ii) four FhuA peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Two groups of MAbs bound to FhuA in outer membrane vesicles but not to intact cells, indicating that their determinants, located between residues 1 and 20 and 21 and 59, are exposed to the periplasm. One of the 28 strongly immunoblot-reactive MAbs bound to FhuA on intact cells in flow cytometry, indicating that its determinant, located between amino acids 321 and 381, is cell surface exposed. This MAb and four others which in flow cytometry bound to cells expressing FhuA were tested for the ability to block ligand binding. While no MAb inhibited growth promotion by ferrichrome or cell killing by microcin 25, some prevented killing by colicin M and were partially able to inhibit the inactivation of T5 phage. These data provide evidence for spatially distinct ligand binding sites on FhuA. The lack of surface reactivity of most of the immunoblot-reactive MAbs suggests that the majority of FhuA sequences which lie external to the outer membrane may adopt a tightly ordered organization with little accessible linear sequence. PMID:7592376

  6. Enhanced potency of a fucose-free monoclonal antibody being developed as an Ebola virus immunoprotectant

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Larry; Pettitt, James; Scully, Corinne; Bohorova, Natasha; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Hiatt, Andrew; Ngo, Long; Steinkellner, Herta; Whaley, Kevin J.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2011-01-01

    No countermeasures currently exist for the prevention or treatment of the severe sequelae of Filovirus (such as Ebola virus; EBOV) infection. To overcome this limitation in our biodefense preparedness, we have designed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which could be used in humans as immunoprotectants for EBOV, starting with a murine mAb (13F6) that recognizes the heavily glycosylated mucin-like domain of the virion-attached glycoprotein (GP). Point mutations were introduced into the variable region of the murine mAb to remove predicted human T-cell epitopes, and the variable regions joined to human constant regions to generate a mAb (h-13F6) appropriate for development for human use. We have evaluated the efficacy of three variants of h-13F6 carrying different glycosylation patterns in a lethal mouse EBOV challenge model. The pattern of glycosylation of the various mAbs was found to correlate to level of protection, with aglycosylated h-13F6 providing the least potent efficacy (ED50 = 33 μg). A version with typical heterogenous mammalian glycoforms (ED50 = 11 μg) had similar potency to the original murine mAb. However, h-13F6 carrying complex N-glycosylation lacking core fucose exhibited superior potency (ED50 = 3 μg). Binding studies using Fcγ receptors revealed enhanced binding of nonfucosylated h-13F6 to mouse and human FcγRIII. Together the results indicate the presence of Fc N-glycans enhances the protective efficacy of h-13F6, and that mAbs manufactured with uniform glycosylation and a higher potency glycoform offer promise as biodefense therapeutics. PMID:22143789

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongfeng; Geren, Isin N; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Marks, James D

    2015-01-01

    The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC) of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10-11 M to 3.53×10-8 M (mean KD 5.38×10-9 M and median KD 1.53×10-9 M), as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10-9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors. PMID:26275214

  8. Epitope location for two monoclonal antibodies against human cystatin C, representing opposite aggregation inhibitory properties.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Izabela; Prądzińska, Martyna; Spodzieja, Marta; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksandra S; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Szymańska, Aneta; Czaplewska, Paulina

    2016-07-01

    Human cystatin C (hCC), like many other amyloidogenic proteins, dimerizes and possibly makes aggregates by subdomain swapping. Inhibition of the process should suppress the fibrillogenesis leading to a specific amyloidosis (hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy, HCCAA). It has been reported that exogenous agents like monoclonal antibodies against cystatin C are able to suppress formation of cystatin C dimers and presumably control the neurodegenerative disease. We have studied in detail two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) representing very different aggregation inhibitory potency, Cyst10 and Cyst28, to find binding sites in hCC sequence responsible for the immunocomplex formation and pave the way for possible immunotherapy of HCCAA. We used the epitope extraction/excision mass spectrometry approach with the use of different enzymes complemented by affinity studies with synthetic hCC fragments as a basic technique for epitope identification. The results were analyzed in the context of hCC structure allowing us to discuss the binding sites for both antibodies. Epitopic sequences for clone Cyst28 which is a highly potent dimerization inhibitor were found in N-terminus, loop 1 and 2 (L1, L2) and fragments of β2 and β3 strands. The crucial difference between conformational epitope sequences found for both mAbs seems to be the lack of interactions with hCC via N-terminus and the loop 1 in the case of mAb Cyst10. Presumably the interactions of mAbs with hCC via L1 and β sheet fragments make the hCC structure rigid and unable to undergo the swapping process. PMID:27143169

  9. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to IgM of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Bromage, Erin S.; Silva, Jessica; Hansen, John D.; Badil, Samantha M.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) have a central role in the North Pacific ecosystem as a forage fish species and are natural reservoirs of several important finfish pathogens, including Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Here, we report the identification of the gene encoding the immunoglobulin mu (IgM) heavy chain, as well as the development and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that specifically react with Pacific herring IgM. Pacific herring immunoglobulin was purified and consisted of heavy and light chains of approximately 80 and 25 kDa. Three hybridoma clones were initially identified by ELISA as reactive with purified immunoglobulin but only one clone was able to detect an 80 kDa protein in Pacific and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) whole plasma by denaturing western blot. However, all three MAbs were able to precipitate an 80 kDa protein from Pacific herring and LCMS sequencing of peptide fragments derived from this protein matched the predicted amino acid sequence of the cloned, heavy chain gene. In addition, two of the MAbs stained cells within the putative lymphocyte gates for the spleen, anterior kidney and posterior kidney but were not reactive for myeloid/granulocyte gates, which is consistent with these MAbs reacting with surface IgM+ B-cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IgM-related gene sequences and anti-IgM monoclonal antibodies from any member of the family Clupeidae. The antibodies produced in this study are critical for achieving our long-term goal of conducting serological surveillance to assess pathogen exposure in natural populations of Pacific herring.

  10. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against human prion proteins in PrP0/0 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Krasemann, S.; Groschup, M. H.; Harmeyer, S.; Hunsmann, G.; Bodemer, W.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prion diseases belong to a group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and animals. The human diseases include kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The pathogenic mechanisms of the prion diseases are not yet understood. Monoclonal antibodies provide valuable tools in the diagnosis, as well as in the basic research, of several diseases; however, monospecific antisera or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human prion proteins were, until now, not available. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have developed an immunization protocol based on nucleic acid injection into nontolerant PrP0/0 mice. DNA or RNA coding for different human prion proteins including the mutated sequences associated with CJD, GSS, and FFI were injected into muscle tissue. Mice were primarily inoculated with DNA plasmids encoding the prion protein (PRNP) gene and boosted either with DNA, RNA, or recombinant Semliki Forest Virus particles expressing PRNP. Hybridomas were then prepared. RESULTS: Different mAbs against human prion proteins were obtained, and their binding behavior was analyzed by peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation. Their cross-reactivity with prion protein from other species was also determined. Our mAbs are directed against four different linear epitopes and may also recognize discontinuous regions of the native prion protein. CONCLUSIONS: These antibodies should allow us to address questions concerning the nature of the prion protein as well as the initiation and progression of prion diseases. Moreover, these mAbs can now be used for the diagnosis of prion diseases of humans and animals. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:8972487

  11. Immunoscintigraphy of small-cell lung cancer xenografts with anti neural cell adhesion molecule monoclonal antibody, 123C3: improvement of tumour uptake by internalisation.

    PubMed

    Kwa, H B; Wesseling, J; Verhoeven, A H; van Zandwijk, N; Hilkens, J

    1996-02-01

    The efficacy of three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunoscintigraphy of small-cell lung cancer (SCLS) xenografts was studied in a Balb/c nu/nu mouse model. These Mabs, 123C3, 123A8 and MOC191, belong to cluster 1 of anti-SCLC MAbs and bind to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) with similar affinity. After intraperitoneal injection of these MAbs, labelled with 125I, the highest uptake in tumour tissue was obtained with MAb 123C3. Seven days after the administration of this MAb 13.9% of the injected dose per gram of tumour tissue was retained in the tumour. The corresponding tumour tissue ratios ranged from 3.97 for blood to 31.03 for colon. The imaging results and the tumour uptake were less favourable for the two other MAbs, 123A8 and MOC191 (fractions of injected dose respectively 6.7% and 9.2%), although affinity, biological activity after labelling and uptake in non-tumour tissues were very similar for all three MAbs. These results may be explained by the differences in the interaction between the MAbs and the tumour cells. Mab 123C3 is internalised into tumour cells, whereas both other anti-NCAM Mabs are not. Internalisation into NCI H69 cells was demonstrated in vitro by radioimmunoassay, confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy. The internalised fraction of MAb 123C3 was 22.3% after 24h, whereas this fraction was only 7.5% for MAb 123A8. Although the internalised radiolabeled Mabs are usually degraded and dehalogenated intracellularly, the retained radioactivity is high. Apparently, intracellular degradation of radiolabelled MAb 123C3 and subsequent secretion of radioactive iodine did not prevent the accumulation of intracellular radioactivity. In conclusion, accumulation and retention of radioactivity in the tumour tissue, due to internalisation of radiolabelled MAbs, may improve the results immunoscintigraphy. PMID:8595157

  12. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Neutralization Analysis of a Panel of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Binley, James M.; Wrin, Terri; Korber, Bette; Zwick, Michael B.; Wang, Meng; Chappey, Colombe; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Katinger, Hermann; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are potentially important tools in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine design. A few rare MAbs have been intensively studied, but we still have a limited appreciation of their neutralization breadth. Using a pseudovirus assay, we evaluated MAbs from clade B-infected donors and a clade B HIV+ plasma against 93 viruses from diverse backgrounds. Anti-gp120 MAbs exhibited greater activity against clade B than non-B viruses, whereas anti-gp41 MAbs exhibited broad interclade activity. Unexpectedly, MAb 4E10 (directed against the C terminus of the gp41 ectodomain) neutralized all 90 viruses with moderate potency. MAb 2F5 (directed against an epitope adjacent to that of 4E10) neutralized 67% of isolates, but none from clade C. Anti-gp120 MAb b12 (directed against an epitope overlapping the CD4 binding site) neutralized 50% of viruses, including some from almost every clade. 2G12 (directed against a high-mannose epitope on gp120) neutralized 41% of the viruses, but none from clades C or E. MAbs to the gp120 V3 loop, including 447-52D, neutralized a subset of clade B viruses (up to 45%) but infrequently neutralized other clades (≤7%). MAbs b6 (directed against the CD4 binding site) and X5 (directed against a CD4-induced epitope of gp120) neutralized only sensitive primary clade B viruses. The HIV+ plasma neutralized 70% of the viruses, including some from all major clades. Further analysis revealed five neutralizing immunotypes that were somewhat associated with clades. As well as the significance for vaccine design, our data have implications for passive-immunization studies in countries where clade C viruses are common, given that only MAbs b12 and 4E10 were effective against viruses from this clade. PMID:15542675

  13. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    B Spurrier; J Sampson; M Totrov; H Li; T ONeal; C Williams; J Robinson; M Gorny; S Zolla-Pazner; X Kong

    2011-12-31

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  14. Production of monoclonal antibodies to porcine interleukin-18 and their use for immunoaffinity purification of recombinant porcine interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Y; Shimoji, Y; Yokomizo, Y; Mori, Y

    2000-03-01

    We have recently reported the cloning and expression of porcine interleukin-18 (IL-18). In this study, we describe the production of anti-porcine IL-18 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and their use in the purification of a large amount of recombinant porcine IL-18 by immunoaffinity column chromatography. Five monoclonal antibodies (2-2-B, 2-5-B, 2-13-C, 3-1-C and 5-3-B) were established and characterized. Three (2-2-B, 3-1-C and 5-3-B) of them were of IgG1 subclass, and the other two were IgMs. Epitope analysis of the three IgG1 mAbs showed that they recognized the same epitope. All five mAbs demonstrated reactivity with baculovirus generated porcine IL-18 by immunoblot analysis. Biologically active porcine IL-18 was obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography using anti-porcine IL-18 mAb at more than 85% purity from culture supernatants of Trichoplusia ni (Tn5) derived cells infected with recombinant baculovirus containing the coding sequence of porcine mature IL-18. These results suggest that the anti-porcine IL-18 mAbs established in this study are useful for one-step purification of porcine mature IL-18 as well as the detection of porcine IL-18 by immunoblotting. PMID:10699583

  15. Development and characterization of a potential diagnostic monoclonal antibody against capsid protein VP1 of the chicken anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Yi-Yang; Huang, Chi-Hung; Sun, Fang-Chun; Sheu, Shyang-Chwen; Lu, Tsung-Chi; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Hsueh, Shu-Chin; Chen, Hsi-Jien

    2012-01-01

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is an important viral pathogen that causes anemia and severe immunodeficiency syndrome in chickens worldwide. In this study, a potential diagnostic monoclonal antibody against the CAV VP1 protein was developed which can precisely recognize the CAV antigen for diagnostic and virus recovery purposes. The VP1 gene of CAV encoding the N-terminus-deleted VP1 protein, VP1Nd129, was cloned into an Escherichia (E.) coli expression vector. After isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyronoside induction, VP1Nd129 protein was shown to be successfully expressed in the E. coli. By performing an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay using two coating antigens, purified VP1Nd129 and CAV-infected liver tissue lysate, E3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was found to have higher reactivity against VP1 protein than the other positive clones according to the result of limiting dilution method from 64 clones. Using immunohistochemistry, the presence of the VP1-specific mAb, E3, was confirmed using CAV-infected liver and thymus tissues as positive-infected samples. Additionally, CAV particle purification was also performed using an immunoaffinity column containing E3 mAb. The monoclonal E3 mAb developed in this study will not only be very useful for detecting CAV infection and performing histopathology studies of infected chickens, but may also be used to purify CAV particles in the future. PMID:22437539

  16. Serological diagnosis of bovine neosporosis by Neospora caninum monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Baszler, T V; Knowles, D P; Dubey, J P; Gay, J M; Mathison, B A; McElwain, T F

    1996-06-01

    Neospora caninum, a protozoan parasite closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, causes abortion and congenital infection in cattle. To investigate specific methods of antemortem diagnosis, the antibody responses of infected cows were evaluated by immunoblot assay and competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA) by using a monoclonal antibody (MAb), MAb 4A4-2, against N. caninum tachyzoites. MAb 4A4-2 bound diffusely to the exterior surface of N. caninum tachyzoites and recognized a single 65-kDa band in immunoblots. MAb 4A4-2 was unreactive to antigens of two closely related apicomplexan protozoa, Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis cruzi. Binding of MAb 4A4-2 was inhibited by mild periodate treatment of N. caninum antigen, demonstrating the carbohydrate nature of the epitope. Immunoblot analysis of N. caninum tachyzoite antigens with sera from cows with confirmed Neospora-induced abortion revealed at minimum 14 major antigens ranging from 11 to 175 kDa. Although the recognized antigens varied from cow to cow, antigens of 116, 65, and 25 kDa were detected in all cows with abortion confirmed to be caused by N. caninum. The binding of MAb 4A4-2 to N. caninum tachyzoite antigen was consistently inhibited by sera from Neospora-infected cows in a CI-ELISA format and was not inhibited by sera from Neospora antibody-negative cows. Furthermore, sera from cattle experimentally infected with T. gondii, S. cruzi, Sarcocystis hominis, or Sarcocystis hirsuta, which had cross-reactive antibodies recognizing multiple N. caninum antigens by immunoblot assay, did not inhibit binding of MAb 4A4-2 in the CI-ELISA. Thus, MAb 4A4-2 binds a carbohydrate epitope on a single N. caninum tachyzoite surface antigen that is recognized consistently and specifically by Neospora-infected cattle. PMID:8735092

  17. Establishment of a Therapeutic Anti-Pan HLA-Class II Monoclonal Antibody That Directly Induces Lymphoma Cell Death via Large Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Shuji; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Nakao, Atsuhito; Abe, Masaaki; Ohtsuji, Naomi; Momose, Shuji; Jin, Hui; Arase, Hisashi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Nakauchi, Yusuke; Masutani, Hiroshi; Maeda, Michiyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Komatsu, Norio; Hino, Okio

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new therapeutic monoclonal Antibody (mAb) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), we immunized a BALB/c mouse with live HL cell lines, alternating between two HL cell lines. After hybridization, we screened the hybridoma clones by assessing direct cytotoxicity against a HL cell line not used for immunization. We developed this strategy for establishing mAb to reduce the risk of obtaining clonotypic mAb specific for single HL cell line. A newly established mouse anti-human mAb (4713) triggered cytoskeleton-dependent, but complement- and caspase-independent, cell death in HL cell lines, Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, and advanced adult T-cell leukemia cell lines. Intravenous injection of mAb 4713 in tumor-bearing SCID mice improved survival significantly. mAb 4713 was revealed to be a mouse anti-human pan-HLA class II mAb. Treatment with this mAb induced the formation of large pores on the surface of target lymphoma cells within 30 min. This finding suggests that the cell death process induced by this anti-pan HLA-class II mAb may involve the same death signals stimulated by a cytolytic anti-pan MHC class I mAb that also induces large pore formation. This multifaceted study supports the therapeutic potential of mAb 4713 for various forms of lymphoma. PMID:27028595

  18. Syntheses of phosphatidyl-beta-D-glucoside analogues to probe antigen selectivity of monoclonal antibody 'DIM21'.

    PubMed

    Greimel, Peter; Lapeyre, Milaine; Nagatsuka, Yasuko; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Ito, Yukishige

    2008-08-01

    Herein, we report the chemical syntheses of a series of phosphatidyl-beta-D-glucoside (PtdGlc) analogues, including 6-O-Ac, sn-2-O-Me, phosphorothioate as well as phosphatidylgalactoside and -mannoside derivatives. In the key step, beta-glycosyl H-phosphonate was condensed with enantiomerically pure diacylglycerol. Comparison of spectroscopic data with mono-acetylated PtdGlc from natural source confirmed the presence of an acetyl moiety at position 6. Furthermore, the reactivity of PtdGlc and its analogues toward monoclonal antibody 'DIM21' (MAb DIM21) was evaluated, revealing the crucial structural antigen features for successful MAb DIM21 binding. PMID:18625561

  19. Kinetic analysis of a monoclonal therapeutic antibody and its single-chain homolog by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rekha; Andrien, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments have become an emerging class of therapeutics since 1986. Their versatility enables them to be engineered for optimal efficiency and decreased immunogenicity, and the path to market has been set by recent regulatory approvals. One of the initial criteria for success of any protein or antibody therapeutic is to understand its binding characteristics to the target antigen. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been widely used and is an important tool for ligand-antigen binding characterization. In this work, the binding kinetics of a recombinant mAb and its single-chain antibody homolog, single-chain variable fragment (scFv), was analyzed by SPR. These two proteins target the same antigen. The binding kinetics of the mAb (bivalent antibody) and scFv (monovalent scFv) for this antigen was analyzed along with an assessment of the thermodynamics of the binding interactions. Alternative binding configurations were investigated to evaluate potential experimental bias because theoretically experimental binding configuration should have no impact on binding kinetics. Self-association binding kinetics in the proteins' respective formulation solutions and antigen epitope mapping were also evaluated. Functional characterization of monoclonal and single-chain antibodies has become just as important as structural characterization in the biotechnology field. PMID:19720041

  20. Effects of a novel anti-exospore monoclonal antibody on microsporidial Nosema bombycis germination and reproduction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Lu, X; Kumar, V S; Zhu, H; Chen, H; Chen, Z; Hong, J

    2007-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C2, against an exospore protein of the microsporidium Nosema bombycis (N. bombycis) was prepared, and its effects on microsporidial germination and reproduction in vitro were studied. MAb 3C2 was effective in inhibiting the germination and subsequent infection of Bombyx mori cells compared to the control mAb. The antigen was isolated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Immunoblotting revealed it to be an 84 kDa protein corresponding to pI (7.2) on the 2-D gel. The present results suggest that the antibodies can be used for diagnostic purposes and for developing new therapeutic strategies in controlling microsporidian diseases. PMID:17577423

  1. Validation of an automated method for compounding monoclonal antibody patient doses

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bas J.M.; Capelle, Martinus A.H.; Arvinte, Tudor; van de Garde, Ewoudt M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Automation robots have recently come to the market as an alternative for manual compounding of drugs for intravenous administration. Our aim was to assess whether robotic compounding can be performed with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) without influencing the aggregation state of the proteins. Three frequently used mAbs were studied: infliximab (Remicade®, Janssen Biotech) and trastuzumab (Herceptin®, Roche) in lyophilised form, and bevacizumab (Avastin®, Roche) as a liquid formulation stored at 2°C to 8°C. The effects of different procedures to prepare the patient doses on antibody aggregation were evaluated. Remicade® and Herceptin® were reconstituted both manually and by a robotic arm (i.v.STATION®, Health Robotics). Additionally, the influence of vigorous shaking during reconstitution was investigated. The effects of rapid aspiration and dispensing on antibody aggregation were investigated for all three mAbs. Aggregation state was assessed by UV-Vis absorbance, 90° light scatter, fluorescence spectroscopy, Nile red fluorescence microscopy, and field flow fractionation without cross and focus flow. Robotic reconstituted samples showed similar findings compared with manual reconstitution if performed exactly according to the summary of product characteristics (SPC). Vials that were vigorously shaken showed a significant increase in aggregates. Similarly, rapid aspiration/dispense cycles resulted in a strong increase in the number and sizes of aggregates for all three mAbs; this result was observed after just one rapid aspiration/dispense cycle. Our study showed that robotic compounding of mAbs is feasible if the robot is exactly programmed according to the SPC, indicating that robotic compounding can be used to achieve reproducible high-quality compounding for delicate formulations. PMID:23255057

  2. Anti-TNP monoclonal antibodies as reagents for enzyme immunoassay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Léo, P; Ucelli, P; Augusto, E F; Oliveira, M S; Tamashiro, W M

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to produce anti-TNP monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that could be conjugated and used for the detection of antigen-antibody reactions, in which the antigen specific-antibody had been previously bound to trinitrophenyl (TNP). For hybridoma production, SP2/0-Ag14 cells were fused with spleen cells from mice previously immunized with TNP-ovalbumin (TNP-OVA). After 10 days, enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect anti-TNP antibodies in the supernatants, and five cultures were found to be strictly positive for TNP. Three of these were subsequently cloned by limiting dilution, and 15 clones were chosen for expansion based on the criterion of high reactivity against TNP. Anti-TNP MAbs produced by those clones were isotyped as IgG1, and purified by Sepharose-protein G affinity cromatography from ascites developed in BALB/c mice. Two purified MAbs (1B2.1B6 and 1B2.1E12) were coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRPO). The resulting conjugates were evaluated in ELISA tests for interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 detection, in which the secondary anti-cytokine antibodies were coupled either to TNP or biotin. The performance of anti-TNP conjugates in these assays were compared with a biotin-streptavidin/peroxidase system. Both types of conjugates were similarly able to detect cytokines with r2 (linear correlation coefficient) close to unity value. Growth studies of one of those hybridomas (1B2.1B6) yielded a specific growth rate of 0.042 h(-1) and a doubling time of 16.5 h. Data discussed here show that at least two MAbs against TNP raised in this work can be used as a reagent for enzyme immunoassays. PMID:11152399

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Lewisy and Lewisb with a Novel Monoclonal Antibody 692/29

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Philip; Spendlove, Ian; Harding, Stephen; Parsons, Tina; Durrant, Lindy G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognising Lewisy, such as BR96, have reached the clinic but have failed to show good anti-tumour responses with an acceptable level of toxicity. No Lewisb mAbs have been trialled in patients. In this study we compare the specificity of three mAbs; BR96 (Lewisy), 2-25 LE (Lewisb) and 692/29 that recognises a unique facet of both Lewisy and Lewisb. We then assessed the in vivo therapeutic effect of 692/29 using xenograft models. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a glycan array, each mAb was shown to display a different binding pattern with only 692/29 binding to both Lewisy and Lewisb. 692/29 was able to kill tumour cells over-expressing Lewisy/b directly, as well as by antibody and complement mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC/CDC), but failed to kill cells expressing low levels of these haptens. In contrast, BR96, directly killed cells expressing either high or low levels of Lewisy perhaps explaining its toxicity in patients. 2-25 LE failed to cause any direct killing but did mediate ADCC/CDC. Both 692/29 and BR96 bound to >80% of a panel of over 400 colorectal tumours whereas 2-25 LE showed lower reactivity (52%). 692/29 demonstrated more restricted normal tissue reactivity than both BR96 and 2-25 LE. 692/29 anti-Lewisy/b mAb also showed good in vivo killing in xenograft models. Conclusions/Significance MAbs targeting both Lewisy and Lewisb may have a therapeutic advantage over mAbs targeting just one hapten. 692/29 has a more restricted normal tissue distribution and a higher antigen threshold for killing which should reduce its toxicity compared to a Lewisy specific mAb. 692/29 has an ability to directly kill tumours whereas the anti-Lewisb mAb does not. This suggests that Lewisy but not Lewisb are functional glycans. 692/29 showed good anti-tumour responses in vivo and is a strong therapeutic candidate. PMID:23408949

  4. Immunological Characterization and Neutralizing Ability of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against Botulinum Neurotoxin Type H

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Barash, Jason R.; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Marks, James D.; Arnon, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Only Clostridium botulinum strain IBCA10-7060 produces the recently described novel botulinum neurotoxin type H (BoNT/H). BoNT/H (N-terminal two-thirds most homologous to BoNT/F and C-terminal one-third most homologous to BoNT/A) requires antitoxin to toxin ratios ≥1190:1 for neutralization by existing antitoxins. Hence, more potent and safer antitoxins against BoNT/H are needed. Methods. We therefore evaluated our existing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to BoNT/A and BoNT/F for BoNT/H binding, created yeast-displayed mutants to select for higher-affinity-binding mAbs by using flow cytometry, and evaluated the mAbs' ability to neutralize BoNT/H in the standard mouse bioassay. Results. Anti-BoNT/A HCC-binding mAbs RAZ1 and CR2 bound BoNT/H with high affinity. However, only 1 of 6 BoNT/F mAbs (4E17.2A) bound BoNT/H but with an affinity >800-fold lower (equilibrium dissociation binding constant [KD] = 7.56 × 10−8 M) than its BoNT/F affinity (KD = 9.1 × 10−11 M), indicating that the N-terminal two-thirds of BoNT/H is immunologically unique. The affinity of 4E17.2A for BoNT/H was increased >500-fold to KD = 1.48 × 10−10 M (mAb 4E17.2D). A combination of mAbs RAZ1, CR2, and 4E17.2D completely protected mice challenged with 280 mouse median lethal doses of BoNT/H at a mAb dose as low as 5 µg of total antibody. Conclusions. This 3-mAb combination potently neutralized BoNT/H and represents a potential human antitoxin that could be developed for the prevention and treatment of type H botulism. PMID:26936913

  5. Generation of monoclonal antibodies of desired specificity using chimeric polyomavirus-derived virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Zvirbliene, A; Samonskyte, L; Gedvilaite, A; Voronkova, T; Ulrich, R; Sasnauskas, K

    2006-04-20

    Foreign protein sequences presented on hamster polyomavirus (HaPyV) major capsid protein VP1-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) have been demonstrated to be highly immunogenic. The current study was aimed to evaluate VP1-derived chimeric VLPs as tools for hybridoma technology to generate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of desired specificity. Chimeric VLPs containing inserts of different size and origin were used as immunogens. Chimeric VLPs carrying a 9 amino acid (aa)-long cytotoxic T-cell epitope (STAPPVHNV) of human mucin 1 (MUC1) elicited a strong epitope-specific humoral immune response in mice and promoted the production of MUC1-specific mAbs. From a total of seven mAbs of IgG isotype generated against the chimeric VLPs, two mAbs were directed against the MUC1 epitope and five mAbs against the VP1-carrier. Two out of five anti-VP1 mAbs recognized epitopes located at the previously defined insertion site #2 (aa 223/224), which confirms its surface-exposed localization. Chimeric VLPs carrying a 120-aa long sequence of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) nucleocapsid protein (NP) promoted the generation of five mAbs of IgG isotype specific to PUUV NP. All mAbs recognized the full-length NP of different PUUV strains. In contrast, no VP1-specific mAbs were obtained. The ability of chimeric VLPs to activate antigen-presenting cells was evaluated by studying the uptake of chimeric VLPs by murine spleen cell-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Efficient uptake of VLPs and activation of murine DCs were demonstrated, which may represent the basis of the strong immunogenicity of chimeric VLPs. In conclusion, chimeric VLPs effectively stimulated the production of IgG antibodies specific for foreign epitopes presented at surface-exposed regions. Thus, chimeric HaPyV VP1-derived VLPs represent efficient immunogens for hybridoma technology and provide a promising alternative to chemical coupling of synthetic peptides to carrier proteins. PMID:16516908

  6. Trichinella spiralis: monoclonal antibody against the muscular larvae for the detection of circulating and fecal antigens in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José-Lino; García-Juarez, Jazmín; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    In this work we search for antigens of Trichinella spiralis in sera and stool of rats experimentally infected. The kinetic of antibodies to excretory and secretory (ES) antigens of muscle larvae (ML) was also determined. Wistar rats were infected with 15 ML per gram of body weight and blood samples were collected weekly for 10 weeks. Antibodies were studied using an indirect ELISA. For detection of circulating antigens and coproantigens, a sandwich ELISA was developed with the use of polyclonal rabbit antibodies obtained against the total extract of ML and an IgM monoclonal antibody (Mab) against ES antigens of ML. No reactivity was observed between Mab and the total worm antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Ascaris suum, Echinococcus granulosus, Fasciola hepatica, Strongyloides stercoralis, Taenia solium, Toxocara canis and Trichuris trichiura. The IgM Mab recognized antigens of 45, 49, and 55 kDa in ES antigens and was unable to bind ES antigens deglycosylated with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid (TFMS) indicating that a glycan structure is present in the epitope recognized by this Mab. The sensitivity of sandwich ELISA was 1 ng/mL. Circulating antigens were detected in all infected rats between 3 and 8 weeks post infection and coproantigens were found during the first two days post infection. Antibodies were detected since the third week post infection through the end of experiment. These results suggested that antigen detection by our sandwich ELISA could be a useful complementary laboratory test for antibody detection. PMID:23026455

  7. Lysyl oxidase like-4 monoclonal antibody demonstrates therapeutic effect against head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Görögh, Tibor; Quabius, Elgar S; Heidebrecht, Hans; Nagy, Andreas; Muffels, Till; Haag, Jochen; Ambrosch, Petra; Hoffmann, Markus

    2016-05-15

    A new member of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family, lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4), is overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) compared to normal squamous epithelium. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) derived from fusion of Balb/c mouse splenocytes immunized with LOXL4 specific peptide was used to evaluate its therapeutic efficacy in 15 HNSCC cell lines associated with LOXL4 overexpression. For xenograft experiments 41 severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were used to analyze LOXL4-mAb mediated tumor regression. Cell viability was analyzed using cytotoxicity-, and clonogenic-assays. Significant suppression of tumor cell growth was observed in 12 out of 15 (80%) tumor cell lines after 48 hr exposure to the mAb (LD50 of 15 µg/ml to 45 µg/ml). The effect induced by the antibody could be blocked by pre-incubation of the antibody with the peptide used for immunization of the mice and antibody generation, indicating that the effect of the antibody is specific. In mice inoculated with HNSCC cells, i.v. injections of the LOXL4-mAb resulted within 70 days in extensive tumor destruction in all treated animals whereas no tumor regression occurred in control animals. In mice pre-immunized i.v. with LOXL4-mAb and subsequently injected with HNSCC cells, tumor development was considerably delayed in contrast to non LOXL4-mAb pre-immunized animals. These results demonstrate that the LOXL4-mAb has potent antitumor activity and suggest its suitability as a therapeutic immune agent applicable to HNSCC exhibiting tumor specific upregulation of LOXL4. PMID:26756583

  8. Generation of Monoclonal Antibodies against Dengue Virus Type 4 and Identification of Enhancing Epitopes on Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chung-Tao; Liao, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chien-Yu; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chiu, Chiung-Yi; Cheng, Ping-Chang; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Wu, Han-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4) pose a serious threat to global health. Cross-reactive and non-neutralizing antibodies enhance viral infection, thereby exacerbating the disease via antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Studying the epitopes targeted by these enhancing antibodies would improve the immune responses against DENV infection. In order to investigate the roles of antibodies in the pathogenesis of dengue, we generated a panel of 16 new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DENV4. Using plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), we examined the neutralizing activity of these mAbs. Furthermore, we used the in vitro and in vivo ADE assay to evaluate the enhancement of DENV infection by mAbs. The results indicate that the cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing mAbs, DD11-4 and DD18-5, strongly enhance DENV1-4 infection of K562 cells and increase mortality in AG129 mice. The epitope residues of these enhancing mAbs were identified using virus-like particle (VLP) mutants. W212 and E26 are the epitope residues of DD11-4 and DD18-5, respectively. In conclusion, we generated and characterized 16 new mAbs against DENV4. DD11-4 and D18-5 possessed non-neutralizing activities and enhanced viral infection. Moreover, we identified the epitope residues of enhancing mAbs on envelope protein. These results may provide useful information for development of safe dengue vaccine. PMID:26309127

  9. Epitope mapping of 10 monoclonal antibodies against the pig analogue of human membrane cofactor protein (MCP)

    PubMed Central

    PéRez De La Lastra, J M; Van Den Berg, C W; Bullido, R; Almazán, F; Domínguez, J; Llanes, D; Morgan, B P

    1999-01-01

    Pig membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46) is a 50 000–60 000 MW glycoprotein that is expressed on a wide variety of cells, including erythrocytes. Pig MCP has cofactor activity for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b and is an efficient regulator of the classical and alternative pathway of human and pig complement. A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was collected from two different laboratories; all of these mAbs were raised against pig leucocytes and all recognized the same complex banding pattern on sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) of erythrocyte membranes. All were shown to be reactive with pig MCP and were divided into four groups of mutually competitive antibodies based on competition studies for membrane-bound MCP and for soluble MCP, the latter by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The antigenic properties of membrane-bound and soluble MCP were similar, although some interesting differences were revealed. None of the 10 mAbs were cross-reactive with human MCP and only one showed cross-reactivity with leucocytes from a panel of large mammals – a weak cross-reactivity with a subset of dog leucocytes. All antibodies in one of the epitope groups and some in a second epitope group were able to block the functional activity of pig MCP, as measured by inhibition of MCP-catalysed C3 degradation by factor I. PMID:10233756

  10. Adsorption behavior of a human monoclonal antibody at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Couston, Ruairidh G.; Skoda, Maximilian W.; Uddin, Shahid; van der Walle, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    One aspiration for the formulation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is to reach high solution concentrations without compromising stability. Protein surface activity leading to instability is well known, but our understanding of mAb adsorption to the solid-liquid interface in relevant pH and surfactant conditions is incomplete. To investigate these conditions, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and neutron reflectometry (NR). The mAb tested (“mAb-1”) showed highest surface loading to silica at pH 7.4 (~12 mg/m2), with lower surface loading at pH 5.5 (~5.5 mg/m2, further from its pI of 8.99) and to hydrophobized silica (~2 mg/m2). The extent of desorption of mAb-1 from silica or hydrophobized silica was related to the relative affinity of polysorbate 20 or 80 for the same surface. mAb-1 adsorbed to silica on co-injection with polysorbate (above its critical micelle concentration) and also to silica pre-coated with polysorbate. A bilayer model was developed from NR data for mAb-1 at concentrations of 50–5000 mg/L, pH 5.5, and 50–2000 mg/L, pH 7.4. The inner mAb-1 layer was adsorbed to the SiO2 surface at near saturation with an end-on” orientation, while the outer mAb-1 layer was sparse and molecules had a “side-on” orientation. A non-uniform triple layer was observed at 5000 mg/L, pH 7.4, suggesting mAb-1 adsorbed to the SiO2 surface as oligomers at this concentration and pH. mAb-1 adsorbed as a sparse monolayer to hydrophobized silica, with a layer thickness increasing with bulk concentration - suggesting a near end-on orientation without observable relaxation-unfolding. PMID:23196810

  11. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for analysis of octopamine in housefly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Liang; Li, Yongdan; Tan, Guiyu; Wang, Baomin; Gao, Xiwu

    2014-08-01

    Octopamine (OA) is one of the biogenic monoamines in the housefly, which acts as an important neurohormone in the physiological process of this pest. In this study, a new hapten of OA was synthesized via aldol condensation. With the hapten, monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were generated and their characterizations were investigated. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) based on MAb 3C11-E3 was established, which required simple sample pre-treatments and had low cross-reactivity with OA structural analogise. The half maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) and the detected range (IC20-IC80) of the icELISA were 128 ng/mL and 12-1438 ng/mL, respectively. Average recoveries of OA ranged from 73 to 129% in the housefly. PMID:25171008

  12. Detection of histidine oxidation in a monoclonal immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masato; Kobayashi, Naoki; Yabuta, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2014-08-01

    Although oxidation of methionine and tryptophan are known as popular chemical modifications that occur in monoclonal antibody (mAb) molecules, oxidation of other amino acids in mAbs has not been reported to date. In this study, oxidation of the histidine residue in a human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) 1 molecule was discovered for the first time by mass spectrometry. The oxidation of a specific histidine located at the CH2 domain of IgG1 occurred under light stress, but it was not observed under heat stress. With the forced degradation study using several reactive oxygen species, the singlet oxygen was attributed to a reactive source of the histidine oxidation. The reaction mechanism of the histidine oxidation was proposed on the basis of the mass spectrometric analysis of IgG1 oxidized in deuterium oxide and hydrogen heavy oxide. PMID:24940720

  13. MALDI immunoscreening (MiSCREEN): a method for selection of anti-peptide monoclonal antibodies for use in immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Morteza; Pope, Matthew E; Soste, Martin V; Eyford, Brett A; Jackson, Angela M; Anderson, N Leigh; Pearson, Terry W

    2011-02-01

    A scalable method for screening and selection of peptide-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is described. To identify high affinity anti-peptide mAbs in hybridoma supernatants, antibodies were captured by magnetic affinity beads followed by binding of specific peptides from solution. After timed washing steps, the remaining bound peptides were eluted from the beads and detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). This allowed measurement of monovalent interactions of peptides with single antigen binding sites on the antibodies, thus reflecting antibody affinity rather than avidity. Antibodies that were able to bind target peptides from solution phase and retain them during washing for a minimum of 10 min were identified by the strength of the appropriate m/z peptide MS signals obtained. This wash time reflects the minimum peptide dissociation time required for use of these antibodies in several current immuno-mass spectrometry assays. Kinetic analysis of antibody-peptide binding by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed that the selected antibodies were of high affinity and, most importantly, had low dissociation constants. This method, called MALDI immunoscreening (MiSCREEN), thus enables rapid screening and selection of high affinity anti-peptide antibodies that are useful for a variety of immunoproteomics applications. To demonstrate their functional utility in immuno-mass spectrometry assays, we used the selected, purified RabMAbs to enrich natural (tryptic) peptides from digested human plasma. PMID:21078325

  14. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal