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Sample records for monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

  1. Nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Edward, Justin A; Swan, Kevin W; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Bartow, Matthew J; Yoo, Daniel; Peak, Taylor A; Song, Bryant M; Chan, Ryan A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Prieto, Minolfa C; Giles, Thomas D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a rare disorder that, without treatment, is progressive and fatal within 3-4 years. Current treatment involves a diverse group of drugs that target the pulmonary vascular bed. In addition, strategies that increase nitric oxide (NO) formation have a beneficial effect in rodents and patients. Nebivolol, a selective β1 adrenergic receptor-blocking agent reported to increase NO production and stimulate β3 receptors, has vasodilator properties suggesting that it may be beneficial in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The present study was undertaken to determine whether nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced (60 mg/kg) pulmonary hypertension in the rat. These results show that nebivolol treatment (10 mg/kg, once or twice daily) attenuates pulmonary hypertension, reduces right ventricular hypertrophy, and improves pulmonary artery remodeling in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. This study demonstrates the presence of β3 adrenergic receptor immunoreactivity in pulmonary arteries and airways and that nebivolol has pulmonary vasodilator activity. Studies with β3 receptor agonists (mirabegron, BRL 37344) and antagonists suggest that β3 receptor-mediated decreases in systemic arterial pressure occur independent of NO release. Our results suggest that nebivolol, a selective vasodilating β1 receptor antagonist that stimulates β3 adrenergic receptors and induces vasodilation by increasing NO production, may be beneficial in treating pulmonary hypertensive disorders. PMID:27172427

  2. Rosuvastatin, sildenafil and their combination in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rat.

    PubMed

    Jasińska-Stroschein, Magdalena; Owczarek, Jacek; Wesołowska, Anna; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2014-09-01

    There is considerable interest in the pleiotropic effects of statins and their potential role in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. Previous experimental findings indicate that a combination of lipophilic statins with phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, can offer preventive effects on rat monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The present study is aimed to assess whether therapeutic regimen provides any benefits. Seven days after pulmonary hypertension induction, hydrophilic rosuvastatin and sildenafil were given for 14 days to male Wistar outbred rats. Right ventricular pressure, right ventricle mass and three biomarkers were evaluated after 21 days: brain natriuretic peptide, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and vascular endothelial growth factor. The present study demonstrates that administration of hydrophilic statin with sildenafil results in reduction of pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular pressure. The results of biochemical measurements may suggest that statins play a positive role in right ventricle function or the process of angiogenesis in pulmonary hypertension development. PMID:25296680

  3. Urantide alleviates monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yifang; Jin, Hong; Tian, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Han; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Zhiyi; Meng, Fanchao

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious disorder with poor prognosis. Urotensin II (UII) has been confirmed to be powerful vasoconstrictor than endothelin-1, which may play an important role in PAH development. The aim of this study is to observe the effects of urantide, a UII receptor antagonist, on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. 60 male Wistar rats were divided into six groups. For early treatment experiment, rats were divided into normal control group, MCT(4w) model group (MCT + saline × 3 wks from the 8th day of MCT injection) and urantide early treatment group (MCT + urantide 10 μg/kg/d × 3 wks, 1 week after MCT injection once). For late treatment experiment, rats were divided as controls, MCT(6w) model group (MCT + saline × 2 wks, 4 weeks after MCT injection once) and urantide late treatment group (MCT + urantide 10 μg/kg/d × 2 wks, 4 weeks after MCT injection once). At the end of experiments, mean pulmonary arterial pressures (mPAP) and mean blood pressure (MBP) of rats in each group were measured by catheterization. Right ventricular weight ratio was also weighed. Relaxation effects of urantide on intralobar pulmonary arterial rings of normal control and MCT(4w) model rats were investigated. Pulmonary artery remodeling was detected by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry analysis. Serum nitric oxide (NO) levels in all six groups were assayed by ELISA kits. Urantide markedly reduced the mPAP levels of MCT induced PAH in both early and late treatment groups. It didn't change the MBP. Urantide dose-dependently relaxed the pulmonary arterial rings of normal control and MCT(4w) model rats. Moreover, N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine Methyl Ester (l-NAME) blocked the dilation response induced by urantide. In addition, urantide inhibited the pulmonary vascular remodeling remarkably. Serum NO level elevated in both early and late treatment rats with urantide infusion. These results suggest that urantide effectively alleviated

  4. Effect of chronic sodium nitrite therapy on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke M; Casey, David B; Lasker, George F; Riehl, Russel A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-06-30

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder that without treatment is progressive and often fatal within 3 years. The treatment of PH involves the use of a diverse group of drugs and lung transplantation. Although nitrite was once thought to be an inactive metabolite of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO), there is increasing evidence that nitrite may be useful in the treatment of PH, but the mechanism by which nitrite exerts its beneficial effect remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic sodium nitrite treatment in a PH model in the rat. Following induction of PH with a single injection of monocrotaline, 60 mg; daily ip injections of sodium nitrite (3mg/kg) starting on day 14 and continuing for 21 days, resulted in a significantly lower pulmonary arterial pressure on day 35 when compared to values in untreated animals with monocrotaline-induced PH. In monocrotaline-treated rats, daily treatment with ip nitrite injections for 21 days decreased right ventricular mass and pathologic changes in small pulmonary arteries. Nitrite therapy did not change systemic arterial pressure or cardiac output when values were measured on day 35. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to iv injections of sodium nitroprusside, sodium nitrite, and BAY 41-8543 were not different in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and rats with chronic nitrite therapy when compared to responses in animals in which pulmonary arterial pressure was increased with U46619. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the mechanisms that convert nitrite to vasoactive NO, activate soluble guanylyl cyclase and mediate the vasodilator response to NO or an NO derivative are not impaired. The present data are consistent with the results of a previous study in monocrotaline-induced PH in which systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output were not evaluated and are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite is

  5. Effect of Chronic Sodium Nitrite Therapy on Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Casey, David B.; Lasker, George F.; Riehl, Russel A.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder that without treatment is progressive and often fatal within 3 years. The treatment of PH involves the use of a diverse group of drugs and lung transplantation. Although nitrite was once thought to be an inactive metabolite of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO), there is increasing evidence that nitrite may be useful in the treatment of PH, but the mechanism by which nitrite exerts its beneficial effect remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic sodium nitrite treatment in a PH model in the rat. Following induction of PH with a single injection of monocrotaline, 60 mg; daily ip injections of sodium nitrite (3 mg/kg) starting on day 14 and continuing for 21 days, resulted in a significantly lower pulmonary arterial pressure on day 35 when compared to values in untreated animals with monocrotaline-induced PH. In monocrotaline-treated rats, daily treatment with ip nitrite injections for 21 days decreased right ventricular mass and pathologic changes in small pulmonary arteries. Nitrite therapy did not change systemic arterial pressure or cardiac output when values were measured on day 35. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to iv injections of sodium nitroprusside, sodium nitrite, and BAY 41-8543 were not different in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and rats with chronic nitrite therapy when compared to responses in animals in which pulmonary arterial pressure was increased with U46619. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the mechanisms that convert nitrite to vasoactive NO, activate soluble guanylyl cyclase and mediate the vasodilator response to NO or an NO derivative are not impaired. The present data are consistent with the results of a previous study in monocrotaline-induced PH in which systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output were not evaluated and are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite is

  6. Inhalable delivery of AAV-based MRP4/ABCC4 silencing RNA prevents monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Claude, Caroline; Mougenot, Nathalie; Bechaux, Julia; Hadri, Lahouaria; Brockschnieder, Damian; Clergue, Michel; Atassi, Fabrice; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter MRP4 (encoded by ABCC4) regulates membrane cyclic nucleotides concentrations in arterial cells including smooth muscle cells. MRP4/ABCC4 deficient mice display a reduction in smooth muscle cells proliferation and a prevention of pulmonary hypertension in response to hypoxia. We aimed to study gene transfer of a MRP4/ABCC4 silencing RNA via intratracheal delivery of aerosolized adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1.shMRP4 or AAV1.control) in a monocrotaline-induced model of pulmonary hypertension in rats. Gene transfer was performed at the time of monocrotaline administration and the effect on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling was assessed 35 days later. AAV1.shMRP4 dose-dependently reduced right ventricular systolic pressure and hypertrophy with a significant reduction with the higher doses (i.e., >1011 DRP/animal) as compared to AAV1.control. The higher dose of AAV1.shMRP4 was also associated with a significant reduction in distal pulmonary arteries remodeling. AAV1.shMRP4 was finally associated with a reduction in the expression of ANF, a marker of cardiac hypertrophy. Collectively, these results support a therapeutic potential for downregulation of MRP4 for the treatment of pulmonary artery hypertension. PMID:26052533

  7. Thymosin Beta 4 Protects Mice from Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liling; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive vascular disease of pulmonary arteries that impedes ejection of blood by the right ventricle. As a result there is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure causing right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure. The pathology of PAH involves vascular cell remodeling including pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Current therapies are limited to reverse the vascular remodeling. Investigating a key molecule is required for development of new therapeutic intervention. Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous G-actin sequestering protein with diverse biological function and promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory responses. However, it remains unknown whether Tβ4 has any protective role in PH. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the whether Tβ4 can be used as a vascular-protective agent. In monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH mouse model, we showed that mice treated with Tβ4 significantly attenuated the systolic pressure and RVH, compared to the MCT treated mice. Our data revealed for the first time that Tβ4 selectively targets Notch3-Col 3A-CTGF gene axis in preventing MCT-induced PH and RVH. Our study may provide pre-clinical evidence for Tβ4 and may consider as vasculo-protective agent for the treatment of PH induced RVH. PMID:25412097

  8. N-acetylcysteine improves established monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of patients suffering from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are predominantly determined by the response of the right ventricle to the increase afterload secondary to high vascular pulmonary resistance. However, little is known about the effects of the current available or experimental PAH treatments on the heart. Recently, inflammation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of PAH. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-known safe anti-oxidant drug, has immuno-modulatory and cardioprotective properties. We therefore hypothesized that NAC could reduce the severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats exposed to monocrotaline (MCT), lowering inflammation and preserving pulmonary vascular system and right heart function. Methods Saline-treated control, MCT-exposed, MCT-exposed and NAC treated rats (day 14–28) were evaluated at day 28 following MCT for hemodynamic parameters (right ventricular systolic pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardiac output), right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular morphometry, lung inflammatory cells immunohistochemistry (monocyte/macrophages and dendritic cells), IL-6 expression, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis. Results The treatment with NAC significantly decreased pulmonary vascular remodeling, lung inflammation, and improved total pulmonary resistance (from 0.71 ± 0.05 for MCT group to 0.50 ± 0.06 for MCT + NAC group, p < 0.05). Right ventricular function was also improved with NAC treatment associated with a significant decrease in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy (625 ± 69 vs. 439 ± 21 μm2 for MCT and MCT + NAC group respectively, p < 0.001) and heart fibrosis (14.1 ± 0.8 vs. 8.8 ± 0.1% for MCT and MCT + NAC group respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions Through its immuno-modulatory and cardioprotective properties, NAC has beneficial effect on pulmonary vascular and right heart function in experimental PH. PMID:24929652

  9. Calorie Restriction Attenuates Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingge; Lei, Jingyi; Qu, Yinxian; Zhang, Huan; Xin, Weichuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Zhichao; Jin, Faguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective nonpharmacological interventions protecting against cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension in the systemic circulation. However, whether CR could attenuate pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is largely unknown. The PAH model was developed by subjecting the rats to a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline. CR lowered mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and reduced vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in PAH rats. Meanwhile, CR attenuated endothelial dysfunction as evidenced by increased relaxation in response to acetylcholine. The beneficial effects of CR were associated with restored sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) expression and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in pulmonary arteries of PAH rats. To further clarify the role of SIRT1 in the protective effects of CR, adenoviral vectors for overexpression of SIRT1 were administered intratracheally at 1 day before monocrotaline injection. Overexpression of SIRT1 exhibited similar beneficial effects on mPAP and endothelial function, and increased eNOS phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in the absence of CR. Moreover, SIRT1 overexpression attenuated the increase in mPAP in hypoxia-induced PAH animals. Overall, the present data demonstrate that CR may serve as an effective treatment of PAH, and targeting the SIRT1/eNOS pathway may improve treatment of PAH. PMID:25636073

  10. Involvement of mast cells in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) are implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling. Accumulation of lung MCs is described in pulmonary hypertension (PH); however, whether MC degranulation and c-kit, a tyrosine kinase receptor critically involved in MC biology, contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of PH has not been fully explored. Methods Pulmonary MCs of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) patients and monocrotaline-injected rats (MCT-rats) were examined by histochemistry and morphometry. Effects of the specific c-kit inhibitor PLX and MC stabilizer cromolyn sodium salt (CSS) were investigated in MCT-rats both by the preventive and therapeutic approaches. Hemodynamic and right ventricular hypertrophy measurements, pulmonary vascular morphometry and analysis of pulmonary MC localization/counts/activation were performed in animal model studies. Results There was a prevalence of pulmonary MCs in IPAH patients and MCT-rats as compared to the donors and healthy rats, respectively. Notably, the perivascular MCs were increased and a majority of them were degranulated in lungs of IPAH patients and MCT-rats (p < 0.05 versus donor and control, respectively). In MCT-rats, the pharmacological inhibitions of MC degranulation and c-kit with CSS and PLX, respectively by a preventive approach (treatment from day 1 to 21 of MCT-injection) significantly attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). Moreover, vascular remodeling, as evident from the significantly decreased muscularization and medial wall thickness of distal pulmonary vessels, was improved. However, treatments with CSS and PLX by a therapeutic approach (from day 21 to 35 of MCT-injection) neither improved hemodynamics and RVH nor vascular remodeling. Conclusions The accumulation and activation of perivascular MCs in the lungs are the histopathological features present in clinical (IPAH patients) and experimental (MCT-rats) PH. Moreover, the

  11. Role of oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide and transforming growth factor-beta in the protective effect of diosgenin in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Obaid, Al Arqam Z; Zaki, Hala F; Agha, Azza M

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disease of various origins that is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. In the present study, the protective effect of diosgenin was investigated in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Diosgenin (100 mg/kg) was given by oral administration once daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the experiment, mean arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography and echocardiography were recorded. Rats were then sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of total nitrate/nitrite level. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total nitrate/nitrite and transforming growth factor-beta contents. Myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities in addition to endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression were also determined. Moreover, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was performed. Diosgenin treatment provided a significant improvement toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by monocrotaline in rats. Furthermore, diosgenin therapy prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in nitric oxide production, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as histological analysis. These findings support the beneficial effect of diosgenin in pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline in rats. PMID:25062790

  12. Protective effects of methylsulfonylmethane on hemodynamics and oxidative stress in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sadollah; Najafi, Moslem; Hamzeiy, Hossein; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayon; Darabi, Masoud; Mostafalou, Sara; Bohlooli, Shahab; Garjani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is naturally occurring organic sulfur that is known as a potent antioxidant/anti-inflammatory compound. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MSM on hemodynamics functions and oxidative stress in rats with monocrotaline- (MCT-) induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 38-days treatment. MSM was administered to rats at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day doses 10 days before a single dose of 60 mg/kg, IP, MCT. Hemodynamics of ventricles were determined by Powerlab AD instrument. Blood samples were obtained to evaluate changes in the antioxidative system including activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Improvements in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were observed in the MSM-treated pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats, with a significant reduction in right ventricular systolic pressure (RSVP) and an increase in the mean arterial pressure (MAP). The values of CAT, SOD, GSH-px activities, and GSH were significantly lower in MCT-induced PAH (P < 0.01), but they were recovered to control levels of MSM-treated groups. Our present results suggest that long-term administration of the MSM attenuates MCT-induced PAH in rats through modulation of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. PMID:23118745

  13. Attenuation of the extract from Moringa oleifera on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang-Hu; Chen, Yi-Jui; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Liu, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Pan, Shwu-Fen; Lin, Tzer-Bin; Chen, Mei-Jung

    2012-02-29

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an extract from Moringa oleifera (MO) on the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) in Wistar rats. An ethanol extraction was performed on dried MO leaves, and HPLC analysis identified niaziridin and niazirin in the extract. PH was induced with a single subcutaneous injection of MCT (60 mg/kg) which resulted in increases in pulmonary arterial blood pressure (Ppa) and in thickening of the pulmonary arterial medial layer in the rats. Three weeks after induction, acute administration of the MO extract to the rats decreased Ppa in a dose-dependent manner that reached statistical significance at a dose of 4.5 mg of freeze-dried extract per kg body weight. The reduction in Ppa suggested that the extract directly relaxed the pulmonary arteries. To assay the effects of chronic administration of the MO extract on PH, control, MCT and MCT+MO groups were designated. Rats in the control group received a saline injection; the MCT and MCT+MO groups received MCT to induce PH. During the third week after MCT treatment, the MCT+MO group received daily i.p. injections of the MO extract (4.5 mg of freeze-dried extract/kg of body weight). Compared to the control group, the MCT group had higher Ppa and thicker medial layers in the pulmonary arteries. Chronic treatments with the MO extract reversed the MCT-induced changes. Additionally, the MCT group had a significant elevation in superoxide dismutase activity when normalized by the MO extract treatments. In conclusion, the MO extract successfully attenuated the development of PH via direct vasodilatation and a potential increase in antioxidant activity. PMID:22242951

  14. Naringenin adds to the protective effect of L-arginine in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats: favorable modulation of oxidative stress, inflammation and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Obaid, Al Arqam Z; Zaki, Hala F; Agha, Azza M

    2014-10-01

    The present study was directed to investigate the possible modulatory effect of naringenin when co-administered with L-arginine in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). L-arginine (500 mg/kg) and naringenin (50 mg/kg) were orally administered daily, alone and in combination, for 3 weeks. Mean arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography and echocardiography were then recorded and rats were sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of total nitrate/nitrite level. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total nitrate/nitrite and transforming growth factor-beta. Myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities in addition to endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression were also determined. Moreover, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was performed. Combined therapy provided a significant improvement in L-arginine protective effect toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by monocrotaline treatment. Furthermore, combined therapy prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as histological analysis compared with either treatment alone. In conclusion, naringenin significantly adds to the protective effect of L-arginine in pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline in rats. PMID:24878387

  15. Therapeutic Benefits of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Ke, Meng-Wei; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Wann, Shue-Ren; Shu, Chih-Wen; Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Pan, Hung-Wei; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in vascular resistance and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream suggest that inflammation may play a role in PAH. In this study, the benefits of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-conditioned medium (iPSC CM) were explored in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rats. We demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPSC CM significantly reduced the right ventricular systolic pressure and ameliorated the hypertrophy of the right ventricle in MCT-induced PAH rats in models of both disease prevention and disease reversal. In the prevention of MCT-induced PAH, iPSC-based therapy led to the decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells and down-regulated the expression of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12α, IL-12β, IL-23 and IFNγ genes in lung specimens, which implied that iPSC-based therapy may be involved in the regulation of inflammation. NF-κB signaling is essential to the inflammatory cascade, which is activated via the phosphorylation of the NF-κB molecule. Using the chemical inhibitor specifically blocked the phosphorylation of NF-κB, and in vitro assays of cultured human M1 macrophages implied that the anti-inflammation effect of iPSC-based therapy may contribute to the disturbance of NF-κB activation. Here, we showed that iPSC-based therapy could restore the hemodynamic function of right ventricle with benefits for preventing the ongoing inflammation in the lungs of MCT-induced PAH rats by regulating NF-κB phosphorylation. PMID:26840075

  16. [Effect of chrysin on expression of NOX4 and NF-κB in right ventricle of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension of rats].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-wei; Guo, Bo; Shen, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Jie-ren

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) on right ventricular remodeling in a rat model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). PAH rats were induced by a single injection of monocrotaline (60 mg x kg(-1), sc) and were administered with chrysin (50 or 100 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) for 4 weeks. At the end of experiment, the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) were monitored via the right jugular vein catheterization into the right ventricle. Right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle (LV) + septum (S) and RV to tibial length were calculated. Right ventricular morphological change was observed by HE staining. Masson's trichrome stain was used to demonstrate collagen deposition. The total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in right ventricle were determined according to the manufacturer's instructions. The expressions of collagen I, collagen III, NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were analyzed by immunohistochemisty, qPCR and (or) Western blot. The results showed that chrysin treatment for 4 weeks attenuated RVSP, mPAP and right ventricular remodeling index (RV/LV+S and RV/Tibial length) of PAH rats induced by monocrotaline. Furthermore, monocrotaline-induced right ventricular collagen accumulation and collagen I and collagen III expression were both significantly suppressed by chrysin. The expressions of NOX4, NF-κB and MDA contents were obviously decreased, while the T-AOC was significantly increased in right ventricule from PAH rats with chrysin treatment. These results suggest that chrysin ameliorates right ventricular remodeling of PAH induced by monocrotaline in rats through its down-regulating of NOX4 expression and antioxidant activity, and inhibiting NF-κB expression and collagen accumulation. PMID:26757549

  17. Activity of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor is augmented in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension of rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Morio, Yoshiteru; Homma, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Akihito; Nagaoka, Tetsutaro; Sato, Koichi; Muramatsu, Masashi; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of endothelium-dependent vasodilator signaling involves three components such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Although EDHF is distinct from nitric oxide and prostacyclin, it requires activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels (K(Ca)) and cytochrome P(450) metabolites. However, the physiological role of EDHF in the pulmonary circulation is unclear. Thus, we tested if EDHF would regulate vascular tone in rat lungs of control and monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension. Inhibition of EDHF with a combination of K(Ca) blockers, charybdotoxin (50 nM) plus apamin (50 nM), increased baseline vascular tone in MCT-induced hypertensive lungs. Thapsigargin (TG; 100 nM), an inhibitor of Ca-ATPase, caused greater EDHF-mediated vasodilation in MCT-induced hypertensive lungs. TG-induced vasodilation was abolished with the charybdotoxin-apamin combination. Sulfaphenazole (10 muM), a cytochrome P(450) inhibitor, reduced the TG-induced vasodilation in MCT-induced hypertensive lungs. RT-PCR analysis exhibited an increase in K(Ca) mRNA in MCT-treated lungs. These results indicate the augmentation of tonic EDHF activity, at least in part, through the alteration in cytochrome P(450) metabolites and the upregulation of K(Ca) expression in MCT-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:17438361

  18. Vascular endothelial-cadherin downregulation as a feature of endothelial transdifferentiation in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Maltabe, Violetta; Manitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Karras, Panagiotis; Kouklis, Panos; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Maniatis, Nikolaos A

    2016-08-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary hypertension (PH) is caused by vasoconstriction and obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by proliferating vascular cells. In analogy to cancer, subsets of proliferating cells may be derived from endothelial cells transitioning into a mesenchymal phenotype. To understand phenotypic shifts transpiring within endothelial cells in PH, we injected rats with alkaloid monocrotaline to induce PH and measured lung tissue levels of endothelial-specific protein and critical differentiation marker vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. VE-cadherin expression by immonoblotting declined significantly 24 h and 15 days postinjection to rebound to baseline at 30 days. There was a concomitant increase in transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug, along with a reduction in VE-cadherin mRNA. Mesenchymal markers α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin were upregulated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, and α-smooth muscle actin was colocalized with endothelial marker platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 by confocal microscopy. Apoptosis was limited in this model, especially in the 24-h time point. In addition, monocrotaline resulted in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and increased lung tissue nitrotyrosine staining. To understand the etiological relationship between nitrosative stress and VE-cadherin suppression, we incubated cultured rat lung endothelial cells with endothelin-1, a vasoconstrictor and pro-proliferative agent in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This resulted in activation of eNOS, NF-κB, and Akt, in addition to induction of Snail, downregulation of VE-cadherin, and synthesis of vimentin. These effects were blocked by eNOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. We propose that transcriptional repression of VE-cadherin by nitrosative stress is involved in endothelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation in experimental PH. PMID

  19. Ruscogenin exerts beneficial effects on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting NF-κB expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Bi, Liqing; Kong, Hui; Xie, Weiping; Hong, Yongqing; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of ruscogenin on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and to determine the mechanism underlying this effect. We isolated pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMCs) from the pulmonary artery of the rats; the PVSMCs were cultured in vitro and then were treated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), PDGF + ruscogenin, or PDGF + ruscogenin + parthenolide. We randomized Sprague-Dawley rats into five groups as follows: control group, PAH group, low-dose group, medium-dose group, and high-dose group; the rats in the low-, medium-, and high-dose groups received the vehicle and ruscogenin 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 mg/kg, respectively, from day 1 to day 21 after injection of monocrotaline (MCT). We measured the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), and medial wall thickness of the pulmonary artery (PAWT). We examined the levels of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) protein by using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, and the mRNA levels of NF-κB in PVSMCs were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mPAP, RVSP, and PAWT and the protein and mRNA levels of NF-κB were significantly higher in the PAH model group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Ruscogenin induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in the mPAP, RVSP, and PAWT and in the NF-κB expression in the PAH group (P < 0.05), which suggests that ruscogenin will also exert dose-dependent effects on MCT-induced PAH through the inhibition of NF-κB. PMID:26722401

  20. Beneficial effects of a novel agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Allan K N; Pereira, Sharlene L; Montagnoli, Tadeu L; Maia, Rodolfo C; Kümmerle, Arthur E; Landgraf, Sharon S; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Ferraz, Emanuelle B; Tesch, Roberta; Nascimento, José H M; de Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by enhanced pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy and increased right ventricular systolic pressure. Here, we investigated the effects of a N-acylhydrazone derivative, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-N-methyl-benzoylhydrazide (LASSBio-1359), on monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Experimental Approach PAH was induced in male Wistar rats by a single i.p. injection of MCT (60 mg·kg−1) and 2 weeks later, oral LASSBio-1359 (50 mg·kg−1) or vehicle was given once daily for 14 days. Echocardiography was used to measure cardiac function and pulmonary artery dimensions, with histological assay of vascular collagen. Studies of binding to human recombinant adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A3) and of docking with A2A receptors were also performed. Key Results MCT administration induced changes in vascular and ventricular structure and function, characteristic of PAH. These changes were reversed by treatment with LASSBio-1359. MCT also induced endothelial dysfunction in pulmonary artery, as measured by diminished relaxation of pre-contracted arterial rings, and this dysfunction was reversed by LASSBio-1359. In pulmonary artery rings from normal Wistar rats, LASSBio-1359 induced relaxation, which was decreased by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385. In adenosine receptor binding studies, LASSBio-1359 showed most affinity for the A2A receptor and in the docking analyses, binding modes of LASSBio-1359 and the A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, were very similar. Conclusion and Implications In rats with MCT-induced PAH, structural and functional changes in heart and pulmonary artery were reversed by treatment with oral LASSBio-1359, most probably through the activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:23530610

  1. Effects of Single Drug and Combined Short-term Administration of Sildenafil, Pimobendan, and Nicorandil on Right Ventricular Function in Rats With Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Telma M; Tanaka, Ryou; Yoshiyuki, Rieko; Fukayama, Toshiharu; Goya, Seijiro; Fukushima, Ryuji

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and the effectiveness of therapy using recently investigated echocardiographic parameters. PAH is characterized by the progressive elevation of pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction, which ultimately results in right-sided heart failure and death. Echocardiography results and invasive measurements of right and left ventricular systolic pressures were compared after 3-week administrations of sildenafil (S group), pimobendan (P group), nicorandil (N group), and their combinations (SP and SPN groups) in male rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension (M group) and without this condition (C group). The groups that received pimobendan alone and in combinations (SP and SPN groups) showed improvement in their echocardiographic parameters of systolic function. A significant improvement of diastolic function was achieved in the SPN group. Invasive measurements showed the most significant decreases of right ventricular systolic pressure in the N and SPN groups, and the use of pimobendan resulted in a comparatively low risk of adverse hemodynamic effects (left ventricular systolic pressure). Although our results suggested the attenuation of PAH severity in all treatment groups, PAH could not be reversed. PMID:25806612

  2. Effects of Single Drug and Combined Short-term Administration of Sildenafil, Pimobendan, and Nicorandil on Right Ventricular Function in Rats With Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryou; Yoshiyuki, Rieko; Fukayama, Toshiharu; Goya, Seijiro; Fukushima, Ryuji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This study was designed to assess the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and the effectiveness of therapy using recently investigated echocardiographic parameters. PAH is characterized by the progressive elevation of pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction, which ultimately results in right-sided heart failure and death. Echocardiography results and invasive measurements of right and left ventricular systolic pressures were compared after 3-week administrations of sildenafil (S group), pimobendan (P group), nicorandil (N group), and their combinations (SP and SPN groups) in male rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension (M group) and without this condition (C group). The groups that received pimobendan alone and in combinations (SP and SPN groups) showed improvement in their echocardiographic parameters of systolic function. A significant improvement of diastolic function was achieved in the SPN group. Invasive measurements showed the most significant decreases of right ventricular systolic pressure in the N and SPN groups, and the use of pimobendan resulted in a comparatively low risk of adverse hemodynamic effects (left ventricular systolic pressure). Although our results suggested the attenuation of PAH severity in all treatment groups, PAH could not be reversed. PMID:25806612

  3. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  4. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  5. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  6. Activation of AMPK Prevents Monocrotaline-Induced Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Han, Dong; Zhang, Yonghong; Xie, Xinming; Ke, Rui; Zhu, Yanting; Liu, Lu; Song, Yang; Yang, Lan; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The current study was performed to investigate the effect of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) – activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation on the extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of pulmonary arteries in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and to address its potential mechanisms. Material/Methods PAH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (MCT) into Sprague-Dawley rats. Metformin (MET) was administered to activate AMPK. Immunoblotting was used to determine the phosphorylation and expression of AMPK and expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). Gelatin zymography was performed to determine the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Results Activation of AMPK by MET significantly reduced the right ventricle systolic pressure and the right ventricular hypertrophy in MCT-induced rat PAH model, and partially inhibited the ECM remodeling of pulmonary arteries. These effects were coupled with the decrease of MMP-2/9 activity and TIMP-1 expression. Conclusions This study suggests that activation of AMPK benefits PAH by inhibiting ECM remodeling of pulmonary arteries. Enhancing AMPK activity might have potential value in clinical treatment of PAH. PMID:26978596

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  9. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  10. Lodenafil treatment in the monocrotaline model of pulmonary hypertension in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Polonio, Igor Bastos; Acencio, Milena Marques Pagliareli; Pazetti, Rogério; de Almeida, Francine Maria; da Silva, Bárbara Soares; Pereira, Karina Aparecida Bonifácio; Souza, Rogério

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the effects of lodenafil on hemodynamics and inflammation in the rat model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH). Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control; monocrotaline (experimental model); and lodenafil (experimental model followed by lodenafil treatment, p.o., 5 mg/kg daily for 28 days) Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was obtained by right heart catheterization. We investigated right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and IL-1 levels in lung fragments. The number of cases of RVH was significantly higher in the monocrotaline group than in the lodenafil and control groups, as were mPAP and IL-1 levels. We conclude that lodenafil can prevent monocrotaline-induced PH, RVH, and inflammation. PMID:25210965

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  13. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  14. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  15. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Sabela, Ana Karênina Dias de Almeida; Mariano, Thaoan Bruno; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; do Carmo, Edna Maria; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Okoshi, Katashi; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. Objective To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8) and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8). Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test), and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p < 0.05). Results Higher fractal dimension values were observed in group M as compared to group C (1.39 ± 0.05 vs. 1.37 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Echocardiography showed lower pulmonary artery flow velocity, pulmonary acceleration time and ejection time values in group M, suggesting function worsening in those animals. Conclusion The changes observed confirm pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction. PMID:27223643

  16. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  17. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  18. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  19. Novel Approaches to Treat Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Umar, S.; Steendijk, P.; Ypey, D. L.; Atsma, D. E.; van der Wall, E. E.; Schalij, M. J.; van der Laarse, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by an increase in pulmonary artery pressure leading to right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, RV failure, and ultimately death. Current treatments can improve symptoms and reduce severity of the hemodynamic disorder but gradual deterioration in their condition often necessitates a lung transplant. Methods and Results. In experimental models of PAH, particularly the model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension, efficacious treatment options tested so far include a spectrum of pharmacologic agents with actions such as anti-mitogenic, proendothelial function, proangiogenic, antiinflammatory and antioxidative. Emerging trends in PAH treatment are gene and cell therapy and their combination, like (progenitor) cells enriched with eNOS or VEGF gene. More animal data should be collected to investigate optimal cell type, in vitro cell transduction, route of administration, and number of cells to inject. Several recently discovered and experimentally tested interventions bear potential for therapeutic purposes in humans or have been shown already to be effective in PAH patients leading to improved life expectation and better quality of life. Conclusion. Since many patients remain symptomatic despite therapy, we should encourage research in animal models of PAH and implement promising treatments in homogeneous groups of PAH patients. PMID:20339474

  20. Pulmonary hypertension caused by pulmonary venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) on the pulmonary circulation is extraordinarily variable, ranging from no impact on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) to a marked increase. The reasons for this are unknown. Both acutely reversible pulmonary vasoconstriction and pathological remodeling (especially medial hypertrophy and intimal hyperplasia) account for increased PVR when present. The mechanisms involved in vasoconstriction and remodeling are not clearly defined, but increased wall stress, especially in small pulmonary arteries, presumably plays an important role. Myogenic contraction may account for increased vascular tone and also indirectly stimulate remodeling of the vessel wall. Increased wall stress may also directly cause smooth muscle growth, migration, and intimal hyperplasia. Even long-standing and severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) usually abates with elimination of PVH, but PVH-PH is an important clinical problem, especially because PVH due to left ventricular noncompliance lacks definitive therapy. The role of targeted PH therapy in patients with PVH-PH is unclear at this time. Most prospective studies indicate that these medications are not helpful or worse, but there is ample reason to think that a subset of patients with PVH-PH may benefit from phosphodiesterase inhibitors or other agents. A different approach to evaluating possible pharmacologic therapy for PVH-PH may be required to better define its possible utility. PMID:25610595

  1. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  2. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rogerio; Jardim, Carlos; Humbert, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension, is a rare disease (incidence and prevalence rates of approximately one and six cases per million inhabitants, respectively) with different clinical phenotypes. A group of diverse conditions manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and share similar pathological and/or clinical findings with IPAH. By definition, IPAH is diagnosed only after alternative diagnoses have been ruled out. Extensive investigation is needed to determine if PAH is associated with thyroid diseases, infectious diseases, autoimmune conditions, exposure to certain drugs (particularly anorexigens), certain genetic mutations, and so on. The presence of genetic abnormalities and risk factors (such as specific drug exposures) reinforces the "multiple hit" concept for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Fortunately, within the past two decades, therapeutic options have become available for IPAH, resulting in improved survival and clinical outcomes. At least seven different compounds have been registered for PAH treatment. However, even with aggressive PAH-specific therapy, mortality rates remain high (∼40% at 5 years). Given the high mortality rates, the use of combinations of agents that work by different pathways has been advocated (either as "add-on" therapy or initial "up front" therapy). Further, new therapeutic agents and treatment strategies are on the near horizon, aiming to further improve survival from the remarkable progress already seen. PMID:24037625

  3. Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oudiz, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    The classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an attempt to define subtypes of PH based on clinical presentation, underlying physiology, and treatment implications. Five groups of PH have been defined, and the classification scheme has been refined over the years to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of PH. Understanding the classification of PH is paramount before embarking on a work-up of patients with PH or suspected PH because treatment and outcome can vary greatly. PMID:27443133

  4. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Denault, André; Deschamps, Alain; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lambert, Jean; Perrault, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an important prognostic factor in cardiac surgery associated with increased morbidity and mortality. With the aging population and the associated increase severity of illness, the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in cardiac surgical patients will increase. In this review, the definition of pulmonary hypertension, the mechanisms and its relationship to right ventricular dysfunction will be presented. Finally, pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic and preventive approaches will be presented. PMID:21286273

  6. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  7. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary pulmonary hypertension 2 Primary pulmonary hypertension 3 Primary pulmonary hypertension 4 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (4 links) ...

  8. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  9. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  11. EP3 receptor deficiency attenuates pulmonary hypertension through suppression of Rho/TGF-β1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ankang; Zuo, Caojian; He, Yuhu; Chen, Guilin; Piao, Lingjuan; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Bing; Shen, Yujun; Tang, Juan; Kong, Deping; Alberti, Sara; Chen, Di; Zuo, Shenkai; Zhang, Qianqian; Yan, Shuai; Fei, Xiaochun; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Bin; Duan, Shengzhong; Yu, Yu; Lazarus, Michael; Su, Yunchao; Breyer, Richard M; Funk, Colin D; Yu, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is commonly associated with chronic hypoxemia in disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prostacyclin analogs are widely used in the management of PAH patients; however, clinical efficacy and long-term tolerability of some prostacyclin analogs may be compromised by concomitant activation of the E-prostanoid 3 (EP3) receptor. Here, we found that EP3 expression is upregulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and human distal pulmonary arteries (PAs) in response to hypoxia. Either pharmacological inhibition of EP3 or Ep3 deletion attenuated both hypoxia and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and restrained extracellular matrix accumulation in PAs in rodent models. In a murine PAH model, Ep3 deletion in SMCs, but not endothelial cells, retarded PA medial thickness. Knockdown of EP3α and EP3β, but not EP3γ, isoforms diminished hypoxia-induced TGF-β1 activation. Expression of either EP3α or EP3β in EP3-deficient PASMCs restored TGF-β1 activation in response to hypoxia. EP3α/β activation in PASMCs increased RhoA-dependent membrane type 1 extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) translocation to the cell surface, subsequently activating pro-MMP-2 and promoting TGF-β1 signaling. Activation or disruption of EP3 did not influence PASMC proliferation. Together, our results indicate that EP3 activation facilitates hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in mice and suggest EP3 inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25664856

  12. EP3 receptor deficiency attenuates pulmonary hypertension through suppression of Rho/TGF-β1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ankang; Zuo, Caojian; He, Yuhu; Chen, Guilin; Piao, Lingjuan; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Bing; Shen, Yujun; Tang, Juan; Kong, Deping; Alberti, Sara; Chen, Di; Zuo, Shenkai; Zhang, Qianqian; Yan, Shuai; Fei, Xiaochun; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Bin; Duan, Shengzhong; Yu, Yu; Lazarus, Michael; Su, Yunchao; Breyer, Richard M.; Funk, Colin D.; Yu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is commonly associated with chronic hypoxemia in disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prostacyclin analogs are widely used in the management of PAH patients; however, clinical efficacy and long-term tolerability of some prostacyclin analogs may be compromised by concomitant activation of the E-prostanoid 3 (EP3) receptor. Here, we found that EP3 expression is upregulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and human distal pulmonary arteries (PAs) in response to hypoxia. Either pharmacological inhibition of EP3 or Ep3 deletion attenuated both hypoxia and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and restrained extracellular matrix accumulation in PAs in rodent models. In a murine PAH model, Ep3 deletion in SMCs, but not endothelial cells, retarded PA medial thickness. Knockdown of EP3α and EP3β, but not EP3γ, isoforms diminished hypoxia-induced TGF-β1 activation. Expression of either EP3α or EP3β in EP3-deficient PASMCs restored TGF-β1 activation in response to hypoxia. EP3α/β activation in PASMCs increased RhoA-dependent membrane type 1 extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) translocation to the cell surface, subsequently activating pro–MMP-2 and promoting TGF-β1 signaling. Activation or disruption of EP3 did not influence PASMC proliferation. Together, our results indicate that EP3 activation facilitates hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in mice and suggest EP3 inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25664856

  13. Peptide-micelle hybrids containing fasudil for targeted delivery to the pulmonary arteries and arterioles to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilesh; Ibrahim, Hany M; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the respirability and efficacy of peptide-micelle hybrid nanoparticles as carriers for inhalational therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CARSKNKDC (CAR), a cell-penetrating and lung-homing peptide, conjugated polyethylene glycol-distearoyl-phosphoethanolamine micelles containing fasudil, an investigational anti-PAH drug, were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for various physicochemical properties. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacological efficacy of hybrid particles containing fasudil were evaluated in healthy rats and monocrotaline-induced PAH rats. CAR micelles containing fasudil had an entrapment efficiency of approximately 58%, showed controlled release of the drug, and were monodispersed with an average size of approximately 14 nm. Nuclear magnetic resonance scan confirmed the drug's presence in the core of peptide-micelle hybrid particles. Compared with plain micelles, CAR peptide increased the cellular uptake by approximately 1.7-fold and extended the drug half-life by approximately fivefold. The formulations were more prone to accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature than in the peripheral blood, which is evident from the ratio of the extent of reduction of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. On the whole, this study demonstrates that peptide-polymer hybrid micelles can serve as inhalational carriers for PAH therapy. PMID:25266507

  14. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang; Choe, Soo Young; Hong, Young Mi

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  15. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  16. Hyperthyroidism and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Marvisi, M; Brianti, M; Marani, G; Del Borello, R; Bortesi, M L; Guariglia, A

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, many authors have described several cases revealing an association between hyperthyroidism and pulmonary hypertension (PH). This observational study was designed to evaluate the incidence of PH in hyperthyroidism and was set in a department of internal medicine and pulmonary diseases with an out-patients department of endocrinology. Thirty-four patients, 25 women and nine men, with a mean age of 38 +/- 15 SD years participated. Twenty had Graves' disease and 14 had a nodular goitre. The patients were divided into two equally matched groups: those with a recently diagnosed hyperthyroidism, taking no drugs (group 1; n = 17) and those in a euthyroid state taking methimazole (group 2; n= 17). Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was performed and systolic pulmonary artery pressurements of (PAPs) was determined by the tricuspid regurgitation method using the Bernoulli equation. Measurements of triiodothyronine, tetraiodothyronine, free thyroxine (Ft4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies were also taken. We found a mild PH in seven patients of group 1 and in none of group 2. The mean +/- SD systolic pulmonaryartery pressurewas 28.88 +/- 6.41 in group 1 and 22.53 +/- 1.84 ingroup 2 (P<0.0001). A correlation was found between the TSH value and PAPs (r = -082;P < 0.001) and Ft4 and PAPs (r = 0 85; P < 0.001) in group 1. These findings indicate the presence of a frequent association between PH and hyperthyroidism. We suggest that hyperthyroidism be included in the differential diagnosis of PH. PMID:11999999

  17. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  18. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  19. Distal vessel stiffening is an early and pivotal mechanobiological regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Haeger, Christina Mallarino; Dieffenbach, Paul B.; Sicard, Delphine; Chrobak, Izabela; Coronata, Anna Maria F.; Suárez Velandia, Margarita M.; Vitali, Sally; Colas, Romain A.; Norris, Paul C.; Marinković, Aleksandar; Liu, Xiaoli; Ma, Jun; Rose, Chase D.; Lee, Seon-Jin; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Serhan, Charles N.; Walsh, Stephen R.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial (PA) stiffness is associated with increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH); however, the role of PA stiffening in the pathogenesis of PH remains elusive. Here, we show that distal vascular matrix stiffening is an early mechanobiological regulator of experimental PH. We identify cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) suppression and corresponding reduction in prostaglandin production as pivotal regulators of stiffness-dependent vascular cell activation. Atomic force microscopy microindentation demonstrated early PA stiffening in experimental PH and human lung tissue. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) grown on substrates with the stiffness of remodeled PAs showed increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, exaggerated contraction, enhanced matrix deposition, and reduced COX-2–derived prostanoid production compared with cells grown on substrates approximating normal PA stiffness. Treatment with a prostaglandin I2 analog abrogated monocrotaline-induced PA stiffening and attenuated stiffness-dependent increases in proliferation, matrix deposition, and contraction in PASMC. Our results suggest a pivotal role for early PA stiffening in PH and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of interrupting mechanobiological feedback amplification of vascular remodeling in experimental PH. PMID:27347562

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Ayhan; Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-06-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  2. [Postpartum pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escalante, Juan Pablo; Diez, Ana; Figueroa Casas, Marcelo; Lasave, Alejandro; Cursack, Guillermo; Poy, Carlos; Rodríguez, María Soledad; Galuppo, Marcela; Zapata, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in pregnancy is a rare disorder that carries a high risk to mother and child, and as such, it is considered a contraindication to becoming pregnant. However, there are few published reports related to the diagnosis of this condition after delivery. We describe three PH cases diagnosed after their normal pregnancies and deliveries. Although the causes are unknown, several mechanisms such as hypercoagulation, placental hypoxia or amniotic fluid embolism have been considered as possible causes. It is difficult to define whether a PH diagnosed in the postpartum period, relates to an earlier asymptomatic PH period that was triggered by the physiological stress of labor or if it is a recently acquired condition. Despite the lack of data to support the absence of PH previous to pregnancy in our three patients, lack of events during this period, asymptomatic and normal deliveries, lead us to believe that they did not suffer this disease prior to pregnancy; considering that high hemodynamic demands impair a ventricle with little reserve, and its subsequent appearance at time of delivery. PMID:25637900

  3. Purinergic dysregulation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Visovatti, Scott H; Hyman, Matthew C; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Kanthi, Yogendra; Robichaud, Patrick; Wang, Jintao; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Rattan, Rahul; Burant, Charles F; Pinsky, David J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the fact that nucleotides and adenosine help regulate vascular tone through purinergic signaling pathways, little is known regarding their contributions to the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a condition characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Even less is known about the potential role that alterations in CD39 (ENTPD1), the ectonucleotidase responsible for the conversion of the nucleotides ATP and ADP to AMP, may play in pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we identified decreased CD39 expression on the pulmonary endothelium of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We next determined the effects of CD39 gene deletion in mice exposed to normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen). Compared with controls, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice were found to have a markedly elevated ATP-to-adenosine ratio, higher pulmonary arterial pressures, more right ventricular hypertrophy, more arterial medial hypertrophy, and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice exhibited a marked increase in lung P2X1 receptors. Systemic reconstitution of ATPase and ADPase enzymatic activities through continuous administration of apyrase decreased pulmonary arterial pressures in hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice to levels found in hypoxic CD39(+/+) controls. Treatment with NF279, a potent and selective P2X1 receptor antagonist, lowered pulmonary arterial pressures even further. Our study is the first to implicate decreased CD39 and resultant alterations in circulating purinergic signaling ligands and cognate receptors in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Reconstitution and receptor blocking experiments suggest that phosphohydrolysis of purinergic nucleotide tri- and diphosphates, or blocking of the P2X1 receptor could serve as treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27208163

  4. Schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga H.; Kim, Nick H.; Mandel, Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Schistosomiasis, a parasite-borne disease, is highly prevalent in Africa and Asia; it is estimated that close to 20 million people worldwide have a severe form of the disease. The chronic form can affect the gastrointestinal system and lead to hepatosplenic disease, and it may cause cardiopulmonary complications, including pulmonary hypertension. The exact pathogenesis of schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension (Sch-PH) remains unclear, although several mechanisms, including parasitic arterial embolization, pulmonary arteriopathy, and portopulmonary hypertension–like pathophysiology, have been suggested. The immunopathology of the disease is also unclear, although there are similarities with the immunology of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Finally, the treatment of Sch-PH has not been well studied. There is some evidence on treating the underlying infection, with unclear effect on Sch-PH, and advanced PAH therapies are now being suggested, but more studies are needed to confirm their efficacy. PMID:25610596

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Humbert, M

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) are two of the key subgroups of pulmonary hypertension. They are characterised by different risk factors. PAH can be associated with mutations in the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2), HIV infection, congenital heart disease, connective tissue disease (such as systemic sclerosis), and exposure to particular drugs and toxins including fenfluramine derivatives. In contrast, CTEPH can be associated with anti-phospholipid antibodies, splenectomy and the presence of a ventriculo-atrial shunt or an infected pacemaker. The first-line therapies used to treat PAH and CTEPH also differ. While medical therapy tends to be used for patients with PAH, pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with CTEPH. However, there are possible common mechanisms behind the two diseases, including endothelial cell dysfunction and distal pulmonary artery remodelling. Further research into these similarities is needed to assist the development of targeted pharmacological therapies for patients with inoperable CTEPH and patients who have persistent pulmonary hypertension after endarterectomy. PMID:20956167

  6. Post splenectomy related pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palkar, Atul V; Agrawal, Abhinav; Verma, Sameer; Iftikhar, Asma; Miller, Edmund J; Talwar, Arunabh

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy predisposes patients to a slew of infectious and non-infectious complications including pulmonary vascular disease. Patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolic events due to various mechanisms that may lead to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The development of CTEPH and pulmonary vasculopathy after splenectomy involves complex pathophysiologic mechanisms, some of which remain unclear. This review attempts congregate the current evidence behind our understanding about the etio-pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease related to splenectomy and highlight the controversies that surround its management. PMID:26949600

  7. KLF5 mediates vascular remodeling via HIF-1α in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochen; He, Yuanzhou; Xu, Yongjian; Huang, Xiaomin; Liu, Jin; Xie, Min; Liu, Xiansheng

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is characterized by active vasoconstriction and profound vascular remodeling. KLF5, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is involved in the excessive proliferation and apoptotic resistance phenotype associated with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms of KLF5-mediated pathogenesis of HPH are largely undefined. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia (10% O2) for 4 wk. Hypoxic rats developed pulmonary arterial remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy with significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressure. The levels of KLF5 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were upregulated in distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle from hypoxic rats. The knockdown of KLF5 via short-hairpin RNA attenuated chronic hypoxia-induced hemodynamic and histological changes in rats. The silencing of either KLF5 or HIF-1α prevented hypoxia-induced (5%) proliferation and migration and promoted apoptosis in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. KLF5 was immunoprecipitated with HIF-1α under hypoxia and acted as an upstream regulator of HIF-1α. The cell cycle regulators cyclin B1 and cyclin D1 and apoptosis-related proteins including bax, bcl-2, survivin, caspase-3, and caspase-9, were involved in the regulation of KLF5/HIF-1α-mediated cell survival. This study demonstrated that KLF5 plays a crucial role in hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling in an HIF-1α-dependent manner and provided a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HPH. PMID:26702149

  8. Who Is at Risk for Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exact number of people who have pulmonary hypertension (PH) isn't known. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension ( ... have group 1 PAH tend to be overweight . PH that occurs with another disease or condition is ...

  9. Encapsulation of beraprost sodium in nanoparticles: analysis of sustained release properties, targeting abilities and pharmacological activities in animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Erika; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Chisa; Tamura, Yuichi; Sawazaki, Ryoichi; Tamura, Fumiya; Tahara, Kayoko; Kasahara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Tsutomu; Takenaga, Mitsuko; Fukuda, Keiichi; Mizushima, Tohru

    2015-01-10

    Prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) and its analogues (such as beraprost sodium, BPS) are beneficial for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The encapsulation of BPS in nanoparticles to provide sustained release and targeting abilities would improve both the therapeutic effect of BPS on PAH and the quality of life of patients treated with this drug. BPS was encapsulated into nanoparticles prepared from a poly(lactic acid) homopolymer and monomethoxy poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(lactide) block copolymer. The accumulation of nanoparticles in damaged pulmonary arteries was examined using fluorescence-emitting rhodamine S-encapsulated nanoparticles. The monocrotaline-induced PAH rat model and the hypoxia-induced mouse model were used to examine the pharmacological activity of BPS-encapsulated nanoparticles. A nanoparticle, named BPS-NP, was selected among various types of BPS-encapsulated nanoparticles tested; this was based on the sustained release profile in vitro and blood clearance profile in vivo. Fluorescence-emitting rhodamine S-encapsulated nanoparticles were prepared in a similar manner to that of BPS-NP, and showed accumulation and prolonged residence in monocrotaline-damaged pulmonary peripheral arteries. Intravenous administration of BPS-NP (once per week, 20μg/kg) protected against monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. The extent of this protection was similar to that observed with oral administration (once per day, 100μg/kg) of BPS alone. The once per week intravenous administration of BPS-NP (20μg/kg) also exhibited an ameliorative effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. The beneficial effects of BPS-NP on PAH animal models seem to be mediated by its sustained release and tissue targeting profiles. BPS-NP may be useful for the treatment of PAH patients due to reduced dosages and frequency of BPS administration. PMID:25449809

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension: Types and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Rose-Jones, Lisa J; Mclaughlin, Vallerie V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a panvasculopathy that affects the distal pulmonary arteries and leads to restricted blood flow. This increased afterload leads to adaptive mechanisms of the right ventricle, with eventual failure once it can no longer compensate. Pulmonary hypertension from associated conditions, most importantly left heart disease, i.e. heart failure, can also lead to the same sequela. Patients often experience early vague symptoms of dyspnea and exercise intolerance, and thus PH can elude clinicians until right heart failure symptoms predominate. Evidence-based treatment options with pulmo-nary vasodilators are available for those with PAH and should be employed early. It is essential that patients be accurately categorized by their etiology of PH, as treatment strategies differ, and can potentially be dangerous if employed in the wrong clinical scenario. PMID:24251459

  11. “Denervation” of autonomous nervous system in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension by low-dose radiation: a case report with an unexpected outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Oezkan, Filiz; Mahnkopf, Christian; Grabenbauer, Gerhard; Kreczy, Alfons; Bartunek, Rudolf; Darwiche, Kaid; Freitag, Lutz; Li, Qiang; Huang, Haidong; Vogl, Thomas; LePilvert, Patrick; Tsiouda, Theodora; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Vasointestinal peptide metabolism plays a key physiological role in multimodular levels of vasodilatory, smooth muscle cell proliferative, parenchymal, and inflammatory lung reactions. In animal studies, vasointestinal peptide relaxes isolated pulmonary arterial segments from several mammalian species in vitro and neutralizes the pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of endothelin. In some animal models, it reduces pulmonary vascular resistance in vivo and in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. A 58-year-old woman presented with dyspnea and mild edema of the lower extremities. A bronchoscopy was performed without any suspicious findings suggesting a central tumor or other infiltrative disease. Endobronchial ultrasound revealed enlarged pulmonary arteries containing thrombi, a few enlarged lymph nodes, and enlarged mediastinal tissue anatomy with suspicion for mediastinal infiltration of a malignant process. We estimated that less than 10% of the peripheral vascular bed of the lung was involved in direct consolidated fibrosis as demonstrated in the left upper lobe apex. Further, direct involvement of fibrosis around the main stems of the pulmonary arteries was assumed to be low from positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Assuming a positive influence of low-dose radiation, it was not expected that this could have reduced pulmonary vascular resistance by over two thirds of the initial result. However; it was noted that this patient had idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension mixed with “acute” (mediastinal) fibrosis which could have contributed to the unexpected success of reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, probably as a result of low-dose radiation to the pulmonary arterial main stems. The patient continues to have no specific complaints concerning her idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  12. "Denervation" of autonomous nervous system in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension by low-dose radiation: a case report with an unexpected outcome.

    PubMed

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Oezkan, Filiz; Mahnkopf, Christian; Grabenbauer, Gerhard; Kreczy, Alfons; Bartunek, Rudolf; Darwiche, Kaid; Freitag, Lutz; Li, Qiang; Huang, Haidong; Vogl, Thomas; Lepilvert, Patrick; Tsiouda, Theodora; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Vasointestinal peptide metabolism plays a key physiological role in multimodular levels of vasodilatory, smooth muscle cell proliferative, parenchymal, and inflammatory lung reactions. In animal studies, vasointestinal peptide relaxes isolated pulmonary arterial segments from several mammalian species in vitro and neutralizes the pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of endothelin. In some animal models, it reduces pulmonary vascular resistance in vivo and in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. A 58-year-old woman presented with dyspnea and mild edema of the lower extremities. A bronchoscopy was performed without any suspicious findings suggesting a central tumor or other infiltrative disease. Endobronchial ultrasound revealed enlarged pulmonary arteries containing thrombi, a few enlarged lymph nodes, and enlarged mediastinal tissue anatomy with suspicion for mediastinal infiltration of a malignant process. We estimated that less than 10% of the peripheral vascular bed of the lung was involved in direct consolidated fibrosis as demonstrated in the left upper lobe apex. Further, direct involvement of fibrosis around the main stems of the pulmonary arteries was assumed to be low from positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Assuming a positive influence of low-dose radiation, it was not expected that this could have reduced pulmonary vascular resistance by over two thirds of the initial result. However; it was noted that this patient had idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension mixed with "acute" (mediastinal) fibrosis which could have contributed to the unexpected success of reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, probably as a result of low-dose radiation to the pulmonary arterial main stems. The patient continues to have no specific complaints concerning her idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  13. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Tulloh, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal. PMID:19554091

  14. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies. PMID:26070575

  15. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  16. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  17. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Udhay; Mark, Tomer M; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  18. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  19. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  20. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Parakh, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a morbid condition associated with complications such as hemoptysis, right heart failure, paradoxical embolism, and even death. There is no known association of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Possible hypothesis for this association is an increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to the compensatory formation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We present one such case presenting with hemoptysis that was managed with endovascular treatment. PMID:27413264

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M.; Yuan, Carol; Oropello, John; Manasia, Anthony; Kohli-Seth, Roopa; Benjamin, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases. PMID:22848817

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy: critical care management.

    PubMed

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M; Yuan, Carol; Oropello, John; Manasia, Anthony; Kohli-Seth, Roopa; Benjamin, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30-56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases. PMID:22848817

  3. [Radiographic assessment of pulmonary hypertension: Methodical aspects].

    PubMed

    Korobkova, I Z; Lazutkina, V K; Nizovtsova, L A; Riden, T V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a menacing complication of a number of diseases, which is responsible for high mortality rates and considerably poorer quality of life in a patient. The timely detection for pulmonary hypertension allows timely initiation of treatment, thus improvement in prognosis in the patient. Chest X-ray is the most commonly used radiographic technique for various causes. Physicians' awareness about the radiographic manifestations of pulmonary hypertension may contribute to the earlier detection of this severe disease. Owing to the natural contrast of reflected structures, a chest X-ray film gives a unique opportunity to assess pulmonary circulation vessels, to reveal the signs of pulmonary hypertension, and to estimate trends in the course of the disease. The paper details a procedure for analysis and the normal radiographic anatomy of pulmonary circulation vessels, gives the present classification of pulmonary hypertension, and sets forth its X-ray semiotics. PMID:26552229

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuily, Stéphane; Wahl, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare but life-threatening condition in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) patients with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The definition of PH is based on hemodynamic parameters estimated by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and confirmed by right heart catheterization (RHC). New evidence suggests that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in SLE patients increase the risk of PH; however, studies yield conflicting results. Hypotheses regarding the impact of aPL on PH include large vessel and microvascular thrombosis, and endothelial remodeling. Natural history of PH is progressive worsening mainly due to recurrent pulmonary embolism. The management in APS patients includes anticoagulation; patients undergoing pulmonary endarterectomy need to be closely monitored because of an increased risk of thrombotic complications. PMID:25604574

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Mathier, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension occurs as the result of disease processes increasing pressure within the pulmonary circulation, eventually leading to right ventricular failure. Patients may become critically ill from complications of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure or may develop pulmonary hypertension as the result of critical illness. Diagnostic testing should evaluate for common causes such as left heart failure, hypoxemic lung disease and pulmonary embolism. Relatively few patients with pulmonary hypertension encountered in clinical practice require specific pharmacologic treatment of pulmonary hypertension targeting the pulmonary vasculature. Management of right ventricular failure involves optimization of preload, maintenance of systemic blood pressure and augmentation of inotropy to restore systemic perfusion. Selected patients may require pharmacologic therapy to reduce right ventricular afterload by directly targeting the pulmonary vasculature, but only after excluding elevated left heart filling pressures and confirming increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Critically-ill patients with pulmonary hypertension remain at high risk of adverse outcomes, requiring a diligent and thoughtful approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25944777

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in primary amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Lyska L.; Bull, David A.; Hatton, Nathan; Nativi-Nicolai, Jose; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C.; Ryan, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amyloidosis involves extravascular deposition of fibrillar proteins within tissues and organs. Primary light chain amyloidosis represents the most common form of systemic amyloidosis involving deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains. Although pulmonary amyloid deposition is common in primary amyloidosis, clinically significant pulmonary amyloidosis is uncommon, and elevated pulmonary artery pressures are rarely observed in the absence of other underlying etiologies for pulmonary hypertension, such as elevated filling pressures secondary to cardiac amyloid. In this case report, we present a patient with primary light chain amyloidosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension in the setting of pulmonary vascular and right ventricular myocardial amyloid deposition. PMID:27252852

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in primary amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Cirulis, Meghan M; Emerson, Lyska L; Bull, David A; Hatton, Nathan; Nativi-Nicolai, Jose; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C; Ryan, John J

    2016-06-01

    Amyloidosis involves extravascular deposition of fibrillar proteins within tissues and organs. Primary light chain amyloidosis represents the most common form of systemic amyloidosis involving deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains. Although pulmonary amyloid deposition is common in primary amyloidosis, clinically significant pulmonary amyloidosis is uncommon, and elevated pulmonary artery pressures are rarely observed in the absence of other underlying etiologies for pulmonary hypertension, such as elevated filling pressures secondary to cardiac amyloid. In this case report, we present a patient with primary light chain amyloidosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension in the setting of pulmonary vascular and right ventricular myocardial amyloid deposition. PMID:27252852

  8. Arrhythmias in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  9. Arrhythmias in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  10. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  11. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:26029570

  12. Recent trends in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Rajagopalan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a serious and unrelenting pulmonary vascular disorder that affects the functional quality of patients and significantly decreases their life span. If diagnosed early, with the number of new therapeutic options that are available, a better quality of life can be provided for a protracted length of time. It is likely that the available treatment will change the natural course of the disease and perhaps prolong survival. As symptoms are often subtle in the early stages of the disease it is imperative that physicians are aware of the manifestations of this condition. A thorough investigation of patients suspected of this condition is essential so that appropriate treatment can be initiated promptly. The routine workup of a patient suspected to have pulmonary hypertension could easily be carried out in any well-equipped peripheral hospital in many affluent and advanced countries. However, it must be mentioned that in some less advanced countries the necessary work up can only be done in major teaching hospitals. Both pulmonologists and cardiologists should be aware of the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the workup and the treatment options that are available. Patients with refractory pulmonary hypertension should be referred to these research centers for enrolment into any ongoing drug trials as well as for evaluation for heart–lung, single lung, or double lung transplantation. This paper is primarily aimed at pulmonologists and cardiologists taking care of these patients. Unless indicated otherwise this paper mainly deals with WHO group 1 pulmonary hypertension which is designated pulmonary arterial hypertension. Extensive review of the literature spanning the last 30 years was made through Medline using titles such as primary pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, secondary pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:21654985

  13. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: the End Result of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Witkin, Alison S; Channick, Richard N

    2015-08-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) occurs when a pulmonary embolism fails to undergo complete thrombolysis leading to vascular occlusion and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the fact that CTEPH is a potential consequence of pulmonary embolism, diagnosis requires a high degree of vigilance as many patients will not have a history of thromboembolic disease. The ventilation perfusion scan is used to evaluate for the possibility of CTEPH although right heart catheterization and pulmonary artery angiogram are needed to confirm the diagnosis. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is the first-line treatment for patients who are surgical candidates. Recently, riociguat has been approved for patients with nonsurgical disease or residual pulmonary hypertension despite surgical intervention. This review describes the pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of CTEPH. PMID:26099554

  14. The Rho kinase inhibitor azaindole-1 has long-acting vasodilator activity in the pulmonary vascular bed of the intact chest rat.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Byun, Ryuk J; Smith, William B; Bhartiya, Manish; Bueno, Franklin R; Badejo, Adeleke M; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-07-01

    Responses to a selective azaindole-based Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (azaindole-1) were investigated in the rat. Intravenous injections of azaindole-1 (10-300 µg/kg), produced small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure and larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure without changing cardiac output. Responses to azaindole-1 were slow in onset and long in duration. When baseline pulmonary vascular tone was increased with U46619 or L-NAME, the decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to the ROCK inhibitor were increased. The ROCK inhibitor attenuated the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to ventilatory hypoxia. Azaindole-1 decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. These results show that azaindole-1 has significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that responses are larger, slower in onset, and longer in duration when compared with the prototypical agent fasudil. Azaindole-1 reversed hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in a similar manner in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. These data suggest that ROCK is involved in regulating baseline tone in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds, and that ROCK inhibition will promote vasodilation when tone is increased by diverse stimuli including treatment with monocrotaline. PMID:22591047

  15. Pulmonary hypertension and pregnancy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gei, Alfredo; Montúfar-Rueda, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a syndrome infrequently associated with pregnancy. Despite advancements in therapy during the past 25 years and encouraging reports of improved outcomes, pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a devastating disease with a significantly reduced lifespan. This disorder should still be considered a contraindication to pregnancy. The decision of a patient to continue the pregnancy should be supported by an empathetic group of health care professionals who would optimize their treatment and hopefully their pregnancy outcomes and survival after delivery. We overview here different aspects of the diagnosis, evaluation, management, and counseling of patients suffering from pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy. PMID:25314091

  16. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Roman, Antonio; López-Meseguer, Manuel; Domingo, Enric

    2015-06-22

    Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension has achieved significant progress over the past 20 years. Currently, 3 groups of drugs have proven useful for the treatment of this disease: endothelin receptor antagonist, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and prostacyclin and its analogues. It is recommended to initiate treatment with one of these drugs, the choice depending on the initial severity of patient disease and the preferences of the treating physician. When the patient does not have a satisfactory response, new drugs acting at a different pathway are most commonly added. At this time, considering referral for lung transplantation could be an alternative. Most experts recommend grouping maximum experience in what is known as expert centers. Treatment has led to better survival in these patients, but there is still a long way to cure this life-threatening disease. PMID:25070518

  17. The serotonin transporter promotes a pathological estrogen metabolic pathway in pulmonary hypertension via cytochrome P450 1B1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating vasculopathy that predominates in women and has been associated with dysregulated estrogen and serotonin signaling. Overexpression of the serotonin transporter (SERT+) in mice results in an estrogen-dependent development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Estrogen metabolism by cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) contributes to the pathogenesis of PAH, and serotonin can increase CYP1B1 expression in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs). We hypothesized that an increase in intracellular serotonin via increased SERT expression may dysregulate estrogen metabolism via CYP1B1 to facilitate PAH. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found elevated lung CYP1B1 protein expression in female SERT+ mice accompanied by PH, which was attenuated by the CYP1B1 inhibitor 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS). Lungs from female SERT+ mice demonstrated an increase in oxidative stress that was marked by the expression of 8-hydroxyguanosine; however, this was unaffected by CYP1B1 inhibition. SERT expression was increased in monocrotaline-induced PH in female rats; however, TMS did not reverse PH in monocrotaline-treated rats but prolonged survival. Stimulation of hPASMCs with the CYP1B1 metabolite 16α-hydroxyestrone increased cellular proliferation, which was attenuated by an inhibitor (MPP) of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and a specific ERα antibody. Thus, increased intracellular serotonin caused by increased SERT expression may contribute to PAH pathobiology by dysregulation of estrogen metabolic pathways via increased CYP1B1 activity. This promotes PASMC proliferation by the formation of pathogenic metabolites of estrogen that mediate their effects via ERα. Our studies indicate that targeting this pathway in PAH may provide a promising antiproliferative therapeutic strategy. PMID:27162617

  18. Propylthiouracil Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension via Suppression of Pen-2, a Key Component of Gamma-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying-Ju; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Huang, Chung-Chi; Chen, Wei-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-secretase-mediated Notch3 signaling is involved in smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyper-activity and proliferation leading to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition, Propylthiouracil (PTU), beyond its anti-thyroid action, has suppressive effects on atherosclerosis and PAH. Here, we investigated the possible involvement of gamma-secretase-mediated Notch3 signaling in PTU-inhibited PAH. In rats with monocrotaline-induced PAH, PTU therapy improved pulmonary arterial hypertrophy and hemodynamics. In vitro, treatment of PASMCs from monocrotaline-treated rats with PTU inhibited their proliferation and migration. Immunocyto, histochemistry, and western blot showed that PTU treatment attenuated the activation of Notch3 signaling in PASMCs from monocrotaline-treated rats, which was mediated via inhibition of gamma-secretase expression especially its presenilin enhancer 2 (Pen-2) subunit. Furthermore, over-expression of Pen-2 in PASMCs from control rats increased the capacity of migration, whereas knockdown of Pen-2 with its respective siRNA in PASMCs from monocrotaline-treated rats had an opposite effect. Transfection of PASMCs from monocrotaline-treated rats with Pen-2 siRNA blocked the inhibitory effect of PTU on PASMC proliferation and migration, reflecting the crucial role of Pen-2 in PTU effect. We present a novel cell-signaling paradigm in which overexpression of Pen-2 is essential for experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension to promote motility and growth of smooth muscle cells. Propylthiouracil attenuates experimental PAH via suppression of the gamma-secretase-mediated Notch3 signaling especially its presenilin enhancer 2 (Pen-2) subunit. These findings provide a deep insight into the pathogenesis of PAH and a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:26367462

  19. The serotonin transporter promotes a pathological estrogen metabolic pathway in pulmonary hypertension via cytochrome P450 1B1.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anne Katrine Z; Dean, Afshan; Morecroft, Ian; Hood, Katie; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Touyz, Rhian M; White, Kevin; MacLean, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating vasculopathy that predominates in women and has been associated with dysregulated estrogen and serotonin signaling. Overexpression of the serotonin transporter (SERT(+)) in mice results in an estrogen-dependent development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Estrogen metabolism by cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) contributes to the pathogenesis of PAH, and serotonin can increase CYP1B1 expression in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs). We hypothesized that an increase in intracellular serotonin via increased SERT expression may dysregulate estrogen metabolism via CYP1B1 to facilitate PAH. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found elevated lung CYP1B1 protein expression in female SERT(+) mice accompanied by PH, which was attenuated by the CYP1B1 inhibitor 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS). Lungs from female SERT(+) mice demonstrated an increase in oxidative stress that was marked by the expression of 8-hydroxyguanosine; however, this was unaffected by CYP1B1 inhibition. SERT expression was increased in monocrotaline-induced PH in female rats; however, TMS did not reverse PH in monocrotaline-treated rats but prolonged survival. Stimulation of hPASMCs with the CYP1B1 metabolite 16α-hydroxyestrone increased cellular proliferation, which was attenuated by an inhibitor (MPP) of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and a specific ERα antibody. Thus, increased intracellular serotonin caused by increased SERT expression may contribute to PAH pathobiology by dysregulation of estrogen metabolic pathways via increased CYP1B1 activity. This promotes PASMC proliferation by the formation of pathogenic metabolites of estrogen that mediate their effects via ERα. Our studies indicate that targeting this pathway in PAH may provide a promising antiproliferative therapeutic strategy. PMID:27162617

  20. Priming with ceramide-1 phosphate promotes the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells on pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisun; Kim, YongHwan; Heo, Jinbeom; Kim, Kang-Hyun; Lee, Seungun; Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Kyunggon; Kim, In-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2016-04-22

    Some molecules enriched in damaged organs can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating the mobilization of stem cells. These so-called "priming" factors include bioactive lipids, complement components, and cationic peptides. However, their therapeutic significance remains to be determined. Here, we show that priming of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with ceramide-1 phosphate (C1P), a bioactive lipid, enhances their therapeutic efficacy in pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs treated with 100 or 200 μM C1P showed improved migration activity in Transwell assays compared with non-primed MSCs and concomitantly activated MAPK(p42/44) and AKT signaling cascades. Although C1P priming had little effect on cell surface marker phenotypes and the multipotency of MSCs, it potentiated their proliferative, colony-forming unit-fibroblast, and anti-inflammatory activities. In a monocrotaline-induced PAH animal model, a single administration of human MSCs primed with C1P significantly attenuated the PAH-related increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and thickness of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells around the vessel wall. Thus, this study shows that C1P priming increases the effects of MSC therapy by enhancing the migratory, self-renewal, and anti-inflammatory activity of MSCs and that MSC therapy optimized with priming protocols might be a promising option for the treatment of PAH patients. PMID:26993164

  1. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  2. Iranian Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, Fanak; Sharif-Kashani, Babak; Malek Mohammad, Majid; Saliminejad, Leila; Monjazebi, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a fatal disorder with a prevalence of 8.6 per million. We introduce a registry website for IPAH and PAH patients ( www.IPAH.ir) for access and efficient delivery of government-aided and subsidized antihypertensive medications. Materials and Methods: The IPAH registry was opened in November 2009. Information of IPAH and PAH patients with a username and password were uploaded in the site. Data entry was possible only via the physicians and healthcare organizations via internet that were given a personalized username and password for entry. Following the patients’ profile submission, a scientific committee composed of a cardiologist and a pulmonologist who were selected by the Ministry of Health of Iran (MOH), evaluated the data. The eligibility of the patient to receive the medications was confirmed after evaluation. If the patient was eligible, 82% of the Bosentan cost was paid by MOH. Results: To date, one hundred and sixteen patients (82 females, 34 males) have been registered. The mean pulmonary artery pressure by right heart catheterization was 69.24±17 mmHg (ranging from 35 to 110 mmHg). Conclusion: The first online Iranian registry program for IPAH and PAH patients is believed to supply essential information for health care providers in the field. PMID:26528365

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  4. [Surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Mercier, Olaf; Fadel, Elie; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Ladurie, François-Leroy; Angel, Claude; Brenot, Philippe; Riou, Jean-Yves; Bourkaib, Riad; Lehouerou, Daniel; Musat, Andy; Stephan, François; Rohnean, Adéla; Jaïs, Xavier; Humbert, Marc; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Dartevelle, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a rare but underdiagnosed disease. The development of imaging played a crucial role for the screening and the decision of operability over the past few years. Indeed, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is the only type of pulmonary hypertension with a potential curative treatment: pulmonary endarterectomy. It is a complexe surgical procedure performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. The aim of the procedure is to completely remove the scar tissue inside the pulmonary arteries down to the segmental and sub-segmental levels. Compared to lung transplantation, which carries a postoperative mortality of 15-20% and a 5-year survival of 50%, pulmonary endarterectomy is a curative treatment with a postoperative mortality of less than 3%. However, lung transplantation remains an option for young patients with inoperable distal disease or after pulmonary endarterectomy failure. Considering that medical history of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism is lacking in 25 to 50%, the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension remains challenging. The lung V/Q scan is useful for the diagnosis showing ventilation and perfusion mismatches. Lesions located at the level of the pulmonary artery, the lobar or segmental arteries may be accessible to surgical removal. The pulmonary angiogram with the lateral view and the pulmonary CT scan help to determine the level of the intravascular lesions. If there is a correlation between the vascular obstruction assessed by imaging and the pulmonary resistance, pulmonary endarterectomy carries a postoperative mortality of less than 3% and has a high rate of success. If the surgery is performed at a later stage of the disease, pulmonary arteriolitis developed mainly in unobstructed territories and participated in the elevated vascular resistance. At this stage, postoperative risk is higher. PMID:25154908

  5. Medical Therapy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jais, Xavier; Channick, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare but life-threatening condition resulting from unresolved thromboembolic obstructions. Pulmonary endarterectomy surgery is currently the standard of treatment, as it is potentially curative; however, not all cases are amenable to surgical intervention due to distal distribution of the organized thromboembolic material or the presence of comorbidities. Up to one-third of patients have persistent or recurrent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy. In addition to the occlusive organized thromboembolic material, there is a small-vessel vasculopathy in nonoccluded parts of the pulmonary circulation that is histologically similar to that described in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This observation has led to frequent off-license use of approved pulmonary arterial hypertension therapies in CTEPH. Small uncontrolled trials have investigated prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in CTEPH with mixed results. A phase III study of the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan met only one of its two coprimary end points. The first large randomized controlled trial showing a positive treatment effect was the Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Trial (CHEST). This study led to the licensing of riociguat for use in inoperable or persistent recurrent CTEPH. Rigorous randomized controlled trials of medical therapy for CTEPH are needed, and several are underway or planned. In the future, outcomes research may be facilitated by identification of novel end points specific to CTEPH. PMID:27571006

  6. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ozsu, Savas; Cinarka, Halit

    2013-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is responsible for significant levels of morbidity and mortality. The estimated cumulative incidence of CTEPH is 2-4% among patients presenting with acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Currently, at the time of CTEPH diagnosis, 37.9% of the patients in an international registry were receiving at least one pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-targeted therapy. Advanced medical therapy is considered in patients with inoperable disease, as a bridge to pulmonary endarterectomy or in those with persistent or recurrent pulmonary hypertension. PAH-specific medical therapies include endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and prostacyclin analogues. The present article will focus on recent developments in the pharmacological treatment of CTEPH. PMID:24015333

  7. Longitudinal In Vivo SPECT/CT Imaging Reveals Morphological Changes and Cardiopulmonary Apoptosis in a Rodent Model of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Paffett, Michael L.; Hesterman, Jacob; Candelaria, Gabriel; Lucas, Selita; Anderson, Tamara; Irwin, Daniel; Hoppin, Jack; Norenberg, Jeffrey; Campen, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has a complex pathogenesis involving both heart and lungs. Animal models can reflect aspects of the human pathology and provide insights into the development and underlying mechanisms of disease. Because of the variability of most animal models of PAH, serial in vivo measurements of cardiopulmonary function, morphology, and markers of pathology can enhance the value of such studies. Therefore, quantitative in vivo SPECT/CT imaging was performed to assess cardiac function, morphology and cardiac perfusion utilizing 201Thallium (201Tl) in control and monocrotaline-treated rats. In addition, lung and heart apoptosis was examined with 99mTc-Annexin V (99mTc-Annexin) in these cohorts. Following baseline imaging, rats were injected with saline or monocrotaline (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and imaged weekly for 6 weeks. To assess a therapeutic response in an established pulmonary hypertensive state, a cohort of rats received resveratrol in drinking water (3 mg/kg/day) on days 28–42 post-monocrotaline injection to monitor regression of cardiopulmonary apoptosis. PAH in monocrotaline-treated rats was verified by conventional hemodynamic techniques on day 42 (right ventricular systolic pressure (RSVP) = 66.2 mmHg in monocrotaline vs 28.8 mmHg in controls) and in terms of right ventricular hypertrophy (RV/LVS = 0.70 in monocrotaline vs 0.32 in controls). Resveratrol partially reversed both RVSP (41.4 mmHg) and RV/LVS (0.46), as well as lung edema and RV contractility +dP/dtmax. Serial 99mTc-Annexin V imaging showed clear increases in pulmonary and cardiac apoptosis when compared to baseline, which regressed following resveratrol treatment. Monocrotaline induced modest changes in whole-heart perfusion as assessed by 201TI imaging and cardiac morphological changes consistent with septal deviation and enlarged RV. This study demonstrates the utility of functional in vivo SPECT/CT imaging in rodent models of PAH and further confirms the

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Houtchens, Jeanne; Martin, Douglas; Klinger, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disease, which requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose when patients initially present. Initial symptoms can be nonspecific and include complaints such as fatigue and mild dyspnea. Once the disease is suspected, echocardiography is used to estimate the pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure and to exclude secondary causes of elevated PA pressures such as left heart disease. Right heart catheterization with vasodilator challenge is critical to the proper assessment of pulmonary hemodynamics and to determine whether patients are likely to benefit from vasodilator therapy. Pathologically, the disease is characterized by deleterious remodeling of the distal pulmonary arterial and arteriolar circulation, which results in increased pulmonary vascular resistance. In the last fifteen years, medications from three different classes have been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. These include the prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. PMID:21941650

  9. Diagnostic Evaluation of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Deepa; Blanchard, Daniel; Auger, William R

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure greater than 25 mm Hg. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is defined as pulmonary hypertension in the presence of an organized thrombus within the pulmonary vascular bed that persists at least 3 months after the onset of anticoagulant therapy. Because CTEPH is potentially curable by surgical endarterectomy, correct identification of patients with this form of pulmonary hypertension and an accurate assessment of surgical candidacy are essential to provide optimal care. Patients most commonly present with symptoms of exertional dyspnea and otherwise unexplained decline in exercise capacity. Atypical chest pain, a nonproductive cough, and episodic hemoptysis are observed less frequently. With more advanced disease, patients often develop symptoms suggestive of right ventricular compromise. Physical examination findings are minimal early in the course of this disease, but as pulmonary hypertension progresses, may include nonspecific finding of right ventricular failure, such as a tricuspid regurgitation murmur, pedal edema, and jugular venous distention. Chest radiographs may suggest pulmonary hypertension, but are neither sensitive nor specific for the diagnosis. Radioisotopic ventilation-perfusion scanning is sensitive for detecting CTEPH, making it a valuable screening study. Conventional catheter-based pulmonary angiography retains an important role in establishing the presence and extent of chronic thromboembolic disease. However, computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging are playing a growing diagnostic role. Innovative technologies such as dual-energy computed tomography, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and optical coherence tomography show promise for contributing diagnostic information and assisting in the preoperative characterization of patients with CTEPH. PMID:27571004

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  11. Role of prostacyclin in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jane A.; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Wright, William R.; Mackenzie, Louise S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Mohamed, Nura

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin is a powerful cardioprotective hormone released by the endothelium of all blood vessels. Prostacyclin exists in equilibrium with other vasoactive hormones and a disturbance in the balance of these factors leads to cardiovascular disease including pulmonary arterial hypertension. Since it's discovery in the 1970s concerted efforts have been made to make the best therapeutic utility of prostacyclin, particularly in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This has centred on working out the detailed pharmacology of prostacyclin and then synthesising new molecules based on its structure that are more stable or more easily tolerated. In addition, newer molecules have been developed that are not analogues of prostacyclin but that target the receptors that prostacyclin activates. Prostacyclin and related drugs have without doubt revolutionised the treatment and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension but are seriously limited by side effects within the systemic circulation. With the dawn of nanomedicine and targeted drug or stem cell delivery systems it will, in the very near future, be possible to make new formulations of prostacyclin that can evade the systemic circulation allowing for safe delivery to the pulmonary vessels. In this way, the full therapeutic potential of prostacyclin can be realised opening the possibility that pulmonary arterial hypertension will become, if not curable, a chronic manageable disease that is no longer fatal. This review discusses these and other issues relating to prostacyclin and its use in pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:25780793

  12. MicroRNAs in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guofei; Chen, Tianji

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease without effective treatment. Despite decades of research and the development of novel treatments, PAH remains a fatal disease, suggesting an urgent need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in patients with PAH and in experimental pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, normalization of a few miRNAs is reported to inhibit experimental pulmonary hypertension. We have reviewed the current knowledge about miRNA biogenesis, miRNA expression pattern, and their roles in regulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. We have also identified emerging trends in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PAH and propose future studies that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25192340

  13. Medical treatment update on pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a chronic, progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature resulting in poor outcomes if left untreated. The management of group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension has included the use of prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists targeting the prostacyclin, endothelin-1, and nitric oxide pathways. Three new medications have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration over the past couple of years. Macitentan is the newest endothelin receptor antagonist, riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, and treprostinil diolamine is the first oral prostanoid. This review will focus on the key trials leading to their approval, special considerations for each medication, and their potential place in therapy. The use of combination therapy as initial therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension will also be discussed. PMID:26336595

  14. Metabolomic Heterogeneity of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yidan; Peng, Jenny; Lu, Catherine; Hsin, Michael; Mura, Marco; Wu, Licun; Chu, Lei; Zamel, Ricardo; Machuca, Tiago; Waddell, Thomas; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Granton, John; de Perrot, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple gene and protein expression have been extensively profiled in human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the mechanism for the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension remains elusive. Analysis of the global metabolomic heterogeneity within the pulmonary vascular system leads to a better understanding of disease progression. Using a combination of high-throughput liquid-and-gas-chromatography-based mass spectrometry, we showed unbiased metabolomic profiles of disrupted glycolysis, increased TCA cycle, and fatty acid metabolites with altered oxidation pathways in the human PAH lung. The results suggest that PAH has specific metabolic pathways contributing to increased ATP synthesis for the vascular remodeling process in severe pulmonary hypertension. These identified metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of PAH. By profiling metabolomic alterations of the PAH lung, we reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of PAH, opening an avenue of exploration for therapeutics that target metabolic pathway alterations in the progression of PAH. PMID:24533144

  15. MicroRNAs in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guofei; Chen, Tianji; Raj, J Usha

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease without effective treatment. Despite decades of research and the development of novel treatments, PAH remains a fatal disease, suggesting an urgent need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in patients with PAH and in experimental pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, normalization of a few miRNAs is reported to inhibit experimental pulmonary hypertension. We have reviewed the current knowledge about miRNA biogenesis, miRNA expression pattern, and their roles in regulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. We have also identified emerging trends in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PAH and propose future studies that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25192340

  16. A Novel Channelopathy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Eric D.; Eyries, Mélanie; Sampson, Kevin S.; Soubrier, Florent; Germain, Marine; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Borczuk, Alain; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc; Loyd, James E.; Kass, Robert S.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high mortality. Familial cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension are usually characterized by autosomal dominant transmission with reduced penetrance, and some familial cases have unknown genetic causes. METHODS We studied a family in which multiple members had pulmonary arterial hypertension without identifiable mutations in any of the genes known to be associated with the disease, including BMPR2, ALK1, ENG, SMAD9, and CAV1. Three family members were studied with whole-exome sequencing. Additional patients with familial or idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension were screened for the mutations in the gene that was identified on whole-exome sequencing. All variants were expressed in COS-7 cells, and channel function was studied by means of patch-clamp analysis. RESULTS We identified a novel heterozygous missense variant c.608 G→A (G203D) in KCNK3 (the gene encoding potassium channel subfamily K, member 3) as a disease-causing candidate gene in the family. Five additional heterozygous missense variants in KCNK3 were independently identified in 92 unrelated patients with familial pulmonary arterial hypertension and 230 patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We used in silico bioinformatic tools to predict that all six novel variants would be damaging. Electrophysiological studies of the channel indicated that all these missense mutations resulted in loss of function, and the reduction in the potassium-channel current was remedied by the application of the phospholipase inhibitor ONO-RS-082. CONCLUSIONS Our study identified the association of a novel gene, KCNK3, with familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Mutations in this gene produced reduced potassium-channel current, which was successfully remedied by pharmacologic manipulation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:23883380

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Aspergilloma-Coexistence of Two Rare Sequelae of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Manish; Saxena, Puneet; Singh, Dharmender; Sashindran, V K

    2016-06-01

    We report a 42 year old non-smoker male who presented with progressive exertional dyspnoea, productive cough with streaky hemoptysis and progressive pedal edema. His physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray and 2D-ECHO revealed features suggestive of right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. On further evaluation for the cause of pulmonary hypertension, his CT pulmonary angiography revealed features of chronic pulmonary thromboembolism with calcified thrombus in the main pulmonary artery along with pulmonary hypertension. Incidentally the CT also revealed a cavity in the right lung with soft tissue within it. A, trans-thoracic needle aspiration of this tissue was suggestive of an aspergilloma. This is a rare case report of co-existence of two uncommon complications of pulmonary embolism-chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary Aspergilloma in the same patient. PMID:27408402

  18. An Update on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Joanna; Matura, Lea Ann

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease that ultimately leads to right heart failure and death. PAH is defined as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg at rest. The diagnosis of PAH is one of exclusion; diagnostics include an extensive history, serology, chest radiograph, pulmonary function tests, ventilation/perfusion scan, transthoracic echocardiogram, and right heart catheterization. Treatment and care of patients with PAH can be complex. Therefore, the nurse practitioner is an integral member of the healthcare team caring for PAH patients, helping to ensure seamless care and support. PMID:25954140

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: The Clinical Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C.; Champion, Hunter C.; Mora, Ana L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disorder in which endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling obstruct small pulmonary arteries, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary pressures. This leads to reduced cardiac output, right heart failure, and ultimately death. In this review, we attempt to answer some important questions commonly asked by patients diagnosed with PAH pertaining to the disease, and aim to provide an explanation in terms of classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology, genetic etiologies, demographics, and prognostic factors. Furthermore, important molecular pathways that are central to the pathogenesis of PAH are reviewed, including nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelin-1, reactive oxygen species, and endothelial and smooth muscle proliferation. PMID:24951762

  20. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Castro, Oswaldo L; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-18

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  1. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases: novel vasoconstrictor pathways.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Simon C; Keane, Michael P; Gaine, Seán; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well recognised complication of chronic hypoxic lung diseases, which are among the most common causes of death and disability worldwide. Development of pulmonary hypertension independently predicts reduced life expectancy. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-term oxygen therapy ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and greatly improves survival, although the correction of alveolar hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension is only partial. Advances in understanding of the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone show that chronic vasoconstriction plays a more important part in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension than previously thought, and that structural vascular changes contribute less. Trials of existing vasodilators show that pulmonary hypertension can be ameliorated and systemic oxygen delivery improved in carefully selected patients, although systemic hypotensive effects limit the doses used. Vasoconstrictor pathways that are selective for the pulmonary circulation can be blocked to reduce hypoxic pulmonary hypertension without causing systemic hypotension, and thus provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26895650

  2. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  3. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  4. The Pathobiology of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a late sequel of venous thromboembolism that cannot be completely reproduced in animal models. The prevalence of CTEPH in humans is estimated at roughly 17-20 per million; however, partly because up to 50% of patients with CTEPH never experience symptomatic pulmonary embolism, precise numbers on the incidence and prevalence are not known. Because CTEPH is diagnosed at a median age of 63 years in patients who often have other concomitant cardiovascular disease or lung disease, assessment of pathophysiology in patients can be challenging, We do know that CTEPH is a dual vascular disorder. Stenoses, webs, and occlusions predominate in large and medium-sized pulmonary arteries at the sites of previous pulmonary emboli. A "secondary vasculopathy" resembling the pulmonary arteriopathy encountered in other forms of pulmonary hypertension predominates in low-resistance vessels. Anastomoses between bronchial artery branches and precapillary pulmonary arterioles appear during evolution of the disease. Other acquired vascular connections between bronchial arteries and pulmonary veins may trigger venous remodeling. Current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of CTEPH include contributions of hyperactive coagulation (e.g., high coagulation factor VIII, combined coagulation defects, dysfibrinogenemias), insufficient anticoagulation, non-O blood groups, and misguided thrombus resolution (e.g., infection, inflammation, dysfunctional innate immunity, abnormal circulating phospholipids). Current research focuses on the question as to whether a genetic predisposition leads to misguided vascular healing after pulmonary thromboembolism in susceptible individuals. PMID:27571003

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alaa M.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) related pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare complication of HIV infection. The pathophysiology of HIV-related PAH is complex, with viral proteins seeming to play the major role. However, other factors, such as coinfection with other microorganisms and HIV-related systemic inflammation, might also contribute. The clinical presentation of HIV-related PAH and diagnosis is similar to other forms of pulmonary hypertension. Both PAH-specific therapies and HAART are important in HIV-related PAH management. Future studies investigating the pathogenesis are needed to discover new therapeutic targets and treatments. PMID:24027641

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a clot in question.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavin; Pakala, Aneesh; Aronson, Willard; Magharyous, Hany; Brown, Brent

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a group of disorders characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right heart failure and premature death. We present an unusual case of PAH diagnosed initially as Idiopathic PAH (IPAH) after secondary causes were excluded which was successfully managed for a number of years with vasodilators and anticoagulation. Over the months after stopping anticoagulation (because of recurring small bowel hemorrhaging) patient developed progressive findings of right heart failure, which failed to respond to escalating doses of prostacyclin. The patient died and an autopsy revealed the surprising finding of extensive organized central pulmonary artery thrombi as is seen in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). We discuss the question of whether these thrombi are generally embolic or develop in situ and recommend that clinicians have a high index of suspicion for central thrombi in patients with IPAH were anticoagulation is contraindicated. PMID:25223151

  8. The current treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kenneth Scott

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular hypertension in general is a progressive, nearly always fatal condition that until recently has had very few treatment options. Our understanding of the pulmonary vascular disease process has opened the window to earlier screening techniques, diagnosis, and treatment options. However, all current treatment options are complex and expensive and therefore require clinical support strategies often necessitating specialized pulmonary hypertension treatment centers. Whether idiopathic or secondary, pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by the deregulated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells, both resistant to cellular apoptosis. Early recognition of such disregulation may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and thus alteration in the disease process. Screening of high-risk populations such as those with connective tissue disorders, HIV disease, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and those exposed to certain drugs and toxins such as methamphetamines and the diet drugs Dexfenfluramine and Fenfluramine is of utmost importance. Similarly, early symptom recognition in these high-risk groups is essential to earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20073161

  9. Transglutaminase 2-mediated serotonylation in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Penumatsa, K. C.

    2013-01-01

    The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) has been previously implicated in pulmonary arterial remodeling and is considered a potential therapeutic target for the disease pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). More recently, it has been recognized that the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) mediates cross-linking of proteins with 5-HT, a posttranslational process of monoaminylation known as “serotonylation.” TG2 activity and serotonylation of protein participate in both smooth muscle proliferation and contraction produced by 5-HT. Indeed, markedly increased TG2 activity has now been identified in lung tissue of an experimental rodent model of pulmonary hypertension, and elevated serotonylation of fibronectin and the signaling molecule Rho, downstream products of transglutamidation, have been found in blood of patients with PAH. The basic mechanism by which TG2 is activated and the potential role(s) of serotonylated proteins in pulmonary hypertension remain a mystery. In the present review we have tried to address the current understanding of 5-HT metabolism in pulmonary hypertension and relate it to what is currently known about the evolving cellular process of serotonylation. PMID:24375797

  10. Pharmacotherapeutic management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joe R; Nawarskas, James J

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disabling chronic disorder of the pulmonary vasculature, which is characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure as a result of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The pathology of PAH is characterized by pulmonary vascular vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and thrombosis. These changes are a result of an imbalance between vasodilators (prostacyclin, nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal peptide) and vasoconstrictors (thromboxane A2, endothelin, serotonin), growth inhibitors and mitogenic factors, and antithrombotic and prothrombotic factors. Recent advances in treatment are directed at restoring the balance between these systems. Endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil), and prostacylin (epoprostenol, iloprost, treprostinil, beraprost) represent the different classes of medications that are currently used in monotherapy and in combination to treat PAH. The purpose of this drug highlight is to provide the reader with an update of the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of PAH. PMID:20395700

  11. Nocturnal periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Baseler, G; Ghofrani, H A; Grimminger, F; Olschewski, H; Seeger, W

    2002-04-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is frequently observed in congestive heart failure. Among other factors, prolongation of circulation time, hypocapnia and hypoxia are thought to underlie this sleep-related breathing disorder. Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is also characterized by reduced cardiac output and blood gas alterations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether a nocturnal periodic breathing (PB) occurs in PPH. A total of 20 consecutive patients with PPH who had been admitted for pharmacological investigation of pulmonary vasoreactivity were investigated by lung function testing, right heart catheterization and full-night attended polysomnography. PB was detected in six patients (30%) (mean +/- SEM: apnoea/hypopnoea index 37 +/- 5 h(-1); arterial oxygen saturation was <90% during 56 +/- 6.5% of total sleep time). The patients with PB had more severe haemodynamic impairment than those without. They also had a more marked reduction in the pulmonary diffusion capacity and greater arterial hypoxia. PB was markedly improved or even eradicated by nasal oxygen during the night. Periodic breathing occurs in patients with advanced primary pulmonary hypertension and can be reversed by nocturnal nasal oxygen. The clinical and prognostic significance of periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension needs to be determined by further studies. PMID:11998995

  12. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease. PMID:26886381

  13. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  14. Pulmonary hypertension complicating connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajeev; Fishbein, Michael C; Saggar, Rajan

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate connective tissue disease (CTD), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma), and markedly increases mortality. More than 70% of cases of PH complicating CTD occur in SSc, which is the major focus of this article. Pulmonary complications (i.e., interstitial lung disease [ILD] and PH) are the leading causes of scleroderma-related deaths. "Isolated" PH (i.e., without ILD) complicates SSc in 7.5 to 20% of cases; secondary PH may also occur in patients with SSc-associated ILD. Several clinical markers and specific autoantibody profiles have been associated with PH in SSc. The role of PH-specific therapy is controversial, as prognosis and responsiveness to therapy are worse in SSc-associated PH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We discuss medical therapies for CTD-associated PH and the role of lung transplantation for patients failing medical therapy. PMID:24037627

  15. Pulmonary endarterectomy for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guth, Stefan; Wiedenroth, Christoph B; Kramm, Thorsten; Mayer, Eckhard

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy is a curative treatment option for patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that not only patients with CTEPH but also patients with pulmonary arterial obstructions and mean pulmonary artery pressures < 25 mmHg should be offered surgery. In this review, the recent literature regarding pathophysiology, diagnostic methods, decision making by an expert CTEPH team, and surgical techniques will be summarized. Novel alternative treatment options for inoperable CTEPH patients will be discussed, i.e. targeted medical therapy and balloon pulmonary angioplasty. For the future the major task will be to define a clear selection process for the optimal treatment of the individual CTEPH patient. PMID:27070482

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  17. Potent and Selective Human Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors with Novel Equatorial Ring Topology: in vivo Efficacy of the Polar Pyrimidopyridazine BAY-8040 in a Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Rat Model.

    PubMed

    von Nussbaum, Franz; Li, Volkhart M; Meibom, Daniel; Anlauf, Sonja; Bechem, Martin; Delbeck, Martina; Gerisch, Michael; Harrenga, Axel; Karthaus, Dagmar; Lang, Dieter; Lustig, Klemens; Mittendorf, Joachim; Schäfer, Martina; Schäfer, Stefan; Schamberger, Jens

    2016-01-19

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a key driver of inflammation in many cardiopulmonary and systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Overshooting high HNE activity is the consequence of a disrupted protease-antiprotease balance. Accordingly, there has been an intensive search for potent and selective HNE inhibitors with suitable pharmacokinetics that would allowing oral administration in patients. Based on the chemical probe BAY-678 and the clinical candidate BAY 85-8501 we explored further ring topologies along the equator of the parent pyrimidinone lead series. Novel ring systems were annulated in the east, yielding imidazolo-, triazolo-, and tetrazolopyrimidines in order to ensure additional inhibitor-HNE contacts beyond the S1 and the S2 pocket of HNE. The western annulation of pyridazines led to the polar pyrimidopyridazine BAY-8040, which combines excellent potency and selectivity with a promising pharmacokinetic profile. In vivo efficacy with regard to decreasing cardiac remodeling and amelioration of cardiac function was shown in a monocrotaline-induced rat model for pulmonary arterial hypertension. This demonstrated in vivo proof of concept in animals. PMID:26333652

  18. Group III Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Lung Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease (WHO group 3) is the second leading cause of PH and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually moderate and correlates with severity of lung disease. In a small minority, PAP may approach that seen in WHO group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Current medications for treating PAH have not shown benefit in controlled trials of group 3 PH and their routine use is discouraged. Patients with severe group 3 PH should be considered for referral to expert centers or entry into clinical trials. PMID:27443138

  19. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Eckhard; Idrees, Majdy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is categorized as group IV in the WHO classification for pulmonary hypertension. The disease requires a very low index of suspicion for identification and needs a special diagnostic approach utilizing clinical, radiological, and hemodynamic tools. As CTEPH is potentially curable, all efforts should be consumed to reach the accurate diagnosis and subsequently evaluated for operability. Although pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is the only curative tool so far, recent updates concerning medical and interventional therapy have made significant advances in inoperable patients. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion on diagnostic algorithm, surgical operability criteria, PEA, and the medical therapy. PMID:25076999

  20. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Eckhard; Idrees, Majdy M

    2014-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is categorized as group IV in the WHO classification for pulmonary hypertension. The disease requires a very low index of suspicion for identification and needs a special diagnostic approach utilizing clinical, radiological, and hemodynamic tools. As CTEPH is potentially curable, all efforts should be consumed to reach the accurate diagnosis and subsequently evaluated for operability. Although pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is the only curative tool so far, recent updates concerning medical and interventional therapy have made significant advances in inoperable patients. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion on diagnostic algorithm, surgical operability criteria, PEA, and the medical therapy. PMID:25076999

  1. Current challenges in pediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the pediatric population is associated with a variety of underlying diseases and causes, significantly morbidity and mortality. In the majority of patients, PAH in children is idiopathic or associated with congenital heart disease (CHD), with pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with connective tissue disease, a rare cause in children. Classification of pediatric PH has generally followed the WHO classification, but recognition of the importance of fetal origins of PH and developmental abnormalities have led to the formation of a new pediatric-specific classification. Incidence data from the Netherlands has revealed an annual incidence and point prevalence of 0.7 and 4.4 for idiopathic PAH and 2.2 and 15.6 for associated pulmonary arterial hypertension-CHD cases per million children. Although the treatment with new selective pulmonary vasodilators offers hemodynamic and functional improvement in pediatric populations, the treatments in children largely depend on results from evidence-based adult studies and experience of clinicians treating children. A recent randomized clinical trial of sildenafil and its long-term extension has led to disparate recommendations in the United States and Europe. PMID:24037630

  2. Riociguat: Something new in pulmonary hypertension therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Elangovan; Jena, Amrita; George, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to be a disease that is associated with woeful outcomes. The search for an ideal drug molecule for PH led to the discovery of riociguat, which is a first-in-class drug molecule that activates soluble guanylate cyclase. We conducted a systematic literature search using databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Springer, Cochrane Reviews and Google Scholar to gather evidence generated from published clinical trials on the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and regulatory status of riociguat. CHEST-1 and the PATENT-1 were phase-3 pivotal clinical trials that showed that riociguat was able to significantly improve the 6-min walk distance with 16 weeks of therapy as compared with the placebo arm. The drug also showed improvement in secondary outcome measures such as improvement in the pulmonary vascular resistance, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels, World Health Organization functional class, time to clinical worsening and Borg dyspnea score. The drug had a modest safety profile, with hypotension being the most bothersome adverse effect. These findings led to various regulatory agencies around the world granting approval for riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The entry of a new class of drug for PAH and CTEPH therapy portends some hope for patients with a disease that is traditionally linked with a poor prognosis. PMID:25709345

  3. Two cases of familial primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kazuhito; Tasaki, Hiromi; Kubara, Takahiro; Nakashima, Yasuhide

    2004-12-01

    Case 1, a 28-year-old woman (third daughter of Case 2) delivered her first child in September 2000, but leg edema and dyspnea on exertion appeared the following January. At the time of our first examination of the patient in May 2001, a chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly and pulmonary artery enlargement. Echocardiography demonstrated enlargement of the right ventricle and small left ventricular dimensions, and an electrocardiogram revealed right ventricle hypertrophy. After perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization, she was diagnosed as having primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Although she was discharged with prescriptions for a diuretic, warfarin and beraprost sodium, she died of a pulmonary hypertensive crisis twenty days after readmission. Case 2, a 60-year-old woman(mother of Case 1) developed the same symptoms as those in Case 1, in May 2001, but recovered after medication. PPH is a rare disease and only a few familial cases are reported. In this family, the eldest daughter of Case 2 had also died of pulmonary hypertension ten years ago, several months after her first delivery. In contrast to the daughters, the mother's symptoms developed gradually. PMID:15624356

  4. Riociguat: Something new in pulmonary hypertension therapeutics?

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Elangovan; Jena, Amrita; George, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to be a disease that is associated with woeful outcomes. The search for an ideal drug molecule for PH led to the discovery of riociguat, which is a first-in-class drug molecule that activates soluble guanylate cyclase. We conducted a systematic literature search using databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Springer, Cochrane Reviews and Google Scholar to gather evidence generated from published clinical trials on the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and regulatory status of riociguat. CHEST-1 and the PATENT-1 were phase-3 pivotal clinical trials that showed that riociguat was able to significantly improve the 6-min walk distance with 16 weeks of therapy as compared with the placebo arm. The drug also showed improvement in secondary outcome measures such as improvement in the pulmonary vascular resistance, N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide levels, World Health Organization functional class, time to clinical worsening and Borg dyspnea score. The drug had a modest safety profile, with hypotension being the most bothersome adverse effect. These findings led to various regulatory agencies around the world granting approval for riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The entry of a new class of drug for PAH and CTEPH therapy portends some hope for patients with a disease that is traditionally linked with a poor prognosis. PMID:25709345

  5. Update on pulmonary hypertension complicating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jyothula, Soma; Safdar, Zeenat

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is the hemodynamic manifestation of various pathological processes that result in elevated pulmonary artery pressures (PAP). The National Institutes of Health Registry defined pulmonary arterial hypertension as the mean PAP of more than 25 mm Hg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure or left atrial pressure equal to or less than 15 mm Hg. This definition remains the currently accepted definition of PH that is used to define PH related to multiple clinical conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The estimated US prevalence of COPD by the National Health Survey in 2002 in people aged >25 was 12.1 million. There is a lack of large population-based studies in COPD to document the correct prevalence of PH and outcome. The major cause of PH in COPD is hypoxemia leading to vascular remodeling. Echocardiogram is the initial screening tool of choice for PH. This simple noninvasive test can provide an estimate of right ventricular systolic and right atrial pressures. Right heart catheterization remains the gold standard to diagnose PH. It provides accurate measurement of mean PAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Oxygen therapy remains the cornerstone therapeutic for hypoxemia in COPD patients. Anecdotal reports suggest utility of PDE5-inhibitors and prostacyclin to treat COPD-related PH. Large randomized clinical trials are needed before the use of these drugs can be recommended. PMID:19802350

  6. Update on pulmonary arterial hypertension pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Velayati, Arash; Valerio, Marcos G; Shen, Michael; Tariq, Sohaib; Lanier, Gregg M; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) refers to several subgroups of disease in which the mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) is elevated to more than 25 mm Hg, pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) ≤ 15 mmHg, and an elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) > 3 Wood units as confirmed by right heart catheterization. The prevalence and geographic distribution of PAH vary depending on the type and etiology of the disease. Despite enormous efforts in the research and development of therapeutic agents in the last twenty years, the disease remains relatively incurable and the overall prognosis remains guarded. Median survival for an untreated patient is 2.8 years. In the last three decades, there have been dramatic advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the disease, resulting in emerging new treatment strategies. In the following pages, we will review currently approved treatments for PAH, as well as a new generation of investigational drugs. PMID:27232660

  7. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Channick, Richard N; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J; Manes, Alessandra; Rubin, Lewis J

    2004-06-16

    Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Laboratory and clinical investigations have clearly shown that endothelin (ET)-1 is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and likely plays a significant pathogenetic role in the development and progression of pulmonary vasculopathy. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, functional status, and clinical outcome in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Bosentan, a dual-receptor antagonist, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for class III and IV patients with PAH, based on two phase III trials. In addition to its efficacy as sole therapy, bosentan may have a role as part of a combination of drugs such as a prostanoid or sildenafil. The selective endothelin receptor-A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan are currently undergoing investigation. PMID:15194180

  8. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: treat the patient not the haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Ben; van den Broek, Annika; Williams, Vaughan; Smith, Gregory; Revesz, Tamas; Edwards, Mark; Gabbay, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disabling condition that is being increasingly recognised. It is unique as a cause of pulmonary hypertension in that it is surgically curable. We wish to highlight the importance of recognition and early referral of any patient who may have CTEPH even in the absence of resting pulmonary hypertension as excellent results can be achieved by restoring pulmonary vascular anatomy, reducing exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension, and reducing dead-space ventilation. We present a case that illustrates these points and discuss our experience as a referral centre for CTEPH. PMID:23133777

  9. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: Treat the Patient Not the Haemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Ben; van den Broek, Annika; Williams, Vaughan; Smith, Gregory; Revesz, Tamas; Edwards, Mark; Gabbay, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disabling condition that is being increasingly recognised. It is unique as a cause of pulmonary hypertension in that it is surgically curable. We wish to highlight the importance of recognition and early referral of any patient who may have CTEPH even in the absence of resting pulmonary hypertension as excellent results can be achieved by restoring pulmonary vascular anatomy, reducing exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension, and reducing dead-space ventilation. We present a case that illustrates these points and discuss our experience as a referral centre for CTEPH. PMID:23133777

  10. [ESC guidelines 2015 on pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, H; Kovacs, G

    2015-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) guidelines published in 2015 include the most important recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The classification of PH into five groups remained unchanged as compared to the previous recommendations; however, there are minor shifts within the groups. Accordingly, a distinction is made between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH due to left heart disease, PH due to chronic hypoxia or lung disease, chronic thromboembolic PH and PH due to unclear or multifactorial mechanisms. The diagnosis of PH is based on right heart catheterization where PH is defined as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mmHg at rest. For the definition of PAH, in addition to a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg, a pulmonary vascular resistance > 3 Wood units is obligatory. Echocardiography is considered to be the most important non-invasive procedure within the diagnostic algorithm and for patients with collagen vascular disease. This is recommended during initial diagnostic work-up and should be followed-up annually. Several novel drugs which were approved since publication of the previous guidelines, were included in the new recommendations. For the first time there is a recommendation for a targeted drug for inoperable chronic thromboembolic PH. An important part of the guidelines is the discussion on PAH upfront combination therapy. PMID:26626554

  11. [Pulmonary hypertension: definition, diagnostic and new classification].

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Simonneau, Gérald

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH): mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) ≥ 25 mm Hg on right heart catheterization at rest. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH): mPAP ≥ 25 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≤ 15 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistances (PVR) >3 Wood units. Patients with compatible symptoms (exertional dyspnea, syncopes, signes of right heart failure) can show signs of PH on cardiac echography and therefore need to be investigated in search of the cause of PH. After ruling out the frequent causes of PH (left heart and chronic respiratory diseases), the V/Q lung scan is used to screen for patients with post-embolic PH, that need to be further investigated hemodynamically and radiologically in order to decide operability. For the rest of the patients, only right heart catheterization can identify patients with precapillary PH and these patients must be further evaluated (clinically, by blood samples and by imaging techniques) in order to be classified in one the PH groups of the classification. For the future the discovery of novel risk factors and understanding the mechanism involved with the already known ones represent two major points of research. PMID:25127985

  12. Pharmacologic treatments for pulmonary hypertension: exploring pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Julio D; Hanson, Rebekah L; Machado, Roberto F

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with multiple etiologies and is categorized into five broad groups. Of these groups, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the most studied and, therefore, all of the currently available drug classes (prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors) were developed to treat PAH. Thus, limited treatment data exist for the less-studied non-PAH forms of PH. Pharmacogenomics can be a tool to better understand the pathways involved in PH, as well as to improve personalization of therapy. However, little pharmacogenomic research has been carried out on this disease. New treatments for PH are on the horizon, deriving from both repurposed currently available drugs and novel therapeutics. PMID:23668740

  13. Advances in Pediatric Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Dunbar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Approved medications for the treatment of adult PAH have been used to treat children but evidence based treatment algorithms for children are lacking. Recent Findings Pediatric PAH registries have begun to define the incidence and prevalence of idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with congenital heart disease. A pediatric specific classification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease has been proposed. Furthermore, the first randomized placebo-controlled trial of type-5 phosphodiesterase therapy in treatment naïve children with PAH has been completed and reported. This trial highlights the importance of the difficulties of performing clinical trials children with targeted PAH therapy as well as the importance of long-term follow-up of adverse events. Summary Classification, clinical trials, and therapy for children with PAH must take into account the unique aspects of PAH in children. PMID:22274573

  14. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Intensive care management of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azem, M. Ali; Al-Hazmi, Manal S.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) may be due to preexisting pulmonary vascular lung disease, liver disease, or cardiac diseases. PH also may be caused by critical illnesses, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute left ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary embolism, or may occur after cardiac or thoracic surgery. Regardless of the underlying cause of PH, the final common pathway for hemodynamic deterioration and death is RV failure, which is the most challenging aspect of patient management. Therapy is thus aimed at acutely relieving RV overload by decreasing PVR and reversing RV failure with pulmonary vasodilators and inotropes. PMID:25076990

  15. Standards of care in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan A; Escribano, Pilar; Morales, Pilar; Gómez, Miguel Á; Oribe, Mikel; Martínez, Angel; Román, Antonio; Segovia, Javier; Santos, Francisco; Subirana, María T

    2008-02-01

    Consensus Statement of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) and the Spanish Society of Cardiology (SEC). Substantial progress in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension in recent years has led to significant improvement in survival. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines issued by scientific societies reflect these new developments. However, certain clinically relevant issues have not been covered in consensus guidelines because of the lack of conclusive scientific evidence. Therefore, the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) and the Spanish Society of Cardiology (SEC) have promoted the present consensus statement in order to define national standards of care in the evaluation and management of pulmonary hypertension in its various forms, as well as to outline a clinical pathway and the basic principles for organizing health care in this clinical setting, with special emphasis on the requirements for and functions of specialized referral units. To prepare the statement, SEPAR and SEC formed a task force composed of national experts in various aspects of pulmonary hypertension. The resulting consensus is based on international clinical guidelines, a review of available scientific evidence, and panel discussion among the task force members. The final statement, approved by all participants, underwent external review. PMID:23063251

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders: pulmonary vascular disease: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Machado, Roberto F; Gladwin, Mark T

    2010-06-01

    The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population. PMID:20522578

  17. Pulmonary hypertension in COPD: results from the ASPIRE registry.

    PubMed

    Hurdman, Judith; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A; Swift, Andrew; Rajaram, Smitha; Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine; Hamilton, Neil; Armstrong, Iain J; Billings, Catherine; Pollard, Lauren; Wild, Jim M; Lawrie, Allan; Lawson, Rod; Sabroe, Ian; Kiely, David G

    2013-06-01

    The phenotype and outcome of severe pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is described in small numbers, and predictors of survival are unknown. Data was retrieved for 101 consecutive, treatment-naïve cases of pulmonary hypertension in COPD. Mean ± SD follow-up was 2.3 ± 1.9 years. 59 patients with COPD and severe pulmonary hypertension, defined by catheter mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥40 mmHg, had significantly lower carbon monoxide diffusion, less severe airflow obstruction but not significantly different emphysema scores on computed tomography compared to 42 patients with mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. 1- and 3-year survival for severe pulmonary hypertension, at 70% and 33%, respectively, was inferior to 83% and 55%, respectively, for mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mixed venous oxygen saturation, carbon monoxide diffusion, World Health Organization functional class and age, but not severity of airflow obstruction, were independent predictors of outcome. Compassionate treatment with targeted therapies in 43 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension was not associated with a survival benefit, although improvement in functional class and/or fall in pulmonary vascular resistance >20% following treatment identified patients with improved survival. Standard prognostic markers in COPD have limited value in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This study identifies variables that predict outcome in this phenotype. Despite poor prognosis, our data suggest that further evaluation of targeted therapies is warranted. PMID:23018917

  18. Pulmonary venous hypertension may allow delayed palliation of single ventricle physiology with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kalantre, Atul; Sunil, Gopalraj S; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease develops early in untreated single ventricle patients with increased pulmonary flow. Pulmonary artery (PA) banding is done at a young age in these patients in order to protect the lung vasculature and maintain low pulmonary artery pressures (PAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). This also enables future completion of the single ventricle palliation. Pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) secondary to left sided obstruction if present in addition in this setting contributes to the pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but involves an element of reversibility of the PAH if the obstruction is relieved. We present two cases of single ventricle both of who re-presented late with PAH and PVH (secondary to mitral valve obstruction) and underwent delayed PA banding at 9.5 and 4.5 years of age respectively. Both patients however had different outcomes. The patient undergoing PA banding at 9.5 years successfully underwent a cavo-pulmonary shunt at the age of 12 years. The patient with PA banding at 4.5 years however, has residual PAH that presently precludes a cavo-pulmonary shunt. PMID:27212849

  19. Novel biomarkers for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Anjum; Ruffenach, Gregoire; Mahajan, Aman; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Umar, Soban

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a deadly disease characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressures leading to right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. The confirmatory gold standard test is the invasive right heart catheterization. The disease course is monitored by pulmonary artery systolic pressure measurement via transthoracic echocardiography. A simple non-invasive test to frequently monitor the patients is much needed. Search for a novel biomarker that can be detected by a simple test is ongoing and many different options are being studied. Here we review some of the new and unique pre-clinical options for potential pulmonary hypertension biomarkers. These biomarkers can be broadly categorized based on their association with endothelial cell dysfunction, inflammation, epigenetics, cardiac function, oxidative stress, metabolism,extracellular matrix, and volatile compounds in exhaled breath condensate. A biomarker that can be detected in blood, urine or breath condensate and correlates with disease severity, progression and response to therapy may result in significant cost reduction and improved patient outcomes. PMID:27439993

  20. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) greater than 3 WU. Specific maneuvers during right heart catheterization can be utilized to disclose vasoreactivity and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, which have implications for management. The inherent complexity in studying a rare disease that exhibits clinical overlap with a common syndrome necessitated the creation of registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization. PMID:26438630

  1. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases. PMID:25076998

  2. Inhaled treprostinil for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Poms, Abby; Kingman, Martha

    2011-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disease characterized by vascular proliferation and vasoconstriction of the small pulmonary arteries that eventually leads to right-sided heart failure and death. Patients often initially have symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and edema; later in the disease, presyncope and syncope are common. Patients with progressive pulmonary arterial hypertension despite oral therapy and/or with severe disease typically require treatment with a prostanoid. Inhaled treprostinil (Tyvaso) is a prostacyclin analog indicated for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension to increase walk distance in patients with symptoms classified as New York Heart Association functional class III. Inhaled treprostinil was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in July 2009. This article provides a brief overview of the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension and reviews the mechanism of action, key clinical data, and the practical management of inhaled treprostinil in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22135338

  3. Erythropoietin upregulation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karamanian, Vanesa A; Harhay, Michael; Grant, Gregory R; Palevsky, Harold I; Grizzle, William E; Zamanian, Roham T; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Taichman, Darren B; Kawut, Steven M; Jones, Peter L

    2014-06-01

    The pathophysiologic alterations of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse. We aimed to determine novel pathogenic pathways from circulating proteins in patients with PAH. Multianalyte profiling (MAP) was used to measure 90 specifically selected antigens in the plasma of 113 PAH patients and 51 control patients. Erythropoietin (EPO) functional activity was assessed via in vitro pulmonary artery endothelial cell networking and smooth muscle cell proliferation assays. Fifty-eight patients had idiopathic PAH, whereas 55 had other forms of PAH; 5 had heritable PAH, 18 had connective tissue disease (15 with scleroderma and 3 with lupus erythematosis), 13 had portopulmonary hypertension, 6 had PAH associated with drugs or toxins, and 5 had congenital heart disease. The plasma-antigen profile of PAH revealed increased levels of several novel biomarkers, including EPO. Immune quantitative and histochemical studies revealed that EPO not only was significantly elevated in the plasma of PAH patients but also promoted pulmonary artery endothelial cell network formation and smooth muscle cell proliferation. MAP is a hypothesis-generating approach to identifying novel pathophysiologic pathways in PAH. EPO is upregulated in the circulation and lungs of patients with PAH and may affect endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation. PMID:25006446

  4. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ru-Jeng; Wu, Tzong-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a severe pulmonary disorder which occurs one in every 500 live births. About 10–50% of the victims will die of the problem and 7–20% of the survivors develop long term impairments such as hearing deficit, chronic lung disease, and intracranial bleed. Most of the adult survivors show evidence of augmented pulmonary vasoreactivity suggesting a phenotypical change. Several animal models have been used to study the pathophysiology and help to develop new therapeutic modality for PPHN. The etiology of PPHN can be classified into three groups: [A] abnormally constricted pulmonary vasculature due to parenchymal diseases; [B] hypoplastic pulmonary vasculature; [C] normal parenchyma with remodeled pulmonary vasculature. Impaired vasorelaxation of pulmonary artery and reduced blood vessel density in lungs are two characteristic findings in PPHN. Medical treatment includes sedation, oxygen, mechanical ventilation, vasorelaxants (inhaled nitric oxide, inhaled or intravenous prostacyclin, intravenous prostaglandin E1, magnesium sulfate), and inotropic agents. Phosphodiesterase inhibitor has recently been studied as another therapeutic agent for PPHN. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) inhibitor has been studied in animal and a case of premature infant with PPHN successfully treated with ET-I inhibitor has been reported in the literature. Surfactant has been reported as an adjunct treatment for PPHN as a complication of meconium aspiration syndrome. Even with the introduction of several new therapeutic modalities there has no significant change in survival rate. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenator is used when medical treatment fails and patient is considered to have a recoverable cause of PPHN. PMID:23537863

  5. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important. PMID:26082002

  6. Pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Isabel S; Fares, Wassim H

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a hemodynamic and pathophysiologic state that can be found in multiple conditions with associated symptoms of dyspnea, decreased exercise tolerance, and progression to right heart failure. The World Health Organization has classified PH into five groups. The first group is pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which can be idiopathic, heritable, due to drugs and toxins, or associated with conditions such as connective tissue diseases, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and others. The development of PAH is believed to result from smooth muscle cells and endothelial dysfunction that impairs production of vasodilators, including nitric oxide and prostacyclin. The importance of distinguishing this group from the other groups of PH is that there are PAH-specific drugs that target the molecular pathways that are pathogenic in the vascular derangements, leading to arterial hypertension, which should not be used in the other forms of PH. Other groups of PH include PH due to left heart disease, lung disease, chronic thromboembolic disease, as well as a miscellaneous category. Echocardiography is used to screen for PH and has varying sensitivity and specificity in detecting PH. Additionally, the right heart pressures estimated during echocardiogram often differ from those obtained during confirmatory testing with right heart catheterization. The most challenging PH diagnosis is in a case that does not fit one group of PH, but meets criteria that overlap between several groups. This also makes the treatment challenging because each group of PH is managed differently. This review provides an overview of the five groups of PH and discusses the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of each. PMID:26316767

  7. Pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Isabel S; Fares, Wassim H

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a hemodynamic and pathophysiologic state that can be found in multiple conditions with associated symptoms of dyspnea, decreased exercise tolerance, and progression to right heart failure. The World Health Organization has classified PH into five groups. The first group is pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which can be idiopathic, heritable, due to drugs and toxins, or associated with conditions such as connective tissue diseases, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and others. The development of PAH is believed to result from smooth muscle cells and endothelial dysfunction that impairs production of vasodilators, including nitric oxide and prostacyclin. The importance of distinguishing this group from the other groups of PH is that there are PAH-specific drugs that target the molecular pathways that are pathogenic in the vascular derangements, leading to arterial hypertension, which should not be used in the other forms of PH. Other groups of PH include PH due to left heart disease, lung disease, chronic thromboembolic disease, as well as a miscellaneous category. Echocardiography is used to screen for PH and has varying sensitivity and specificity in detecting PH. Additionally, the right heart pressures estimated during echocardiogram often differ from those obtained during confirmatory testing with right heart catheterization. The most challenging PH diagnosis is in a case that does not fit one group of PH, but meets criteria that overlap between several groups. This also makes the treatment challenging because each group of PH is managed differently. This review provides an overview of the five groups of PH and discusses the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of each. PMID:26316767

  8. Pericardial effusion in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious condition that can lead to right heart failure and death. Pericardial effusion in PAH is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and its pathogenesis is complex and poorly understood. There are few data on the prevalence of pericardial effusion in PAH, and more importantly, the management of pericardial effusion is controversial. Current literature abounds with case reports, case series, and retrospective studies that have limited value for assessing this association. Hence, we summarize the available evidence on this ominous association and identify areas for future research. PMID:24618534

  9. "Nocturnal seizures" in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Anthony; McSweeney, Julia; Kulik, Thomas; Khatwa, Umakanth; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-10-15

    The usual differential diagnoses of nocturnal events in children include parasomnias, nocturnal seizures, nocturnal reflux (Sandifer syndrome), hypnic jerks, periodic limb movements of sleep, and sleep disordered breathing. We report a previously healthy young girl who presented to the sleep clinic for evaluation of nocturnal events which were diagnosed as medically refractory nocturnal seizures. It was not until a syncopal event occurred in the daytime, which prompted referral for cardiac evaluation, the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hyper-tension (IPAH) was made. Sleep physicians should consider IPAH in the differential diagnosis of nocturnal events in children. PMID:24127156

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension and Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Roth, Todd S; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a frequent complication in adults with congenital heart disease. Regardless of etiology, the optimal treatment strategy for this difficult population is challenging. The new frontier of targeted PAH therapies has demonstrated improved functional capacity in the various phenotypes of PAH-CHD, with work currently in progress scrutinizing outcomes. In those who fail conventional medical therapy, heart and heart-lung (block) transplantation become the final therapeutic options, with the role of ventricular assist devices and the total artificial heart still under investigation in this group. PMID:27443136

  11. Molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental studies are redefining the cellular and molecular bases of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The genetic abnormalities first identified in association with the idiopathic form of PAH — together with a vast increase in our understanding of cell signaling, cell transformation, and cell-cell interactions; gene expression; microRNA processing; and mitochondrial and ion channel function — have helped explain the abnormal response of vascular cells to injury. Experimental and clinical studies now converge on the intersection and interactions between a genetic predisposition involving the BMPR2 signaling pathway and an impaired metabolic and chronic inflammatory state in the vessel wall. These deranged processes culminate in an exuberant proliferative response that occludes the pulmonary arterial (PA) lumen and obliterates the most distal intraacinar vessels. Here, we describe emerging therapies based on preclinical studies that address these converging pathways. PMID:23202738

  12. Ambrisentan: new drug. Too risky in mildly symptomatic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) In patients with mildly symptomatic pulmonary hypertension (stage III), there is no firm evidence that ambrisentan reduces mortality or slows disease progression. In contrast, ambrisentan has frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects; (2) In patients whose physical activity is markedly restricted by pulmonary hypertension, it is better to continue using bosentan, with which we have far more experience. PMID:19585715

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John; Dasgupta, Asish; Huston, Jessica; Chen, Kuang-Huieh; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an idiopathic cardiopulmonary disease characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by excessive proliferation and apoptosis-resistance of vascular cells, as well as inflammation, thrombosis and vasoconstriction. Vascular obstruction increases the afterload faced by the right ventricle (RV), leading to RV failure. The proliferative, obstructive vasculopathy of PAH shares several mitochondrial abnormalities with cancer, notably a shift to aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondria in the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) normally serve as oxygen sensors. In PAH, acquired mitochondrial abnormalities, including epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disrupt oxygen sensing creating a pseudo-hypoxic environment characterized by normoxic activation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α). The resulting metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg phenomenon) reflects inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases. In addition, altered mitochondrial dynamics result in mitochondrial fragmentation. The molecular basis of this structural change includes upregulation and activation of fission mediators, notably dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP-1), and downregulation of fusion mediators, especially mitofusin-2 (MFN2). These pathogenic mitochondrial abnormalities offer new therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mitotic fission or enhancement of fusion in PAH PASMC slows cell proliferation, causes cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis. DRP-1 inhibition or MFN2 gene therapy can regress PAH in experimental models of PAH. This review focuses on the etiology of mitochondrial fragmentation in PAH and explores the therapeutic implications of mitochondrial dynamics in the pulmonary vasculature and RV. PMID:25672499

  14. Drug Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension in Children

    PubMed Central

    Vorhies, Erika E; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease in infants and children that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary vascular functional and structural changes resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and eventual right heart failure and death. In the majority of pediatric patients, PAH is idiopathic or associated with congenital heart disease and rarely is associated with other conditions such as connective tissue or thromboembolic disease. Although treatment of the underlying disease and reversal of advanced structural changes has not yet been achieved with current therapy, quality of life and survival have been improved significantly. Targeted pulmonary vasodilator therapies, including endothelin receptor antagonists, prostacyclin analogues and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have demonstrated hemodynamic and functional improvement in children. The management of pediatric PAH remains challenging as treatment decisions continue to depend largely on results from evidence-based adult studies and the clinical experience of pediatric experts. This article reviews the current drug therapies and their use in the management of PAH in children. PMID:24114695

  15. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  16. Relevant Issues in the Pathology and Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Stephen L.; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although pulmonary hypertension primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in pulmonary hypertension is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that while vasospasm plays a role, pulmonary hypertension is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR)2 or activin-like kinase (Alk)-1 or epigenetically-inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase 2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild pulmonary hypertension in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of pulmonary hypertension has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microRNAs. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of pulmonary hypertension and cellular and molecular

  17. Overview of current therapeutic approaches for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, Jason A.; Risbano, Michael G.; Mathier, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    There have been tremendous strides in the management of pulmonary hypertension over the past 20 years with the introduction of targeted medical therapies and overall improvements in surgical treatment options and general supportive care. Furthermore, recent data shows that the survival of those with pulmonary arterial hypertension is improving. While there has been tremendous progress, much work remains to be done in improving the care of those with secondary forms of pulmonary hypertension, who constitute the majority of patients with this disorder, and in the optimal treatment approach in those with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This article will review general and targeted medical treatment, along with surgical interventions, of those with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22034603

  18. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease. PMID:27086030

  19. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-24

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP] <25 mm Hg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP ≥25 mm Hg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mm Hg or mPAP ≥25 mm Hg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0 l/min/m(2)]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on

  20. A Contemporary Approach to Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Udhay; Horn, Evelyn M

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there have been major changes in the landscape of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy with the introduction of novel agents and innovative treatment strategies for this progressive disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the evolution in trial design in this field and highlight the salient features of recently published studies. We also summarize our approach to therapy selection in this chronic disease and identify areas for future exploration. The therapeutic armamentarium now includes 13 approved therapies. While most of these agents have been studied in small, short-term trials using the 6-min walk distance as a primary endpoint, there has been a shift in recent years toward larger, long-term, event-driven trials that utilize combined morbidity and mortality endpoints. The SERAPHIN and GRIPHON trials were two such studies, which led to the approval of the dual endothelin-receptor antagonist macitentan and the selective prostacyclin receptor antagonist selexipag, respectively. Other event-driven trials, like AMBITION and COMPASS-2, have provided valuable insight into the use of combined oral therapies in symptomatic patients. In conclusion, despite being a more manageable disease in the modern treatment era, pulmonary hypertension is still associated with considerable morbidity and much more work remains to be done in this field. Important questions remain about the most optimal way to manage patients and conduct trials going forward. PMID:27491673

  1. Treatment-Related Biomarkers in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Aparna C.; Dusek, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) over the last two decades have led to the introduction of multiple classes of oral therapy, but the disease remains devastating for many patients. Disease progression, in spite of oral monotherapy, is a major problem, and alternative therapy, such as infusion of prostacyclins, is cumbersome and carries considerable potential morbidity. Use of combination oral therapy, including drugs from both the endothelin receptor antagonist and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor classes, has increased, and there is some evidence to support this approach. Given the multiple options now available in pulmonary hypertension (PH) therapy, biomarkers to guide treatment decisions could be helpful. Here, we review the evidence for and against the clinical use of molecular biomarkers relevant to PH pathogenesis, emphasizing assayable markers that may also inform more rational selection of agents that influence pathways targeted by treatment. We emphasize the interactive nature of changes in mediators and messengers, such as endothelin-1, prostacyclin, brain natriuretic peptide (which has demonstrated biomarker utility), nitric oxide derivatives, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which play important roles in processes central to progression of PAH, such as vascular remodeling, vasoconstriction, and maladaptive right ventricular changes, and are relevant to its therapy. Accordingly, we propose that the identification and use of a molecular biomarker panel that assays these molecules in parallel and serially might, if validated, better inform unique patient phenotypes, prognosis, and the rational selection and titration of combination oral and other therapy in individual patients with PH/PAH. PMID:25611885

  2. Criteria for diagnosis of exercise pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Herve, Philippe; Lau, Edmund M; Sitbon, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Montani, David; Godinas, Laurent; Lador, Frederic; Jaïs, Xavier; Parent, Florence; Günther, Sven; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Chemla, Denis

    2015-09-01

    The previous definition of exercise pulmonary hypertension (PH) with a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) >30 mmHg was abandoned because healthy individuals can exceed this threshold at high cardiac output (CO). We hypothesised that incorporating assessment of the pressure-flow relationship using the mPAP/CO ratio, i.e. total pulmonary resistance (TPR), might enhance the accuracy of diagnosing an abnormal exercise haemodynamic response.Exercise haemodynamics were evaluated in 169 consecutive subjects with normal resting mPAP ≤20 mmHg. Subjects were classified into controls without heart or lung disease (n=68) versus patients with pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) (n=49) and left heart disease (LHD) (n=52).TPR and mPAP at maximal exercise produced diagnostic accuracy with area under the receiver operating curve of 0.99 and 0.95, respectively, for discriminating controls versus patients with PVD and LHD. The old criterion of mPAP >30 mmHg had sensitivity of 0.98 but specificity of 0.77. Combining maximal mPAP >30 mmHg and TPR >3 mmHg·min·L(-1) retained sensitivity at 0.93 but improved specificity to 1.0. The accuracy of the combined criteria was high across different age groups, sex, body mass index and diagnosis (PVD or LHD).Combining mPAP >30 mmHg and TPR >3 mmHg·min·L(-1) is superior to mPAP >30 mmHg alone for defining a pathological haemodynamic response of the pulmonary circulation during exercise. PMID:26022955

  3. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  4. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay; Berkelhamer, Sara; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood and hypoxemia. PPHN is often secondary to parenchymal lung disease (such as meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia or respiratory distress syndrome) or lung hypoplasia (with congenital diaphragmatic hernia or oligohydramnios) but can also be idiopathic. The diagnosis of PPHN is based on clinical evidence of labile hypoxemia often associated with differential cyanosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by the echocardiographic demonstration of - (a) right-to-left or bidirectional shunt at the ductus or foramen ovale and/or, (b) flattening or leftward deviation of the interventricular septum and/or, (c) tricuspid regurgitation, and finally (d) absence of structural heart disease. Management strategies include optimal oxygenation, avoiding respiratory and metabolic acidosis, blood pressure stabilization, sedation and pulmonary vasodilator therapy. Failure of these measures would lead to consideration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO); however decreased need for this rescue therapy has been documented with advances in medical management. While trends also note improved survival, long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities such as deafness and learning disabilities remain a concern in many infants with severe PPHN. Funded by: 1R01HD072929-0 (SL). PMID:27057331

  5. Medical therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Tomas; Zayas, Nayeli; de Mendieta, Maitane Alonso; Plascencia, Karen; Escobar, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary Arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance due to severe remodeling of the small pulmonary arteries. In PAH, the endothelial cells fail to maintain their homeostatic balance, with the consequent impaired production of vasodilators and over-expression of vasoconstrictors and proliferators. Current treatment of PAH is based on the discovery of three main pathways of endothelial dysfunction (prostacyclin, nitric oxide and endothelin-1), and includes drugs such as prostacyclin analogs, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs). Recently approved drugs that act through these classic pathways include riociguat (cyclic GMP stimulator) and macitentan (a tissue specific dual ERA). However, several new drugs and new pathways are under study. New targeted therapies include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Rho kinase inhibitors and serotonin receptor blockers. There are now ten drugs approved for the treatment of PAH that, alone or in combination, have changed the natural history of this disease. The new drugs will allow us to further modified the patients' life expectancy and move towards a cure. PMID:26791159

  6. Extensive pulmonary sarcoid reaction in a patient with BMPR-2 associated idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Braam, Evelien A J E; Quanjel, Marian J R; Van Haren-Willems, Jolanda H G M; Van Oosterhout, Matthijs F M; Vink, Aryan; Heijdra, Yvonne F; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive life-threatening disease characterized by vascular remodeling. There is evidence that varied immune mechanism play an important role in progression of pulmonary hypertension.  We describe a case of a 35-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and a novel BMPR2 mutation, who underwent a successful lung transplantation.  Extensive granulomatous inflammation was seen in the resected lungs. The granulomatous inflammation found in the histology supports  a sarcoid-like reaction due to pulmonary hypertension in the context of the BMPR2 mutation. PMID:27537724

  7. Therapeutic sesamol attenuates monocrotaline-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in rats by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Srinivasan; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chen, Shin-Yi; Yang, Shan-Shan; Chandrasekaran, Victor Raj Mohan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effect of sesamol against monocrotaline-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with a single dose of monocrotaline (90 mg/kg) to induce SOS. Sesamol (5, 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected 24 h after monocrotaline treatment. Control rats were given saline only. Aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, mast cells, CD 68(+) Kupffer cells, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), laminin, and collagen were assessed 48 h after monocrotaline treatment. All tested parameters, except for TIMP-1, laminin, and collagen, were significantly higher in monocrotaline-treated rats than in control rats, and, except for TIMP-1, laminin, and collagen, significantly lower in sesamol-treated rats than in monocrotaline-treated rats. In addition, liver pathology revealed that sesamol offered significant protection against SOS. We conclude that a single dose of sesamol therapeutically attenuated SOS by decreasing the recruitment of inflammatory cells, downregulating MMP-9, and upregulating TIMP-1 expression. PMID:21681587

  8. Changes in large pulmonary arterial viscoelasticity in chronic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Lakes, Roderic S; Golob, Mark; Eickhoff, Jens C; Chesler, Naomi C

    2013-01-01

    Conduit pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening is characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and is an excellent predictor of mortality due to right ventricular (RV) overload. To better understand the impact of conduit PA stiffening on RV afterload, it is critical to examine the arterial viscoelastic properties, which require measurements of elasticity (energy storage behavior) and viscosity (energy dissipation behavior). Here we hypothesize that PAH leads to frequency-dependent changes in arterial stiffness (related to elasticity) and damping ratio (related to viscosity) in large PAs. To test our hypothesis, PAH was induced by the combination of chronic hypoxia and an antiangiogenic compound (SU5416) treatment in mice. Static and sinusoidal pressure-inflation tests were performed on isolated conduit PAs at various frequencies (0.01-20 Hz) to obtain the mechanical properties in the absence of smooth muscle contraction. Static mechanical tests showed significant stiffening of large PAs with PAH, as expected. In dynamic mechanical tests, structural stiffness (κ) increased and damping ratio (D) decreased at a physiologically relevant frequency (10 Hz) in hypertensive PAs. The dynamic elastic modulus (E), a material stiffness, did not increase significantly with PAH. All dynamic mechanical properties were strong functions of frequency. In particular, κ, E and D increased with increasing frequency in control PAs. While this behavior remained for D in hypertensive PAs, it reversed for κ and E. Since these novel dynamic mechanical property changes were found in the absence of changes in smooth muscle cell content or contraction, changes in collagen and proteoglycans and their interactions are likely critical to arterial viscoelasticity in a way that has not been previously described. The impact of these changes in PA viscoelasticity on RV afterload in PAH awaits further investigation. PMID:24223157

  9. Changes in Large Pulmonary Arterial Viscoelasticity in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Lakes, Roderic S.; Golob, Mark; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2013-01-01

    Conduit pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening is characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and is an excellent predictor of mortality due to right ventricular (RV) overload. To better understand the impact of conduit PA stiffening on RV afterload, it is critical to examine the arterial viscoelastic properties, which require measurements of elasticity (energy storage behavior) and viscosity (energy dissipation behavior). Here we hypothesize that PAH leads to frequency-dependent changes in arterial stiffness (related to elasticity) and damping ratio (related to viscosity) in large PAs. To test our hypothesis, PAH was induced by the combination of chronic hypoxia and an antiangiogenic compound (SU5416) treatment in mice. Static and sinusoidal pressure-inflation tests were performed on isolated conduit PAs at various frequencies (0.01–20 Hz) to obtain the mechanical properties in the absence of smooth muscle contraction. Static mechanical tests showed significant stiffening of large PAs with PAH, as expected. In dynamic mechanical tests, structural stiffness (κ) increased and damping ratio (D) decreased at a physiologically relevant frequency (10 Hz) in hypertensive PAs. The dynamic elastic modulus (E), a material stiffness, did not increase significantly with PAH. All dynamic mechanical properties were strong functions of frequency. In particular, κ, E and D increased with increasing frequency in control PAs. While this behavior remained for D in hypertensive PAs, it reversed for κ and E. Since these novel dynamic mechanical property changes were found in the absence of changes in smooth muscle cell content or contraction, changes in collagen and proteoglycans and their interactions are likely critical to arterial viscoelasticity in a way that has not been previously described. The impact of these changes in PA viscoelasticity on RV afterload in PAH awaits further investigation. PMID:24223157

  10. Choriocarcinoma-associated pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Yu, Meining; Ma, Luyao; Xu, Hai; Li, Fanghong Rose

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cases of pulmonary embolism and pulmonary artery hypertension caused by choriocarcinoma represent a rare clinical emergency. We report a case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary embolism and hypertension and died soon after complete pulmonary embolectomy. A related literature review revealed that almost all of these patients had previously experienced a spontaneous abortion (average, 6 months) and were not pregnant. PMID:26423729

  11. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension in children

    PubMed Central

    Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanna; Galal, Nasser; Kouatli, Amjad; Kandil, Hammam; Chehab, May

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively uncommon in children. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in pediatric comprises a wide spectrum of diseases, from a transient neonatal condition to a progressive disease associated with morbidity and mortality. Most common PAH in pediatric are idiopathic (IPAH) or PAH associated with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD), while other associated conditions, such as connective tissue disease (CTD), are less common in pediatrics. Despite better understanding of PH and the availability of new medications during recent decades; the diagnosis, investigation and choice of therapy remain a challenge in children, as evidence-based recommendations depend mainly on adult studies. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion about the distinctive features of PAH in pediatric, mainly emphacysing on classification and diagnostic algorithm. PMID:25076989

  12. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanna; Galal, Nasser; Kouatli, Amjad; Kandil, Hammam; Chehab, May

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively uncommon in children. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in pediatric comprises a wide spectrum of diseases, from a transient neonatal condition to a progressive disease associated with morbidity and mortality. Most common PAH in pediatric are idiopathic (IPAH) or PAH associated with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD), while other associated conditions, such as connective tissue disease (CTD), are less common in pediatrics. Despite better understanding of PH and the availability of new medications during recent decades; the diagnosis, investigation and choice of therapy remain a challenge in children, as evidence-based recommendations depend mainly on adult studies. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion about the distinctive features of PAH in pediatric, mainly emphacysing on classification and diagnostic algorithm. PMID:25076989

  13. Neonatal pulmonary artery thrombosis presenting as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Taylor; Antle, Amanda; Studer, Matthew; Thompson, Mark; Perry, Stanton; Mahnke, C Becket

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery thrombosis in neonates occurs rarely. This report describes the case of a term infant with a pulmonary artery thrombosis presenting as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. The risk factors identified in the case included maternal diabetes and heterozygous factor V Leiden deficiency. The pulmonary thrombus was successfully treated with percutaneous catheter-based embolectomy. PMID:19052800

  14. Targeting soluble guanylate cyclase for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lasker, George F; Maley, Jason H; Pankey, Edward A; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a disease characterized by a sustained increase in pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right heart failure. Current treatments focus on endothelial dysfunction and an aberrant regulatory pathway for vascular tone. Unfortunately, a large proportion of patients are unresponsive to conventional vasodilator therapy. Investigations are ongoing into the effects of experimental therapies targeting the signal transduction pathway that mediates vasodilation. Here, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, along with current treatments. We then present a focused review of recent animal studies and human trials examining the use of activators and stimulators of soluble guanylate cyclase for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:21510726

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension in Hemodialysis Patients Following Repeated Endovascular Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Mu-Yang; Lin, Lin; Chen, Tsung-Yan; Wang, Ren-Huei; Huang, Su-Chin; Liu, HsiuChiao; Lai, Chao-Lun; Pu, Shih-Yen; Tsai, Kuei-Chin; Wu, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension is unusually high in Taiwanese patients with end-stage renal disease. Thrombosis of hemodialysis grafts is common and pulmonary embolism has been reported after endovascular thrombectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pulmonary hypertension and endovascular thrombectomy of hemodialysis grafts. Methods One hundred and ten patients on hemodialysis via arteriovenous grafts were enrolled in our study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured by right heart catheterization. Clinical information was collected by review of medical records. Comorbid cardiopulmonary disease was evaluated by echocardiography and chest X-ray. The history of patient vascular access thrombosis was reviewed from database, hemodialysis records, and interviews with staff at hemodialysis centers. Results Fifty-two participants (47%) had pulmonary hypertension diagnosed by right heart catheterization. There was no difference in the number of thrombectomy procedures between patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Based on multivariate analysis, the number of prior endovascular thrombectomy procedures did not correlate with mean PAP (F-value = 1.10, p = 0.30) nor was it associated with pulmonary hypertension (odds ratio = 0.92, p = 0.17). Conclusions Prior endovascular arteriovenous graft thrombectomies were not associated with pulmonary hypertension or increased mean PAP in end-stage renal disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:27274170

  16. Sildenafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, AK; Bavdekar, SB

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease of varied etiologies. Although PAH has no curative treatment, a greater understanding of pathophysiology, technological advances resulting in early diagnosis, and the availability of several newer drugs have improved the outlook for patients with PAH. Sildenafil is one of the therapeutic agents used extensively in the treatment of PAH in children, as an off-label drug. In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) issued a warning regarding the of use high-dose sildenafil in children with PAH. This has led to a peculiar situation where there is a paucity of approved therapies for the management of PAH in children and the use of the most extensively used drug being discouraged by the regulator. This article provides a review of the use of sildenafil in the treatment of PAH in children. PMID:26119438

  17. Sleep Apnea, Heart Failure, and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Javaheri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Despite the emergence of sleep apnea (SA) as a significant risk factor for heart failure (HF) mortality, data indicate that SA remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Less well established, though perhapsmore emphasized, is the role of sleep apnea in pulmonary hypertension (PH). SA occurs in approximately 50 % of HF patients, and its consequences include intermittent hypoxemia, arousal, and intrathoracic pressure swings leading to neurohormonal stimulation, oxidative stress and inflammation. While SA is also considered a cause of PH, severe PH due solely to SA is rare. Combining the results of several studies using Swan-Ganz catheters for diagnosis of PH, approximately 10 % of patients with OSA have PH. Effective treatment of SA in HF is associated with improved survival, while treatment of SA in PH is typically associated with modest hemodynamic improvement. PMID:24097114

  18. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Avram

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an entity that is known to complicate connective tissue diseases (CTD). PAH in CTD is a very important diagnosis which greatly affects treatment and prognosis. The most commonly affected CTD is scleroderma, although lupus, inflammatory myopathies such as poly and dermatomyositis, and mixed CTD are also associated with PAH. The manifestations of PAH have both similarities and differences when occurring in the setting of CTD as compared with idiopathic PAH. These differences are most notable in scleroderma. In this section we will discuss the features of PAH as they appear in CTDs, and in particular, scleroderma. The focus of this article is an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of PAH in CTD, and how this setting might differ from idiopathic and other forms of PAH. PMID:20160534

  19. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: changing approaches to management].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, B A; Preobrazhenskiĭ, D V; Batyraliev, T A; Belenkov, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to different aspects of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); new classification of PAH is published in 2010. There are idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with other diseases. Current guidelines recommend to treat PAH only after the verification of diagnosis with right heart catheterization and acute tests with vasodilators. Patients-reactors should be treated with calcium antagonists. The following drugs related to one of three categories should be used in PAH: (1) prostanoids (epoprostenol, iloprost et al.); (2) blockers of endothelin receptors (bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan); (3) phosphodiesterase 5 type inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil et al.) In majority of cases the combined treatment is used, usually the combination of bosentan and sildenafil is used. PMID:21626809

  20. Surgical treatment of pulmonary hypertension: Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jason; Russo, Mark J.; Muller, Charlie; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious and progressive disorder that results in right ventricular dysfunction that lead to subsequent right heart failure and death. When untreated the median survival for these patients is 2.8 years. Over the past decade advances in disease specific medical therapy considerably changed the natural history. This is reflected in a threefold decrease in the number of patients undergoing lung transplantation for PH which used to be main stay of treatment. Despite the successful development of medical therapy lung transplant still remains the gold standard for patients who fail medical therapy. Referral for lung transplant is recommended when patients have a less than 2-3 years of predicted survival or in NYHA class III or IV. Both single and bilateral lung transplants have been successfully performed for PH but outcome analyses and survival comparisons generally favor a bilateral lung transplant. PMID:22140622

  1. Exercise intolerance in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Robin M; Gain, Kevin R; Gabbay, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with symptoms of dyspnea and fatigue, which contribute to exercise limitation. The origins and significance of dyspnea and fatigue in PAH are not completely understood. This has created uncertainly among healthcare professionals regarding acceptable levels of these symptoms, on exertion, for patients with PAH. Dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV) contributes to functional limitation and mortality in PAH; however, the role of the RV in eliciting dyspnea and fatigue has not been thoroughly examined. This paper explores the contribution of the RV and systemic and peripheral abnormalities to exercise limitation and symptoms in PAH. Further, it explores the relationship between exercise abnormalities and symptoms, the utility of the cardiopulmonary exercise test in identifying RV dysfunction, and offers suggestions for further research. PMID:22737582

  2. Exercise Intolerance in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Robin M.; Gain, Kevin R.; Gabbay, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with symptoms of dyspnea and fatigue, which contribute to exercise limitation. The origins and significance of dyspnea and fatigue in PAH are not completely understood. This has created uncertainly among healthcare professionals regarding acceptable levels of these symptoms, on exertion, for patients with PAH. Dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV) contributes to functional limitation and mortality in PAH; however, the role of the RV in eliciting dyspnea and fatigue has not been thoroughly examined. This paper explores the contribution of the RV and systemic and peripheral abnormalities to exercise limitation and symptoms in PAH. Further, it explores the relationship between exercise abnormalities and symptoms, the utility of the cardiopulmonary exercise test in identifying RV dysfunction, and offers suggestions for further research. PMID:22737582

  3. Recapitulation of developing artery muscularization in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Abdul Q; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-03-13

    Excess smooth muscle accumulation is a key component of many vascular disorders, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, but the underlying cell biological processes are not well defined. In pulmonary artery hypertension, reduced pulmonary artery compliance is a strong independent predictor of mortality, and pathological distal arteriole muscularization contributes to this reduced compliance. We recently demonstrated that embryonic pulmonary artery wall morphogenesis consists of discrete developmentally regulated steps. In contrast, poor understanding of distal arteriole muscularization in pulmonary artery hypertension severely limits existing therapies that aim to dilate the pulmonary vasculature but have modest clinical benefit and do not prevent hypermuscularization. Here, we show that most pathological distal arteriole smooth muscle cells, but not alveolar myofibroblasts, derive from pre-existing smooth muscle. Furthermore, the program of distal arteriole muscularization encompasses smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation, distal migration, proliferation, and then redifferentiation, thereby recapitulating many facets of arterial wall development. PMID:24582963

  4. Noninvasive pulmonary artery wave intensity analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Quail, Michael A.; Knight, Daniel S.; Steeden, Jennifer A.; Taelman, Liesbeth; Moledina, Shahin; Taylor, Andrew M.; Segers, Patrick; Coghlan, Gerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary wave reflections are a potential hemodynamic biomarker for pulmonary hypertension (PH) and can be analyzed using wave intensity analysis (WIA). In this study we used pulmonary vessel area and flow obtained using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) to implement WIA noninvasively. We hypothesized that this method could detect differences in reflections in PH patients compared with healthy controls and could also differentiate certain PH subtypes. Twenty patients with PH (35% CTEPH and 75% female) and 10 healthy controls (60% female) were recruited. Right and left pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA) flow and area curves were acquired using self-gated golden-angle, spiral, phase-contrast CMR with a 10.5-ms temporal resolution. These data were used to perform WIA on patients and controls. The presence of a proximal clot in CTEPH patients was determined from contemporaneous computed tomography/angiographic data. A backwards-traveling compression wave (BCW) was present in both LPA and RPA of all PH patients but was absent in all controls (P = 6e−8). The area under the BCW was associated with a sensitivity of 100% [95% confidence interval (CI) 63–100%] and specificity of 91% (95% CI 75–98%) for the presence of a clot in the proximal PAs of patients with CTEPH. In conclusion, WIA metrics were significantly different between patients and controls; in particular, the presence of an early BCW was specifically associated with PH. The magnitude of the area under the BCW showed discriminatory capacity for the presence of proximal PA clot in patients with CTEPH. We believe that these results demonstrate that WIA could be used in the noninvasive assessment of PH. PMID:25659483

  5. Noninvasive pulmonary artery wave intensity analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quail, Michael A; Knight, Daniel S; Steeden, Jennifer A; Taelman, Liesbeth; Moledina, Shahin; Taylor, Andrew M; Segers, Patrick; Coghlan, Gerry J; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Pulmonary wave reflections are a potential hemodynamic biomarker for pulmonary hypertension (PH) and can be analyzed using wave intensity analysis (WIA). In this study we used pulmonary vessel area and flow obtained using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) to implement WIA noninvasively. We hypothesized that this method could detect differences in reflections in PH patients compared with healthy controls and could also differentiate certain PH subtypes. Twenty patients with PH (35% CTEPH and 75% female) and 10 healthy controls (60% female) were recruited. Right and left pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA) flow and area curves were acquired using self-gated golden-angle, spiral, phase-contrast CMR with a 10.5-ms temporal resolution. These data were used to perform WIA on patients and controls. The presence of a proximal clot in CTEPH patients was determined from contemporaneous computed tomography/angiographic data. A backwards-traveling compression wave (BCW) was present in both LPA and RPA of all PH patients but was absent in all controls (P = 6e(-8)). The area under the BCW was associated with a sensitivity of 100% [95% confidence interval (CI) 63-100%] and specificity of 91% (95% CI 75-98%) for the presence of a clot in the proximal PAs of patients with CTEPH. In conclusion, WIA metrics were significantly different between patients and controls; in particular, the presence of an early BCW was specifically associated with PH. The magnitude of the area under the BCW showed discriminatory capacity for the presence of proximal PA clot in patients with CTEPH. We believe that these results demonstrate that WIA could be used in the noninvasive assessment of PH. PMID:25659483

  6. Abnormal right ventricular relaxation in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    La Gerche, Andre; Roberts, Timothy J.; Prior, David L.; MacIsaac, Andrew I.; Burns, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a well-described complication of systemic hypertension. However, less is known regarding the effect of chronic pressure overload on right ventricular (RV) diastolic function. We hypothesized that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is associated with abnormal RV early relaxation and that this would be best shown by invasive pressure measurement. Twenty-five patients undergoing right heart catheterization for investigation of breathlessness and/or suspected PHT were studied. In addition to standard measurements, RV pressure was sampled with a high-fidelity micromanometer, and RV pressure/time curves were analyzed. Patients were divided into a PHT group and a non-PHT group on the basis of a derived mean pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 25 mmHg. Eleven patients were classified to the PHT group. This group had significantly higher RV minimum diastolic pressure ( vs. mmHg, ) and RV end-diastolic pressure (RVEDP; vs. mmHg, ), and RV τ was significantly prolonged ( vs. ms, ). There were strong correlations between RV τ and RV minimum diastolic pressure (, ) and between RV τ and RVEDP (, ). There was a trend toward increased RV contractility (end-systolic elastance) in the PHT group ( vs. mmHg/mL, ) and a correlation between RV systolic pressure and first derivative of maximum pressure change (, ). Stroke volumes were similar. Invasive measures of RV early relaxation are abnormal in patients with PHT, whereas measured contractility is static or increasing, which suggests that diastolic dysfunction may precede systolic dysfunction. Furthermore, there is a strong association between measures of RV relaxation and RV filling pressures. PMID:26064464

  7. [Treatment algorithm for pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M

    2005-06-01

    During the last decade, we have witnessed substantial improvements in the therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including true innovations targeting some of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Intravenous epoprostenol was the first drug to improve symptoms and survival of patients with PAH. Novel prostanoids including subcutaneous treprostinil and inhaled iloprost also have beneficial effects in many patients, although their long-term efficacy is less well known. Among the newer treatments for PAH, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have reshaped clinical practice. The endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been approved in many parts of the world and most current guidelines recommend this drug as first-line treatment for PAH. Novel endothelin receptor antagonists such as sitaxsentan and ambrisentan are currently being investigated. The phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor sildenafil is also being intensively studied in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and most of the available data look promising, although approval for PAH is still pending. Other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have not yet undergone extensive study in PAH. However, PAH is a complex disorder and targeting a single pathway cannot be expected to be uniformly successful. Thus, combining substances with different modes of action is expected to improve symptoms, hemodynamics and survival in PAH patients, although combination therapy has yet to undergo the scrutiny of large randomized clinical trials.Based on the available data, several guidelines for the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to PAH have been published recently. These guidelines have incorporated treatment algorithms, which, fortunately, are virtually identical. The present review article summarizes the current guidelines to the management of patients with PAH. PMID:15965810

  8. Severe Pulmonary Arteriopathy Is Associated with Persistent Hypoxemia after Pulmonary Endarterectomy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ishida, Keiichi; Naito, Akira; Kato, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Takao; Sekine, Ayumi; Nishimura, Rintaro; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Shigeta, Ayako; Masuda, Masahisa; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by occlusion of pulmonary arteries by organized chronic thrombi. Persistent hypoxemia and residual pulmonary hypertension (PH) following successful pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) are clinically important problems; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have previously reported that residual PH is closely related to severe pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypothesize that this arteriopathy might also be involved in impaired gas exchange. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between hypoxemia and pulmonary arteriopathy after PEA. Methods and Results Between December 2011 and November 2014, 23 CTEPH patients underwent PEA and lung biopsy. The extent of pulmonary arteriopathy was quantified pathologically in lung biopsy specimens. We then analyzed the relationship between the severity of pulmonary arteriopathy and gas exchange after PEA. We observed that the severity of pulmonary arteriopathy was negatively correlated with postoperative and follow-up PaO2 (postoperative PaO2: r = -0.73, p = 0.0004; follow-up PaO2: r = -0.66, p = 0.001), but not with preoperative PaO2 (r = -0.373, p = 0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed that the obstruction ratio and patient age were determinants of PaO2 one month after PEA (R2 = 0.651, p = 0.00009). Furthermore, the obstruction ratio and improvement of pulmonary vascular resistance were determinants of PaO2 at follow-up (R2 = 0.545, p = 0.0002). Severe pulmonary arteriopathy might increase the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference and impair diffusion capacity, resulting in hypoxemia following PEA. Conclusion The severity of pulmonary arteriopathy was closely associated with postoperative and follow-up hypoxemia. PMID:27571267

  9. Advances in the management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Kim, Nick H

    2015-09-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), a potentially curable form of pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary thromboendarterectomy surgery, has been the focus of significant medical advances. In addition to new imaging modalities that are now used to help recognize and diagnose CTEPH, additional treatment options have emerged for inoperable cases. These include a newly approved medical therapy for inoperable disease or persistent/recurrent CTEPH as well as percutaneous balloon angioplasty of the pulmonary arteries. In this article, we summarize these recent advances in the field and review the related literature. PMID:26239014

  10. Breath Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cikach, Frank S.; Tonelli, Adriano R.; Barnes, Jarrod; Paschke, Kelly; Newman, Jennie; Grove, David; Dababneh, Luma; Wang, Sihe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and devastating condition characterized by vascular cell proliferation and is associated with several metabolic derangements. We hypothesized that metabolic derangements in PAH can be detected by measuring metabolic by-products in exhaled breath. Methods: We collected breath and blood samples from patients with PAH at the time of right-sided heart catheterization (n = 31) and from healthy control subjects (n = 34). Breath was analyzed by selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry in predetermined training and validation cohorts. Results: Patients with PAH were 51.5 ± 14 years old, and 27 were women (85%). Control subjects were 38 ± 13 years old, and 22 were women (65%). Discriminant analysis in the training set identified three ion peaks (H3O+29+, NO+56+, and O2+98+) and the variable age that correctly classified 88.9% of the individuals. In an independent validation cohort, 82.8% of the individuals were classified correctly. The concentrations of the volatile organic compounds 2-propanol, acetaldehyde, ammonia, ethanol, pentane, 1-decene, 1-octene, and 2-nonene were different in patients with PAH compared with control subjects. Exhaled ammonia was higher in patients with PAH (median [interquartile range]: 94.7 parts per billion (ppb) [70-129 ppb] vs 60.9 ppb [46-77 ppb], P < .001) and was associated with right atrial pressure (ρ = 0.57, P < .001), mean pulmonary artery pressure (ρ = 0.43, P = .015), cardiac index by thermodilution (ρ = −0.39, P = .03), pulmonary vascular resistance (ρ = 0.40, P = .04), mixed venous oxygen (ρ = −0.59, P < .001), and right ventricular dilation (ρ = 0.42, P = .03). Conclusions: Breathprint is different between patients with PAH and healthy control subjects. Several specific compounds, including ammonia, were elevated in the breath of patients with PAH. Exhaled ammonia levels correlated with severity of disease. PMID:24091389

  11. Role for Telomerase in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Shariq; Quarck, Rozenn; Marcos, Elisabeth; Parpaleix, Aurelien; Gary-Bobo, Guillaume; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Boczkowski, Jorge; Delcroix, Marion; Blasco, Maria A.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Amsellem, Valérie; Adnot, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background Cells exhibiting dysregulated growth may express telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the dual function of which consists of maintaining telomere length, in association with the RNA template molecule TERC, and controlling cell growth. Here, we investigated lung TERT in human and experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) and its role in controlling pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) proliferation. Methods and Results Marked TERT expression or activity was found in lungs from patients with idiopathic PH and from mice with PH induced by hypoxia or serotonin-transporter overexpression (SM22-5HTT+ mice), chiefly within PA-SMCs. In cultured mouse PA-SMCs, TERT was expressed on growth stimulation by serum. The TERT inhibitor imetelstat and the TERT activator TA65 abrogated and stimulated PA-SMC growth, respectively. PA-SMCs from PH mice showed a heightened proliferative phenotype associated with increased TERT expression, which was suppressed by imetelstat treatment. TERC−/− mice at generation 2 and TERT−/− mice at generations 2, 3, and 4 developed less severe PH than did wild-type mice exposed to chronic hypoxia, with less distal pulmonary artery muscularization and fewer Ki67-stained proliferating PA-SMCs. Telomere length differed between TERC−/− and TERT−/− mice, whereas PH severity was similar in the 2 strains and across generations. Chronic imetelstat treatment reduced hypoxia-induced PH in wild-type mice or partially reversed established PH in SM22-5HTT+ mice while simultaneously decreasing TERT expression. Opposite effects occurred in mice treated with TA65. Conclusions Telomerase exerts telomere-independent effects on PA-SMC growth in PH and may constitute a treatment target for PH. PMID:25550449

  12. Metformin Reverses Development of Pulmonary Hypertension via Aromatase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dean, Afshan; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Salt, Ian P; MacLean, Margaret R

    2016-08-01

    Females are more susceptible to pulmonary arterial hypertension than males, although the reasons remain unclear. The hypoglycemic drug, metformin, is reported to have multiple actions, including the inhibition of aromatase and stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Inhibition of aromatase using anastrazole is protective in experimental pulmonary hypertension but whether metformin attenuates pulmonary hypertension through this mechanism remains unknown. We investigated whether metformin affected aromatase activity and if it could reduce the development of pulmonary hypertension in the sugen 5416/hypoxic rat model. We also investigated its influence on proliferation in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Metformin reversed right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and decreased pulmonary vascular remodeling in the rat. Furthermore, metformin increased rat lung AMP-activated protein kinase signaling, decreased lung and circulating estrogen levels, levels of aromatase, the estrogen metabolizing enzyme; cytochrome P450 1B1 and its transcription factor; the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. In human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, metformin decreased proliferation and decreased estrogen synthesis by decreasing aromatase activity through the PII promoter site of Cyp19a1 Thus, we report for the first time that metformin can reverse pulmonary hypertension through inhibition of aromatase and estrogen synthesis in a manner likely to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase. PMID:27296990

  13. Long term combination treatment for severe idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Affuso, Flora; Cirillo, Plinio; Ruvolo, Antonio; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Serafino

    2010-01-01

    We report the long-term follow-up of 3 cases of severe idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, in whom tadalafil plus sitaxentan combination therapy improved the clinical condition and exercise performance without any relevant adverse event. PMID:21160759

  14. Meandering right pulmonary vein associated with severe and progressive "idiopathic-like" pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Sofia; Bret, Montserrat; Del Cerro, Maria Jesus

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the pulmonary veins are rare. Meandering right pulmonary vein, considered a part of the Scimitar syndrome spectrum, is often an incidental finding during chest imaging. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl diagnosed with meandering pulmonary vein, who developed pulmonary hypertensive disease with an aggressive course, in spite of absence of hypoxia or elevated pulmonary wedge pressure. PMID:26374461

  15. Pulmonary hypertension due to isolated metastatic squamous cell carcinoma thromboemboli.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael K; Granger, Emily K; Preda, Veronica A

    2006-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension as the initial presentation of occult malignancy is extremely rare. The differential diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension due to arterial tumour embolism is often overlooked and deserves contemplation. Our case report details the presentation of cardiorespiratory decompensation from an assumed classic saddle pulmonary embolus in a previously fit, well 80-year-old gentleman. The patient underwent successful pulmonary thromboendarterectomy, however, intraoperatively the specimen was noted to be atypical. This resulted in the surprising definitive diagnosis of thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension secondary to laminated thrombi of metastatic squamous cell tumour emboli. The site of tumour origin was however not histologically apparent and was unable to be elucidated on extensive further investigation. Post-operatively the patient had considerable subjective and functional improvement returning to activities of daily living. He however passed away some 9 months later. PMID:16412689

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature. PMID:24083892

  17. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a current review of pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Sonu; Ojrzanowski, Marcin; Majewski, Sebastian; Talwar, Arunabh

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) is a rare and devastating disease characterized by progressive increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance, which eventually leads to right ventricular failure and death. At present there is no cure for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however over the past decade targeted pharmaceutical options have become available for the treatment of PAH. Prior to evaluation for therapeutic options a definitive diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension must be made via comprehensive physical exam and definitive diagnostic testing. Screening test of choice remains echocardiography and gold standard for definitive diagnosis is right heart catheterization. Once the establishment of a diagnosis of PAH is made therapeutic options may be a possibility based on a diagnostic algorithm and disease severity of the PAH patient. There are different classes of medications available with different mechanisms of actions which net a vasodilatory effect and improve exercise tolerance, quality of life as well and survival. PMID:26693827

  18. Contribution of live heartworms harboring in pulmonary arteries to pulmonary hypertension in dogs with dirofilariasis.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Sasaki, Y; Ishihara, K; Hirano, Y

    1990-12-01

    To investigate whether adult heartworms harboring in the pulmonary arteries contribute to pulmonary hypertension, we determined the cardio-pulmonary values immediately before and after removal of heartworms from the pulmonary arteries and before and after insertion of live worms in their place. In 10 heartworm-infected dogs, 8 to 46 worms were removed. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure fell significantly from 24.5 +/- 7.9 mmHg to 16.3 +/- 4.9 mmHg (p less than 0.01) immediately after removal. The right cardiac output decreased in 7 of the 10 cases. The total pulmonary resistance and right ventricular stroke work index also decreased. At 24 hours after removal, live heartworms were put back into the pulmonary arteries of their host dog. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure elevated significantly (p less than 0.01) immediately after insertion. The right cardiac output further decreased in 7 of the 10 dogs, and the total pulmonary resistance and right ventricular stroke work index increased. Separate from this, 12 to 42 heartworms were transplanted into the pulmonary arteries of 5 heartworm-free dogs. Immediately after transplantation, the pulmonary arterial pressure did not show any significant change. However, the stroke volume decreased, and the total pulmonary resistance increased. These facts suggest a contribution of live heartworms to the pulmonary hypertension, although there is a complicated interaction among the presence of heartworms, the pulmonary lesions and the pulmonary hypertension. PMID:2287128

  19. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:25650280

  20. Arginine metabolic endotypes in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wedes, Samuel H.; Hsu, Jean W.; Bohren, Kurt M.; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Jahoor, Farook; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Decreased synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOS) is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Multiple factors may contribute to decreased NO bioavailability, including increased activity of arginase, the enzyme that converts arginine to ornithine and urea, which may compete with NOS for arginine; inadequate de novo arginine production from citrulline; and increased concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NOS. We hypothesized that PAH patients with the lowest arginine availability secondary to increased arginase activity and/or inadequate de novo arginine synthesis might have a slower rate of NO synthesis and greater pulmonary vascular resistance. Nine patients with group 1 PAH and 10 healthy controls were given primed, constant intravenous infusions of 15N2-arginine, 13C,2H4-citrulline, 15N2-ornithine, and 13C-urea in the postabsorptive state. The results showed that, compared with healthy controls, PAH patients had a tendency toward increased arginine clearance and ornithine flux but no difference in arginine and citrulline flux, de novo arginine synthesis, or NO synthesis. Arginine-to-ADMA ratio was increased in PAH patients. Two endotypes of patients with low and high arginase activity were identified; compared with the low-arginase group, the patients with high arginase had increased arginine flux, slower NO synthesis, and lower plasma concentrations of ADMA. These results demonstrate that increased breakdown of arginine by arginase occurs in PAH and affects NO synthesis. Furthermore, there is no compensatory increase in de novo arginine synthesis to overcome this increased utilization of arginine by arginase. PMID:25992277

  1. Shared medical appointments in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rahaghi, Franck F; Chastain, Veronica L; Benavides, Rosanna; Ferrer, Gustavo; Ramirez, Jose; Mehta, Jinesh; Oliveira, Eduardo; Smolley, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to adapt the shared medical appointment (SMA) model to the care of pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients and evaluate patient satisfaction. Our SMA team included a PH specialist, a PH nurse, and one research fellow. Eight to twelve PH patients with a family member were invited during office visits and by phone calls. Attendance was verified and encouraged by phone calls and informational letters. The meetings started with a 30-minute presentation on various PH topics, which was followed by each patient's individual visit and a focused examination in front of the group, allowing group questions and interaction. Of the total number of patients (n = 53), 84% stated that they would attend a future SMA. The care provided was rated excellent to very good by 98% of the patients. Ninety-two percent stated that they improved their understanding of the disease and treatment options, and 59% acknowledged a preference for the group visit over the private visit. Twenty-five percent of patients stated that they were very likely to likely to some extent to agree to change or seek a change in treatment modality on the basis of conversation with other patients in the SMA. The majority of our patients expressed no privacy concerns before the meeting (76%), and even more expressed no such concerns afterward (88%). In conclusion, the SMA model allows PH patients to increase understanding of their disease process while integrating peer support, promoting social interaction, and addressing patients' emotional needs. Other (rare) pulmonary diseases may benefit from this model. PMID:25006421

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with Martorell hypertensive leg ulcer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer (Martorell ulcer) is characterized by distinct alterations in the arteriolar wall of subcutaneous vessels, leading to progressive narrowing of the vascular lumen and increase of vascular resistance. These changes are similar to the alterations observed in pulmonary arterioles in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH). This study was aimed to assess an association between the two disorders. Methods In this case–control study, 14 patients with Martorell ulcer were clinically assessed for the presence of pulmonary hypertension using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Data from patients were compared to 28 matched hypertensive controls. Results Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) in patients with Martorell ulcer was significantly higher than in the control group (33.8 ± 16.9 vs 25.3 ± 6.5 mmHg, p = 0.023); the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 31% (5/14) in patients and 7% (2/28) in controls (p = 0.031). No differences were seen in left heart size and function between patients and controls. Conclusion This study provides first evidence that subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis, the hallmark of Martorell ulcer, is associated with PH. These findings suggest that patients with Martorell leg ulcer might be at significant risk to develop elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. Patients with leg ulcers who present with dyspnea should be evaluated by echocardiography for the presence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22686459

  3. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Fistula with Pulmonary Hypertension - To Close or Not to Close?

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Chiau-Suong; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Chu, I-Tseng

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old female presented to our facility suffering from exertional dyspnea for 2-3 months. Her chest x-ray showed a nodular shadow in the right lower lung, and chest CT revealed a pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (PAVF). Subsequent echocardiographic examination detected no intra-cardiac shunt but did indicate pulmonary hypertension as evidenced by a tricuspid regurgitation flow velocity of 4.17 M/sec. Contrast echocardiography with antecubital vein injection of agitated normal saline demonstrated visualization of the left heart chambers compatible with PAVF. At cardiac catheterization, pulmonary arterial pressure was 59/26 mmHg, mean 34 mmHg. Because there was no intra-cardiac communication detected, primary pulmonary hypertension was tentatively diagnosed. Pulmonary angiography demonstrated a PAVF arising from the lower right pulmonary artery, forming a secular structure on its course in draining into the left atrium through a long pulmonary vein. In this particular anomaly, a concurrence of PAVF with pulmonary hypertension, we judged that the PAVF might serve as a safety valve for pulmonary hypertension and should not be closed. We therefore left the PAVF untreated and thereafter provided medical management for this patient. The concomitant presence of PAVF and pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical condition. The ultimate treatment strategy for this uncommon condition should be carefully considered. PMID:27122941

  4. [Inhaled iloprost, a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Clinical evidence from its use in perioperative pulmonary hypertension cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Telona-Fermán, Eslí; Barragán-García, Rodolfo; Calderón-Abbo, Moisés Cutiel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled iloprost is one of the most recent drugs from prostanoids group's in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. His place in pulmonary hypertension seen in the perioperative cardiovascular surgery has not been defined. In this review we analyze pulmonary hypertension group's susceptibles of cardiac surgery and its importance, besides the current clinical evidence from drug use in this context. PMID:25450429

  5. Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shibu; Safdar, Zeenat; Torres, Fernando; Pacheco, Luis D.; Feldman, Jeremy; deBoisblanc, Bennet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease with a predilection for young women that is associated with right ventricular failure and premature death. PAH can complicate pregnancy with hemodynamic instability or sudden death during parturition and postpartum. Our aim was to examine the impact of PAH on pregnancy outcomes in the modern era. Methods: We conducted a retrospective evaluation of pregnant patients with PAH managed between 1999 and 2009 at five US medical centers. Patient demographics, medical therapies, hemodynamic measurements, manner of delivery, anesthetic administration, and outcomes were assessed. Results: Among 18 patients with PAH, 12 continued pregnancy and six underwent pregnancy termination. Right ventricular systolic pressure in patients managed to parturition was 82 ± 5 mm Hg and in patients with pregnancy termination was 90 ± 16 mm Hg. Six patients underwent pregnancy termination at mean gestational age of 13 ± 1.0 weeks with no maternal deaths or complications. Twelve patients elected to continue their pregnancy and were hospitalized at 29 ± 1.4 weeks. PAH-specific therapy was administered to nine (75%) at time of delivery consisting of sildenafil, IV prostanoids, or combination therapy. All parturients underwent Cesarean section at 34 weeks with one in-hospital death and one additional death 2 months postpartum for maternal mortality of 16.7%. Conclusions: Compared with earlier reports, maternal morbidity and mortality among pregnant women with PAH was reduced, yet maternal complications remain significant and patients should continue to be counseled to avoid pregnancy. PMID:23100080

  6. Updated treatment algorithm of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Galiè, Nazzareno; Corris, Paul A; Frost, Adaani; Girgis, Reda E; Granton, John; Jing, Zhi Cheng; Klepetko, Walter; McGoon, Michael D; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Preston, Ioana R; Rubin, Lewis J; Sandoval, Julio; Seeger, Werner; Keogh, Anne

    2013-12-24

    The demands on a pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment algorithm are multiple and in some ways conflicting. The treatment algorithm usually includes different types of recommendations with varying degrees of scientific evidence. In addition, the algorithm is required to be comprehensive but not too complex, informative yet simple and straightforward. The type of information in the treatment algorithm are heterogeneous including clinical, hemodynamic, medical, interventional, pharmacological and regulatory recommendations. Stakeholders (or users) including physicians from various specialties and with variable expertise in PAH, nurses, patients and patients' associations, healthcare providers, regulatory agencies and industry are often interested in the PAH treatment algorithm for different reasons. These are the considerable challenges faced when proposing appropriate updates to the current evidence-based treatment algorithm.The current treatment algorithm may be divided into 3 main areas: 1) general measures, supportive therapy, referral strategy, acute vasoreactivity testing and chronic treatment with calcium channel blockers; 2) initial therapy with approved PAH drugs; and 3) clinical response to the initial therapy, combination therapy, balloon atrial septostomy, and lung transplantation. All three sections will be revisited highlighting information newly available in the past 5 years and proposing updates where appropriate. The European Society of Cardiology grades of recommendation and levels of evidence will be adopted to rank the proposed treatments. PMID:24355643

  7. [Combination treatment in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kramer, Mordechai R

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a marked improvement in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) due to the development of targeted therapies. There are now several treatment options available--oral, inhaled, and those delivered by subcutaneous or intravenous methods. These treatments have greatly improved patient survival, which in the past was 2.5 years on average. Efficient treatment choice generally proceeds from oral therapies--PDE-5 inhibitors (sildenafil) and endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan or ambrisentan)--to inhaled prostanoids (iloprost) or subcutaneous (treprostinil). Intravenous prostacyclins are used in treating the more severe cases. The different pathways of action of each class of drugs allow a synergistic effect of combination therapy similar to malignancy or patients in congestive heart failure. The updated treatment algorithm includes combinations of therapies that target different pathways. This article will review the literature regarding combination therapy for the treatment of PAH. Combining PAH therapies that target different pathways is now a well-established treatment option, based on numerous international clinical trials, and offers new hope to patients suffering from this severe disease. PMID:22164922

  8. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients. PMID:18238950

  9. CD133+ cells in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Foris, Vasile; Kovacs, Gabor; Marsh, Leigh M; Bálint, Zoltán; Tötsch, Martin; Avian, Alexander; Douschan, Philipp; Ghanim, Bahil; Klepetko, Walter; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst

    2016-08-01

    Circulating mononuclear cells may play an important role for the vascular remodelling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but studies addressing multiple progenitor populations are rare and inconsistent.We used a comprehensive fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of circulating mononuclear cells in 20 PAH patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls, and additionally analysed CD133(+) cells in the lung tissue of five PAH transplant recipients and five healthy controls (donor lungs).PAH patients were characterised by increased numbers of circulating CD133(+) cells and lymphopenia as compared with control. In PAH, CD133(+) subpopulations positive for CD117 or CD45 were significantly increased, whereas CD133(+)CD309(+), CD133(+)CXCR2(+) and CD133(+)CD31(+) cells were decreased. In CD133(+) cells, SOX2, Nanog, Ki67 and CXCR4 were not detected, but Oct3/4 mRNA was present in both PAH and controls. In the lung tissue, CD133(+) cells included three main populations: type 2 pneumocytes, monocytes and undifferentiated cells without significant differences between PAH and controls.In conclusion, circulating CD133(+) progenitor cells are elevated in PAH and consist of phenotypically different subpopulations that may be up- or downregulated. This may explain the inconsistent results in the literature. CD133(+) type 2 pneumocytes in the lung tissue are not associated with circulating CD133(+) mononuclear cells. PMID:27103380

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with hematological disorders following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Meera, V; Jijina, Farah

    2009-06-01

    Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied by echocardiography and Doppler in 43 splenectomized patients with various disorders 1-20 years after splenectomy. Pulmonary arterial hypertension was detected only in thalassemia major, intermedia, hereditary sphereocytosis and myelofibrosis groups comprising a total of 21 patients. Six patients out of 21 was found to have PAH with mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 46.28 ± 28.17 mm of Hg. Twenty-one controls having similar duration and type of disease also were assessed for PAH in this case control study 3/21 had pulmonary arterial hypertension in this control group. The difference in number of patients showing pulmonary hypertension between case and control was not statistically significant (Chi square test P=0.29) though the difference in pulmonary arterial pressure between case and control were significantly different (t test P<0.0029) with control group showing a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 ± 19 mm Hg.Platelet count in the splenectomized group was significantly higher (P=0.0029) than the controls. Pulmonary thromboembolism was equally high in the PAH patients with and without splenectomy. Patients undergoing splenectomy due to trauma, immune thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, extrahepatic portal hypertension, autoimmune hemolytic anemia did not show PAH after splenectomy even years after the procedure PAH following splenectomy is common after certain disorders and control patients in these diseases have tendency to develop PAH even without splenectomy. Pulmonary thromboembolism may be an important pathophysiological mechanism leading to this condition. Patients having hemolytic anemia and myelofibrosis should have regular evaluation of pulmonary arterial pressure whether he/she has been splenectomized or not.This is particularly important as availability of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as sildenafil allows one to manage these cases. PMID:23100974

  11. Smooth Muscle-Mediated Connective Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecham, Robert P.; Whitehouse, Loren A.; Wrenn, David S.; Parks, William C.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.; Crouch, Edmond C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    1987-07-01

    Abnormal accumulation of connective tissue in blood vessels contributes to alterations in vascular physiology associated with disease states such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Elastin synthesis was studied in blood vessels from newborn calves with severe pulmonary hypertension induced by alveolar hypoxia in order to investigate the cellular stimuli that elicit changes in pulmonary arterial connective tissue production. A two- to fourfold increase in elastin production was observed in pulmonary artery tissue and medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive calves. This stimulation of elastin production was accompanied by a corresponding increase in elastin messenger RNA consistent with regulation at the transcriptional level. Conditioned serum harvested from cultures of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells isolated from hypertensive animals contained one or more low molecular weight elastogenic factors that stimulated the production of elastin in both fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and altered the chemotactic responsiveness of fibroblasts to elastin peptides. These results suggest that connective tissue changes in the pulmonary vasculature in response to pulmonary hypertension are orchestrated by the medial smooth muscle cell through the generation of specific differentiation factors that alter both the secretory phenotype and responsive properties of surrounding cells.

  12. The burden of pulmonary hypertension in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Gidwani, Suman; Nair, Ajith

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) is a significant global health problem and accounts for a substantial portion of cardiovascular disease in the developing world. Although there have been considerable advances in therapeutics for pulmonary arterial hypertension, over 97% of the disease burden lies within the developing world where there is limited access to health care and pharmaceuticals. The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension differ between industrialized and developing nations. Infectious diseases-including schistosomiasis human immunodeficiency virus, and rheumatic fever-are common causes of PVD, as are hemoglobinopathies, and untreated congenital heart disease. High altitude and exposure to household air pollutants also contribute to a significant portion of PVD cases. Although diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension requires the use of imaging and invasive hemodynamics, access to equipment may be limited. PVD therapies may be prohibitively expensive and limited to a select few. Prevention is therefore important in limiting the global PVD burden. PMID:25667181

  13. Why there is a need to discuss pulmonary hypertension other than pulmonary arterial hypertension?

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, George

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a condition characterized by the elevation of the mean pulmonary artery pressure above 25 mmHg and the pulmonary vascular resistance above 3 wood units. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon condition with severe morbidity and mortality, needing early recognition and appropriate and specific treatment. PH is frequently associated with hypoxemia, mainly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and DPLD and/or left heart diseases (LHD), mainly heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction. Although in the majority of patients with PH the cause is not PAH, a significant number of published studies are still in regard to group I PH, leading to a logical assumption that PH due to other causes is not such an important issue. So, is there a reason to discuss PH other than PAH? Chronic lung diseases, mainly chronic obstructive lung disease and DPLD, are associated with a high incidence of PH which is linked to exercise limitations and a worse prognosis. Although pathophysiological studies suggest that specific PAH therapy may benefit such patients, the results presented from small studies in regard to the safety and effectiveness of the specific PAH therapy are discouraging. PH is a common complication of left heart disease and is related to disease severity, especially in patients with reduced ejection fraction. There are two types of PH related to LHD based on diastolic pressure difference (DPD, defined as diastolic pulmonary artery pressure - mean PAWP): Isolated post-capillary PH, defined as PAWP > 15 mmHg and DPD < 7 mmHg, and combined post-capillary PH and pre-capillary PH, defined as PAWP > 15 mmHg and DPD ≥ 7 mmHg. The potential use of PAH therapies in patients with PH related to left heart disease is based on a logical pathobiological rationale. In patients with heart failure, endothelial dysfunction has been proposed as a cause of PH and hence as a target for treatment, supported by the presence of

  14. Why there is a need to discuss pulmonary hypertension other than pulmonary arterial hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, George

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a condition characterized by the elevation of the mean pulmonary artery pressure above 25 mmHg and the pulmonary vascular resistance above 3 wood units. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon condition with severe morbidity and mortality, needing early recognition and appropriate and specific treatment. PH is frequently associated with hypoxemia, mainly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and DPLD and/or left heart diseases (LHD), mainly heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction. Although in the majority of patients with PH the cause is not PAH, a significant number of published studies are still in regard to group I PH, leading to a logical assumption that PH due to other causes is not such an important issue. So, is there a reason to discuss PH other than PAH? Chronic lung diseases, mainly chronic obstructive lung disease and DPLD, are associated with a high incidence of PH which is linked to exercise limitations and a worse prognosis. Although pathophysiological studies suggest that specific PAH therapy may benefit such patients, the results presented from small studies in regard to the safety and effectiveness of the specific PAH therapy are discouraging. PH is a common complication of left heart disease and is related to disease severity, especially in patients with reduced ejection fraction. There are two types of PH related to LHD based on diastolic pressure difference (DPD, defined as diastolic pulmonary artery pressure - mean PAWP): Isolated post-capillary PH, defined as PAWP > 15 mmHg and DPD < 7 mmHg, and combined post-capillary PH and pre-capillary PH, defined as PAWP > 15 mmHg and DPD ≥ 7 mmHg. The potential use of PAH therapies in patients with PH related to left heart disease is based on a logical pathobiological rationale. In patients with heart failure, endothelial dysfunction has been proposed as a cause of PH and hence as a target for treatment, supported by the presence of

  15. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a distinct disease entity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene

    2015-06-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a distinct subtype of pulmonary hypertension (PH). One disease hypothesis is that CTEPH results from the non-resolution of venous thromboembolism. CTEPH is characterised by the presence of obstructive fibrotic thromboembolic material in the major pulmonary vessels, with concomitant microvascular arteriopathy, resulting in progressive PH. The clinical presentation of CTEPH is similar to pulmonary arterial hypertension with nonspecific symptoms, but it is distinguished from pulmonary arterial hypertension by the presence of mismatched segmental defects on the ventilation/perfusion scan. The exact prevalence and incidence of CTEPH are unknown, but are thought to have been underestimated in the past. CTEPH is unique among the subgroups of PH in that it is potentially curable with pulmonary endarterectomy, a surgical intervention intended to remove the occlusive material from the pulmonary vasculature. However, in some patients the obstructions are technically inaccessible or the risk/benefit ratios are unfavourable, making the condition inoperable. It is thought that the involvement of the smaller, more distal vessels is a target for medical treatment. Untreated, CTEPH may result in right heart failure and death. The pathophysiological mechanisms which cause CTEPH are complex and have not yet been fully elucidated. PMID:26028636

  16. Follow-Up of Pulmonary Hypertension With Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wright, Leah M; Dwyer, Nathan; Celermajer, David; Kritharides, Len; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Individual patient response to effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is variable and difficult to quantify. Consequently, management decisions regarding initiation and continuation of therapy are highly dependent on the results of investigations. Registry data show that changes in cardiac index, mean right atrial pressure, and mean pulmonary artery pressure have the greatest influence on survival. It is recognized that pulmonary artery pressure (PASP) responses to PAH-specific drugs are heterogeneous. However, follow-up testing is strongly focused on assessing changes in PASP and functional status (6-min walk). The goals of therapy, which should be highlighted in follow-up imaging, include not only reduction of PASP, decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance, and improvements in right ventricular function, cardiac output, and tricuspid regurgitation. This paper reviews the echocardiographic follow-up of pulmonary hypertension, and especially focuses on right ventricular function-a major determinant of outcome, for which reliable echocardiographic assessment has become more feasible. PMID:27282440

  17. Upregulated Copper Transporters in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zimnicka, Adriana M.; Tang, Haiyang; Guo, Qiang; Kuhr, Frank K.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Wan, Jun; Chen, Jiwang; Smith, Kimberly A.; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Choudhury, Moumita S. R.; Levitan, Irena; Machado, Roberto F.; Kaplan, Jack H.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu) plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2) also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness. PMID:24614111

  18. Pulmonary hypertension: prevalence and mortality in the Armadale echocardiography cohort

    PubMed Central

    Strange, Geoff; Stewart, Simon; Deague, Jenny A; Nelson, Helen; Kent, Aaron; Gabbay, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) lacks community prevalence and outcome data. Objective To characterise minimum ‘indicative’ prevalences and mortality data for all forms of PHT in a selected population with an elevated estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (ePASP) on echocardiography. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Residents of Armadale and the surrounding region in Western Australia (population 165 450) referred to our unit for transthoracic echocardiography between January 2003 and December 2009. Results Overall, 10 314 individuals (6.2% of the surrounding population) had 15 633 echo studies performed. Of these, 3320 patients (32%) had insufficient TR to ePASP and 936 individuals (9.1%, 95% CI 8.6% to 9.7%) had PHT, defined as, ePASP>40 mm Hg. The minimum ‘indicative’ prevalence for all forms of PHT is 326 cases/100 000 inhabitants of the local population, with left heart disease-associated PHT being the commonest cause (250 cases/100 000). 15 cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension/100 000 inhabitants were identified and an additional 144 individuals (15%) with no identified cause for their PHT. The mean time to death for those with ePASP >40 mm Hg, calculated from the first recorded ePASP, was 4.1 years (95% CI 3.9 to 4.3). PHT increased mortality whatever the underlying cause, but patients with PHT from left heart disease had the worst prognosis and those with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension receiving disease-specific treatment the best prognosis. Risk of death increased with PHT severity: severe pulmonary hypertension shortened the lifespan by an average of 1.1 years compared with mild pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions In this cohort, PHT was common and deadly. Left heart disease was the most common cause and had the worst prognosis and treated pulmonary arterial hypertension had the best prognosis. PMID:22760869

  19. Current Clinical Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yon K; Perez, Vinicio de Jesus; Liu, Juliana; Spiekerkoetter, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 2 decades there has been a tremendous evolution in the evaluation and care of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The introduction of targeted PAH therapy consisting of prostacyclin and its analogues, endothelin antagonists, phosphodiestase-5 inhibitors, and now a soluble guanylate cyclase activator have increased therapeutic options and potentially reduced morbidity and mortality, yet none of the current therapies have been curative. Current clinical management of PAH has become more complex given the focus on early diagnosis, an increased number of available therapeutics within each mechanistic class, as well as the emergence of clinically challenging scenarios such as perioperative care. Efforts to standardize the clinical care of PAH patients have led to the formation of multidisciplinary PAH tertiary care programs that strive to offer medical care based on peer-reviewed evidence-based and expert consensus guidelines. Furthermore, these tertiary PAH centers often support clinical and basic science research programs to gain novel insights into the pathogenesis of PAH with the goal to improve the clinical management of this devastating disease. In this manuscript, we discuss the clinical approach and management of PAH from the perspective of a single US-based academic institution. We provide an overview of currently available clinical guidelines, and offer some insight into how we approach current controversies in clinical management of certain patient subsets. We conclude with an overview of our program structure as well as a perspective on research and the role of a tertiary PAH center in contributing new knowledge to the field. PMID:24951763

  20. Coenzyme Q supplementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Jacqueline; Farha, Samar; Park, Margaret M.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Lundgrin, Erika L.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Bongard, Robert D.; Merker, Marilyn P.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a fundamental abnormality in the vascular endothelium and smooth muscle of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Because coenzyme Q (CoQ) is essential for mitochondrial function and efficient oxygen utilization as the electron carrier in the inner mitochondrial membrane, we hypothesized that CoQ would improve mitochondrial function and benefit PAH patients. To test this, oxidized and reduced levels of CoQ, cardiac function by echocardiogram, mitochondrial functions of heme synthesis and cellular metabolism were evaluated in PAH patients (N=8) in comparison to healthy controls (N=7), at baseline and after 12 weeks oral CoQ supplementation. CoQ levels were similar among PAH and control individuals, and increased in all subjects with CoQ supplementation. PAH patients had higher CoQ levels than controls with supplementation, and a tendency to a higher reduced-to-oxidized CoQ ratio. Cardiac parameters improved with CoQ supplementation, although 6-minute walk distances and BNP levels did not significantly change. Consistent with improved mitochondrial synthetic function, hemoglobin increased and red cell distribution width (RDW) decreased in PAH patients with CoQ, while hemoglobin declined slightly and RDW did not change in healthy controls. In contrast, metabolic and redox parameters, including lactate, pyruvate and reduced or oxidized gluthathione, did not change in PAH patients with CoQ. In summary, CoQ improved hemoglobin and red cell maturation in PAH, but longer studies and/or higher doses with a randomized placebo-controlled controlled design are necessary to evaluate the clinical benefit of this simple nutritional supplement. PMID:25180165

  1. Calcium antagonist verapamil prevented pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers with ascites by arresting pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Qiao, Jian; Wang, Huiyu; Gao, Mingyu; Ou, Deyuan; Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Maohong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaobo; Guo, Yuming

    2007-04-30

    Calcium signaling has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Verapamil, one of the calcium antagonists, is used to characterize the role of calcium signaling in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension syndrome in broilers. The suppression effect of verapamil on pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling was examined in broilers, from the age of 16 days to 43 days. Our results showed that oral administration of lower dose of verapamil (5 mg/kg body weight every 12 h) prevented the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, the ascites heart index and the erythrocyte packed cell volume of birds at low temperature from increasing, the heart rate from decreasing, and pulmonary arteriole median from thickening, and no pulmonary arteriole remodeling in broilers treated with the two doses of verapamil at low temperature was observed. Our results indicated that calcium signaling was involved in the development of broilers' pulmonary arterial hypertension, which leads to the development of ascites, and we suggest that verapamil may be used as a preventive agent to reduce the occurrence and development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers. PMID:17320074

  2. The Role of Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance in the Development and Progression of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grinnan, Daniel; Farr, Grant; Fox, Adam; Sweeney, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disorder which often leads to right ventricular failure and death. While the existing classification system for pulmonary hypertension does not account for the impact of diabetes mellitus, evidence is emerging that suggests that diabetes is associated with pulmonary hypertension and that diabetes modifies the course of pulmonary hypertension. There is also growing radiographic, hemodynamic, biochemical, and pathologic data supporting an association between diabetes and pulmonary hypertension. More robust epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm an association between diabetes and pulmonary hypertension and to show that diabetes is a disease modifier in pulmonary hypertension. In addition, evaluating the effects of glucose control in animals with pulmonary hypertension and diabetes (as well as in humans) is warranted. PMID:27376089

  3. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (ascites syndrome) in broilers: a review.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Rhoads, D D; Erf, G F; Anthony, N B

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) syndrome in broilers (also known as ascites syndrome and pulmonary hypertension syndrome) can be attributed to imbalances between cardiac output and the anatomical capacity of the pulmonary vasculature to accommodate ever-increasing rates of blood flow, as well as to an inappropriately elevated tone (degree of constriction) maintained by the pulmonary arterioles. Comparisons of PAH-susceptible and PAH-resistant broilers do not consistently reveal differences in cardiac output, but PAH-susceptible broilers consistently have higher pulmonary arterial pressures and pulmonary vascular resistances compared with PAH-resistant broilers. Efforts clarify the causes of excessive pulmonary vascular resistance have focused on evaluating the roles of chemical mediators of vasoconstriction and vasodilation, as well as on pathological (structural) changes occurring within the pulmonary arterioles (e.g., vascular remodeling and pathology) during the pathogenesis of PAH. The objectives of this review are to (1) summarize the pathophysiological progression initiated by the onset of pulmonary hypertension and culminating in terminal ascites; (2) review recent information regarding the factors contributing to excessively elevated resistance to blood flow through the lungs; (3) assess the role of the immune system during the pathogenesis of PAH; and (4) present new insights into the genetic basis of PAH. The cumulative evidence attributes the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance in PAH-susceptible broilers to an anatomically inadequate pulmonary vascular capacity, to excessive vascular tone reflecting the dominance of pulmonary vasoconstrictors over vasodilators, and to vascular pathology elicited by excessive hemodynamic stress. Emerging evidence also demonstrates that the pathogenesis of PAH includes characteristics of an inflammatory/autoimmune disease involving multifactorial genetic, environmental, and immune system components. Pulmonary

  4. REACTIVE OXYGEN AND NITROGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Tabima, Diana M.; Frizzell, Sheila; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease can be defined as either a disease affecting the pulmonary capillaries and pulmonary arterioles, termed pulmonary arterial hypertension, or as a disease affecting the left ventricle, called pulmonary venous hypertension. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder of the pulmonary circulation characterized by endothelial dysfunction, as well as intimal and smooth muscle proliferation. Progressive increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure impair the performance of the right ventricle, resulting in declining cardiac output, reduced exercise capacity, right heart failure, and ultimately death. While the primary and heritable forms of the disease are thought to affect over 5,000 patients in the U.S., the disease can occur secondary to congenital heart disease, most advanced lung diseases, and many systemic diseases. Multiple studies implicate oxidative stress in the development of PAH. Further, this oxidative stress has been shown to be associated with alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathways, whereby bioavailable NO is decreased and ROS and RNS production are increased. Many canonical ROS and NO signaling pathways are simultaneously disrupted in PAH, with increased expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases and xanthine oxidoreductase, uncoupling of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), and reduction in mitochondrial number, as well as impaired mitochondrial function. Upstream dysregulation of ROS/NO redox homeostasis impairs vascular tone and contributes to the pathological activation of anti-apoptotic and mitogenic pathways, leading to cell proliferation and obliteration of the vasculature. This manuscript will review the available data regarding the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension, and provide a description of targeted therapies

  5. Endothelin receptor antagonists in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, David

    2007-03-01

    The recognition that endothelin-1 contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to the development of clinically useful endothelin receptor antagonists that improve symptoms and functional capacity and alter the natural history of the disease in a beneficial way. The antagonists have varying degrees of selectivity for the two classes of endothelin receptor, termed ETA and ETB, and the varying degrees may translate into clinical differences. Endothelin receptor antagonists have become an integral part of therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the indications for their use are expanding. PMID:17338931

  6. Special Situations in Pulmonary Hypertension: Pregnancy and Right Ventricular Failure.

    PubMed

    Svetlichnaya, Jana; Janmohammed, Munir; De Marco, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Despite rapid advances in medical therapy, pregnancy and right ventricular (RV) failure predicts a poor prognosis in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Evidence-based therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension should be initiated early in the disease course to decrease RV wall stress and prevent RV remodeling and fibrosis. In patients with acutely decompensated RV failure, an aggressive and multifaceted approach must be used; a thorough search for triggering factors for the decompensation is a key part of the successful management strategy. Patients with refractory RV failure who are not candidates for surgical intervention should be referred to palliative care to maximize quality of life and symptom relief. PMID:27443142

  7. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by a persistent elevation of pulmonary artery pressure accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). The current treatment for pulmonary hypertension is limited and only provides symptomatic relief due to unknown etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. Both vasoconstriction and structural remodeling (enhanced proliferation of VSMC) of the pulmonary arteries contribute to the progressive course of PAH, irrespective of different underlying causes. The exact molecular mechanism of PAH, however, is not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to provide recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of PAH. Specifically, this review focuses on nitric oxide (NO), oxidative stress and inflammation and how these factors contribute to the development and progression of PAH. This review also discusses recent and potential therapeutic advancements for the treatment of PAH. PMID:20051913

  8. Recent Strategies in Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Flora

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterized by an elevation in pulmonary artery pressure that can lead to right ventricular failure and death. The pulmonary circulation has to accommodate the entire cardiac output in each cardiac cycle and evolution has adapted to this by making it a low-pressure high-flow system. However, pathology can affect both the arterial and venous components of this system. Pulmonary venous hypertension mainly refers to diseases that result in elevated venous pressure and occurs mainly from mitral valve and left-sided heart disease. Standard treatment options include oral anticoagulation, diuretics, oxygen supplementation, and for a small percentage of patients, calcium channel blockers. Newer treatments include prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antago¬nists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. This article reviews the current treatments strategies for PAH and provides guidelines for its management. PMID:25946920

  9. Type 1 neurofibromatosis and pulmonary hypertension: a report of two cases and a review

    PubMed Central

    Malviya, Amit; Mishra, Sundeep; Kothari, Shyam S

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in type 1 neurofibromatosis is not well known and was previously attributed to diffuse fibrosing alveolitis and parenchymal tumours. More recently, cases of severe pulmonary hypertension due to pulmonary vasculopathy have been described. Involvement of vascular beds, both large and medium calibre vessels, but not pulmonary vasculature, in type 1 neurofibromatosis is well known. The authors describe two such cases and briefly review the literature. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in neurofibromatosis warrants further studies. PMID:27326022

  10. Computer-assisted diagnostic tool to quantify the pulmonary veins in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Pamulapati, Vivek; Alam, Shoaib; Mehari, Alem; Kato, Gregory J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common cause of death among patients with sickle cell disease. This study investigates the use of pulmonary vein analysis to assist the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension non-invasively with CT-Angiography images. The characterization of the pulmonary veins from CT presents two main challenges. Firstly, the number of pulmonary veins is unknown a priori and secondly, the contrast material is degraded when reaching the pulmonary veins, making the edges of these vessels to appear faint. Each image is first denoised and a fast marching approach is used to segment the left atrium and pulmonary veins. Afterward, a geodesic active contour is employed to isolate the left atrium. A thinning technique is then used to extract the skeleton of the atrium and the veins. The locations of the pulmonary veins ostia are determined by the intersection of the skeleton and the contour of the atrium. The diameters of the pulmonary veins are measured in each vein at fixed distances from the corresponding ostium, and for each distance, the sum of the diameters of all the veins is computed. These indicators are shown to be significantly larger in sickle-cell patients with pulmonary hypertension as compared to controls (p-values < 0.01).

  11. The Flavonoid Quercetin Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Enrique; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Barreira, Bianca; Galindo, Pilar; Pandolfi, Rachele; Jimenez, Rosario; Moreno, Laura; Cogolludo, Angel; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin is a dietary flavonoid which exerts vasodilator, antiplatelet and antiproliferative effects and reduces blood pressure, oxidative status and end-organ damage in humans and animal models of systemic hypertension. We hypothesized that oral quercetin treatment might be protective in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Three weeks after injection of monocrotaline, quercetin (10 mg/kg/d per os) or vehicle was administered for 10 days to adult Wistar rats. Quercetin significantly reduced mortality. In surviving animals, quercetin decreased pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and muscularization of small pulmonary arteries. Classic biomarkers of pulmonary arterial hypertension such as the downregulated expression of lung BMPR2, Kv1.5, Kv2.1, upregulated survivin, endothelial dysfunction and hyperresponsiveness to 5-HT were unaffected by quercetin. Quercetin significantly restored the decrease in Kv currents, the upregulation of 5-HT2A receptors and reduced the Akt and S6 phosphorylation. In vitro, quercetin induced pulmonary artery vasodilator effects, inhibited pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, quercetin is partially protective in this rat model of PAH. It delayed mortality by lowering PAP, RVH and vascular remodeling. Quercetin exerted effective vasodilator effects in isolated PA, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in PASMCs. These effects were associated with decreased 5-HT2A receptor expression and Akt and S6 phosphorylation and partially restored Kv currents. Therefore, quercetin could be useful in the treatment of PAH. PMID:25460361

  12. Transcatheter Embolization of Pulmonary Artery False Aneurysm Associated with Primary Pulmonary Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, T. Kanazawa, S.; Mimura, H.; Yasui, K.; Okumura, Y.; Dendo, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Takahara, M.; Hiraki, Y.

    2004-03-15

    A 29-year-old woman with primary pulmonary hypertension presented with recurrent hemoptysis. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest demonstrated the enhanced mass surrounded by consolidation related to parenchymal hemorrhage. Pulmonary angiography suggested that the mass was a pulmonary artery false aneurysm. After a microcatheter was superselectively inserted into the parent artery of the falseaneurysm, the false aneurysm was successfully treated by transcatheterembolization with coils. Her hemoptysis has never recurred.

  13. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts Treated with Transcatheter Embolization and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Sato, Haruka; Miura, Masanobu; Yaoita, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Saori; Tatebe, Shunsuke; Aoki, Tatsuo; Satoh, Kimio; Ota, Hideki; Takase, Kei; Sugimura, Koichiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary abnormalities are often present in patients with liver diseases. We herein report a case of congenital portosystemic shunts complicated by hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH). A 57-year-old woman complained of dyspnea and was subsequently diagnosed with HPS and PoPH caused by congenital portosystemic shunts. Although shunt closure by transcatheter embolization was successfully performed, her dyspnea worsened and pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance elevated. Conventional vasodilator therapy was started, resulting in an improvement of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In some patients with congenital portosystemic shunts, shunt closure could exacerbate PH, and vasodilator therapy may be effective. PMID:27580545

  14. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yon K; Chung, Lorinda

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vascular remodeling of pulmonary arterioles that leads to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right heart failure, and death. It is associated with connective tissue diseases, including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and mixed connective tissue disease. PAH is characterized by dyspnea on exertion and fatigue. Syncopal events suggest severe disease. Patients may present with signs of right heart failure. One- and 3-year survival rates are approximately 81% and 52%, respectively. Given the high prevalence and mortality, algorithms for screening are currently under investigation and will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. PMID:25836644

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus: report of four cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, H.D.; Kramer, N.

    1981-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has been reported rarely in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). During the past 31/2 yr we have observed pulmonary hypertension as a major clinical manifestation of their disease in four of 43 patients with well-documented SLE followed at out institution. Pulmonary hypertension could be attributed to underlying lung disease in three and was considered to be primary in the remaining patient. Neither hydralazine nor prednisone administration had any effect on the course of the pulmonary hypertension in these patients. The presence of pulmonary hypertension in the course of active SLE may be more common than previously recognized.

  16. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    PubMed

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  17. A Novel Vascular Homing Peptide Strategy to Selectively Enhance Pulmonary Drug Efficacy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Michie; Alzoubi, Abdallah; O’Neill, Kealan; Abe, Kohtaro; Urakami, Takeo; Komatsu, Masanobu; Alvarez, Diego; Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Mann, David; Ruoslahti, Erkki; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Oka, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation in the pharmacological treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the lack of pulmonary vascular selectivity. Recent studies have identified a tissue-penetrating homing peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically homes to hypertensive pulmonary arteries but not to normal pulmonary vessels or other tissues. Some tissue-penetrating vascular homing peptides have a unique ability to facilitate transport of co-administered drugs into the targeted cells/tissues without requiring physical conjugation of the drug to the peptide (bystander effect). We tested the hypothesis that co-administered CAR would selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular effects of i.v. vasodilators in Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia-exposed PAH rats. Systemically administered CAR was predominantly detected in cells of remodeled pulmonary arteries. Intravenously co-administered CAR enhanced pulmonary, but not systemic, effects of the vasodilators, fasudil and imatinib, in PAH rats. CAR increased lung tissue imatinib concentration in isolated PAH lungs without increasing pulmonary vascular permeability. Sublingual CAR was also effective in selectively enhancing the pulmonary vasodilation by imatinib and sildenafil. Our results suggest a new paradigm in the treatment of PAH, using an i.v./sublingual tissue-penetrating homing peptide to selectively augment pulmonary vascular effects of nonselective drugs without the potentially problematic conjugation process. CAR may be particularly useful as an add-on therapy to selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular efficacy of any ongoing drug treatment in patients with PAH. PMID:24401613

  18. A novel vascular homing peptide strategy to selectively enhance pulmonary drug efficacy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Toba, Michie; Alzoubi, Abdallah; O'Neill, Kealan; Abe, Kohtaro; Urakami, Takeo; Komatsu, Masanobu; Alvarez, Diego; Järvinen, Tero A H; Mann, David; Ruoslahti, Erkki; McMurtry, Ivan F; Oka, Masahiko

    2014-02-01

    A major limitation in the pharmacological treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the lack of pulmonary vascular selectivity. Recent studies have identified a tissue-penetrating homing peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically homes to hypertensive pulmonary arteries but not to normal pulmonary vessels or other tissues. Some tissue-penetrating vascular homing peptides have a unique ability to facilitate transport of co-administered drugs into the targeted cells/tissues without requiring physical conjugation of the drug to the peptide (bystander effect). We tested the hypothesis that co-administered CAR would selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular effects of i.v. vasodilators in Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia-exposed PAH rats. Systemically administered CAR was predominantly detected in cells of remodeled pulmonary arteries. Intravenously co-administered CAR enhanced pulmonary, but not systemic, effects of the vasodilators, fasudil and imatinib, in PAH rats. CAR increased lung tissue imatinib concentration in isolated PAH lungs without increasing pulmonary vascular permeability. Sublingual CAR was also effective in selectively enhancing the pulmonary vasodilation by imatinib and sildenafil. Our results suggest a new paradigm in the treatment of PAH, using an i.v./sublingual tissue-penetrating homing peptide to selectively augment pulmonary vascular effects of nonselective drugs without the potentially problematic conjugation process. CAR may be particularly useful as an add-on therapy to selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular efficacy of any ongoing drug treatment in patients with PAH. PMID:24401613

  19. The emerging role of epigenetics in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gamen, Elisabetta; Seeger, Werner; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetics is usually defined as the study of changes in phenotype and gene expression not related to sequence alterations, but rather the chemical modifications of DNA and of its associated chromatin proteins. These modifications can be acquired de novo, being inherited, and represent the way in which genome and environment interact. Recent evidence points to the involvement of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension, as they can partly explain how environmental and lifestyle factors can impose susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension and can explain the phenotypic alteration and maintenance of the disease state.In this article, we review the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are mediated by DNA methylation, the post-translational modifications of histone tails and noncoding RNAs in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, pharmacological interventions aimed at epigenetic regulators/modifiers and their outcomes in different cellular and preclinical rodent models are discussed. Lastly, the remaining challenges and future directions in which to explore epigenetic-based therapies in pulmonary hypertension are discussed. PMID:27492834

  20. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  1. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sweiss, Nadera J.; Hushaw, Linda; Thenappan, Thenappan; Sawaqed, Ray; Machado, Roberto F.; Patel, Amit R.; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Husain, Aliya N.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) can develop pulmonary hypertension (PH; mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg) caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), left ventricular disease, or pulmonary fibrosis. PAH is a pulmonary vascular disease, the diagnosis of which requires pulmonary capillary wedge pressure less than 15 mm Hg, pulmonary vascular resistance greater than 3 Wood Units, and exclusion of thromboembolism and parenchymal lung disease. Molecular mechanisms underlying PAH-SSc include activation of inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways in the vasculature and right ventricle. Circulating autoantibodies trigger endothelial damage and fibroblast activation. PAH most commonly occurs as a late complication in patients with limited cutaneous disease and anticentromere antibodies. Although echocardiography is a useful screening tool, heart catheterization is required to diagnose PAH before initiating therapy. Prognosis and therapeutic response are worse in PAH-SSc than in other PAH categories (median survival, 1–3 y). Approved therapies include prostacyclins, endothelin antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Research is needed to define disease mechanisms and develop effective therapies. PMID:20425528

  3. Statement on pregnancy in pulmonary hypertension from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, David G.; Cockrill, Barbara A.; Safdar, Zeenat; Wilson, Victoria J.; Al Hazmi, Manal; Preston, Ioana R.; MacLean, Mandy R.; Lahm, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy outcomes in patients with pulmonary hypertension remain poor despite advanced therapies. Although consensus guidelines recommend against pregnancy in pulmonary hypertension, it may nonetheless occasionally occur. This guideline document sought to discuss the state of knowledge of pregnancy effects on pulmonary vascular disease and to define usual practice in avoidance of pregnancy and pregnancy management. This guideline is based on systematic review of peer-reviewed, published literature identified with MEDLINE. The strength of the literature was graded, and when it was inadequate to support high-level recommendations, consensus-based recommendations were formed according to prespecified criteria. There was no literature that met standards for high-level recommendations for pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension. We drafted 38 consensus-based recommendations on pregnancy avoidance and management. Further, we identified the current state of knowledge on the effects of sex hormones during pregnancy on the pulmonary vasculature and right heart and suggested areas for future study. There is currently limited evidence-based knowledge about both the basic molecular effects of sex hormones and pregnancy on the pulmonary vasculature and the best practices in contraception and pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension. We have drafted 38 consensus-based recommendations to guide clinicians in these challenging topics, but further research is needed in this area to define best practices and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26401246

  4. Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linguraru, Marius George; Mukherjee, Nisha; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Machado, Roberto F.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a known complication associated with sickle-cell disease; roughly 75% of sickle cell disease-afflicted patients have pulmonary arterial hypertension at the time of death. This prospective study investigates the potential of image analysis to act as a surrogate for presence and extent of disease, and whether the size change of the pulmonary arteries of sickle cell patients could be linked to sickle-cell associated pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary CT-Angiography scans from sickle-cell patients were obtained and retrospectively analyzed. Randomly selected pulmonary CT-Angiography studies from patients without sickle-cell anemia were used as negative controls. First, images were smoothed using anisotropic diffusion. Then, a combination of fast marching and geodesic active contours level sets were employed to segment the pulmonary artery. An algorithm based on fast marching methods was used to compute the centerline of the segmented arteries. From the centerline, the diameters at the pulmonary trunk and first branch of the pulmonary arteries were measured automatically. Arterial diameters were normalized to the width of the thoracic cavity, patient weight and body surface. Results show that the pulmonary trunk and first right and left pulmonary arterial branches at the pulmonary trunk junction are significantly larger in diameter with increased blood flow in sickle-cell anemia patients as compared to controls (p values of 0.0278 for trunk and 0.0007 for branches). CT with image processing shows great potential as a surrogate indicator of pulmonary hemodynamics or response to therapy, which could be an important tool for drug discovery and noninvasive clinical surveillance.

  5. Mycophenolate mofetil attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Takahashi, Masafumi . E-mail: masafumi@sch.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Morimoto, Hajime; Izawa, Atsushi; Ise, Hirohiko; Hongo, Minoru; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Ito, Takayuki; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Uichi

    2006-10-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), leading to occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, and death. We investigated whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a potent immunosuppresssant, prevents the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH in rats. MMF effectively decreased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, and reduced the medial thickness of pulmonary arteries. MMF significantly inhibited the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, infiltration of macrophages, and expression of P-selectin and interleukin-6 on the endothelium of pulmonary arteries. The infiltration of T cells and mast cells was not affected by MMF. In vitro experiments revealed that mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active metabolite of MMF, dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of human pulmonary arterial SMCs. MMF attenuated the development of PAH through its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. These findings provide new insight into the potential role of immunosuppressants in the treatment of PAH.

  6. Initial experience with Tadalafil in Pediatric Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Calderbank, Michelle; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Our objective was to investigate the safety, tolerability, and effects of tadalafil in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension after transition from sildenafil or receiving tadalafil as initial therapy. Thirty three pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty nine of 33 patients were switched from sildenafil to tadalafil. The main reason for changing from sildenafil was once daily dosing. The average dose of sildenafil and tadalafil were 3.4+/−1.1 mg/kg/day and 1.0+/−0.4 mg/kg/day, respectively. In 14 of 29 patients undergoing repeat catheterization, statistically significant improvements were observed following transition from sildenafil to tadalafil, in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mmHg) (53.2+/−18.3 versus 47.4+/−13.7, p<0.05) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (unitsxm2) (12.2+/−7.0 versus 10.6+/−7.2, p<0.05). In 4 patients treated with tadalafil as initial therapy, clinical improvement was noted. Side effect profiles were similar in patients who had transitioned from sildenafil to tadalafil and included headache, nausea, myalgia, nasal congestion, flushing, and allergic reaction. Two patients discontinued tadalafil due to migraine or an allergic reaction. One patient on sildenafil had no break through syncope after transition to tadalafil. Tadalafil can be safely used in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and may prevent disease progression. PMID:22402804

  7. [Emerging therapies for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Voswinckel, Robert; Reichenberger, Frank; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner

    2005-06-01

    Besides all progress in the therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past years, there is still no cure for this devastating disease. By introducing effective and nonparenteral medications (e. g., oral endothelin receptor antagonists [ERAs], inhaled prostanoids), quality of life, exercise tolerance and prognosis of patients have substantially improved. However, applicability of these therapies can be hampered by serious side effects and/or the necessity for elaborate application techniques. Whether selective ERAs--due to their specificity for the A-type receptor--have potential benefits over the nonselective ERA bosentan remains to be answered by the analysis of pivotal trials recently carried out with ambrisentan and sitaxsentan. Inhaled treprostinil can potentially have benefits over the already approved inhaled iloprost, related to its higher pulmonary selectivity as well as to the longer biological half-life. However, this has yet to be proven in long-term randomized controlled trials. In comparison to the previously mentioned substances, the selective phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil approached approval closest as new therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Oral sildenafil has proven its efficacy as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in various forms of pulmonary hypertension. The results of the pivotal phase III trial have confirmed the strong efficacy and excellent tolerability of this substance. Combination therapies, despite all progress seen for single agents, can be regarded as the most promising therapeutic approach for the future. However, controlled randomized trials that are currently under consideration have to confirm this notion. PMID:15965806

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with hematological disorders following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Meera, V; Jijina, Farah; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2010-03-01

    Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied by Echocardiography and Doppler in 43 splenectomised patients with various disorders 1-20 years after splenectomy. PAH was detected only in thalassemia major, intermedia, hereditary sphereocytosis and myelofibrosis groups comprising a total of 21 patients. Six patients out of 21 was found to have PAH with mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 46.28 ± 28.17 mmHg. Twenty one controls having similar duration and type of disease also were assessed for PAH in this case control study 3/21 had PAH in this control group. The difference in number of patients showing pulmonary hypertension between case and control was not statistically significant (chi-square test p = 0.29-though the difference in pulmonary arterial pressure between case and control were significantly different (t-test p<0.0029) with control group showing a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 ± 19 mmHg.Platelet count in the splenectomised group was significantly higher (p = 0.0029) than the controls. Pulmonary thromboembolism was equally high in the PAH patients with and without splenectomy. Patients undergoing splenectomy due to trauma, immune thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, extra hepatic portal hypertension, autoimmune hemolytic anemia did not show PAH after splenectomy even years after the procedure PAH following splenectomy is common after certain disorders and control patients with these diseases have tendency to develop PAH even without splenectomy. Pulmonary thromboembolism may be an important pathophysiological mechanism leading to this condition. Patients having hemolytic anemia and myelofibrosis should have regular evaluation of pulmonary arterial pressure whether he/she has been splenectomised or not. This is particularly important as availability of phosphodiesterase inhibitors like sildenafil allows one to manage these cases. PMID:23100991

  9. Pulmonary hypertension during acute respiratory diseases in infants

    PubMed Central

    Bardi-Peti, Luiza; Ciofu, Eugen Pascal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives:The study was undertaken to assess whether previously healthy infants with acute respiratory diseases develop elevated pulmonary artery pressures and to identify which type of disease is associated with pulmonary hypertension. Material and Methods:We performed 2D and Doppler echocardiography in 137 infants, aged between 1 and 12 month, from November 2007 to December 2009. 75 infants had acute respiratory diseases (49 bronchiolitis, 16 interstitial pneumonia, 3 bronchopneumonia, 6 episodic wheezing, 1 lobar pneumonia) and 62 were in the control group. We excluded children with congenital heart diseases and other conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension. The method of time to peak velocity corrected for heart rate was used to estimate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We analysed 2 age-subgroups: 1-2 months and 2-12 months. A Student’s t-test for independent samples was used to compare the mean values of variables. Outcomes:Increased mean pulmonary pressures (>25mmHg) were measured in 18 infants with respiratory diseases, with the next distribution: 14 bronchiolitis, 2 bronchopneumonia, 1 episodic wheezing, 1 interstitial pneumonia. The values were categorized as mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mean PAP were significantly increased in subjects with clinically bronchoobstructive disease (bronchiolitis, episodic wheezing, bronchopneumonia) vs. control (p=0.05 in first age-subgroup and<0.001 in second age-subgroup). In infants with bronchoobstructive disease hospitalization was significantly longer in patients with pulmonary hypertension vs. normal PAP (p= 0.04 in first age-subgroup and 0.005 in second age-subgroup). In patients with bronchoobstructive diseases, mean PAPm and PAPs were significantly increased in subjects with a moderate/severe episode of wheezing at admission vs. a mild episode (p=0.02). Mean PAPm and PAPs were increased in subjects with interstitial pneumonia vs. control, but without statistic significance

  10. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, M R; Wharton, J; Grimminger, F; Ghofrani, H A

    2008-07-01

    The pulmonary vascular bed is both a source of and target for a number of vasoactive factors. Among the most important for pulmonary vascular homeostasis are factors that utilise cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as an intracellular second messenger. These include nitric oxide and the natriuretic peptide family (atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides). In the search for therapeutic strategies that engage the cGMP signalling pathway for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), inhibition of cGMP metabolism by phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5)-targeted compounds has proven most successful to date. One PDE5 inhibitor, sildenafil, has been shown to improve pulmonary haemodynamics and exercise capacity in patients with PAH and is now an approved treatment. Others are under investigation. An interesting, although still tentative, observation is the potential of sildenafil to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance without adversely affecting ventilation-perfusion matching. Another is the expression of phosphodiesterase type 5 in the hypertrophied right ventricle. These data suggest that phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors may have effects that distinguish them from other treatments for pulmonary hypertension and merit further study. PMID:18591337

  11. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  12. Diagnostic advances and opportunities in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    D'Armini, Andrea M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterised by the presence of thromboembolic material in the pulmonary circulation, and patients have a poor prognosis without treatment. Patients present with nonspecific symptoms, such as breathlessness and syncope, which means that other more common conditions are sometimes suspected before CTEPH, leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. This is problematic because CTEPH is potentially curable with surgical pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA); indeed, CTEPH should always be considered in any patient with unexplained pulmonary hypertension (PH). Several key evaluations are necessary and complementary to confirm a diagnosis of CTEPH and assess operability. Echocardiography is initially used to confirm a general diagnosis of PH. Ventilation/perfusion scanning is then essential in the first stage of CTEPH diagnosis, with a wedge-shaped perfusion deficit indicative of CTEPH. This should be followed by right heart catheterisation (RHC) which is mandatory in confirming the diagnosis and providing haemodynamic parameters that are key predictors of the risk associated with PEA and subsequent prognosis. RHC is ideally coupled with conventional pulmonary angiography, the gold-standard technique for confirming the location and extent of disease, and thus whether the obstruction is surgically accessible. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is also now routinely used as a complementary technique to aid diagnosis and operability assessment. Recent improvements in the resolution of other noninvasive techniques, such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, allow for detailed reconstructions of the vascular tree and imaging of vessel defects, and interest in their use is increasing. PMID:26028637

  13. High Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension-Causing Gene Mutation in Chinese Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Qunying; Liu, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhihui; Luo, Qin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is unknown. Histopathologic studies revealed that pulmonary vasculature lesions similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) existed in CTEPH patients as well. It’s well-known that genetic predisposition plays an important role in the mechanism of PAH. So we hypothesized that PAH-causing gene mutation might exist in some CTEPH patients and act as a background to facilitate the development of CTEPH. In this study, we analyzed 7 PAH-causing genes including BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, KCNK3, and CBLN2 in 49 CTEPH patients and 17 patients recovered from pulmonary embolism (PE) but without pulmonary hypertension(PH). The results showed that the nonsynonymous mutation rate in CTEPH patients is significantly higher than that in PE without PH patients (25 out of 49 (51%) CTEPH patients vs. 3 out of 17 PE without PH patients (18%); p = 0.022). Four CTEPH patients had the same point mutation in ACVRL1 exon 10 (c.1450C>G), a mutation approved to be associated with PH in a previous study. In addition, we identified two CTEPH associated SNPs (rs3739817 and rs55805125). Our results suggest that PAH-causing gene mutation might play an important role in the development of CTEPH. PMID:26820968

  14. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Schistosomiasis and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Butrous, Ghazwan

    2014-07-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by infection with the parasite Schistosoma, which is a flat-worm or fluke. The dominant species are Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum, and Schistosoma haematobium. Schistosomiasis is the third most common parasitic disease in the world after malaria and amoebiasis. It is endemic in more than 70 countries affecting about 200 million people worldwide, of whom 80% are in sub-Saharan Africa. There are pockets of infection in north-eastern Brazil, near the Yangtze River in China, and some pockets in south East Asia. In the East Mediterranean regions, the Schistosoma have been reported in Iraq and Egypt as well as in Sudan. The latter has the highest infection rate nowadays, particularly in the Al Jazeera area, due to the poor Schistosoma control program. In the Arabian peninsula, schistosomiasis has been reported in southwest part of Saudi Arabia, mainly in the Asir province and Jizan province, which lay in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia and directly north of the border with Yemen. The efforts to control schistosomiasis have been very successful in Saudi Arabia due to the irrigation system control. However, the infection is prone in Yemen, where the schistosomiasis control is much less strict. Thus as a result, the problem still exists due to transmigration of the populations from both countries. As a cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), schistosomiasis is still under diagnosed and undertreated. This article with give a highlight about the pathophysiology of the disease and both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25076995

  15. Diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension from radiographic estimates of pulmonary arterial size.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, A; Gray, H; Denison, D M

    1988-01-01

    The reported accuracy of radiographic measurements in predicting pulmonary hypertension is very variable. Measurements of right and left descending pulmonary artery diameter have been reported to provide a correct diagnosis in as many as 98% of patients. A study was carried out to determine the predictive value of measurements made from the chest radiographs of 50 normal subjects and of 27 patients undergoing right heart catheterisation for cardiac or pulmonary vascular disease, taking account of radiographic magnification. After such corrections a right descending pulmonary artery diameter over 16.7 mm or a left descending pulmonary artery diameter of over 16.9 mm distinguished 12 of 23 pulmonary hypertensive subjects, with no false positive results. The diameter was then arbitrarily squared (any differences between patients and control subjects being exaggerated) and the product was divided by either predicted or actual lung volume in an attempt to correct for body size. The new index distinguished 19 of 23 patients with pulmonary hypertension, with one false positive, when the divisor was actual lung volume; when predicted lung volume was used 18 of 23 patients were distinguished, again with one false positive result. PMID:3353884

  16. Estradiol improves pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling in perinatal pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Parker, T A; Ivy, D D; Galan, H L; Grover, T R; Kinsella, J P; Abman, S H

    2000-02-01

    Partial ligation of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in the fetal lamb causes sustained elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and hypertensive structural changes in small pulmonary arteries, providing an animal model for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Based on its vasodilator and antimitogenic properties in other experimental studies, we hypothesized that estradiol (E(2)) would attenuate the pulmonary vascular structural and hemodynamic changes caused by pulmonary hypertension in utero. To test our hypothesis, we treated chronically instrumented fetal lambs (128 days, term = 147 days) with daily infusions of E(2) (10 microg; E(2) group, n = 6) or saline (control group, n = 5) after partial ligation of the DA. We measured intrauterine pulmonary and systemic artery pressures in both groups throughout the study period. After 8 days, we delivered the study animals by cesarean section to measure their hemodynamic responses to birth-related stimuli. Although pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures were not different in utero, fetal PVR immediately before ventilation was reduced in the E(2)-treated group (2.43 +/- 0.79 vs. 1.48 +/- 0.26 mmHg. ml(-1). min, control vs. E(2), P < 0.05). During the subsequent delivery study, PVR was lower in the E(2)-treated group in response to ventilation with hypoxic gas but was not different between groups with ventilation with 100% O(2). During mechanical ventilation after delivery, arterial partial O(2) pressure was higher in E(2) animals than controls (41 +/- 11 vs. 80 +/- 35 Torr, control vs. E(2), P < 0. 05). Morphometric studies of hypertensive vascular changes revealed that E(2) treatment decreased wall thickness of small pulmonary arteries (59 +/- 1 vs. 48 +/- 1%, control vs. E(2), P < 0.01). We conclude that chronic E(2) treatment in utero attenuates the pulmonary hemodynamic and histological changes caused by DA ligation in fetal lambs. PMID:10666122

  17. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Systemic Sclerosis Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tedford, Ryan J.; Mudd, James O.; Girgis, Reda E.; Mathai, Stephen C.; Zaiman, Ari L.; Housten-Harris, Traci; Boyce, Danielle; Kelemen, Benjamin W.; Bacher, Anita C.; Shah, Ami A.; Hummers, Laura K.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Russell, Stuart D.; Saggar, Rajeev; Saggar, Rajan; Maughan, W. Lowell; Hassoun, Paul M.; Kass, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis associated pulmonary artery hypertension (SScPAH) has a worse prognosis compared to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), with a median survival of 3 years after diagnosis often due to right ventricular (RV) failure. We tested if SScPAH or systemic sclerosis related pulmonary hypertension with interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD-PH) imposes a greater pulmonary vascular load than IPAH and/or leads to worse RV contractile function. Methods and Results We analyzed pulmonary artery pressures and mean flow in 282 patients with pulmonary hypertension (166 SScPAH, 49 SSc-ILD-PH, 67 IPAH). An inverse relation between pulmonary resistance (RPA) and compliance (CPA) was similar for all three groups, with a near constant resistance × compliance product. RV pressure-volume loops were measured in a subset, IPAH (n=5) and SScPAH (n=7) as well as SSc without PH (SSc-no-PH, n=7) to derive contractile indexes (end-systolic elastance [Ees] and preload recruitable stroke work [Msw]), measures of right ventricular load (arterial elastance [Ea]), and RV-pulmonary artery coupling (Ees/Ea). RV afterload was similar in SScPAH and IPAH (RPA=7.0±4.5 vs. 7.9±4.3 Wood units; Ea=0.9±0.4 vs. 1.2±0.5 mmHg/mL; CPA=2.4±1.5 vs. 1.7±1.1 mL/mmHg; p>0.3 for each). Though SScPAH did not have greater vascular stiffening compared to IPAH, RV contractility was more depressed (Ees=0.8±0.3 vs. 2.3±1.1, p<0.01; Msw=21±11 vs. 45±16, p=0.01), with differential RV-PA uncoupling (Ees/Ea=1.0±0.5 vs. 2.1±1.0, p=.03). This ratio was higher in SSc-no-PH (Ees/Ea = 2.3±1.2, p=0.02 vs. SScPAH). Conclusions RV dysfunction is worse in SScPAH compared to IPAH at similar afterload, and may be due to intrinsic systolic function rather than enhanced pulmonary vascular resistive and/or pulsatile loading. PMID:23797369

  18. [A case of systemic scleroderma complicating pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Rumiko; Umebayashi, Hiroaki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Katakura, Shigeki; Mori, Masaaki; Aihara, Yuhkoh; Yokota, Shumpei

    2006-12-01

    The patient was a 7-year-old girl. At the age of 6, deposits of pigment had appeared on the skin of her face and limbs, the skin had become sclerosed, and she had developed dyspnea on exertion. Her previous physician had hospitalized her. She was diagnosed as systemic scleroderma that accompanied pulmonary hypertension by her symptoms and laboratory findings. She was referred to our hospital at 7 years of age, and she was hospitalized. At that time, the entire skin showed deposition of brown pigment, the skin of the limbs was sclerotic. And the face was mask-like, flexion of the joints of the fingers and knees was limited, and the fingertips were ulcerated. Raynaud's phenomenon was present. She was positive for antinuclear antibodies, and negative for other autoantibodies. Echocardiography revealed pulmonary hypertension. After admission, steroid pulse therapy and cyclophosphamide (CY) pulse therapy were initiated, and for aftercare, 15 mg/day of prednisolone (PSL) and mizolibin (MZB) were administered orally. After several months, the sclerosis of the skin improved and the restriction of limb flexion was almost eliminated. The pulmonary hypertension advanced temporarily (maximum: 70 mmHg), but after oral administration of a PGI2 preparation and low-flow supplemental oxygen therapy and the initiation of anticoagulant therapy, the systolic pressure of the pulmonary artery improved to 34 mmHg. The CY pulse therapy was terminated after two years, and internal use of PSL and MZB was continued. The patient's condition is now stable. This case was treated from an early stage with steroid pulse therapy and CY pulse therapy, accompanied with oral administration of a PGI2 preparation for the pulmonary hypertension. The dermal symptoms improved, and it was possible to maintain a state of remission. PMID:17202755

  19. Quality of life among pulmonary hypertension patients in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Merja; Puhakka, Airi; Halme, Maija

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to examine pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients’ quality of life (QOL) for the first time in Finland. Methods This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study. The SF-36v2 questionnaire was sent to the PH patients who had been referred to or followed up on at the Helsinki University Central Hospital's pulmonary clinic for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (APAH), or chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH). The patients were on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) – specific drugs, were at least 18 years old, and had signed an informed consent. Results There were 62 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and 53% of respondents rated their health as moderate. Similarly, 55% of respondents rated their health status approximately the same compared to their situation 1 year ago. QOL was impaired in all other subscales, except for the mental health and mental component score. A majority of patients suffered from PH symptoms, which worsened their QOL. The greatest impact on their QOL was associated with a high World Health Organization (WHO) functional class (FC), poor performance in a 6-min walking test (6MWT), symptoms, oxygen therapy, elevated pro-brain natriuretic peptide, pericardial effusion, APAH etiology, and being retired from work. Conclusions The respondents had a reduced QOL, compared to the general population, in all other subscales, except for mental health. APAH patients had the worst QOL. Good results in functional capacity measures (WHO FC, 6MWT) were associated with a better QOL. Patients’ QOL can be improved by reducing the symptoms of PAH. PMID:26787306

  20. Prevalence of coronary artery-pulmonary artery collaterals in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Noel S; Blanchard, Daniel G; Knowlton, Kirk U; McDivit, Anna M; Pretorius, Victor; Madani, Michael M; Fedullo, Peter F; Kerr, Kim M; Kim, Nick H; Poch, David S; Auger, William R; Daniels, Lori B

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of coronary artery-pulmonary artery collaterals in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and to correlate their presence with the degree of clot burden. CTEPH is a treatable cause of severe pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. Bronchopulmonary collateral vessels have been used as a supplementary diagnostic and prognostic tool for this disease. Coronary artery-pulmonary artery collaterals in this population have not been described. The coronary angiograms of 300 consecutive patients with CTEPH evaluated for pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) between January 1, 2007, and May 1, 2014, were examined. Of these patients, 259 (50% male; mean age, 58.3 ± 10.6 years) had cineangiographic images deemed adequate to definitively assess for the presence of coronary artery-pulmonary artery collaterals and were included in the final analyses. Pulmonary angiogram reports were reviewed for extent of pulmonary artery obstruction. The coronary angiograms of 259 age- and sex-matched control patients were also examined. Among 259 CTEPH patients with definitive imaging, 34 coronary artery-pulmonary artery collaterals were found in 28 patients (10.8%), versus 1 coronary artery-pulmonary artery collateral among control subjects (0.4%; P < 0.001). Compared with CTEPH patients without collaterals, patients with collaterals had a significantly higher prevalence of total occlusion of their right or left main pulmonary artery (P < 0.001) or lobar arteries (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the prevalence of coronary artery-pulmonary artery collaterals in CTEPH patients undergoing coronary angiography for possible PTE is approximately 11%. These vessels are associated with more severe pulmonary artery occlusion. PMID:26064456

  1. Prevalence of coronary artery–pulmonary artery collaterals in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Daniel G.; Knowlton, Kirk U.; McDivit, Anna M.; Pretorius, Victor; Madani, Michael M.; Fedullo, Peter F.; Kerr, Kim M.; Kim, Nick H.; Poch, David S.; Auger, William R.; Daniels, Lori B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study sought to determine the prevalence of coronary artery–pulmonary artery collaterals in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and to correlate their presence with the degree of clot burden. CTEPH is a treatable cause of severe pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. Bronchopulmonary collateral vessels have been used as a supplementary diagnostic and prognostic tool for this disease. Coronary artery–pulmonary artery collaterals in this population have not been described. The coronary angiograms of 300 consecutive patients with CTEPH evaluated for pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) between January 1, 2007, and May 1, 2014, were examined. Of these patients, 259 (50% male; mean age, 58.3 ± 10.6 years) had cineangiographic images deemed adequate to definitively assess for the presence of coronary artery–pulmonary artery collaterals and were included in the final analyses. Pulmonary angiogram reports were reviewed for extent of pulmonary artery obstruction. The coronary angiograms of 259 age- and sex-matched control patients were also examined. Among 259 CTEPH patients with definitive imaging, 34 coronary artery–pulmonary artery collaterals were found in 28 patients (10.8%), versus 1 coronary artery–pulmonary artery collateral among control subjects (0.4%; P < 0.001). Compared with CTEPH patients without collaterals, patients with collaterals had a significantly higher prevalence of total occlusion of their right or left main pulmonary artery (P < 0.001) or lobar arteries (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the prevalence of coronary artery–pulmonary artery collaterals in CTEPH patients undergoing coronary angiography for possible PTE is approximately 11%. These vessels are associated with more severe pulmonary artery occlusion. PMID:26064456

  2. Sex-Dependent Influence of Endogenous Estrogen in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Kirsty M.; Wright, Audrey F.; Duggan, Nicholas; Rowlands, David J.; Hussey, Martin J.; Roberts, Sonia; Fullerton, Josephine; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Thomas, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension is greater in women, suggesting estrogens may play a role in the disease pathogenesis. Experimentally, in males, exogenously administered estrogen can protect against pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, in models that display female susceptibility, estrogens may play a causative role. Objectives: To clarify the influence of endogenous estrogen and sex in PH and assess the therapeutic potential of a clinically available aromatase inhibitor. Methods: We interrogated the effect of reduced endogenous estrogen in males and females using the aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, in two models of PH: the hypoxic mouse and Sugen 5416/hypoxic rat. We also determined the effects of sex on pulmonary expression of aromatase in these models and in lungs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Measurements and Main Results: Anastrozole attenuated PH in both models studied, but only in females. To verify this effect was caused by reduced estrogenic activity we confirmed that in hypoxic mice inhibition of estrogen receptor α also has a therapeutic effect specifically in females. Female rodent lung displays increased aromatase and decreased bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Id1 expression compared with male. Anastrozole treatment reversed the impaired bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 pathway in females. Increased aromatase expression was also detected in female human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells compared with male. Conclusions: The unique phenotype of female pulmonary arteries facilitates the therapeutic effects of anastrozole in experimental PH confirming a role for endogenous estrogen in the disease pathogenesis in females and suggests aromatase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. PMID:24956156

  3. Vascular and right ventricular remodelling in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Marion; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Fadel, Elie; Lang, Irene; Simonneau, Gérald; Naeije, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) increased pulmonary vascular resistance is caused by fibrotic organisation of unresolved thromboemboli. CTEPH mainly differs from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by the proximal location of pulmonary artery obliteration, although distal arteriopathy can be observed as a consequence of non-occluded area over-perfusion. Accordingly, there is proportionally more wave reflection in CTEPH, impacting on pressure and flow wave morphology. However, the time constant, i.e. resistance × compliance, is not different in CTEPH and PAH, indicating only trivial effects of proximal wave reflection on hydraulic right ventricular load. More discriminative is the analysis of the pressure decay after pulmonary arterial occlusion, which is more rapid in the absence of significant distal arteriopathy. Structure and function of the right ventricle show a similar pattern to right ventricular hypertrophy, namely dilatation and wall thickening, as well as loss of function in CTEPH and PAH. This is probably related to similar loading conditions. Hyperventilation with hypocapnia is characteristic of both PAH and CTEPH. Ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide, as a function of arterial carbon dioxide tension, conform to the alveolar ventilation equation in both conditions, indicating a predominant role of increased chemosensitivity. However, a slight increase in the arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide tension gradient in CTEPH shows a contribution of increased dead space ventilation. PMID:22903956

  4. Pulmonary vascular stiffness: measurement, modeling, and implications in normal and hypertensive pulmonary circulations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Kendall S; Lammers, Steven R; Shandas, Robin

    2011-07-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  6. Pulmonary Vascular Stiffness: Measurement, Modeling, and Implications in Normal and Hypertensive Pulmonary Circulations

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lammers, Steven R.; Shandas, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  7. Obesity and Pulmonary Hypertension: A Review of Pathophysiologic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott E.; Andrus, Bruce W.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a potentially life-threatening condition arising from a wide variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms. Effective treatment requires a systematic diagnostic approach to identify all reversible mechanisms. Many of these mechanisms are relevant to those afflicted with obesity. The unique mechanisms of PH in the obese include obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anorexigen use, cardiomyopathy of obesity, and pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Novel mechanisms of PH in the obese include endothelial dysfunction and hyperuricemia. A wide range of effective therapies exist to mitigate the disability of PH in the obese. PMID:22988490

  8. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Focus on Infused Prostacyclins.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Traci

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vasoconstriction and cell proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature. Guideline-driven interventions with infused prostacyclin treatment are the mainstay for patients with advanced symptoms. Infused prostacyclin therapy is complex. It is critical to manage prostacyclin therapy with precision because boluses or interruptions can be fatal. Education of patients and inpatient staff nurses is necessary to prevent negative outcomes. Nurses are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team caring for patients with PAH. The diagnostic evaluation and treatment of PAH are reviewed here, and challenges associated with the care of patients on prostacyclin therapy are discussed. PMID:27598071

  9. Effects of bosentan on peripheral endothelial function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Shiro; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Kamimura, Yoshihiro; Shimokata, Shigetake; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kondo, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve the prognosis of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the effect of the oral dual ERA bosentan on peripheral endothelial dysfunction (PED), as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), in patients with pulmonary hypertension is not well characterized. We investigated the effect of bosentan on PED in patients with PAH or inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). A total of 18 patients with PAH and 8 with CTEPH were treated with bosentan. All patients underwent FMD assessment before and after 3 months of bosentan treatment. Whereas FMD increased from 6.01% ± 2.42% at baseline to 8.07% ± 3.18% after 3 months (P < 0.0001) in patients with PAH, those with CTEPH showed no change in FMD after bosentan therapy. In addition, FMD at baseline showed no correlation with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.09) or plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels (r = −0.23) in patients with PAH. Bosentan treatment ameliorated PED in patients with PAH but not in those with inoperable CTEPH. In addition, FMD did not correlate with PAH severity. PMID:27252842

  10. [Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses].

    PubMed

    Onodera, S

    1992-12-01

    Alterations in the physiological balance to maintain the pulmonary circulation at a normal low pressure level result in an elevation in pulmonary vascular tone. Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses were analyzed under some experimental conditions, which included microembolism, administration of vasoactive agents, hypoxia, and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. It is widely accepted that these responses are highly localized and complex. In the present study, excised canine lung lobes, rat lungs, and pulmonary arterial rings from the rat were employed according to the particular experimental design. The mechanism of the initial rapid elevation followed by a gradual decline in perfusion pressure in microembolism was considered to be related not only to the size of the emboli, but to the degree of mechanical injury of the endothelium. The main sites of constriction of the pulmonary vasculature by several drugs were determined in the pulsatile perfused canine lung lobes, according to the degree of decrease in inflow wave amplitude during antegrade or retrograde perfusion. Further, by applying the same method it was confirmed that the site of hypoxic vasoconstriction is located in the peripheral pulmonary vascular bed between the muscular arteries and veins, which are constricted mainly by serotonin and histamine, respectively. A cross perfusion system was set up, employing two lobes from the same dog, in which normoxic blood was perfused into the hypoxic ventilated lobe and vice versa. As a result, the pulmonary vessels showed a response to ventilation hypoxia that was far more sensitive than that to perfusion hypoxia. The effects of a beta-agonist (isoproterenol) and beta-antagonists (propranolol, pindolol) on hypoxic vasoconstriction were observed. Although pindolol (a vasodilatory beta-blocker) abolished hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, which was similar to the effect of isoproterenol, the mechanism of action of pindolol was suggested to be different

  11. Therapeutic applications of sildenafil citrate in the management of paediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Leah; Matok, Ilan; Paret, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and a poor prognosis. The exact underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood; however, it is hypothesised that pulmonary medial hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction lead to impaired production of vasodilators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin, and increased expression of vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1. The current treatment modalities for pulmonary hypertension include conventional supportive therapies and more specific pharmacological therapies that are targeted at abnormalities of endothelial function. NO and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors induce pulmonary vasodilation by increasing intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) concentrations. Sildenafil citrate is a highly selective inhibitor of PDE5. Investigations in animal models and recent clinical case reports with some studies in the paediatric population suggest that sildenafil may be a promising agent in treating pulmonary hypertension. The effect of sildenafil on pulmonary vasculature appears to be independent of the underlying cause, thereby providing a role in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PAH associated with congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension secondary to lung disease or persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. It may also be beneficial in postoperative pulmonary hypertension and in neonates who are difficult to wean from inhaled NO. It is easily administered and effective, and has minimal systemic adverse effects. Although the reported results in children with pulmonary hypertension are promising, it is an experimental drug and large-scale randomised controlled studies are required to validate the safety, efficacy and dosage in the paediatric population. PMID:17209664

  12. Pulmonary artery denervation for treatment of a patient with pulmonary hypertension secondary to left heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) predicts poor outcome in patients with left heart disease. A 62-year-old man was referred for heart failure associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy. He received a diagnosis of combined postcapillary and precapillary PH secondary to left heart disease on the basis of hemodynamic parameters. After the pulmonary artery denervation procedure was performed, hemodynamic parameters were markedly improved, which resulted in a significant increase in functional capacity. PMID:27252851

  13. Analysis of Pulmonary Vasodilator Responses to SB-772077-B [4-(7-((3-Amino-1-pyrrolidinyl)carbonyl)-1-ethyl-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-amine], a Novel Aminofurazan-Based Rho Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Casey, David B.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of SB-772077-B [4-(7-((3-amino-1-pyrrolidinyl)carbonyl)-1-ethyl-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-amine], an aminofurazan-based Rho kinase inhibitor, on the pulmonary vascular bed and on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension were investigated in the rat. The intravenous injections of SB-772077-B decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when pulmonary vascular resistance was increased by U46619 [9,11-dideoxy-11α,9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α], hypoxia, or Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. SB-772077-B was more potent than Y-27632 [trans-4-[(1R)-1-aminoethyl]-N-4-pyridinyl-cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride] or fasudil [5-(1,4-diazepane-1-sulfonyl)isoquinoline] in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. The results with SB-772077-B, fasudil, and Y-27632 suggest that Rho kinase is constitutively active and is involved in the regulation of baseline tone and vasoconstrictor responses. Chronic treatment with SB-772077-B attenuated the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure induced by monocrotaline. The intravenous injection of SB-772077-B decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to SB-772077-B in monocrotaline-treated rats were smaller than responses in U46619-infused animals, and the analysis of responses suggests that approximately 60% of the pulmonary hypertensive response is mediated by a Rho kinase-sensitive mechanism. The observation that Rho kinase inhibitors decrease pulmonary arterial pressure when pulmonary vascular resistance is increased by interventions such as hypoxia, U46619, angiotensin II, nitric-oxide synthase inhibition, and Bay K 8644 [S-(-)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-[trifluoromethyl]phenyl)-3-pyridine carboxylic acid methyl ester] suggest that the

  14. Analysis of pulmonary vasodilator responses to SB-772077-B [4-(7-((3-amino-1-pyrrolidinyl)carbonyl)-1-ethyl-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-amine], a novel aminofurazan-based Rho kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Badejo, Adeleke M; Casey, David B; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2009-07-01

    The effects of SB-772077-B [4-(7-((3-amino-1-pyrrolidinyl)carbonyl)-1-ethyl-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-amine], an aminofurazan-based Rho kinase inhibitor, on the pulmonary vascular bed and on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension were investigated in the rat. The intravenous injections of SB-772077-B decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when pulmonary vascular resistance was increased by U46619 [9,11-dideoxy-11alpha,9alpha-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F(2alpha)], hypoxia, or N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. SB-772077-B was more potent than Y-27632 [trans-4-[(1R)-1-aminoethyl]-N-4-pyridinyl-cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride] or fasudil [5-(1,4-diazepane-1-sulfonyl)isoquinoline] in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. The results with SB-772077-B, fasudil, and Y-27632 suggest that Rho kinase is constitutively active and is involved in the regulation of baseline tone and vasoconstrictor responses. Chronic treatment with SB-772077-B attenuated the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure induced by monocrotaline. The intravenous injection of SB-772077-B decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to SB-772077-B in monocrotaline-treated rats were smaller than responses in U46619-infused animals, and the analysis of responses suggests that approximately 60% of the pulmonary hypertensive response is mediated by a Rho kinase-sensitive mechanism. The observation that Rho kinase inhibitors decrease pulmonary arterial pressure when pulmonary vascular resistance is increased by interventions such as hypoxia, U46619, angiotensin II, nitric-oxide synthase inhibition, and Bay K 8644 [S-(-)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-[trifluoromethyl]phenyl)-3-pyridine carboxylic acid methyl ester] suggest

  15. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Fukuda, Asami; Kusunoki, Yuji; Narato, Ritsuko; Saito, Hitoshi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is one of the leading causes of severe pulmonary hypertension. According to previously reported studies in the pertinent literature, chronic inflammatory conditions may be implicated in the development of CTEPH. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CTEPH in association with chronic infection. The patient had experienced five episodes of pneumonia in the five years prior to the diagnosis of CTEPH. Blood tests from the previous five years of outpatient follow-up demonstrated that the C-reactive protein level was slightly elevated. This case suggests that a relationship exists between chronic inflammation and CTEPH, and furthermore, may contribute towards elucidating the pathophysiology of CTEPH. PMID:27250055

  16. Tension bulla: a cause of reversible pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Michael J; Waxman, Jacob D; Forman, John M

    2015-01-01

    A tension pneumothorax represents a medical emergency warranting urgent diagnosis and treatment. A rapidly expanding bulla may resemble the same clinical presentation but requires an entirely different treatment. A 53-year-old woman presented with increasing shortness of breath and her physical examination and chest x-ray were interpreted as showing a tension pneumothorax. A chest tube was placed which did not resolve the process. Placement of a second chest tube was likewise unsuccessful. A chest CT was then performed and was interpreted as showing an unresolved tension pneumothorax, despite seemingly adequate placement of the 2 chest tubes. Further review of the CT showed the border of a giant bulla and a tentative diagnosis was made of a rapidly expanding bulla with tension physiology. Echocardiogram revealed significant pulmonary hypertension. The bulla was surgically excised, the patient had marked improvement in her clinical symptoms and signs, and echocardiographic follow-up showed complete resolution of the pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25590488

  17. High-altitude disorders: pulmonary hypertension: pulmonary vascular disease: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Pasha, M A Qadar; Newman, John H

    2010-06-01

    Globally, it is estimated that > 140 million people live at a high altitude (HA), defined as > 2,500 m (8,200 ft), and that countless others sojourn to the mountains for work, travel, and sport. The distribution of exposure to HA is worldwide, including 35 million in the Andes and > 80 million in Asia, including China and central Asia. HA stress primarily is due to the hypoxia of low atmospheric pressure, but dry air, intense solar radiation, extreme cold, and exercise contribute to acute and chronic disorders. The acute disorders are acute mountain sickness (also known as soroche), HA cerebral edema, and HA pulmonary edema (HAPE). Of these, HAPE is highly correlated with acute pulmonary hypertension. The first chronic syndrome described in HA dwellers in Peru was chronic mountain sickness (Monge disease), which has a large component of relative hypoventilation and secondary erythrocytosis. The prevalence of chronic mountain sickness in HA dwellers ranges from 1.2% in native Tibetans to 5.6% in Chinese Han; 6% to 8% in male residents of La Paz, Bolivia; and 15.6% in the Andes. Subacute mountain sickness is an exaggerated pulmonary hypertensive response to HA hypoxia occurring over months, most often in infants and very young children. Chronic pulmonary hypertension with heart failure but without hypoventilation is seen in Asia. Not only does HA pulmonary hypertension exact health consequences for the millions affected, but also the mechanisms of disease relate to pulmonary hypertension associated with multiple other disorders. Genetic understanding of these disorders is in its infancy. PMID:20522576

  18. Quality of life in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Stephen C; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Nikkho, Sylvia; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-08-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) experience debilitating symptoms that have a negative impact on their quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical capability, psychological wellbeing and social relationships. The use of QoL measurement tools is important in the assessment of treatment efficacy and in guiding treatment decisions. However, despite the importance of QoL, particularly to the patient, it remains under-reported in clinical studies of CTEPH therapy. CTEPH is unique in pulmonary hypertension in that it is potentially curable by surgery; however, a proportion of patients either have residual PH following surgery or are not operable. Although some patients with CTEPH have been treated off-label with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, there have been few randomised controlled trials of these therapies in patients with CTEPH. Moreover, in these trials QoL outcomes are variably assessed, and there is little consistency in the tools used. Here we review the assessment of QoL in patients with CTEPH and the tools that have been used. We also discuss the effect of surgical intervention and medical therapies on QoL. We conclude that further studies of QoL in patients with CTEPH are needed to further validate the optimal QoL tools. PMID:27076580

  19. Quality of life in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Nikkho, Sylvia; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) experience debilitating symptoms that have a negative impact on their quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical capability, psychological wellbeing and social relationships. The use of QoL measurement tools is important in the assessment of treatment efficacy and in guiding treatment decisions. However, despite the importance of QoL, particularly to the patient, it remains under-reported in clinical studies of CTEPH therapy. CTEPH is unique in pulmonary hypertension in that it is potentially curable by surgery; however, a proportion of patients either have residual PH following surgery or are not operable. Although some patients with CTEPH have been treated off-label with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, there have been few randomised controlled trials of these therapies in patients with CTEPH. Moreover, in these trials QoL outcomes are variably assessed, and there is little consistency in the tools used. Here we review the assessment of QoL in patients with CTEPH and the tools that have been used. We also discuss the effect of surgical intervention and medical therapies on QoL. We conclude that further studies of QoL in patients with CTEPH are needed to further validate the optimal QoL tools. PMID:27076580

  20. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Potoka, Karin P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-02-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management. PMID:25398989

  1. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Potoka, Karin P.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management. PMID:25398989

  2. Current Concepts in Management of Pulmonary Hypertension: Fighting the Old Demon with Modern Weapons.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in children is a rare disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis is not fully understood. Diagnostic evaluation focuses on ruling out other etiologies of pulmonary hypertension and prognosticating the disease. Congenital heart disease and left sided heart disease associated pulmonary hypertension are more common in children. Therapies for idiopathic pulmonary hypertension have evolved over the past decade. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil), endothelin antagonists (Bosentan and ambrisentan) and prostanoids are the classes of drugs shown to be useful in pulmonary hypertension. However, use of these drugs in children is based on extrapolation of adult usage and on expert consensus rather than based on randomized controlled trial evidence. Despite these advances, the outcomes of various forms of pulmonary hypertension remain poor, especially in India, where some forms of therapy are not available and children often are diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease. PMID:26223872

  3. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. Personal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has changed dramatically with the development of targeted therapy with selective pulmonary vasodilators. The number of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD is increasing. It is important to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of these patients, and to achieve this, a register of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD should be established. At the World Symposium in Nice, France, in 2013, the consensus was reached that patients with a pulmonary resistance of < 4 Wood Units (WU)·m(2) have operable disease, and patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) have inoperable disease. However, these criteria are conservative. Some patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) and a good response to a pulmonary vasodilator test have operable disease and a favorable clinical course long after repair of CHD. The criteria determining operability in patients with PAH associated with CHD in the era of pulmonary vasodilators should be established using data obtained from patient registers and/or multicenter studies. The optimal management of Eisenmenger syndrome should also be established using data obtained from patient registers. Prospective studies should be conducted to determine the life expectancy of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in the era of targeted therapy. A relatively mild increase in pulmonary resistance may result in failure of a Fontan circulation. The effects of pulmonary vasodilators on the long-term prognosis of patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are still unclear. PMID:25787791

  4. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by fibrotic obstruction of the proximal pulmonary arteries, and it is believed to result from incomplete thrombus resolution after acute pulmonary embolism. While treatment for this condition with surgery and medical therapy has improved outcomes, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CTEPH is incomplete. Numerous risk factors have been associated with the development of CTEPH, including but not limited to acquired thrombophilias and chronic inflammatory states. A minority of patients with CTEPH have an abnormal fibrin structure that may delay thrombus resolution. Recently, examination of resected scar material in patients with CTEPH has suggested that deficient angiogenesis may play a role in thrombus nonresolution, and there is increasing interest in factors that drive intravascular scar formation. An additional challenge in CTEPH research is understanding the etiology and implications of the small-vessel disease present in many patients. Future work will likely be directed at understanding the pathways important to disease pathogenesis through further examinations of resected tissue material, continued work on animal models, and genomic approaches to identify alterations in gene expression or gene variants that may distinguish CTEPH from other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27252839

  5. Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Risk of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Farha, Samar; Hu, Bo; Comhair, Suzy; Zein, Joe; Dweik, Raed; Erzurum, Serpil C; Aldred, Micheala A

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious and often fatal disease. It is a panvasculopathy of the pulmonary microcirculation characterized by vasoconstriction and arterial obstruction due to vascular proliferation and remodeling and ultimately right ventricular failure. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a universal finding in pulmonary vascular cells of patients with PAH, and is mechanistically linked to disease origins in animal models of pulmonary hypertension. Mitochondria have their own circular DNA (mtDNA), which can be subgrouped into polymorphic haplogroup variants, some of which have been identified as at-risk or protective from cardiovascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we hypothesized that mitochondrial haplogroups may be associated with PAH. To test this, mitochondrial haplogroups were determined in a cohort of PAH patients and controls [N = 204 Caucasians (125 PAH and 79 controls) and N = 46 African Americans (13 PAH and 33 controls)]. Haplogroup L was associated with a lower rate of PAH as compared to macrohaplogroups N and M. When haplogroups were nested based on ancestral inheritance and controlled for age, gender and race, haplogroups M and HV, JT and UK of the N macro-haplogroup had significantly higher rates of PAH compared to the ancestral L (L0/1/2 and L3) (all p ≤ 0.05). Overall, the findings suggest that mitochondrial haplogroups influence risk of PAH and that a vulnerability to PAH may have emerged under the selective enrichment of specific haplogroups that occurred with the migration of populations out of Africa. PMID:27224443

  6. Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Risk of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Hu, Bo; Comhair, Suzy; Zein, Joe; Dweik, Raed

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious and often fatal disease. It is a panvasculopathy of the pulmonary microcirculation characterized by vasoconstriction and arterial obstruction due to vascular proliferation and remodeling and ultimately right ventricular failure. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a universal finding in pulmonary vascular cells of patients with PAH, and is mechanistically linked to disease origins in animal models of pulmonary hypertension. Mitochondria have their own circular DNA (mtDNA), which can be subgrouped into polymorphic haplogroup variants, some of which have been identified as at-risk or protective from cardiovascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we hypothesized that mitochondrial haplogroups may be associated with PAH. To test this, mitochondrial haplogroups were determined in a cohort of PAH patients and controls [N = 204 Caucasians (125 PAH and 79 controls) and N = 46 African Americans (13 PAH and 33 controls)]. Haplogroup L was associated with a lower rate of PAH as compared to macrohaplogroups N and M. When haplogroups were nested based on ancestral inheritance and controlled for age, gender and race, haplogroups M and HV, JT and UK of the N macro-haplogroup had significantly higher rates of PAH compared to the ancestral L (L0/1/2 and L3) (all p ≤ 0.05). Overall, the findings suggest that mitochondrial haplogroups influence risk of PAH and that a vulnerability to PAH may have emerged under the selective enrichment of specific haplogroups that occurred with the migration of populations out of Africa. PMID:27224443

  7. Hemodynamic Characterization of Rodent Models of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Mao, Lan; Rajagopal, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by endothelial cell apoptosis, smooth muscle proliferation and obliteration of pulmonary arterioles. This in turn results in right ventricular (RV) failure, with significant morbidity and mortality. Rodent models of PAH, in the mouse and the rat, are important for understanding the pathophysiology underlying this rare disease. Notably, different models of PAH may be associated with different degrees of pulmonary hypertension, RV hypertrophy and RV failure. Therefore, a complete hemodynamic characterization of mice and rats with PAH is critical in determining the effects of drugs or genetic modifications on the disease. Here we demonstrate standard procedures for assessment of right ventricular function and hemodynamics in both rat and mouse PAH models. Echocardiography is useful in determining RV function in rats, although obtaining standard views of the right ventricle is challenging in the awake mouse. Access for right heart catheterization is obtained by the internal jugular vein in closed-chest mice and rats. Pressures can be measured using polyethylene tubing with a fluid pressure transducer or a miniature micromanometer pressure catheter. Pressure-volume loop analysis can be performed in the open chest. After obtaining hemodynamics, the rodent is euthanized. The heart can be dissected to separate the RV free wall from the left ventricle (LV) and septum, allowing an assessment of RV hypertrophy using the Fulton index (RV/(LV+S)). Then samples can be harvested from the heart, lungs and other tissues as needed. PMID:27167679

  8. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a comparison between children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Barst, R.J.; Ertel, S.I.; Beghetti, M.; Ivy, D.D.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including pathology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment are reviewed in children and adults. The histopathology seen in adults is also observed in children, although children have more medial hypertrophy at presentation. Both populations have vascular and endothelial dysfunction. Several unique disease states are present in children, as lung growth abnormalities contribute to pulmonary hypertension. Although both children and adults present at diagnosis with elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery pressure, children have less heart failure. Dyspnoea on exertion is the most frequent symptom in children and adults with PAH, but heart failure with oedema occurs more frequently in adults. However, in idiopathic PAH, syncope is more common in children. Haemodynamic assessment remains the gold standard for diagnosis, but the definition of vasoreactivity in adults may not apply to young children. Targeted PAH therapies approved for adults are associated with clinically meaningful effects in paediatric observational studies; children now survive as long as adults with current treatment guidelines. In conclusion, there are more similarities than differences in the characteristics of PAH in children and adults, resulting in guidelines recommending similar diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms in children (based on expert opinion) and adults (evidence-based). PMID:21357924

  9. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension. Epidemiology and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Marion; Kerr, Kim; Fedullo, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare complication of pulmonary embolism. As for most rare diseases, epidemiologic data are scarce, but recent registries suggest an incidence of at least 5 per million inhabitants per year. A history of massive or recurrent acute pulmonary embolism is observed in most patients with CTEPH, but the proportion of patients who develop CTEPH after acute pulmonary embolism is a matter of debate, further complicated by the possible misdiagnosis of CTEPH as acute pulmonary embolism. A complete resolution of thrombi is usually not achieved after acute pulmonary embolism, and the clinical relevance of a "postpulmonary embolism syndrome" with persistent perfusion defects and exercise intolerance is discussed. Risk factors most consistently associated with CTEPH are circulating anti-phospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant, increased factor VIII, non-O blood groups, and chronic inflammatory diseases. There is no female predominance, and it is a disease of older age. Survival in the absence of specific surgical or medical treatment is poor and depends on the hemodynamic severity. PMID:27571001

  10. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. PMID:25497573

  11. Inhaled therapy for the management of perioperative pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, C. A.; Morozowich, S. T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are at high risk for complications in the perioperative setting and often receive vasodilators to control elevated pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). Administration of vasodilators via inhalation is an effective strategy for reducing PAP while avoiding systemic side effects, chiefly hypotension. The prototypical inhaled pulmonary-specific vasodilator, nitric oxide (NO), has a proven track record but is expensive and cumbersome to implement. Alternatives to NO, including prostanoids (such as epoprostenol, iloprost, and treprostinil), NO-donating drugs (sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and nitrite), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (milrinone, sildenafil) may be given via inhalation for the purpose of treating elevated PAP. This review will focus on the perioperative therapy of PH using inhaled vasodilators. PMID:26139748

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension Among End-Stage Renal Failure Patients Following Hemodialysis Access Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Richard J.; Stavropoulos, S. William; Wasserstein, Alan G.; Clark, Timothy W.I.

    2005-01-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous hemodialysis thrombectomy causes subclinical pulmonary emboli without short-term clinical consequence; the long-term effects on the pulmonary arterial vasculature are unknown. We compared the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension between patients who underwent one or more hemodialysis access thrombectomy procedures with controls without prior thrombectomy.Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed. Cases (n = 88) had undergone one or more hemodialysis graft thrombectomy procedures, with subsequent echocardiography during routine investigation of comorbid cardiovascular disease. Cases were compared with controls without end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (n = 100, group 1), and controls with ESRD but no prior thrombectomy procedures (n = 117, group 2). The presence and velocity of tricuspid regurgitation on echocardiography was used to determine the prevalence and grade of pulmonary hypertension; these were compared between cases and controls using the chi-square test and logistic regression.Results: The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension among cases was 52% (46/88), consisting of mild, moderate and severe in 26% (n = 23), 10% (n = 9) and 16% (n = 14), respectively. Prevalence of pulmonary hypertension among group 1 controls was 26% (26/100), consisting of mild, moderate and severe pulmonary hypertension in 14%, 5% and 7%, respectively. Cases had 2.7 times greater odds of having pulmonary hypertension than group 1 controls (p = 0.002). The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension among group 2 controls was 42% (49/117), consisting of mild, moderate and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension in 25% (n = 49), 10% (n = 12) and 4% (n = 5), respectively. Cases were slightly more likely to have pulmonary hypertension than group 2 controls (OR = 1.5), although this failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.14).Conclusion: Prior hemodialysis access thrombectomy does not appear to be a risk factor for pulmonary arterial hypertension

  13. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boueiz, Adel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive growth of medical literature on pulmonary hypertension (PH) has led to a steady increase in awareness of this disease within the medical community during the past decade. The recent revision of the classification of PH is presented in in the main guidelines. Group 1 PH or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous group and includes PH due to inheritable, drug-induced, and toxin-induced causes and to such underlying systemic causes as connective tissue diseases, human immunodeficiency viral infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune multisystem disorder, which affects over 240 persons per million in the United States.[1] Its manifestations are not confined to the skin but may also involve the lungs, kidneys, peripheral circulation, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The outcome of PAH associated with SSc is worse when compared to other subtypes of PAH. In this review, we summarize available information about the pulmonary vascular and cardiac manifestations of SSc with special emphasis on their prognostic implications as well as the peculiarity of their detection. PMID:25076994

  14. An inadequate pulmonary vascular capacity and susceptibility to pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Chapman, M E; Hamal, K R; Bowen, O T; Lorenzoni, A G; Erf, G F; Anthony, N B

    2007-05-01

    Broilers are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS; ascites syndrome) when their pulmonary vascular capacity is anatomically or functionally inadequate to accommodate the requisite cardiac output without an excessive elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure. The consequences of an inadequate pulmonary vascular capacity have been demonstrated experimentally and include elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) attributable to noncompliant, fully engorged vascular channels; sustained pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); systemic hypoxemia and hypercapnia; specific right ventricular hypertrophy, and right atrioventricular valve failure (regurgitation), leading to central venous hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis. Pulmonary vascular capacity is broadly defined to encompass anatomical constraints related to the compliance and effective volume of blood vessels, as well as functional limitations related to the tone (degree of constriction) maintained by the primary resistance vessels (arterioles) within the lungs. Surgical occlusion of 1 pulmonary artery halves the anatomical pulmonary vascular capacity, doubles the PVR, triggers PAH, eliminates PHS-susceptible broilers, and reveals PHS-resistant survivors whose lungs are innately capable of handling sustained increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and cardiac output. We currently are using i.v. microparticle injections to increase the PVR and trigger PAH sufficient in magnitude to eliminate PHS-susceptible individuals while allowing PHS-resistant individuals to survive as progenitors of robust broiler lines. The microparticles obstruct pulmonary arterioles and cause local tissues and responding leukocytes to release vasoactive substances, including the vasodilator NO and the highly effective vasoconstrictors thromboxane A(2) and serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]. Nitric oxide is the principal vasodilator responsible for modulating (attenuating) the PAH response and ensuing mortality triggered by

  15. Irreversible pulmonary hypertension associated with Troglostrongylus brevior infection in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Crisi, Paolo E; Traversa, Donato; Di Cesare, Angela; Luciani, Alessia; Civitella, Carla; Santori, Domenico; Boari, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    A four month-old kitten was referred at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Teramo, Italy. Physical examination, echocardiography, thoracic radiography, copromicroscopy and biomolecular assays led to a diagnosis of severe parasitic bronchopneumonia by Troglostrongylus brevior complicated by pulmonary hypertension. A single administration of a spot on solution containing imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 1% was effective in stopping larval shedding but clinical, radiographic and echocardiographic signs of bronchopneumonia and pulmonary hypertension still persisted after further follow-ups.While cases of pulmonary hypertension are known in infections by Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, this is the first report of irreversible pulmonary hypertension in a kitten with troglostrongylosis. PMID:26412548

  16. Cyber support: describing concerns of caregivers of people with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lichenstein, Sarah; McDonough, Annette; Matura, Lea Ann

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of how caregivers of people with pulmonary hypertension are using an online discussion board. The chronicity and complex medical needs of people with pulmonary hypertension warrant a holistic nursing approach combining the patient and caregiver concerns to adequately address their needs. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized. A convenience sample over an 18-month period of those caregivers who posted Internet messages to the Pulmonary Hypertension Discussion Board was included. Sociodemographics collected were age and gender of the person with pulmonary hypertension and the relationship of the caregiver to the person with pulmonary hypertension. Clinical variables collected were medications and oxygen use and years since diagnosis. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes. A total of 98 caregivers posted to the discussion board during the 18-month period; 46% of those posting were mothers of children with pulmonary hypertension. Four themes emerged: fear and frustration, questions and concerns, someone to listen to, and moving on with life. These themes characterize how caregivers of people with pulmonary hypertension were using the discussion board. Caregivers of people with pulmonary hypertension may need more information and support from their healthcare providers to adequately care for those with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24113162

  17. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient β and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH. PMID:22034607

  18. Anaesthetic Management of Caesarean Section in a Term Pregnancy with Ventricular Septal Defect and Pulmonary Hypertension with Severe Pulmonary Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Rohan; Kaeley, Nidhi; Bhatia, Ruby

    2016-06-01

    Pregnancy with pulmonary hypertension - WHO risk class IV cardiac disease is associated with significant haemodynamic burden due to cardiocirculatory changes which is a significant indirect cause of maternal mortality. We report a very rare case - primigravida term pregnancy with pulmonary hypertension, large ventricular septal defect (2.4 cm(2)), bidirectional shunt mainly left to right with severe pulmonary stenosis with peak gradient of 144mmHg. Caesarean section was done under general anaesthesia with successful maternal and neonatal outcome. PMID:27504386

  19. Elafin Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension via Caveolin-1–Dependent Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Nils P.; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Gu, Mingxia; Li, Caiyun G.; Li, Hai; Kaschwich, Mark; Diebold, Isabel; Hennigs, Jan K.; Kim, Ki-Yoon; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Wang, Lingli; Cao, Aiqin; Sa, Silin; Jiang, Xinguo; Stockstill, Raymond W.; Nicolls, Mark R.; Zamanian, Roham T.; Bland, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, impaired bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2) signaling, and increased elastase activity. Synthetic elastase inhibitors reverse experimental pulmonary hypertension but cause hepatotoxicity in clinical studies. The endogenous elastase inhibitor elafin attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in mice, but its potential to improve endothelial function and BMPR2 signaling, and to reverse severe experimental pulmonary hypertension or vascular pathology in the human disease was unknown. Objectives: To assess elafin-mediated regression of pulmonary vascular pathology in rats and in lung explants from patients with pulmonary hypertension. To determine if elafin amplifies BMPR2 signaling in pulmonary artery endothelial cells and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods: Rats with pulmonary hypertension induced by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blockade and hypoxia (Sugen/hypoxia) as well as lung organ cultures from patients with pulmonary hypertension were used to assess elafin-mediated reversibility of pulmonary vascular disease. Pulmonary arterial endothelial cells from patients and control subjects were used to determine the efficacy and mechanism of elafin-mediated BMPR2 signaling. Measurements and Main Results: In Sugen/hypoxia rats, elafin reduced elastase activity and reversed pulmonary hypertension, judged by regression of right ventricular systolic pressure and hypertrophy and pulmonary artery occlusive changes. Elafin improved endothelial function by increasing apelin, a BMPR2 target. Elafin induced apoptosis in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and decreased neointimal lesions in lung organ culture. In normal and patient pulmonary artery endothelial cells, elafin promoted angiogenesis by increasing pSMAD-dependent and -independent BMPR2 signaling. This was linked mechanistically to augmented interaction of BMPR2 with caveolin-1 via

  20. Modulation of the LKB1-AMPK Signalling Pathway Underpins Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Evans, A Mark; Lewis, Sophronia A; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A; Moral-Sanz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the defining characteristic of pulmonary arteries is the process of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which, under physiological conditions, supports ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung by diverting blood flow away from oxygen deprived areas of the lung to oxygen rich regions. However, when alveolar hypoxia is more widespread, either at altitude or with disease (e.g., cystic fibrosis), HPV may lead to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. HPV is driven by the intrinsic response to hypoxia of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, which are acutely sensitive to relatively small changes in pO2 and have evolved to monitor oxygen supply and thus address ventilation-perfusion mismatch. There is now a consensus that the inhibition by hypoxia of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation represents a key step towards the induction of HPV, but the precise nature of the signalling pathway(s) engaged thereafter remains open to debate. We will consider the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase through which AMPK is intimately coupled to changes in oxygen supply via mitochondrial metabolism. A growing body of evidence, from our laboratory and others, suggests that modulation of the LKB1-AMPK signalling pathway underpins both hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26303471

  1. Pulmonary endarterectomy: the potentially curative treatment for patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). It is a complex surgical procedure with a simple principle: removal of obstructive thromboembolic material from the pulmonary arteries in order to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance, relieve pulmonary hypertension (PH) and alleviate right ventricular dysfunction. In the majority of patients there is symptomatic and prognostic benefit. However, not all patients with CTEPH are suitable for treatment with PEA. Operability assessment is not always easy, being largely subjective and based on experience. It is therefore important that all patients are referred to an experienced CTEPH centre for careful evaluation of suitability for surgery. The most common reason for inoperability is distal vasculopathy accounting for a high proportion of the vascular resistance. Surgery requires cardiopulmonary bypass and periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Complications include reperfusion lung injury and persistent PH. However, with careful patient selection, surgical technique and post-operative management, PEA is a highly effective treatment with mortality rates <5% at experienced centres. Patients who are unsuitable for surgery may be candidates for medical therapy. PMID:26028638

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Onyekwere, O C; Campbell, A; Teshome, M; Onyeagoro, S; Sylvan, C; Akintilo, A; Hutchinson, S; Ensing, G; Gaskin, P; Kato, G; Rana, S; Kwagyan, J; Gordeuk, V; Williams, J; Castro, O

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) in the pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) population is not known despite its high prevalence in adult patients. Our hypothesis was that increased pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs) would be found in SCD children and adolescents, especially those with a history of pulmonary complications: acute chest syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, asthma, and reactive airway disease. Fifty-two SCD children, 23 of whom had underlying pulmonary disease, were screened for PHTN, which was defined as a tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) of at least 2.5 m/s. Twenty-four (46.15%) SCD patients had increased PAP (i.e., TRV > or =2.5 m/s), and 6 (11.5%) had significant PHTN (i.e., TRV > or =3.0 m/s). Pulmonary disease was marginally associated with PHTN (odds ratio 2.80 and confidence interval 0.88 to 8.86; p = 0.0795). As in adult SCD patients with PHTN, this complication was correlated with the degree of hemolysis as manifested by significantly higher lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin, lower hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and a strong association with Hb-SS phenotype. However, after statistical adjustment for age and sex, increased serum LDH was not associated with the development of PHTN. Further studies are needed to clarify the prevalence and mechanisms of PHTN in pediatric and adolescent patients with SCD. PMID:17680298

  3. Modulation of miRNAs in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudhiranjan; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a new class of posttranscriptional regulators of many cardiac and vascular diseases. They are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that contributes crucial roles typically through binding of the 3′-untranslated region of mRNA. A single miRNA may influence several signaling pathways associated with cardiac remodeling by targeting multiple genes. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of pulmonary (micro) vasculature that results in elevated vascular resistance, leading to right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure. The pathology of PH involves vascular cell remodeling including pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. There is no cure for this disease. Thus, novel intervention pathways that govern PH induced RVH may result in new treatment modalities. Current therapies are limited to reverse the vascular remodeling. Recent studies have demonstrated the roles of various miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PH and pulmonary disorders. This review provides an overview of recent discoveries on the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PH and discusses the potential for miRNAs as therapeutic targets and biomarkers of PH at clinical setting. PMID:25861465

  4. Management of pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gien, J; Kinsella, J P

    2016-06-01

    In infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a posterolateral diaphragmatic defect results in herniation of abdominal contents into the chest and compression of the intrathoracic structures. In the most severe cases, hypoplasia of the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular (LV) hypoplasia/dysfunction all contribute to increased mortality. The management of PH in CDH is complicated by structural and functional changes in the heart, pulmonary vasculature, airways and lung parenchyma; consequently, determining optimal management strategies is challenging. Treatment of PH in patients with CDH changes as the underlying pathophysiology evolves in the days and weeks after birth. During the early transition, the use of pulmonary vasodilators is limited by LV structural and functional abnormalities, and pulmonary vasodilators such as inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) may have a limited role (for example, stabilization for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), treatment of marked preductal desaturation and treatment of PH as LV performance improves). In contrast, subacute treatment of PH in CDH with iNO has an important role in recurrent or persistent PH and potentially improves survival. Chronic PH and vascular abnormalities may persist into childhood in patients with CDH, contributing to late mortality. It is unclear how pulmonary vasodilator therapies, such as iNO, sildenafil and bosentan, will modulate late outcomes in CDH with late/chronic PH. PMID:27225962

  5. Right Ventricular Adaptation and Failure in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John J.; Huston, Jessica; Kutty, Shelby; Hatton, Nathan D.; Bowman, Lindsay; Tian, Lian; Herr, Julia E.; Johri, Amer M.; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an obstructive pulmonary vasculopathy, characterized by excess proliferation, apoptosis-resistance, inflammation, fibrosis and vasoconstriction. While PAH therapies target some of these vascular abnormalities (primarily vasoconstriction) most do not directly benefit the right ventricle (RV). This is suboptimal since a patient’s functional state and prognosis are largely determined by the success of the adaptation of the RV to the increased afterload. The RV initially hypertrophies but may ultimately decompensate, becoming dilated, hypokinetic and fibrotic. A number of pathophysiologic abnormalities have been identified in the PAH RV, including: ischemia and hibernation (partially reflecting RV capillary rarefaction), autonomic activation (due to GRK2-mediated down-regulation and desensitization of β-adrenergic receptors), mitochondrial-metabolic abnormalities (notably increased uncoupled glycolysis and glutaminolysis), and fibrosis. Many RV abnormalities are detectable by molecular imaging and may serve as biomarkers. Some molecular pathways, such as those regulating angiogenesis, metabolism and mitochondrial dynamics, are similarly deranged in the RV and pulmonary vasculature, offering the possibility of therapies that treat both the RV and pulmonary circulation. An important paradigm in PAH is that the RV and pulmonary circulation constitute a unified cardiopulmonary unit. Clinical trials of PAH pharmacotherapies should assess both components of the cardiopulmonary unit. PMID:25840092

  6. Circulating Angiogenic Precursors in Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Asosingh, Kewal; Aldred, Micheala A.; Vasanji, Amit; Drazba, Judith; Sharp, Jacqueline; Farver, Carol; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Xu, Weiling; Licina, Lauren; Huang, Lan; Anand-Apte, Bela; Yoder, Mervin C.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) involves hyperproliferative and apoptosis-resistant pulmonary artery endothelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the relative contribution of bone marrow-derived proangiogenic precursors and tissue-resident endothelial progenitors to vascular remodeling in IPAH. Levels of circulating CD34+CD133+ bone marrow-derived proangiogenic precursors were higher in peripheral blood from IPAH patients than in healthy controls and correlated with pulmonary artery pressure, whereas levels of resident endothelial progenitors in IPAH pulmonary arteries were comparable to those of healthy controls. Colony-forming units of endothelial-like cells (CFU-ECs) derived from CD34+CD133+ bone marrow precursors of IPAH patients secreted high levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2, had greater affinity for angiogenic tubes, and spontaneously formed disorganized cell clusters that increased in size in the presence of transforming growth factor-β or bone morphogenetic protein-2. Subcutaneous injection of NOD SCID mice with IPAH CFU-ECs within Matrigel plugs, but not with control CFU-ECs, produced cell clusters in the Matrigel and proliferative lesions in surrounding murine tissues. Thus, mobilization of high levels of proliferative bone marrow-derived proangiogenic precursors is a characteristic of IPAH and may participate in the pulmonary vascular remodeling process. PMID:18258847

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Fibrosing Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hoeper, Marius M.; Behr, Juergen; Held, Matthias; Grunig, Ekkehard; Vizza, C. Dario; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Lange, Tobias J.; Claussen, Martin; Grohé, Christian; Klose, Hans; Olsson, Karen M.; Zelniker, Thomas; Neurohr, Claus; Distler, Oliver; Wirtz, Hubert; Opitz, Christian; Huscher, Doerte; Pittrow, David; Gibbs, J. Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common finding in patients with chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP). Little is known about the response to pulmonary vasodilator therapy in this patient population. COMPERA is an international registry that prospectively captures data from patients with various forms of PH receiving pulmonary vasodilator therapies. Methods We retrieved data from COMPERA to compare patient characteristics, treatment patterns, response to therapy and survival in newly diagnosed patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and PH associated with IIP (PH-IIP). Results Compared to patients with IPAH (n = 798), patients with PH-IIP (n = 151) were older and predominantly males. Patients with PH-IIP were treated predominantly with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (88% at entry, 87% after 1 year). From baseline to the first follow-up visit, the median improvement in 6MWD was 30 m in patients with IPAH and 24.5 m in patients with PH-IIP (p = 0.457 for the difference between both groups). Improvements in NYHA functional class were observed in 22.4% and 29.5% of these patients, respectively (p = 0.179 for the difference between both groups). Survival rates were significantly worse in PH-IIP than in IPAH (3-year survival 34.0 versus 68.6%; p<0.001). Total lung capacity, NYHA class IV, and mixed-venous oxygen saturation were independent predictors of survival in patients with PH-IIP. Conclusions Patients with PH-IIP have a dismal prognosis. Our results suggest that pulmonary vasodilator therapy may be associated with short-term functional improvement in some of these patients but it is unclear whether this treatment affects survival. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01347216 PMID:26630396

  8. Genistein attenuates low temperature induced pulmonary hypertension in broiler chicks by modulating endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Wu, Zhenlong; Guo, Yuming

    2010-12-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by high pulmonary blood pressure, vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein would prevent the development of low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers. Hemodynamic parameters, vascular remodeling, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1 content in lung tissue were evaluated. The results demonstrated that genistein significantly reduced pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppressed pulmonary arterial vascular remodeling without affecting broilers' performance. The beneficial effects appeared to be mediated by restoring endothelial function especially endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1, two critical vasoactive molecules that associated with the development of hypertension. Genistein supplementation might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20854807

  9. Polydatin Attenuates Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension and Reverses Remodeling through Protein Kinase C Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qing; Shi, Xiao-Peng; Ye, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Jin; Miao, Shan; Wang, Si-Wang; Li, Bo; Jiang, Xiu-Xiu; Zhang, Song; Hu, Nan; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is a life-threatening emergency if untreated. Consistent pulmonary hypertension also leads to arteries and ventricular remodeling. The clinical therapeutic strategy for pulmonary hypertension and the corresponding remodeling mainly interacts with NO, angiotensin II (Ang II) and elevated endothelin (ET) targets. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of polydatin on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. It was observed that polydatin attenuated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, reversed remodeling, and regulated NO, Ang II, ET contents in the serum and lung samples. However, forced activation of PKC signaling by its selective activator thymeleatoxin (THX) could abate the effects of polydatain. These results suggest that polydatin might be a promising candidate for hypoxic pulmonary treatment through interaction with PKC mechanisms. PMID:22837726

  10. Possible role of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guerreso, Kelsey; Conner, Edward Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are many different causes of pulmonary hypertension and the pathogenesis of the disease is still being elucidated. Although they are not the most common, autoimmunity and inflammation have been identified as possible causes. No one autoantibody has been identified as the definite cause of pulmonary hypertension. We present a rare association of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and isolated pulmonary hypertension. Case presentation A 53 year old African American female presented with abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, dyspnea and fatigue. Upon further exam she was found to have high titers of antinuclear antibodies and anti-SSA/Ro antibodies. This antibody profile would typically be suggestive of Sjögren's Syndrome, which is characterized by dry eyes and poor salivary gland function. However, since this patient did not have any symptoms consistent with the disease a diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome could not be made. A combination of laboratory, imaging and diagnostic studies were done that revealed a final diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion It is known that pulmonary hypertension has association with autoimmune diseases, however no clear markers yet exist. Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies have been rarely described in cases of pulmonary disease, and less so in pulmonary hypertension. This case describes a unique association between isolated pulmonary hypertension and anti-SSA/Ro antibody, thereby illustrating the need to investigate this autoantibody and others in the pathogenesis of autoimmune pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Ambrisentan for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: improving outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elshaboury, Soha M; Anderson, Joe R

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature that is associated with severe functional impairment and a poor prognosis. Ambrisentan is a selective endothelin type A receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of patients with PAH World Health Organization group 1. The efficacy and safety of ambrisentan has been evaluated in the ARIES series (Ambrisentan for the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, Efficacy Studies), which has established its use as both monotherapy or in conjunction with other PAH therapies. Specifically, ambrisentan is effective at increasing exercise tolerance, decreasing the risk of functional class deterioration, and prolonging time to clinical worsening. Further, ambrisentan has a favorable effect on mortality, with an 88% patient survival rate after two years of therapy compared with a 61% survival rate as estimated by the National Institute of Health Registry. Ambrisentan is generally well tolerated in all patient groups, with the main side effects of peripheral edema, sinusitis, flushing, and nasal congestion considered to be mild to moderate in nature. Ambrisentan has several favorable qualities that potentially make it more acceptable to patients, including once-daily administration, limited adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions, and minimal risk of liver enzyme elevation. Because of the potential risk of teratogenicity associated with ambrisentan, it is only available through a limited distribution program, ie, LEAP (the Letairis Education and Access Program). Ongoing clinical trials will help to clarify the role of ambrisentan in the treatment of PAH. PMID:23674888

  12. Right heart catheterisation: best practice and pitfalls in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Preston, Ioana R

    2015-12-01

    Right heart catheterisation (RHC) plays a central role in identifying pulmonary hypertension (PH) disorders, and is required to definitively diagnose pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Despite widespread acceptance, there is a lack of guidance regarding the best practice for performing RHC in clinical practice. In order to ensure the correct evaluation of haemodynamic parameters directly measured or calculated from RHC, attention should be drawn to standardising procedures such as the position of the pressure transducer and catheter balloon inflation volume. Measurement of pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, in particular, is vulnerable to over- or under-wedging, which can give rise to false readings. In turn, errors in RHC measurement and data interpretation can complicate the differentiation of PAH from other PH disorders and lead to misdiagnosis. In addition to diagnosis, the role of RHC in conjunction with noninvasive tests is widening rapidly to encompass monitoring of treatment response and establishing prognosis of patients diagnosed with PAH. However, further standardisation of RHC is warranted to ensure optimal use in routine clinical practice. PMID:26621978

  13. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension--a position paper].

    PubMed

    Wilkens, H; Lang, I; Blankenburg, T; Grohé, C; Guth, S; Held, M; Klepetko, W; Konstantinides, S; Kramm, T; Krüger, U; Lankeit, M; Schäfers, H J; Seyfarth, H J; Mayer, E

    2014-12-01

    This position paper summarises current developments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) including diagnostic approaches and treatment options. Based on the guidelines of the task force of CTEPH experts at the 5th World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Nice 2013. Open questions arising during the treatment of patients with CTEPH are addressed. Patients with suspected CTEPH should undergo echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. A ventilation/perfusion scan is the recommended imaging test for screening in the diagnostic algorithm for the evaluation of CTEPH. CTEPH-patients should be discussed in an expert center with an interdisciplinary team and an experienced PEA surgeon to decide the further treatment. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is the treatment of choice for patients with CTEPH. Medical therapy with PH-targeted medications for inoperable CTEPH and residual disease after PEA should only be initiated if evaluation reveals that the patient is no candidate for a PEA. Current data suggest that CTEPH patients treated with PEA have a better long-term survival rate and quality of life than patients treated with medical therapy. PMID:25084310

  14. MURC deficiency in smooth muscle attenuates pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ogata, Takehiro; Naito, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Takuya; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav1) is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. MURC (also called Cavin-4) is a member of the cavin family, which regulates caveolar formation and functions together with caveolins. Here, we show that hypoxia increased Murc mRNA expression in the mouse lung, and that Murc-null mice exhibited attenuation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) accompanied by reduced ROCK activity in the lung. Conditional knockout mice lacking Murc in smooth muscle also resist hypoxia-induced PH. MURC regulates the proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through Rho/ROCK signalling. Cav1 suppresses RhoA activity in PASMCs, which is reversed by MURC. MURC binds to Cav1 and inhibits the association of Cav1 with the active form of Gα13, resulting in the facilitated association of the active form of Gα13 with p115RhoGEF. These results reveal that MURC has a function in the development of PH through modulating Rho/ROCK signalling. PMID:27546070

  15. Patent ductus arteriosus and pulmonary hypertension in related Pembroke Welsh corgis.

    PubMed

    Oswald, G P; Orton, E C

    1993-03-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and pulmonary hypertension were diagnosed in 5 related 12- to 24-week-old Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs. A ductus diverticulum and small PDA were diagnosed in the pups' sire. Multiple factors likely contribute to the early development of pulmonary hypertension, including pulmonary hyperperfusion, genetic predisposition, and atmospheric pressure. The dogs of this report had a strong genetic predisposition to PDA, had large-diameter PDA associated with pulmonary hyperperfusion, and lived at altitudes of 5,000 to 7,000 feet above sea level. This combination of factors likely had an additive influence on the pulmonary vasculature, resulting in accelerated development of pulmonary hypertension in these dogs. Early recognition and treatment of PDA is critical in this setting before the development of severe pulmonary hypertension and uncorrectable disease. PMID:8454510

  16. A Huge Thrombosed Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm without Pulmonary Hypertension in a Patient with Hepatosplenic Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed S.; Ramadan, Mahmoud M.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 55 Final Diagnosis: Thrombosed pulmonary artery aneurysm Symptoms: Cough productive • fever • shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pericardiocentesis Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: We herein report a case of huge pulmonary artery aneurysm in a 55-year-old male farmer from the Nile delta (Lower-Egypt), mostly due to infestation with Schistosoma mansoni, which is the parasite causing hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. Case Report: This male patient was admitted with a month-long history of progressive shortness of breath, 2-month history of fever, and a cough with mucoid sputum for 10 days. On examination, he had normal temperature and blood pressure, but he had tachypnea, tachycardia, and congested neck veins. Electrocardiography showed multifocal atrial tachycardia and right bundle branch block. Conclusions: The present case is unique in that it shows the presence of a huge pulmonary artery aneurysm despite the absence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25746428

  17. Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: A Newly Recognized Cause of Severe Pulmonary Hypertension in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Williams, K; Andrie, K; Cartoceti, A; French, S; Goldsmith, D; Jennings, S; Priestnall, S L; Wilson, D; Jutkowitz, A

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well-known though poorly characterized disease in veterinary medicine. In humans, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of severe pulmonary hypertension with a mean survival time of 2 years without lung transplantation. Eleven adult dogs (5 males, 6 females; median age 10.5 years, representing various breeds) were examined following the development of severe respiratory signs. Lungs of affected animals were evaluated morphologically and with immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin, desmin, CD31, CD3, CD20, and CD204. All dogs had pulmonary lesions consistent with PVOD, consisting of occlusive remodeling of small- to medium-sized pulmonary veins, foci of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH), and accumulation of hemosiderophages; 6 of 11 dogs had substantial pulmonary arterial medial and intimal thickening. Ultrastructural examination and immunohistochemistry showed that smooth muscle cells contributed to the venous occlusion. Increased expression of CD31 was evident in regions of PCH indicating increased numbers of endothelial cells in these foci. Spindle cells strongly expressing alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin co-localized with foci of PCH; similar cells were present but less intensely labeled elsewhere in non-PCH alveoli. B cells and macrophages, detected by immunohistochemistry, were not co-localized with the venous lesions of canine PVOD; small numbers of CD3-positive T cells were occasionally in and around the wall of remodeled veins. These findings indicate a condition in dogs with clinically severe respiratory disease and pathologic features resembling human PVOD, including foci of pulmonary venous remodeling and PCH. PMID:26926086

  18. Acute effects of riociguat in borderline or manifest pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Staehler, Gerd; Grünig, Ekkehard; Halank, Michael; Mitrovic, Veselin; Unger, Sigrun; Mueck, Wolfgang; Frey, Reiner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Schermuly, Ralph T.; Behr, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat is the first oral soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (PH). This pilot study assessed the impact of a single dose of riociguat on hemodynamics, gas exchange, and lung function in patients with PH associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adults with COPD-associated borderline or manifest PH (pulmonary vascular resistance > 270 dyn·s·cm−5, mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 23 mmHg, ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] to forced vital capacity < 70%, and partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide in arterial blood > 50 and ≤ 55 mmHg, respectively) received riociguat 1 or 2.5 mg during right heart catheterization. Twenty-two patients completed the study (11 men, 11 women, aged 56–82 years; 1-mg group: n = 10 [mean FEV1: 43.1%]; 2.5-mg group: n = 12 [mean FEV1: 41.2%]). Riociguat caused significant improvements (P < 0.01) from baseline in mean pulmonary artery pressure (1 mg: −3.60 mmHg [−11.44%]; 2.5 mg: −4.83 mmHg [−14.76%]) and pulmonary vascular resistance (1 mg: −58.32 dyn·s·cm−5 [−15.35%]; 2.5 mg: −123.8 dyn·s·cm−5 [−32.96%]). No relevant changes in lung function or gas exchange were observed. Single doses of riociguat were well tolerated and showed promising hemodynamic effects without untoward effects on gas exchange or lung function in patients with COPD-associated PH. Placebo-controlled studies of chronic treatment with riociguat are warranted. PMID:26064454

  19. Activation of Calpain-2 by Mediators in Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Han, Weihong; Rafikov, Ruslan; Bagi, Zsolt; Offermanns, Stefan; Saido, Takaomi C; Black, Stephen M; Su, Yunchao

    2016-03-01

    Calpain mediates collagen synthesis and cell proliferation and plays an important role in pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In the present study, we investigated whether and how calpain is activated by PAH mediators in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These data show that smooth muscle-specific knockout of calpain attenuated and knockout of calpastatin potentiated pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. Treatment of PASMCs with the PAH mediators platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), serotonin, H2O2, endothelin-1, and IL-6 caused significant increases in calpain activity, cell proliferation, and collagen-I protein level without changes in protein levels of calpain-1 and -2. The calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA/AM) did not affect calpain activation, but the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 inhibitor PD98059 and knocking down of calpain-2 prevented calpain activation in PAH mediator-treated PASMCs. Mass spectrometry data showed that the phosphorylation of calpain-2 at serine (Ser) 50 was increased and the phosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser369 was decreased in PDGF-treated PASMCs. The PDGF-induced increase in Ser50 phosphorylation of calpain-2 was prevented by PD98059, whereas dephosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser369 was blocked by the protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor fostriecin. Furthermore, smooth muscle of pulmonary arteries in PAH animal models and patients with PAH showed higher levels of phospho-Ser50-calpain-2 (P-Ser50) and lower levels of phospho-Ser369-calpain-2 (P-Ser369). These data support that calpain modulates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. PAH mediator-induced activation of calpain is caused by ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser50 and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser369 in pulmonary vascular remodeling of PAH. PMID:26248159

  20. HIV protease inhibitors in pulmonary hypertension: rationale and design of a pilot trial in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Xiao-hui; Yu, Zai-xin; Cai, Jing-jing; Billiar, Timothy R.; Chen, Alex F.; Lv, Ben; Chen, Zi-ying; Huang, Zhi-jun; Yang, Guo-ping; Song, Jie; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We propose an exploratory clinical study, the first of its kind to our knowledge, to determine the safety and potential clinical benefit of the combination of the HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs) saquinavir and ritonavir (SQV+RIT) in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). This study is based on evidence that (1) HIV-PIs can improve pulmonary hemodynamics in experimental models; (2) both Toll-like receptor 4 and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) participate in the pathogenesis of experimental pulmonary hypertension; and (3) a high-throughput screen for inhibitors of HMGB1-induced macrophage activation yielded HIV-PIs as potent inhibitors of HMGB1-induced cytokine production. In this proposed open-label, pre-post study, micro, low, and standard doses of SQV+RIT will be given to IPAH patients for 14 days. Patients will receive follow-up for the next 14 days. The primary outcome to be evaluated is change in HMGB1 level from baseline at 14 days. The secondary outcome is changes in tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, C-reactive protein, pulmonary arterial pressure based on echocardiography parameters and New York Heart Association/World Health Organization functional class, and Brog dyspnea scale index from baseline at 14 days. Other secondary measurements will include N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, atrial natriuretic peptide, and 6-minute walk distance. We propose that SQV+RIT treatment will improve inflammatory disorders and pulmonary hemodynamics in IPAH patients. If the data support a potentially useful therapeutic effect and suggest that SQV+RIT is safe in IPAH patients, the study will warrant further investigation. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02023450.) PMID:26401255

  1. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ly, Doanh T

    2010-06-01

    Delivery of anesthesia to patients with severe pulmonary hypertension can be extremely challenging. The profound hemodynamic alterations of the disease can often be exacerbated by alterations in circulatory function brought about by anesthetic and surgical interventions. High perioperative morbidity and mortality rates have been reported. Minimizing adverse outcomes in these patients requires careful perioperative evaluation and planning. Selection of an anesthetic technique suitable for the surgery without causing major hemodynamic alterations, which can lead to cardiac failure and death, is a unique consideration of the anesthesia provider. As shown in this case report, caudal anesthesia, when appropriate, can offer a safe anesthetic for these patients. PMID:20572406

  2. Pulmonary stenosis development and reduction of pulmonary arterial hypertension in atrioventricular septal defect: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Emeline; Bouvaist, Hélène; Marlière, Stéphanie; Ninet, Gérard; Vanzetto, Gérald

    2009-01-01

    A 24-year-old patient was admitted for dyspnoea and syncope. He had a previous history of complete atrio-ventricular septal defect and trisomy 21. At the age of 6 months, in 1984, cardiac catheterization revealed a quasi-systemic pulmonary arterial hypertension with a bidirectional shunt corresponding to an Eisenmenger syndrome. Corrective cardiac surgery was not performed at this time because surgical risk was considered too high. Until the age of 20 years old, he showed few symptoms while under medical treatment. But since 2006, his functional status became worse with an increased dyspnoea, syncopes, and severe cyanosis. In these conditions, haemodynamic parameters have been re-evaluated in 2006 and 2008. They highlighted a late and progressive development of a valvular and infundibular pulmonary stenosis leading to a normalisation of pulmonary arterial pressures. At the age of 24 , the patient underwent corrective cardiac surgery which was successful. Late development of both infundibular and valvular pulmonary stenosis have not been described before in non operated congenital ventricular septal defects, but development of one or the other abnormality would be found in 8% of patients. The physiopathological mechanism of this obstruction is unclear. Nevertheless, in unoperated congenital cardiac shunt lesions, reversibility of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension should be reconidered and re-assessed during follow up. PMID:19758423

  3. Selexipag for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    The endothelin (ET), nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2) pathways are involved in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) pathogenesis. While ET and NO are targeted early in the disease process, limitations of current pharmacotherapies that target the PGI2 pathway (PGI2 or PGI2 analogues) result in them not being used or delayed. Selexipag is a novel oral, selective agonist of the PGI2 (IP) receptor. Activation of the IP receptor induces vasodilation in the pulmonary circulation and inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, key factors in PAH pathogenesis. By combining oral dosing with improved receptor selectivity, selexipag may enable earlier combination therapy targeting the three-molecular pathways of PAH with anticipated improvements in daily- and long-term clinical function and outcome in PAH. PMID:26567613

  4. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis-associated Pulmonary Hypertension Showing a Drastic Improvement Following Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Atsuhiko; Hidaka, Kouko

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare, smoking-related, interstitial lung disease, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with mortality. We herein report a case of PLCH complicated by severe PH and respiratory impairment. After developing PH, the patient displayed a cystic pattern on chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). This, in turn, corresponded with the scarring stage of PLCH. However, the patient's PH and respiratory impairment improve dramatically following smoking cessation. PLCH patients with a cystic pattern on chest HRCT may still be able to improve their PH and respiratory impairment when they are able to quit smoking. PMID:26935369

  5. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension for lobectomy-anesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chiluveru, Swapna A.; Dave, Nandini M.; Dias, Raylene J.; Garasia, Madhu B.

    2016-01-01

    The association of congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) with congenital heart disease is rare. We present the case of a 6-month-old child with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension (PH) who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypoxia. The patient underwent right lobectomy for CPAM. With timely management, real-time monitoring, one lung ventilation, and adequate analgesia, we were able to extubate the child in the immediate postoperative period. We conclude that with meticulous planning and multidisciplinary team approach, such complex cases can be managed successfully. PMID:27052089

  6. Caffeine causes pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Kamely, M; Torshizi, M A Karimi; Rahimi, S; Wideman, R F

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), or ascites, is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. Experimental models are required for triggering PHS to study the pathogenesis of this syndrome and to select resistant genetic lines. Caffeine increases vascular resistance and promotes systemic hypertension in mammals, but a similar effect of caffeine on the pulmonary circulation had not previously been demonstrated. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of caffeine alone (Exp. 1) or in combination with cold temperature (Exp. 2) on parameters associated with PHS in young broiler chicks. In Exp. 1, 288 chicks were distributed among 24 pens and brooded at standard environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 2, 192 chicks were distributed among 16 pens and brooded at cool environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 15, 30, and 45 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 1 caffeine administered at or above 12.5 mg/(kg BW·d) induced severe PHS and resulted in acute mortality and RVH ( < 0.05). Hematocrit also slightly increased by caffeine supplementation ( = 0.07). In Exp. 2 caffeine-treated broilers exposed to cold temperatures remarkably exhibited PHS incidences and developed RVH with right ventricular to total ventricular weight ratios of 30% or greater. Moreover, hematocrit significantly increased because of caffeine supplementation in cool ambient temperature ( = 0.002). Our data demonstrate that caffeine induces high incidences of PHS in broilers, which is exacerbated by exposure to low temperatures. PMID:27136008

  7. [Relevant issues in the pathology and pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Tuder, Rubin M; Archer, Stephen L; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although PH primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in PH is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that although vasospasm plays a role, PH is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 or activin-like kinase-1, or epigenetically inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase-2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild PH in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of the role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of PH has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of PH, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microribonucleic acids. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of PH and cellular and molecular pathogenetic links should further expand our understanding of the disease. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D4-12) a 2013 by the

  8. Relevant issues in the pathology and pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tuder, Rubin M; Archer, Stephen L; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2013-12-24

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although PH primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in PH is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that although vasospasm plays a role, PH is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 or activin-like kinase-1, or epigenetically inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase-2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild PH in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of the role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of PH has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of PH, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microribonucleic acids. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of PH and cellular and molecular pathogenetic links should further expand our understanding of the disease. PMID:24355640

  9. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Seferian, Andrei; Savale, Laurent; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH. PMID:23997051

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; De Pasquale, Carmine G.; Sajkov, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD), including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV) range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH. PMID:25165714

  11. Cytoskeletal defects in Bmpr2-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer A.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Schuster, Manfred; Robinson, Linda J.; Gladson, Santhi; Loibner, Hans; Bai, Susan; Blackwell, Tom R.; Tada, Yuji; Harral, Julie W.; Talati, Megha; Lane, Kirk B.; Fagan, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    The heritable form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is typically caused by a mutation in bone morphogenic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2), and mice expressing Bmpr2 mutations develop PAH with features similar to human disease. BMPR2 is known to interact with the cytoskeleton, and human array studies in PAH patients confirm alterations in cytoskeletal pathways. The goal of this study was to evaluate cytoskeletal defects in BMPR2-associated PAH. Expression arrays on our Bmpr2 mutant mouse lungs revealed cytoskeletal defects as a prominent molecular consequence of universal expression of a Bmpr2 mutation (Rosa26-Bmpr2R899X). Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells cultured from these mice have histological and functional cytoskeletal defects. Stable transfection of different BMPR2 mutations into pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells revealed that cytoskeletal defects are common to multiple BMPR2 mutations and are associated with activation of the Rho GTPase, Rac1. Rac1 defects are corrected in cell culture and in vivo through administration of exogenous recombinant human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2). rhACE2 reverses 77% of gene expression changes in Rosa26-Bmpr2R899X transgenic mice, in particular, correcting defects in cytoskeletal function. Administration of rhACE2 to Rosa26-Bmpr2R899X mice with established PAH normalizes pulmonary pressures. Together, these findings suggest that cytoskeletal function is central to the development of BMPR2-associated PAH and that intervention against cytoskeletal defects may reverse established disease. PMID:22180660

  12. Epidemiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Guha, Ashrith; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Park, Myung H

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left side heart disease is associated with adverse outcomes. The exact prevalence of PH in the different pathologies that affect the left ventricle, however, is difficult to access with the current literature. The lack of a standard definition of PH in older studies, the different modalities to assess pulmonary artery pressures and the varying disease severity, all account for the great variability in the reported prevalence of PH. PH can accompany heart failure (HF) with reduced (HFrEF) or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) as well as mitral and aortic valve disease; in any of these instances it is important to recognize whether the elevation of pulmonary pressures is driven by elevated left ventricular pressures only (isolated post-capillary PH) or if there is an accompanying remodeling component in the pulmonary arterioles (combined post-capillary and pre-capillary PH). The objective of this review is to describe the definitions, prevalence and the risk factors associated with the development of PH in the setting of HFrEF, HFpEF and valvular heart disease. PMID:27402130

  13. Expression of mutant bone morphogenetic protein receptor II worsens pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Linda J.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; McClellan, Lucas J.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; McConaha, Melinda E.; Gleaves, Linda A.; Talati, Megha A.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; West, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is often complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PH), and previous studies have shown a potential link between bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR2) and PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. We exposed transgenic mice expressing mutant BMPR2 and control mice to repetitive intraperitoneal injections of bleomycin for 4 weeks. The duration of transgene activation was too short for mutant BMPR2 mice to develop spontaneous PH. Mutant BMPR2 mice had increased right ventricular systolic pressure compared to control mice, without differences in pulmonary fibrosis. We found increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1-α stabilization in lungs of mutant-BMPR2-expressing mice compared to controls following bleomycin treatment. In addition, expression of the hypoxia response element protein connective tissue growth factor was increased in transgenic mice as well as in a human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell line expressing mutant BMPR2. In mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, mutant BMPR2 expression resulted in increased HIF1-α and reactive oxygen species production following exposure to hypoxia, both of which were attenuated with the antioxidant TEMPOL. These data suggest that expression of mutant BMPR2 worsens secondary PH through increased HIF activity in vascular endothelium. This pathway could be therapeutically targeted in patients with PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26697175

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Common Respiratory Conditions: Classification, Evaluation and Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fein, Daniel G; Zaidi, Ali N; Sulica, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to chronic respiratory disease and/or hypoxia is classified as World Health Organization (WHO) Group III pulmonary hypertension. The patients most commonly encountered in clinical practice with group III PH include those with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diffuse parenchymal lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. The purpose of this review is to outline the variable clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in the most common pulmonary disease states and how a clinician may approach the management of these patients. PMID:27571110

  15. Pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator, BAY 60–2770, are not dependent on endogenous nitric oxide or reduced heme

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A.; Bhartiya, Manish; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Haider, Umair; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.

    2011-01-01

    4-({(4-Carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-{[4′-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy}phenyl)ethyl]amino}methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60–2770) is a nitric oxide (NO)-independent activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that increases the catalytic activity of the heme-oxidized or heme-free form of the enzyme. In this study, responses to intravenous injections of the sGC activator BAY 60–2770 were investigated under baseline and elevated tone conditions induced by the thromboxane mimic U-46619 when NO synthesis was inhibited by Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME), when sGC activity was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), an agent that oxidizes sGC, and in animals with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The intravenous injections of BAY 60–2770 under baseline conditions caused small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and no change or small increases in cardiac output. Under elevated tone conditions during infusion of U-46619, intravenous injections of BAY 60–2770 caused larger decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, smaller decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and increases in cardiac output. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to BAY 60–2770 were enhanced by l-NAME or by ODQ in a dose that attenuated responses to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. ODQ had no significant effect on baseline pressures and attenuated pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator BAY 41–8543 2-{1-[2-(fluorophenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl}-5(4-morpholinyl)-4,6-pyrimidinediamine. BAY 60–2770 and sodium nitroprusside decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in monocrotaline-treated rats in a nonselective manner. The present data show that BAY 60–2770 has vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds that is enhanced by ODQ and NOS inhibition, suggesting that the heme-oxidized form of sGC can be

  16. Pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator, BAY 60-2770, are not dependent on endogenous nitric oxide or reduced heme.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Bhartiya, Manish; Badejo, Adeleke M; Haider, Umair; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-03-01

    4-({(4-Carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-{[4'-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy}phenyl)ethyl]amino}methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770) is a nitric oxide (NO)-independent activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that increases the catalytic activity of the heme-oxidized or heme-free form of the enzyme. In this study, responses to intravenous injections of the sGC activator BAY 60-2770 were investigated under baseline and elevated tone conditions induced by the thromboxane mimic U-46619 when NO synthesis was inhibited by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), when sGC activity was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), an agent that oxidizes sGC, and in animals with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The intravenous injections of BAY 60-2770 under baseline conditions caused small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and no change or small increases in cardiac output. Under elevated tone conditions during infusion of U-46619, intravenous injections of BAY 60-2770 caused larger decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, smaller decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and increases in cardiac output. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to BAY 60-2770 were enhanced by L-NAME or by ODQ in a dose that attenuated responses to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. ODQ had no significant effect on baseline pressures and attenuated pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator BAY 41-8543 2-{1-[2-(fluorophenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl}-5(4-morpholinyl)-4,6-pyrimidinediamine. BAY 60-2770 and sodium nitroprusside decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in monocrotaline-treated rats in a nonselective manner. The present data show that BAY 60-2770 has vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds that is enhanced by ODQ and NOS inhibition, suggesting that the heme-oxidized form of sGC can be activated in vivo in an

  17. [Successful pregnancy in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Case report].

    PubMed

    Szenczi, Orsolya; Karlócai, Kristóf; Bucsek, László; Rigó, János

    2016-04-10

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by progressive increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance which lead to right ventricular failure and death. Pregnancy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is contraindicated because of the high maternal and fetal mortality. The authors present a case of successful pregnancy and delivery of a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in Hungary for the first time. The aim of the report was to demonstrate that management and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in a pregnant woman is a complex and multidisciplinary task that should involve obstetrician, cardiologist and anesthesiologist. Those patients who become pregnant and do not wish to terminate the pregnancy must be referred to obstetric centers where a multidiciplinary approach is taken. PMID:27039998

  18. Reported Sildenafil Side Effects in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siehr, Stephanie L.; McCarthy, Elisa K.; Ogawa, Michelle T.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sildenafil, a phosphodiestase type 5 inhibitor, was approved in 2005 for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adults and is commonly used off-label for pediatric patients. Little is known, however, about sildenafil’s side effects in this population. Methods: Single institution, longitudinal survey-based study performed in an outpatient pediatric cardiology clinic. Pediatric patients on sildenafil [alone or in combination with other pulmonary hypertension (PH) therapies] completed questionnaires regarding frequency of vascular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and hematologic side effects. Results: Between January 2011 and May 2014, 66 pediatric patients with PH on sildenafil filled out 214 surveys, 32 patients (96 surveys) on monotherapy, and 43 patients (118 surveys) on sildenafil plus an endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) (bosentan or ambrisentan) and/or a prostacyclin (epoprostenol or treprostinil). Overall, 30% of respondents identified at least one side effect. For all patients on sildenafil, incidence of side effects by system was 37% gastrointestinal, 35% vascular, and 22% neurologic. For patients on sildenafil monotherapy, incidence of side effects by system was 24% gastrointestinal, 21% vascular, and 18% neurologic compared to patients on combination therapy who reported an incidence of 48% gastrointestinal, 45% vascular, and 25% neurologic. Conclusion: Incidence of vascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic side effect in pediatric patients on sildenafil therapy for PAH was 30%. Side effects were more common in patients on combination therapy with an ERA and/or prostacyclin than in patients on sildenafil monotherapy. PMID:25806361

  19. The effect of sildenafil on right ventricular remodeling in a rat model of monocrotaline-induced right ventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Hyeryon; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) leads to right ventricular failure (RVF) as well as an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Our purpose was to study the effect of sildenafil on right ventricular remodeling in a rat model of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced RVF. Methods The rats were distributed randomly into 3 groups. The control (C) group, the monocrotaline (M) group (MCT 60 mg/kg) and the sildenafil (S) group (MCT 60 mg/kg+ sildenafil 30 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Masson Trichrome staining was used for heart tissues. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Results The mean right ventricular pressure (RVP) was significantly lower in the S group at weeks 1, 2, and 4. The number of intra-acinar arteries and the medial wall thickness of the pulmonary arterioles significantly lessened in the S group at week 4. The collagen content also decreased in heart tissues in the S group at week 4. Protein expression levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X, caspase-3, Bcl-2, interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin (ET)-1 and ET receptor A (ERA) in lung tissues greatly decreased in the S group at week 4 according to immunohistochemical staining. According to Western blotting, protein expression levels of troponin I, brain natriuretic peptide, caspase-3, Bcl-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, MMP-2, eNOS, ET-1, and ERA in heart tissues greatly diminished in the S group at week 4. Conclusion Sildenafil alleviated right ventricular hypertrophy and mean RVP. These data suggest that sildenafil improves right ventricular function. PMID:27462355

  20. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma. PMID:27468364

  1. Pulmonary vascular pressure profiles in broilers selected for susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension syndrome: age and sex comparisons.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Eanes, M L; Hamal, K R; Anthony, N B

    2010-09-01

    Broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) have an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) when compared with PHS-resistant broilers. Two distinctly different syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH), both are associated with increases in PAP. Pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs when the right ventricle must elevate the PAP to overcome increased resistance to flow through restrictive pulmonary arterioles upstream from the pulmonary capillaries. In contrast, PVH is commonly caused by increased downstream (postcapillary) resistance. The sites of resistance to pulmonary blood flow are deduced by making contemporaneous measurements of the PAP and the wedge pressure (WP) and calculating the transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) (TPG = PAP - WP). We obtained PAP and WP values from 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, and 24-wk-old anesthetized male and female broilers from a PHS-susceptible line. Pressures were recorded as a catheter was advanced through a wing vein to the pulmonary artery and onward until the WP was obtained. In addition to sex and age comparisons of vascular pressure gradients, the data also were pooled to obtain 3 cohorts for broilers having the lowest PAP values (n = 52; range: 12 to 22.9 mmHg), intermediate PAP values (n = 63; range: 23 to 32.9 mmHg), and highest PAP values (n = 62; range: 33 to 62 mmHg) independent of age or sex. Within each of the age, sex, and PAP cohort comparisons, broilers with elevated PAP consistently exhibited the hemodynamic characteristics of pulmonary arterial hypertension (elevated PAP and TPG combined with a normal WP) and not PVH (elevated PAP and WP combined with a normal or reduced TPG). Susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased precapillary (arteriole) resistance. PMID:20709965

  2. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH. PMID:26942293

  3. Nestin-expressing vascular wall cells drive development of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saboor, Farhan; Reckmann, Ansgar N; Tomczyk, Claudia U M; Peters, Dorothea M; Weissmann, Norbert; Kaschtanow, Andre; Schermuly, Ralph T; Michurina, Tatyana V; Enikolopov, Grigori; Müller, Dieter; Mietens, Andrea; Middendorff, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Nestin, a well-known marker of neuronal stem cells, was recently suggested to characterise stem cell-like progenitors in non-neuronal structures during development and tissue repair. Integrating novel morphological approaches (CLARITY), we investigate whether nestin expression defines the proliferating cell population that essentially drives vascular remodelling during development of pulmonary hypertension.The role of nestin was investigated in lungs of nestin-GFP (green fluorescent protein) mice, models of pulmonary hypertension (rat: monocrotaline, SU5416/hypoxia; mouse: hypoxia), samples from pulmonary hypertension patients and human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs).Nestin was solely found in lung vasculature and localised to proliferating VSMCs, but not bronchial smooth muscle cells. Nestin was shown to affect cell number and was significantly enhanced in lungs early during development of pulmonary hypertension, correlating well with increased VSMC proliferation, expression of phosphorylated (activated) platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and downregulation of the smooth muscle cell differentiation marker calponin. At later time points when pulmonary hypertension became clinically evident, nestin expression and proliferation returned to control levels. Increase of nestin-positive VSMCs was also found in human pulmonary hypertension, both in vessel media and neointima.Nestin expression seems to be obligatory for VSMC proliferation, and specifies lung vascular wall cells that drive remodelling and (re-)generation. Our data promise novel diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets for pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26699726

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return in an Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Stefan; Lee, Justin Z.; Lee, Kwan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) is an uncommon congenital abnormality, which may present in the adult population. It is often associated with sinus venosus defect (SVD). The diagnosis and therapy for this condition may be challenging. Case Presentation. We describe a case of an elderly woman who presented with NYHA Class IV dyspnea and was suspected to have symptomatic pulmonary hypertension. She was later found to have anomalous right upper pulmonary vein return to the superior vena cava and associated SVD with bidirectional shunting. Therapeutic options were discussed and medical management alone with aggressive diuresis and sildenafil was adopted. Follow-up visits revealed success in the planned medical therapy. Conclusions. PAPVR is a rare congenital condition that may present during late adulthood. The initial predominant left-to-right shunting associated with this anomaly may go undetected for years with the gradual development of pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure due to right heart volume overload. Awareness of the condition is important, as therapy is time-sensitive with early detection potentially leading to surgical therapy as a viable option. PMID:27006835

  5. Severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity are not associated with worse functional outcomes after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Catherine N.; Robbins, Ivan M.; Petracek, Michael R.; Pugh, Meredith E.; Brittain, Evan L.; Hemnes, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predictors of functional outcomes in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) are important to identify preoperatively. We hypothesized that baseline severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity would not be associated with 6-month functional outcomes after PTE. Clinical and hemodynamic data were collected on consecutive patients undergoing PTE from 2008 to 2014. Patients were stratified according to baseline pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and body mass index (BMI). Six-minute walk distance (6MWD), New York Heart Association functional class (FC), and echocardiography were assessed in each group at baseline and 6 months after PTE. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between functional outcomes and baseline PVR and BMI. Forty-two patients underwent PTE and had 6-month follow up data. In comparisons of patients with high and low baseline PVR, the baseline characteristics, distribution of disease, 6MWD, and FC were similar. Postoperative hemodynamics for both groups were similar. At 6 months, both groups achieved improvements in FC, and there were no between-group differences in the change in 6MWD or FC. In comparisons of obese and nonobese patients, perioperative and FC improvement were similar; however, obese patients achieved a greater improvement in 6MWD than nonobese patients (P = 0.04). In conclusion, our data suggest that baseline severity of CTEPH and obesity were not associated with worse functional outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these results, as these findings could have implications for patient selection for PTE. PMID:27252843

  6. Increasing pulmonary artery pulsatile flow improves hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in piglets.

    PubMed

    Courboulin, Audrey; Kang, Chantal; Baillard, Olivier; Bonnet, Sebastien; Bonnet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease affecting distal pulmonary arteries (PA). These arteries are deformed, leading to right ventricular failure. Current treatments are limited. Physiologically, pulsatile blood flow is detrimental to the vasculature. In response to sustained pulsatile stress, vessels release nitric oxide (NO) to induce vasodilation for self-protection. Based on this observation, this study developed a protocol to assess whether an artificial pulmonary pulsatile blood flow could induce an NO-dependent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure. One group of piglets was exposed to chronic hypoxia for 3 weeks and compared to a control group of piglets. Once a week, the piglets underwent echocardiography to assess PAH severity. At the end of hypoxia exposure, the piglets were subjected to a pulsatile protocol using a pulsatile catheter. After being anesthetized and prepared for surgery, the jugular vein of the piglet was isolated and the catheter was introduced through the right atrium, the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, under radioscopic control. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the pulsatile protocol. It was demonstrated that this pulsatile protocol is a safe and efficient method of inducing a significant reduction in mean PAP via an NO-dependent mechanism. These data open up new avenues for the clinical management of PAH. PMID:25993379

  7. Successful thrombo-embolectomy in long-standing thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension 1

    PubMed Central

    Nash, E. S.; Shapiro, S.; Landau, A.; Barnard, C. N.

    1968-01-01

    The operative removal of thrombo-emboli from the pulmonary arteries in acute pulmonary embolism is an accepted method of treatment. The removal of thrombi that have been present for many months has been attempted less often. This case report covers the operative treatment and the pre- and post-operative physiological studies in a patient with long-standing thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension, in whom a large thrombus was removed under cardiopulmonary bypass from the left pulmonary artery. Dramatic clinical improvement resulted. A plea is made for a more radical approach to thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension when a local obstruction can be demonstrated. Images PMID:5654068

  8. Notch Activation of Ca(2+) Signaling in the Development of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kimberly A; Voiriot, Guillaume; Tang, Haiyang; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Song, Shanshan; Yamamura, Hisao; Yamamura, Aya; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Jun; Pohl, Nicole M; Tauseef, Mohammad; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A; Haddad, Gabriel G; Powell, Frank L; Makino, Ayako; Mehta, Dolly; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an important physiological response that optimizes the ventilation/perfusion ratio. Chronic hypoxia causes vascular remodeling, which is central to the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We have previously shown that Notch3 is up-regulated in HPH and that activation of Notch signaling enhances store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), an important mechanism that contributes to pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and contraction. Here, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in HPV and hypoxia-induced enhancement of SOCE. We examined SOCE in human PASMCs exposed to hypoxia and pulmonary arterial pressure in mice using the isolated perfused/ventilated lung method. Wild-type and canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 6(-/-) mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia to induce HPH. Inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates hypoxia-enhanced SOCE in PASMCs and hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia activates Notch signaling and up-regulates TRPC6 channels. Additionally, treatment with a Notch ligand can mimic hypoxic responses. Finally, inhibition of TRPC6, either pharmacologically or genetically, attenuates HPV, hypoxia-enhanced SOCE, and the development of HPH. These results demonstrate that hypoxia-induced activation of Notch signaling mediates HPV and the development of HPH via functional activation and up-regulation of TRPC6 channels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration and PASMC proliferation is critical to elucidation of the pathogenesis of HPH. Targeting Notch regulation of TRPC6 will be beneficial in the development of novel therapies for pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:25569851

  9. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  10. Altered artery mechanics and structure in monocrotaline pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, D; Szarek, J L; Coflesky, J T; Jones, R C; Reid, L M; Evans, J N

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in rats, induced by an injection of monocrotaline, is associated with changes in the wall structure of the pulmonary arterial bed. We have studied the effects of this remodeling on mechanical properties of cylindrical pulmonary artery segments from rats 21 days after monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Resting and active (KCl induced) circumference-tension relationships were established for segments of extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary arteries isolated from the hilum and the fifth lateral branch from the axial pathway (all preacinar). The thicknesses of the vessel wall, the media, and adventitia were measured at several positions around the circumference of the artery by computerized analysis of histological cross sections of the segments fixed at a standard circumference. Resting and active stress were also calculated. The study shows that active circumferential tension and active stress are reduced in vessels from MCT-treated rats. Based on our findings, it is unlikely that altered contractile function of preacinar arteries contributes significantly to the increased vascular resistance seen in this model. PMID:3145283

  11. Peripheral airways obstruction in idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (primary).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bonetti, P; Lupi-Herrera, E; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Barrios, R; Seoane, M; Sandoval, J

    1983-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung were studied in ten nonsmokers with idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (IPAH) (mean pulmonary artery pressure 65.7 +/- 30 mm Hg). In the routine lung test, residual volume was found to be abnormal (greater than 120 percent of the predicted) in seven patients, and measured airway resistance was normal in eight out of the ten patients. A decreased FEF 75-85 percent, abnormal values for the helium-air flow ratios and increased closing capacities were documented in eight of ten patients in whom lung elastic recoil was normal (six of ten) or increased (four of ten). These features suggest peripheral airways obstruction (PAO) which was also supported by histopathologic findings in three cases (one biopsy and two necropsies). The observed changes in lung compliance could be related to the behavior of the coupling of the air-space and vascular compartments. The etiology of PAO in IPAH patients is not known, but our results indicate that both the peripheral airways and the pulmonary circulation are affected. The knowledge of PAO in IPAH patients could help to better understand the observed V/Q inequality in this entity. PMID:6839814

  12. The limits of oral therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian-Qian; Jing, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease in which remodeling of the small pulmonary arteries leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and right-sided heart failure. Over the past decade, new treatments for PAH, such as the use of ERAs, PDE-5 inhibitors and prostacyclin analogs, have brought about dramatic improvements in clinical outcomes. Epoprostenol infusion therapy has been shown to improve hemodynamics, functional status, and survival, and it remains the gold standard for treatment of patients with severe PAH. Many agents, approved for PAH are always delivered in pill form. Although oral therapy occupies an important position, it has some drawbacks and limitations in PAH management. For patients in World Health Organization functional class IV and with severe right heart failure, there are few data on the long-term survival of patients treated with oral medications. Further research, exploration, and clinical experience with oral therapy in severe PAH and combination therapy will redefine its position in PAH management. PMID:26648729

  13. Signal transduction in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Malenfant, Simon; Neyron, Anne-Sophie; Paulin, Roxane; Potus, François; Meloche, Jolyane; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a unique disease. Properly speaking, it is not a disease of the lung. It can be seen more as a microvascular disease occurring mainly in the lungs and affecting the heart. At the cellular level, the PAH paradigm is characterized by inflammation, vascular tone imbalance, pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis and the presence of in situ thrombosis. At a clinical level, the aforementioned abnormal vascular properties alter physically the pulmonary circulation and ventilation, which greatly influence the right ventricle function as it highly correlates with disease severity. Consequently, right heart failure remains the principal cause of death within this cohort of patients. While current treatment modestly improve patients’ conditions, none of them are curative and, as of today, new therapies are lacking. However, the future holds potential new therapies that might have positive influence on the quality of life of the patient. This article will first review the clinical presentation of the disease and the different molecular pathways implicated in the pathobiology of PAH. The second part will review tomorrow's future putative therapies for PAH. PMID:24015329

  14. Pharmacologic strategies in neonatal pulmonary hypertension other than nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Mathew, Bobby; Leach, Corinne L

    2016-04-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is approved for use in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) but does not lead to sustained improvement in oxygenation in one-third of patients with PPHN. Inhaled NO is less effective in the management of PPHN secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), extreme prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Intravenous pulmonary vasodilators such as prostacyclin, alprostadil, sildenafil, and milrinone have been successfully used in PPHN resistant to iNO. Oral pulmonary vasodilators such as endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil and tadalafil are used both during acute and chronic phases of PPHN. In the absence of infection, glucocorticoids may also be effective in PPHN. Many of these pharmacologic agents are not approved for use in PPHN and our knowledge is based on case reports and small trials. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are required to evaluate alternate pharmacologic strategies in PPHN. PMID:26778236

  15. Right Ventricular Hemodynamics in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, James; Fenster, Brett; Hertzberg, Jean; Schroeder, Joyce

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) have allowed for characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV), including calculation of vorticity and circulation, and qualitative visual assessment of coherent flow patterns. In this study, we investigate qualitative and quantitative differences in right ventricular hemodynamics between subjects with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal controls. Fifteen (15) PH subjects and 10 age-matched controls underwent same day 3D time resolved CMR and echocardiography. Echocardiography was used to determine right ventricular diastolic function as well as pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Velocity vectors, vorticity vectors, and streamlines in the RV were visualized in Paraview and total RV Early (E) and Atrial (A) wave diastolic vorticity was quantified. Visualizations of blood flow in the RV are presented for PH and normal subjects. The hypothesis that PH subjects exhibit different RV vorticity levels than normals during diastole is tested and the relationship between RV vorticity and PASP is explored. The mechanics of RV vortex formation are discussed within the context of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular diastolic function coincident with PH.

  16. Prostanoid therapies in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LeVarge, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin is an endogenous eicosanoid produced by endothelial cells; through actions on vascular smooth-muscle cells, it promotes vasodilation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevated mean pulmonary artery pressure due to a high pulmonary vascular resistance state. A relative decrease in prostacyclin presence has been associated with PAH; this pathway has thus become a therapeutic target. Epoprostenol, the synthetic equivalent of prostacyclin, was first utilized as short-term or bridging therapy in the 1980s. Further refinement of its long-term use via continuous intravenous infusion followed. A randomized controlled trial by Barst et al in 1996 demonstrated functional, hemodynamic, and mortality benefits of epoprostenol use. This work was a groundbreaking achievement in the management of PAH and initiated a wave of research that markedly altered the dismal prognosis previously associated with PAH. Analogs of prostacyclin, including iloprost and treprostinil, exhibit increased stability and allow for an extended array of parenteral and non-parenteral (inhaled and oral) therapeutic options. This review further examines the pharmacology and clinical use of epoprostenol and its analogs in PAH. PMID:25848300

  17. Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Grünig, Ekkehard

    2012-05-28

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a group of distinct disorders that includes idiopathic PAH (IPAH), familial PAH and PAH associated with other conditions (APAH) such as connective tissue disease (CTD-APAH) or congenital heart disease. PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. If left untreated, PAH can lead to right heart failure and premature death. CTD-APAH represents an important clinical subgroup of APAH that has a higher risk of death than IPAH. The European treatment guidelines advocate the use of PAH-targeted therapies including bosentan, ambrisentan, sildenafil, inhaled iloprost, intravenous epoprostenol (I-A recommendations), tadalafil or treprostinil (I-B recommendations) for patients in WHO functional class II-III. Not all randomized clinical studies of the approved PAH-targeted therapies have included patients with CTD-APAH. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical characteristics of CTD-APAH and discuss the approved pharmacological treatments, with a focus on data specific to this subgroup where possible. PMID:22621693

  18. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Luke S.

    2015-01-01

    Although rare in its idiopathic form, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not uncommon in association with various associated medical conditions, most notably connective tissue disease (CTD). In particular, it develops in approximately 10% of patients with systemic sclerosis and so these patients are increasingly screened to enable early detection. The response of patients with systemic sclerosis to PAH-specific therapy appears to be worse than in other forms of PAH. Survival in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH is inferior to that observed in idiopathic PAH. Potential reasons for this include differences in age, the nature of the underlying pulmonary vasculopathy and the ability of the right ventricle to cope with increased afterload between patients with systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and idiopathic PAH, while coexisting cardiac and pulmonary disease is common in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH. Other forms of connective tissue-associated PAH have been less well studied, however PAH associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a better prognosis than systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and likely responds to immunosuppression. PMID:25705389

  19. Circulating miRNAs as Potential Marker for Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chuanyu; Henderson, Heather; Spradley, Christopher; Li, Li; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kumar, Sandeep; Hong, Nayeon; Arroliga, Alejandro C.; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2013-01-01

    MircoRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that govern the gene expression and, play significant role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The detection of miRNAs in circulation of pulmonary hypertensive (PH) human subjects remains elusive. In the current study, we determined the pattern of miRNAs of mild-to-severe human PH subjects and, compared them with the control subjects by miRNA array. Blood was obtained using fluoroscopic and waveform guided catheterization from the distal (pulmonary artery) port of the catheter. A total 40 human subjects were included in the study and, the degree of PH was determined by mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Among several miRNAs in the array, we validated 14 miRNAs and, the data were consistent with the array profile. We identified several novel downregulated miRNAs (miR-451, miR-1246) and upregulated miRNAs (miR-23b, miR-130a and miR-191) in the circulation of PH subjects. Our study showed novel set of miRNAs which are dysregulated in PH and, are directly proportional to the degree of PH. These miRNAs may be considered as potential biomarker for early detection of PH. PMID:23717609

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension and Indicators of Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    von Siebenthal, Célia; Aubert, John-David; Mitsakis, Periklis; Yerly, Patrick; Prior, John O.; Nicod, Laurent Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disease, whose underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. It is characterized by pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction and vessels wall thickening, mainly intimal and medial layers. Several molecular pathways have been studied, but their respective roles remain unknown. Cardiac repercussions of PH are hypertrophy, dilation, and progressive right ventricular dysfunction. Multiple echocardiographic parameters are being used, in order to assess anatomy and cardiac function, but there are no guidelines edited about their usefulness. Thus, it is now recommended to associate the best-known parameters, such as atrial and ventricular diameters or tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion. Cardiac catheterization remains necessary to establish the diagnosis of PH and to assess pulmonary hemodynamic state. Concerning energetic metabolism, free fatty acids, normally used to provide energy for myocardial contraction, are replaced by glucose uptake. These abnormalities are illustrated by increased 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography, which seems to be correlated with echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27376066

  1. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Medical and surgical management for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Majdy M.; Swiston, John; Nizami, Imran; Al Dalaan, Abdullah; Levy, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the availability of the pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapy, PAH was a dreadful disease with a very poor prognosis. Better understanding of the complex pathobiology of PAH has led to a major therapeutic evolution. International regulatory agencies have approved many specific drugs with different pharmacologic pathways and routes of administration. In the year 2013, two new drugs with great potentials in managing PAH have been added to the treatment options, macitentan and riociguat. Additional drugs are expected to come in the near future. A substantial body of evidence has confirmed the effectiveness of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapies in improving the patients’ symptomatic status and slowing down the rate of clinical deterioration. Although the newer modern medications have significantly improved the survival of patients with PAH, it remains a non-curable and fatal disease. Lung transplantation (LT) remains the only therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced disease who continue to deteriorate despite optimal therapy. PMID:25077002

  2. Perceptions of Received Information, Social Support, and Coping in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension or Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Bodil; Ekmehag, Björn; Hesselstrand, Roger; Rådegran, Göran; Sjöberg, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Patients with a life-limiting diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) need disease-specific information, ability to cope, and functioning social networks. This cohort study investigated the experiences of PAH and CTEPH patients who received information about their diagnosis, treatment, and management, in addition to coping and social support. Sixty-eight adult patients (mean ± SD, age 67 ± 14; 66% women) were included. A total of 54% of the patients wanted more information. Patients received information mostly in areas concerning medical test procedures, the diagnosis, disease severity, possible disease causes, and how to manage their disease. Coping ability was significantly better in patients who were satisfied with the received information (P = 0.0045). The information given to PAH or CTEPH patients and their communication with healthcare professionals can be greatly improved. Gaps in information and misunderstandings can be avoided by working in cooperation with the patients, their relatives, and within the PAH team. PMID:25374462

  3. Clinical characteristics of 53 dogs with Doppler-derived evidence of pulmonary hypertension: 1992-1996.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; Boon, J; Orton, E C

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension occurs as a primary or secondary disorder of the pulmonary vasculature. Doppler echocardiography provides a noninvasive tool for the estimation of pulmonary arterial pressure when tricuspid regurgitation or pulmonic insufficiency is present. The cardiology database at Colorado State University was reviewed, and echocardiographic records from cases diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension were evaluated. Application of the modified Bernoulli equation to the maximal instantaneous velocity of a right-sided regurgitant jet provided evidence of pulmonary hypertension in 53 dogs over a 4-year period. Tricuspid regurgitant velocity > or = 2.8 m/second or pulmonic insufficiency velocity > or = 2.2 m/second was considered abnormal and indicative of pulmonary hypertension. Tricuspid regurgitant gradients in 51 dogs ranged from 32 to 145 mm Hg (mean, 63.0 mm Hg; median, 57.0 mm Hg; 25th-75th percentiles, 45.2-76.5 mm Hg). Pulmonic insufficiency gradients in 8 dogs ranged from 20 to 100 mm Hg (mean, 59.5 mm Hg; median, 61.5 mm Hg; 25th-75th percentiles, 32.0-84.5 mm Hg). Affected dogs ranged in age from 2 months to 16 years. Clinical signs were characteristic of cardiopulmonary disease, but a relatively high frequency of syncope was noted (12 of 53 dogs, 23%). Pulmonary hypertension was probably due to increased pulmonary vascular resistance in 23 dogs, pulmonary overcirculation in 2 dogs, and pulmonary venous hypertension in 23 dogs. Five dogs lacked a clinically recognizable cardiopulmonary cause of pulmonary vascular disease. Our results suggest that pulmonary hypertension can occur as a complication of commonly encountered cardiopulmonary diseases, and that Doppler echocardiography can facilitate recognition of this condition. PMID:10499728

  4. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  5. Perioperative management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation (a lesson for other anaesthesia settings).

    PubMed

    Rabanal, J M; Real, M I; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension are some of the most challenging for an anaesthesiologist to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing surgical procedures is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias and ischaemia leading to haemodynamic instability. Lung transplantation is the only therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease. Patients undergoing lung transplantation present a variety of challenges for anaesthesia team, but pulmonary hypertension remains the most important. The purpose of this article is to review the anaesthetic management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation, with particular emphasis on the choice of anaesthesia, pulmonary vasodilator therapy, inotropic and vasopressor therapy, and the most recent intraoperative monitoring recommendations to optimize patient care. PMID:25156939

  6. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26534956

  7. Pulmonary Vascular Pressure Profiles in Broilers Selected for Susceptibility to Pulmonary Hypertension Syndrome: Age and Gender Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, R. F.; Eanes, M. L.; Hamal, K. R.; Anthony, N. B.

    2011-01-01

    Broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) have an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) when compared with PHS-resistant broilers. Two distinctly different syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH), both are associated with increases in PAP. Pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs when the right ventricle must elevate the PAP to overcome increased resistance to flow through restrictive pulmonary arterioles upstream from the pulmonary capillaries. In contrast, PVH is commonly caused by increased downstream (post-capillary) resistance. The sites of resistance to pulmonary blood flow are deduced by making contemporaneous measurements of the PAP and the wedge pressure (WP), and calculating the trans-pulmonary pressure gradient (TPG = PAP-WP). We obtained PAP and WP values from 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 wk old anesthetized male and female broilers from a PHS-susceptible line. Pressures were recorded as a catheter was advanced through a wing vein to the pulmonary artery and onward until the WP was obtained. In addition to gender and age comparisons of vascular pressure gradients, the data also were pooled to obtain three cohorts for broilers having the lowest PAP values (n = 52; range: 12 to 22.9 mmHg), intermediate PAP values (n = 63; range: 23 to 32.9 mmHg), and highest PAP values (n = 62; range: 33 to 62 mmHg) independent of age or gender. Within each of the age, gender and PAP cohort comparisons, broilers with elevated PAP consistently exhibited the hemodynamic characteristics of PAH (elevated PAP and TPG combined with a normal WP) and not PVH (elevated PAP and WP combined with a normal or reduced TPG). Susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased pre-capillary (arteriole) resistance. PMID:20709965

  8. Isorhynchophylline protects against pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppresses PASMCs proliferation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin; Cui, Yuqian; Deng, Wei; Xu, Dachun; Han, Hui; Wang, Hao; Chen, Yuguo; Li, Yu; Wu, Dawei

    2014-07-18

    Increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Isorhynchophylline (IRN) is a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla. It has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether IRN can influence the development of PAH. Here we examined the effect of IRN on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. Our data demonstrated that IRN prevented MCT induced PAH in rats, as assessed by right ventricular (RV) pressure, the weight ratio of RV to (left ventricular+septum) and RV hypertrophy. IRN significantly attenuated the percentage of fully muscularized small arterioles, the medial wall thickness, and the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro studies, IRN concentration-dependently inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis showed that IRN caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. IRN-induced growth inhibition was associated with downregulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as an increase in p27Kip1 levels in PDGF-BB-stimulated PASMCs. Moreover, IRN negatively modulated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, ERK1/2, Akt/GSK3β, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). These results demonstrate that IRN could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and attenuate pulmonary vascular remodeling after MCT induction. These beneficial effects were at least through the inhibition of PDGF-Rβ phosphorylation and its downstream signaling pathways. Therefore, IRN might be a potential candidate for the treatment of PAH. PMID:24950404

  9. Imatinib in pulmonary arterial hypertension: c-Kit inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farha, Samar; Dweik, Raed; Rahaghi, Franck; Benza, Raymond; Hassoun, Paul; Frantz, Robert; Torres, Fernando; Quinn, Deborah A; Comhair, Suzy; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by severe remodeling of the pulmonary artery resulting in increased pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy and, ultimately, failure. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells play a critical role in vascular homeostasis and have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. A proliferation of c-Kit(+) hematopoietic progenitors and mast cells has been noted in the remodeled vessels in PAH. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets c-Kit, has been shown to be beneficial for patients with PAH. Here we hypothesize that the clinical benefit of imatinib in PAH could be related to c-Kit inhibition of progenitor cell mobilization and maturation into mast cells. As a corollary to the phase 3 study using imatinib in PAH, blood samples were collected from 12 patients prior to starting study drug (baseline) and while on treatment at weeks 4 and 24. Eight were randomized to imatinib and 4 to placebo. Circulating c-Kit(+) and CD34(+)CD133(+) hematopoietic progenitors as well as biomarkers of mast cell numbers and activation were measured. Circulating CD34(+)CD133(+) and c-Kit(+) progenitor cells as well as c-Kit(+)/CD34(+)CD133(+) decreased with imatinib therapy (all P < 0.05). In addition, total tryptase, a marker of mast cell load, dropped with imatinib therapy (P = 0.02) and was related to pulmonary vascular resistance (R = 0.7, P = 0.02). The findings support c-Kit inhibition as a potential mechanism of action of imatinib in PAH and suggest that tryptase is a potential biomarker of response to therapy. PMID:25621158

  10. Resolution of pulmonary hypertension complication during venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia application.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Wang, Jingkun; Pollock, Robert; Jubak, Bob; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system for advanced cancer treatment. The vv-PISH system consistently delivered hyperthermia to adult healthy swine, but significant pulmonary hypertension developed during the heating phase. The goal of this study was to develop a method to prevent pulmonary hypertension. We hypothesized that pulmonary hypertension results from decreased priming solution air solubility, which causes pulmonary gas embolism. Healthy adult sheep (n = 3) were used to establish a standard vv-PISH sheep model without priming solution preheating. In subsequent sheep (n = 7), the priming solution was preheated (42-46°C) and the hyperthermia circuit flushed with CO2. All sheep survived the experiment and achieved 2 hours of 42°C hyperthermia. In the group lacking priming solution preheating, significant pulmonary hypertension (35-44 mm Hg) developed. In the sheep with priming solution preheating, pulmonary artery pressure was very stable without pulmonary hypertension. Blood electrolytes were in physiologic range, and complete blood counts were unaffected by hyperthermia. Blood chemistries revealed no significant liver or kidney damage. Our simple strategy of priming solution preheating completely resolved the problem of pulmonary hypertension as a milestone toward developing a safe and easy-to-use vv-PISH system for cancer treatment. PMID:23820278

  11. Immune modulation of the pulmonary hypertensive response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Chapman, M E; Wang, W; Erf, G F

    2004-04-01

    The lungs of broilers are constantly challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) that can activate leukocytes and trigger thromboxane A2 (TxA2)- and serotonin (5HT)-mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to pulmonary hypertension. Among broilers from a single genetic line, some individuals respond to LPS with large increases in pulmonary arterial pressure, whereas others fail to exhibit any response to the same supramaximal dose of LPS. This extreme variability in the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS appears to reflect variability in the types or proportions of chemical mediators released by leukocytes. Our research has confirmed that TxA2 and 5HT are potent pulmonary vasoconstrictors in broilers and that broilers hatched and reared together consistently exhibit pulmonary hypertension after i.v. injections of TxA2 or 5HT. Previous in vitro studies conducted using macrophages from different lines of chickens demonstrated innate variability in the LPS-stimulated induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by the onset of an LPS-refractory state. The NOS enzyme converts arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). It is known that NO produced by endothelial NOS serves as a key modulator of flow-dependent pulmonary vasodilation, and it is likely that NO generated by iNOS also contributes to the pulmonary vasodilator response. Accordingly, it is our hypothesis that the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in broilers is minimal when more vasodilators (NO, prostacyclin) than vasoconstrictors (TxA2, 5HT) are generated during an LPS challenge. Indeed, inhibiting NO production through pharmacological blockade of NOS with the inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester modestly increased the baseline pulmonary arterial pressure and dramatically increased the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in all broilers evaluated. Innate differences in the effect of LPS on the pulmonary vasculature may contribute to differences in susceptibility of

  12. Pulmonary vascular effects of pulsed inhaled nitric oxide in COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Bita; De Backer, Jan; Vos, Wim; Van Holsbeke, Cedric; Ferreira, Francisca; Quinn, Deborah A; Hufkens, Annemie; Claes, Rita; De Backer, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with secondary pulmonary hypertension (PH), which worsens prognosis. PH can be lowered by oxygen, but also by inhaled nitric oxide (NO), which has the potential to improve the health status of these patients. NO is an important mediator in vascular reactions in the pulmonary circulation. Oral compounds can act through NO-mediated pathways, but delivering pulsed inhaled NO (iNO) directly to the airways and pulmonary vasculature could equally benefit patients. Therefore, a proof-of-concept study was performed to quantify pulmonary blood vessel caliber changes after iNO administration using computed tomography (CT)-based functional respiratory imaging (FRI). Methods Six patients with secondary PH due to COPD received “pulsed” iNO in combination with oxygen for 20 minutes via a nasal cannula. Patients underwent a high-resolution CT scan with contrast before and after iNO. Using FRI, changes in volumes of blood vessels and associated lobes were quantified. Oxygen saturation and blood pressure were monitored and patients were asked about their subjective feelings. Results Pulmonary blood vessel volume increased by 7.06%±5.37% after iNO. A strong correlation (Ω20=0.32, P=0.002) was obtained between ventilation and observed vasodilation, suggesting that using the pulsed system, iNO is directed toward the ventilated zones, which consequently experience more vasodilation. Patients did not develop oxygen desaturation, remained normotensive, and perceived an improvement in their dyspnea sensation. Conclusion Inhalation of pulsed NO with oxygen causes vasodilation in the pulmonary circulation of COPD patients, mainly in the well-ventilated areas. A high degree of heterogeneity was found in the level of vasodilation. Patients tend to feel better after the treatment. Chronic use trials are warranted. PMID:27462149

  13. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  14. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Schroeder, Joyce D; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m(2); P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = -0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = -0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = -0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR-based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  15. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J. Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m2; P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = −0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = −0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = −0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = −0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR–based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  16. Recognizing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Pinney, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left heart disease (LHD) or heart failure (HF) is the most common form of PH, yet its prevalence is underappreciated. Varying terminology possibly leads to misconceptions in pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. The accurate diagnosis of PH due to LHD is contingent upon hemodynamic assessment via right heart catheterization, however due to limitations in access, comprehensive echocardiography and integrative scoring systems are frequently used. When present in the setting of PH due to LHD, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) confers a poor clinical prognosis. The management of RVD is directed towards treating underlying HF and/or valvular disease. Implantable hemodynamic monitors may offer opportunity to obtain longitudinal information to increase diagnostic accuracy as well as monitor the effect of treatment of PH in the setting of HF with and without the presence of RVD. PMID:26780235

  17. Macitentan (Opsumit) for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Megan; Walter, Claire; Agarwal, Richa; Kanwar, Manreet; Benza, Raymond L

    2014-07-01

    The endothelin pathway is a key pathway for the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Antagonism of this pathway is recommended as initial therapy in low-risk patient with PAH to inhibit fibrosis, cell proliferation, and inflammation caused by endothelin. Prior to October 2013, ambrisentan, a selective ETA receptor antagonist and bosentan, a dual ETA/ETB antagonist, were the only currently available agents for PAH targeting the endothelin pathway. Based on the results of the SERAPHIN trial, macitentan (brand name Opsumit®), a new ETA/ETB antagonist, has been US FDA approved to delay disease progression and reduce hospitalizations for PAH. SERAPHIN is the first ERA trial to use an event-driven strategy with a composite primary end point of morbidity or mortality. Previous trials have focused on short-term outcomes, such as improved 6-min walk distance and WHO functional class. PMID:24851934

  18. Pathways in pulmonary arterial hypertension: the future is here.

    PubMed

    Sitbon, Olivier; Morrell, Nicholasw

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that the endothelin, nitric oxide and prostacyclin pathways play an important role in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Indeed, the therapeutic options currently available for the management of PAH all act on one of these mechanistic pathways. However, this is an exciting time for both clinicians and scientists, as increased understanding of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PAH has resulted in the development of a number of novel therapeutic options. This article highlights how the introduction of new compounds such as macitentan, riociguat and selexipag, which act on the endothelin, nitric oxide and prostacyclin pathways, respectively, have the potential to further improve the prognosis for patients with PAH. PMID:23204120

  19. An update on medical therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; O'Callaghan, Dermot S; Humbert, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, great progress has been made in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Available therapies target one of three principal pathways: the endothelin (ET), nitric oxide (NO) or the prostacyclin (PGI2) pathway. Evidence shows that current drugs, used either as monotherapy or in different combinations, can improve exercise capacity, clinical symptoms, hemodynamics and even survival in PAH. Unfortunately, the disease remains incurable and the prognosis of the disease is still poor. However, existing and novel potent antiproliferative therapies are being explored, and new agents targeting different and/or additional pathways are likely to become available to clinicians in the near future. Promising candidates include tyrosine kinase antagonists (e.g. imatinib); soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators (riociguat); an oral analog of prostacyclin (selexipag); and a tissue targeting endothelin receptor antagonist (macitentan). Phase II or III trials have either been completed or are underway to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these various therapies. PMID:24122306

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Era of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Yamini; Cooper, Lauren B; Parikh, Kishan S; Felker, G Michael; Milano, Carmelo A; Rogers, Joseph G; Hernandez, Adrian F; Patel, Chetan B

    2016-01-01

    Left heart disease (LHD) represents the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and is associated with worse prognosis compared with LHD without PH. In addition, PH due to LHD may prevent patients from receiving heart transplantation, because of risk of perioperative right ventricular failure. Current literature lacks comprehensive descriptions and management strategies of PH due to LHD. In this review, we summarize the literature that is available to highlight the definition, pathogenesis, and prognosis of PH due to LHD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in this population. Finally, we provide recommendations regarding the management and reassessment of PH due to LHD in the specific context of MCS. PMID:27442856

  1. The role of endothelin-1 in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Adrian H.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare but debilitating disease, which if left untreated rapidly progresses to right ventricular failure and eventually death. In the quest to understand the pathogenesis of this disease differences in the profile, expression and action of vasoactive substances released by the endothelium have been identified in patients with PAH. Of these, endothelin-1 (ET-1) is of particular interest since it is known to be an extremely powerful vasoconstrictor and also involved in vascular remodelling. Identification of ET-1 as a target for pharmacological intervention has lead to the discovery of a number of compounds that can block the receptors via which ET-1 mediates its effects. This review sets out the evidence in support of a role for ET-1 in the onset and progression of the disease and reviews the data from the various clinical trials of ET-1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25405182

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: on the way to a manageable disease.

    PubMed

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2008-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an orphan disease for which no specific pharmacological therapy was available until 1996. Pharmacotherapy for PAH is currently dominated by three endothelin receptor antagonists, bosentan, ambrisentan and sitaxentan (which is not yet approved in the US), and the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil. Drug candidates undergoing phase III clinical trials for PAH include inhalable and oral treprostinil, aviptadil (an inhalable vasoactive intestinal peptide), and the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil. Riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, is scheduled to enter phase III clinical trials in 2008. By approximately 2010, the role of infusable or injectable PGs as treatment for PAH will likely diminish significantly, while inhalable nitric oxide will remain as mainstay therapy in neonatal PAH. Benefits in survival and quality-of-life will decide if any of the more experimental approaches that utilize newly discovered molecular pathways in PAH will ultimately result in marketed drugs. PMID:18729002

  3. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: endothelin-receptor antagonists].

    PubMed

    Hoeper, M M

    2006-12-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is of significance in the pathophysiology and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Bosentan, an endothelin-receptor antagonist, currently plays a central role in the treatment of PHT, because it improves exercise capacity, hemodynamics, clinical symptoms and right ventricular function, achieving a survival duration of 2- 3 years. Bosentan causes an increase of transaminases in about 10% of patients, but this effect is reversible on dosage reduction or discontinuing the medication. However, transaminases should be measured every 4 weeks while patients are on bosentan. Almost all current guidelines list bosentan as of equal value to sildenafil or prostacyclin analogues in the first-line treatment of patients in NYHA functional class III and also, with narrower indications, of those in class IV. PMID:17139593

  4. New Trial Designs and Potential Therapies for Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Bull, Todd M.; Saggar, Rajeev; Barst, Robyn J.; Elgazayerly, Amany; Fleming, Thomas R.; Grimminger, Friedrich; Rainisio, Maurizio; Stewart, Duncan J.; Stockbridge, Norman; Ventura, Carlo; Ghofrani, Ardeschir H.; Rubin, Lewis J.

    2014-01-01

    A greater understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and pathophysiology of pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) has led to significant advances, but the disease remains fatal. Treatment options are neither universally available nor always effective, underscoring the need for development of novel therapies and therapeutic strategies. Clinical trials to date have provided evidence of efficacy, but were limited in evaluating the scope and duration of treatment effects. Numerous potential targets in varied stages of drug development exist, in addition to novel uses of familiar therapies. The pursuit of gene and cell-based therapy continues, and device use to help acute deterioration and chronic management is emerging. This rapid surge of drug development has led to multicenter pivotal clinical trials and has resulted in novel ethical and global clinical trial concerns. This paper will provide an overview of the opportunities and challenges that await the development of novel treatments for PAH. PMID:24355645

  5. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Laura C.; McAuley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S.; Finney, Simon J.; Griffiths, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung protective ventilation strategies has probably reduced the severity of PH in ALI, a recent invasive hemodynamic analysis suggests that even in the modern era, its presence remains clinically important. We therefore sought to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiology of PH in ALI. PMID:22246001

  6. Connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Vivek; Lau, Edmund M T

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been several advances in the assessment and management of connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-PAH) that improved outcomes of the treatment of this lethal disease, and this will be the focus of this study. Systemic sclerosis is the leading cause of CTD-PAH, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, idiopathic inflammatory myositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Clinical registries have been invaluable in informing about the burden of disease, risk and prognostic factors, and temporal trends with respect to treatment and outcome in CTD-PAH. The major advances have centered on improved disease classification and diagnostic criteria, screening and early diagnosis, the emergence of evidence-based therapies including combination goal-orientated treatment strategies, and the establishment of centers with expertise in PAH. PMID:27421214

  7. Psychosocial Burdens of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Discussion Paper.

    PubMed

    Doyle-Cox, Carolyn; Brousseau, Carolynne; Tulloch, Heather; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Davies, Ross A; Sherrard, Heather; Clark, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is an uncommon and devastating chronic illness with no known cure. Little is known about the disease, and even less about the psychosocial burdens. While it is important to create awareness about the physical aspects of the disease, it is equally important to create awareness about the psychosocial burdens patients and their families face. We reviewed the literature to better understand these psychosocial burdens, which include impact from physical limitations, emotional strains, financial burdens, social isolation, lack of intimacy in relationships, and an overall lack of information. The findings can be used to assist health care providers to understand the psychosocial challenges that are being experienced by patients and families in order to better provide supportive care. The creation of a standardized tool to assess the psychosocial burdens at each clinic visit can benefit health care providers by addressing challenges faced and facilitate subsequent referral to appropriate specialists. PMID:27159936

  8. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Naeije, R

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation. PMID:20956193

  9. Inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension treated with riociguat: A case study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Ochoa-Parra, Nuria; Navas-Tejedor, Paula; Morán-Fernández, Laura; Gómez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2015-12-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with a one-year history of progressive dyspnea, WHO functional class III-IV and exercise-related syncope. Transthoracic echocardiography and computed tomography pulmonary angiography were performed, leading to a diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension. She was referred to our pulmonary hypertension unit, where a complete study was performed, including ventilation/perfusion scan, which was consistent with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Risk factors for this condition were excluded and therapeutic options were evaluated. Imaging studies showed distal pulmonary disease so pulmonary endarterectomy was rejected. Further therapeutic options were evaluated and the patient was subsequently enrolled in an open-label uncontrolled trial with riociguat. After one year of treatment, significant improvement in functional class, 6-minute walk test and NT-proBNP were seen, without significant secondary effects. PMID:26632111

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension and Computed Tomography Measurement of Small Pulmonary Vessels in Severe Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Shin; Washko, George R.; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Estepar, Raul San Jose; Diaz, Alejandro; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hoffman, Eric; Fessler, Henry E.; Criner, Gerard J.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Scharf, Steven M.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Reilly, John J.; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Vascular alteration of small pulmonary vessels is one of the characteristic features of pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The in vivo relationship between pulmonary hypertension and morphological alteration of the small pulmonary vessels has not been assessed in patients with severe emphysema. Objectives: We evaluated the correlation of total cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) assessed on computed tomography (CT) scans with the degree of pulmonary hypertension estimated by right heart catheterization. Methods: In 79 patients with severe emphysema enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), we measured CSA less than 5 mm2 (CSA<5) and 5 to 10 mm2 (CSA5−10), and calculated the percentage of total CSA for the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5–10, respectively). The correlations of %CSA<5 and %CSA5–10 with pulmonary arterial mean pressure (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{Ppa}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) obtained by right heart catheterization were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis using \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{Ppa}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} as the dependent outcome was also performed. Measurements and Main Results: The %CSA<5 had a significant negative correlation with \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage

  11. Nutritional approaches to ameliorate pulmonary hypertension in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Khajali, F; Wideman, R F

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews recent nutritional approaches for counteracting the development of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS; ascites) in broiler chickens especially when they are reared at high altitudes. High altitudes impose the sustained stress of hypobaric hypoxia, which reduces the availability of atmospheric oxygen to red blood cells passing through the lungs, thereby causing systemic arterial hypoxaemia (undersaturation of haemoglobin with oxygen), pulmonary arterial hypertension and PHS/ascites in susceptible broilers. Proper nutritional strategies are needed to reduce metabolic activity and prevent the development of ascites especially when modern broilers are reared in regions where the existing altitudes limit the availability of atmospheric oxygen. This article also addresses controversies with regard to broiler nutrition in relation to PHS. For example, the catabolism of protein from feed ingredients incurs increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that feeding reduced-protein diets to broiler chickens may result in reduced PHS incidences. However, experimental and field data indicate that feeding reduced-protein diets to broilers subjected to hypobaric hypoxia increases the development of PHS. Controversies on the nutrition of unsaturated fat in relation to PHS are also discussed. In conclusion, hypoxia, acidosis, vasoconstriction and enhanced metabolic rate are triggers of PHS. Feeding reduced-protein diets might promote the susceptibility of broilers to PHS by decreased dietary intake of arginine, decreased uric acid production and increased lipogenesis. Feeding high-protein diets, dietary arginine supplementation, partial substitution of sodium bicarbonate for sodium chloride, feeding low-fat diets and effective feed restriction programmes can be considered as nutritional approaches to prevent PHS. PMID:25817417

  12. Severe pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats are tolerant to mild exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Lauren J.; Scruggs, April K.; McLendon, Jared M.; Haven, April K.; Bauer, Natalie N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A frequently used end point of clinical outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the 6-minute walk distance. Furthermore, some data suggest that mild to moderate exercise as an intervention in stable PAH is beneficial. Some of these questions have been recapitulated in the monocrotaline and hypoxia animal models of pulmonary hypertension. However, mild exercise and walk distance as end points have not been rigorously examined in the severe progressive Sugen 5416/hypoxia/normoxia (Su/Hx/Nx) animal model of PAH at each stage of worsening disease. Our hypothesis was that animals that were preselected as runners would have increased walk times and improved right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) ratios, echocardiography, and histology compared with nonexercised Su/Hx/Nx animals. We examined four groups of rats: Su/Hx/Nx sedentary, Su/Hx/Nx exercised, control sedentary, and control exercised. Echocardiography was performed at 5, 8, and 13 weeks to assess right ventricular inner diameter in diastole and left ventricular eccentricity index. We found no difference between exercised and sedentary Su/Hx/Nx rats, and both were worsened compared with controls. Rats were euthanized at 13 weeks, and we found that neither RV/LV+S nor the occurrence of occlusive lesions were influenced by exercise. Most interesting, however, was that despite progressive PAH development, exercised Su/Hx/Nx rats showed no decrease in time or distance for treadmill exercise. In all, our data suggest that, despite severe PAH development, Su/Hx/Nx rats retain the same treadmill exercise capacity as control animals. PMID:26064461

  13. Drug treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: current and future agents.

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed substantial improvements in the therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including true innovations targeting some of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Intravenous epoprostenol was the first drug to improve symptoms and survival of patients with PAH. Novel prostanoids, including subcutaneous treprostinil and inhaled iloprost, also have beneficial effects in many patients, although their long-term efficacy is less well known. Among the newer treatments for PAH, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors have reshaped clinical practice. The endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been approved in many parts of the world and most current guidelines recommend this drug as first-line treatment for patients with PAH in functional class III. Novel endothelin receptor antagonists such as sitaxsentan sodium and ambrisentan are currently being investigated. The PDE5 sildenafil is also being intensively studied in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and most of the available data look promising, although approval for PAH is still pending. Other PDE5 inhibitors have not yet undergone extensive study in PAH. The increasing insight into the pathogenesis of PAH opens several new therapeutic opportunities, which include vasoactive intestinal peptide, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, adrenomedullin and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). However, PAH is a complex disorder and targeting a single pathway can not be expected to be uniformly successful. Thus, combining substances with different modes of action is expected to improve symptoms, haemodynamics and survival in PAH patients, although combination therapy has yet to undergo the scrutiny of large randomised clinical trials. PMID:15977967

  14. Heart Rate Variability and Arrhythmic Burden in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Witte, C; Meyer Zur Heide Genannt Meyer-Arend, J U; Andrié, R; Schrickel, J W; Hammerstingl, C; Schwab, J O; Nickenig, G; Skowasch, D; Pizarro, C

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that sudden cardiac death constitutes a major cause of mortality in pulmonary hypertension (PH). As validated method to evaluate cardiac autonomic system dysfunction, alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) are predictive of arrhythmic events, particularly in left ventricular disease. Here, we sought to determine the clinical value of HRV assessment in PH. Sixty-four patients were allocated to different PH-subgroups in this prospectively conducted trial: 25 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), 11 patients with chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH), and 28 patients with COPD-induced PH. All patients underwent 24-h Holter electrocardiogram for HRV assessment by time- and frequency-domain analysis. Arrhythmic burden was evaluated by manual analysis and complementary automatic measurement of premature atrial and ventricular contractions. The results were compared to 31 healthy controls. The PAH patients offered a significantly higher mean heart rate (78.6 ± 10.4 bpm vs. 70.1 ± 10.3 bpm, p = 0.04), a higher burden of premature ventricular contractions (p < 0.01), and decreases in HRV (SDNN: p < 0.01; SDANN: p < 0.01; very low frequency: p < 0.01; low frequency/high frequency ratio: p < 0.01; total power: p = 0.02). In CTEPH patients, only the amount of premature ventricular contractions differed from controls (p < 0.01), whereas in COPD both premature atrial contraction count and frequency-domain-based HRV manifested significant differences. In conclusion, PAH appears to be primarily affected by HRV alterations and ventricular arrhythmic burden, indicating a high risk for malignant arrhythmic events. PMID:27241509

  15. Successful balloon pulmonary angioplasty with gadolinium contrast media for a patient with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and iodine allergy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomohisa; Ogo, Takeshi; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tahara, Nobuhiro; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Nakanishi, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    A 28-year-old male was referred to our hospital with dyspnea. He was diagnosed as having chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and a pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) was performed. However, exertional dyspnea remained because of residual pulmonary hypertension; therefore, the patient was re-admitted to our hospital 1 year after PEA. We performed computed tomography and pulmonary angiography and found web and band lesions in the distal pulmonary artery with a high pulmonary artery pressure. Although further management was complicated because the patient had an anaphylactic shock to iodine-based contrast media, we eventually completed five sessions of balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA) using gadolinium contrast medium. His symptoms and hemodynamics dramatically improved after a series of BPA. After 15 months, mean pulmonary arterial pressure reduced from 67 mmHg to 20 mmHg, and subjective symptoms improved from stage Ⅳ to I as per the WHO classification system. BPA is a potential procedure for residual pulmonary hypertension after PEA and could be safely performed using gadolinium contrast medium for patients with iodine allergy. PMID:27141436

  16. Epigenetic modulation as a therapeutic approach for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Dae; Lee, Aram; Choi, Jihea; Park, Youngsook; Kang, Hyesoo; Chang, Woochul; Lee, Myeong-Sok; Kim, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare but progressive and currently incurable disease, which is characterized by vascular remodeling in association with muscularization of the arterioles, medial thickening and plexiform lesion formation. Despite our advanced understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH and the recent therapeutic advances, PAH still remains a fatal disease. In addition, the susceptibility to PAH has not yet been adequately explained. Much evidence points to the involvement of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases including cancer, peripheral hypertension and asthma. The knowledge gained from the epigenetic study of various human diseases can also be applied to PAH. Thus, the pursuit of novel therapeutic targets via understanding the epigenetic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of PAH, such as DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA, might be an attractive therapeutic avenue for the development of a novel and more effective treatment. This review provides a general overview of the current advances in epigenetics associated with PAH, and discusses the potential for improved treatment through understanding the role of epigenetics in the development of PAH. PMID:26228095

  17. Epigenetic modulation as a therapeutic approach for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Dae; Lee, Aram; Choi, Jihea; Park, Youngsook; Kang, Hyesoo; Chang, Woochul; Lee, Myeong-Sok; Kim, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare but progressive and currently incurable disease, which is characterized by vascular remodeling in association with muscularization of the arterioles, medial thickening and plexiform lesion formation. Despite our advanced understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH and the recent therapeutic advances, PAH still remains a fatal disease. In addition, the susceptibility to PAH has not yet been adequately explained. Much evidence points to the involvement of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases including cancer, peripheral hypertension and asthma. The knowledge gained from the epigenetic study of various human diseases can also be applied to PAH. Thus, the pursuit of novel therapeutic targets via understanding the epigenetic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of PAH, such as DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA, might be an attractive therapeutic avenue for the development of a novel and more effective treatment. This review provides a general overview of the current advances in epigenetics associated with PAH, and discusses the potential for improved treatment through understanding the role of epigenetics in the development of PAH. PMID:26228095

  18. Neuroinflammation in pulmonary hypertension: concept, facts, and relevance.

    PubMed

    Hilzendeger, Aline M; Shenoy, Vinayak; Raizada, Mohan K; Katovich, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive lung disease characterized by elevated pressure in the lung vasculature, resulting in right-sided heart failure and premature death. The pathogenesis of PH is complex and multifactorial, involving a dysregulated autonomic nervous system and immune response. Inflammatory mechanisms have been linked to the development and progression of PH; however, these are usually restricted to systemic and/or local lung tissue. Inflammation within the CNS, often referred to as neuroinflammation involves activation of the microglia, the innate immune cells that are found specifically in the brain and spinal cord. Microglial activation results in the release of several cytokines and chemokines that trigger neuroinflammation, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and metabolic disorders. In this review, we introduce the concept of neuroinflammation in the context of PH, and discuss possible strategies that could be developed for PH therapy based on this concept. PMID:25090964

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Oral Medications for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ataru; Inoue, Sachie; Ishii, Tomonori; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2016-07-27

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease that imposes a significant burden on patients. Although multiple treatment options for PAH are available, head-to-head comparisons are difficult to conduct. Network meta-analysis (NMA) can be a useful alternative for direct comparison to estimate the relative effectiveness of multiple treatments. The objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and NMA to evaluate the relative effectiveness among oral PAH medications.Data collection was performed by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Ichushi-Web. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing at least 1 of the following 3 outcome measurements; 6-minute walk distance test (6MWD), WHO functional class (WHOFC), and mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) were included (PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015016557). Outcomes were evaluated by estimating the differences in the mean change from baseline or by estimating the odds ratios. Analyses were performed using WinBUGS 1.4.3.Seven double-blind RCTs were eligible. NMA results showed similar improvements in 6MWD for all medications assessed. Bosentan and sildenafil caused a statistically significant improvement in WHOFC compared to other medications.The relative effectiveness of oral PAH medications could be compared using NMA, which suggested the superiority of bosentan and sildenafil in the improvement of WHOFC. PMID:27385603

  20. New perspectives for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Reshma S; MacAllister, Raymond J; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis. Therapeutic options remain limited despite the introduction of prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors within the last 15 years; these interventions address predominantly the endothelial and vascular dysfunctionS associated with the condition, but simply delay progression of the disease rather than offer a cure. In an attempt to improve efficacy, emerging approaches have focused on targeting the pro-proliferative phenotype that underpins the pulmonary vascular remodelling in the lung and contributes to the impaired circulation and right heart failure. Many novel targets have been investigated and validated in animal models of PH, including modulation of guanylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, tyrosine kinases, Rho kinase, bone morphogenetic proteins signalling, 5-HT, peroxisome proliferator activator receptors and ion channels. In addition, there is hope that combinations of such treatments, harnessing and optimizing vasodilator and anti-proliferative properties, will provide a further, possibly synergistic, increase in efficacy; therapies directed at the right heart may also offer an additional benefit. This overview highlights current therapeutic options, promising new therapies, and provides the rationale for a combination approach to treat the disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21175577

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Hilberg, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on PH in relation to COPD and ILD from a clinical perspective with emphasis on diagnosis, biomarkers, prevalence, impact, treatment, and practical implications. PH in COPD and ILD is associated with a poor prognosis, and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However, treatment with systemically administered pulmonary vasodilators implies the risk of worsening the ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with lung disease. Inhaled vasodilators may be better suited for PH in lung disease, but new treatment modalities are also required. PMID:23849967

  2. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a voyage around the year 2008].

    PubMed

    Baloira, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    There have been spectacular developments in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), both in its treatment and knowledge of its pathogenesis. Several studies have been published throughout 2008 that have contributed to improve these two aspects a little. As regards the pathogenesis, mutations in BMPR2 continue gaining points as fundamental factors in the development of the disease. It has been shown that patients who carry any of them have a more rapid and severe clinical course. There is a relationship between the BMPR2 pathway and inflammation of the pulmonary vascular tree. A new anti-endothelin drug, ambrisentan, has also appeared on the scene this year. With an efficacy comparable to other drugs of its group, the secondary effects appear to be a lot less. An important work has been the demonstration of an improvement in several parameters in functional class II in patients with PAH with bosentan. Results using new combinations, such as sildenafil and epoprostenol, have also been presented. A common type of PAH is that which seems to be associated with thromboembolic disease. Treatment with sildenafil and in some selected cases, percutaneous angioplasty, has obtained favourable responses. Finally, in 2008, two new consensus documents have emerged, one Spanish and the other British, which in the light of current knowledge, give a clearer insight into the management of this serious disease. PMID:19303531

  3. Imaging the heart in pulmonary hypertension: an update.

    PubMed

    Grünig, Ekkehard; Peacock, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive imaging of the heart plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and several well-established techniques are available for assessing performance of the right ventricle, the key determinant of patient survival. While right heart catheterisation is mandatory for establishing a diagnosis of PH, echocardiography is the most important screening tool for early detection of PH. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is also a reliable and practical tool that can be used as part of the diagnostic work-up. Echocardiography can measure a range of haemodynamic and anatomical variables (e.g. pericardial effusion and pulmonary artery pressure), whereas CMRI provides complementary information to echocardiography via high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging. Together with echocardiography and CMRI, techniques such as high-resolution computed tomography and positron emission tomography may also be valuable for screening, monitoring and follow-up assessments of patients with PH, but their clinical relevance has yet to be established. Technological advances have produced new variants of echocardiography, CMRI and positron emission tomography, and these permit closer examination of myocardial architecture, motion and deformation. Integrating these new tools into clinical practice in the future may lead to more precise noninvasive determination of diagnosis, risk and prognosis for PH. PMID:26621979

  4. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively. PMID:26047999

  5. Functional Prostacyclin Synthase Promoter Polymorphisms. Impact in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Amber R.; Lu, Xiao; Conklin, David S.; Del Rosario, Mark J.; Lowe, Anita M.; Elos, Mihret T.; Fettig, Lynsey M.; Wong, Randall E.; Hara, Naoko; Cogan, Joy D.; Phillips, John A.; Taylor, Matthew R.; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Loyd, James E.; Geraci, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, vascular remodeling, and ultimately right ventricular heart failure. PAH can have a genetic component (heritable PAH), most often through mutations of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, and idiopathic and associated forms. Heritable PAH is not completely penetrant within families, with approximately 20% concurrence of inactivating bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutations and delayed onset of PAH disease. Because one of the treatment options is using prostacyclin analogs, we hypothesized that prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants associated with increased mRNA expression may play a protective role in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 unaffected carriers. Objectives: To characterize the range of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and assess their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. To determine the distribution of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in PAH, unaffected carriers in heritable PAH families, and control populations. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction approaches were used to genotype prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in more than 300 individuals. Prostacyclin synthase promoter haplotypes’ transcriptional activities were determined with luciferase reporter assays. Measurements and Main Results: We identified a comprehensive set of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and tested their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. We demonstrated differences of prostacyclin synthase promoter activities dependent on their haplotype. Conclusions: Prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants exhibit a range of transcriptional activities. We discovered a significant bias for more active prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in unaffected carriers as compared with affected patients with PAH. PMID:24605778

  6. Pulmonary Arterial Stiffness: Toward a New Paradigm in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Pathophysiology and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Myers, Cynthia; Brown, R Dale; Frid, Maria G; Tan, Wei; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of the pulmonary arterial bed with the subsequent increased load on the right ventricle is a paramount feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pathophysiology of vascular stiffening is a complex and self-reinforcing function of extracellular matrix remodeling, driven by recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and their interactions with resident vascular cells, and mechanotransduction of altered hemodynamic forces throughout the ventricular-vascular axis. New approaches to understanding the cell and molecular determinants of the pathophysiology combine novel biopolymer substrates, controlled flow conditions, and defined cell types to recapitulate the biomechanical environment in vitro. Simultaneously, advances are occurring to assess novel parameters of stiffness in vivo. In this comprehensive state-of-art review, we describe clinical hemodynamic markers, together with the newest translational echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging methods, to assess vascular stiffness and ventricular-vascular coupling. Finally, fluid-tissue interactions appear to offer a novel route of investigating the mechanotransduction processes and disease progression. PMID:26733189

  7. Dramatic and sustained responsiveness of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis-associated pulmonary hypertension to vasodilator therapy.

    PubMed

    May, Adam; Kane, Garvan; Yi, Eunhee; Frantz, Robert; Vassallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an uncommon diffuse lung disease characterized by the abnormal accumulation of Langerhans' cells around small airways and other distal lung compartments. Although pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a frequent complication of PLCH, the role of advanced PH therapies for PLCH-related PH is not well-established. We describe a PLCH patient with severe, disease-related PH that responded unexpectedly well to advanced PH therapy with sustained improvement over a 10 year follow-up period. This case indicates that PLCH-associated PH may, in certain instances, be highly responsive to advanced PH therapies and emphasizes the importance of trialing these therapies among patients with PLCH-related PH. PMID:26029568

  8. Dramatic and sustained responsiveness of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis-associated pulmonary hypertension to vasodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    May, Adam; Kane, Garvan; Yi, Eunhee; Frantz, Robert; Vassallo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an uncommon diffuse lung disease characterized by the abnormal accumulation of Langerhans' cells around small airways and other distal lung compartments. Although pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a frequent complication of PLCH, the role of advanced PH therapies for PLCH-related PH is not well-established. We describe a PLCH patient with severe, disease-related PH that responded unexpectedly well to advanced PH therapy with sustained improvement over a 10 year follow-up period. This case indicates that PLCH-associated PH may, in certain instances, be highly responsive to advanced PH therapies and emphasizes the importance of trialing these therapies among patients with PLCH-related PH. PMID:26029568

  9. Pulmonary vascular disease in mice xenografted with human BM progenitors from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Lichtin, Alan; Graham, Brian; George, Deepa; Aldred, Micheala; Hazen, Stanley L.; Loyd, James; Tuder, Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic myeloid progenitors released into the circulation are able to promote vascular remodeling through endothelium activation and injury. Endothelial injury is central to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a proliferative vasculopathy of the pulmonary circulation, but the origin of vascular injury is unknown. In the present study, mice transplanted with BM-derived CD133+ progenitor cells from patients with PAH, but not from healthy controls, exhibited morbidity and/or death due to features of PAH: in situ thrombi and endothelial injury, angioproliferative remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Myeloid progenitors from patients with heritable and/or idiopathic PAH all produced disease in xenografted mice. Analyses of hematopoietic transcription factors and colony formation revealed underlying abnormalities of progenitors that skewed differentiation toward the myeloid-erythroid lineage. The results of the present study suggest a causal role for hematopoietic stem cell abnormalities in vascular injury, right ventricular hypertrophy, and morbidity associated with PAH. PMID:22745307

  10. [Pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure. Part XI. Endothelin receptor blockers in the treatment of primary pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Batyraliev, T A; Makhmutkhodzhaev, S A; Ekinsi, E; Pataraia, S A; Pershukov, I V; Sidorenko, B A; Preobrazhenskiĭ, D V

    2007-01-01

    In a series of articles the authors discuss literature data concerning epidemiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), its current classification; peculiarities of its pathogenesis and treatment in various diseases and conditions. In the eleventh communication the authors discuss literature data related to the role of endothelin system in pathogenesis of primary (idiopathic) PAH, as well as PAH associated with diffuse diseases of connective tissue and congenital heart disease. This communication also contains presentation of clinical pharmacology of three available endothelin receptor blockers - bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan, and analysis of results of randomized controlled trials of efficacy and safety of these agents in patients with idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with diffuse diseases of connective tissue and congenital heart disease. PMID:18260899

  11. Recent progress in the diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2013-09-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension caused by non-resolving thromboembolisms of the pulmonary arteries. In Japan, in contrast to Western countries, CTEPH is more prevalent in women. A Japanese multicenter study reported that a form of CTEPH unrelated to deep vein thrombosis is associated with HLA-B⁎5201, suggesting that this form of CTEPH may be associated with vasculopathy. CTEPH can be cured by pulmonary endarterectomy, provided that the thrombi are surgically accessible; thus, early diagnosis is important, and all patients with exertional dyspnea should be evaluated for pulmonary hypertension. Ventilation/perfusion scans provide an excellent non-invasive means to distinguish CTEPH from pulmonary arterial hypertension. Similarly, computed tomographic pulmonary angiograms allow for the detection of thrombi and evaluation of pulmonary hemodynamics in a minimally invasive manner. Importantly, the absence of subpleural perfusion on pulmonary angiograms can suggest the presence of small vessel disease. Small vessel disease might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH, and its detection is essential in preventing operative death. Although no modern therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension have been approved for treatment of CTEPH, a recent randomized control trial of riociguat in patients with CTEPH demonstrated that riociguat significantly improved 6-min walking distance. Further investigations into treatments that target endothelial dysfunction and hyperproliferative CTEPH cells are needed. Recently, balloon pulmonary angioplasty has emerged as a promising treatment modality in Japan. A specialized medical team, including at least one expert surgeon, should make decisions regarding patients' candidacy for pulmonary endarterectomy and/or balloon pulmonary angioplasty. PMID:23978639

  12. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Natali, Delphine; Price, Laura C; Jaïs, Xavier; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease characterized by vascular proliferation and remodeling, resulting in a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance, right heart failure, and death. The pathogenesis of PAH is multifactorial, with endothelial cell dysfunction playing an integral role. This endothelial dysfunction is characterized by an overproduction of vasoconstrictors and proliferative factors, such as endothelin-1, and a reduction of vasodilators and antiproliferative factors, such prostacyclin and nitric oxide. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) is implicated in this process by inactivating cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the nitric oxide pathway second messenger. PDE-5 is abundantly expressed in lung tissue, and appears to be upregulated in PAH. Three oral PDE-5 inhibitors are available (sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil) and are the recommended first-line treatment for erectile dysfunction. Experimental studies have shown the beneficial effects of PDE-5 inhibitors on pulmonary vascular remodeling and vasodilatation, justifying their investigation in PAH. Randomized clinical trials in monotherapy or combination therapy have been conducted in PAH with sildenafil and tadalafil, which are therefore currently the approved PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH treatment. Sildenafil and tadalafil significantly improve clinical status, exercise capacity, and hemodynamics of PAH patients. Combination therapy of PDE-5 inhibitors with prostacyclin analogs and endothelin receptor antagonists may be helpful in the management of PAH although further studies are needed in this area. The third PDE-5 inhibitor, vardenafil, is currently being investigated in PAH. Side effects are usually mild and transient and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, digestive disorders, and myalgia. Mild and moderate renal or hepatic failure does not significantly affect the metabolism of PDE-5 inhibitors, whereas coadministration of bosentan decreases sildenafil and

  13. Are Hemodynamics Surrogate Endpoints in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Fritz, Jason S.; Smith, K. Akaya; Palevsky, Harold I.; Klinger, James R.; Halpern, Scott D.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While frequently assessed in trials and clinical practice, hemodynamic response to therapy has never been validated as a surrogate endpoint for clinical events in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods and Results We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized placebo-controlled trials to determine if treatment-induced changes in hemodynamic values at 12 weeks accounted for the relationship between treatment assignment and the probability of early clinical events (death, lung transplantation, atrial septostomy, PAH hospitalization, withdrawal for clinical worsening, escalation in PAH therapy). We included 1119 subjects with PAH. The median (interquartile range) age was 48 (37 – 59), and 23% were men. 656 (59%) received active therapy (101 [15%] iloprost, 118 [18%] sitaxsentan, 204 [31%] sildenafil, and 233 [36%] subcutaneous treprostinil). Active treatment significantly lowered right atrial pressure (RAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output and index (p < 0.01 for all). Changes in hemodynamic values (except for RAP and mPAP) were significantly associated with the risk of a clinical event (p ≤ 0.01 for all). While active treatment approximately halved the odds of a clinical event compared to placebo (p < 0.001), changes in hemodynamics accounted for only 1.2 – 13.9% of the overall treatment effect. Conclusions Treatment-induced changes in hemodynamics at 12 weeks only partially explain the impact of therapy on the probability of early clinical events in PAH. These findings suggest that resting hemodynamics are not valid surrogate endpoints for short-term events in PAH clinical trials. PMID:24951771

  14. Speckle Tracking Echocardiography to Evaluate for Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Rice, Jessica L; Stream, Amanda R; Fox, Daniel L; Geraci, Mark W; Vandivier, R William; Dorosz, Jennifer L; Bull, Todd M

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), increasing morbidity and mortality. Current echocardiographic measures have poor predictive value for the diagnosis of PH in COPD. Right ventricular (RV) strain obtained by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a measure of myocardial deformation which correlates with RV function and survival in subjects with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that RV strain measurements would be feasible and correlate with invasive hemodynamic measurements in patients with COPD. Retrospective analysis of RV strain values from subjects with severe COPD with echocardiogram within 48 hours of right heart catheterization was performed. First, 54 subjects were included in the analysis. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and RV strain could be estimated in 31% and 57%, respectively. Then, 61% had RV-focused apical views, and of those, RV strain could be obtained for 94%. RV free wall strain correlated with PVR (r = 0.41, p = 0.02). Subjects with pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) > 3 Wood units (WU) had less negative (worse) RV free wall strain values than those with PVR ≤ 3 WU, with a median strain of -20 (-23, -12) versus -23 (-29, -15), p < 0.05. A receiver operating characteristic curve demonstrated an RV free wall strain of > -23 to be 92% sensitive and 44% specific for identifying PVR > 3 WU (AUC 0.71). RV strain estimates are feasible in the majority of subjects with severe COPD. RV strain correlates with PVR and may improve screening for PH in subjects with COPD. PMID:26829151

  15. Cell Permeable Peptide Conjugated Nanoerythrosomes of Fasudil Prolong Pulmonary Arterial Vasodilation in PAH Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilesh; Patel, Brijeshkumar; Nahar, Kamrun; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a cell permeable peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), conjugated nanoerythrosomes (NERs) containing fasudil, a rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, produces prolonged pulmonary preferential vasodilation. CAR conjugated NERs containing fasudil were prepared by hypotonic lysis and extrusion method, optimized for various physicochemical properties in-vitro. The formulations were then used to study the hemodynamic efficacy in a monocrotaline-induced rodent model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CAR-NERs-Fasudil was spherical in shape with an average vesicle size and entrapment efficiency of 161.3±1.37nm and 48.81±1.96%, respectively. Formulations were stable for ~3 weeks when stored at 4°C and the drug was released in a controlled fashion for >48 hrs. The uptake of CAR-NERs-Fasudil by TGF-β activated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell was ~1.5 fold greater than the uptake of NERs-Fasudil. CAR-NERs-Fasudil inhibited ROCK activity and 5-hydroxytryptamine induced cell proliferation. In terms of reduction of pulmonary arterial pressure, intratracheal administration of CAR-NERs-Fasudil was ~2-fold more specific to the lungs compared with plain fasudil. Overall, CAR peptide grafted nanoerythrosomes offers a new platform for improving the therapeutic efficacy of a rho-kinase inhibitor, fasudil, without affecting peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25460151

  16. Pulmonary vascular morphology as an imaging biomarker in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J. C.; Agarwal, M.; González, G.; Come, C. E.; Diaz, A. A.; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, G.; Hunsaker, A.; San José Estépar, R.; Waxman, A. B.; Washko, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) have morphologic changes to the pulmonary vasculature. These include pruning of the distal vessels, dilation of the proximal vessels, and increased vascular tortuosity. Advances in image processing and computer vision enable objective detection and quantification of these processes in clinically acquired computed tomographic (CT) scans. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the pulmonary vasculature were created from the CT angiograms of 18 patients with CTEPH diagnosed using imaging and hemodynamics as well as 15 control patients referred to our Dyspnea Clinic and found to have no evidence of pulmonary vascular disease. Compared to controls, CTEPH patients exhibited greater pruning of the distal vasculature (median density of small-vessel volume: 2.7 [interquartile range (IQR): 2.5–3.0] vs. 3.2 [3.0–3.8]; P = 0.008), greater dilation of proximal arteries (median fraction of blood in large arteries: 0.35 [IQR: 0.30–0.41] vs. 0.23 [0.21–0.31]; P = 0.0005), and increased tortuosity in the pulmonary arterial tree (median: 4.92% [IQR: 4.85%–5.21%] vs. 4.63% [4.39%–4.92%]; P = 0.004). CTEPH was not associated with dilation of proximal veins or increased tortuosity in the venous system. Distal pruning of the vasculature was correlated with the cardiac index (R = 0.51, P = 0.04). Quantitative models derived from CT scans can be used to measure changes in vascular morphology previously described subjectively in CTEPH. These measurements are also correlated with invasive metrics of pulmonary hemodynamics, suggesting that they may be used to assess disease severity. Further work in a larger cohort may enable the use of such measures as a biomarker for diagnostic, phenotyping, and prognostic purposes. PMID:27162616

  17. Alterations in lung arginine metabolism in lambs with pulmonary hypertension associated with increased pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Kumar, Sanjiv; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Tian, Jing; Rehmani, Imran; Datar, Sanjeev; Oishi, Peter; Fratz, Sohrab; Venema, Richard C.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate impaired nitric oxide (NO) signaling in children and animal models with congenital heart defects and increased pulmonary blood flow. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these alterations remain incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if early changes in arginine metabolic pathways could play a role in the reduced NO signaling demonstrated in our lamb model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt lambs). The activities of the arginine recycling enzymes, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) were both decreased in lung tissues of Shunt lambs while arginase activity was increased. Associated with these alterations, lung L-arginine levels were decreased. These changes correlated with an increase in NO synthase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This study provides further insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to decreased NO signaling in Shunt lambs and suggests that altered arginine metabolism may play a role in the development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary hypertension secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:19818875

  18. Pregnancy outcomes in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome treated with sildenafil monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Pichy Ann; Benedicto, Jubert

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension have not been documented in our local setting. In our institution, access to therapies like nitric oxide, inhaled prostacyclin and iloprost is limited. We describe two such women given sildenafil monotherapy between April and May 2011. Both had an atrial septal defect complicated by Eisenmenger syndrome. Both survived – one after elective Caesarean section for malpresentation (breech) under general anaesthesia, the other after an assisted vaginal delivery. In addition to oral sildenafil, both received oxygen supplementation. To date, there have been three reported cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension in pregnancy treated with sildenafil in combination with another drug. Our two cases demonstrate that treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension using sildenafil as monotherapy may allow stabilization of the maternal condition and improve clinical outcomes for both mother and baby. However, pregnancy is still discouraged in women with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  19. Pulmonary hypertension due to obstructive sleep apnea in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Soon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Kim, Young-Hwue; Ko, Jae-Kon; Park, In-Sook

    2012-06-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is characterized by peculiar facies, mental retardation, broad thumbs, and great toes. Approximately one-third of the affected individuals have a variety of congenital heart diseases. They can also have upper airway obstruction during sleep, due to hypotonia and the anatomy of the oropharynx and airway, which make these patients susceptible to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In our case, pulmonary hypertension was caused, successively, by congenital heart defects (a large patent ductus arteriosus and arch hypoplasia) and obstructive sleep apnea during early infancy. The congenital heart defects were surgically corrected, but persistent pulmonary hypertension was identified 2 months after the operation. This pulmonary hypertension was due to OSA, and it was relieved by nasal continuous positive airway pressure. This case is the first report of pulmonary hypertension from OSA in a young infant with RTS. PMID:22745646

  20. What is the clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in acute respiratory distress syndrome? A review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Mita, Carol; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Elevated pulmonary arterial pressures appear to be a prominent feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Current clinical guidelines for the management of ARDS do not specifically address treatment of pulmonary hypertension or associated right ventricular dysfunction because the clinical significance of this entity remains unclear. Interpretation of elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, pulmonary vascular resistance, and transpulmonary gradient as well as signs of right ventricular dysfunction is confounded by the effects of positive pressure ventilation. There does not appear to be a consistent relationship between the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular failure and mortality in patients with ARDS, but it is unclear if right ventricular failure contributes to the mortality risk per se or if the underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension, including intravascular micro and macro thrombosis, are simply markers for systemic dysregulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis that may lead to multiorgan failure in ARDS. While studies of pulmonary vasodilator therapies have not shown a mortality benefit in ARDS, such trials have targeted improved oxygenation rather than improved pulmonary hemodynamics so that the possible contribution of improved right ventricular function to better outcomes has not been directly tested in large trials. Future studies are needed to determine if treatment of pulmonary hypertension and associated right ventricular dysfunction will affect mortality in patients with ARDS. PMID:24193181

  1. Plasma endothelin-1 levels in patients with systemic sclerosis: influence of pulmonary or systemic arterial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, S; Ferri, C; Di Francesco, L; Baldoncini, R; Carlesimo, M; Bottoni, U; Properzi, G; Santucci, A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the behaviour of circulating endothelin-1 (ET-1) in patients affected by systemic sclerosis and to elucidate the relationship between systemic and pulmonary plasma peptide and arterial pressure levels. METHODS--Plasma ET-1 concentrations were determined in 48 patients affected by systemic sclerosis (41 women, seven men; mean age 47.2 (SD 5.5) years) with or without systemic or pulmonary hypertension (or both). A group of 18 normal volunteers served as controls (15 women, three men; mean age 45.0 (10.1) years). RESULTS--Plasma ET-1 levels were significantly greater in patients affected by systemic sclerosis (1.65 (0.29) pg/ml) than in controls (0.63 (0.19) pg/ml) (p < 0.0001). Pulmonary artery systolic hypertension alone was present in 14 patients with systemic sclerosis (50.5 (8.49) mm Hg, range 37-67 mm Hg), and systemic hypertension alone (160.7 (5.9)/100.6 (3.2) mm Hg) was present in 11 patients. Both conditions were present in 12 patients, while 11 patients had systemic hypertension. There were no significant differences in plasma ET-1 levels between patients with pulmonary hypertension alone (1.62 (0.21) pg/ml) and those with systemic hypertension alone (1.65 (0.43) pg/ml). In particular, patients with normal pulmonary artery and systemic pressures (n = 11) had plasma ET-1 concentrations identical to those found in patients (n = 12) with both pulmonary and systemic hypertension (1.70 (0.15) v 1.64 (0.35) pg/ml, respectively). No correlations were observed between plasma ET-1 and either pulmonary or systemic pressures. CONCLUSION--Systemic sclerosis is characterised by increased plasma ET-1 levels, but neither pulmonary nor systemic hypertension are accompanied by further increase in plasma peptide levels. PMID:7495344

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital heart defects: are leukotrienes involved?

    PubMed Central

    Serraf, A.; Gascard, J-P.; Bruniaux, J.; Labat, C.; Planche, C.

    1997-01-01

    The circulating levels of leukotriene E4 in infants with congenital heart defects, increased pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary arterial hypertension, were determined and compared with infants with decreased pulmonary blood flow (Tetralogy of Fallot). There was no correlation (r=0.38) between the pulmonary arterial pressure (56 ± 4 mmHg) and the leukotriene E4 levels (1.37 ± 0.67 ng/ml blood) measured in peripheral blood samples from the hypertensive group prior to surgery. There was considerable variation in the detectable leukotriene E4 levels in blood samples from different patients. The levels detected in the blood samples between the two groups of patients was similar. These data suggest that neither the surgical repair during cardiopulmonary bypass nor the pulmonary hypertension appeared to modify the leukotriene E4 blood levels in the small number of patients studied. PMID:18472866

  3. HIF2α–arginase axis is essential for the development of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crosby, Alexi; Macias, David; Branco, Cristina; Colaço, Renato D. D. R.; Southwood, Mark; Toshner, Mark; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is correlated with pulmonary vascular remodeling. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) HIF-1α and HIF-2α are known to contribute to the process of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling; however, the specific role of pulmonary endothelial HIF expression in this process, and in the physiological process of vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia, remains unclear. Here we show that pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α is a critical regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The rise in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) normally observed following chronic hypoxic exposure was absent in mice with pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α deletion. The RVSP of mice lacking HIF-2α in pulmonary endothelium after exposure to hypoxia was not significantly different from normoxic WT mice and much lower than the RVSP values seen in WT littermate controls and mice with pulmonary endothelial deletion of HIF-1α exposed to hypoxia. Endothelial HIF-2α deletion also protected mice from hypoxia remodeling. Pulmonary endothelial deletion of arginase-1, a downstream target of HIF-2α, likewise attenuated many of the pathophysiological symptoms associated with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We propose a mechanism whereby chronic hypoxia enhances HIF-2α stability, which causes increased arginase expression and dysregulates normal vascular NO homeostasis. These data offer new insight into the role of pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α in regulating the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. PMID:27432976

  4. Isorhynchophylline protects against pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppresses PASMCs proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin; Cui, Yuqian; Deng, Wei; Xu, Dachun; Han, Hui; Wang, Hao; Chen, Yuguo; Li, Yu; Wu, Dawei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We focus on PASMCs proliferation in the pathogenesis of PAH. • Isorhynchophylline inhibited PASMCs proliferation and alleviated PAH. • IRN blocked PDGF-Rβ phosphorylation and its downstream signal transduction. • IRN regulated cyclins and CDKs to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. • We reported IRN has the potential to be a candidate for PAH treatment. - Abstract: Increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Isorhynchophylline (IRN) is a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla. It has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether IRN can influence the development of PAH. Here we examined the effect of IRN on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. Our data demonstrated that IRN prevented MCT induced PAH in rats, as assessed by right ventricular (RV) pressure, the weight ratio of RV to (left ventricular + septum) and RV hypertrophy. IRN significantly attenuated the percentage of fully muscularized small arterioles, the medial wall thickness, and the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro studies, IRN concentration-dependently inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis showed that IRN caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. IRN-induced growth inhibition was associated with downregulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as an increase in p27Kip1 levels in PDGF-BB-stimulated PASMCs. Moreover, IRN negatively modulated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, ERK1/2, Akt/GSK3β, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). These results demonstrate that IRN could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and

  5. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  6. Evaluation of the serotonin receptor blockers ketanserin and methiothepin on the pulmonary hypertensive responses of broilers to intravenously infused serotonin.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M E; Wideman, R F

    2006-04-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension remains incompletely understood. Many factors have been implicated; however, there has been great interest in the potent pulmonary vasoconstrictor serotonin (5-HT) due to episodes of primary pulmonary hypertension in humans triggered by serotoninergic appetite-suppressant drugs. Pulmonary hypertensive patients have elevated blood 5-HT levels and pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 5-HT is believed to be mediated through 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors that are expressed by pulmonary smooth muscle cells. The vascular remodeling associated with pulmonary hypertension also appears to require the serotonin transporter. We investigated the roles of 5-HT receptor blockers on the development of pulmonary hypertension induced by infusing 5-HT i.v. in broilers. For this purpose, we treated broilers with the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (5 mg/ kg of BW) or with the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist methiothepin (3 mg/kg of BW). Receptor blockade was followed by infusion of 5-HT while recording pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary arterial blood flow. The results demonstrate that methiothepin, but not ketanserin, eliminated the 5-HT-induced pulmonary hypertensive responses in broilers. The 5-HT2A receptor does not, therefore, appear to play a role in the 5-HT-induced pulmonary hypertensive responses in broilers. Methiothepin did not inhibit pulmonary vascular contractility per se, because the pulmonary hypertensive response to the thromboxane A2 mimetic U44069 remained intact in methiothepin-treated broilers. Methiothepin will be a useful tool for evaluating the role of 5-HT in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) as well as the onset of pulmonary hypertension triggered by inflammatory stimuli such as bacterial lipolysaccharide. PMID:16615363

  7. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Zhang, B K; Liu, D; Nie, W; Yuan, J M; Wang, Z; Guo, Y M

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to determine if H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers, a condition frequently observed in a variety of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. 2. Two-week-old broilers were reared under normoxic conditions or exposed to normobaric hypoxia (6 h/day) with tissue levels of H(2)S adjusted by administering sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 10 µmol/kg body weight/day). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular mass, plasma and tissue H(2)S levels, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CSE) and vascular remodeling were determined at 35 d of age. 3. Exposure to hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension was characterized by elevated pulmonary pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. This was accompanied by decreased expression of CSE and decreased concentrations of plasma and tissue H(2)S. 4. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was significantly reduced by administration of NaHS but this protective effect was largely abolished by D, L-propargylglycerine, an inhibitor of CSE. 5. The results indicate that H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Supplementing NaHS or H(2)S could be a strategy for reducing hypoxia-induced hypertension in broilers. PMID:23281754

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension and Other Potentially Fatal Pulmonary Complications in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yukiko; Weiss, Jennifer E.; Haroldson, Kathryn L.; Lee, Tzielan; Punaro, Marilynn; Oliveira, Sheila; Rabinovich, Egla; Riebschleger, Meredith; Antón, Jordi; Blier, Peter R.; Gerloni, Valeria; Hazen, Melissa M; Kessler, Elizabeth; Onel, Karen; Passo, Murray H; Rennebohm, Robert M; Wallace, Carol A; Woo, Patricia; Wulffraat, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by fevers, rash and arthritis, for which IL1 and IL6 inhibitors appear effective. Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), interstitial lung disease (ILD) and alveolar proteinosis (AP) have been recently reported in sJIA patients with increased frequency. Our aim was to characterize and compare these cases to a larger cohort of sJIA patients. Methods sJIA patients who developed PAH, ILD and/or AP were identified through an electronic listserv, and their demographic, sJIA and pulmonary disease characteristics, and medication exposure information were collected. These features were compared to a cohort of sJIA patients enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry. Results Patients (N=25) were significantly (p<0.05) more likely than the CARRA registry cohort (N=389) to be female, have more systemic features, and to have been exposed to an IL-1 inhibitor, tocilizumab, infliximab, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide. Eighty% were diagnosed after 2004. Twenty (80%) patients had MAS during their disease course and 15 (60%) had MAS at pulmonary diagnosis. Sixteen patients had PAH, 5 AP and 7 ILD. Seventeen (68%) patients were taking or recently (≤1 month) discontinued a biologic agent at pulmonary symptom onset; 12 (48%) were taking anti-IL1 therapy (primarily anakinra). Seventeen (68%) patients died at a mean of 8.8 months from pulmonary diagnosis. Conclusions PAH, AP and ILD are under-recognized complications of sJIA which are frequently fatal. These may be the result of severe uncontrolled systemic disease activity, and may be influenced by medication exposure. PMID:23139240

  9. Thrombospondin-1 null mice are resistant to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective Chronic hypoxia induces pulmonary hypertension in mice. Smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and medial thickening characterize the vasculature of these animals. Thrombospondin-1 null (TSP-1-/-) mice spontaneously develop pulmonary smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and medial thickening. In addition, TSP-1 produced by the pulmonary endothelium inhibits pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell growth. Based on these observations we sought to describe the pulmonary vascular changes in TSP-1-/- mice exposed to chronic hypoxia. Methods We exposed TSP-1-/- and wild type (WT) mice to a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 0.1 for up to six weeks. Pulmonary vascular remodeling was evaluated using tissue morphometrics. Additionally, right ventricle systolic pressures (RVSP) and right ventricular hypertrophy by right ventricle/left ventricle + septum ratios (RV/LV+S) were measured to evaluate pulmonary hypertensive changes. Finally, acute pulmonary vasoconstriction response in both TSP-1-/- and WT mice was evaluated by acute hypoxia and U-46619 (a prostaglandin F2 analog) response. Results In hypoxia, TSP-1-/- mice had significantly lower RVSP, RV/LV+S ratios and less pulmonary vascular remodeling when compared to WT mice. TSP-1-/- mice also had significantly lower RVSP in response to acute pulmonary vasoconstriction challenges than their WT counterparts. Conclusion TSP-1-/- mice had diminished pulmonary vasoconstriction response and were less responsive to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension than their wild type counterparts. This observation suggests that TSP-1 could play an active role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:20441584

  10. Effects of Different Pulmonary Vasodilators on Arterial Saturation in a Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Eva Maria; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Bechem, Martin; Keldenich, Jörg; Klipp, Alexandra; Schaefer, Katja; Ulbrich, Hannes-Friedrich; Truebel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Background Approved therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension can induce oxygen desaturation when administered to patients with secondary forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH), probably due to an increase in ventilation/perfusion mismatch. Thus, so far these treatments have largely failed in secondary forms of PH. Methods We established an animal model of heterogeneous lung ventilation to evaluate the desaturation potential of mechanistically distinct vasoactive drugs launched or currently in clinical development for the treatment of PH. Single-lung ventilation was induced in five groups (N = 6) of anesthetized minipigs (7 weeks, 4 to 5 kg BW), and their hemodynamic parameters were monitored before and after intravenous injection of control (vehicle only), endothelin antagonist (bosentan; 0.3, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil; 3, 10, 30, 100 µg/kg), and soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators (BAY 41–8543 and riociguat; 1, 3, 10, 30 µg/kg). Cumulative doses were administered before successive unilateral ventilation cycles. The doses were chosen to achieve equal effect on blood pressure by the different pharmacologic principles. Results Single-lung ventilation resulted in transient increases in mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and desaturation. In contrast to control, all drugs dose-dependently decreased hypoxic mPAP (a positive treatment effect) and increased area under the arterial hemoglobin saturation curve (unwanted desaturation effect). Riociguat and bosentan reduced hypoxic mPAP to the greatest extent, while the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators riociguat and BAY 41–8543 lowered arterial oxygen saturation of hemoglobin the least. Conclusions Future investigations will be required to confirm these findings in clinical settings. PMID:24015306

  11. Calcium antagonists, diltiazem and nifedipine, protect broilers against low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Guo, Yuming; Qiao, Jian

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether calcium antagonists, diltiazem and nifedipine, can depress low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) in broilers (also known as ascites) and to characterize their efficacy on hemodynamics and pulmonary artery function. Chicks were randomly allocated into six experimental groups and orally administered with vehicle, 5.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)/12 h nifedipine or 15.0 mg/kg BW/12 h diltiazem from 16 to 43 days of age under low temperature. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the ascites heart index (AHI), the erythrocyte packed cell volume (PCV) and the relative percentage of medial pulmonary artery thickness were examined on days 29, 36 and 43. The data showed that administration of diltiazem protected broilers from low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. Although nifedipine prevented mPAP from increasing during the early stage, it did not suppress the development of PH during the late stage and did not keep heart rate (HR), PCV, AHI and the thickness of pulmonary small artery smooth muscle layer at the normal levels. Taken together, our results showed that diltiazem can effectively prevent low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers with fewer side-effects and may be a potential compound for the prevention of this disease in poultry industry. PMID:20662820

  12. Arginase inhibition protects against hypoxia‑induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjin; Sun, Bolin; Song, Xuepeng; Zheng, Yanbo; Wang, Ligang; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to determine the role of arginase (Arg) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro, human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) were cultured under hypoxic conditions with, or without, the Arg inhibitor, S‑(2‑boronoethyl)‑l‑cysteine (BEC), for 48 h, following which the proliferation of the HPASMCs was determined using MTT and cell counting assays. For the in vivo investigation, 30 male rats were randomly divided into the following three groups (n=10 per group): i) control group, ii) PAH group and iii) BEC group, in which the right ventricle systolic pressure (RVSP) of the rats was assessed. The levels of cyclin D1, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)4 and p27 were measured in vitro and in vivo. The phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular‑related kinase (ERK) were also measured in HPASMCs. In vitro, compared with the hypoxia group, Arg inhibition reduced HPASMC proliferation and reduced the expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, phosphorylated (p‑)Akt and p‑ERK. By contrast, Arg inhibition increased the expression of p27. In vivo, compared with the control group, the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were reduced in the PAH group, however, the expression of p27 and the RVSP increased. In the BEC group, the opposite effects were observed. Therefore, it was suggested that Arg inhibition may reduce the RVSP of PAH rats and reduce HPASMC proliferation by decreasing the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, increasing the expression of p27, and partly reducing the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. PMID:26126810

  13. Molecular pathogenesis and current pathology of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Jesus Perez, Vinicio A

    2016-05-01

    Following its initial description over a century ago, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) continues to challenge researchers committed to understanding its pathobiology and finding a cure. The last two decades have seen major developments in our understanding of the genetics and molecular basis of PAH that drive cells within the pulmonary vascular wall to produce obstructive vascular lesions; presently, the field of PAH research has taken numerous approaches to dissect the complex amalgam of genetic, molecular and inflammatory pathways that interact to initiate and drive disease progression. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of PAH pathology and the role that genetic factors and environmental influences share in the development of vascular lesions and abnormal cell function. We also discuss how animal models can assist in elucidating gene function and the study of novel therapeutics, while at the same time addressing the limitations of the most commonly used rodent models. Novel experimental approaches based on application of next generation sequencing, bioinformatics and epigenetics research are also discussed as these are now being actively used to facilitate the discovery of novel gene mutations and mechanisms that regulate gene expression in PAH. Finally, we touch on recent discoveries concerning the role of inflammation and immunity in PAH pathobiology and how they are being targeted with immunomodulatory agents. We conclude that the field of PAH research is actively expanding and the major challenge in the coming years is to develop a unified theory that incorporates genetic and mechanistic data to address viable areas for disease modifying drugs that can target key processes that regulate the evolution of vascular pathology of PAH. PMID:26694808

  14. Prevalence, Predictors, and Outcomes of Pulmonary Hypertension in CKD.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Roy, Jason; Tao, Kelvin; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Chen, Jing; Deo, Rajat; Flack, John M; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Plappert, Theodore J; Raj, Dominic S; Saydain, Ghulam; Sondheimer, James H; Sood, Ruchi; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Dweik, Raed A; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes in the dialysis and general populations, but its effect in CKD is unclear. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of PH measures and their associations with long-term clinical outcomes in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study participants who had Doppler echocardiography performed were considered for inclusion. PH was defined as the presence of estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) >35 mmHg and/or tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) >2.5 m/s. Associations between PH, PASP, and TRV and cardiovascular events, renal events, and all-cause mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 2959 eligible participants, 21% (n=625) had PH, with higher rates among those with lower levels of kidney function. In the multivariate model, older age, anemia, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy were associated with greater odds of having PH. After adjusting for relevant confounding variables, PH was independently associated with higher risk for death (hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.72) and cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.52) but not renal events. Similarly, TRV and PASP were associated with death and cardiovascular events but not renal events. In this study of patients with CKD and preserved left ventricular systolic function, we report a high prevalence of PH. PH and higher TRV and PASP (echocardiographic measures of PH) are associated with adverse outcomes in CKD. Future studies may explain the mechanisms that underlie these findings. PMID:26386072

  15. Constitutive Reprogramming of Fibroblast Mitochondrial Metabolism in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Tauber, Jan; Li, Min; Zhang, Hui; Flockton, Amanda R; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Chelladurai, Prakash; D'Alessandro, Angelo; El Kasmi, Karim C; Ježek, Petr; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-07-01

    Remodeling of the distal pulmonary artery wall is a characteristic feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In hypoxic PH, the most substantial pathologic changes occur in the adventitia. Here, there is marked fibroblast proliferation and profound macrophage accumulation. These PH fibroblasts (PH-Fibs) maintain a hyperproliferative, apoptotic-resistant, and proinflammatory phenotype in ex vivo culture. Considering that a similar phenotype is observed in cancer cells, where it has been associated, at least in part, with specific alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, we sought to define the state of mitochondrial metabolism in PH-Fibs. In PH-Fibs, pyruvate dehydrogenase was markedly inhibited, resulting in metabolism of pyruvate to lactate, thus consistent with a Warburg-like phenotype. In addition, mitochondrial bioenergetics were suppressed and mitochondrial fragmentation was increased in PH-Fibs. Most importantly, complex I activity was substantially decreased, which was associated with down-regulation of the accessory subunit nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 4 (NDUFS4). Owing to less-efficient ATP synthesis, mitochondria were hyperpolarized and mitochondrial superoxide production was increased. This pro-oxidative status was further augmented by simultaneous induction of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced oxidase 4. Although acute and chronic exposure to hypoxia of adventitial fibroblasts from healthy control vessels induced increased glycolysis, it did not induce complex I deficiency as observed in PH-Fibs. This suggests that hypoxia alone is insufficient to induce NDUFS4 down-regulation and constitutive abnormalities in complex I. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that, in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling in PH, alterations in fibroblast mitochondrial metabolism drive distinct changes in cellular behavior, which potentially occur independently of hypoxia. PMID:26699943

  16. Serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 in children with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Melahat Melek; Oguz, Ayse Deniz; Sanli, Cihat; Cevik, Ayhan

    2014-04-01

    This prospective cross-sectional study attempted to determine both the usefulness of the serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as a biomarker for pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease and the nature of this marker's association with catheter angiographic findings. Our study included a total of 70 male and female children, comprising 30 patients with both pulmonary artery hypertension and congenital heart disease, 20 patients with congenital heart disease alone, and 20 healthy control subjects. Levels of ICAM-1 in plasma samples from all groups were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Cardiac catheterization was also performed in all patients. The mean serum ICAM-1 levels in pediatric patients who had congenital heart disease with and without pulmonary artery hypertension were 349.6 ± 72.9 ng/mL and 312.3 ± 69.5 ng/mL, respectively (P=0.002). In healthy control subjects, the mean serum ICAM-1 level was 231.4 ± 60.4 ng/mL. According to the results of this study, the ICAM-1 level of the pulmonary artery hypertension group was significantly higher than those of the congenital heart disease group and the healthy control group. Correlation analysis showed that ICAM-1 level was correlated with systolic and mean pulmonary artery pressures (r=0.62, P=0.001; r=0.57, P=0.001)-which are 2 important values used in diagnosis of pulmonary artery hypertension. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded consistent results for the prediction of pulmonary artery hypertension. Therefore, we conclude that ICAM-1 has potential use as a biomarker for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary artery hypertension. PMID:24808775

  17. Serum Levels of Soluble ICAM-1 in Children with Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Oguz, Melahat Melek; Oguz, Ayse Deniz; Sanli, Cihat; Cevik, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    This prospective cross-sectional study attempted to determine both the usefulness of the serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as a biomarker for pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease and the nature of this marker's association with catheter angiographic findings. Our study included a total of 70 male and female children, comprising 30 patients with both pulmonary artery hypertension and congenital heart disease, 20 patients with congenital heart disease alone, and 20 healthy control subjects. Levels of ICAM-1 in plasma samples from all groups were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Cardiac catheterization was also performed in all patients. The mean serum ICAM-1 levels in pediatric patients who had congenital heart disease with and without pulmonary artery hypertension were 349.6 ± 72.9 ng/mL and 312.3 ± 69.5 ng/mL, respectively (P=0.002). In healthy control subjects, the mean serum ICAM-1 level was 231.4 ± 60.4 ng/mL. According to the results of this study, the ICAM-1 level of the pulmonary artery hypertension group was significantly higher than those of the congenital heart disease group and the healthy control group. Correlation analysis showed that ICAM-1 level was correlated with systolic and mean pulmonary artery pressures (r=0.62, P=0.001; r=0.57, P=0.001)—which are 2 important values used in diagnosis of pulmonary artery hypertension. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded consistent results for the prediction of pulmonary artery hypertension. Therefore, we conclude that ICAM-1 has potential use as a biomarker for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary artery hypertension. PMID:24808775

  18. New models of pulmonary hypertension based on VEGF receptor blockade-induced endothelial cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolls, Mark R.; Mizuno, Shiro; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima; Farkas, Laszlo; Drake, Jennnifer I.; Al Husseini, Aysar; Gomez-Arroyo, Jose G.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Bogaard, Herman J.

    2012-01-01

    In spite of treatment, severe angioproliferative pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a disease characterized by great morbidity and shortened survival. New treatment strategies for patients with PAH are needed, and after drug development, preclinical studies are best conducted in animal models which present with pulmonary angio-obliterative disease and right heart failure. A rat model of severe pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure, described a decade ago, continues to be investigated and provide insight into the nature of the lung vascular lesions and mechanisms of cardiac adaptation to an altered lung circulation. This rat model is based on the combination of VEGF receptor blockade with Su5416 and chronic hypoxia; use of this pulmonary hypertension induction strategy led to developing the concept of apoptosis-dependent compensatory vascular cell growth. Although, often employed in experimental designs, chronic hypoxia is not necessary for the development of angio-obliterative pulmonary hypertension. Left pneumonectomy combined with Su5416 also results in severe pulmonary hypertension in normoxic conditions. Similarly, the immune insufficiency component of severe PAH can be modeled in athymic rats (lacking T-lymphocytes). In these rats housed under normoxic conditions, treatment with the VEGFR receptor blocker results in angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension; cardiopulmonary disease in these animals can be prevented by immune reconstitution of regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Finally, chronic hypoxia can be replaced with another stimulator of HIF-1α: Ovalbumin (Ova). Immunization of rats with Ova increases lung tissue HIF-1α protein expression, and in Su5416-treated rats causes lethal pulmonary hypertension. Finally, we postulate that these models may also be useful for “reverse translation”; that is, the mechanisms of lung vascular cell death and growth and the modifying influences of immune and bone marrow cells that have been identified

  19. Estrogens and development of pulmonary hypertension - Interaction of estradiol metabolism and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Tofovic, Stevan P.

    2010-01-01

    Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by clustered proliferation of endothelial cells in the lumina of small size pulmonary arteries resulting in concentric obliteration of the lumina and formation of complex vascular structures known as plexiform lesions. This debilitating disease occurs more frequently in women, yet both animal studies in classical models of PAH and limited clinical data suggest protective effects of estrogens: the estrogen paradox in pulmonary hypertension. Little is known about the role of estrogens in PAH, but one line of evidence strongly suggests that the vascular protective effects of 17β-estradiol (estradiol; E2) are mediated largely by its downstream metabolites. Estradiol is metabolized to 2-hydroxyestradiol (2HE) by CYP1A1/CYP1B1, and 2HE is converted to 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) by catechol-O-methyl transferase. 2ME is extensively metabolized to 2-methoxyestrone, a metabolite that lacks biologic activity but which may be converted back to 2ME. 2ME has no estrogenic activity and its effects are mediated by estrogen receptors-independent mechanism(s). Notably, in systemic and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts 2ME exerts stronger anti-mitotic effects than E2 itself. E2 and 2ME, despite having similar effects on other cardiovascular cells, have opposing effects on endothelial cells; that is, in endothelial cells, E2 is pro-mitogenic, pro-angiogenic and anti- apoptotic, whereas 2ME is antimitogenic, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic. This may have significant ramifications in severe PAH that involves uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal, apoptosis resistant endothelial cells. Based on its cellular effects, 2ME should be expected to attenuate the progression of disease and provide protection in severe PAH. In contrast, E2, due to its mitogenic, angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic effects (otherwise desirable in normal, quiescent endothelial cells), may even adversely affect

  20. Incidence and risk factors of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in patients after acute pulmonary embolism