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Sample records for monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes

  1. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate. PMID:25846831

  2. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Compagnone, Adele; Caso, Paolo; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs) are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists. PMID:24282415

  3. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  4. Monogenic IL-1 Mediated Autoinflammatory and Immunodeficiency Syndromes: Finding the Right Balance in Response to Danger Signals

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Cailin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Interleukin -1 was the first cytokine identified and is a powerful inducer of fever and inflammation. The biologically active receptor for IL-1, shares signaling pathways with some pathogen recognition receptors, the toll like receptors (TLRs) which early on suggested an important role in innate immune function. DISCUSSION The discovery that some intracellular “danger receptors”, the NOD like receptors (NLRs) can assemble to form multimolecular platforms, the inflammasomes, that not only sense intracellular danger but also activate IL-1β, has provided the molecular basis for the integration of IL-1 as an early response mediator in danger recognition. The critical role of balancing IL-1 production and signaling in human disease has recently been demonstrated in rare human monogenic diseases with mutations that affect the meticulous control of IL-1 production, release and signaling by leading to decreased or increased TLR/IL-1 signaling. In diseases of decreased TLR/IL-1 signaling (IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies) patients are at risk for infections with gram positive organisms; and in diseases of increased signaling, patients develop systemic autoinflammatory diseases (Cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), and deficiency of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA)). CONCLUSION Monogenic defects in a number of rare diseases that affect the balance of TLR/IL-1 signaling have provided us with opportunities to study the systemic effects of IL-1 in human diseases. The molecular defects in CAPS and DIRA provided a therapeutic rationale for targeting IL-1 and the impressive clinical results from IL-1 blocking therapies have undoubtedly confirmed the pivotal role of IL-1 in human disease and spurred the exploration of modifying IL-1 signaling in a number of genetically complex common human diseases. PMID:20353899

  5. Pigmentary hypertrichosis and non-autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (PHID) syndrome is associated with severe chronic inflammation and cardiomyopathy, and represents a new monogenic autoinflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Senniappan, Senthil; Hughes, Marina; Shah, Pratik; Shah, Vanita; Kaski, Juan Pablo; Brogan, Paul; Hussain, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in SLC29A3 lead to pigmentary hypertrichosis and non-autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (PHID) and H syndromes, familial Rosai-Dorfman disease, and histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome. We report a new association of PHID syndrome with severe systemic inflammation, scleroderma-like changes, and cardiomyopathy. A 12-year-old girl with PHID syndrome presented with shortness of breath, hepatosplenomegaly, and raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. An echocardiogram showed biventricular myocardial hypertrophy, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed circumferential late gadolinium enhancement of the myocardium. No systemic amyloid deposits were observed on a whole-body serum amyloid P scintigraphy scan. Abdominal ultrasound revealed intra-abdominal fat surrounding the solid organs, suggesting a possibility of evolving lipodystrophy with visceral adiposity. PHID syndrome is a novel monogenic autoinflammatory syndrome (AIS) associated with severe elevation of serum amyloid. Lipodystrophy, cutaneous sclerodermatous changes, and cardiomyopathy were also present in this case. In contrast to other AIS, blockade of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis-α was ineffective. PMID:23729543

  6. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: disorders of amplified danger sensing and cytokine dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gina A Montealegre; de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases converges on the presence of exaggerated immune responses that are triggered through activation of altered pattern recognition receptor (PRR) pathways and result in cytokine/chemokine amplification loops and the inflammatory clinical phenotype seen in autoinflammatory patients. The PRR response can be triggered by accumulation of metabolites, by mutations in sensors leading to their constitutive overactivation, or by mutations in mediator cytokine pathways that lead to amplification and/or inability to downregulate an inflammatory response in hematopoietic and/or nonhematopoietic cells. The study of the pathogenesis of sterile inflammation in patients with autoinflammatory syndromes continues to uncover novel inflammatory pathways. PMID:24182851

  7. The protean ocular involvement in monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bascherini, Vittoria; Granato, Carmela; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Emmi, Giacomo; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Bacherini, Daniela; Franceschini, Rossella; Iannone, Florenzo; Salerni, Annabella; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Frediani, Bruno; Selmi, Carlo; Rigante, Donato; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Ocular involvement is frequent in the monogenic autoinflammatory disorders and generally occurs as spontaneously recurring inflammatory events at different ocular sites caused by the aberrant release of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-1β. Over the past decade, we witnessed a significant growth of eye abnormalities associated with idiopathic granulomatous disorders, familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome. The pathogenetic mechanisms of these disorders have shown the evidence of disrupted cytokine signaling, but the explanation for the heterogeneous ocular involvement remains to be elucidated. We herein review the monogenic autoinflammatory disorders affecting the eye, describing their main clinical features with specific regard to the ocular involvement, which can lead to decreased visual acuity and even blindness, if the primary disorder is undetected or left untreated. PMID:25833143

  8. [Autoinflammatory syndromes in childhood].

    PubMed

    Horneff, G

    2015-08-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are a group of hereditary and non-hereditary diseases of the innate immune system, characterized by inflammation with no apparent cause, recurrence at irregular intervals and manifestation on the skin, mucous membranes, joints, bone, gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels and the central nervous system (CNS). Amyloidosis and other possibly severe long-term complications are important. Advances in genetics and molecular biology have improved understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, including familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome and improved others. The vast majority of these diseases are based on activation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) pathway, so that inhibition of IL-1 provides a therapeutic option. Other syndromes are characterized by a granulomatous inflammation. Newer autoinflammatory diseases, such as chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) and stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI) are, however, driven by interferons. PMID:26238708

  9. Systemic and organ involvement in monogenic autoinflammatory disorders: a global review filtered through internists' lens.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs) are rare diseases driven by cytokine-mediated extraordinary sterile inflammation that results from the activation of innate immune pathways. The clinical hallmark of these diseases is the recurrence of stereotyped episodes of systemic- and organ-specific inflammation; the most common systems involved being the skin, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system. The autoinflammatory disorders may have a profound impact on the quality of life of the affected patients, and a delayed diagnosis may lead to severe complications, the most dreadful of which is AA-Amyloidosis. This review gives an overview on the four main AIDs, namely familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrinopathies, and mevalonate kinase deficiency, focusing on their clinical phenotype in adults and differential diagnosis, suggesting a diagnostic algorithm, and reviewing the available treatments. PMID:27221072

  10. IL-1 Blockade in Autoinflammatory Syndromes1

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Adriana A.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. Pathogenic variants in two interleukin-1 (IL-1)–regulating genes, NLRP3 and IL1RN, cause two severe and early-onset autoinflammatory syndromes, CAPS (cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes) and DIRA (deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist). The discovery of the mutations that cause CAPS and DIRA led to clinical and basic research that uncovered the key role of IL-1 in an extended spectrum of immune dysregulatory conditions. NLRP3 encodes cryopyrin, an intracellular “molecular sensor” that forms a multimolecular platform, the NLRP3 inflammasome, which links “danger recognition” to the activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The success and safety profile of drugs targeting IL-1 in the treatment of CAPS and DIRA have encouraged their wider use in other autoinflammatory syndromes including the classic hereditary periodic fever syndromes (familial Mediterranean fever, TNF receptor–associated periodic syndrome, and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome) and additional immune dysregulatory conditions that are not genetically well defined, including Still’s, Behcet’s, and Schnitzler diseases. The fact that the accumulation of metabolic substrates such as monosodium urate, ceramide, cholesterol, and glucose can trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome connects metabolic stress to IL-1β-mediated inflammation and provides a rationale for therapeutically targeting IL-1 in prevalent diseases such as gout, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease. PMID:24422572

  11. Biological Treatments: New Weapons in the Management of Monogenic Autoinflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lucherini, Orso Maria; Muscari, Isabella; Magnotti, Flora; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Guerrini, Susanna; Patti, Maria; Punzi, Leonardo; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders, an expanding group of hereditary diseases characterized by apparently unprovoked recurrent episodes of inflammation, without high-titre autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cells, has been revolutionized by the discovery that several of these conditions are caused by mutations in proteins involved in the mechanisms of innate immune response, including components of the inflammasome, cytokine receptors, receptor antagonists, and oversecretion of a network of proinflammatory molecules. Aim of this review is to synthesize the current experience and the most recent evidences about the therapeutic approach with biologic drugs in pediatric and adult patients with monogenic autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:23970817

  12. The inflammasomes and autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Lori; De Nardo, Dominic; Franklin, Bernardo S; Hoffman, Hal M; Latz, Eicke

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation, a vital response of the immune system to infection and damage to tissues, can be initiated by various germline-encoded innate immune-signaling receptors. Among these, the inflammasomes are critical for activation of the potent proinflammatory interleukin-1 cytokine family. Additionally, inflammasomes can trigger and maintain inflammatory responses aimed toward excess nutrients and the numerous danger signals that appear in a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. We discuss our understanding of how inflammasomes assemble to trigger caspase-1 activation and subsequent cytokine release, describe how genetic mutations in inflammasome-related genes lead to autoinflammatory syndromes, and review the contribution of inflammasome activation to various pathologies arising from metabolic dysfunction. Insights into the mechanisms that govern inflammasome activation will help in the development of novel therapeutic strategies, not only for managing genetic diseases associated with overactive inflammasomes, but also for treating common metabolic diseases for which effective therapies are currently lacking. PMID:25423351

  13. CANDLE syndrome: a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Bengoa, ŞebnemYilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Ataseven, Eda Büke; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2015-05-01

    CANDLE syndrome (chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by early onset, recurrent fever, skin lesions, and multisystemic inflammatory manifestations. Most of the patients have been shown to have mutation in PSMB8 gene. Herein, we report a 2-year-old patient with young onset recurrent fever, atypical facies, widespread skin lesions, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, joint contractures, hypertrglyceridemia, lipodystrophy, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Clinical features together with the skin biopsy findings were consistent with the CANDLE syndrome. The pathogenesis and treatment of this syndrome have not been fully understood. Increased awareness of this recently described syndrome may lead to recognition of new cases and better understanding of its pathogenesis which in turn may help for development of an effective treatment. PMID:25036278

  14. Urticarial vasculitis and urticarial autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marzano, A V; Tavecchio, S; Venturini, M; Sala, R; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Gattorno, M

    2015-02-01

    Urticaria is a frequent disorder classified as acute and chronic forms, which presents with wheals that can be associated with angioedema. Several entities may manifest with urticarial skin lesions, encompassing a heterogeneous group of conditions that have to be differentiated from ordinary urticaria. This review is focused on two of these urticarial syndromes: urticarial vasculitis (UV), which represents the most important differential diagnosis with common urticaria, and autoinflammatory diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and Schnitzler's Syndrome, both rare multisystem forms that may masquerade as common urticaria. UV is a small-vessel vasculitis with predominant skin involvement, characterized by wheals persisting for more than 24 hours, burning rather than itching and resolving with hyperpigmentation as well as by other cutaneous manifestations including purpura, papules, vesicles, bullae and necrotic-ulcerative lesions. Histology shows a classic pattern of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, with possible presence of upper dermal edema. CAPS are classified as three distinct entities: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells Syndrome and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome, which represent a spectrum of disorders caused by different mutations in a single gene, NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor 3). This gene encodes for cryopyrin, an inflammasome protein that activates interleukin-1β, leading to an overproduction of this pivotal proinflammatory cytokine. Histologically, urticarial lesions are generally characterized by a perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate. Unlike urticaria, neither UV nor urticarial autoinflammatory syndromes do respond to antihistamines: thus, it is important not to misdiagnose such conditions in order to give the patients specific treatments, potentially preventing serious systemic complications. PMID:25586657

  15. Lights and shadows in autoinflammatory syndromes from the childhood and adulthood perspective.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Natale, Marco Francesco; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-03-01

    In a high percentage of cases, the monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (AIS), caused by subversion in the inflammasome homeostasis leading to cytokine oversecretion and characterized by multiple inflammatory pictures, start in childhood. However, the description of tardive manifestations, veiled phenotypes, and atypical clinical signs beginning in adulthood has been more and more reported in recent times, requiring that many specialists become confident with concepts, details, and management strategies of AIS. Differences between child- and adult-onset syndromes raise the question of whether pathogenic mechanisms might differ when the timetable of AIS onset diverges, but show that carefulness is needed to establish a straightforward diagnosis. PMID:26631101

  16. The Central Role of Anti-IL-1 Blockade in the Treatment of Monogenic and Multi-Factorial Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Silvia; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Inherited autoinflammatory diseases are secondary to mutations of proteins playing a pivotal role in the regulation of the innate immunity leading to seemingly unprovoked episodes of inflammation. The understanding of the molecular pathways involved in these disorders has shed new lights on the pattern of activation and maintenance of the inflammatory response and disclosed new molecular therapeutic targets. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents the prototype of an autoinflammatory disease. The study of the pathophysiological consequence of mutations in the cryopyrin gene (NLRP3) allowed the identification of intracellular pathways responsible for the activation and secretion of the potent inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). It became clear that several multi-factorial inflammatory conditions display a number of pathogenic and clinical similarities with inherited autoinflammatory diseases. The dramatic effect of interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade in CAPS opened new perspectives for the treatment of other inherited and multi-factorial autoinflammatory disorders. Several IL-1 blockers are now available on the market. In this review we outline the more recent novelties in the treatment with different IL-1 blockers in inherited and multi-factorial autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:24198817

  17. PASS Syndrome: An IL-1-Driven Autoinflammatory Disease.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Mathieu; Berner, Jeanne; Di Lucca, Julie; Fischer, Lara; Kaparos, Nikolaos; Conrad, Curdin; Hohl, Daniel; So, Alexander; Gilliet, Michel

    2016-01-01

    PASS syndrome is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by a chronic-relapsing course of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne vulgaris, hidradenitis suppurativa and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we describe a case of a patient with spontaneously recurrent purulent skin lesions along with seronegative spondylarthritis consistent with the PASS syndrome. During his disease exacerbation, the patient displayed episodes of fever along with elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β. Skin lesions were characterized by sterile neutrophilic infiltrates and showed a rapid response to the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (Kineret®) consistent with the autoinflammatory nature of this disease. However, unlike other autoinflammatory diseases such as PAPA and PAPASH, we did not find mutations in the gene PSTPIP1, raising the possibility that other specific mutations in the IL-1 pathway may be involved. PMID:26919742

  18. The Inherited Autoinflammatory Syndrome: A Decade of Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Goldfinger, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The hereditary autoinflammatory diseases arise from mutations of genes regulating the innate immune system. These rare disorders are well characterized, both clinically and in terms of their molecular pathogenesis. The recurrent attacks of febrile polyserositis of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) are due to defective pyrin, a protein that down-regulates inflammation. The Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D Syndrome (HIDS), which mimics FMF, results from a genetically conferred deficiency of mevalonate kinase. TRAPS (TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome), formerly known as Familial Hibernian Fever, is caused by a defective membrane receptor for TNF. Three other hereditary disorders which overlap in their clinical expression - Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome, the Muckle Wells syndrome, and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflamatory Disease (NOMID) - are a consequence of gain-of-function mutations of the gene encoding cryopyrin, the scaffolding protein of the inflammasome. The PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, Acne) results from mutations of a gene that increases the binding of its product (PSPSTPIP1) to pyrin, thereby blunting the inhibitory effect of pyrin on inflammasome activation. PMID:19768193

  19. The Relationship between NALP3 and Autoinflammatory Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lorna; Raheem, Irfan; Malemud, Charles J; Askari, Ali D

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome, which is required for synthesis of interleukin-1β, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory syndromes. This review of the literature summarizes the interconnectedness of NALP3 inflammasome with some of these disorders. Familial Mediterranean fever results from a mutation in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene, which encodes the pyrin protein. Previous study results suggest that pyrin suppresses caspase-1 activation, perhaps by competing for the adaptor protein, termed, pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ACS) which therefore interferes with NALP3 inflammasome activation. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome is constitutively activated in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes due to gain-of-function mutations resulting from point mutations within the neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein/class 2 transcription factor/heterokaryon incompatibility/telomerase-associated protein-1 (NACHT) domain of the NALP3 protein. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome is caused by mutations in the genes encoding proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1). These PSTPIP1 mutants are thought to bind to pyrin causing an increase in the pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC) pyroptosome assembly leading to procaspase-1 recruitment and therefore its activation. Hyperimmunoglublinemia D syndrome is caused by mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency, which may be affected by protein accumulation that leads to NALP3 inflammasome activation. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome is associated with mutations in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene which decreases the level of soluble tumor necrosis factor

  20. The Relationship between NALP3 and Autoinflammatory Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lorna; Raheem, Irfan; Malemud, Charles J.; Askari, Ali D.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome, which is required for synthesis of interleukin-1β, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory syndromes. This review of the literature summarizes the interconnectedness of NALP3 inflammasome with some of these disorders. Familial Mediterranean fever results from a mutation in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene, which encodes the pyrin protein. Previous study results suggest that pyrin suppresses caspase-1 activation, perhaps by competing for the adaptor protein, termed, pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ACS) which therefore interferes with NALP3 inflammasome activation. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome is constitutively activated in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes due to gain-of-function mutations resulting from point mutations within the neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein/class 2 transcription factor/heterokaryon incompatibility/telomerase-associated protein-1 (NACHT) domain of the NALP3 protein. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome is caused by mutations in the genes encoding proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1). These PSTPIP1 mutants are thought to bind to pyrin causing an increase in the pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC) pyroptosome assembly leading to procaspase-1 recruitment and therefore its activation. Hyperimmunoglublinemia D syndrome is caused by mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency, which may be affected by protein accumulation that leads to NALP3 inflammasome activation. Tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome is associated with mutations in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene which decreases the level of soluble tumor necrosis

  1. Autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases: from Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis to NOD2-mediated disease and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Caso, Francesco; Galozzi, Paola; Costa, Luisa; Sfriso, Paolo; Cantarini, Luca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of genetic mutations leading to dysfunction of inflammatory and apoptotic pathways, has allowed to characterise a group of diseases, recognised as monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes. Among those, Blau syndrome (BS) and early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS) have been identified as familial and sporadic phenotypes of the same non-caseating granulomatous form. Both the diseases are caused by mutations in the CARD15/NOD2 gene, encoding the cytosolic NOD2 protein, one of the key molecules in the regulation of innate immunity. Clinical onset is typically located in the first years of life and phenotype is characterised by simultaneous or less articular, cutaneous and ocular non-caseating granulomatous inflammation, which can be variably associated with a heterogeneous systemic spectrum. The CARD15/NOD2 gene has also been identified as one of the genes linked to susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD), a common polygenic inflammatory granulomatous bowel disease. The heightened nuclear factor-κB activity, found in the intestinal tissue of patients affected by CD, has probably a genetic cause related to several CARD15/NOD2 polymorphisms. Other substitutions in the CARD15/NOD2 gene have also been found in a recently described disorder, called NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease, which shares several clinical characteristics with BS and EOS. This review attempts to describe these diseases on the basis of the most recent evidences. We described genetic and clinical aspects, mainly focusing on BS and EOS, the most representative diseases of autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases, with the ultimate purpose to expand their knowledge. PMID:26509073

  2. Caveats and truths in genetic, clinical, autoimmune and autoinflammatory issues in Blau syndrome and early onset sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Cimaz, Rolando; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sfriso, Paolo; Verrecchia, Elena; Tognon, Sofia; Bascherini, Vittoria; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-12-01

    Blau syndrome (BS) and early onset sarcoidosis (EOS) are, respectively, the familial and sporadic forms of the pediatric granulomatous autoinflammatory disease, which belong to the group of monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes. Both of these conditions are caused by mutations in the NOD2 gene, which encodes the cytosolic NOD2 protein, one of the pivotal molecules in the regulation of innate immunity, primarily expressed in the antigen-presenting cells. Clinical onset of BS and EOS is usually in the first years of life with noncaseating epithelioid granulomas mainly affecting joints, skin, and uveal tract, variably associated with heterogeneous systemic features. The dividing line between autoinflammatory and autoimmune mechanisms is probably not so clear-cut, and the relationship existing between BS or EOS and autoimmune phenomena remains unclear. There is no established therapy for the management of BS and EOS, and the main treatment aim is to prevent ocular manifestations entailing the risk of potential blindness and to avoid joint deformities. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, such as methotrexate or azathioprine, may be helpful; when patients are unresponsive to the combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressant agents, the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor infliximab should be considered. Data on anti-interleukin-1 inhibition with anakinra and canakinumab is still limited and further corroboration is required. The aim of this paper is to describe BS and EOS, focusing on their genetic, clinical, and therapeutic issues, with the ultimate goal of increasing clinicians' awareness of both of these rare but serious disorders. PMID:25182201

  3. Autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases: from Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis to NOD2-mediated disease and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Caso, Francesco; Galozzi, Paola; Costa, Luisa; Sfriso, Paolo; Cantarini, Luca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of genetic mutations leading to dysfunction of inflammatory and apoptotic pathways, has allowed to characterise a group of diseases, recognised as monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes. Among those, Blau syndrome (BS) and early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS) have been identified as familial and sporadic phenotypes of the same non-caseating granulomatous form. Both the diseases are caused by mutations in the CARD15/NOD2 gene, encoding the cytosolic NOD2 protein, one of the key molecules in the regulation of innate immunity. Clinical onset is typically located in the first years of life and phenotype is characterised by simultaneous or less articular, cutaneous and ocular non-caseating granulomatous inflammation, which can be variably associated with a heterogeneous systemic spectrum. The CARD15/NOD2 gene has also been identified as one of the genes linked to susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD), a common polygenic inflammatory granulomatous bowel disease. The heightened nuclear factor-κB activity, found in the intestinal tissue of patients affected by CD, has probably a genetic cause related to several CARD15/NOD2 polymorphisms. Other substitutions in the CARD15/NOD2 gene have also been found in a recently described disorder, called NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease, which shares several clinical characteristics with BS and EOS. This review attempts to describe these diseases on the basis of the most recent evidences. We described genetic and clinical aspects, mainly focusing on BS and EOS, the most representative diseases of autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases, with the ultimate purpose to expand their knowledge. PMID:26509073

  4. Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndromes: advances in pathogeneses, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Amelia; Jacks, Jennifer; Kessler, Marcus; Emanuel, Peter D; Gao, Ling

    2015-02-01

    The disease spectrum currently known as the proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) was first described in 1939 in patients who presented with recurrent fevers beginning in infancy or early childhood, which were accompanied by nodular erythema, a pernio-like rash, and joint contractures. Since then, several syndromes, such as chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome, Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NNS), joint contractures, muscle atrophy, microcytic anemia and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP) syndrome, and Japanese autoinflammatory syndrome with lipodystrophy (JASL), have been used to categorize patients with diseases within the same spectrum. Recently, independent studies have identified mutations in the human proteasome subunit β type 8 (PSMB8) gene, which result in a sustained inflammatory response in all syndromes. Further functional studies not only suggest a causative role of PSMB8 mutations but also imply that they represent one disease spectrum, referred to as PRAAS. In this paper, we review the clinical presentations and laboratory findings of PRAAS, as well as the most recent advances in pathogeneses, diagnosis, and treatment options for patients with diseases in this spectrum. PMID:25521013

  5. Advances in the genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically-complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet’s disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases - namely the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically-complex autoinflammatory phenotypes. PMID:26077134

  6. Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) in commercial sheep.

    PubMed

    Luján, Lluís; Pérez, Marta; Salazar, Eider; Álvarez, Neila; Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Irusta, Silvia; Santamaría, Jesús; Insausti, Nerea; Cortés, Yerzol; Figueras, Luis; Cuartielles, Isabel; Vila, Miguel; Fantova, Enrique; Chapullé, José Luis Gracia

    2013-07-01

    We describe a form of the autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) in commercial sheep, linked to the repetitive inoculation of aluminum-containing adjuvants through vaccination. The syndrome shows an acute phase that affects less than 0.5% of animals in a given herd, it appears 2-6 days after an adjuvant-containing inoculation and it is characterized by an acute neurological episode with low response to external stimuli and acute meningoencephalitis, most animals apparently recovering afterward. The chronic phase is seen in a higher proportion of flocks, it can follow the acute phase, and it is triggered by external stimuli, mostly low temperatures. The chronic phase begins with an excitatory phase, followed by weakness, extreme cachexia, tetraplegia and death. Gross lesions are related to a cachectic process with muscular atrophy, and microscopic lesions are mostly linked to a neurodegenerative process in both dorsal and ventral column of the gray matter of the spinal cord. Experimental reproduction of ovine ASIA in a small group of repeatedly vaccinated animals was successful. Detection of Al(III) in tissues indicated the presence of aluminum in the nervous tissue of experimental animals. The present report is the first description of a new sheep syndrome (ovine ASIA syndrome) linked to multiple, repetitive vaccination and that can have devastating consequences as it happened after the compulsory vaccination against bluetongue in 2008. The ovine ASIA syndrome can be used as a model of other similar diseases affecting both human and animals. A major research effort is needed in order to understand its complex pathogenesis. PMID:23579772

  7. Effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor ITF2357 in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bodar, Evelien J; Simon, Anna; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2011-01-01

    We explored the effects of the oral histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor ITF2357 in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome. In this prospective open-label pilot study, eight patients were enrolled; one patient with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), three patients with hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) and four patients with Schnitzler syndrome were closely followed during 90 d of ITF2357 treatment. Three patients with Schnitzler syndrome and one TRAPS patient experienced a partial remission. In four patients, there was no effect. In HIDS patients, there was a tendency toward a higher attack frequency and increasing attack severity. In two patients (one TRAPS and one HIDS), we observed a decrease of acute-phase response without signs of clinical improvement. One patient with Schnitzler syndrome showed a partial response despite an ongoing acute-phase response. In conclusion, ITF2357 monotherapy was able to induce partial response only in patients with Schnitzler syndrome and no response in patients with HIDS. PMID:21274502

  8. Autoinflammatory bone disorders: update on immunologic abnormalities and clues about possible triggers

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Ferguson, Polly J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review To provide an update on the genetics and immunologic basis of autoinflammatory bone disorders including chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis including the monogenic forms of the disease. Recent findings Ongoing research in murine, canine and human models of sterile bone inflammation has solidified the hypothesis that sterile bone inflammation can be genetically driven. Mutations in Pstpip2, LPIN2 and IL1RN have been identified in monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders that have allowed more detailed dissection of the immunologic defects that can produce sterile osteomyelitis. Recent studies in murine chronic multifocal osteomyelitis, deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), Majeed syndrome and SAPHO syndrome reveal abnormalities in innate immune system function. IL-1 pathway dysregulation is present in several of these disorders and blocking IL-1 therapeutically has resulted in control of disease in DIRA, Majeed syndrome and in some cases of SAPHO and CRMO. Basic research demonstrates the importance of the innate immune system in disease pathogenesis and offer clues about potential disease triggers. Summary Research and clinical data produced over the last several years support the important role of innate immunity in sterile osteomyelitis. Based on what has been learned in the monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders, IL-1 is emerging as an important pathway in the development of sterile bone inflammation. PMID:23917160

  9. Screening for Hormonal, Monogenic, and Syndromic Disorders in Obese Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kelly; Page, Laura; Balikcioglu, Pinar Gumus

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obesity in the United States is nearly 17%. Most cases are “exogenous”, resulting from excess energy intake relative to energy expenditure over a prolonged period of time. However, some cases of obesity are “endogenous”, associated with hormonal, genetic, or syndromic disorders such as hypothyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, growth hormone deficiency, defective leptin signaling, mutations in the melanocortin 4 receptor, and Prader-Willi and Bardet-Biedl syndromes. This article reviews the hormonal, monogenic, and syndromic causes of childhood obesity and identifies critical features that distinguish “endogenous” obesity disorders from the more common exogenous obesity. Findings that raise suspicion for endogenous obesity include onset in infancy, lack of satiety, poor linear growth, dysmorphic features, and cognitive dysfunction. Selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory tests and indications for subspecialist referral are also discussed. PMID:25198446

  10. Shared functional defect in IP₃R-mediated calcium signaling in diverse monogenic autism syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schmunk, G; Boubion, B J; Smith, I F; Parker, I; Gargus, J J

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects 2% of children, and is characterized by impaired social and communication skills together with repetitive, stereotypic behavior. The pathophysiology of ASD is complex due to genetic and environmental heterogeneity, complicating the development of therapies and making diagnosis challenging. Growing genetic evidence supports a role of disrupted Ca(2+) signaling in ASD. Here, we report that patient-derived fibroblasts from three monogenic models of ASD-fragile X and tuberous sclerosis TSC1 and TSC2 syndromes-display depressed Ca(2+) release through inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). This was apparent in Ca(2+) signals evoked by G protein-coupled receptors and by photoreleased IP3 at the levels of both global and local elementary Ca(2+) events, suggesting fundamental defects in IP3R channel activity in ASD. Given the ubiquitous involvement of IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, gene expression and neurodevelopment, we propose dysregulated IP3R signaling as a nexus where genes altered in ASD converge to exert their deleterious effect. These findings highlight potential pharmaceutical targets, and identify Ca(2+) screening in skin fibroblasts as a promising technique for early detection of individuals susceptible to ASD. PMID:26393489

  11. Autoimmunity in connection with a metal implant: a case of autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Loyo, Esthela; Jara, Luis J; López, Persio David; Puig, Ana Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been recently proposed by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin as a new entity that comprises several conditions: the macrophagic-myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf War syndrome, silicosis and post-vaccination phenomena, autoimmunity related to infectious fragments, hormones, aluminum, silicone, squalene oil, and pristane. We report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed serial episodes of high fever, extreme fatigue, transient thrombocytopenia, multiple cervical adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, neutropenia, severe proteinuria and urine sediment abnormalities, elevated serum ferritin levels, and transient low positive antinuclear antibodies 1 year after she had a nickel-titanium chin implant for cosmetic reasons. The clinical picture simulated a variety of probable diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome, adult onset Still's disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and hemophagocytic syndrome, among others, so she underwent an extensive medical investigation including two lymph node biopsies. She received treatment accordingly with steroids, methotrexate, and mofetil mycophenolate, with initial improvement of her symptoms, which recurred every time the dose was reduced. Two and a half years later the patient decided to retire the chin implant and afterwards all her systemic symptoms have disappeared. She remains in good health, without recurrence of any symptom and off medications until today. Albeit this patient fulfills proposed major ASIA criteria, to our knowledge it would be the first description of systemic features of autoinflammation in connection with a metal implant. PMID:26000140

  12. Expression of cytokines, chemokines and other effector molecules in two prototypic autoinflammatory skin diseases, pyoderma gangrenosum and Sweet's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Fanoni, D; Antiga, E; Quaglino, P; Caproni, M; Crosti, C; Meroni, P L; Cugno, M

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's syndrome (SS) are two inflammatory skin diseases presenting with painful ulcers and erythematous plaques, respectively; both disorders have a debilitating clinical behaviour and PG is potentially life-threatening. Recently, PG and SS have been included among the autoinflammatory diseases, which are characterized by recurrent episodes of sterile inflammation, without circulating autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells. However, an autoinflammatory pattern clearly supporting this inclusion has never been demonstrated. We studied 16 patients with PG, six with SS and six controls, evaluating, using a sandwich-based protein antibody array method, the expression profile of inflammatory effector molecules in PG, SS and normal skin. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and its receptor I were significantly higher in PG (P = 0·0001 for both) and SS (P = 0·004–0·040) than in controls. In PG, chemokines such as IL-8 (P = 0·0001), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 1/2/3 (P = 0·002), CXCL 16 (P = 0·003) and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) (P = 0·005) were over-expressed. In SS, IL-8 (P = 0·018), CXCL 1/2/3 (P = 0·006) and CXCL 16 (P = 0·036) but not RANTES were over-expressed, suggesting that chemokine-mediated signals are lower than in PG. Fas/Fas ligand and CD40/CD40 ligand systems were over-expressed in PG (P = 0·0001 for Fas, P = 0·009 for Fas ligand, P = 0·012 for CD40, P = 0·0001 for CD40 ligand), contributing to tissue damage and inflammation, while their role seems to be less significant in SS. Over-expression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network supports the view that PG and SS are autoinflammatory diseases. The differences in expression profile of inflammatory effectors between these two disorders may explain the stronger local aggressiveness in PG than SS. PMID:24903614

  13. Monogenic Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... some children with monogenic diabetes are misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes and are given insulin. When correctly diagnosed, some of these children can take diabetes pills instead, with even better ...

  14. Autoinflammatory bone disorders with special focus on chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sterile bone inflammation is the hallmark of autoinflammatory bone disorders, including chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) with its most severe form chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Autoinflammatory osteopathies are the result of a dysregulated innate immune system, resulting in immune cell infiltration of the bone and subsequent osteoclast differentiation and activation. Interestingly, autoinflammatory bone disorders are associated with inflammation of the skin and/or the intestine. In several monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders mutations in disease-causing genes have been reported. However, regardless of recent developments, the molecular pathogenesis of CNO/CRMO remains unclear. Here, we discuss the clinical presentation and molecular pathophysiology of human autoinflammatory osteopathies and animal models with special focus on CNO/CRMO. Treatment options in monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders and CRMO will be illustrated. PMID:24359092

  15. Loss-of-function mutations in TNFAIP3 leading to A20 haploinsufficiency cause an early onset autoinflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Wang, Hongying; Schwartz, Daniella M.; Stoffels, Monique; Park, Yong Hwan; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Dan; Demirkaya, Erkan; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Yu, Xiaomin; Ouyang, Claudia; Chen, Celeste; Chin, David T.; Zaal, Kristien; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.; Hanson, Eric P.; Yu, Zhen; Mullikin, James C.; Hasni, Sarfaraz A.; Wertz, Ingrid; Ombrello, Amanda K.; Stone, Deborah L.; Hoffmann, Patrycja; Jones, Anne; Barham, Beverly K.; Leavis, Helen L.; van Royen-Kerkof, Annet; Sibley, Cailin; Batu, Ezgi D.; Gül, Ahmet; Siegel, Richard M.; Boehm, Manfred; Milner, Joshua D.; Ozen, Seza; Gadina, Massimo; Chae, JaeJin; Laxer, Ronald M.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Aksentijevich, Ivona

    2016-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are driven by abnormal activation of innate immunity1. Herein we describe a new syndrome caused by high penetrance heterozygous germline mutations in the NFκB regulatory protein TNFAIP3 (A20) in six unrelated families with early onset systemic inflammation. The syndrome resembles Behçet’s disease (BD), which is typically considered a polygenic disorder with onset in early adulthood2. A20 is a potent inhibitor of the NFκB signaling pathway3. TNFAIP3 mutant truncated proteins are likely to act by haploinsufficiency since they do not exert a dominant-negative effect in overexpression experiments. Patients’ cells show increased degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of NFκB p65, and increased expression of NFκB-mediated proinflammatory cytokines. A20 restricts NFκB signals via deubiquitinating (DUB) activity. In cells expressing the mutant A20 protein, there is defective removal of K63-linked ubiquitin from TRAF6, NEMO, and RIP1 after TNF stimulation. NFκB-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines are potential therapeutic targets for these patients. PMID:26642243

  16. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  17. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today’s periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  18. A−β− Subtype of Ketosis-Prone Diabetes Is Not Predominantly a Monogenic Diabetic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Haaland, Wade C.; Scaduto, Diane I.; Maldonado, Mario R.; Mansouri, Dena L.; Nalini, Ramaswami; Iyer, Dinakar; Patel, Sanjeet; Guthikonda, Anu; Hampe, Christiane S.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Metzker, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD) is an emerging syndrome that encompasses several distinct phenotypic subgroups that share a predisposition to diabetic ketoacidosis. We investigated whether the A−β− subgroup of KPD, characterized by complete insulin dependence, absent β-cell functional reserve, lack of islet cell autoantibodies, and strong family history of type 2 diabetes, represents a monogenic form of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Over 8 years, 37 patients with an A−β− phenotype were identified in our longitudinally followed cohort of KPD patients. Seven genes, including hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A), glucokinase (GCK), HNF1A, pancreas duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), HNF1B, neurogenic differentiation 1 (NEUROD1), and PAX4, were directly sequenced in all patients. Selected gene regions were also sequenced in healthy, unrelated ethnically matched control subjects, consisting of 84 African American, 96 Caucasian, and 95 Hispanic subjects. RESULTS The majority (70%) of the A−β− KPD patients had no significant causal polymorphisms in either the proximal promoter or coding regions of the seven genes. The combination of six potentially significant low-frequency, heterozygous sequence variants in HNF-1α (A174V or G574S), PDX1 (putative 5′–untranslated region CCAAT box, P33T, or P239Q), or PAX4 (R133W) were found in 27% (10/37) of patients, with one additional patient revealing two variants, PDX1 P33T and PAX4 R133W. The A174V variant has not been previously reported. CONCLUSIONS Despite its well-circumscribed, robust, and distinctive phenotype of severe, nonautoimmune-mediated β-cell dysfunction, A−β− KPD is most likely not a predominantly monogenic diabetic syndrome. Several A−β− KPD patients have low-frequency variants in HNF1A, PDX1, or PAX4 genes, which may be of functional significance in their pathophysiology. PMID:19228875

  19. Lighting the fires within: the cell biology of autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Heiyoung; Bourla, Ariel Bulua; Kastner, Daniel L; Colbert, Robert A; Siegel, Richard M

    2012-08-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are characterized by seemingly unprovoked pathological activation of the innate immune system in the absence of autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells. Discovery of the causative mutations underlying several monogenic autoinflammatory diseases has identified key regulators of innate immune responses. Recent studies have highlighted the role of misfolding, oligomerization and abnormal trafficking of pathogenic mutant proteins in triggering autoinflammation, and suggest that more common rheumatic diseases may have an autoinflammatory component. This coincides with recent discoveries of new links between endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory signalling pathways, which support the emerging view that autoinflammatory diseases may be due to pathological dysregulation of stress-sensing pathways that normally function in host defence. PMID:22828911

  20. Monogenic syndromes of abnormal glucose homeostasis: clinical review and relevance to the understanding of the pathology of insulin resistance and ß cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J; Barrett, T

    2005-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is caused by a combination of insulin resistance and ß cell failure. The polygenic nature of type 2 diabetes has made it difficult to study. Although many candidate genes for this condition have been suggested, in most cases association studies have been equivocal. Monogenic forms of diabetes have now been studied extensively, and the genetic basis of many of these syndromes has been elucidated, leading to greater understanding of the functions of the genes involved. Common variations in the genes causing monogenic disorders have been associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in several populations and explain some of the linkage seen in genome-wide scans. Monogenic disorders are also helpful in understanding both normal and disordered glucose and insulin metabolism. Three main areas of defect contribute to diabetes: defects in insulin signalling leading to insulin resistance; defects of insulin secretion leading to hypoinsulinaemia; and apoptosis leading to decreased ß cell mass. These three pathological pathways are reviewed, focusing on rare genetic syndromes which have diabetes as a prominent feature. Apoptosis seems to be a final common pathway in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Study of rare forms of diabetes may help ion determining new therapeutic targets to preserve or increase ß cell mass and function. PMID:15772126

  1. Interleukin-1 as a common denominator from autoinflammatory to autoimmune disorders: premises, perils, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cantarini, Luca; Vitale, Antonio; Iannone, Florenzo; Anelli, Maria Grazia; Andreozzi, Laura; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rigante, Donato

    2015-01-01

    A complex web of dynamic relationships between innate and adaptive immunity is now evident for many autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, the first deriving from abnormal activation of innate immune system without any conventional danger triggers and the latter from self-/non-self-discrimination loss of tolerance, and systemic inflammation. Due to clinical and pathophysiologic similarities giving a crucial role to the multifunctional cytokine interleukin-1, the concept of autoinflammation has been expanded to include nonhereditary collagen-like diseases, idiopathic inflammatory diseases, and metabolic diseases. As more patients are reported to have clinical features of autoinflammation and autoimmunity, the boundary between these two pathologic ends is becoming blurred. An overview of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders, PFAPA syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, uveitis, pericarditis, Behçet's disease, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung diseases, and Still's disease is presented to highlight the fundamental points that interleukin-1 displays in the cryptic interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:25784780

  2. Interleukin-1 as a Common Denominator from Autoinflammatory to Autoimmune Disorders: Premises, Perils, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cantarini, Luca; Vitale, Antonio; Iannone, Florenzo; Anelli, Maria Grazia; Andreozzi, Laura; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rigante, Donato

    2015-01-01

    A complex web of dynamic relationships between innate and adaptive immunity is now evident for many autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, the first deriving from abnormal activation of innate immune system without any conventional danger triggers and the latter from self-/non-self-discrimination loss of tolerance, and systemic inflammation. Due to clinical and pathophysiologic similarities giving a crucial role to the multifunctional cytokine interleukin-1, the concept of autoinflammation has been expanded to include nonhereditary collagen-like diseases, idiopathic inflammatory diseases, and metabolic diseases. As more patients are reported to have clinical features of autoinflammation and autoimmunity, the boundary between these two pathologic ends is becoming blurred. An overview of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders, PFAPA syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, uveitis, pericarditis, Behçet's disease, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung diseases, and Still's disease is presented to highlight the fundamental points that interleukin-1 displays in the cryptic interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:25784780

  3. The phenotype of TNF receptor-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (TRAPS) at presentation: a series of 158 cases from the Eurofever/EUROTRAPS international registry

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, H J; Papa, R; Gerhold, K; Obici, L; Touitou, I; Cantarini, L; Frenkel, J; Anton, J; Kone-Paut, I; Cattalini, M; Bader-Meunier, B; Insalaco, A; Hentgen, V; Merino, R; Modesto, C; Toplak, N; Berendes, R; Ozen, S; Cimaz, R; Jansson, A; Brogan, P A; Hawkins, P N; Ruperto, N; Martini, A; Woo, P; Gattorno, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the genetic findings, demographic features and clinical presentation of tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (TRAPS) in patients from the Eurofever/EUROTRAPS international registry. Methods A web-based registry collected retrospective data on patients with TNFRSF1A sequence variants and inflammatory symptoms. Participating hospitals included paediatric rheumatology centres and adult centres with a specific interest in autoinflammatory diseases. Cases were independently validated by experts in the disease. Results Complete information on 158 validated patients was available. The most common TNFRSF1A variant was R92Q (34% of cases), followed by T50M (10%). Cysteine residues were disrupted in 27% of cases, accounting for 39% of sequence variants. A family history was present in 19% of patients with R92Q and 64% of those with other variants. The median age at which symptoms began was 4.3 years but 9.1% of patients presented after 30 years of age. Attacks were recurrent in 88% and the commonest features associated with the pathogenic variants were fever (88%), limb pain (85%), abdominal pain (74%), rash (63%) and eye manifestations (45%). Disease associated with R92Q presented slightly later at a median of 5.7 years with significantly less rash or eye signs and more headaches. Children were more likely than adults to present with lymphadenopathy, periorbital oedema and abdominal pains. AA amyloidosis has developed in 16 (10%) patients at a median age of 43 years. Conclusions In this, the largest reported case series to date, the genetic heterogeneity of TRAPS is accompanied by a variable phenotype at presentation. Patients had a median 70 symptomatic days a year, with fever, limb and abdominal pain and rash the commonest symptoms. Overall, there is little evidence of a significant effect of age or genotype on disease features at presentation. PMID:23965844

  4. Animal models of monogenic migraine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Tolner, Else A; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder with a strong genetic component. Rare monogenic forms of migraine, or syndromes in which migraine frequently occurs, help scientists to unravel pathogenetic mechanisms of migraine and its comorbidities. Transgenic mouse models for rare monogenic mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome (FASPS), have been created. Here, we review the current state of research using these mutant mice. We also discuss how currently available experimental approaches, including epigenetic studies, biomolecular analysis and optogenetic technologies, can be used for characterization of migraine genes to further unravel the functional and molecular pathways involved in migraine. PMID:27154999

  5. Hypothetical review: thymic aberrations and type-I interferons; attempts to deduce autoimmunizing mechanisms from unexpected clues in monogenic and paraneoplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meager, A; Peterson, P; Willcox, N

    2008-10-01

    In sporadic autoimmune disorders, dendritic cells are increasingly being incriminated as agents provocateurs. However, the mechanisms and any 'danger signals' that induce them to autoimmunize remain enigmatic. Here, we focus on unexpected clues from two prototypic/ highly informative autoimmune syndromes, acquired thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis and the monogenic autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS1), caused by mutations in the AutoImmune Regulator (AIRE). Both involve the thymus, and in both we find early, persistent, highly prevalent and high-titre neutralizing autoantibodies against type-I interferons, regardless of the exact AIRE genotype or the characteristically variable clinical phenotype in APS1. Thus these key innate<-->adaptive immune intermediaries are now implicated in APS1 and paraneoplastic myasthenia as well as in systemic lupus erythematosus and other sporadic autoimmune disorders. The currently accepted notion that autoimmunization proceeds automatically (by 'default') does not explain how, when or where autoimmune responses are initiated against which targets in APS1, or whether exogenous or internal danger signals are involved, or predict whether the primary auto-immunogenic targets are AIRE-dependent. As the parallels between these syndromes must hold novel clues to these puzzles, they demand explanations. To unify these and other findings, we propose that autoimmunization occurs centrally in aberrant thymic environments rendered 'dangerous' by AIRE-deficiency (possibly by excess undegraded nucleic acids/dead cell debris). The ensuing autoreactivity focuses early on the locally abundant type I interferons and then on other peripheral tissue autoantigens that are still expressed despite the absence of AIRE. These ideas raise numerous questions that others may already have the materials to address. PMID:18727623

  6. Molecular Mechanisms in Genetically Defined Autoinflammatory Diseases: Disorders of Amplified Danger Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Canna, Scott W.; Liu, Yin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoinflammatory diseases present with noninfectious fever flares and systemic and/or disease-specific organ inflammation. Their excessive proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses can be life threatening and lead to organ damage over time. Studying such patients has revealed genetic defects that have helped unravel key innate immune pathways, including excessive IL-1 signaling, constitutive NF-κB activation, and, more recently, chronic type I IFN signaling. Discoveries of monogenic defects that lead to activation of proinflammatory cytokines have inspired the use of anticytokine-directed treatment approaches that have been life changing for many patients and have led to the approval of IL-1-blocking agents for a number of autoinflammatory conditions. In this review, we describe the genetically characterized autoinflammatory diseases, we summarize our understanding of the molecular pathways that drive clinical phenotypes and that continue to inspire the search for novel treatment targets, and we provide a conceptual framework for classification. PMID:25706096

  7. Autoinflammatory pustular neutrophilic diseases.

    PubMed

    Naik, Haley B; Cowen, Edward W

    2013-07-01

    This article provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biological insights. Monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes are discussed, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist, deficiency of the interleukin 36 receptor antagonist, CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis, and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne. How these new genetic advancements may inform how previously described pustular diseases are viewed, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype, is also discussed. PMID:23827244

  8. Recommendations for the management of autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, Nienke M; Oswald, Marlen; Jeyaratnam, Jerold; Anton, Jordi; Barron, Karyl S; Brogan, Paul A; Cantarini, Luca; Galeotti, Caroline; Grateau, Gilles; Hentgen, Veronique; Hofer, Michael; Kallinich, Tilmann; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Lachmann, Helen J; Ozdogan, Huri; Ozen, Seza; Russo, Ricardo; Simon, Anna; Uziel, Yosef; Wouters, Carine; Feldman, Brian M; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Benseler, Susanne M; Frenkel, Joost; Gattorno, Marco; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B

    2015-09-01

    : Autoinflammatory diseases are characterised by fever and systemic inflammation, with potentially serious complications. Owing to the rarity of these diseases, evidence-based guidelines are lacking. In 2012, the European project Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) was launched to optimise and disseminate regimens for the management of children and young adults with rheumatic diseases, facilitating the clinical practice of paediatricians and (paediatric) rheumatologists. One of the aims of SHARE was to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of the autoinflammatory diseases cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). These recommendations were developed using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedure. An expert committee of paediatric and adult rheumatologists was convened. Recommendations derived from the systematic literature review were evaluated by an online survey and subsequently discussed at a consensus meeting using Nominal Group Technique. Recommendations were accepted if more than 80% agreement was reached. In total, four overarching principles, 20 recommendations on therapy and 14 recommendations on monitoring were accepted with ≥80% agreement among the experts. Topics included (but were not limited to) validated disease activity scores, therapy and items to assess in monitoring of a patient. By developing these recommendations, we aim to optimise the management of patients with CAPS, TRAPS and MKD. PMID:26109736

  9. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  10. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role. PMID:26357457

  11. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role. PMID:26357457

  12. Autoinflammatory Skin Disorders: The Inflammasomme in Focus.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Prajwal; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-07-01

    Autoinflammatory skin disorders are a group of heterogeneous diseases that include diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Therapeutic strategies targeting IL-1 cytokines have proved helpful in ameliorating some of these diseases. While inflammasomes are the major regulators of IL-1 cytokines, inflammasome-independent complexes can also process IL-1 cytokines. Herein, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of how IL-1 cytokines, stemming from inflammasome-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of skin conditions. Importantly, we discuss several mouse models of skin inflammation generated to help elucidate the basic cellular and molecular effects and modulation of IL-1 in the skin. Such models offer perspectives on how these signaling pathways could be targeted to improve therapeutic approaches in the treatment of these rare and debilitating inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:27267764

  13. Horror autoinflammaticus: the molecular pathophysiology of autoinflammatory disease (*).

    PubMed

    Masters, Seth L; Simon, Anna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Kastner, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    The autoinflammatory diseases are characterized by seemingly unprovoked episodes of inflammation, without high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cells. The concept was proposed ten years ago with the identification of the genes underlying hereditary periodic fever syndromes. This nosology has taken root because of the dramatic advances in our knowledge of the genetic basis of both mendelian and complex autoinflammatory diseases, and with the recognition that these illnesses derive from genetic variants of the innate immune system. Herein we propose an updated classification scheme based on the molecular insights garnered over the past decade, supplanting a clinical classification that has served well but is opaque to the genetic, immunologic, and therapeutic interrelationships now before us. We define six categories of autoinflammatory disease: IL-1beta activation disorders (inflammasomopathies), NF-kappaB activation syndromes, protein misfolding disorders, complement regulatory diseases, disturbances in cytokine signaling, and macrophage activation syndromes. A system based on molecular pathophysiology will bring greater clarity to our discourse while catalyzing new hypotheses both at the bench and at the bedside. PMID:19302049

  14. How not to miss autoinflammatory diseases masquerading as urticaria.

    PubMed

    Krause, K; Grattan, C E; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Gattorno, M; Kallinich, T; de Koning, H D; Lachmann, H J; Lipsker, D; Navarini, A A; Simon, A; Traidl-Hoffmann, C; Maurer, M

    2012-12-01

    Urticarial skin reactions are one of the most frequent problems seen by allergists and clinical immunologists in daily practice. The most common reason for recurrent wheals is spontaneous urticaria. There are, however, several less common diseases that present with urticarial rash, such as urticarial vasculitis and autoinflammatory disorders. The latter include cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome and Schnitzler's syndrome, both rare and disabling conditions mediated by increased interleukin-1 secretion. Apart from the urticarial rash, patients are suffering from a variety of systemic symptoms including recurrent fever attacks, arthralgia or arthritis and fatigue. Autoinflammatory diseases are often associated with a diagnostic delay of many years and do not respond to antihistamines and other treatments of urticaria. Also, the chronic inflammation may lead to long-term complications such as amyloidosis. It is therefore important not to miss these diseases when diagnosing and treating patients with chronic recurrent urticarial rash. Here, we present clinical clues and tips that can help to identify autoinflammatory disorders in patients presenting with chronic urticarial rash and discuss their clinical picture and management. PMID:22978406

  15. Analysis of the genetic basis of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Bedoni, Nicola; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Vanoni, Federica; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Hofer, Michaël; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory syndrome in children from Western countries. In spite of its strong familial clustering, its genetic basis and inheritance pattern are still unknown. We performed a comprehensive genetic study on 68 individuals from 14 families. Linkage analysis suggested a susceptibility locus on chromosome 8, but direct molecular sequencing did not support this initial statistical finding. Exome sequencing revealed the absence of any gene that was mutated in all patients. Exhaustive screening of genes involved in other autoinflammatory syndromes or encoding components of the human inflammasome showed no DNA variants that could be linked to PFAPA molecular pathology. Among these, the previously-reported missense mutation V198M in the NLRP3 gene was clearly shown not to co-segregate with PFAPA. Our results on this relatively large cohort indicate that PFAPA syndrome is unlikely to be a monogenic condition. Moreover, none of the several genes known to be involved in inflammation or in autoinflammatory disorders seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, suggesting that PFAPA results from oligogenic or complex inheritance of variants in multiple disease genes and/or non-genetic factors. PMID:25988833

  16. Erysipelas-like erythema of familial Mediterranean fever syndrome: a case report with emphasis on histopathologic diagnostic clues.

    PubMed

    Kolivras, Athanassios; Provost, Philippe; Thompson, Curtis T

    2013-06-01

    We report histopathological findings in a case of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) syndrome with an erysipelas-like erythema (ELE). ELE is the only pathognomic cutaneous manifestation of FMF. ELE is characterized by well-demarcated, tender, erythematous and infiltrated plaques recurring on the same site and resolving spontaneously within 48-72 h. FMF is a monogenic autoinflammatory syndrome highlighted by recurrent fever associated with polyserositis involving mainly the peritoneum, synovium and pleura. FMF results from a mutation of the MEFV gene, which encodes for pyrin, leading to Il-1β activation and promoting neutrophil migration into the dermis. Histopathological findings in our case showed a sparse superficial perivascular and interstitial lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with some neutrophils, no eosinophils and mild papillary dermal edema. Venules and lymphatics were dilated, though no vasculitis was identified. Neutrophils are the most common cutaneous marker of autoinflammation, and cutaneous manifestations of monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are represented by the spectrum of aseptic neutrophilic dermatoses. Neutrophils in the presence of recurrent fever and in the correct clinical context of recurrent erysipelas in the same site are a diagnostic clue for FMF. PMID:23521609

  17. Basic mechanisms of monogenic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A

    1999-01-01

    To revive the appreciation of the importance of genetic studies for the understanding of neurologic diseases inherited in a monogenic fashion. After a description of the basic patterns of monogenic inheritance, the importance of linkage studies for the mapping of a disease gene is mentioned. Furthermore, the term linkage disequilibrium is introduced. Finally, several procedures used in current linkage analyses are briefly mentioned, with the aim of identifying the disease gene. The importance of genetic studies of disease families with many members, preferably from isolated surroundings to favor homogeneity, is stressed. However, such analyses can be performed only as a consequence of a close cooperation between clinicians and research scientists. PMID:10446743

  18. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  19. Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Monogenic Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by personality changes, language impairment, and deficits of executive functions associated with frontal and temporal lobe degeneration. Different phenotypes have been defined on the basis of presenting clinical symptoms, i.e., the behavioral variant of FTD, the agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and the semantic variant of PPA. Some patients have an associated movement disorder, either parkinsonism, as in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome, or motor neuron disease (FTD–MND). A family history of dementia is found in 40% of cases of FTD and about 10% have a clear autosomal-dominant inheritance. Genetic studies have identified several genes associated with monogenic FTD: microtubule-associated protein tau, progranulin, TAR DNA-binding protein 43, valosin-containing protein, charged multivesicular body protein 2B, fused in sarcoma, and the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72. Patients often present with an extensive phenotypic variability, even among different members of the same kindred carrying an identical disease mutation. The objective of the present work is to review and evaluate available literature data in order to highlight recent advances in clinical, biological, and neuroimaging features of monogenic frontotemporal lobar degeneration and try to identify different mechanisms underlying the extreme phenotypic heterogeneity that characterizes this disease. PMID:26388768

  20. From the Mediterranean to the Sea of Japan: The Transcontinental Odyssey of Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are comprehensively caused by aberrant production of proinflammatory cytokines and are revealed by cyclically and spontaneously occurring inflammatory events. Over the last decade, there has been a revolution in the understanding of periodic fever syndromes, cryopyrinopathies, and skin disorders with pyogenic, granulomatous, or dystrophic features, which have been recognized across different countries spanning from the Mediterranean basin to the Japanese archipelago. Many children and adults with autoinflammatory diseases continue to elude diagnosis, and the diagnostic delay of many years puts these patients at risk of long-term severe complications, such as amyloidosis. Any hint of suspicion of autoinflammatory disease thus needs to be highlighted in various medical specialties, and this review examines their frequencies around the world, trying to match them with geographic location, ethnic and genetic data, in an attempt to realize a geoepidemiologic map for most of these conditions. PMID:23971037

  1. Monogenic diseases that can be cured by liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Daina, Erica; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Colledan, Michele; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    While the prevalence of most diseases caused by single-gene mutations is low and defines them as rare conditions, all together, monogenic diseases account for approximately 10 in every 1000 births according to the World Health Organisation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) could offer a therapeutic option in monogenic diseases in two ways: by substituting for an injured liver or by supplying a tissue that can replace a mutant protein. In this respect, LT may be regarded as the correction of a disease at the level of the dysfunctional protein. Monogenic diseases that involve the liver represent a heterogeneous group of disorders. In conditions associated with predominant liver parenchymal damage (i.e., genetic cholestatic disorders, Wilson's disease, hereditary hemochromatosis, tyrosinemia, α1 antitrypsin deficiency), hepatic complications are the major source of morbidity and LT not only replaces a dysfunctional liver but also corrects the genetic defect and effectively cures the disease. A second group includes liver-based genetic disorders characterised by an architecturally near-normal liver (urea cycle disorders, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome-1). In these defects, extrahepatic complications are the main source of morbidity and mortality while liver function is relatively preserved. Combined transplantation of other organs may be required, and other surgical techniques, such as domino and auxiliary liver transplantation, have been attempted. In a third group of monogenic diseases, the underlying genetic defect is expressed at a systemic level and liver involvement is just one of the clinical manifestations. In these conditions, LT might only be partially curative since the abnormal phenotype is maintained by extrahepatic synthesis of the toxic metabolites (i.e., methylmalonic acidemia, propionic acidemia). This review focuses on principles of diagnosis, management

  2. Cryopyrin-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndromes (CAPS) - Juvenile

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... SG, Mueller JL, Tresierras M, Broide DH, Wanderer AA, Kolodner RD. Fine structure mapping of CIAS1: identification ... PubMed Hoffman HM, Mueller JL, Broide DH, Wanderer AA, Kolodner RD. Mutation of a new gene encoding ...

  4. Pathogenesis of Behçet's disease: autoinflammatory features and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gül, Ahmet

    2015-07-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is an inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by recurrent attacks affecting the mucocutaneous tissues, eyes, joints, blood vessels, brain and gastrointestinal tract. It is a multifactorial disease classified as a variable vessel vasculitis, and several environmental triggers may induce inflammatory episodes in genetically susceptible individuals. BD has several autoinflammatory features including recurrent self-limited clinical manifestations overlapping with monogenic autoinflammatory disorders, significant host predisposition and abnormally increased inflammatory response, with a robust innate component. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*51 is the strongest susceptibility factor described so far affecting the disease risk and typical phenotype. Non-HLA genetic associations such as endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), interleukin 23 receptor (IL23R) and IL10 variations suggest that BD shares susceptibility genes and inflammatory pathways with spondyloarthritis. Although genomewide association studies revealed an increased risk associated with recessively inherited ERAP1 variations in HLA-B*51 positive patients, it is not clear yet whether certain peptide-HLA allele combinations result in an adaptive response by a self-antigen-directed cytotoxic response or an innate response by modulating an NK cell activity or causing an unfolded protein response. Understanding of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I-driven inflammatory response is expected to provide insights for the development of better treatment and remission-induction options in BD as well as in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriasis. PMID:26068404

  5. On Recurrence Formulae of Solid Spherical Monogenics

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, S.; Guerlebeck, K.

    2008-09-01

    We construct a new orthonormal basis of solid spherical monogenics in L{sub 2}. The important property of the basis polynomials is that the hypercomplex derivative as well as the primitive yield (up to a factor) again a basis function of the same system. Besides we refine a decomposition theorem for monogenic functions. With these properties the polynomial system provides a powerful tool to analyze orthogonal series expansions.

  6. Interleukin-1: Ariadne's Thread in Autoinflammatory and Autoimmune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cattalini, Marco; Vitale, Antonio; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rigante, Donato

    2015-02-01

    Autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders are characterized by chronic activation of the immune system, which leads to systemic self-directed inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Mutations in inflammasome-related proteins have been associated with autoinflammatory disorders, and the link between inflammasome and autoimmune disorders is becoming increasingly clear. As researchers learn more about these two areas, other disorders that were once thought to be autoimmune are now being considered autoinflammatory, or as having at least an autoinflammatory component. This review depicts the role of interleukin-1 as "Ariadne's thread" on the path through the labyrinth of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders and emphasizes the blurred boundary between innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:26223084

  7. Untangling the Web of Systemic Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Caso, Francesco; De Clemente, Caterina; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is involved in the pathophysiology of systemic autoinflammatory diseases (SAIDs), an enlarging group of disorders caused by dysregulated production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, in which autoreactive T-lymphocytes and autoantibodies are indeed absent. A widely deranged innate immunity leads to overactivity of proinflammatory cytokines and subsequent multisite inflammatory symptoms depicting various conditions, such as hereditary periodic fevers, granulomatous disorders, and pyogenic diseases, collectively described in this review. Further research should enhance our understanding of the genetics behind SAIDs, unearth triggers of inflammatory attacks, and result in improvement for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25132737

  8. Lombardia GENS: a collaborative registry for monogenic diseases associated with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bersano, Anna; Baron, Pierluigi; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Trobia, Nadia; Sterzi, Roberto; Motto, Cristina; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Ferrarese, Carlo; Santoro, Patrizia; Parati, Eugenio; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro; Candelise, Livia

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Italian region of Lombardy, with its existing stroke centers and high-technology laboratories, provides a favorable context for studying monogenic diseases associated with stroke. The Lombardia GENS project was set up to create a regional network for the diagnosis of six monogenic diseases associated with stroke: CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine, hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Marfan syndrome. The network comprises 36 stroke centers and seven high-technology laboratories, performing molecular analysis. In this context, all stroke/TIA patients fulfilling clinical criteria for monogenic diseases are currently being included in an ongoing study. Demographic, clinical and family data and diagnostic criteria are collected using standardized forms. On the basis of stroke incidence in Lombardy and the reported prevalence of the diseases considered, we expect, during the course of the study, to collect datasets and DNA samples from more than 200 stroke patients suspected of having monogenic diseases. This will allow evaluation of the regional burden and better phenotype characterization of monogenic diseases associated with stroke. PMID:23158583

  9. On Convergence Aspects of Spheroidal Monogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, S.; Morais, J.

    2011-09-01

    Orthogonal polynomials have found wide applications in mathematical physics, numerical analysis, and other fields. Accordingly there is an enormous amount of variety of such polynomials and relations that describe their properties. The paper's main results are the discussion of approximation properties for monogenic functions over prolate spheroids in R3 in terms of orthogonal monogenic polynomials and their interdependences. Certain results are stated without proof for now. The motivation for the present study stems from the fact that these polynomials play an important role in the calculation of the Bergman kernel and Green's monogenic functions in a spheroid. Once these functions are known, it is possible to solve both basic boundary value and conformal mapping problems. Interestingly, most of the used methods have a n-dimensional counterpart and can be extended to arbitrary ellipsoids. But such a procedure would make the further study of the underlying ellipsoidal monogenics somewhat laborious, and for this reason we shall not discuss these general cases here. To the best of our knowledge, this does not appear to have been done in literature before.

  10. Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score: a novel tool to discriminate monogenic and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K A; Oram, R A; Flanagan, S E; De Franco, E; Colclough, K; shepherd, M; Ellard, S

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing patients with monogenic diabetes from Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is important for correct diagnosis, treatment and to select patients for gene discovery studies. We assessed whether a T1D genetic risk score (T1D-GRS) generated from T1D-associated common genetic variants provides a novel way to discriminate monogenic diabetes from T1D. The T1D-GRS was highly discriminative of proven MODY (n=805) and T1D (n=1963) (ROC-AUC=0.87). A T1D-GRS of >0.280 (>50th T1D centile) was indicative of T1D (94% specificity, 50% sensitivity). We then analyzed the T1D-GRS in 242 White-European patients with neonatal diabetes (NDM) who had been tested for all known neonatal diabetes genes. Monogenic NDM was confirmed in 90%, 59% and 8% in patients with GRS <5th T1D centile, 50-75th T1D centile and >75th T1D centile, respectively. Applying a GRS 50th T1D centile cut-off in 48 NDM patients with no known genetic cause, identified those most likely to have a novel monogenic etiology by highlighting patients with probable early-onset T1D (GRS >50th T1D centile) who were diagnosed later, had less syndromic presentation but had additional autoimmune features compared to proven monogenic NDM. The T1D-GRS is a novel tool to improve the use of biomarkers in the discrimination of monogenic diabetes from T1D. PMID:27207547

  11. Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score: A Novel Tool to Discriminate Monogenic and Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kashyap A; Oram, Richard A; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Colclough, Kevin; Shepherd, Maggie; Ellard, Sian; Weedon, Michael N; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-07-01

    Distinguishing patients with monogenic diabetes from those with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is important for correct diagnosis, treatment, and selection of patients for gene discovery studies. We assessed whether a T1D genetic risk score (T1D-GRS) generated from T1D-associated common genetic variants provides a novel way to discriminate monogenic diabetes from T1D. The T1D-GRS was highly discriminative of proven maturity-onset diabetes of young (MODY) (n = 805) and T1D (n = 1,963) (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.87). A T1D-GRS of >0.280 (>50th T1D centile) was indicative of T1D (94% specificity, 50% sensitivity). We then analyzed the T1D-GRS of 242 white European patients with neonatal diabetes (NDM) who had been tested for all known NDM genes. Monogenic NDM was confirmed in 90, 59, and 8% of patients with GRS <5th T1D centile, 50-75th T1D centile, and >75th T1D centile, respectively. Applying a GRS 50th T1D centile cutoff in 48 NDM patients with no known genetic cause identified those most likely to have a novel monogenic etiology by highlighting patients with probable early-onset T1D (GRS >50th T1D centile) who were diagnosed later and had less syndromic presentation but additional autoimmune features compared with those with proven monogenic NDM. The T1D-GRS is a novel tool to improve the use of biomarkers in the discrimination of monogenic diabetes from T1D. PMID:27207547

  12. Pharmacogenomics: mapping monogenic mutations to direct therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Palmer

    2012-07-01

    The molecular mapping of mutations that underlie congenital disorders of monogenic origin can result in both a broader understanding of the molecular basis of the disorder and novel therapeutic insights. Indeed, genotyping patients and then replicating the behavior of the mutant gene products in well-defined biochemical or electrophysiological systems will allow tailoring of therapy to be mutation- and protein sequence-dependent. In this issue of the JCI, Shen and colleagues describe such an approach that identified novel mutations in the α subunit of the nicotinic receptor linked to myasthenia gravis. PMID:22728931

  13. The role of the inflammasome in patients with autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hal M; Broderick, Lori

    2016-07-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are disorders of the innate immune system, characterized by systemic inflammation often driven by inflammasomes, and independent of infection and autoreactive antibodies or antigen-specific T cells. These diseases are increasingly recognized as disorders of immune dysregulation, presenting with a constellation of fevers, rashes, and mucosal symptoms in many cases, which suggests that the allergist/immunologist is the appropriate specialist for these patients. However, many practicing physicians are unaware of these disorders in their pediatric and adult patient populations, leading to substantial delays in diagnosis. Recognizing autoinflammatory disease symptom patterns, performing appropriate diagnostic tests, and instituting early effective therapy are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. This review will focus on understanding the molecular basis of inflammasomes, recognizing the distinguishing features of the classic autoinflammatory disorders, and appreciating the treatment modalities available. PMID:27373321

  14. Safety profile of anakinra in the management of rheumatologic, metabolic and autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Giannini, Margherita; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lapadula, Giovanni; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Anakinra is a biologic response modifier that competitively antagonises the biologic effects of interleukin-1, the ancestor pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine produced by numerous cell types, found in excess in the serum, synovial fluid and any involved tissues of patients with many inflammatory diseases. The magnitude of the risk of different infections, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, associated with the large use of anakinra in many rheumatologic, metabolic or autoinflammatory disorders is still unknown. In addition, it is unclear whether this effect is modified by the concomitant use of antirheumatic drugs and corticosteroids. The rates of development of Mtb disease in patients treated with anakinra due to rheumatoid arthritis, systemic autoinflammatory diseases, Schnitzler's syndrome, Behçet's disease, adult-onset Still disease, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, gout and diabetes mellitus have been usually very low. However, clinicians must carefully weigh the benefits of biological drugs against their risks, particularly in patients prone to infections. Additional data are needed to understand whether this risk of Mtb infection and reactivation are representative of a class effect related to biologics or whether anakinra bears specifically an intrinsic lower risk in comparison with other biologic drugs. PMID:26940286

  15. Pyrin inflammasome activation and RhoA signaling in the autoinflammatory diseases FMF and HIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Hwan; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L; Chae, Jae Jin

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding pyrin and mevalonate kinase (MVK) cause distinct interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-mediated autoinflammatory diseases: familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS). Pyrin forms an inflammasome when mutant or in response to bacterial modification of the GTPase RhoA. We found that RhoA activated the serine-threonine kinases PKN1 and PKN2 that bind and phosphorylate pyrin. Phosphorylated pyrin bound to 14-3-3 proteins, regulatory proteins that in turn blocked the pyrin inflammasome. The binding of 14-3-3 and PKN proteins to FMF-associated mutant pyrin was substantially decreased, and the constitutive IL-1β release from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with FMF or HIDS was attenuated by activation of PKN1 and PKN2. Defects in prenylation, seen in HIDS, led to RhoA inactivation and consequent pyrin inflammasome activation. These data suggest a previously unsuspected fundamental molecular connection between two seemingly distinct autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:27270401

  16. Association of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) shares genetic and cytokine profiles with other autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Ceccherini, Isabella; Gattorno, Marco; Fanoni, Daniele; Caroli, Francesco; Rusmini, Marta; Grossi, Alice; De Simone, Clara; Borghi, Orietta M; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Crosti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    The association of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) has recently been described and suggested to be a new entity within the spectrum of autoinflammatory syndromes, which are characterized by recurrent episodes of sterile inflammation, without circulating autoantibodies and autoreactive T-cells. We conducted an observational study on 5 patients with PASH syndrome, analyzing their clinical features, genetic profile of 10 genes already known to be involved in autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs), and cytokine expression pattern both in lesional skin and serum. In tissue skin samples, the expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β and its receptors I and II were significantly higher in PASH (P = 0.028, 0.047, and 0.050, respectively) than in controls. In PASH patients, chemokines such as IL-8 (P = 0.004), C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) 1/2/3 (P = 0.028), CXCL 16 (P = 0.008), and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) (P = 0.005) were overexpressed. Fas/Fas ligand and cluster of differentiation (CD)40/CD40 ligand systems were also overexpressed (P = 0.016 for Fas, P = 0.006 for Fas ligand, P = 0.005 for CD40, and P = 0.004 for CD40 ligand), contributing to tissue damage and inflammation. In peripheral blood, serum levels of the main proinflammatory cytokines, that is, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-17, were within the normal range, suggesting that in PASH syndrome, the inflammatory process is mainly localized into the skin. Four out of our 5 PASH patients presented genetic alterations typical of well-known AIDs, including inflammatory bowel diseases, and the only patient lacking genetic changes had clinically evident Crohn disease. In conclusion, overexpression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network, along with the genetic changes, supports the view that PASH syndrome is autoinflammatory in origin. PMID:25501066

  17. Live birth after PGD with confirmation by a comprehensive approach (karyomapping) for simultaneous detection of monogenic and chromosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Handyside, Alan H; Thornhill, Alan R; Ottolini, Christian S; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Wells, Dagan; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders has the drawback of time and cost associated with tailoring a specific test for each couple, disorder, or both. The inability of any single assay to detect the monogenic disorder in question and simultaneously the chromosomal complement of the embryo also limits its application as separate tests may need to be carried out on the amplified material. The first clinical use of a novel approach ('karyomapping') was designed to circumvent this problem. In this example, karyomapping was used to confirm the results of an existing PGD case detecting both chromosomal abnormalities and a monogenic disorder (Smith-Lemli-Opitz [SLO] syndrome) simultaneously. The family underwent IVF, ICSI and PGD, and both polar body and cleavage stage biopsy were carried out. Following whole genome amplification, array comparative genomic hybridisation of the polar bodies and minisequencing and STR analysis of single blastomeres were used to diagnose maternal aneuploidies and SLO status, respectively. This was confirmed, by karyomapping. Unlike standard PGD, karyomapping required no a-priori test development. A singleton pregnancy and live birth, unaffected with SLO syndrome and with no chromosome abnormality, ensued. Karyomapping is potentially capable of detecting a wide spectrum of monogenic and chromosome disorders and, in this context, can be considered a comprehensive approach to PGD. PMID:25154779

  18. Neutrophilic dermatoses and autoinflammatory diseases with skin involvement--innate immune disorders.

    PubMed

    Navarini, Alexander A; Satoh, Takashi K; French, Lars E

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) such as Sweet's syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum were first described more than 50 years ago and grouped based on their clinical features combined with the typical, neutrophil-rich cutaneous inflammation. In contrast, the recently identified autoinflammatory diseases (ADs) that are also associated with neutrophil granulocyte infiltration of the skin were first characterized based on their genetic architecture. Though both the older ND and the newer AD encompass distinct conditions, they can be seen as parts of a spectrum of innate inflammation. Both groups of diseases show so many overlapping clinical, pathogenetic, histologic, and genetic features that together they should likely be considered as innate immune disorders. PMID:26620372

  19. Monogenic Generalized Hermite Polynomials and Associated Hermite-Bessel Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cação, I.

    2010-09-01

    A large range of generalizations of the ordinary Hermite polynomials of one or several real or complex variables has been considered by several authors, using different methods. We construct monogenic generalizations of ordinary Hermite polynomials starting from a hypercomplex analogue to the real valued Lahiri exponential generating function. By using specific operational techniques, we derive some of their properties. As an application of the constructed polynomials, we define associated monogenic Hermite-Bessel functions.

  20. An autoinflammatory neurological disease due to interleukin 6 hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are rare illnesses characterized by apparently unprovoked inflammation without high-titer auto-antibodies or antigen-specific T cells. They may cause neurological manifestations, such as meningitis and hearing loss, but they are also characterized by non-neurological manifestations. In this work we studied a 30-year-old man who had a chronic disease characterized by meningitis, progressive hearing loss, persistently raised inflammatory markers and diffuse leukoencephalopathy on brain MRI. He also suffered from chronic recurrent osteomyelitis of the mandible. The hypothesis of an autoinflammatory disease prompted us to test for the presence of mutations in interleukin-1−pathway genes and to investigate the function of this pathway in the mononuclear cells obtained from the patient. Search for mutations in genes associated with interleukin-1−pathway demonstrated a novel NLRP3 (CIAS1) mutation (p.I288M) and a previously described MEFV mutation (p.R761H), but their combination was found to be non-pathogenic. On the other hand, we uncovered a selective interleukin-6 hypersecretion within the central nervous system as the likely pathogenic mechanism. This is also supported by the response to the anti-interleukin-6−receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab, but not to the recombinant interleukin-1−receptor antagonist anakinra. Exome sequencing failed to identify mutations in other genes known to be involved in autoinflammatory diseases. We propose that the disease described in this patient might be a prototype of a novel category of autoinflammatory diseases characterized by prominent neurological involvement. PMID:23432807

  1. Compassionate Use Protocol for the Treatment of Autoinflammatory Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Chronic Atypical Neutrophilic Dermatosis With Lipodystrophy and Elevated Temperature (CANDLE); Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM); Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING)-Associated Vasculopathy With Onset During Infancy (SAVI)

  2. From monogenic to polygenic obesity: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Carla I. G.; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The heritability of obesity and body weight in general is high. A small number of confirmed monogenic forms of obesity—the respective mutations are sufficient by themselves to cause the condition in food abundant societies—have been identified by molecular genetic studies. The elucidation of these genes, mostly based on animal and family studies, has led to the identification of important pathways to the disorder and thus to a deeper understanding of the regulation of body weight. The identification of inborn deficiency of the mostly adipocyte-derived satiety hormone leptin in extremely obese children from consanguineous families paved the way to the first pharmacological therapy for obesity based on a molecular genetic finding. The genetic predisposition to obesity for most individuals, however, has a polygenic basis. A polygenic variant by itself has a small effect on the phenotype; only in combination with other predisposing variants does a sizeable phenotypic effect arise. Common variants in the first intron of the ‘fat mass and obesity associated’ gene (FTO) result in an elevated body mass index (BMI) equivalent to approximately +0.4 kg/m² per risk allele. The FTO variants were originally detected in a genome wide association study (GWAS) pertaining to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Large meta-analyses of GWAS have subsequently identified additional polygenic variants. Up to December 2009, polygenic variants have been confirmed in a total of 17 independent genomic regions. Further study of genetic effects on human body weight regulation should detect variants that will explain a larger proportion of the heritability. The development of new strategies for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of obesity can be anticipated. PMID:20127379

  3. Monogenic polyarteritis: the lesson of ADA2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Caorsi, Roberta; Penco, Federica; Schena, Francesca; Gattorno, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The deficiency of Adenosine Deaminase 2 (DADA2) is a new autoinflammatory disease characterised by an early onset vasculopathy with livedoid skin rash associated with systemic manifestations, CNS involvement and mild immunodeficiency.This condition is secondary to autosomal recessive mutations of CECR1 (Cat Eye Syndrome Chromosome Region 1) gene, mapped to chromosome 22q11.1, that encodes for the enzymatic protein adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2). By now 19 different mutations in CECR1 gene have been detected.The pathogenetic mechanism of DADA2 is still unclear. ADA2 in a secreted protein mainly expressed by cells of the myeloid lineage; its enzymatic activity is higher in conditions of hypoxia, inflammation and oncogenesis. Moreover ADA2 is able to induce macrophages proliferation and differentiation; it's deficiency is in fact associated with a reduction of anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2). The deficiency of ADA2 is also associated with an up-regulation of neutrophils-expressed genes and an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The mild immunodeficiency detected in many DADA2 patients suggests a role of this protein in the adaptive immune response; an increased mortality of B cells and a reduction in the number of memory B cells, terminally differentiated B cells and plasmacells has been described in many patients. The lack of the protein is associated with endothelium damage; however the function of this protein in the endothelial homeostasis is still unknown.From the clinical point of view, this disease is characterized by a wide spectrum of severity. Chronic or recurrent systemic inflammation with fever, elevation of acute phase reactants and skin manifestations (mainly represented by livedo reticularis) is the typical clinical picture. While in some patients the disease is mild and skin-limited, others present a severe, even lethal, disease with multi-organ involvement; the CNS involvement is rather common with ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes. In

  4. Robust disparity estimation based on color monogenic curvature phase.

    PubMed

    Zang, Di; Li, Jie; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Junqi

    2012-07-01

    Disparity estimation for binocular images is an important problem for many visual tasks such as 3D environment reconstruction, digital hologram, virtual reality, robot navigation, etc. Conventional approaches are based on brightness constancy assumption to establish spatial correspondences between a pair of images. However, in the presence of large illumination variation and serious noisy contamination, conventional approaches fail to generate accurate disparity maps. To have robust disparity estimation in these situations, we first propose a model - color monogenic curvature phase to describe local features of color images by embedding the monogenic curvature signal into the quaternion representation. Then a multiscale framework to estimate disparities is proposed by coupling the advantages of the color monogenic curvature phase and mutual information. Both indoor and outdoor images with large brightness variation are used in the experiments, and the results demonstrate that our approach can achieve a good performance even in the conditions of large illumination change and serious noisy contamination. PMID:22772192

  5. Association of Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, and Suppurative Hidradenitis (PASH) Shares Genetic and Cytokine Profiles With Other Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, Angelo V.; Ceccherini, Isabella; Gattorno, Marco; Fanoni, Daniele; Caroli, Francesco; Rusmini, Marta; Grossi, Alice; De Simone, Clara; Borghi, Orietta M.; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Crosti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The association of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) has recently been described and suggested to be a new entity within the spectrum of autoinflammatory syndromes, which are characterized by recurrent episodes of sterile inflammation, without circulating autoantibodies and autoreactive T-cells. We conducted an observational study on 5 patients with PASH syndrome, analyzing their clinical features, genetic profile of 10 genes already known to be involved in autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs), and cytokine expression pattern both in lesional skin and serum. In tissue skin samples, the expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β and its receptors I and II were significantly higher in PASH (P = 0.028, 0.047, and 0.050, respectively) than in controls. In PASH patients, chemokines such as IL-8 (P = 0.004), C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) 1/2/3 (P = 0.028), CXCL 16 (P = 0.008), and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) (P = 0.005) were overexpressed. Fas/Fas ligand and cluster of differentiation (CD)40/CD40 ligand systems were also overexpressed (P = 0.016 for Fas, P = 0.006 for Fas ligand, P = 0.005 for CD40, and P = 0.004 for CD40 ligand), contributing to tissue damage and inflammation. In peripheral blood, serum levels of the main proinflammatory cytokines, that is, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-17, were within the normal range, suggesting that in PASH syndrome, the inflammatory process is mainly localized into the skin. Four out of our 5 PASH patients presented genetic alterations typical of well-known AIDs, including inflammatory bowel diseases, and the only patient lacking genetic changes had clinically evident Crohn disease. In conclusion, overexpression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network, along with the genetic changes, supports the view that PASH syndrome is autoinflammatory in origin. PMID:25501066

  6. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY The most common forms of ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  7. [Personalized therapy in cardiology. Biomarkers, pharmacogenetics and therapy of monogenic diseases].

    PubMed

    Eschenhagen, T; Blankenberg, S

    2013-02-01

    Improved therapy and prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases have contributed to an increase in life expectancy like no other field of medicine. However, many cardiological diseases remain untreatable and standard therapies often work only in a minority of patients or cause more harm than benefit. Personalized approaches appear to be a promising solution. Monogenic heart diseases are paradigmatic for this approach and can in rare cases be treated mutation specifically. Overall, however, success remains limited. Next generation sequencing will facilitate the identification of mutations causing diseases. Cell culture models based on induced pluripotent stem cells open the perspective of individualized testing of disease severity and pharmacological or genetic therapy. In contrast to monogenic diseases genetic testing plays no practical role yet in the management of multifactorial cardiovascular diseases. Biomarkers can identify individuals with increased cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, biomarker-guided therapy represents an attractive option with troponin-guided therapy of acute coronary syndromes as a successful example. Individual responses to drugs vary and are partly determined by genes. Simple genetic analyses can improve response prediction and minimize side effects in cases such as warfarin and high doses of simvastatin. Taken together personalized approaches will gain importance in the cardiovascular field but this requires the development of better methods and research that quantifies the true value of the new knowledge. PMID:23371262

  8. Network‐Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome‐Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E.; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J.; Simpson, Michael A.; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole‐exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease‐causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene‐ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow‐up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease‐causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof‐of‐principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams‐Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/. PMID:26394720

  9. An additional monogenic disorder that masquerades as multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, K.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Vahedi, K.

    1996-11-11

    In their comprehensive differential diagnosis of monogenic diseases that can mimic multiple sclerosis, Natowicz and Bejjani did not include a newly recognized monogenic disorder known under the acronym of CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy); this disorder can mimic MS clinically and radiologically to a remarkable extent. The underlying histopathological lesion of CADASIL is a non-atherosclerotic, non-amyloid arteriopathy affecting mainly the penetrating medullary arteries to the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia. Electron microscopy shows an abnormal deposit of granular osmiophilic material in the arterial wall. These arterial changes are observed in various tissues even though clinical manifestations seem to be restricted to the central nervous system. The CADASIL gene was mapped recently to chromosome 19 and gene identification is ongoing. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  10. LINKAGE programs: linkage analysis for monogenic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wang, Qing K; Rao, Shaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Identification of the genes for a human disease provides significant insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of the disease. A human disease gene can be identified by its chromosomal location (positional cloning). Linkage analysis is a key step in positional cloning. For monogenic disorders with a known inheritance pattern, model-based linkage analysis is effective in mapping the disease location. Therefore, model-based linkage analysis can provide a powerful tool to positional cloning of some specific molecular determinants that co-segregate with disease phenotypes in the isolated samples (e.g., large and multiplex impaired pedigrees). This chapter describes model-based human genetic linkage analysis as implemented in the LINKAGE computer package. First, we introduce the basic concepts and principles for genetic analysis of monogenic disorders. Then, we demonstrate the usages of the programs by analyzing several examples of hypothetical pedigrees with the inheritance modes of autosomal-dominant, autosomal-recessive, and genetic heterogeneity. PMID:17071989

  11. Fourteen Monogenic Genes Account for 15% of Nephrolithiasis/Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Halbritter, Jan; Baum, Michelle; Hynes, Ann Marie; Rice, Sarah J.; Thwaites, David T.; Gucev, Zoran S.; Fisher, Brittany; Spaneas, Leslie; Porath, Jonathan D.; Braun, Daniela A.; Wassner, Ari J.; Nelson, Caleb P.; Tasic, Velibor

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a prevalent condition with a high morbidity. Although dozens of monogenic causes have been identified, the fraction of single-gene disease has not been well studied. To determine the percentage of cases that can be molecularly explained by mutations in 1 of 30 known kidney stone genes, we conducted a high-throughput mutation analysis in a cohort of consecutively recruited patients from typical kidney stone clinics. The cohort comprised 272 genetically unresolved individuals (106 children and 166 adults) from 268 families with nephrolithiasis (n=256) or isolated nephrocalcinosis (n=16). We detected 50 likely causative mutations in 14 of 30 analyzed genes, leading to a molecular diagnosis in 14.9% (40 of 268) of all cases; 20 of 50 detected mutations were novel (40%). The cystinuria gene SLC7A9 (n=19) was most frequently mutated. The percentage of monogenic cases was notably high in both the adult (11.4%) and pediatric cohorts (20.8%). Recessive causes were more frequent among children, whereas dominant disease occurred more abundantly in adults. Our study provides an in-depth analysis of monogenic causes of kidney stone disease. We suggest that knowledge of the molecular cause of nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis may have practical implications and might facilitate personalized treatment. PMID:25296721

  12. Fourteen monogenic genes account for 15% of nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Halbritter, Jan; Baum, Michelle; Hynes, Ann Marie; Rice, Sarah J; Thwaites, David T; Gucev, Zoran S; Fisher, Brittany; Spaneas, Leslie; Porath, Jonathan D; Braun, Daniela A; Wassner, Ari J; Nelson, Caleb P; Tasic, Velibor; Sayer, John A; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-03-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a prevalent condition with a high morbidity. Although dozens of monogenic causes have been identified, the fraction of single-gene disease has not been well studied. To determine the percentage of cases that can be molecularly explained by mutations in 1 of 30 known kidney stone genes, we conducted a high-throughput mutation analysis in a cohort of consecutively recruited patients from typical kidney stone clinics. The cohort comprised 272 genetically unresolved individuals (106 children and 166 adults) from 268 families with nephrolithiasis (n=256) or isolated nephrocalcinosis (n=16). We detected 50 likely causative mutations in 14 of 30 analyzed genes, leading to a molecular diagnosis in 14.9% (40 of 268) of all cases; 20 of 50 detected mutations were novel (40%). The cystinuria gene SLC7A9 (n=19) was most frequently mutated. The percentage of monogenic cases was notably high in both the adult (11.4%) and pediatric cohorts (20.8%). Recessive causes were more frequent among children, whereas dominant disease occurred more abundantly in adults. Our study provides an in-depth analysis of monogenic causes of kidney stone disease. We suggest that knowledge of the molecular cause of nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis may have practical implications and might facilitate personalized treatment. PMID:25296721

  13. Current Progress in Therapeutic Gene Editing for Monogenic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Versha; Moore, Marc; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2016-03-01

    Programmable nucleases allow defined alterations in the genome with ease-of-use, efficiency, and specificity. Their availability has led to accurate and widespread genome engineering, with multiple applications in basic research, biotechnology, and therapy. With regard to human gene therapy, nuclease-based gene editing has facilitated development of a broad range of therapeutic strategies based on both nonhomologous end joining and homology-dependent repair. This review discusses current progress in nuclease-based therapeutic applications for a subset of inherited monogenic diseases including cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, diseases of the bone marrow, and hemophilia and highlights associated challenges and future prospects. PMID:26765770

  14. Genetics of inflammatory bowel disease from multifactorial to monogenic forms

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Girardelli, Martina; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic multifactorial disorders. According to a recent study, the number of IBD association loci is increased to 201, of which 37 and 27 loci contribute specifically to the development of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis respectively. Some IBD associated genes are involved in innate immunity, in the autophagy and in the inflammatory response such as NOD2, ATG16L1 and IL23R, while other are implicated in immune mediated disease (STAT3) and in susceptibility to mycobacterium infection (IL12B). In case of early onset of IBD (VEO-IBD) within the 6th year of age, the disease may be caused by mutations in genes responsible for severe monogenic disorders such as the primary immunodeficiency diseases. In this review we discuss how these monogenic disorders through different immune mechanisms can similarly be responsible of VEO-IBD phenotype. Moreover we would highlight how the identification of pathogenic genes by Next Generation Sequencing technologies can allow to obtain a rapid diagnosis and to apply specific therapies. PMID:26604638

  15. Brief Report: Sensory Reactivity in Children with Phelan-McDermid Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mieses, A. M.; Tavassoli, T.; Li, E.; Soorya, L.; Lurie, S.; Wang, A. T.; Siper, P. M.; Kolevzon, A.

    2016-01-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS), a monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), results from deletion or mutation of the "SHANK3" gene. Atypical sensory reactivity is now included in the diagnostic criteria for ASD. Examining the sensory phenotype in monogenic forms of ASD, such as PMS, may help identify underlying mechanisms of…

  16. Vector extension of monogenic wavelets for geometric representation of color images.

    PubMed

    Soulard, Raphaël; Carré, Philippe; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Monogenic wavelets offer a geometric representation of grayscale images through an AM-FM model allowing invariance of coefficients to translations and rotations. The underlying concept of local phase includes a fine contour analysis into a coherent unified framework. Starting from a link with structure tensors, we propose a nontrivial extension of the monogenic framework to vector-valued signals to carry out a nonmarginal color monogenic wavelet transform. We also give a practical study of this new wavelet transform in the contexts of sparse representations and invariant analysis, which helps to understand the physical interpretation of coefficients and validates the interest of our theoretical construction. PMID:23193237

  17. Self-fertilization and monogenic strains in natural populations of terrestrial slugs.

    PubMed

    McCracken, G F; Selander, R K

    1980-01-01

    Electrophoretic studies of genetic variation in 14 species of terrestrial slugs of the families Arionidae, Philomycidae, and Limacidae in the eastern United States indicate that self-fertilization, either facultative or obligatory, is the normal breeding system in six of the species. Three of these six species are single monogenic strains; one consists of three monogenic strains; one includes a highly heterozygous form and two monogenic strains; and one has a moderate amount of polymorphism but little heterozygosity and strong linkage disequilibrium. Eight species are outcrossers, being highly polymorphic and panmictic within local populations. Niche breadth, assessed in terms of extent of geographic distribution and variety of habitats occupied and measured on an experimental plot of woodland, is greater in some monogenic strains than in highly heterozygous, outcrossing species. Colonizing success apparently is independent of the amount of genetic variation carried by a species. PMID:16592767

  18. Self-fertilization and monogenic strains in natural populations of terrestrial slugs

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Gary F.; Selander, Robert K.

    1980-01-01

    Electrophoretic studies of genetic variation in 14 species of terrestrial slugs of the families Arionidae, Philomycidae, and Limacidae in the eastern United States indicate that self-fertilization, either facultative or obligatory, is the normal breeding system in six of the species. Three of these six species are single monogenic strains; one consists of three monogenic strains; one includes a highly heterozygous form and two monogenic strains; and one has a moderate amount of polymorphism but little heterozygosity and strong linkage disequilibrium. Eight species are outcrossers, being highly polymorphic and panmictic within local populations. Niche breadth, assessed in terms of extent of geographic distribution and variety of habitats occupied and measured on an experimental plot of woodland, is greater in some monogenic strains than in highly heterozygous, outcrossing species. Colonizing success apparently is independent of the amount of genetic variation carried by a species. PMID:16592767

  19. New insights from monogenic diabetes for “common” type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tallapragada, Divya Sri Priyanka; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R.

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between monogenic and complex genetic diseases are becoming increasingly blurred, as a result of better understanding of phenotypes and their genetic determinants. This had a large impact on the way complex disease genetics is now being investigated. Starting with conventional approaches like familial linkage, positional cloning and candidate genes strategies, the scope of complex disease genetics has grown exponentially with scientific and technological advances in recent times. Despite identification of multiple loci harboring common and rare variants associated with complex diseases, interpreting and evaluating their functional role has proven to be difficult. Information from monogenic diseases, especially related to the intermediate traits associated with complex diseases comes handy. The significant overlap between traits and phenotypes of monogenic diseases with related complex diseases provides a platform to understand the disease biology better. In this review, we would discuss about one such complex disease, type 2 diabetes, which shares marked similarity of intermediate traits with different forms of monogenic diabetes. PMID:26300908

  20. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... For More Information American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of ...

  1. Preclinical characterization and clinical development of ILARIS(®) (canakinumab) for the treatment of autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Gram, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which is part of the first line innate response in vertebrates and is induced in injury, infection, and immunity. While temporally limited induction of IL-1β is believed to protect the organisms against traumatic or infectious insults, its aberrant expression in chronic inflammation is detrimental. Therefore, pharmacological neutralization of IL-1β in chronic inflammatory diseases is a meaningful strategy to treat inflammation and to alleviate respective clinical symptoms in man. Canakinumab is a high-affinity human monoclonal antibody designed to target human IL-1β in inflammatory diseases. Indeed, canakinumab has shown excellent efficacy in rare genetic autoinflammatory diseases or pathological conditions associated with aberrant production of IL-1β. This review focuses on the molecular and clinical mode of action and pharmaceutical development of canakinumab in (auto)inflammatory diseases. PMID:26720283

  2. Association between inherited monogenic liver disorders and chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Piekuse, Linda; Kreile, Madara; Zarina, Agnese; Steinberga, Zane; Sondore, Valentina; Keiss, Jazeps; Lace, Baiba; Krumina, Astrida

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequencies of mutations that cause inherited monogenic liver disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C. METHODS: This study included 86 patients with chronic hepatitis C (55 men, 31 women; mean age at diagnosis, 38.36 ± 14.52 years) who had undergone antiviral therapy comprising pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Viral load, biochemical parameter changes, and liver biopsy morphological data were evaluated in all patients. The control group comprised 271 unrelated individuals representing the general population of Latvia for mutation frequency calculations. The most frequent mutations that cause inherited liver disorders [gene (mutation): ATP7B (H1069Q), HFE (C282Y, H63D), UGT1A1 (TA)7, and SERPINA1 (PiZ)] were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), bidirectional PCR allele-specific amplification, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and sequencing. RESULTS: The viral genotype was detected in 80 of the 86 patients. Viral genotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in 61 (76%), 7 (9%), and 12 (15%) patients, respectively. Among all 86 patients, 50 (58%) reached an early viral response and 70 (81%) reached a sustained viral response. All 16 patients who did not reach a sustained viral response had viral genotype 1. Case-control analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in only the H1069Q mutation between patients and controls (patients, 0.057; controls, 0.012; odds ratio, 5.514; 95%CI: 1.119-29.827, P = 0.022). However, the H1069Q mutation was not associated with antiviral treatment outcomes or biochemical indices. The (TA) 7 mutation of the UGT1A1 gene was associated with decreased ferritin levels (beta regression coefficient = -295.7, P = 0.0087). CONCLUSION: Genetic mutations that cause inherited liver diseases in patients with hepatitis C should be studied in detail. PMID:24575168

  3. Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID) confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Tintle, Linda; Kierczak, Marcin; Perloski, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Lundquist, Andrew; Murén, Eva; Fels, Max; Tengvall, Katarina; Pielberg, Gerli; Dufaure de Citres, Caroline; Dorso, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérôme; Hanson, Jeanette; Thomas, Anne; Leegwater, Peter; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Meadows, Jennifer R S

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disease (AID) manifests from the dysregulation of the innate immune system and is characterised by systemic and persistent inflammation. Clinical heterogeneity leads to patients presenting with one or a spectrum of phenotypic signs, leading to difficult diagnoses in the absence of a clear genetic cause. We used separate genome-wide SNP analyses to investigate five signs of AID (recurrent fever, arthritis, breed specific secondary dermatitis, otitis and systemic reactive amyloidosis) in a canine comparative model, the pure bred Chinese Shar-Pei. Analysis of 255 DNA samples revealed a shared locus on chromosome 13 spanning two peaks of association. A three-marker haplotype based on the most significant SNP (p<2.6×10(-8)) from each analysis showed that one haplotypic pair (H13-11) was present in the majority of AID individuals, implicating this as a shared risk factor for all phenotypes. We also noted that a genetic signature (F ST) distinguishing the phenotypic extremes of the breed specific Chinese Shar-Pei thick and wrinkled skin, flanked the chromosome 13 AID locus; suggesting that breed development and differentiation has played a parallel role in the genetics of breed fitness. Intriguingly, a potential modifier locus for amyloidosis was revealed on chromosome 14, and an investigation of candidate genes from both this and the chromosome 13 regions revealed significant (p<0.05) renal differential expression in four genes previously implicated in kidney or immune health (AOAH, ELMO1, HAS2 and IL6). These results illustrate that phenotypic heterogeneity need not be a reflection of genetic heterogeneity, and that genetic modifiers of disease could be masked if syndromes were not first considered as individual clinical signs and then as a sum of their component parts. PMID:24130694

  4. Classification on the monogenic scale space: application to target recognition in SAR image.

    PubMed

    Ganggang Dong; Gangyao Kuang

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel classification strategy based on the monogenic scale space for target recognition in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image. The proposed method exploits monogenic signal theory, a multidimensional generalization of the analytic signal, to capture the characteristics of SAR image, e.g., broad spectral information and simultaneous spatial localization. The components derived from the monogenic signal at different scales are then applied into a recently developed framework, sparse representation-based classification (SRC). Moreover, to deal with the data set, whose target classes are not linearly separable, the classification via kernel combination is proposed, where the multiple components of the monogenic signal are jointly considered into a unifying framework for target recognition. The novelty of this paper comes from: the development of monogenic feature via uniformly downsampling, normalization, and concatenation of the components at various scales; the development of score-level fusion for SRCs; and the development of composite kernel learning for classification. In particular, the comparative experimental studies under nonliteral operating conditions, e.g., structural modifications, random noise corruption, and variations in depression angle, are performed. The comparative experimental studies of various algorithms, including the linear support vector machine and the kernel version, the SRC and the variants, kernel SRC, kernel linear representation, and sparse representation of monogenic signal, are performed too. The feasibility of the proposed method has been successfully verified using Moving and Stationary Target Acquiration and Recognition database. The experimental results demonstrate that significant improvement for recognition accuracy can be achieved by the proposed method in comparison with the baseline algorithms. PMID:25872212

  5. The Schnitzler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underdiagnosed entity which is considered today as being a paradigm of an acquired/late onset auto-inflammatory disease. It associates a chronic urticarial skin rash, corresponding from the clinico-pathological viewpoint to a neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, a monoclonal IgM component and at least 2 of the following signs: fever, joint and/or bone pain, enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and/or liver, increased ESR, increased neutrophil count, abnormal bone imaging findings. It is a chronic disease with only one known case of spontaneous remission. Except of the severe alteration of quality of life related mainly to the rash, fever and pain, complications include severe inflammatory anemia and AA amyloidosis. About 20% of patients will develop a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly Waldenström disease and lymphoma, a percentage close to other patients with IgM MGUS. It was exceedingly difficult to treat patients with this syndrome until the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra became available. Anakinra allows a complete control of all signs within hours after the first injection, but patients need continuous treatment with daily injections. In many aspects, the Schnitzler syndrome resembles the genetically determined auto-inflammatory syndromes involving activating mutations of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This latter point and its consequences will be addressed. PMID:21143856

  6. Allelic variation, aneuploidy, and nongenetic mechanisms suppress a monogenic trait in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sirr, Amy; Cromie, Gareth A; Jeffery, Eric W; Gilbert, Teresa L; Ludlow, Catherine L; Scott, Adrian C; Dudley, Aimée M

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant features of monogenic diseases, including severity of symptoms and age of onset, can vary widely in response to environmental differences as well as to the presence of genetic modifiers affecting the trait's penetrance and expressivity. While a better understanding of modifier loci could lead to treatments for Mendelian diseases, the rarity of individuals harboring both a disease-causing allele and a modifying genotype hinders their study in human populations. We examined the genetic architecture of monogenic trait modifiers using a well-characterized yeast model of the human Mendelian disease classic galactosemia. Yeast strains with loss-of-function mutations in the yeast ortholog (GAL7) of the human disease gene (GALT) fail to grow in the presence of even small amounts of galactose due to accumulation of the same toxic intermediates that poison human cells. To isolate and individually genotype large numbers of the very rare (∼0.1%) galactose-tolerant recombinant progeny from a cross between two gal7Δ parents, we developed a new method, called "FACS-QTL." FACS-QTL improves upon the currently used approaches of bulk segregant analysis and extreme QTL mapping by requiring less genome engineering and strain manipulation as well as maintaining individual genotype information. Our results identified multiple distinct solutions by which the monogenic trait could be suppressed, including genetic and nongenetic mechanisms as well as frequent aneuploidy. Taken together, our results imply that the modifiers of monogenic traits are likely to be genetically complex and heterogeneous. PMID:25398792

  7. Characterization of rice blast resistance genes in rice germplasm with monogenic lines and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes have been effectively deployed in preventing rice crop losses due to the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In the present study, we studied the interaction between 24 monogenic lines carrying at least one major R gene, Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pi...

  8. An online monogenic diabetes discussion group: supporting families and fueling new research.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Marie E; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2015-11-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments and design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern. PMID:26184072

  9. Orthogonal Bases of Hermitean Monogenic Polynomials: An Explicit Construction in Complex Dimension 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, F.; De Schepper, H.; Lávička, R.; Souček, V.

    2010-09-01

    In this contribution we construct an orthogonal basis of Hermitean monogenic polynomials for the specific case of two complex variables. The approach combines group representation theory, see [5], with a Fischer decomposition for the kernels of each of the considered Dirac operators, see [4], and a Cauchy-Kovalevskaya extension principle, see [3].

  10. Mutations in the cofilin partner Aip1/Wdr1 cause autoinflammatory disease and macrothrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Stirzaker, Roslynn A.; Hacking, Douglas F.; Tahtamouni, Lubna H.; Willson, Tracy A.; Mielke, Lisa A.; Henley, Katya J.; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Wicks, Ian P.; Stevenson, William S.; Nurden, Paquita; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Justice, Monica J.

    2007-01-01

    A pivotal mediator of actin dynamics is the protein cofilin, which promotes filament severing and depolymerization, facilitating the breakdown of existing filaments, and the enhancement of filament growth from newly created barbed ends. It does so in concert with actin interacting protein 1 (Aip1), which serves to accelerate cofilin's activity. While progress has been made in understanding its biochemical functions, the physiologic processes the cofilin/Aip1 complex regulates, particularly in higher organisms, are yet to be determined. We have generated an allelic series for WD40 repeat protein 1 (Wdr1), the mammalian homolog of Aip1, and report that reductions in Wdr1 function produce a dramatic phenotype gradient. While severe loss of function at the Wdr1 locus causes embryonic lethality, macrothrombocytopenia and autoinflammatory disease develop in mice carrying hypomorphic alleles. Macrothrombocytopenia is the result of megakaryocyte maturation defects, which lead to a failure of normal platelet shedding. Autoinflammatory disease, which is bone marrow–derived yet nonlymphoid in origin, is characterized by a massive infiltration of neutrophils into inflammatory lesions. Cytoskeletal responses are impaired in Wdr1 mutant neutrophils. These studies establish an essential requirement for Wdr1 in megakaryocytes and neutrophils, indicating that cofilin-mediated actin dynamics are critically important to the development and function of both cell types. PMID:17515402

  11. Reduced serpinB9-mediated caspase-1 inhibition can contribute to autoinflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgh, Robert; Meeldijk, Jan; Jongeneel, Lieneke; Frenkel, Joost; Bovenschen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Patients who suffer from autoinflammatory disease (AID) exhibit seemingly uncontrolled release of interleukin (IL)-1β. The presence of this inflammatory cytokine triggers immune activation in absence of pathogens and foreign material. The mechanisms that contribute to ‘sterile inflammation’ episodes in AID patients are not fully understood, although for some AIDs underlying genetic causes have been identified. We show that the serine protease inhibitor B9 (serpinB9) regulates IL-1β release in human monocytes. SerpinB9 function is more commonly known for its role in control of granzyme B. SerpinB9 however also serves to restrain IL-1β maturation through caspase-1 inhibition. We here describe an autoinflammatory disease-associated serpinB9 (c.985G>T, A329S) variant, which we discovered in a patient with unknown AID. Using patient cells and serpinB9 overexpressing monocytic cells, we show the A329S variant of serpinB9 exhibits unobstructed granzyme B inhibition, but compromised caspase-1 inhibition. SerpinB9 gene variants might contribute to AID development. PMID:26992230

  12. Biallelic hypomorphic mutations in a linear deubiquitinase define otulipenia, an early-onset autoinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Yu, Xiaomin; Demirkaya, Erkan; Deuitch, Natalie; Stone, Deborah; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Wang, Hongying; Yang, Dan; Park, Yong Hwan; Ombrello, Amanda K; Blake, Mary; Romeo, Tina; Remmers, Elaine F; Chae, Jae Jin; Mullikin, James C; Güzel, Ferhat; Milner, Joshua D; Boehm, Manfred; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Gadina, Massimo; Welch, Steven B; Özen, Seza; Topaloglu, Rezan; Abinun, Mario; Kastner, Daniel L; Aksentijevich, Ivona

    2016-09-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are caused by mutations in genes that function in innate immunity. Here, we report an autoinflammatory disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in OTULIN (FAM105B), encoding a deubiquitinase with linear linkage specificity. We identified two missense and one frameshift mutations in one Pakistani and two Turkish families with four affected patients. Patients presented with neonatal-onset fever, neutrophilic dermatitis/panniculitis, and failure to thrive, but without obvious primary immunodeficiency. HEK293 cells transfected with mutated OTULIN had decreased enzyme activity relative to cells transfected with WT OTULIN, and showed a substantial defect in the linear deubiquitination of target molecules. Stimulated patients' fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed evidence for increased signaling in the canonical NF-κB pathway and accumulated linear ubiquitin aggregates. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines were significantly increased in the supernatants of stimulated primary cells and serum samples. This discovery adds to the emerging spectrum of human diseases caused by defects in the ubiquitin pathway and suggests a role for targeted cytokine therapies. PMID:27559085

  13. Protein misfolding and dysregulated protein homeostasis in autoinflammatory diseases and beyond.

    PubMed

    Agyemang, Amma F; Harrison, Stephanie R; Siegel, Richard M; McDermott, Michael F

    2015-07-01

    Cells have a number of mechanisms to maintain protein homeostasis, including proteasome-mediated degradation of ubiquitinated proteins and autophagy, a regulated process of "self-eating" where the contents of entire organelles can be recycled for other uses. The unfolded protein response prevents protein overload in the secretory pathway. In the past decade, it has become clear that these fundamental cellular processes also help contain inflammation though degrading pro-inflammatory protein complexes such as the NLRP3 inflammasome. Signaling pathways such as the UPR can also be co-opted by toll-like receptor and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signaling to induce inflammatory responses. Mutations that alter key inflammatory proteins, such as NLRP3 or TNFR1, can overcome normal protein homeostasis mechanisms, resulting in autoinflammatory diseases. Conversely, Mendelian defects in the proteasome cause protein accumulation, which can trigger interferon-dependent autoinflammatory disease. In non-Mendelian inflammatory diseases, polymorphisms in genes affecting the UPR or autophagy pathways can contribute to disease, and in diseases not formerly considered inflammatory such as neurodegenerative conditions and type 2 diabetes, there is increasing evidence that cell intrinsic or environmental alterations in protein homeostasis may contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25994946

  14. Monogenic and chromosomal causes of isolated speech and language impairment.

    PubMed

    Barnett, C P; van Bon, B W M

    2015-11-01

    The importance of a precise molecular diagnosis for children with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy has become widely accepted and genetic testing is an integral part of the diagnostic evaluation of these children. In contrast, children with an isolated speech or language disorder are not often genetically evaluated, despite recent evidence supporting a role for genetic factors in the aetiology of these disorders. Several chromosomal copy number variants and single gene disorders associated with abnormalities of speech and language have been identified. Individuals without a precise genetic diagnosis will not receive optimal management including interventions such as early testosterone replacement in Klinefelter syndrome, otorhinolaryngological and audiometric evaluation in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, cardiovascular surveillance in 7q11.23 duplications and early dietary management to prevent obesity in proximal 16p11.2 deletions. This review summarises the clinical features, aetiology and management options of known chromosomal and single gene disorders that are associated with speech and language pathology in the setting of normal or only mildly impaired cognitive function. PMID:26139234

  15. Aberrant actin depolymerization triggers the pyrin inflammasome and autoinflammatory disease that is dependent on IL-18, not IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man Lyang; Chae, Jae Jin; Park, Yong Hwan; De Nardo, Dominic; Stirzaker, Roslynn A; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Tye, Hazel; Cengia, Louise; DiRago, Ladina; Metcalf, Donald; Roberts, Andrew W; Kastner, Daniel L; Lew, Andrew M; Lyras, Dena; Kile, Benjamin T; Croker, Ben A; Masters, Seth L

    2015-06-01

    Gain-of-function mutations that activate the innate immune system can cause systemic autoinflammatory diseases associated with increased IL-1β production. This cytokine is activated identically to IL-18 by an intracellular protein complex known as the inflammasome; however, IL-18 has not yet been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders. We have now identified an autoinflammatory disease in mice driven by IL-18, but not IL-1β, resulting from an inactivating mutation of the actin-depolymerizing cofactor Wdr1. This perturbation of actin polymerization leads to systemic autoinflammation that is reduced when IL-18 is deleted but not when IL-1 signaling is removed. Remarkably, inflammasome activation in mature macrophages is unaltered, but IL-18 production from monocytes is greatly exaggerated, and depletion of monocytes in vivo prevents the disease. Small-molecule inhibition of actin polymerization can remove potential danger signals from the system and prevents monocyte IL-18 production. Finally, we show that the inflammasome sensor of actin dynamics in this system requires caspase-1, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and the innate immune receptor pyrin. Previously, perturbation of actin polymerization by pathogens was shown to activate the pyrin inflammasome, so our data now extend this guard hypothesis to host-regulated actin-dependent processes and autoinflammatory disease. PMID:26008898

  16. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases. PMID:25604318

  17. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Behçet’s Disease Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System When your body is attacked—perhaps by a virus or other germs—your immune system defends you. It “sees” and kills the germs ...

  18. Recruitment of A20 by the C-terminal domain of NEMO suppresses NF-κB activation and autoinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Shawver, Linda Monaco; Wessel, Alex W; Luo, Yongquan; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Lee, Younglang; Vonortas, Spiridon; Cheng, Laurence; Ashwell, Jonathan D; Orange, Jordan S; Siegel, Richard M; Hanson, Eric P

    2016-02-01

    Receptor-induced NF-κB activation is controlled by NEMO, the NF-κB essential modulator. Hypomorphic NEMO mutations result in X-linked ectodermal dysplasia with anhidrosis and immunodeficiency, also referred to as NEMO syndrome. Here we describe a distinct group of patients with NEMO C-terminal deletion (ΔCT-NEMO) mutations. Individuals harboring these mutations develop inflammatory skin and intestinal disease in addition to ectodermal dysplasia with anhidrosis and immunodeficiency. Both primary cells from these patients, as well as reconstituted cell lines with this deletion, exhibited increased IκB kinase (IKK) activity and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Unlike previously described loss-of-function mutations, ΔCT-NEMO mutants promoted increased NF-κB activation in response to TNF and Toll-like receptor stimulation. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed impaired interactions with A20, a negative regulator of NF-κB activation, leading to prolonged accumulation of K63-ubiquitinated RIP within the TNFR1 signaling complex. Recruitment of A20 to the C-terminal domain of NEMO represents a novel mechanism limiting NF-κB activation by NEMO, and its absence results in autoinflammatory disease. PMID:26802121

  19. An Autoinflammatory Disease Due to Homozygous Deletion of the IL1RN Locus

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sreelatha; Jia, Shuang; Geoffrey, Rhonda; Lorier, Rachel; Suchi, Mariko; Broeckel, Ulrich; Hessner, Martin J.; Verbsky, James

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a patient with an autoinflammatory disease in which the main clinical features are pustular rash, marked osteopenia, lytic bone lesions, respiratory insufficiency, and thrombosis. Genetic studies revealed a 175-kb homozygous deletion at chromosome 2q13, which encompasses several interleukin-1 family members, including the gene encoding the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist (IL1RN). Mononuclear cells, obtained from the patient and cultured, produced large amounts of inflammatory cytokines, with increasing amounts secreted after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. A similar increase was not observed in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from a patient with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID). Treatment with anakinra completely resolved the symptoms and lesions. PMID:19494219

  20. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  1. An Autoinflammatory Disease with Deficiency of the Interleukin-1–Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, Ivona; Masters, Seth L.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Dancey, Paul; Frenkel, Joost; van Royen-Kerkhoff, Annet; Laxer, Ron; Tedgård, Ulf; Cowen, Edward W.; Pham, Tuyet-Hang; Booty, Matthew; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Plass, Nicole; Stone, Deborah L.; Turner, Maria L.; Hill, Suvimol; Butman, John A.; Schneider, Rayfel; Babyn, Paul; El-Shanti, Hatem I.; Pope, Elena; Barron, Karyl; Bing, Xinyu; Laurence, Arian; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Chapelle, Dawn; Clarke, Gillian I.; Ohson, Kamal; Nicholson, Marc; Gadina, Massimo; Yang, Barbara; Korman, Benjamin D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; van Hagen, P. Martin; Hak, A. Elisabeth; Huizing, Marjan; Rahman, Proton; Douek, Daniel C.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    Background Autoinflammatory diseases manifest inflammation without evidence of infection, high-titer autoantibodies, or autoreactive T cells. We report a disorder caused by mutations of IL1RN, which encodes the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist, with prominent involvement of skin and bone. Methods We studied nine children from six families who had neonatal onset of sterile multifocal osteomyelitis, periostitis, and pustulosis. Response to empirical treatment with the recombinant interleukin-1–receptor antagonist anakinra in the first patient prompted us to test for the presence of mutations and changes in proteins and their function in interleukin-1–pathway genes including IL1RN. Results We identified homozygous mutations of IL1RN in nine affected children, from one family from Newfoundland, Canada, three families from the Netherlands, and one consanguineous family from Lebanon. A nonconsanguineous patient from Puerto Rico was homozygous for a genomic deletion that includes IL1RN and five other interleukin-1–family members. At least three of the mutations are founder mutations; heterozygous carriers were asymptomatic, with no cytokine abnormalities in vitro. The IL1RN mutations resulted in a truncated protein that is not secreted, thereby rendering cells hyperresponsive to interleukin-1β stimulation. Patients treated with anakinra responded rapidly. Conclusions We propose the term deficiency of the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist, or DIRA, to denote this autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations affecting IL1RN. The absence of interleukin-1–receptor antagonist allows unopposed action of interleukin-1, resulting in life-threatening systemic inflammation with skin and bone involvement. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00059748.) PMID:19494218

  2. Allelic Variation, Aneuploidy, and Nongenetic Mechanisms Suppress a Monogenic Trait in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sirr, Amy; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Gilbert, Teresa L.; Ludlow, Catherine L.; Scott, Adrian C.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant features of monogenic diseases, including severity of symptoms and age of onset, can vary widely in response to environmental differences as well as to the presence of genetic modifiers affecting the trait’s penetrance and expressivity. While a better understanding of modifier loci could lead to treatments for Mendelian diseases, the rarity of individuals harboring both a disease-causing allele and a modifying genotype hinders their study in human populations. We examined the genetic architecture of monogenic trait modifiers using a well-characterized yeast model of the human Mendelian disease classic galactosemia. Yeast strains with loss-of-function mutations in the yeast ortholog (GAL7) of the human disease gene (GALT) fail to grow in the presence of even small amounts of galactose due to accumulation of the same toxic intermediates that poison human cells. To isolate and individually genotype large numbers of the very rare (∼0.1%) galactose-tolerant recombinant progeny from a cross between two gal7Δ parents, we developed a new method, called “FACS-QTL.” FACS-QTL improves upon the currently used approaches of bulk segregant analysis and extreme QTL mapping by requiring less genome engineering and strain manipulation as well as maintaining individual genotype information. Our results identified multiple distinct solutions by which the monogenic trait could be suppressed, including genetic and nongenetic mechanisms as well as frequent aneuploidy. Taken together, our results imply that the modifiers of monogenic traits are likely to be genetically complex and heterogeneous. PMID:25398792

  3. Determinants of Power in Gene-Based Burden Testing for Monogenic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Guo, Michael H; Dauber, Andrew; Lippincott, Margaret F; Chan, Yee-Ming; Salem, Rany M; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has enabled new approaches for discovering genes associated with monogenic disorders. One such approach is gene-based burden testing, in which the aggregate frequency of "qualifying variants" is compared between case and control subjects for each gene. Despite substantial successes of this approach, the genetic causes for many monogenic disorders remain unknown or only partially known. It is possible that particular genetic architectures lower rates of discovery, but the influence of these factors on power has not been rigorously evaluated. Here, we leverage large-scale exome-sequencing data to create an empirically based simulation framework to evaluate the impact of key parameters (background variation rates, locus heterogeneity, mode of inheritance, penetrance) on power in gene-based burden tests in the context of monogenic disorders. Our results demonstrate that across genes, there is a wide range in sample sizes needed to achieve power due to differences in the background rate of rare variants in each gene. Increasing locus heterogeneity results in rapid increases in sample sizes needed to achieve adequate power, particularly when individual genes contribute to less than 5% of cases under a dominant model. Interestingly, incomplete penetrance as low as 10% had little effect on power due to the low prevalence of monogenic disorders. Our results suggest that moderate incomplete penetrance is not an obstacle in this gene-based burden testing approach but that dominant disorders with high locus heterogeneity will require large sample sizes. Our simulations also provide guidance on sample size needs and inform study design under various genetic architectures. PMID:27545677

  4. Genetics 101 for cardiologists: rare genetic variants and monogenic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Sali M K; Hegele, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic diseases have a distinctive familial inheritance that follows Mendel's laws, showing patterns like dominant, recessive, or X-linked. There are > 7000 monogenic diseases curated in databases, and together they account for up to 10% of all illnesses encountered in the emergency room or clinic. Despite the rarity of individual monogenic conditions, mapping their causative genes and mutations is important for several reasons. First, knowing the causative gene and mutation could provide actionable information for genetic counselling. Sometimes, knowing the gene and mutation allows for early diagnosis in affected families, which is important if there is an evidence-based intervention. Second, the implication of a mutant gene as being causative for a clinical phenotype provides strong evidence of the importance of the gene product in a cellular or biochemical pathway. Discovery of new molecular pathways in families with rare diseases can serve as the first step toward developing rational therapies to help not only affected families, but also patients with less extreme, nongenetic forms of the same condition. For instance, the study of rare patients with familial hypercholesterolemia helped in developing statin drugs, initially as a treatment for familial hypercholesterolemia but now a widely used therapy to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:23200093

  5. LipidSeq: a next-generation clinical resequencing panel for monogenic dyslipidemias[S

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Christopher T.; Dubé, Joseph B.; Loyzer, Melissa N.; MacDonald, Austin; Carter, David E.; McIntyre, Adam D.; Cao, Henian; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F.; Hegele, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the design of a targeted resequencing panel for monogenic dyslipidemias, LipidSeq, for the purpose of replacing Sanger sequencing in the clinical detection of dyslipidemia-causing variants. We also evaluate the performance of the LipidSeq approach versus Sanger sequencing in 84 patients with a range of phenotypes including extreme blood lipid concentrations as well as additional dyslipidemias and related metabolic disorders. The panel performs well, with high concordance (95.2%) in samples with known mutations based on Sanger sequencing and a high detection rate (57.9%) of mutations likely to be causative for disease in samples not previously sequenced. Clinical implementation of LipidSeq has the potential to aid in the molecular diagnosis of patients with monogenic dyslipidemias with a high degree of speed and accuracy and at lower cost than either Sanger sequencing or whole exome sequencing. Furthermore, LipidSeq will help to provide a more focused picture of monogenic and polygenic contributors that underlie dyslipidemia while excluding the discovery of incidental pathogenic clinically actionable variants in nonmetabolism-related genes, such as oncogenes, that would otherwise be identified by a whole exome approach, thus minimizing potential ethical issues. PMID:24503134

  6. Ciliary disturbances in syndromal and non-syndromal obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Tamar I.; van Haelst, Mieke M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing global health problem. Although it is mainly thought to be due to the changing obesogenic environment, the genetic contribution has been estimated between 40–70%. A number of genes have been identified that cause obesity in animals as well as in humans. Rare highly penetrant monogenic forms of obesity can cause both syndromal and non-syndromal forms of obesity. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Alström syndrome are well known monogenic obesity syndromes caused by primary cilia defects. The pathogenesis of the obesity phenotype in these disorders is however not fully understood. Disturbance of the appetite regulation system, abnormalities in body composition and decreased energy expenditure have been suggested to cause obesity in these ciliopathies. There are currently 19 known genes associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and one Alström syndrome gene. Although ciliopathy genes have been described primarily in these syndromal obesity disorders, non-syndromal obesity may also result from disturbed cilia function. There are multiple genes associated with both obesity and ciliary function. Here we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the clinical, pathophysiological and genetic aspects of obesity in patients with ciliary defects.

  7. Muckle-Wells Syndrome: A Case Report with an NLRP3 T348M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Naz Villalba, Elena; Gomez de la Fuente, Enrique; Caro Gutierrez, Dolores; Pinedo Moraleda, Fernando; Yanguela Rodilla, Julio; Mazagatos Angulo, Diana; López Estebaranz, Jose Luis

    2016-09-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes are a recently described group of conditions caused by mutations in multiple genes that code for proteins of the innate immune system. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes are autoinflammatory diseases comprising three clinically overlapping disorders: familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease. MWS is characterized by a moderate phenotype with fever, rash, arthralgia, conjunctivitis, sensorineural deafness, and potentially life-threatening amyloidosis. We report a 5-year-old girl with MWS that manifested as a recurrent skin rash without fever episodes or intracranial hypertension with papilledema. Genetic analysis revealed a T348M mutation of the NLRPR 3 gene in the patient and her mother. She was successfully treated with the interleukin-1β antagonist receptor anakinra. PMID:27435956

  8. Association of Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, and Suppurative Hidradenitis (PASH) Shares Genetic and Cytokine Profiles With Other Autoinflammatory Diseases: Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    [In the article "Association of Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, and Suppurative Hidradenitis (PASH) Shares Genetic and Cytokine Profiles With Other Autoinflammatory Diseases", which appeared in Volume 93, Issue 27 of Medicine, one of Orietta M. Borghi's affiliations was omitted. The article should have stated that Orietta M. Borghi is associated with the IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milano, Italy as well as the Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e di Comunità, Università di Milano.]. PMID:25803365

  9. What Is the Best NGS Enrichment Method for the Molecular Diagnosis of Monogenic Diabetes and Obesity?

    PubMed

    Philippe, Julien; Derhourhi, Mehdi; Durand, Emmanuelle; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Dechaume, Aurélie; Rabearivelo, Iandry; Dhennin, Véronique; Vaxillaire, Martine; De Graeve, Franck; Sand, Olivier; Froguel, Philippe; Bonnefond, Amélie

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnosis of monogenic diabetes and obesity is of paramount importance for both the patient and society, as it can result in personalized medicine associated with a better life and it eventually saves health care spending. Genetic clinical laboratories are currently switching from Sanger sequencing to next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches but choosing the optimal protocols is not easy. Here, we compared the sequencing coverage of 43 genes involved in monogenic forms of diabetes and obesity, and variant detection rates, resulting from four enrichment methods based on the sonication of DNA (Agilent SureSelect, RainDance technologies), or using enzymes for DNA fragmentation (Illumina Nextera, Agilent HaloPlex). We analyzed coding exons and untranslated regions of the 43 genes involved in monogenic diabetes and obesity. We found that none of the methods achieves yet full sequencing of the gene targets. Nonetheless, the RainDance, SureSelect and HaloPlex enrichment methods led to the best sequencing coverage of the targets; while the Nextera method resulted in the poorest sequencing coverage. Although the sequencing coverage was high, we unexpectedly found that the HaloPlex method missed 20% of variants detected by the three other methods and Nextera missed 10%. The question of which NGS technique for genetic diagnosis yields the highest diagnosis rate is frequently discussed in the literature and the response is still unclear. Here, we showed that the RainDance enrichment method as well as SureSelect, which are both based on the sonication of DNA, resulted in a good sequencing quality and variant detection, while the use of enzymes to fragment DNA (HaloPlex or Nextera) might not be the best strategy to get an accurate sequencing. PMID:26599467

  10. Does Attention Constrain Developmental Trajectories in Fragile X Syndrome? A 3-Year Prospective Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Kim; Cole, Victoria; Longhi, Elena; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Scerif, Gaia

    2012-01-01

    Basic attentional processes and their impact on developmental trajectories in fragile X syndrome were assessed in a 3-year prospective study. Although fragile X syndrome is a monogenic X-linked disorder, there is striking variability in outcomes even in young boys with the condition. Attention is a key factor constraining interactions with the…

  11. Monogenic Diabetes: What It Teaches Us on the Common Forms of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisheng; Chan, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    To date, more than 30 genes have been linked to monogenic diabetes. Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified > 50 susceptibility loci for common type 1 diabetes (T1D) and approximately 100 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D). About 1-5% of all cases of diabetes result from single-gene mutations and are called monogenic diabetes. Here, we review the pathophysiological basis of the role of monogenic diabetes genes that have also been found to be associated with common T1D and/or T2D. Variants of approximately one-third of monogenic diabetes genes are associated with T2D, but not T1D. Two of the T2D-associated monogenic diabetes genes-potassium inward-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11), which controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the β-cell; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG), which impacts multiple tissue targets in relation to inflammation and insulin sensitivity-have been developed as major antidiabetic drug targets. Another monogenic diabetes gene, the preproinsulin gene (INS), is unique in that INS mutations can cause hyperinsulinemia, hyperproinsulinemia, neonatal diabetes mellitus, one type of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY10), and autoantibody-negative T1D. Dominant heterozygous INS mutations are the second most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. Moreover, INS gene variants are strongly associated with common T1D (type 1a), but inconsistently with T2D. Variants of the monogenic diabetes gene Gli-similar 3 (GLIS3) are associated with both T1D and T2D. GLIS3 is a key transcription factor in insulin production and β-cell differentiation during embryonic development, which perturbation forms the basis of monogenic diabetes as well as its association with T1D. GLIS3 is also required for compensatory β-cell proliferation in adults; impairment of this function predisposes to T2D. Thus, monogenic forms of diabetes are invaluable "human models" that have

  12. Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, E.E.J.; Pelc, K.; Dan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a truncating mutation. We discuss the clinical aspects with special emphasis on the behavioral phenotype and we review current perspectives in clinical management alongside with perspectives in altering gene expression. PMID:22670134

  13. Secondary amyloidosis in autoinflammatory diseases and the role of inflammation in renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Scarpioni, Roberto; Ricardi, Marco; Albertazzi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The release of proinflammatory cytokines during inflammation represents an attempt to respond to injury, but it may produce detrimental effects. The inflammasome is a large, multiprotein complex that drives proinflammatory cytokine production in response to infection and tissue injury; the best-characterized inflammasome is the nod-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP3). Once activated, inflammasome leads to the active form of caspase-1, the enzyme required for the maturation of interleukin-1beta. Additional mechanisms bringing to renal inflammatory, systemic diseases and fibrotic processes were recently reported, via the activation of the inflammasome that consists of NLRP3, apoptosis associated speck-like protein and caspase-1. Several manuscripts seem to identify NLRP3 inflammasome as a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of progressive chronic kidney disease. Serum amyloid A (SAA), as acute-phase protein with also proinflammatory properties, has been shown to induce the secretion of cathepsin B and inflammasome components from human macrophages. SAA is a well recognised potent activator of the NLRP3. Here we will address our description on the involvement of the kidney in autoinflammatory diseases driven mainly by secondary, or reactive, AA amyloidosis with a particular attention on novel therapeutic approach which has to be addressed in suppressing underlying inflammatory disease and reducing the SAA concentration. PMID:26788465

  14. Modulation of Inflammasome Activity for the Treatment of Auto-inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Vishva M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The innate immune system orchestrates inflammatory responses to microorganisms or danger-associated molecular patterns generated, for example, by the deposition of uric acid in the joints of gout patients. The innate immune system comprises multiple germ-line encoded receptors, of which the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs) are crucial for the maturation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. NLRs oligomerize to form large multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes that generate active caspase-1 fragments leading to the cleavage and secretion of mature cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18. The regulation of multiple inflammasomes At least four independent inflammasomes have been identified, NLRP1, NLRP3, IPAF, and AIM2. These inflammasomes assemble in response to different stimuli to confer specificity and are also subject to negative regulatory mechanisms to ensure that once a productive inflammatory response has been mounted, inflammatory cytokine production is restrained. Treatment of auto-inflammatory disorders A number of human conditions are characterized by unrestrained inflammasome activation. As much is now known about how inflammasomes are regulated, it is hoped that this can be channeled into the development of novel therapeutics, for example, those that may block the upstream activation and assembly of inflammasomes. PMID:20358394

  15. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Valentina Rosa; Murdocca, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients affected by genetic diseases. No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases; thus, hiPSCs represent a major impact on patient’ health. hiPSCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases, together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology, for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications. Moreover, these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs. Today, innovative gene therapy protocols, especially gene editing-based, are being developed, allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine, eluding ethical and immune rejection problems. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiPSCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy. We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming, the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors, and the type of iPSC-derived differentiated cells, relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model. PMID:27114745

  16. Severe infectious diseases of childhood as monogenic inborn errors of immunity.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-12-22

    This paper reviews the developments that have occurred in the field of human genetics of infectious diseases from the second half of the 20th century onward. In particular, it stresses and explains the importance of the recently described monogenic inborn errors of immunity underlying resistance or susceptibility to specific infections. The monogenic component of the genetic theory provides a plausible explanation for the occurrence of severe infectious diseases during primary infection. Over the last 20 y, increasing numbers of life-threatening infectious diseases striking otherwise healthy children, adolescents, and even young adults have been attributed to single-gene inborn errors of immunity. These studies were inspired by seminal but neglected findings in plant and animal infections. Infectious diseases typically manifest as sporadic traits because human genotypes often display incomplete penetrance (most genetically predisposed individuals remain healthy) and variable expressivity (different infections can be allelic at the same locus). Infectious diseases of childhood, once thought to be archetypal environmental diseases, actually may be among the most genetically determined conditions of mankind. This nascent and testable notion has interesting medical and biological implications. PMID:26621750

  17. Severe infectious diseases of childhood as monogenic inborn errors of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the developments that have occurred in the field of human genetics of infectious diseases from the second half of the 20th century onward. In particular, it stresses and explains the importance of the recently described monogenic inborn errors of immunity underlying resistance or susceptibility to specific infections. The monogenic component of the genetic theory provides a plausible explanation for the occurrence of severe infectious diseases during primary infection. Over the last 20 y, increasing numbers of life-threatening infectious diseases striking otherwise healthy children, adolescents, and even young adults have been attributed to single-gene inborn errors of immunity. These studies were inspired by seminal but neglected findings in plant and animal infections. Infectious diseases typically manifest as sporadic traits because human genotypes often display incomplete penetrance (most genetically predisposed individuals remain healthy) and variable expressivity (different infections can be allelic at the same locus). Infectious diseases of childhood, once thought to be archetypal environmental diseases, actually may be among the most genetically determined conditions of mankind. This nascent and testable notion has interesting medical and biological implications. PMID:26621750

  18. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy.

    PubMed

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Valentina Rosa; Murdocca, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-04-26

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients affected by genetic diseases. No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases; thus, hiPSCs represent a major impact on patient' health. hiPSCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases, together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology, for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications. Moreover, these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs. Today, innovative gene therapy protocols, especially gene editing-based, are being developed, allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine, eluding ethical and immune rejection problems. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiPSCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy. We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming, the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors, and the type of iPSC-derived differentiated cells, relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model. PMID:27114745

  19. Genetic Stroke Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Kevin M.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This review describes the clinical and radiographic features, genetic determinants, and treatment options for the most well-characterized monogenic disorders associated with stroke. Recent Findings: Stroke is a phenotype of many clinically important inherited disorders. Recognition of the clinical manifestations of genetic disorders associated with stroke is important for accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Genetic studies have led to the discovery of specific mutations associated with the clinical phenotypes of many inherited stroke syndromes. Summary: Several inherited causes of stroke have established and effective therapies, further underscoring the importance of timely diagnosis. PMID:24699489

  20. PSTPIP2, a Protein Associated with Autoinflammatory Disease, Interacts with Inhibitory Enzymes SHIP1 and Csk.

    PubMed

    Drobek, Ales; Kralova, Jarmila; Skopcova, Tereza; Kucova, Marketa; Novák, Petr; Angelisová, Pavla; Otahal, Pavel; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Brdicka, Tomas

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the adaptor protein PSTPIP2 are the cause of the autoinflammatory disease chronic multifocal osteomyelitis in mice. This disease closely resembles the human disorder chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, characterized by sterile inflammation of the bones and often associated with inflammation in other organs, such as the skin. The most critical process in the disease's development is the enhanced production of IL-1β. This excessive IL-1β is likely produced by neutrophils. In addition, the increased activity of macrophages, osteoclasts, and megakaryocytes has also been described. However, the molecular mechanism of how PSTPIP2 deficiency results in this phenotype is poorly understood. Part of the PSTPIP2 inhibitory function is mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases from the proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich (PEST) family, which are known to interact with the central part of this protein, but other regions of PSTPIP2 not required for PEST-family phosphatase binding were also shown to be indispensable for PSTPIP2 function. In this article, we show that PSTPIP2 binds the inhibitory enzymes Csk and SHIP1. The interaction with SHIP1 is of particular importance because it binds to the critical tyrosine residues at the C terminus of PSTPIP2, which is known to be crucial for its PEST-phosphatase-independent inhibitory effects in different cellular systems. We demonstrate that in neutrophils this region is important for the PSTPIP2-mediated suppression of IL-1β processing and that SHIP1 inhibition results in the enhancement of this processing. We also describe deregulated neutrophil response to multiple activators, including silica, Ab aggregates, and LPS, which is suggestive of a rather generalized hypersensitivity of these cells to various external stimulants. PMID:26304991

  1. Metabolic differences in ripening of Solanum lycopersicum 'Ailsa Craig' and three monogenic mutants.

    PubMed

    Beisken, Stephan; Earll, Mark; Baxter, Charles; Portwood, David; Ament, Zsuzsanna; Kende, Aniko; Hodgman, Charlie; Seymour, Graham; Smith, Rebecca; Fraser, Paul; Seymour, Mark; Salek, Reza M; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Application of mass spectrometry enables the detection of metabolic differences between groups of related organisms. Differences in the metabolic fingerprints of wild-type Solanum lycopersicum and three monogenic mutants, ripening inhibitor (rin), non-ripening (nor) and Colourless non-ripening (Cnr), of tomato are captured with regard to ripening behaviour. A high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry system coupled to liquid chromatography produced a time series of the ripening behaviour at discrete intervals with a focus on changes post-anthesis. Internal standards and quality controls were used to ensure system stability. The raw data of the samples and reference compounds including study protocols have been deposited in the open metabolomics database MetaboLights via the metadata annotation tool Isatab to enable efficient re-use of the datasets, such as in metabolomics cross-study comparisons or data fusion exercises. PMID:25977786

  2. How the differential load induced by normal fault scarps controls the distribution of monogenic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccaferri, Francesco; Acocella, Valerio; Rivalta, Eleonora

    2016-04-01

    Understanding shallow magma transfer and the related vent distribution is crucial for volcanic hazard. In the present study we investigate the link between the stress induced by topographic scarps and the distribution of monogenic volcanoes at divergent plate boundaries. With a numerical model of dyke propagation we show that vertical dykes beneath a normal fault scarp tend to deflect towards the footwall side of the scarp. This effect increases with the scarp height, is stronger for dykes propagating underneath the hanging wall side, and decreases with the distance from the scarp. A comparison to the East African Rift System, Afar and Iceland shows that: 1) the inner rift structure, which shapes the topography, controls shallow dyke propagation; 2) differential loading due to mass redistribution affects magma propagation over a broad scale range (100 - 105 m). Our results find application to any volcanic field with tectonics- or erosion-induced topographic variations.

  3. How the differential load induced by normal fault scarps controls the distribution of monogenic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccaferri, F.; Acocella, V.; Rivalta, E.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding shallow magma transfer and the related vent distribution is crucial for volcanic hazard. Here we investigate how the stress induced by topographic scarps linked to normal faults affects the distribution of monogenic volcanoes at divergent plate boundaries. Our numerical models of dyke propagation below a fault scarp show that the dykes tend to propagate toward and erupt on the footwall side. This effect, increasing with the scarp height, is stronger for dykes propagating underneath the hanging wall side and decreases with the distance from the scarp. A comparison to the East African Rift System, Afar and Iceland shows that (1) the inner rift structure, which shapes the topography, controls shallow dyke propagation; (2) differential loading due to mass redistribution affects magma propagation over a broad scale range (100-105 m). Our results find application to any volcanic field with tectonics- or erosion-induced topographic variations and should be considered in any volcanic hazard assessment.

  4. The diagnostic approach to monogenic very early onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Holm H; Schwerd, Tobias; Koletzko, Sibylle; Shah, Neil; Kammermeier, Jochen; Elkadri, Abdul; Ouahed, Jodie; Wilson, David C; Travis, Simon P; Turner, Dan; Klein, Christoph; Snapper, Scott B; Muise, Aleixo M

    2014-11-01

    Patients with a diverse spectrum of rare genetic disorders can present with inflammatory bowel disease (monogenic IBD). Patients with these disorders often develop symptoms during infancy or early childhood, along with endoscopic or histological features of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, or IBD unclassified. Defects in interleukin-10 signaling have a Mendelian inheritance pattern with complete penetrance of intestinal inflammation. Several genetic defects that disturb intestinal epithelial barrier function or affect innate and adaptive immune function have incomplete penetrance of the IBD-like phenotype. Several of these monogenic conditions do not respond to conventional therapy and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the broad spectrum of these extremely rare diseases, a correct diagnosis is frequently a challenge and often delayed. In many cases, these diseases cannot be categorized based on standard histological and immunologic features of IBD. Genetic analysis is required to identify the cause of the disorder and offer the patient appropriate treatment options, which include medical therapy, surgery, or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In addition, diagnosis based on genetic analysis can lead to genetic counseling for family members of patients. We describe key intestinal, extraintestinal, and laboratory features of 50 genetic variants associated with IBD-like intestinal inflammation. In addition, we provide approaches for identifying patients likely to have these disorders. We also discuss classic approaches to identify these variants in patients, starting with phenotypic and functional assessments that lead to analysis of candidate genes. As a complementary approach, we discuss parallel genetic screening using next-generation sequencing followed by functional confirmation of genetic defects. PMID:25058236

  5. [Genetics of primary headache syndromes].

    PubMed

    Freilinger, T

    2014-08-01

    Migraine has an important genetic component. The prototypic monogenic form of migraine is hemiplegic migraine, a rare subtype of migraine with aura, for which three causative genes have been identified. Studies of transgenic animal models have substantially improved our understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this monogenic model disease as well as of migraine in general. Beyond this, there are other (rarer) monogenic forms of migraine, e.g., in the context of hereditary mostly vascular syndromes such as CADASIL. By contrast, the common types of migraine with and without aura are genetically complex. With the identification of the first robust genetic risk variants in large genome-wide association studies, our knowledge in this still dynamically expanding field has substantially increased. This review summarizes the current status of migraine genetics, with a special focus on hemiplegic migraine as well as the most recent findings in complex migraine genetics. In addition, the first preliminary findings on the genetics of other types of primary headache disorders (cluster headache, tension-type headache) are briefly reviewed. PMID:25012921

  6. Live births after simultaneous avoidance of monogenic diseases and chromosome abnormality by next-generation sequencing with linkage analyses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Huang, Lei; Xu, Liya; Huang, Jin; Ma, Fei; Zhu, Xiaohui; Tang, Yaqiong; Liu, Mingshan; Lian, Ying; Liu, Ping; Li, Rong; Lu, Sijia; Tang, Fuchou; Qiao, Jie; Xie, X Sunney

    2015-12-29

    In vitro fertilization (IVF), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) help patients to select embryos free of monogenic diseases and aneuploidy (chromosome abnormality). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, while experiencing a rapid cost reduction, have improved the precision of PGD/PGS. However, the precision of PGD has been limited by the false-positive and false-negative single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), which are not acceptable in IVF and can be circumvented by linkage analyses, such as short tandem repeats or karyomapping. It is noteworthy that existing methods of detecting SNV/copy number variation (CNV) and linkage analysis often require separate procedures for the same embryo. Here we report an NGS-based PGD/PGS procedure that can simultaneously detect a single-gene disorder and aneuploidy and is capable of linkage analysis in a cost-effective way. This method, called "mutated allele revealed by sequencing with aneuploidy and linkage analyses" (MARSALA), involves multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC) for single-cell whole-genome amplification. Aneuploidy is determined by CNVs, whereas SNVs associated with the monogenic diseases are detected by PCR amplification of the MALBAC product. The false-positive and -negative SNVs are avoided by an NGS-based linkage analysis. Two healthy babies, free of the monogenic diseases of their parents, were born after such embryo selection. The monogenic diseases originated from a single base mutation on the autosome and the X-chromosome of the disease-carrying father and mother, respectively. PMID:26712022

  7. The labyrinth of autoinflammatory disorders: a snapshot on the activity of a third-level center in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; De Clemente, Caterina; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Emmi, Giacomo; Silvestri, Elena; Magnotti, Flora; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Prinzi, Eugenia; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Frediani, Bruno; Cimaz, Rolando; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rigante, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs) are a novel class of diseases elicited by mutations in genes regulating the homeostasis of innate immune complexes, named inflammasomes, which lead to uncontrolled oversecretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β. Protean inflammatory symptoms are variably associated with periodic fever, depicting multiple specific conditions. Childhood is usually the lifetime in which most hereditary AIDs start, though still a relevant number of patients may experience a delayed disease onset and receive a definite diagnosis during adulthood. As a major referral laboratory for patients with recurrent fevers, we have tested samples from 787 patients in the period September 2007-March 2014, with a total of 1,328 AID-related genes evaluated and a gene/patient ratio of 1.69. In this report, we describe our experience in the clinical approach to AIDs, highlight the most striking differences between child and adult-onset AIDs, and shed an eye-opening insight into their diagnostic process. PMID:24953660

  8. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  9. Concise Review: Patient-Derived Stem Cell Research for Monogenic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yiren; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic disorders (MGDs) are caused by a single gene mutation and have a serious impact on human health. At present, there are no effective therapeutic methods for MGDs. Stem cell techniques provide insights into potential treatments for MGDs. With the development of patient-derived stem cells, we can begin to progressively understand the molecular mechanism of MGDs and identify new drugs for MGD treatment. Using powerful genome editing tools, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 system, MGD-associated gene mutations can be corrected in MGD stem cells in vitro and then transplanted into MGD animal models to assess their safety and therapeutic effects. Despite the continued challenges surrounding potential pluripotent stem cell tumorigenicity and concerns regarding the genetic modification of stem cells, the extensive clinical application of MGD patient-specific stem cells will be pursued through further advances in basic research in the MGD field. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress in research into the use of patient-derived stem cells for the potential treatment of MGDs and provide predictions regarding the direction of future investigations. PMID:26227066

  10. Identification of Buried Objects in GPR Using Amplitude Modulated Signals Extracted from Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lihong; Qin, Yao; Ren, Xiaozhen; Wang, Qifu

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to detect the target reflections in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images, so that surface metal targets can be identified successfully. In order to accurately locate buried metal objects, a novel method called the Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis (MMSA) system is applied in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images. This process includes four steps. First the image is decomposed by the MMSA to extract the amplitude component of the B-scan image. The amplitude component enhances the target reflection and suppresses the direct wave and reflective wave to a large extent. Then we use the region of interest extraction method to locate the genuine target reflections from spurious reflections by calculating the normalized variance of the amplitude component. To find the apexes of the targets, a Hough transform is used in the restricted area. Finally, we estimate the horizontal and vertical position of the target. In terms of buried object detection, the proposed system exhibits promising performance, as shown in the experimental results. PMID:26690146

  11. The genetic and molecular bases of monogenic disorders affecting proteolytic systems

    PubMed Central

    Richard, I

    2005-01-01

    Complete and limited proteolysis represents key events that regulate many biological processes. At least 5% of the human genome codes for components of proteolytic processes if proteases, inhibitors, and cofactors are taken into account. Accordingly, disruption of proteolysis is involved in numerous pathological conditions. In particular, molecular genetic studies have identified a growing number of monogenic disorders caused by mutations in protease coding genes, highlighting the importance of this class of enzymes in development, organogenesis, immunity, and brain function. This review provides insights into the current knowledge about the molecular genetic causes of these disorders. It should be noted that most are due to loss of function mutations, indicating absolute requirement of proteolytic activities for normal cellular functions. Recent progress in understanding the function of the implicated proteins and the disease pathogenesis is detailed. In addition to providing important clues to the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of disease, functional characterisation of mutations in proteolytic systems emphasises the pleiotropic functions of proteases in the body homeostasis. PMID:15994873

  12. Identification of Buried Objects in GPR Using Amplitude Modulated Signals Extracted from Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Lihong; Qin, Yao; Ren, Xiaozhen; Wang, Qifu

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to detect the target reflections in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images, so that surface metal targets can be identified successfully. In order to accurately locate buried metal objects, a novel method called the Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis (MMSA) system is applied in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images. This process includes four steps. First the image is decomposed by the MMSA to extract the amplitude component of the B-scan image. The amplitude component enhances the target reflection and suppresses the direct wave and reflective wave to a large extent. Then we use the region of interest extraction method to locate the genuine target reflections from spurious reflections by calculating the normalized variance of the amplitude component. To find the apexes of the targets, a Hough transform is used in the restricted area. Finally, we estimate the horizontal and vertical position of the target. In terms of buried object detection, the proposed system exhibits promising performance, as shown in the experimental results. PMID:26690146

  13. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R; Martin, Ina V; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  14. Monogenic control of variations in antipyrine metabolite formation. New polymorphism of hepatic drug oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Penno, M B; Vesell, E S

    1983-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms that control large variations among normal uninduced subjects in the elimination of the model compound antipyrine (AP) and other drugs, AP was administered to 144 subjects (83 unrelated adults and 61 members of 13 families). Thereafter, at regular intervals for 72 h, the urine of each subject was collected and concentrations of AP and its three main metabolites measured. From these urinary concentrations, rate constants for formation of each AP metabolite were calculated. Trimodal curves were observed when values for each AP rate constant were plotted in 83 unrelated subjects; probit plots of these values showed inflections at the two antimodes of each trimodal distribution. All members of our 13 families were assigned one of three phenotypes determined by where their AP metabolite rate constant placed them in the trimodal distributions derived from the 83 unrelated subjects. In each family, pedigree analysis to identify the mode of transmission of these three phenotypes was consistent with their monogenic control. These results provide evidence for a new polymorphism of drug oxidation in man. PMID:6863539

  15. A Comparison of Pragmatic Language in Boys with Autism and Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klusek, Jessica; Martin, Gary E.; Losh, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Impaired pragmatic language (i.e., language use for social interaction) is a hallmark feature of both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known monogenic disorder associated with ASD. However, few cross-population comparisons of ASD and FXS have been conducted, and it is unclear whether pragmatic…

  16. Attention across Modalities as a Longitudinal Predictor of Early Outcomes: The Case of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scerif, Gaia; Longhi, Elena; Cole, Victoria; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Cornish, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an early diagnosed monogenic disorder, associated with a striking pattern of cognitive/attentional difficulties and a high risk of poor behavioural outcomes. FXS therefore represents an ideal model disorder to study prospectively the impact of early attention deficits on behaviour. Methods: Thirty-seven boys…

  17. [Genetic fever syndromes. Hereditary recurrent (periodic) fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Neudorf, U; Lainka, E; Kallinich, T; Holzinger, D; Roth, J; Föll, D; Niehues, T

    2013-05-01

    Genetic fever syndromes or hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRF) are considered to be part of the autoinflammatory diseases (AID) which result from errors in the innate immune system. Patients typically have self-limiting episodes of fever and high levels of inflammation markers. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant. The diseases of the HRF include familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-associated periodic syndrome, hyper-IgD syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes. The disease known as deficiency of interleukin 1 (IL1) receptor antagonist does not fully belong to this group because fever is not a typical symptom. The therapy depends on the type and severity of the disease. Effective prophylaxis is possible for FMF. Biologicals, especially IL1 blocking agents are highly effective in very severe fever syndromes. In order to collect more information on AID, to establish a biobank and coordinate research in this field the AID-Net project was founded. Currently 606 patients with AID are registered of whom 381 have HRF. PMID:23552978

  18. Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis (DSO) of the mandible in SAPHO syndrome: a novel approach with anti-TNF therapy. Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marí, Antonio; Morla, Arnaud; Melero, Mireia; Schiavone, Rocio; Rodríguez, Jesus

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible is now considered a local manifestation of SAPHO syndrome. This rare condition is thought to be of auto-inflammatory origin. The myriad of treatments shown in the literature, are basically empirical and reflect its unknown origin. We present a clinical case of refractory DSO treated with an anti-TNF drug (etanercept) with complete clinical remission. We advise against radical surgery and an interdisciplinary approach is recommended. A systematic literature review was also conducted. PMID:25441866

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis monogenic strains: screening and interactions with insecticides used against rice pests

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Laura M.N.; Dörr, Natália C.; Ribeiro, Ana Paula A.; de Salles, Silvia M.; de Oliveira, Jaime V.; Menezes, Valmir G.; Fiuza, Lidia M.

    2012-01-01

    The screening of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry proteins with high potential to control insect pests has been the goal of numerous research groups. In this study, we evaluated six monogenic Bt strains (Bt dendrolimus HD-37, Bt kurstaki HD-1, Bt kurstaki HD-73, Bt thuringiensis 4412, Bt kurstaki NRD-12 and Bt entomocidus 60.5, which codify the cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ba, cry1C, cry2A genes respectively) as potential insecticides for the most important insect pests of irrigated rice: Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, Oryzophagus oryzae, Oebalus poecilus and Tibraca limbativentris. We also analyzed their compatibility with chemical insecticides (thiamethoxam, labdacyhalothrin, malathion and fipronil), which are extensively used in rice crops. The bioassay results showed that Bt thuringiensis 4412 and Bt entomocidus 60.5 were the most toxic for the lepidopterans, with a 93% and 82% mortality rate for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. For O. oryzae, the Bt kurstaki NRD-12 (64%) and Bt dendrolimus HD-37 (62%) strains were the most toxic. The Bt dendrolimus HD-37 strain also caused high mortality (82%) to O. poecilus, however the strains assessed to T. limbativentris caused a maximum rate of 5%. The assays for the Bt strains interaction with insecticides revealed the compatibility of the six strains with the four insecticides tested. The results from this study showed the high potential of cry1Aa and cry1Ba genes for genetic engineering of rice plants or the strains to biopesticide formulations. PMID:24031872

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis monogenic strains: screening and interactions with insecticides used against rice pests.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Laura M N; Dörr, Natália C; Ribeiro, Ana Paula A; de Salles, Silvia M; de Oliveira, Jaime V; Menezes, Valmir G; Fiuza, Lidia M

    2012-04-01

    The screening of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry proteins with high potential to control insect pests has been the goal of numerous research groups. In this study, we evaluated six monogenic Bt strains (Bt dendrolimus HD-37, Bt kurstaki HD-1, Bt kurstaki HD-73, Bt thuringiensis 4412, Bt kurstaki NRD-12 and Bt entomocidus 60.5, which codify the cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ba, cry1C, cry2A genes respectively) as potential insecticides for the most important insect pests of irrigated rice: Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, Oryzophagus oryzae, Oebalus poecilus and Tibraca limbativentris. We also analyzed their compatibility with chemical insecticides (thiamethoxam, labdacyhalothrin, malathion and fipronil), which are extensively used in rice crops. The bioassay results showed that Bt thuringiensis 4412 and Bt entomocidus 60.5 were the most toxic for the lepidopterans, with a 93% and 82% mortality rate for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. For O. oryzae, the Bt kurstaki NRD-12 (64%) and Bt dendrolimus HD-37 (62%) strains were the most toxic. The Bt dendrolimus HD-37 strain also caused high mortality (82%) to O. poecilus, however the strains assessed to T. limbativentris caused a maximum rate of 5%. The assays for the Bt strains interaction with insecticides revealed the compatibility of the six strains with the four insecticides tested. The results from this study showed the high potential of cry1Aa and cry1Ba genes for genetic engineering of rice plants or the strains to biopesticide formulations. PMID:24031872

  1. [Monogenic form of diabetes mellitus due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1) - the first case in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György; Balogh, István; Gaál, Zsolt

    2016-03-20

    The classification of diabetes mellitus in adolescents and young adults is often difficult. The diagnosis of the monogenic form of diabetes may have substantial influence on quality of life, prognosis and the choice of the appropriate treatment of affected patients. Among MODY (maturity-onset of diabetes in the young) MODY-1 is rarely detected, only 13 families were described in 2000, and 103 different mutations in 173 families were known in 2013 worldwide. The authors present the first Hungarian case of a monogenic form of diabetes due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1). The diabetes of the index patient No. 1 (42-year-old woman with insulin treated diabetes) was diagnosed as gestational diabetes at age of 20 when she was treated with diet only. Later, insulin treatment has been initiated when marked hyperglycaemia was detected during an episode of acute pneumonia at age of 26. The diabetes of the index patient No. 2 (20-year-old daughter of the index patient No. 1, treated also with insulin) was diagnosed as type 2 diabetes at age of 13 and the patient was treated with diet only. Later the classification was modified to type 1 and insulin therapy was initiated at age of 14. The manifestation of diabetes, the familial occurrence and the low dose insulin requirement were suggestive for monogenic diabetes. Using molecular genetic method a mutation (c.869G>A, p.R290H) of HNF4α gene was found and MODY-1 was diagnosed in both cases. Insulin therapy was switched to treatment with low dose sulfanylurea and an excellent glycaemic control was achieved and sustained at follow-up of 1-year. No further positive cases were found during screening of other family members. PMID:26971647

  2. Evidence-based provisional clinical classification criteria for autoinflammatory periodic fevers.

    PubMed

    Federici, Silvia; Sormani, Maria Pia; Ozen, Seza; Lachmann, Helen J; Amaryan, Gayane; Woo, Patricia; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Dewarrat, Natacha; Cantarini, Luca; Insalaco, Antonella; Uziel, Yosef; Rigante, Donato; Quartier, Pierre; Demirkaya, Erkan; Herlin, Troels; Meini, Antonella; Fabio, Giovanna; Kallinich, Tilmann; Martino, Silvana; Butbul, Aviel Yonatan; Olivieri, Alma; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Neven, Benedicte; Simon, Anna; Ozdogan, Huri; Touitou, Isabelle; Frenkel, Joost; Hofer, Michael; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Gattorno, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and validate a set of clinical criteria for the classification of patients affected by periodic fevers. Patients with inherited periodic fevers (familial Mediterranean fever (FMF); mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD); tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS); cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS)) enrolled in the Eurofever Registry up until March 2013 were evaluated. Patients with periodic fever, aphthosis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome were used as negative controls. For each genetic disease, patients were considered to be 'gold standard' on the basis of the presence of a confirmatory genetic analysis. Clinical criteria were formulated on the basis of univariate and multivariate analysis in an initial group of patients (training set) and validated in an independent set of patients (validation set). A total of 1215 consecutive patients with periodic fevers were identified, and 518 gold standard patients (291 FMF, 74 MKD, 86 TRAPS, 67 CAPS) and 199 patients with PFAPA as disease controls were evaluated. The univariate and multivariate analyses identified a number of clinical variables that correlated independently with each disease, and four provisional classification scores were created. Cut-off values of the classification scores were chosen using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis as those giving the highest sensitivity and specificity. The classification scores were then tested in an independent set of patients (validation set) with an area under the curve of 0.98 for FMF, 0.95 for TRAPS, 0.96 for MKD, and 0.99 for CAPS. In conclusion, evidence-based provisional clinical criteria with high sensitivity and specificity for the clinical classification of patients with inherited periodic fevers have been developed. PMID:25637003

  3. Pyoderma gangrenosum, acne and suppurative hidradenitis syndrome following bowel bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Ishak, Rim S; Colombo, Antonella; Caroli, Francesco; Crosti, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The clinical triad of pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) has recently been described as a new disease entity within the spectrum of autoinflammatory syndromes, which are an emerging group of inflammatory diseases distinct from autoimmune, allergic and infectious disorders. PASH syndrome is similar to PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, acne and PG), but it differs in lacking the associated arthritis and on a genetic basis. PAPA syndrome is caused by mutations in a gene involved in the regulation of innate immune responses, the PSTPIP1, while no mutations have been detected to date in patients with PASH syndrome. We report a young male patient who developed coexisting disseminated PG, typical suppurative hidradenitis and acneiform eruption on the face, after he had undergone bowel bypass surgery for obesity. The cutaneous manifestations associated with bowel bypass syndrome often mimic PG or other neutrophilic dermatoses, suggesting a pathogenesis related to neutrophil-mediated inflammation for this condition. This is the first report describing PASH syndrome after bariatric surgery, and we propose to include such neutrophilic dermatoses in the list of complications occurring after bowel bypass surgery. Extensive genetic studies may help to clarify the etiopathogenesis of PASH as well as of autoinflammatory diseases in general. PMID:23171584

  4. Fetal Genotyping in Maternal Blood by Digital PCR: Towards NIPD of Monogenic Disorders Independently of Parental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Perlado, Sara; Bustamante-Aragonés, Ana; Donas, Marta; Lorda-Sánchez, Isabel; Plaza, Javier; Rodríguez de Alba, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To date, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of monogenic disorders has been limited to cases with a paternal origin. This work shows a validation study of the Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) technology for analysis of both paternally and maternally inherited fetal alleles. For the purpose, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were studied with the only intention to mimic monogenic disorders. Methods NIPD SNP genotyping was performed by ddPCR in 55 maternal plasma samples. In 19 out of 55 cases, inheritance of the paternal allele was determined by presence/absence criteria. In the remaining 36, determination of the maternally inherited fetal allele was performed by relative mutation dosage (RMD) analysis. Results ddPCR exhibited 100% accuracy for detection of paternal alleles. For diagnosis of fetal alleles with maternal origin by RMD analysis, the technology showed an accuracy of 96%. Twenty-nine out of 36 were correctly diagnosed. There was one FP and six maternal plasma samples that could not be diagnosed. Discussion In this study, ddPCR has shown to be capable to detect both paternal and maternal fetal alleles in maternal plasma. This represents a step forward towards the introduction of NIPD for all pregnancies independently of the parental origin of the disease. PMID:27078875

  5. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ursani, Mohammad A.; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 44 Final Diagnosis: PAPASH syndrome Symptoms: Recurrent skin ulcers • diarrhea • inflammatory arthritis Medication: Prednisone • anti-tumor necrosis factor Clinical Procedure: N/A Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Case Report: A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. Conclusions: Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various

  6. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ursani, Mohammad A; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). CASE REPORT A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. CONCLUSIONS Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various auto-inflammatory disorders may share pathogenic commonalities. PMID:27530224

  7. Creation of the Web-Based University of Chicago Monogenic Diabetes Registry: Using Technology to Facilitate Longitudinal Study of Rare Subtypes of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Greeley, Siri Atma W; Naylor, Rochelle N; Cook, Lindsay S; Tucker, Susan E; Lipton, Rebecca B; Philipson, Louis H

    2011-01-01

    Background Monogenic diabetes is a group of disorders caused by mutations in any one of a number of genes. Although a monogenic diagnosis—estimated to represent as much as 2% of all diabetes patients—can have a transformational impact on treatment, the majority of monogenic cases remain unidentified and little is known about their natural history. We thus created the first United States Monogenic Diabetes Registry (http://www.kovlerdiabetescenter.org/registry/) for individuals with either neonatal diabetes diagnosed before 1 year of age or with a phenotype suggestive of maturity-onset diabetes of the young. Methods Inclusion criteria and consent documents are viewable on our Web site, which allows secure collection of contact information to facilitate telephone consent and enrollment. Relevant medical, family, and historical data are collected longitudinally from a variety of sources and stored in our Web-accessible secure database. Results We have enrolled well over 700 subjects in the registry so far, with steady recruitment of those diagnosed under 1 year of age and increasing enrollment of those diagnosed later in life. Initially, participants were mostly self-referred but are increasingly being referred by their physicians. Comprehensive survey and medical records data are collected at enrollment, with ongoing collection of longitudinal data. Associated private Facebook and email discussion groups that we established have already fostered active participation. Conclusions Our early success with the Monogenic Diabetes Registry demonstrates the effectiveness of low-cost Web-based tools, including surveys, the Research Electronic Data Capture database program, and discussion groups, for efficient enrollment and support of rare patients, and collection and maintenance of their data. PMID:21880229

  8. Single-Nucleotide Mutations in FMR1 Reveal Novel Functions and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Fragile X Syndrome Protein FMRP

    PubMed Central

    Suhl, Joshua A.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a monogenic disorder and a common cause of intellectual disability. Despite nearly 25 years of research on FMR1, the gene underlying the syndrome, very few pathological mutations other than the typical CGG-repeat expansion have been reported. This is in contrast to other X-linked, monogenic, intellectual disability disorders, such as Rett syndrome, where many point mutations have been validated as causative of the disorder. As technology has improved and significantly driven down the cost of sequencing, allowing for whole genes to be sequenced with relative ease, in-depth sequencing studies on FMR1 have recently been performed. These studies have led to the identification of novel variants in FMR1, where some of which have been functionally evaluated and are likely pathogenic. In this review, we discuss recently identified FMR1 variants, the ways these novel variants cause dysfunction, and how they reveal new regulatory mechanisms and functionalities of the gene. PMID:26819560

  9. From bench to bedside and back again: translational research in autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dirk; Kessel, Christoph; Omenetti, Alessia; Gattorno, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Translational research approaches brought major changes to the understanding and treatment options of autoinflammatory diseases. Patients with common complex multifactorial diseases such as systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), and particularly those with rare monogenic autoinflammatory diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) or TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), benefited from a deeper understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms and new treatment options emerging from preclinical studies. The study of IL-1 and IL-6 in this context led to novel therapies by forward translation. Conversely, effective treatment of sJIA and TRAPS with IL-1 blockade stimulated reverse translational efforts to study the pathophysiology of these cytokines in autoinflammatory diseases. These translational efforts led to the discovery of biomarkers such as S100 proteins, IL-18 or serum amyloid A, which are components of the inflammatory process, support diagnosis and allow for monitoring of disease activity, helping to predict patient outcomes. The ongoing characterization of autoinflammatory diseases in individual patients has led to classification into heterogeneous subgroups. Further characterization of relevant subgroups and the design of tailored treatment regimens, as well as the identification of new therapeutic targets and treatment options, are the major future challenges in the field of autoinflammatory diseases, particularly for paediatric rheumatologists. PMID:26077920

  10. Mutations in Known Monogenic High Bone Mass Loci Only Explain a Small Proportion of High Bone Mass Cases

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lawrie; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Appleton, Louise H; Addison, Kathryn A; Brugmans, Marieke; Clark, Graeme R; Ward, Kate A; Paggiosi, Margaret; Stone, Mike; Thomas, Joegi; Agarwal, Rohan; Poole, Kenneth ES; McCloskey, Eugene; Fraser, William D; Williams, Eleanor; Bullock, Alex N; Davey Smith, George; Brown, Matthew A; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma L

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High bone mass (HBM) can be an incidental clinical finding; however, monogenic HBM disorders (eg, LRP5 or SOST mutations) are rare. We aimed to determine to what extent HBM is explained by mutations in known HBM genes. A total of 258 unrelated HBM cases were identified from a review of 335,115 DXA scans from 13 UK centers. Cases were assessed clinically and underwent sequencing of known anabolic HBM loci: LRP5 (exons 2, 3, 4), LRP4 (exons 25, 26), SOST (exons 1, 2, and the van Buchem's disease [VBD] 52‐kb intronic deletion 3′). Family members were assessed for HBM segregation with identified variants. Three‐dimensional protein models were constructed for identified variants. Two novel missense LRP5 HBM mutations ([c.518C>T; p.Thr173Met], [c.796C>T; p.Arg266Cys]) were identified, plus three previously reported missense LRP5 mutations ([c.593A>G; p.Asn198Ser], [c.724G>A; p.Ala242Thr], [c.266A>G; p.Gln89Arg]), associated with HBM in 11 adults from seven families. Individuals with LRP5 HBM (∼prevalence 5/100,000) displayed a variable phenotype of skeletal dysplasia with increased trabecular BMD and cortical thickness on HRpQCT, and gynoid fat mass accumulation on DXA, compared with both non‐LRP5 HBM and controls. One mostly asymptomatic woman carried a novel heterozygous nonsense SOST mutation (c.530C>A; p.Ser177X) predicted to prematurely truncate sclerostin. Protein modeling suggests the severity of the LRP5‐HBM phenotype corresponds to the degree of protein disruption and the consequent effect on SOST‐LRP5 binding. We predict p.Asn198Ser and p.Ala242Thr directly disrupt SOST binding; both correspond to severe HBM phenotypes (BMD Z‐scores +3.1 to +12.2, inability to float). Less disruptive structural alterations predicted from p.Arg266Cys, p.Thr173Met, and p.Gln89Arg were associated with less severe phenotypes (Z‐scores +2.4 to +6.2, ability to float). In conclusion, although mutations in known HBM loci may be asymptomatic, they only

  11. Mutations in Known Monogenic High Bone Mass Loci Only Explain a Small Proportion of High Bone Mass Cases.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Celia L; Wheeler, Lawrie; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Appleton, Louise H; Addison, Kathryn A; Brugmans, Marieke; Clark, Graeme R; Ward, Kate A; Paggiosi, Margaret; Stone, Mike; Thomas, Joegi; Agarwal, Rohan; Poole, Kenneth Es; McCloskey, Eugene; Fraser, William D; Williams, Eleanor; Bullock, Alex N; Davey Smith, George; Brown, Matthew A; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    High bone mass (HBM) can be an incidental clinical finding; however, monogenic HBM disorders (eg, LRP5 or SOST mutations) are rare. We aimed to determine to what extent HBM is explained by mutations in known HBM genes. A total of 258 unrelated HBM cases were identified from a review of 335,115 DXA scans from 13 UK centers. Cases were assessed clinically and underwent sequencing of known anabolic HBM loci: LRP5 (exons 2, 3, 4), LRP4 (exons 25, 26), SOST (exons 1, 2, and the van Buchem's disease [VBD] 52-kb intronic deletion 3'). Family members were assessed for HBM segregation with identified variants. Three-dimensional protein models were constructed for identified variants. Two novel missense LRP5 HBM mutations ([c.518C>T; p.Thr173Met], [c.796C>T; p.Arg266Cys]) were identified, plus three previously reported missense LRP5 mutations ([c.593A>G; p.Asn198Ser], [c.724G>A; p.Ala242Thr], [c.266A>G; p.Gln89Arg]), associated with HBM in 11 adults from seven families. Individuals with LRP5 HBM (∼prevalence 5/100,000) displayed a variable phenotype of skeletal dysplasia with increased trabecular BMD and cortical thickness on HRpQCT, and gynoid fat mass accumulation on DXA, compared with both non-LRP5 HBM and controls. One mostly asymptomatic woman carried a novel heterozygous nonsense SOST mutation (c.530C>A; p.Ser177X) predicted to prematurely truncate sclerostin. Protein modeling suggests the severity of the LRP5-HBM phenotype corresponds to the degree of protein disruption and the consequent effect on SOST-LRP5 binding. We predict p.Asn198Ser and p.Ala242Thr directly disrupt SOST binding; both correspond to severe HBM phenotypes (BMD Z-scores +3.1 to +12.2, inability to float). Less disruptive structural alterations predicted from p.Arg266Cys, p.Thr173Met, and p.Gln89Arg were associated with less severe phenotypes (Z-scores +2.4 to +6.2, ability to float). In conclusion, although mutations in known HBM loci may be asymptomatic, they only account for a very small

  12. Sickle Cell Disease in the Post Genomic Era: A Monogenic Disease with a Polygenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Driss, A; Asare, KO; Hibbert, JM; Gee, BE; Adamkiewicz, TV; Stiles, JK

    2009-01-01

    More than half a century after the discovery of the molecular basis of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), the causes of the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disease remain unclear. This heterogeneity manifests with different clinical outcomes such as stroke, vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome, avascular necrosis, leg ulcers, priapism and retinopathy. These outcomes cannot be explained by the single mutation in the beta-globin gene alone but may be attributed to genetic modifiers and environmental effects. Recent advances in the post human genome sequence era have opened the door for the identification of novel genetic modifiers in SCD. Studies are showing that phenotypes of SCD seem to be modulated by polymorphisms in genes that are involved in inflammation, cell–cell interaction and modulators of oxidant injury and nitric oxide biology. The discovery of genes implicated in different phenotypes will help understanding of the physiopathology of the disease and aid in establishing targeted cures. However, caution is needed in asserting that genetic modifiers are the cause of all SCD phenotypes, because there are other factors such as genetic background of the population, environmental components, socio-economics and psychology that can play significant roles in the clinical heterogeneity. PMID:20401335

  13. Differential impact of high and low penetrance TNFRSF1A gene mutations on conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cell functions in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Valentina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Perna, Francesco; Obici, Laura; Merlini, Giampaolo; Cattalini, Marco; La Torre, Francesco; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Magnotti, Flora; Galgani, Mario; Galeazzi, Mauro; Marone, Gianni; De Rosa, Veronica; Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    TNFR-associated periodic syndrome is an autoinflammatory disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in TNFRSF1A, the gene encoding for TNFR superfamily 1A. The lack of knowledge in the field of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome biology is clear, particularly in the context of control of immune self-tolerance. We investigated how TNF-α/TNFR superfamily 1A signaling can affect T cell biology, focusing on conventional CD4(+)CD25(-) and regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell functions in patients with TNFR-associated periodic syndrome carrying either high or low penetrance TNFRSF1A mutations. Specifically, we observed that in high penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, at the molecular level, these alterations were secondary to a hyperactivation of the ERK1/2, STAT1/3/5, mammalian target of rapamycin, and NF-κB pathways in conventional T cells. In addition, these patients had a lower frequency of peripheral regulatory T cells, which also displayed a defective suppressive phenotype. These alterations were partially found in low penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, suggesting a specific link between the penetrance of the TNFRSF1A mutation and the observed T cell phenotype. Taken together, our data envision a novel role for adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome involving both CD4(+) conventional T cells and Tregs, suggesting a novel mechanism of inflammation in the context of autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:26598380

  14. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Extraembryonic Tissues of Fetuses Affected by Monogenic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa V; Botta, Annalisa; Murdocca, Michela; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Orlandi, Augusto; Giardina, Emiliano; Santoro, Massimo; Brancati, Francesco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from an autologous extraembryonic fetal source is an innovative personalized regenerative technology that can transform own-self cells into embryonic stem-like ones. These cells are regarded as a promising candidate for cell-based therapy, as well as an ideal target for disease modeling and drug discovery. Thus, hiPSCs enable researchers to undertake studies for treating diseases or for future applications of in utero therapy. We used a polycistronic lentiviral vector (hSTEMCCA-loxP) encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC genes and containing loxP sites, excisible by Cre recombinase, to reprogram patient-specific fetal cells derived from prenatal diagnosis for several genetic disorders, such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), β-thalassemia (β-Thal), lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as from wild-type (WT) fetal cells. Because cell types tested to create hiPSCs influence both the reprogramming process efficiency and the kinetics, we used chorionic villus (CV) and amniotic fluid (AF) cells, demonstrating how they represent an ideal cell resource for a more efficient generation of hiPSCs. The successful reprogramming of both CV and AF cells into hiPSCs was confirmed by specific morphological, molecular, and immunocytochemical markers and also by their teratogenic potential when inoculated in vivo. We further demonstrated the stability of reprogrammed cells over 10 and more passages and their capability to differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers, as well as into neural cells. These data suggest that hiPSCs-CV/AF can be considered a valid cellular model to accomplish pathogenesis studies and therapeutic applications. PMID:26474030

  15. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. PMID:27288824

  16. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D syndrome: a rare cause of prolonged fever and treatment with anti-interleukin 1 agent.

    PubMed

    Aygun, Deniz; Sahin, Sezgin; Cokugras, Haluk; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D syndrome (HIDS) is an autosomal recessive, autoinflammatory disease that is characterised with intermittent febrile episodes, cervical lymphadenopathy, rashes, arthritis and gastrointestinal symptoms associated with synovial or serosal inflammation. HIDS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase enzyme. The febrile attacks usually start in early childhood and triggered by stress or vaccinations. We report a case of 16-month-old boy who had episodes of recurrent fever accompanied by maculopapular rash and lymphadenopathy. He was diagnosed as HIDS and he had heterozygote mutation of mevalonate kinase gene. PMID:27190114

  17. Hyper-IgE Syndromes and the Lung.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alexandra F; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2016-09-01

    Elevated serum IgE has many etiologies including parasitic infection, allergy and asthma, malignancy, and immune dysregulation. The hyper-IgE syndromes caused by mutations in STAT3, DOCK8, and PGM3 are monogenic primary immunodeficiencies associated with high IgE, eczema, and recurrent infections. These primary immunodeficiencies are associated with recurrent pneumonias leading to bronchiectasis; however, each has unique features and genetic diagnosis is essential in guiding therapy, discussing family planning, and defining prognosis. This article discusses the clinical features of these primary immunodeficiencies with a particular focus on the pulmonary manifestations and discussion of the genetics, pathogenesis, and approaches to therapy. PMID:27514600

  18. Methodological challenges in monitoring new treatments for rare diseases: lessons from the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases and encompass Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID). Canakinumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IL-1 beta and approved for CAPS patients but requires post-approval monitoring due to low and short exposures during the licensing process. Creative approaches to observational methodology are needed, harnessing novel registry strategies to ensure Health Care Provider reporting and patient monitoring. Methods A web-based registry was set up to collect information on long-term safety and effectiveness of canakinumab for CAPS. Results Starting in November 2009, this registry enrolled 241 patients in 43 centers and 13 countries by December 31, 2012. One-third of the enrolled population was aged < 18; the overall population is evenly divided by gender. Enrolment is ongoing for children. Conclusions Innovative therapies in orphan diseases require post-approval structures to enable in depth understanding of safety and natural history of disease. The rarity and distribution of such diseases and unpredictability of treatment require innovative methods for enrolment and follow-up. Broad international practice-based recruitment and web-based data collection are practical. PMID:24016338

  19. Brief Report: Sensory Reactivity in Children with Phelan-McDermid Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mieses, A M; Tavassoli, T; Li, E; Soorya, L; Lurie, S; Wang, A T; Siper, P M; Kolevzon, A

    2016-07-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS), a monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), results from deletion or mutation of the SHANK3 gene. Atypical sensory reactivity is now included in the diagnostic criteria for ASD. Examining the sensory phenotype in monogenic forms of ASD, such as PMS, may help identify underlying mechanisms of sensory reactivity. Using the Short Sensory Profile, the current study compared sensory reactivity in 24 children with PMS to 61 children with idiopathic ASD (iASD). Results suggest that children with PMS show more low energy/weak symptoms and less sensory sensitivity as compared to children with iASD. This study is the first to demonstrate differences in sensory reactivity between children with PMS and iASD, helping to refine the PMS phenotype. PMID:26914612

  20. How to diagnose a lipodystrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie; Douillard, Claire; Defrance, Frédérique; Dieudonne, Lucile; Mouton, Fanny; Lemaire, Christine; Bertrand-Escouflaire, Nicole; Bourdelle-Hego, Marie-Françoise; Devemy, Fabrice; Evrard, Anne; Gheerbrand, Dominique; Girardot, Caroline; Gumuche, Sophie; Hober, Christine; Topolinski, Hélène; Lamblin, Blandine; Mycinski, Bénédicte; Ryndak, Amélie; Karrouz, Wassila; Duvivier, Etienne; Merlen, Emilie; Cortet, Christine; Weill, Jacques; Lacroix, Dominique; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of adipose tissue diseases ranges from obesity to lipodystrophy, and is accompanied by insulin resistance syndrome, which promotes the occurrence of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular complications. Lipodystrophy refers to a group of rare diseases characterized by the generalized or partial absence of adipose tissue, and occurs with or without hypertrophy of adipose tissue in other sites. They are classified as being familial or acquired, and generalized or partial. The genetically determined partial forms usually occur as Dunnigan syndrome, which is a type of laminopathy that can also manifest as muscle, cardiac, neuropathic or progeroid involvement. Gene mutations encoding for PPAR-gamma, Akt2, CIDEC, perilipin and the ZMPSTE 24 enzyme are much more rare. The genetically determined generalized forms are also very rare and are linked to mutations of seipin AGPAT2, FBN1, which is accompanied by Marfan syndrome, or of BANF1, which is characterized by a progeroid syndrome without insulin resistance and with early bone complications. Glycosylation disorders are sometimes involved. Some genetically determined forms have recently been found to be due to autoinflammatory syndromes linked to a proteasome anomaly (PSMB8). They result in a lipodystrophy syndrome that occurs secondarily with fever, dermatosis and panniculitis. Then there are forms that are considered to be acquired. They may be iatrogenic (protease inhibitors in HIV patients, glucocorticosteroids, insulin, graft-versus-host disease, etc.), related to an immune system disease (sequelae of dermatopolymyositis, autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes, particularly associated with type 1 diabetes, Barraquer-Simons and Lawrence syndromes), which are promoted by anomalies of the complement system. Finally, lipomatosis is currently classified as a painful form (adiposis dolorosa or Dercum's disease) or benign symmetric multiple form, also known as Launois-Bensaude syndrome or Madelung

  1. Key facts and hot spots on tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; De Clemente, Caterina; Caso, Francesco; Emmi, Giacomo; Costa, Luisa; Silvestri, Elena; Andreozzi, Laura; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), formerly known as familial Hibernian fever, is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease, resulting from mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene, encoding the 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor. The pathophysiologic mechanism of TRAPS remains ambiguous and only partially explained. The onset age of the syndrome is variable and the clinical scenery is characterized by recurrent episodes of high-grade fever that typically lasts 1-3 weeks, associated with migrating myalgia, pseudocellulitis, diffuse abdominal pain, appendicitis-like findings, ocular inflammatory signs, and risk of long-term amyloidosis. Fever episodes are responsive to high-dose corticosteroids, but different classes of drugs have been reported to be ineffective. The use of etanercept is unable to control systemic inflammation, while interleukin-1 blockade has been shown as effective in the control of disease activity in many patients reported so far. PMID:24935411

  2. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguado-Gil, L; Irarrazaval-Armendáriz, I; Pretel-Irazabal, M

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease included in the group of autoinflammatory syndromes. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation in different regions of the body. The main clinical manifestations are myalgia, migratory erythematous rash, periorbital edema, and abdominal pain. The diagnosis is reached using gene analysis and prognosis depends on the appearance of amyloidosis secondary to the recurrent episodes of inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and corticosteroids are the most widely used treatments. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of TRAPS, thanks to a better understanding of its pathogenesis. Dermatologists must be aware that the skin manifestations of TRAPS are particularly important, as they are often diagnostic. PMID:23891452

  3. Monogenec Arrhythmic Syndromes: From Molecular and Genetic Aspects to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    E.Z., Golukhova; O.I., Gromova; R.A., Shomahov; N.I., Bulaeva; L.A., Bockeria

    2016-01-01

    The abrupt cessation of effective cardiac function that is generally due to heart rhythm disorders can cause sudden and unexpected death at any age and is referred to as a syndrome called “sudden cardiac death” (SCD). Annually, about 400,000 cases of SCD occur in the United States alone. Less than 5% of the resuscitation techniques are effective. The prevalence of SCD in a population rises with age according to the prevalence of coronary artery disease, which is the most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest. However, there is a peak in SCD incidence for the age below 5 years, which is equal to 17 cases per 100,000 of the population. This peak is due to congenital monogenic arrhythmic canalopathies. Despite their relative rarity, these cases are obviously the most tragic. The immediate causes, or mechanisms, of SCD are comprehensive. Generally, it is arrhythmic death due to ventricular tachyarrythmias – sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Bradyarrhythmias and pulseless electrical activity account for no more than 40% of all registered cardiac arrests, and they are more often the outcome of the abovementioned arrhythmias. Our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for SCD has emerged from decades of basic science investigation into the normal electrophysiology of the heart, the molecular physiology of cardiac ion channels, the fundamental cellular and tissue events associated with cardiac arrhythmias, and the molecular genetics of monogenic disorders of the heart rhythm (for example, the long QT syndrome). This review presents an overview of the molecular and genetic basis of SCD in the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, short QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, and sudden cardiac death prevention strategies by modern techniques (including implantable cardioverter-defibrillator) PMID:27437140

  4. Monogenec Arrhythmic Syndromes: From Molecular and Genetic Aspects to Bedside.

    PubMed

    E Z, Golukhova; O I, Gromova; R A, Shomahov; N I, Bulaeva; L A, Bockeria

    2016-01-01

    The abrupt cessation of effective cardiac function that is generally due to heart rhythm disorders can cause sudden and unexpected death at any age and is referred to as a syndrome called "sudden cardiac death" (SCD). Annually, about 400,000 cases of SCD occur in the United States alone. Less than 5% of the resuscitation techniques are effective. The prevalence of SCD in a population rises with age according to the prevalence of coronary artery disease, which is the most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest. However, there is a peak in SCD incidence for the age below 5 years, which is equal to 17 cases per 100,000 of the population. This peak is due to congenital monogenic arrhythmic canalopathies. Despite their relative rarity, these cases are obviously the most tragic. The immediate causes, or mechanisms, of SCD are comprehensive. Generally, it is arrhythmic death due to ventricular tachyarrythmias - sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Bradyarrhythmias and pulseless electrical activity account for no more than 40% of all registered cardiac arrests, and they are more often the outcome of the abovementioned arrhythmias. Our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for SCD has emerged from decades of basic science investigation into the normal electrophysiology of the heart, the molecular physiology of cardiac ion channels, the fundamental cellular and tissue events associated with cardiac arrhythmias, and the molecular genetics of monogenic disorders of the heart rhythm (for example, the long QT syndrome). This review presents an overview of the molecular and genetic basis of SCD in the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, short QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, and sudden cardiac death prevention strategies by modern techniques (including implantable cardioverter-defibrillator). PMID:27437140

  5. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  6. The clinical application of genome-wide sequencing for monogenic diseases in Canada: Position Statement of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym; Hartley, Taila; Adam, Shelin; Bernier, Francois; Chong, Karen; Fernandez, Bridget A; Friedman, Jan M; Geraghty, Michael T; Hume, Stacey; Knoppers, Bartha M; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Majewski, Jacek; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Meyn, M Stephen; Michaud, Jacques L; Nelson, Tanya N; Richer, Julie; Sadikovic, Bekim; Skidmore, David L; Stockley, Tracy; Taylor, Sherry; van Karnebeek, Clara; Zawati, Ma'n H; Lauzon, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and scope The aim of this Position Statement is to provide recommendations for Canadian medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors and other physicians regarding the use of genome-wide sequencing of germline DNA in the context of clinical genetic diagnosis. This statement has been developed to facilitate the clinical translation and development of best practices for clinical genome-wide sequencing for genetic diagnosis of monogenic diseases in Canada; it does not address the clinical application of this technology in other fields such as molecular investigation of cancer or for population screening of healthy individuals. Methods of statement development Two multidisciplinary groups consisting of medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors, ethicists, lawyers and genetic researchers were assembled to review existing literature and guidelines on genome-wide sequencing for clinical genetic diagnosis in the context of monogenic diseases, and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) membership-at-large and, following incorporation of feedback, approved by the CCMG Board of Directors. The CCMG is a Canadian organisation responsible for certifying medical geneticists and clinical laboratory geneticists, and for establishing professional and ethical standards for clinical genetics services in Canada. Results and conclusions Recommendations include (1) clinical genome-wide sequencing is an appropriate approach in the diagnostic assessment of a patient for whom there is suspicion of a significant monogenic disease that is associated with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, or where specific genetic tests have failed to provide a diagnosis; (2) until the benefits of reporting incidental findings are established, we do not endorse the intentional clinical analysis of disease-associated genes

  7. PFAPA syndrome and Behçet's disease: a comparison of two medical entities based on the clinical interviews performed by three different specialists.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Vitale, Antonio; Bersani, Giulia; Nieves, Laura Martin; Cattalini, Marco; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Iannone, Florenzo; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Ceribelli, Angela; Brunetta, Enrico; Selmi, Carlo; Rigante, Donato

    2016-02-01

    The pediatric syndrome characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) and adult Behçet's disease share some clinical manifestations and are both polygenic autoinflammatory disorders with interleukin-1β showing to play a pivotal role. However, the diagnosis is mostly clinical and we hypothesize that specific criteria may be addressed differently by different physicians. To determine the diagnostic variability, we compared the answers of 80 patients with a definite diagnosis of Behçet's disease (age 42.1 ± 13.7 years) obtained by separate telephone interviews conducted by a rheumatologist, a pediatrician, and an internist working largely in the field of autoinflammatory disorders. Questions were related to the age of symptom onset, the occurrence of recurrent fevers during childhood, and the association with oral aphthosis, cervical adenitis and/or pharyngitis, previous treatments, possible growth impairment, the time lapse between PFAPA-like symptoms and the onset of Behçet's disease, and the occurrence of Behçet-related manifestation during childhood. The rheumatologist identified 30 % of patients with Behçet's disease fulfilling PFAPA syndrome diagnostic criteria, compared to the pediatrician and the internist identifying 10 and 7.5 %, respectively. Most of the patients suffered from recurrent oral aphthosis in childhood also without fever (50, 39, and 48 % with each interviewer), yet no patient fulfilled the Behçet's disease diagnostic criteria. Our data suggest that physician awareness and expertise are central to the diagnosis of autoinflammatory disorders through an accurate collection of the medical history. PMID:25665824

  8. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  9. Paradoxical Autoinflammatory Skin Reaction to Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Blockers Manifesting as Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, Angelo V.; Tavecchio, Simona; Berti, Emilio; Gelmetti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The therapy of inflammatory bowel disease, particularly with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, may be associated with a number of cutaneous adverse effects, including psoriasis-like, eczema-like, and lichenoid eruptions. Other rare skin complications are neutrophilic dermatoses such as amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (APF), which is a chronic relapsing pustular disorder classified in this spectrum. The authors analyzed clinical, histopathologic, and cytokine expression profiles of 3 inflammatory bowel disease patients with APF triggered by adalimumab (patient 1) and infliximab (patients 2 and 3). All 3 patients presented with sterile pustules involving the cutaneous folds, genital regions, and scalp 6 months after starting adalimumab (patient 1) and 9 months after starting infliximab (patients 2 and 3). Histology was characterized by epidermal spongiform pustules with a dermal neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate. Tumor necrosis factor blocker withdrawal associated with topical and systemic corticosteroids induced complete remission of APF in all 3 patients. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and its receptors as well as TNF alpha and its receptors were significantly higher in APF than in controls. Also IL-17, leukocyte selectin, and chemokines, such as IL-8, [C-X-C motif] chemokine ligand 1/2/3 (C = cysteine, X = any amino acid), [C-X-C motif] chemokine ligand 16 (C = cysteine, X = any amino acid), and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) were significantly overexpressed. Finally, the authors found significant overexpression of both metalloproteinases 2/9 and their inhibitors 1/2. The observation of 3 patients with APF following anti-TNF therapy expands not only the clinical context of APF but also the spectrum of anti-TNF side effects. Overexpression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network supports the view that APF is autoinflammatory in origin. PMID

  10. Moyamoya disease and syndromes: from genetics to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Guey, Stéphanie; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Hervé, Dominique; Kossorotoff, Manoelle

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya angiopathy is characterized by a progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and the development of a network of abnormal collateral vessels. This chronic cerebral angiopathy is observed in children and adults. It mainly leads to brain ischemic events in children, and to ischemic and hemorrhagic events in adults. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries and Western countries. Two main nosological entities are identified. On the one hand, moyamoya disease corresponds to isolated moyamoya angiopathy, defined as being "idiopathic" according to the Guidelines of the Research Committee on the Pathology and Treatment of Spontaneous Occlusion of the Circle of Willis. This entity is probably multifactorial and polygenic in most patients. On the other hand, moyamoya syndrome is a moyamoya angiopathy associated with an underlying condition and forms a very heterogeneous group with various clinical presentations, various modes of inheritance, and a variable penetrance of the cerebrovascular phenotype. Diagnostic and evaluation techniques rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) conventional angiography, and cerebral hemodynamics measurements. Revascularization surgery can be indicated, with several techniques. Characteristics of genetic moyamoya syndromes are presented, with a focus on recently reported mutations in BRCC3/MTCP1 and GUCY1A3 genes. Identification of the genes involved in moyamoya disease and several monogenic moyamoya syndromes unraveled different pathways involved in the development of this angiopathy. Studying genes and pathways involved in monogenic moyamoya syndromes may help to give insights into pathophysiological models and discover potential candidates for medical treatment strategies. PMID:25733922

  11. Moyamoya disease and syndromes: from genetics to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Guey, Stéphanie; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Hervé, Dominique; Kossorotoff, Manoelle

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya angiopathy is characterized by a progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and the development of a network of abnormal collateral vessels. This chronic cerebral angiopathy is observed in children and adults. It mainly leads to brain ischemic events in children, and to ischemic and hemorrhagic events in adults. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries and Western countries. Two main nosological entities are identified. On the one hand, moyamoya disease corresponds to isolated moyamoya angiopathy, defined as being “idiopathic” according to the Guidelines of the Research Committee on the Pathology and Treatment of Spontaneous Occlusion of the Circle of Willis. This entity is probably multifactorial and polygenic in most patients. On the other hand, moyamoya syndrome is a moyamoya angiopathy associated with an underlying condition and forms a very heterogeneous group with various clinical presentations, various modes of inheritance, and a variable penetrance of the cerebrovascular phenotype. Diagnostic and evaluation techniques rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) conventional angiography, and cerebral hemodynamics measurements. Revascularization surgery can be indicated, with several techniques. Characteristics of genetic moyamoya syndromes are presented, with a focus on recently reported mutations in BRCC3/MTCP1 and GUCY1A3 genes. Identification of the genes involved in moyamoya disease and several monogenic moyamoya syndromes unraveled different pathways involved in the development of this angiopathy. Studying genes and pathways involved in monogenic moyamoya syndromes may help to give insights into pathophysiological models and discover potential candidates for medical treatment strategies. PMID:25733922

  12. Exenatide Is an Effective Antihyperglycaemic Agent in a Mouse Model of Wolfram Syndrome 1.

    PubMed

    Sedman, Tuuli; Rünkorg, Kertu; Krass, Maarja; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Vasar, Eero; Volke, Vallo

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 is a very rare monogenic disease resulting in a complex of disorders including diabetes mellitus. Up to now, insulin has been used to treat these patients. Some of the monogenic forms of diabetes respond preferentially to sulphonylurea preparations. The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether exenatide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, and glipizide, a sulphonylurea, are effective in a mouse model of Wolfram syndrome 1. Wolframin-deficient mice were used to test the effect of insulin secretagogues. Wolframin-deficient mice had nearly normal fasting glucose levels but developed hyperglycaemia after glucose challenge. Exenatide in a dose of 10 μg/kg lowered the blood glucose level in both wild-type and wolframin-deficient mice when administered during a nonfasted state and during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Glipizide (0.6 or 2 mg/kg) was not able to reduce the glucose level in wolframin-deficient animals. In contrast to other groups, wolframin-deficient mice had a lower insulin-to-glucose ratio during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, indicating impaired insulin secretion. Exenatide increased the insulin-to-glucose ratio irrespective of genotype, demonstrating the ability to correct the impaired insulin secretion caused by wolframin deficiency. We conclude that GLP-1 agonists may have potential in the treatment of Wolfram syndrome-related diabetes. PMID:27069934

  13. Exenatide Is an Effective Antihyperglycaemic Agent in a Mouse Model of Wolfram Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Sedman, Tuuli; Rünkorg, Kertu; Krass, Maarja; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Vasar, Eero; Volke, Vallo

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 is a very rare monogenic disease resulting in a complex of disorders including diabetes mellitus. Up to now, insulin has been used to treat these patients. Some of the monogenic forms of diabetes respond preferentially to sulphonylurea preparations. The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether exenatide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, and glipizide, a sulphonylurea, are effective in a mouse model of Wolfram syndrome 1. Wolframin-deficient mice were used to test the effect of insulin secretagogues. Wolframin-deficient mice had nearly normal fasting glucose levels but developed hyperglycaemia after glucose challenge. Exenatide in a dose of 10 μg/kg lowered the blood glucose level in both wild-type and wolframin-deficient mice when administered during a nonfasted state and during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Glipizide (0.6 or 2 mg/kg) was not able to reduce the glucose level in wolframin-deficient animals. In contrast to other groups, wolframin-deficient mice had a lower insulin-to-glucose ratio during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, indicating impaired insulin secretion. Exenatide increased the insulin-to-glucose ratio irrespective of genotype, demonstrating the ability to correct the impaired insulin secretion caused by wolframin deficiency. We conclude that GLP-1 agonists may have potential in the treatment of Wolfram syndrome-related diabetes. PMID:27069934

  14. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  15. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  16. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  17. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  18. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  19. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome managed with the couple canakinumab-alendronate.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Frediani, Bruno; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Management of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is puzzling, and therapeutic choices can be complicated, due to both wide genetic heterogeneity and protean clinical phenotype. We report on a 35-year-old female who was diagnosed with TRAPS, after finding the V95M mutation on the TNFRSF1A gene; who was treated in order with etanercept, anakinra, and canakinumab (150 mg/every 8 weeks by subcutaneous injection, then increased to 150 mg every 4 weeks); and who started therapy with oral alendronate (70 mg/weekly) to control her osteoporosis. Alendronate combined with canakinumab led to the optimal clinical control of all TRAPS manifestations and normalization of inflammatory markers. Further studies should be performed to clarify bisphosphonates' role in the scenery of autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:24609716

  20. Doubling the referral rate of monogenic diabetes through a nationwide information campaign--update on glucokinase gene mutations in a Polish cohort.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, M; Fendler, W; Antosik, K; Baranowska, A; Gnys, P; Zmyslowska, A; Malecki, M; Mlynarski, W

    2012-12-01

    In order to improve recruitment efficiency of patients with monogenic diabetes in Poland, in September 2010 a nationwide advertising campaign was launched to inform multiple target groups interested or participating in pediatric diabetologic care. Promotional actions aimed at informing physicians, patients, parents and educators were carried out through nationwide newspapers, medical and patient-developed websites and educational conference presentations. Recruitment efficiency was compared between September 2010 (publication of the first report on project's results) and the following 12 months. The number of families and patients referred to genetic screening was increased by 92% and 96% respectively nearly reaching the numbers recruited throughout the initial 4 years of the project. Participation of non-academic centers was also significantly increased from 2.3% to 7.5% (p = 0.0005). DNA sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependant Probe Amplification of the glucokinase gene resulted in finding 50 different mutations. Among those mutations, 19 were novel variants, which included: 17 missense mutations (predicted to be pathogenic according to bioinformatic analysis), 1 nonsense mutation and 1 mutation affecting a consensus intronic splice site. Advertising actions directed at increasing recruitment efficiency are a powerful and possibly neglected tool in screening for rare genetic disorders with a clinically defined phenotype. PMID:22035297

  1. Mapping genetic modifiers of survival in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Alison R.; Hawkins, Nicole A.; McCollom, Clint E.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population. Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for several monogenic epilepsy syndromes. More than 800 mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A have been reported in patients with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus and Dravet syndrome. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A result in Dravet syndrome, a severe infant-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by intractable seizures, developmental delays and increased mortality. A common feature of monogenic epilepsies is variable expressivity among individuals with the same mutation, suggesting that genetic modifiers may influence clinical severity. Mice with heterozygous deletion of Scn1a (Scn1a+/−) model a number of Dravet syndrome features, including spontaneous seizures and premature lethality. Phenotype severity in Scn1a+/− mice is strongly dependent on strain background. On the 129S6/SvEvTac strain Scn1a+/− mice exhibit no overt phenotype, while on the (C57BL/6J × 129S6/SvEvTac)F1 strain Scn1a+/− mice exhibit spontaneous seizures and early lethality. To systematically identify loci that influence premature lethality in Scn1a+/− mice, we performed genome scans on reciprocal backcrosses. QTL mapping revealed modifier loci on mouse chromosomes 5, 7, 8 and 11. RNA-seq analysis of strain-dependent gene expression, regulation and coding sequence variation provided a list of potential functional candidate genes at each locus. Identification of modifier genes that influence survival in Scn1a+/− mice will improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for improved treatment of human patients. PMID:24152123

  2. Histologic and Immunohistochemical Features of the Skin Lesions in CANDLE Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio; Colmenero, Isabel; Requena, Luis; Paller, Amy S; Ramot, Yuval; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Vera, Angel; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Kutzner, Heinz

    2015-07-01

    Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome is a newly characterized autoinflammatory disorder, caused by mutations in PSMB8. It is characterized by early-onset fevers, accompanied by a widespread, violaceous, and often annular cutaneous eruption. Although the exact pathogenesis of this syndrome is still obscure, it is postulated that the inflammatory disease manifestations stem from excess secretion of interferons. Based on preliminary blood cytokine and gene expression studies, the signature seems to come mostly from type I interferons, which are proposed to lead to the recruitment of immature myeloid cells into the dermis and subcutis. In this study, we systematically analyzed skin biopsies from 6 patients with CANDLE syndrome by routine histopathology and immunohistochemistry methods. Skin lesions showed the presence of extensive mixed dermal and subcutaneous inflammatory infiltrate, composed of mononuclear cells, atypical myeloid cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and some mature lymphocytes. Positive LEDER and myeloperoxidase staining supported the presence of myeloid cells. Positive CD68/PMG1 and CD163 staining confirmed the existence of histiocytes and monocytic macrophages in the inflammatory infiltrate. CD123 staining was positive, demonstrating the presence of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Uncovering the unique histopathological and immunohistochemical features of CANDLE syndrome provides tools for rapid and specific diagnosis of this disorder and further insight into the pathogenesis of this severe life-threatening condition. PMID:26091509

  3. An Autosomal Recessive Syndrome of Joint Contractures, Muscular Atrophy, Microcytic Anemia, and Panniculitis-Associated Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Hernandez, Maria Dolores; Sousa, Ana Berta; Subramanyam, Lalitha; Martínez de Villarreal, Laura; dos Santos, Heloísa G.; Barboza, Oralia

    2010-01-01

    Context: Genetic lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by partial or complete loss of adipose tissue and predisposition to insulin resistance and its complications such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, acanthosis nigricans, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Objective: The objective of the study was to report a novel autosomal recessive lipodystrophy syndrome. Results: We report the detailed phenotype of two males and one female patient, 26–34 yr old, belonging to two pedigrees with an autosomal recessive syndrome presenting with childhood-onset lipodystrophy, muscle atrophy, severe joint contractures, erythematous skin lesions, and microcytic anemia. Other variable clinical features include hypergammaglobulinemia, hepatosplenomegaly, generalized seizures, and basal ganglia calcification. None of the patients had diabetes mellitus or acanthosis nigricans. Two had mild hypertriglyceridemia and all had low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Skin biopsy of an erythematous nodular skin lesion from one of the patients revealed evidence of panniculitis. The lipodystrophy initially affected the upper body but later became generalized involving abdomen and lower extremities as well. Conclusions: We conclude that these patients represent a novel autoinflammatory syndrome resulting in joint contractures, muscle atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy. The molecular genetic basis of this disorder remains to be elucidated. PMID:20534754

  4. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation.

    PubMed

    Katz, David M; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J; Menon, Debashish U; Philpot, Benjamin D; Tarquinio, Daniel C

    2016-02-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. PMID:26830113

  5. Alström Syndrome: Mutation Spectrum of ALMS1.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jan D; Muller, Jean; Collin, Gayle B; Milan, Gabriella; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Dinwiddie, Darrell; Farrow, Emily G; Miller, Neil A; Favaretto, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Dollfus, Hélène; Vettor, Roberto; Naggert, Jürgen K

    2015-07-01

    Alström Syndrome (ALMS), a recessive, monogenic ciliopathy caused by mutations in ALMS1, is typically characterized by multisystem involvement including early cone-rod retinal dystrophy and blindness, hearing loss, childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, fibrosis, and multiple organ failure. The precise function of ALMS1 remains elusive, but roles in endosomal and ciliary transport and cell cycle regulation have been shown. The aim of our study was to further define the spectrum of ALMS1 mutations in patients with clinical features of ALMS. Mutational analysis in a world-wide cohort of 204 families identified 109 novel mutations, extending the number of known ALMS1 mutations to 239 and highlighting the allelic heterogeneity of this disorder. This study represents the most comprehensive mutation analysis in patients with ALMS, identifying the largest number of novel mutations in a single study worldwide. Here, we also provide an overview of all ALMS1 mutations identified to date. PMID:25846608

  6. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Katz, David M.; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J.; Menon, Debashish U.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Tarquinio, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. PMID:26830113

  7. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Methods Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). Results All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Conclusions Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or

  8. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  9. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  10. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  11. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  12. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are examples of this type of ... Blood cortisol levels Blood sugar Saliva cortisol levels Dexamethasone suppression test 24-hour urine for cortisol and ...

  13. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  14. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  15. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  16. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Morquio syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who have a child with Morquio syndrome to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available.

  17. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001549.htm Asperger syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form ...

  18. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis References Joseph RL, Alleva JT, Hudgins TH. Piriformis syndrome. In: Frontera: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  19. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  20. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  1. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  2. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  3. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  4. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called trisomy 21. ...

  5. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  6. Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome (Cross syndrome).

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Unsal, E; Köse, G

    1991-01-01

    A typical case of Cross syndrome with hypopigmentation, mental and psychomotor retardation, spasticity, bilateral optic atrophy and dental defects in a three-year-old boy is presented. The clinical features of this rare syndrome are discussed. PMID:1814043

  7. Paleomagnetic, Anisortopy of Magnetic Susceptibility, and structural Data Bearing on Magma Emplacement and the growth of the Miocene Hrad Trosky a Monogenic Strombolian Cinder Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brister, A. R.; Petronis, M. S.; Lindline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Rapprich, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Hrad (castle) Trosky is a 14th century medieval castle located in NE Bohemia, Czech Republic built on top of a monogenic Strombolian cinder-spatter cone. The Hrad Trosky Volcano belongs to a relatively well-preserved set of middle Miocene scoria cones in the Jičín Volcanic field. Volcanic activity occurred in the form of scattered Strombolian eruptions from multiple volcanic centers producing basanitic magmas mostly erupted along an east-west trend associated with the Lusatian fault. Erosion of the Hrad Trosky Volcano resulted in exceptional three dimensional exposure of the magma feeder conduit system. In order to gain a better understanding of the magma emplacement and subvolcanic deformation processes at the Hrad Trosky volcano we collected samples for a detailed, paleomagnetic, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and structural study. AMS data provides information on magma flow patterns and improve our understanding of the kinematics of magma flow. Paleomagnetic data will be compared to the late Miocene expected field direction to discern any subvocanic deformation associated with subsequent intrusions during the growth of the volcanic system. Structural data, such as basic field mapping, fracture patterns, Reidel shears, and other kinematic indicator, should provide additional constraints on the details of volcanic construction and/or deformation. To asses the evolution of the Hrad Trosky volcano, we collected twenty-one sampling sites with eight to fourteen sample collected at each sites. These include fifteen sites in the magma conduit, five sites in lava flows, and one site scoria. In addition, we conducted five baked-contact tests to evaluate the stability of the remanence and the antiquity of the magnetization. Preliminary results are encouraging with AMS data yielding high susceptibility resultsand well defined principal susceptibility axes. Paleomagnetic data show a relatively simple demagnetization behavior that likely reflects a primary

  8. Etanercept-Induced Myelopathy in a Pediatric Case of Blau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caracseghi, Fabiola; Izquierdo-Blasco, Jaume; Sanchez-Montanez, Angel; Melendo-Perez, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Modesto, Consuelo

    2011-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autoinflammatory disorder within the group of pediatric granulomatous diseases. Mutations in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15) are responsible for this condition, which has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable expressivity. The clinical picture includes arthritis, uveitis, skin rash, and granulomatous inflammation. Central nervous system involvement is seldom reported, although some isolated cases of seizures, neurosensorial hearing loss, and transient cranial nerve palsy have been described. Treatment consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive agents, among which anti-tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha (TNF-α) biologic agents, such as etanercept, play an important role. Among the major adverse effects of TNF-α inhibitors, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis, and acute transverse myelitis have been reported in adults. We describe a case of pediatric Blau syndrome affected by etanercept-induced myelopathy, manifesting as a clinical syndrome of transverse myelitis. The patient experienced rapid recovery after etanercept was discontinued. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature and, possibly, the one with the latest onset, following 8 years of treatment. We discuss the etiopathogenic mechanisms of this reaction and possible explanations for the imaging findings. PMID:22937436

  9. History, Genetics, and Strategies for Cancer Prevention in Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Stoffel, Elena M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the third cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The majority of CRC cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events, but up to 6% are attributed to known monogenic disorders that confer a markedly increased risk for the development of CRC and multiple extracolonic malignancies. Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited CRC syndrome and is associated with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2 but also MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Although the risk of CRC and endometrial cancer may approach near 75% and 50%, respectively, in gene mutation carriers, the identification of these individuals and at-risk family members through predictive genetic testing provides opportunities for cancer prevention including specialized cancer screening, intensified surveillance, and/or prophylactic surgeries. This article will provide a review of the major advances in risk assessment, molecular genetics, DNA mutational analyses, and cancer prevention and management made since Lynch syndrome was first described 100 years ago. PMID:23891921

  10. Alström Syndrome: Mutation spectrum of ALMS1

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jan D.; Muller, Jean; Collin, Gayle B.; Milan, Gabriella; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Dinwiddie, Darrell; Farrow, Emily G.; Miller, Neil A.; Favaretto, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Dollfus, Hélène; Vettor, Roberto; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Alström Syndrome, a recessive, monogenic ciliopathy caused by mutations in ALMS1, is typically characterized by multi-system involvement including early cone-rod retinal dystrophy and blindness, hearing loss, childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, fibrosis and multiple organ failure. The precise function of ALMS1 remains elusive, but roles in endosomal and ciliary transport and cell cycle regulation have been shown. The aim of our study was to further define the spectrum of ALMS1 mutations in patients with clinical features of Alström Syndrome. Mutational analysis in a world-wide cohort of 204 families identified 109 novel mutations, extending the number of known ALMS1 mutations to 239 and highlighting the allelic heterogeneity of this disorder. This study represents the most comprehensive mutation analysis in patients with Alström Syndrome, identifying the largest number of novel mutations in a single study worldwide. Here, we also provide an overview of all ALMS1 mutations identified to date. PMID:25846608

  11. The genetic component of Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten W.; Holst, Anders G.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Olesen, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a clinical entity first described in 1992. BrS is characterized by ST-segment elevations in the right precordial leads and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. It affects young subjects, predominantly males, with structurally normal hearts. The prevalence varies with ethnicity ranging from 1:2,000 to 1:100,000 in different parts of the world. Today, hundreds of variants in 17 genes have been associated with BrS of which mutations in SCN5A, coding for the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, accounts for the vast majority. Despite this, approximately 70% of BrS cases cannot be explained genetically with the current knowledge. Moreover, the monogenic role of some of the variants previously described as being associated with BrS has been questioned by their occurrence in about 4% (1:23) of the general population as found in NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) currently including approximately 6500 individuals. If we add the variants described in the five newest identified genes associated with BrS, they appear at an even higher prevalence in the ESP (1:21). The current standard treatment of BrS is an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). The risk stratification and indications for ICD treatment are based on the ECG and on the clinical and family history. In this review we discuss the genetic basis of BrS. PMID:23874304

  12. Neutrophils from patients with SAPHO syndrome show no signs of aberrant NADPH oxidase-dependent production of intracellular reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wekell, Per; Björnsdottir, Halla; Björkman, Lena; Sundqvist, Martina; Christenson, Karin; Osla, Veronica; Berg, Stefan; Fasth, Anders; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if aberrant intracellular production of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils is a disease mechanism in the autoinflammatory disease SAPHO syndrome, characterized by synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, as has previously been suggested based on a family with SAPHO syndrome-like disease. Methods. Neutrophil function was explored in a cohort of four patients with SAPHO syndrome, two of whom were sampled during both inflammatory and non-inflammatory phase. Intracellular neutrophil ROS production was determined by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in response to phorbol myristate acetate. Results. Cells from all patients produced normal amounts of ROS, both intra- and extracellularly, when compared with internal controls as well as with a large collection of healthy controls assayed in the laboratory over time (showing an extensive inter-personal variability in a normal population). Further, intracellular production of ROS increased during the inflammatory phase. Neutrophil activation markers were comparable between patients and controls. Conclusion. Dysfunctional generation of intracellular ROS in neutrophils is not a generalizable feature in SAPHO syndrome. Secondly, serum amyloid A appears to be a more sensitive inflammatory marker than CRP during improvement and relapses in SAPHO syndrome. PMID:27121779

  13. Linkage Analysis in Familial Non-Lynch Syndrome Colorectal Cancer Families from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and many families segregate the disease as a seemingly monogenic trait. A minority of familial colorectal cancer could be explained by known monogenic genes and genetic loci. Familial polyposis and Lynch syndrome are two syndromes where the predisposing genes are known but numerous families have been tested without finding the predisposing gene. We performed a genome wide linkage analysis in 121 colorectal families with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The families were ascertained from the department of clinical genetics at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden and were considered negative for Familial Polyposis and Lynch syndrome. In total 600 subjects were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism array chips. Parametric- and non-parametric linkage analyses were computed using MERLIN in all and subsets of families. No statistically significant result was seen, however, there were suggestive positive HLODs above two in parametric linkage analysis. This was observed in a recessive model for high-risk families, at locus 9q31.1 (HLOD=2.2, rs1338121) and for moderate-risk families, at locus Xp22.33 (LOD=2.2 and HLOD=2.5, rs2306737). Using families with early-onset, recessive analysis suggested one locus on 4p16.3 (LOD=2.2, rs920683) and one on 17p13.2 (LOD/HLOD=2.0, rs884250). No NPL score above two was seen for any of the families. Our linkage study provided additional support for the previously suggested region on chromosome 9 and suggested additional loci to be involved in colorectal cancer risk. Sequencing of genes in the regions will be done in future studies. PMID:24349560

  14. Linkage analysis in familial non-Lynch syndrome colorectal cancer families from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kontham, Vinaykumar; von Holst, Susanna; Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and many families segregate the disease as a seemingly monogenic trait. A minority of familial colorectal cancer could be explained by known monogenic genes and genetic loci. Familial polyposis and Lynch syndrome are two syndromes where the predisposing genes are known but numerous families have been tested without finding the predisposing gene. We performed a genome wide linkage analysis in 121 colorectal families with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The families were ascertained from the department of clinical genetics at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden and were considered negative for Familial Polyposis and Lynch syndrome. In total 600 subjects were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism array chips. Parametric- and non-parametric linkage analyses were computed using MERLIN in all and subsets of families. No statistically significant result was seen, however, there were suggestive positive HLODs above two in parametric linkage analysis. This was observed in a recessive model for high-risk families, at locus 9q31.1 (HLOD=2.2, rs1338121) and for moderate-risk families, at locus Xp22.33 (LOD=2.2 and HLOD=2.5, rs2306737). Using families with early-onset, recessive analysis suggested one locus on 4p16.3 (LOD=2.2, rs920683) and one on 17p13.2 (LOD/HLOD=2.0, rs884250). No NPL score above two was seen for any of the families. Our linkage study provided additional support for the previously suggested region on chromosome 9 and suggested additional loci to be involved in colorectal cancer risk. Sequencing of genes in the regions will be done in future studies. PMID:24349560

  15. Overgrowth Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Kalish, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall-Smith, Weaver, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith-Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  16. Lutembacher's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandhya S.; Sakaria, Amit K.; Mahajan, Sanket K.; Shah, Kuldeep B.

    2012-01-01

    The definition of Lutembacher's syndrome has undergone many changes. It refers to combination of congenital Atrial Septal Defect with acquired mitral stenosis. Lutembacher's syndrome is a very rare disease and in the past, it has been either overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Here, we will discuss a case of a pregnant lady who developed breathlessness during her third trimester of pregnancy and on detailed examination and investigation, she was found to be having Lutembacher's syndrome. PMID:22629045

  17. Sheehan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  18. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Sanfilippo syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names MPS III References Pyeritz ...

  19. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  20. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth is often smaller than average. A child with Turner syndrome is much shorter than children who are the ... Growth hormone may help a child with Turner syndrome grow taller. ... started when the girl is 12 or 13 years old. These help trigger ...

  1. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  2. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  3. Early-onset sarcoidosis caused by a rare CARD15/NOD2 de novo mutation and responsive to infliximab: a case report with long-term follow-up and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Francesco; Lapadula, Giovanni; Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Iannone, Florenzo

    2015-02-01

    Granulomatous autoinflammatory diseases are monogenic syndromes caused by mutations in the region encoding for the nucleotide-binding domain region of the NOD2/CARD15 gene with subsequent dysregulation of the inflammatory response and formation of noncaseous granulomas. They include Blau syndrome (BS) and early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS); both are clinically and genetically indistinguishable between them and they are the familial (autosomal dominantly inherited) and sporadic forms of the same disease, respectively. We describe a case of EOS, misdiagnosed for 30 years such as "juvenile rheumatoid arthritis" before and "classic sarcoidosis" later. In our patient, we found a new de novo mutation (E383G) in NOD2 that has been reported only in a family of Japanese patients with BS. After long-term follow-up (42 months), infliximab maintained good efficacy and safety without any sign of disease relapse and side effects. PMID:24445386

  4. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... with this syndrome do not have a smile). Miller syndrome Miller Syndrome is very rare condition characterized by downward ... dysplasia • Hemangioma • Hemifacial Microsomia / Goldenhar syndrome • Microtia/Atresia • Miller syndrome • Moebius syndrome • Nager syndrome • Pierre Robin Sequence • ...

  5. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  6. Neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Klar, Nitasha; Cohen, Bernard; Lin, Doris D M

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes (or phakomatoses) are a diverse group of congenital disorders that encompass abnormalities of neuroectodermal and, sometimes, mesodermal development, hence commonly involving the skin, eye, and central nervous system. These are often inherited conditions and typically present in early childhood or adolescence. Some of the abnormalities and clinical symptoms may, however, be progressive, and there is an increased risk of neoplastic formation in many of the syndromes. As a group, neurocutaneous syndromes are characterized by distinctive cutaneous stigmata and neurologic symptomology, the latter often representing the most devastating and debilitating features of these diseases. Many of these syndromes are markedly heterogeneous in nature as they affect many organ systems. Given the incurable nature of these conditions and the broad spectrum of pathologies they comprise, treatments vary on a case-by-case basis and tend to be palliative rather than curative. With the advances in molecular genetics, however, greater understanding of biologic functions of the gene products and the correlative phenotypic expression is being attained, and this knowledge may guide future therapeutic developments. This chapter focuses on the cutaneous and neurologic pathology with emphasis on neuroimaging of selective neurocutaneous syndromes, including tuberous sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and incontinentia pigmenti. PMID:27432683

  7. [Aarskog's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hromádková, L; Frána, L

    1991-05-01

    The authors described the rare Aarskog syndrome in a 6-year-old boy, associated with left-sided Brown's syndrome. Another 4-year-old boy came from an affected family where the brother suffered also from Aarskog's syndrome and in the mother some microsymptoms were detected. The authors recommend that patients who on examination of a refraction defect or strabism display uncommon features in the face or other parts of the body should be always subjected to a general examination incl. genetic examination. PMID:1913912

  8. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair. PMID:18724614

  9. LEOPARD Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Majumdar, Biswajit; Rudra, Olympia; Chakraborty, Sougat

    2015-10-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited or sporadic disorder of variable penetrance and expressivity. The acronym LEOPARD stands for its cardinal clinical features including Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and Deafness. We present herein a patient with LEOPARD syndrome and distinctive features. It was noteworthy that our patient presented with the concern of generalized lentiginosis and subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had LEOPARD syndrome. In this report we would like to highlight the importance of detailed clinical examination and appropriate imaging in patients with multiple lentigines. PMID:26632807

  10. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614