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Sample records for morbus crohn med

  1. Morbus Coats

    PubMed Central

    Förl, B.; Schmack, I.; Grossniklaus, H.E.; Rohrschneider, K.

    2010-01-01

    Der fortgeschrittene Morbus Coats stellt im Kleinkindalter eine der schwierigsten Differenzialdiagnosen zum Retinoblastom dar. Wir beschreiben die klinischen und histologischen Befunde zweier Jungen im Alter von 9 und 21 Monaten mit einseitiger Leukokorie. Trotz umfassender Diagnostik mittels Narkoseuntersuchung, MRT und Ultraschall konnte ein Retinoblastom nicht sicher ausgeschlossen werden, und es erfolgte eine Enukleation. Histologisch wurde die Diagnose eines Morbus Coats gesichert. Da eine differenzialdiagnostische Abgrenzung zwischen Morbus Coats und Retinoblastom schwierig sein kann, halten wir in zweifelhaften Fällen auch angesichts der eingeschränkten Visusprognose und potenzieller Sekundärkomplikationen beim fortgeschrittenen Morbus Coats eine Enukleation für indiziert. PMID:18299842

  2. [Morbus Ormond (idiopatic retroperitoneal fibrosis)].

    PubMed

    Michaligová, A; Plank, L; Jezíková, A; Manka, V; Makovický, P; Mokán, M

    2011-05-01

    Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) is a rare condition characterized by the development of fibrotic tissue around the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries and often involves structures as ureters and the inferior vena cava. The age at onset of signs and symptoms is between 40-60 years, males predominane over females. In most cases the clinical manifestation is presented as compressive syndrom of ureters, therefore the first known cases were described by urologists. In this report we present the case of 37-years old male examinated for persistent fever about 38 degrees C and high inflammatory activity in spite of empiric antibiotic therapy. Positron emission tomography (PET) showed locality of high metabolic activity of fluorodeoxyglucose with maximum paraaortal left. Microscopic examination of extracted mass showed presence of fibrous and inflammatory components. With clinical presentation, imaging and histological findings we made out the diagnosis of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis--morbus Ormond. PMID:21695934

  3. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  4. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments to induce remission in adults with Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce and maintain remission in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce remission in adults with colonic Crohn's disease? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 93 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:21524318

  5. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:19450352

  6. Morbus-Locke's early essay on disease.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, J

    2000-01-01

    John Locke engaged in a systematic study of medicine from the late 1650's. In this period he acquainted himself with the three main competing natural philosophical theories of the time -Galenism, Paracelsianism and Mechanism. He was particularly interested in the work of Sennert, Helmont and Doyle. In 1666, just after the publication of Boyle's The Origine of Formes and Qualities, Locke wrote a short paper entitled Morbus. This paper gave Locke's own view of the nature of disease. Locke went out of his way to criticise Boyle's attempts to give mechanical explanations for biological phenomena. He endorsed Helmont's theory that disease was caused by "ferments" and "Archei" and re-introduced Galenic temperaments as factors of susceptibility in seminal diseases. Locke did not endorse a mechanical corpuscularianism at this stage in his career, when his contact with Boyle was most frequent. Consequently, Locke's espousal of the corpuscular philosophy in the Essay cannot be attributed to Locke's association with Boyle at this time. PMID:15025079

  7. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  8. Oral Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Bn; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, Gv

    2014-09-01

    'Crohn's disease' is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  9. Oral Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, BN; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, GV

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease’ is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  10. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication. Images Figure PMID:7567761

  11. MEDLI Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of MEDLI, the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument, which contains multiple sophisticated temperature sensors to measure atmospheric conditions and performance o...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Crohn׳s Disease.

    PubMed

    Westerland, Olwen; Griffin, Nyree

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has become established as the first-line imaging test for patients with Crohn׳s disease. This article reviews the role of MR enterography in assessing the extent and activity of Crohn׳s disease at baseline and on treatment follow-up. It discusses the role of diffusion-weighted imaging, and the recent introduction of MR scoring systems to facilitate noninvasive objective assessment of disease activity and cumulative bowel damage. PMID:27342892

  13. Management of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kammermeier, Jochen; Morris, Mary-Anne; Garrick, Vikki; Furman, Mark; Rodrigues, Astor; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is rapidly increasing in children so an up to date knowledge of diagnosis, investigation and management is essential. Exclusive enteral nutrition is the first line treatment for active disease. The vast majority of children will need immunosuppressant treatment and around 20% will need treatment with biologics. Recent guidelines have helped make best use of available therapies. PMID:26553907

  14. [From Morbus Sudeck to complex regional pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Kozlowski, K; Schumacher, T; Goerig, M; Beck, H

    2011-04-01

    Burning pain and autonomic disorders, such as change of skin color, hyperhidrosis, edema and stiffness in joints of extremities were first described in 1864 by Silas W. Mitchell. The German expression "Morbus Sudeck" takes its name from the surgeon Paul Sudeck from Hamburg who described spotty decalcification in x-rays in 1900. In the Anglo-Saxon world, the theory that the sympathetic nervous system was involved in the generation and sustention of these alterations was based on the observations of the French surgeon René Leriche and in 1846 James A. Evans introduced the expression sympathetic reflex dystrophy. As doubts arose that the sympathetic nervous system could not be the sole culprit, the descriptive phrase of complex regional pain syndrome was introduced to substitute for more than 60 synonyms focusing on the fact that the disease develops after minor trauma or nerve lesions and does not correlate with the severity of the trauma. Diagnosing this syndrome is still hampered by the fact that no specific laboratory or radiological marker has yet been identified. Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to therapy seem to be inevitable. Since Sudeck first described the disease, 110 years have passed. The underlying hypothesis and theories as well as the development during this time period are summarized. PMID:21350971

  15. Punctate palmoplantar keratoderma associated with morbus Bechterew and HLA B 27. A family study.

    PubMed

    Gamborg Nielsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Four patients in a family with punctate palmoplantar keratoderma (Buschke-Fischer) associated with Morbus Bechterew and HLA B 27 in 3 of the family members are reported. Without severe side effect, the proband was successfully treated with 50 mg etretinate per day for 6 weeks. PMID:2459882

  16. Pathogenesis of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyapati, Ray; Satsangi, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of Crohn's disease (CD), an archetypal common, complex disease, has now been achieved. Our ability to interrogate the deep complexities of the biological processes involved in maintaining gut mucosal homeostasis is a major over-riding factor underpinning this rapid progress. Key studies now offer many novel and expansive insights into the interacting roles of genetic susceptibility, immune function, and the gut microbiota in CD. Here, we provide overviews of these recent advances and new mechanistic themes, and address the challenges and prospects for translation from concept to clinic. PMID:26097717

  17. Pathogenesis of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Ray; Satsangi, Jack; Ho, Gwo-Tzer

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of Crohn's disease (CD), an archetypal common, complex disease, has now been achieved. Our ability to interrogate the deep complexities of the biological processes involved in maintaining gut mucosal homeostasis is a major over-riding factor underpinning this rapid progress. Key studies now offer many novel and expansive insights into the interacting roles of genetic susceptibility, immune function, and the gut microbiota in CD. Here, we provide overviews of these recent advances and new mechanistic themes, and address the challenges and prospects for translation from concept to clinic. PMID:26097717

  18. Rifaximin and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Prantera, Cosimo; Scribano, Maria Lia

    2013-11-14

    In a recent article, Longman and Swaminath analyzed our paper on the use of rifaximin in patients with moderately active Crohn's disease (CD). Here we report some considerations concerning their article. The exploratory post-hoc subgroup analysis showed that early-stage disease and, differently from that written by Longman and Swaminath, also colonic involvement seemed to be associated with a significant higher efficacy of rifaximin-EIR 800 mg twice daily. Early-stage disease is generally considered as the more easily treatable phase of CD, and the better response to rifaximin in Crohn's colitis is in accordance with the high concentration of bacteria in the colon. In addition, patients with C reactive protein level > 5 mg/L achieved remission more significantly than patients with normal values, thus suggesting that the symptoms were probably caused by inflammation instead of by non-inflammatory causes. We also analyze the role of rifaximin against gut bacteria and the clinical situations that could obtain the best results from antibiotics. PMID:24259983

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardon L, Mathew CG. Sequence variants in the autophagy gene IRGM and multiple other replicating loci contribute ... new susceptibility loci for Crohn disease and implicates autophagy in disease pathogenesis. Nat Genet. 2007 May;39( ...

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Panter, S J; Bramble, M G; Bell, J R

    2001-04-01

    We report a case of a 34-year-old woman, presenting initially with anaemia followed by sacro-iliac pain, and subsequently found to have necrotizing fasciitis complicating Crohn's disease where the organisms were introduced via a fistulous tract. It is perhaps surprising that this is not a more common complication of fistulating Crohn's disease, but we believe this is the first case report of this particular complication. PMID:11338075

  1. [Surgery in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Horisberger, K; Kienle, P

    2015-11-01

    Surgical treatment is primarily used to treat complications of Crohn's disease but also to improve the quality of life. An adequate preoperative preparation including improvement of the nutritional status, weaning off or stopping immunosuppressive medication and preoperative drainage of abscesses can decrease the complication rate. With the exception of when neoplasia is present, bowel-sparing techniques (e. g. strictureplasty and limited resection) are now standard, which has resulted in a low risk of short bowel syndrome. The laparoscopic approach is possible for most indications even in the case of recurrent disease, in primary ileocecal resection the laparoscopic approach has been shown to be superior to the open approach. None of the available techniques for anastomotic reconstruction of the bowels has been shown to be superior. A drainage seton is a good option to retain the quality of life in complex fistulas and reconstructive repair should only be considered when the rectum is free from inflammation. PMID:26537846

  2. Sweet's syndrome in association with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaz, A; Kramer, K; Kalish, R A

    2000-11-01

    A case of Sweet's syndrome in association with Crohn's disease in a young woman is reported. Sweet's syndrome is a rare extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:11060149

  3. [Colonic Crohn's disease complicated with peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Chaoui, F; Hellal, H; Balamane, M; Boudhane, M; Mikol, J; Masmoudi, A

    1990-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease and peripheral neuropathy is a rare event and the pathogenic factors often implicated are vitamin B12 deficiency or metronidazole treatment. We report a case of severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with Crohn's disease and unrelated to vitamin deficiency or metronidazole treatment. This represents a very rare extra-digestive manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:2125951

  4. [Focus on Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Klotz, Caroline; Dhooge, Marion; Oudjit, Ammar; Barret, Maximilien; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain; Abitbol, Vered

    2015-04-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that affects the entire digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. The inflammatory disease is transmural and may be complicated by abscesses, fistulas, strictures. Budesonide is used as first-line treatment for a first episode of ileitis. Thiopurines and methotrexate are used as immunosuppressive maintenance therapy. Anti-tumour necrosis factors (TNF) alpha therapy is used as induction and maintenance therapy in case of severe flares or corticodependence. Combination of immunosuppressive therapy and anti-TNF-alpha (combotherapy) prevents the appearance of specific anti drug antibodies. Combotherapy is used in case of severe disease. The goal of the treatment is to achieve clinical remission, endoscopic mucosal healing, and to prevent the occurrence of complications such as strictures, fistulas or abscesses. Anoperineal lesions are found in 10% of the patients at diagnosis. Surgical treatment is indicated for severe medical treatment-resistant patients or complications such as symptomatic stenosis, fistula or abscess unresponsive to medical treatment or immediately complicated. PMID:25622513

  5. Crohn's Disease: The First Visit

    PubMed Central

    Farraye, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    A Crohn's disease patient's first visit to a new practice is the optimal time to collect important clinical data and identify appropriate therapies. A methodologic approach to this visit is crucial. The focus of this visit should be on preparing the patient for the initiation of treatment, with particular attention to the necessary steps prior to the use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents. This paper is intended to provide recommendations and a checklist for the initial assessment and evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21528042

  6. Cutaneous Manifestations of Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joshua W; Swoger, Jason M; Grandinetti, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Awareness of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is increasing in dermatology and gastroenterology, with enhanced identification of entities that range from granulomatous diseases recapitulating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease to reactive conditions and associated dermatoses. In this review, the underlying etiopathology of Crohn disease is discussed, and how this mirrors certain skin manifestations that present in a subset of patients is explored. The array of extraintestinal manifestations that do not share a similar pathology, but which are often seen in association with inflammatory bowel disease, is also discussed. Treatment and pathogenetic mechanisms, where available, are discussed. PMID:26143422

  7. Perianal Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galandiuk, Susan; Kimberling, Jennifer; Al-Mishlab, Talib G.; Stromberg, Arnold J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Fissures, fistulas, abscesses, and anal canal stenosis are manifestations of perianal Crohn disease (CD). There are no known predictors of which patients will fail sphincter-sparing surgical therapy and ultimately require fecal diversion. Methods: Of 356 consecutive patients with CD, 24% (86) had perianal CD (age range, 14–83 years), and women were slightly more frequently affected. Clinical variables were examined for factors predictive of the need for permanent fecal diversion. Results: CD associated with perianal CD was limited to the small bowel and/or ileocolic area in 23% of patients; the remainder had colorectal CD. Eighty-six patients underwent 344 operations. Forty-two patients (49%) ultimately required permanent diversion; among them were 21 of 32 patients (66%) with anal stricture and 12 of 20women (60%) with rectovaginal fistula. Univariate analyses of clinical variables were performed with respect to need for permanent fecal diversion. Significant univariate predictors were the presence of colonic CD (P = 0.0045, odds ratio [OR] 5.4), avoidance of ileocolic resection (P = 0.0147, OR 0.4), and the presence of an anal stricture (P = 0.0165, OR 3.0). In multivariate logistic regression, the presence of colonic disease and anal canal stricture were predictors of permanent diversion. The OR associated with the risk of permanent diversion in the presence of colonic disease and in the absence of anal stricture was 10 (P = 0.0345). In the presence of both colonic disease and anal canal stenosis, the OR associated with permanent stoma was 33 (P = 0.0023). Conclusions: The management of perianal CD continues to be challenging. Roughly half of patients required permanent fecal diversion, which was even more frequently true for patients with colonic CD and anal stenosis. Recognizing these tendencies will assist both patients and surgeons in planning optimal treatment. PMID:15849515

  8. [Mediterranean lymphoma mimicking Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Jouini, S; Ayadi, K; Mokrani, A; Wachuku, E; Hmouda, H; Gourdie, R

    2001-07-01

    We report an uncommon localization of mediterranean lymphoma of the terminal ileum in a 28 year-old male patient. Ultrasound and Computed Tomography showed moderate regular and symmetrical intestinal wall thickening simulating Crohn's disease. We highlight the role of computed tomography in the diagnosis, staging and detection of complications. PMID:11507451

  9. Urolithiasis and crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Sandro Roberto da Silva; Mendonça, Tiago; Oliveira, Pedro; Oliveira, Tiago; Dias, José; Lopes, Tomé

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present an updated description of the relation between Crohn's disease (CD) and Urolithiasis. Patients and Methods: A literature search for English-language original and review articles was conducted in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases in the month of December 2014 for papers either published or e-published up to that date, addressing the association between CD and urolithiasis as its consequence. All articles published in English language were selected for screening based on the following search terms: “CD,” “renal calculus,” “IBD,” and “urolithiasis.” We restricted the publication dates to the last 15 years (2000–2014). Results: In total, 901 patients were included in this review of which 95 were identified as having CD and urolithiasis simultaneously, for a total of 10.5%. Average age was 45.07 years old, irrespective of gender. 28.6% of patients received some kind of medical intervention without any kind of surgical technique involved, 50% of patients were submitted to a surgical treatment, and the remaining 21.4% were submitted to a combination of surgical and medical treatment. Urolithiasis and pyelonephritis incidence ranged from 4% to 23% with a risk 10–100 times greater than the risk for general population or for patients with UC, being frequent in patients with ileostomy and multiple bowel resections. We found that urolithiasis occurred in 95 patients from a total of 901 patients with CD (10.5%); 61.81% in men and 38.19% in women. Stone disease seems to present approximately 4–7 years after the diagnosis of bowel disease and CaOx seems to be the main culprit. Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary

  10. Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's Research supports immediate drug treatment after bowel surgery for ... Crohn's disease patients will have relapses after bowel surgery, new research suggests. The study included 240 Crohn's disease patients ...

  11. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; de Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  12. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves de

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  13. Rectovaginal fistula in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J L; Stricker, J W; Schoetz, D J; Coller, J A; Veidenheimer, M C

    1989-10-01

    Rectovaginal fistulas in the setting of Crohn's disease present a difficult management dilemma. Some patients with this problem require proctocolectomy, yet other patients with minimal symptoms never require an operation for treatment of the rectovaginal fistula. For a small percentage of patients, local surgical repair of the fistula may be warranted. Since 1980, this study has attempted local repair in seven patients with symptomatic rectovaginal fistulas from Crohn's disease. Five patients underwent staged repair of the fistula. Closure of the colostomy was eventually possible in three of these patients. Two of the three patients have had no evidence of recurrence at followup in excess of two years. The third patient required an ileostomy for intestinal disease and had no recurrence of the fistula. Two patients underwent primary repair of the rectovaginal fistula without fecal diversion; in one of these patients, the fistula recurred ten days after operation, necessitating a diverting ileostomy. The other patient remains cured 26 months after repair. The results of this review indicate that in the setting of quiescent rectal disease, an attempt to repair the fistula can be expected to have a reasonable chance of success. The presence of a rectovaginal fistula in a patient with Crohn's disease does not mandate removal of the rectum. PMID:2791765

  14. Dysphagia in Crohn's disease: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, C; Netzer, P; Scheurer, U; Seibold, F

    2002-09-01

    Dysphagia is a rare manifestation in a patient with Crohn's disease. We report on the case of a patient with long-standing Crohn's disease who developed progressive dysphagia over 3 years. Endoscopy showed minimal distal oesophagitis with non-specific histological findings. Further investigation with cinematography, barium swallow and manometry established an achalasia-like motility disorder. Biopsies obtained from the oesophagus were non-specific. Balloon dilatation was performed. Initial success was followed by recurrent dysphagia. At repeat endoscopy, an oesophageal fistula was detected. An attempt at conservative medical management failed and oesophagectomy was successfully performed. Pathology results of the resected specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of oesophageal Crohn's disease. Even if achalasia is suspected in a Crohn's patient, it should be taken into consideration that the motility disorder could be the result of a transmural inflammation with or without fibrosis caused by Crohn's disease. PMID:12405254

  15. What is Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents As ... large intestine, leading to the anus. Who Gets Crohn's Disease? Both men and women can get Crohn's disease, ...

  16. [A giant field of death: medical and scientific controversies about the cholera morbus epidemic of 1855].

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciana Dos

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the cholera morbus epidemic that afflicted the province of Pernambuco, Brazil, in 1855, focusing on the medical and scientific controversies about how the disease spread, which split medical opinion into two camps: contagion and infection. Documents and reports produced by the Society of Medicine of Pernambuco and the General Public Health Board were analyzed, based on which it was possible to describe the official medical and sanitation program, involving engineers, scientists, and physicians, designed to plan a salubrious city - a model of civilization that combined redeveloping the urban space and disseminating new habits amongst the local people. It is essentially an exercise in observing a science and a society as they take shape. PMID:27276040

  17. Anorectal syphilis mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mesut; Memisoglu, Reşat; Aydin, Selda; Tabak, Omur; Mete, Bilgül; Memisoglu, Necat; Tabak, Fehmi

    2011-10-01

    Anorectal syphilis, one of the great masqueraders in medicine, can be difficult to diagnose not only because of its variable symptoms but also because it is hard to think of unless a detailed history about sexual preferences and practices, including homosexuality, has been gathered. With increasing acceptance of sexual activity in our culture, despite moral and religious issues, various forms of sex have led to many different clinical conditions of sexually transmitted diseases. In this report, we describe a rare case of primary anorectal syphilis with clinical, endoscopic and histologic features that was misdiagnosed as Crohn's disease. PMID:21437679

  18. Highly destructive perianal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A. K.; Udall, J.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports a case of highly destructive perianal Crohn's disease in a 15-year-old boy who presented with fecal impaction and incontinence. Both upper and lower gastrointestinal tract endoscopy were unrevealing. Treatment with intravenous prednisolone and broad-spectrum antibiotics supplemented by enteral feeding with an elemental diet resulted in prompt recovery. However, healing of his perianal lesions began only after a diverting colostomy. Awareness of this uncommon entity is important because prompt recognition can lead to early institution of appropriate treatment and avoid further morbidity. PMID:9727293

  19. Agglutinins to bacteria in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, N; Mayberry, J F; Rhodes, J; Neale, L; Munro, J; Wensinck, F; Lawson, G H; Rowland, A C; Berkhoff, G A; Barthold, S W

    1980-01-01

    Sera from patients with Crohn's disease were tested for antibodies against organisms which are thought to cause inflammatory bowel disease in animals, or have been implicated in human Crohn's disease. Control sera were collected from healthy individuals and patients with ulcerative colitis. Sera from Crohn's disease and controls failed to agglutinate Clostridium colinum or Campylobacter sputorum subsp. mucosalis and two strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (M26 and M27). Most of the sera agglutinated a Citrobacter freundii variant, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (M28) and Mycobacterium avium (M41) but Crohn's disease sera did not differ from controls. A complement fixation test against Chlamydia gave more positive reactions in patients with Crohn's disease and colitis than in healthy controls. There was a clear difference between the sera from patients with Crohn's disease and other sera, including ulcerative colitis, in agglutination tests with the commensal coccoid rods of the genera Eubacterium and Peptostreptococcus; in these tests 54% of sera from Crohn's disease were positive compared with 11% in ulcerative colitis and none of the sera from healthy controls. All the results were essentially negative with the exception of those from Eubacterium and Peptostreptococcus and these bacteria merit investigation. PMID:7429299

  20. Discs Large Homolog 5 (DLG5) Gene Polymorphism and Crohn's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of the Published Studies.

    PubMed

    Shafieyoun, Arezoo; Moraveji, Sharareh; Bashashati, Mohammad; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-05-01

    The real pathophysiology of Crohn's disease is unknown. The higher prevalence of Crohn's disease in Caucasian and Jewish ethnicities, as well as its familial aggregation and higher concordance among monozygotic twins, suggest some roles for genes in its development, clinical progression, and outcome. Recent original studies have indicated DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism as a risk factor for Crohn's disease. Meanwhile, the results of these studies are not consistent. We performed the current meta-analysis to understand whether there is any association between DLG5 gene polymorphism and the risk of Crohn's disease. PubMed was searched to find the case-control studies on DLG5 gene polymorphisms and Crohn's disease. This search compiled 65 articles and based on our criteria. 11 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The association between the DLG5 113G/A polymorphism and the risk of disease was assessed using odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Heterogeneity was evaluated based on I2 values.  Random and fixed-effect models were used when I2>50% and I2≤50%, respectively. Eleven studies with a total of 4648 cases and 5677 controls were pooled. Based on our meta-analysis, DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism both at genotypic and allelic levels were not associated with the risk of Crohn's disease. Pooled data indicated no significant association between DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism and the development of Crohn's disease. In order to achieve a superior conclusion, multicenter studies on larger number of patients are recommended. PMID:27309475

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, David H; Carucci, Laura R; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Dillman, Jonathan R; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Gage, Kenneth L; Noto, Richard B; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy; Lalani, Tasneem

    2015-10-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by episodic flares and times of remission. Underlying structural damage occurs progressively, with recurrent bouts of inflammation. The diagnosis and management of this disease process is dependent on several clinical, laboratory, imaging, endoscopic, and histologic factors. In recent years, with the maturation of CT enterography, and MR enterography, imaging has played an increasingly important role in relation to Crohn Disease. In addition to these specialized examination modalities, ultrasound and routine CT have potential uses. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and nuclear medicine may be less beneficial depending on the clinical scenario. The imaging modality best suited to evaluating this disease may change, depending on the target population, severity of presentation, and specific clinical situation. This document presents seven clinical scenarios (variants) in both the adult and pediatric populations and rates the appropriateness of the available imaging options. They are summarized in a consolidated table, and the underlying rationale and supporting literature are presented in the accompanying narrative. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26435118

  2. Food intolerance and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M; Teahon, K; Levi, A J; Bjarnason, I

    1993-01-01

    It has been claimed that prolonged remissions of Crohn's disease can be achieved after enteral or parenteral nutrition, by identifying and excluding foods that exacerbate a patient's symptoms. The occurrence of food intolerances were assessed after induction of remission with elemental diet in 42 eligible patients to whom single foods were introduced over five days. Suspect foods were reinvestigated with open and if possible, double blind rechallenge. Fourteen patients (33%) dropped out of the study because of relapse of disease unrelated to food (n = 8) or because of difficulties in complying with the regimen (n = 6). Twenty (48%) of the patients identified food sensitivities whereas eight (19%) did not. Seventeen of the patients who identified food sensitivities had an open rechallenge with recurrence of symptoms in 10 (24% of total). Food sensitivity was confirmed in three patients on double blind challenge. There was no significant difference in the duration of remission between patients who did or did not identify food sensitivities. During the study three cases of intolerance to the formula diet, and one of severe salicylate sensitivity were encountered. In conclusion food sensitivities are evident after treatment of Crohn's disease with elemental diet but are variable, often do not persist, and are of insufficient importance to warrant putting all patients through elimination diets. PMID:8314511

  3. Cell therapy of refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L; Ruchkina, I N; Konoplyannikov, A G

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed medium-term efficiency and safety of biological therapy of Crohn's disease, in particular transplantation of allogenic mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and anticytokine therapy with selective immunosuppressive agents. It was found that both methods of biological therapy of refractory Crohn's disease resulted in clinical and in some cases endoscopic remission. In most cases, clinical remission was maintained without steroid hormone therapy. Thus, both methods produce comparable clinical results. It was concluded that transplantation of mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells could be considered as a promising method in the therapy of refractory Crohn's disease comparable by its efficiency with infliximab therapy. PMID:24319711

  4. Is Crohn's disease due to defective immunity?

    PubMed Central

    Korzenik, J R

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease is currently undergoing a reassessment. The concept of this disease as a primary T cell disorder is being questioned, with a new emphasis on the role of innate immunity in initiating early events and in perpetuating the inflammatory state. Crohn's disease has been proposed instead to result from impaired innate immunity, encompassing the mucosal barrier and cellular elements including neutrophils and macrophages. Recent advances in genetics, functional studies on innate immunity and therapeutic trials on patients with Crohn's disease have lent support to this evolving hypothesis. PMID:17172582

  5. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G.; Arastu, Sanaa

    2016-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough. PMID:27144198

  6. Crohn`s disease. Increasing trend in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A; Azzam, Nahlah A

    2013-11-01

    We attempted, through systematic review to explore the epidemiology and risk factors of Crohn's disease (CD) with special attention to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). We selected articles that contained population-based, epidemiological, and clinical character studies of CD. We collected data concerned with the prevalence, demographic features, and the possible etiology of CD that might explain its emergence in KSA. The prevalence of CD in Western countries ranged between 11-43/100,000 with flawless evidence of CD prevalence emerging in previously low incidence areas like Asia. Prevalence in KSA has markedly increased over the last 3 decades. Combined ileal and colonic involvement was the most frequently affected site. Diet, smoking, drugs, and westernization of life are assumed to contribute to the pathogenesis. There is convincing evidence of CD emerging in Asia, including KSA. Westernization of lifestyle and smoking is probably the major contributing factors. Genetic studies are warranted. PMID:24252887

  7. Crohn's disease: the cold chain hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Alastair; Kalantzis, Tommy

    2006-07-01

    A recent published hypothesis proposed that Crohn's disease was provoked by infantile exposure to micro-organisms that can survive refrigerator temperature. A case-control study was accordingly devised. The mean age at first fridge was 5.6 years amongst 88 patients with Crohn's disease, 5.5 years in 88 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 7.6 years in 88 controls, but a majority of individuals had always been exposed to refrigerated food. Differences were more striking in subjects aged above the median (10.3, 10.9 and 15.0 years for Crohn's disease, UC and controls, respectively). This support for the hypothesis reached statistical significance for those with Crohn's disease compared to the controls (p=0.045). PMID:16059694

  8. [Sweet syndrome associated with Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Ly, S; Beylot-Barry, M; Beyssac, R; Doutre, M S; Beylot, C

    1995-01-01

    The association of Sweet's syndrome and Crohn's disease is rare. We report a new case of such association. A 45 year-old woman developed a diarrhea, fever, and skin lesions consistent with a presumptive diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome. Crohn's disease was also diagnosed. Oral prednisone, associated with mesalazine, effected improvement of both cutaneous lesions and bowel disease. The ten cases of the literature and ours show that Sweet's syndrome may occur during an acute phase of Crohn's disease. Most of the time, Crohn's disease has already been diagnosed. However, this was not so with our patient, wherein lies the originality of our case. A general corticotherapy is the preferred course of treatment. PMID:8570958

  9. Evaluation for postoperative recurrence of Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Swoger, Jason M; Regueiro, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Disease recurrence following resective surgery for Crohn disease remains a challenging clinical problem, and more studies are needed to better define risk stratification and treatment recommendations in the postoperative setting. Endoscopy remains the gold standard for the assessment of postoperative disease recurrence, and all Crohn disease patients who undergo surgery should undergo ileocolonoscopy within 6 to 12 months of surgery. The degree of endoscopic recurrence in the neoterminal ileum during this procedure provides prognostic information regarding the severity of the future disease course. WCE, MRE, and SICUS are all promising noninvasive modalities to assess for postoperative Crohn disease activity. However, further studies are needed to better define scoring systems, operating characteristics and variability, and prognostic data for each of these modalities. In patients at risk for early disease recurrence, more aggressive prophylactic therapy should be considered, in hopes of delivering true “top-down” therapy that may offer maximum impact in altering the natural history of Crohn disease. PMID:22500519

  10. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  11. European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation Topical Review on Prediction, Diagnosis and Management of Fibrostenosing Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Florian; Latella, Giovanni; Magro, Fernando; Yuksel, Elif S; Higgins, Peter D R; Di Sabatino, Antonio; de Bruyn, Jessica R; Rimola, Jordi; Brito, Jorge; Bettenworth, Dominik; van Assche, Gert; Bemelman, Willem; d'Hoore, Andre; Pellino, Gianluca; Dignass, Axel U

    2016-08-01

    This ECCO topical review of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] focused on prediction, diagnosis, and management of fibrostenosing Crohn's disease [CD]. The objective was to achieve evidence-supported, expert consensus that provides guidance for clinical practice. PMID:26928961

  12. Morbus sacer in Africa: some religious aspects of epilepsy in traditional cultures.

    PubMed

    Jilek-Aall, L

    1999-03-01

    Epilepsy when manifested as grand mal seizure provokes strong and ambivalent feelings in those witnessing it. Terms such as morbus sacer, denoting both a sacred and demoniac condition, or folk names indicating divine punishment, have expressed these feelings in European societies from antiquity to the Middle Ages and beyond. An atmosphere of fear, shame and mysticism surrounds epilepsy even in our days in many non-Western and also in Western cultures. In the course of work and studies in Tanzania, where I organized the Mahenge Clinic for Epilepsy in 1960, and in other parts of Africa, I found that epilepsy is conceived of as an "African'' affliction, a manifestation of supernatural forces that makes it difficult to reach epilepsy sufferers with modern medical treatment. Epilepsy is traditionally looked on as caused by ancestral spirits or attributed to possession by evil spirits. It is also thought to be due to witchcraft, and "poisoning," and often taken to be contagious. Epilepsy may, under Christian missionary teaching, have come to be considered as due to demoniac possession or divine punishment for sins, in accordance with biblical examples. In many parts of Africa, syncretic amalgamation of indigenous traditions with Judeo-Christian doctrines influenced popular attitudes toward epilepsy. We demonstrated that persistent efforts at health education in the context of organized treatment of epilepsy can result in a change of popular notions about epilepsy and consequently lead to significant improvement in the quality of life of epilepsy sufferers. PMID:10080524

  13. [Crohn's disease and cancer risk. Incidence/prevalence, clinical characteristics, and potential prevention strategies].

    PubMed

    Allgayer, Hubert; Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2007-09-15

    Epidemiologic data concerning the risk for colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis are based on a variety of large and well-conducted cohort studies. Guidelines for tumor prevention have been published by the German Gastroenterology Society (DGVS) in 2004. By contrast, the risk constellations in Crohn's disease are less clear and guidelines are lacking. Based on a recent literature search (PubMed March 2007), the published data predominantly expressed as relative risk and/or standardized incidence/mortality ratio are critically reviewed with recommendations for tumor prevention strategies based on individual risk constellations. PMID:17879011

  14. Living with Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Living with Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Photo ... Why have you chosen to speak out about Crohn's disease? For many years I really didn't talk ...

  15. Thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis: an unusual complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Olushola; Mayooran, Nithiananthan; Iqbal, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis complicating Crohn's disease is a rare occurrence and mostly occurred in patients with Crohn's disease complicated by an abscess or fistulising disease. We report a case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis, occurring in a refractory Crohn's disease without contiguous abscess or fistula with the bowel. PMID:24916975

  16. Recurrent Sweet's syndrome in reactivated Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Actis, G C; Lagget, M; Ciancio, A; Rocca, G; Tomasini, C; Puiatti, P; Verme, G

    1995-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman developed an acute febrile dermatosis on two occasions concurrently with recurrent Crohn's disease of the colon. Based on the presence of painful erythematous plaques on both hands and forearms, on the leukocytosis with excess bands in peripheral blood, on the histology showing dermal infiltration by mature granulocytes, and on the prompt response to steroids, the diagnosis was made of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease. Sweet's syndrome is thought to be a hypersensitivity reaction that leads to parainflammatory (e.g., infections, autoimmune disorders, vaccinations) and paraneoplastic (myeloproliferative disorders, solid malignancy) associations, with a frequency of 10-30%. The association of Sweet's syndrome with Crohn's disease is very rare, but the gastroenterologist should readily differentiate it; it is important to be aware that such patients may have a nonspecific elevated activity index owing to the underlying dermatosis. PMID:8583109

  17. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A M E G; Christiaans, Maarten H L; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  18. Optimizing biological therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter László

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, including both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents or lose response over time. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring has gained a major role in identifying the mechanism and management of loss of response. The aim of this review article is to summarize the predictors of efficacy and outcomes, the different mechanisms of anti-TNF/biological failure in Crohn's disease and identify strategies to optimize biological treatment. PMID:26471077

  19. Successful noninvasive ventilation and enzyme replacement therapy in an adult patient with morbus hunter.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, M; Litterst, P

    2012-01-01

    M. Hunter is characterized by an accumulation of mucopolysaccharides in cells, blood, and connective tissue as a consequence of a deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Unlike enzyme replacement therapy with idursulfase in children, there is limited long-term experience in adult patients with Morbus Hunter.The case presented here describes the development of a man born in 1971 who was admitted to Hemer Lung Clinic in 2005 with severe obstructive sleep apnea, pulmonary functional impairment, and ventilatory failure (FEV 1: 0.8 L, VC: 1.0 L; pO(2): 52 mmHg; pCO(2): 81 mmHg, 6 MWT: 100 m). Initially, the patient received symptomatic treatment with noninvasive ventilation, which achieved a considerable improvement in pulmonary function and a normalization of blood gasses. Since February 2008, the patient received additional enzyme replacement therapy with idursulfase, which resulted in a further significant functional improvement (FEV1: 1.6; VC: 2.3 L; VO(2)max: 1,350 mL or 28.1 mL/kg body weight), in a normalization of prior elevated pulmonary artery pressures and also in impressive changes in the physiognomy and joint mobility. In November 2010, the polysomnography and nocturnal blood gas analysis without NIV showed only a mild obstructive sleep-related breathing disorder with no sign of hypoventilation. Therapy was changed to nocturnal CPAP therapy with a constant pressure of 6 cm H(2)O. Additional administration of oxygen was not required. With this therapy, the patient has been asymptomatic up to September 2011.Adult Hunter patients also benefit from enzyme replacement therapy and, in restrictive ventilatory defects with hypoventilation, from symptomatic therapy with noninvasive ventilation. PMID:23430920

  20. Growth in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cezard, J P; Touati, G; Alberti, C; Hugot, J P; Brinon, C; Czernichow, P

    2002-01-01

    Growth failure (GF) is one of the major complications affecting children with inflammatory bowel disease. The faltering is temporary in 40-50% of cases and prolonged in 10-20% in Crohn's disease (CD). Such failure is rare in children with ulcerative colitis (5%). This complication is often associated with retarded bone development and delayed onset of sexual maturation. The delayed linear growth has a variety of causes including insufficient intake due to anorexia and the inflammatory process with increased energy and protein expenditure. Other factors are increased intestinal loss, secondary hypopituitarism and treatment with steroids. Therapeutic strategies of CD in children have changed this last decade by introducing new therapeutic agents such as topic steroids, immunosuppressors, anti-TNF (antibody and notably in children enteral nutrition which has shown its efficacy in inducing remissions of active CD, restoring nutritional status and stimulation of linear growth. The results of a recent prospective multicentric study over 2 years in 82 CD show that severe GF (-2 SD) is initially present in 15% (n = 12), among them 11 remain < -2SD after 2 years of follow-up. Six patients who were on the normal range initially increased their GF during the follow-up (< -2SD) (total 21% < -2SD (n = 17) at 2 years). At inclusion in this group there was no difference in growth velocity, used of steroids, enteral nutrition or severity of CD as compared to the group with no GF. It suggests that new treatment strategy should be developed in the future for this specific complication of paediatric CD. PMID:12373007

  1. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Crohn's Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Crohn's Disease URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ...

  3. Crohn's disease: the cold chain hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Alberti, Corinne; Berrebi, Dominique; Bingen, Edouard; Cézard, Jean-Pierre

    2003-12-13

    Crohn's disease is the result of an abnormal immune response of the gut mucosa triggered by one or more environmental risk factors in people with predisposing gene variations, including CARD15 mutations. Epidemiological data allow assessment of familial environmental risk factors related to western lifestyle, diet, bacteria, and domestic hygiene. All findings point to refrigeration as a potential risk factor for Crohn's disease. Furthermore, cold-chain development paralleled the outbreak of Crohn's disease during the 20th century. The cold chain hypothesis suggests that psychrotrophic bacteria such as Yersinia spp and Listeria spp contribute to the disease. These bacteria have been identified in Crohn's disease lesions and we discuss their pathogenic properties with respect to our knowledge of the disease. From a molecular perspective, we postulate that the disease is a result of a defect in host recognition by pathogenic bacterial components that usually escape the immune response (eg, Yop molecules), which results in an excessive host response to these bacteria. PMID:14683664

  4. Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... How old were you when you first experienced the symptoms that would later be diagnosed as Crohn's ...

  5. The MedDRA paradox.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Gary H

    2008-01-01

    MedDRA (the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Terminology) is a controlled vocabulary widely used as a medical coding scheme. However, MedDRA's characterization of its structural hierarchy exhibits some confusing and paradoxical features. The goal of this paper is to examine these features, determine whether there is a coherent view of the MedDRA hierarchy that emerges, and explore what lessons are to be learned from this for using MedDRA and similar terminologies in a broad medical informatics context that includes relations among multiple disparate terminologies, thesauri, and ontologies. PMID:18998828

  6. Treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease with certolizumab.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Camp, Brendan; Adhami, Katayun; Jacob, Vinita; Magro, Cynthia; Wildman, Horatio

    2015-11-01

    Metastatic Crohn disease is a rare cutaneous manifestation of Crohn disease characterized by granulomatous lesions discontinuous with the diseased areas of the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman with history of Crohn disease who was admitted for treatment of cellulitis after presenting with a tender erythematous plaque of the left calf. Microbiological tests including tissue cultures were negative. A skin biopsy revealed granulomatous dermatitis consistent with metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease. Owing to concomitant perianal fistulas and abscesses and prior infusion reaction to infliximab, the patient was treated with certolizumab, a pegylated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor combined with methotrexate resulting in complete resolution of the skin lesion. This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing this rare skin manifestation of Crohn disease and adds certolizumab as one of TNF inhibitors useful in the treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease. PMID:26632928

  7. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature.

  8. Crohn's and colitis in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Day, Andrew S; Ledder, Oren; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2012-11-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis can be grouped as the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These conditions have become increasingly common in recent years, including in children and young people. Although much is known about aspects of the pathogenesis of these diseases, the precise aetiology is not yet understood, and there remains no cure. Recent data has illustrated the importance of a number of genes-several of these are important in the onset of IBD in early life, including in infancy. Pain, diarrhoea and weight loss are typical symptoms of paediatric Crohn's disease whereas bloody diarrhoea is more typical of colitis in children. However, atypical symptoms may occur in both conditions: these include isolated impairment of linear growth or presentation with extra-intestinal manifestations such as erythema nodosum. Growth and nutrition are commonly compromised at diagnosis in both Crohn's disease and colitis. Consideration of possible IBD and completion of appropriate investigations are essential to ensure prompt diagnosis, thereby avoiding the consequences of diagnostic delay. Patterns of disease including location and progression of IBD in childhood differ substantially from adult-onset disease. Various treatment options are available for children and adolescents with IBD. Exclusive enteral nutrition plays a central role in the induction of remission of active Crohn's disease. Medical and surgical therapies need to considered within the context of a growing and developing child. The overall management of these chronic conditions in children should include multi-disciplinary expertise, with focus upon maintaining control of gut inflammation, optimising nutrition, growth and quality of life, whilst preventing disease or treatment-related complications. PMID:23139601

  9. Coexistent Crohn's disease and sigmoid diverticulosis.

    PubMed Central

    McCue, J.; Coppen, M. J.; Rasbridge, S. A.; Lock, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports six patients with a diagnosis of diverticular disease with associated localized Crohn's colitis who were all treated by segmental resection. Two patients died in the post-operative period from disease unrelated to their colonic pathology. The remaining four patients remain well, show no signs of recurrent disease and have required no further surgery. The behaviour and significance of the two conditions occurring in the same patient is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2608592

  10. MSL Launches With MEDLI Sensors

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA engineers Michelle Munk and David Way explain the MEDLI -- Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation -- package on the MSL aeroshell that will measure the heatin...

  11. Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents During the early stages of ... Clinical Research Trials: www.clinicaltrials.gov search "Crohn's disease" Crohns and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA): ... Issue: Volume 10 Number 4 Page 6-7

  12. Crohn's Disease of the Ileoanal Pouch.

    PubMed

    Lightner, Amy L; Pemberton, John H; Loftus, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) of the pouch is an increasingly recognized diagnosis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. This post-ileal pouch-anal anastomosis diagnosis in conjunction with pouchitis remains the leading reason for pouch excision. Unfortunately, CD of the pouch remains a difficult diagnosis with lack of a uniform definition largely because of its similarity to common postoperative pouch complications, including pouchitis, abscess formation, or stricture at the anastomosis. Once diagnosed, treatment algorithms largely include multimodal therapy including biologics. This review focuses on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for CD of the pouch, a postoperative de novo diagnosis of CD. PMID:27057684

  13. The MedCLIVAR Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Piero; Medclivar Sc, The

    2014-05-01

    MedCLIVAR serves as a scientific network to promote interaction among different scientific disciplines and to develop a multidisciplinary vision of the evolution of the Mediterranean climate through studies that integrate atmospheric, marine, and terrestrial climate components at time scales ranging from paleoreconstructions to future climate scenarios. The network deals with scientific issues including past climate variability; connections between the Mediterranean and global climate; the Mediterranean Sea circulation and sea level; feedbacks on the global climate system; and regional responses to greenhouse gas, air pollution, and aerosols. The MedCLIVAR initiative was proposed at the 2003 European Geosciences Union assembly in Nice, France. In 2005, it was endorsed by the International Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) office. Subsequently, the MedCLIVAR Research Network Project was formally approved by the European Science Foundation and launched in May 2006 for a five year duration. Now MedCLIVAR is continuing with self supporting initiatives, such as the third MedCLIVAR conference, which will be held in June 2014 in Ankara (Turkey) , the publication of a special issue of Regional Environmental Change devoted to the climate of the Mediterranean region, and a newsletter, which is published every six months. More information available in Lionello, P., Gacic, M., Gomis, D., Garcia-Herrera, R., Giorgi, F., Planton, S., Trigo, R., (...), Xoplaki, E. (2012) Program focuses on climate of the Mediterranean region, Eos Trans. AGU 93:105-106

  14. Course and prognosis of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Truelove, S C; Pena, A S

    1976-01-01

    During the period 1938-70 there were 303 patients at the Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, diagnosed as suffering from Crohn's disease. Of these, 82 have been excluded, leaving 221 with a firm diagnosis. These patients have been divided into 'new cases', in which the disease was diagnosed at the Radcliffe Infirmary, and 'referred cases' in which the diagnosis was already made at the time of referral. In this series, there were three main sites of involvement: small intestinal, large intestinal, and both small and large intestinal. Ileocolitis was the commonest anatomical distribution. The disease showed progression to new, sites in a considerable number of the patients during the period under study. There was a fivefold increase of new cases between the first and third decades covered by the study and this applied equally to patients presenting as an acute abdomen, which supports the idea that the disease is truly increasing. Survival curves have been plotted and compared with expected survival curves. In terms of mortality, Crohn's disease emerges as a disease which becomes progressively more dangerous as the years go by, which is in sharp contrast with the findings in ulcerative colitis in which the main risk of dying is in the early years. PMID:1269986

  15. Vulvoperineal Crohn's disease: response to metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Aida; Ezzine-Sebai, Nadia; Fazaa, Becima; Zeglaoui, Faten; Zermani, Rachida; Kamoun, Mohamed Ridha

    2010-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman with a medical history of chronic juvenile arthritis with bilateral prosthetic hips presented with vulvoperineal ulcerations of 3 years' duration. There was no diarrhea or recent weight loss. Cutaneous examination showed asymmetrical vulvar edema of the labia minora and labia majora with deep and linear ulcerations having verrucous borders located on the inguinocrural regions and the buttocks fold (Figure 1). On physical examination there was bilateral limited mobilization of the hips. A biopsy specimen was taken from the border of the vulvar ulceration and histologic examination showed under a hyperplasic epidermis an epithelioid granuloma with multinucleated giant cells of the dermis without caseification. Laboratory analyses and results from chest x-ray were normal. Results for Koch bacilla in the spittle, microbiologic studies (staining for microorganisms and cultures), and tuberculin intradermoreaction were negative. There was no Crohn's disease aspect on colonoscopy, and there was normal small bowel enterography. Systematic intestinal biopsies were also with normal aspect. Based on the clinical data and granulomatous histologic characteristics, the diagnosis of metastatic Crohn's disease without digestive involvement was obtained. The patient was started on metronidazole 1 g/d. After 6 months of treatment, there was an almost-complete healing of ulcerations (Figure 2). Treatment was well-tolerated. PMID:21137614

  16. A case of phrynoderma in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Gabriela; Cornejo, Christine; McMahon, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Phrynoderma is a type of follicular hyperkeratosis associated with nutritional deficiencies. It is rarely seen in developed countries, although cases have been reported in patients with severe malnutrition or malabsorption secondary to various causes. This report describes a 19-year-old patient with poorly controlled Crohn's disease and malnutrition who developed the characteristic hyperkeratotic papules and plaques on his trunk and extremities in the setting of low serum vitamin A levels. To our knowledge, there are no reports of phrynoderma associated with Crohn's disease. It is likely that our patient's low vitamin A level and subsequent phrynoderma was the result of increased Crohn's disease activity and malnutrition. PMID:24274972

  17. Treatment of Crohn's disease recurrence after ileoanal anastomosis by azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Berrebi, W; Chaussade, S; Bruhl, A L; Pariente, A; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1993-08-01

    Ileoanal anastomosis is a surgical procedure performed in patients with ulcerative colitis. In a small number of patients operated on for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease occurs in the reservoir, mimicking pouchitis, and may lead to pouch excision and to a permanent terminal ileostomy. Two patients with recurrent Crohn's disease in the reservoir after ileoanal anastomosis were treated with azathioprine for 18 and 24 months, respectively. Azathioprine induced a complete clinical and endoscopic remission. These two observations suggested that immunosuppressive drugs were a good option for permanent ileostomy in cases of recurrence of Crohn's disease in the reservoir after ileoanal anastomosis. PMID:8344116

  18. Sweet's syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Carpels, W; Mattelaer, C; Geboes, K; Coremans, G; Tack, J

    1999-01-01

    Crohn's disease is rarely associated with Sweet's syndrome. We report a 32-year old woman who presented with diarrhea, fever and disseminated erythematous plaques on the arms and the trunk. After colonoscopy with biopsies, Crohn's disease was diagnosed. Skin biopsy showed a dense infiltration of neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, establishing also the diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome. Crohn's disease is one of several systemic diseases that may underlie Sweet's syndrome. Treatment with methylprednisolone resulted in a rapid improvement of both gastro-intestinal symptoms and skin lesions. PMID:10547905

  19. A Practical Approach to Preventing Postoperative Recurrence in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hashash, Jana G; Regueiro, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence remains common, and preventing additional surgery remains a challenge. A critical step to postoperative management of Crohn's disease is being able to identify patients who should receive immediate postoperative therapy from the patients who can wait for recurrence prior to starting medications. All patients, regardless of their risk for recurrence, are advised to undergo a colonoscopy at 6 to 12 months after surgery to evaluate for endoscopic evidence of Crohn's disease. Further management of patients depends on symptoms and the presence or absence of endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27086006

  20. Overview of the MEDLI Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazarik, Michael J.; Little, Alan; Cheatwood, F. Neil; Wright, Michael J.; Herath, Jeff A.; Martinez, Edward R.; Munk, Michelle; Novak, Frank J.; Wright, Henry S.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) Project s objectives are to measure aerothermal environments, sub-surface heatshield material response, vehicle orientation, and atmospheric density for the atmospheric entry and descent phases of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle. The flight science objectives of MEDLI directly address the largest uncertainties in the ability to design and validate a robust Mars entry system, including aerothermal, aerodynamic and atmosphere models, and thermal protection system (TPS) design. The instrumentation suite will be installed in the heatshield of the MSL entry vehicle. The acquired data will support future Mars entry and aerocapture missions by providing measured atmospheric data to validate Mars atmosphere models and clarify the design margins for future Mars missions. MEDLI thermocouple and recession sensor data will significantly improve the understanding of aeroheating and TPS performance uncertainties for future missions. MEDLI pressure data will permit more accurate trajectory reconstruction, as well as separation of aerodynamic and atmospheric uncertainties in the hypersonic and supersonic regimes. This paper provides an overview of the project including the instrumentation design, system architecture, and expected measurement response.

  1. Overview of the MEDLI Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazarik, Michael J.; Hwang, Helen; Little, Alan; Cheatwood, Neil; Wright, Michael; Herath, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) Project's objectives are to measure aerothermal environments, sub-surface heatshield material response, vehicle orientation, and atmospheric density for the atmospheric entry and descent phases of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle. The flight science objectives of MEDLI directly address the largest uncertainties in the ability to design and validate a robust Mars entry system, including aerothermal, aerodynamic and atmosphere models, and thermal protection system (TPS) design. The instrumentation suite will be installed in the heatshield of the MSL entry vehicle. The acquired data will support future Mars entry and aerocapture missions by providing measured atmospheric data to validate Mars atmosphere models and clarify the design margins for future Mars missions. MEDLI thermocouple and recession sensor data will significantly improve the understanding of aeroheating and TPS performance uncertainties for future missions. MEDLI pressure data will permit more accurate trajectory reconstruction, as well as separation of aerodynamic and atmospheric uncertainties in the hypersonic and supersonic regimes. This paper provides an overview of the project including the instrumentation design, system architecture, and expected measurement response.

  2. Pediatric Magnetic Resonance Enterography: Focused on Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Mi; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disease of the intestines characterized by frequent relapse and remission. It often develops in children and adolescents, who are vulnerable to repeated exposure to ionizing radiations. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is an increasingly important radiation-free imaging modality that is used to evaluate pediatric patients with Crohn's disease. MRE can evaluate extraluminal and extraintestinal abnormalities as well as the status of the bowel wall. In addition, MRE has an advantage in the evaluation of the small bowel involvement. MRE can be used for the initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease, and can aid in the assessment of disease activity and complications such as penetrating and fibrostenotic diseases. The aims of this article are to review the MRE technique for obtaining diagnostic and high-quality images and to discuss interpretations of imaging findings in patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:26473134

  3. Evolving roles of cross-sectional imaging in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Magarotto, Andrea; Orlando, Stefania; Coletta, Marina; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella; Caprioli, Flavio

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of cross-sectional imaging techniques for the clinical management of Crohn's disease patients has steadily grown over the recent years, thanks to a series of technological advances, including the evolution of contrast media for magnetic resonance, computed tomography and bowel ultrasound. This has resulted in a continuous improvement of diagnostic accuracy and capability to detect Crohn's disease-related complications. Additionally, a progressive widening of indications for cross-sectional imaging in Crohn's disease has been put forward, thus leading to hypothesize that in the near future imaging techniques can increasingly complement endoscopy in most clinical settings, including the grading of disease activity and the assessment of mucosal healing or Crohn's disease post-surgical recurrence. PMID:27338853

  4. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in patient with Crohn's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-05-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  5. Oophorovesicular-colonic fistula: a rare complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S D; Gray, R R; Cadesky, K I; Mackenzie, R L

    1988-11-01

    Salpingitis and vesicular fistulas are rare complications of Crohn's disease. In this report the authors describe a case of oophorovesicular-colonic fistula secondary to Crohn's disease. The patient presented with bleeding from the bladder during menstruation, fecaluria and pneumaturia. A single-stage left salpingo-oophorectomy, sigmoid resection and repair of the fistula were carried out, with complete resolution of symptoms and preservation of fertility potential. PMID:3179852

  6. Oral status in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sundh, B; Hultén, L

    1982-01-01

    The dental status in a randomly selected group of patients with Crohn's disease was assessed and compared with that in a normal population. The results showed evidence that these patients in spite of an ordinary oral hygiene standard have a high caries frequency and activity, and that dental caries was particularly common in those subjected to extensive small bowel resection. Unusual dietary habits and malabsorption may probably be the main cause of the condition, although neglect of oral hygiene during active phases of the disease might also be important. Increased attention has to be directed towards this problem. A strict oral hygiene should be recommended and the regular use of fluoride treatment appears to be justified in such a high risk group of patients. PMID:7158213

  7. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease tissue cytotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, L.C.; Gitnick, G.

    1982-06-01

    Bowel-wall tissue filtrates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease produce cytopathic effects in tissue culture. The cytopathic effects inducers have been reported to have the characteristics of a small RNA virus. Clostridium difficile toxin also produces cytopathic effects and has been found in the stools of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The present study concerns the further characterization of the cytopathic inducers in tissues of inflammatory bowel disease patients. It was found that they are nonsedimentable at 148,000 g for 2 h and resistant to inactivation by UV light. They are proteins that are distinct from C. difficile toxin and are unique cytotoxins which are associated with the early cytopathic effects observed in Riff-free chick embryo and rabbit ileum cell cultures. These results suggest that the early cytopathic effects previously described are not produced by a virus. They do not explain the delayed cytopathic effects seen in rabbit ileum or WI-38 cells.

  8. The oral cavity in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Pittock, S; Drumm, B; Fleming, P; McDermott, M; Imrie, C; Flint, S; Bourke, B

    2001-05-01

    We assessed the utility of expert oral examination as a part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected Crohn's disease. Of 45 patients with newly diagnosed CD, 25 had been examined by a dentist. Twelve (48%) of these had oral CD lesions. Mucosal tags constituted the most frequent form of oral lesion (8/12). Of 8 oral biopsy specimens, 6 (75%) contained non-caseating granulomas. Patients with oral CD had more oral symptoms, presented for diagnosis sooner, and were more likely to have other upper gastrointestinal inflammation than those without oral lesions. Oral manifestations of CD are common in children; therefore, expert oral examination may be useful during diagnostic evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:11343060

  9. [Crohn's disease. Clinical and therapeutical considerations].

    PubMed

    Paşalega, M; Calotă, F; Paraliov, T; Meşină, C; Vîlcea, D; Tomescu, P; Pănuş, A; Tenea, T; Mirea, C; Traşcă, E; Ene, D; Vasile, I

    2005-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory condition of the intestinal tract of unknown etiology. Most commonly the disease affects the small bowel, the colon and the rectum. The acute and aggressive forms can evolve fast, mimicking an acute surgical illness, requiring surgical intervention in emergency. Surgical therapeutical option, in this condition, must be determined strictly by establishing a correct intraoperative diagnosis, through macroscopic features and histologic evidence. Because it is an incurable disease with variable evolution, marked by recurrence, that involves repeated surgical intervention, the surgical treatment (often resection), must be most conservative from the small bowel. We present 3 cases of surgical interventions with emergency characteristics (bowel obstruction through fitobezoar, colonic tumors obstruction of colon splenic angle, urachal infected tumors). In these cases the diagnosis was established intraoperatively and the surgical intervention was adapted to the particular cases. PMID:16372678

  10. Overview of biologic therapy for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    Therapy for Crohn's disease (CD) is evolving at breakneck speed. Biologic therapies are assuming ever more important roles in treating this unrelenting, life-long disorder. New evidence suggests that earlier, more aggressive use of biological therapies for CD may improve overall efficacy rates, as well as reduce long-term complications. In addition to optimizing the use of older biologic therapies (antibodies against TNF-alpha), recent and ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the clinical efficacy of a large number of other biologic therapies, honing in on a wide array of immunological targets. The promise of biologic therapies stems from their ability to induce complete and long-lasting remission of symptoms in a way that 'standard' therapies have not been able to accomplish. In this review of biologic therapies for CD, we examine the latest clinical trial data and evidence for mechanism of action of a variety of current and future therapies. PMID:19591627

  11. [Medical mangement of Crohn's disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Preel, J L; Eugene, C; Mignon, M; Weissman, A; Hardouin, J P; Debray, C

    Medical management of Crohn's disease is above all symptomatic. According to the severeness of the case, treatment varies and may be simple (regimen, antidiarrheic agents and sulfamid drugs) or more sophisticated (continous parenteral alimentation). Sulfamids and antibiotics have a definite although temporary action. Pathogenic medication includes: 1) steroid therapy who is active, but its effects are not long stand; 2) immunosuppressors who allow for the reduction of steroid therapy dosages; 3) immunostimulants as proposed by Geffroy. Among those presently studied are Calmette-Guérin vaccine, either given orally or by scarification, and two anti-parasitic drugs, metronidazole and levamisole. Short term results are good but they worsen with time. The main problem is to know when to discuss surgery. As need be, resection although mutilating, should be timely indicated. PMID:224473

  12. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  13. Fistulizing Crohn's Disease Presenting After Surgery on a Perianal Lesion.

    PubMed

    Singer, Andrew A M; Gadepalli, Samir K; Eder, Sally J; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Perianal skin lesions, such as skin tags, can be an early presenting sign of Crohn's disease. Surgical intervention on these lesions may increase the risk of fistula development and lead to worse outcomes. This case series examined 8 patients who underwent surgical intervention on what appeared to be benign perianal skin lesions, only to reveal fistulas leading to the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. This patient population comprised 20% of all pediatric patients with Crohn's disease who had perianal fistula present at diagnosis. The initial type of perianal lesion varied from case to case and included skin tags, hemorrhoids, and perianal abscesses. All of the patients had other presenting features that, in retrospect, may have been attributed to Crohn's disease. None presented solely with a perianal lesion. Four patients had weight loss or growth failure. Most of the remainder had abnormal laboratory test results. These findings should raise the awareness of primary care providers that perianal lesions can be the first presenting sign of possible Crohn's disease in otherwise healthy appearing children. Such children should undergo a thorough evaluation for Crohn's disease before surgical intervention on perianal lesions because surgical procedures may be associated with worse outcomes. PMID:26908665

  14. Increased permeability of macroscopically normal small bowel in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Ghoos, Y; Maes, B; Hiele, M; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Rutgeerts, P

    1994-10-01

    To investigate permeability alterations of the macroscopically normal jejunum in Crohn's disease, the permeation of two probes was measured during perfusion of an isolated jejunal segment. The data were compared with the results obtained by the standard per oral test in the same patients. Test probes were PEG-400 and [51Cr]EDTA. Ten normal individuals, 12 patients with Crohn's ileitis or ileocolitis, and seven patients with isolated Crohn's colitis all with normal jejunum on x-ray series were studied. Upon perfusion of the proximal small bowel, the 3-hr [51Cr]EDTA excretion was significantly increased in ileitis patients (P = 0.023) as compared to normals. The excretion exceeded the highest value of normals in eight of 12 ileitis patients. The excretion in Crohn's colitis patients was not significantly increased (P = 0.24) and abnormal excretion was found only in one of the Crohn's colitis patients. PEG-400 permeation during perfusion did not differentiate between the groups, but five of the seven patients with isolated Crohn's colitis had PEG-400 excretion exceeding the highest value in normals. Overall, 13 of the 19 patients had increased permeation of one of the two probes through jejunal mucosa during perfusion. These data suggest that the permeability is increased in the majority of patients even in segments that seem normal on x-ray. PMID:7924738

  15. Absorption of prednisolone in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, J A; Williams, S E; Turnberg, L A; Houston, J B; Rowland, M

    1983-01-01

    The absorption of prednisolone in patients with Crohn's disease was investigated. Seven patients with Crohn's disease and eight normal control subjects were given a tracer dose of tritiated prednisolone with 20 mg cold prednisolone by mouth. On a separate occasion they were given an intravenous injection of radiolabelled prednisolone. After oral ingestion only 53.4 +/- 11.7% of labelled material was excreted in the urine of Crohn's patients compared with 82.5 +/- 3.6% in the normal subjects. The oral/intravenous availability ratio was 0.61 +/- 0.14 in Crohn's patients and 0.89 +/- 0.07 in the normal group. Areas under plasma concentration-time curves were lower in patients than normal subjects and the oral/intravenous ratios were 0.6 +/- 0.2 and 0.86 +/- 0.09 respectively. Faecal excretion of radioactivity after oral ingestion was greater in Crohn's patients (19.3 +/- 2.5%, n = 3) than in normal subjects (7 +/- 2.8%, n = 4). The range for each type of measurement was much wider in the patient group than in the normal subjects. These data suggest that patients with Crohn's disease do not absorb prednisolone normally and that absorption varies between patients. PMID:6826099

  16. On the etiology of Crohn disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mishina, D; Katsel, P; Brown, S T; Gilberts, E C; Greenstein, R J

    1996-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic, panenteric intestinal inflammatory disease. Its etiology is unknown. Analogous to the tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy, CD may have two clinical manifestations. One is aggressive and fistulizing (perforating), and the other is contained, indolent, and obstructive (nonperforating) [Gi]-berts, E. C. A. M., Greenstein, A. J., Katsel, P., Harpaz, N. & Greenstein, R. J. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 12721-127241. The etiology, if infections, may be due to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. We employed reverse transcription PCR using M. paratuberculosis subspecies-specific primers (IS 900) on total RNA from 12 ileal mucosal specimens (CD, n = 8; controls, n = 4, 2 with ulcerative colitis and 2 with colonic cancer). As a negative control, we used Myobacterium avium DNA, originally cultured from the drinking water of a major city in the United States. cDNA sequence analysis shows that all eight cases of Crohn's disease and both samples from the patients with ulcerative colitis contained M. paratuberculosis RNA. Additionally, the M. avium control has the DNA sequence of M. paratuberculosis. We demonstrate the DNA sequence of M. paratuberculosis from mucosal specimens from humans with CD. The potable water supply may be a reservoir of infection. Although M. paratuberculosis signal in CD has been previously reported, a cause and effect relationship has not been established. In part, this is due to conflicting data from studies with empirical antimycobacterial therapy. We conclude that clinical trials with anti-M. paratuberculosis therapy are indicated in patients with CD who have been stratified into the aggressive (perforating) and contained (nonperforating) forms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8790414

  17. Mini-Med School Planning Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Mini-Med Schools are public education programs now offered by more than 70 medical schools, universities, research institutions, and hospitals across the nation. There are even Mini-Med Schools in Ireland, Malta, and Canada! The program is typically a lecture series that meets once a week and provides "mini-med students" information on some of the…

  18. Specific antibody response to oligomannosidic epitopes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sendid, B; Colombel, J F; Jacquinot, P M; Faille, C; Fruit, J; Cortot, A; Lucidarme, D; Camus, D; Poulain, D

    1996-01-01

    Elevated antibody levels against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported in sera from patients with Crohn's disease and not with ulcerative colitis. The aim of the study was to identify the nature of the epitopes supporting this antibody response. Whole cells from different S. cerevisiae strains were selected in immunofluorescence assay for their ability to differentiate the antibody responses of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Their cell wall phosphopeptidomannans were then tested as antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against sera from 42 patients with Crohn's disease, 20 patients with ulcerative colitis, and 34 healthy controls. Graded chemical degradations were performed on the most reactive strain phosphopeptidomannan. The discriminating epitope was determined through gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The greatest discrimination among patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and controls was obtained with Su1, a S. cerevisiae strain used in brewing of beer. ELISA directed against phosphopeptidomannan of this strain was 64% sensitive and 77% specific for discriminating Crohn's disease versus ulcerative colitis and 71% sensitive and 89% specific for Crohn's disease versus controls. Periodate oxidation and selective degradation demonstrated that the most important polysaccharide epitope was shared by both the acid-stable and the alkali-labile domains of the phosphopeptidomannan. The determination of oligomannose sequences of S. cerevisiae Su1 phosphopeptidomannans suggested that a mannotetraose, Man (1 --> 3)Man(1 --> 2)Man(1 --> 2)Man, supported the serological response seen in Crohn's disease. Further identification of the immunogen eliciting this antibody response as a marker of the disease may help to understand its etiology. PMID:8991640

  19. European evidence based consensus on the diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease: special situations

    PubMed Central

    Caprilli, R; Gassull, M A; Escher, J C; Moser, G; Munkholm, P; Forbes, A; Hommes, D W; Lochs, H; Angelucci, E; Cocco, A; Vucelic, B; Hildebrand, H; Kolacek, S; Riis, L; Lukas, M; de Franchis, R; Hamilton, M; Jantschek, G; Michetti, P; O'Morain, C; Anwar, M M; Freitas, J L; Mouzas, I A; Baert, F; Mitchell, R; Hawkey, C J

    2006-01-01

    This third section of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) Consensus on the management of Crohn's disease concerns postoperative recurrence, fistulating disease, paediatrics, pregnancy, psychosomatics, extraintestinal manifestations, and alternative therapy. The first section on definitions and diagnosis reports on the aims and methods of the consensus, as well as sections on diagnosis, pathology, and classification of Crohn's disease. The second section on current management addresses treatment of active disease, maintenance of medically induced remission, and surgery of Crohn's disease. PMID:16481630

  20. An unusual cutaneous manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Jessica A; Markowitz, David M; Husain, Sameera; Grossman, Marc E

    2011-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with a 12-year history of quiescent Crohn's disease on mesalamine presented to his gastroenterologist in April 2009, complaining of abdominal cramping, diarrhea, and a 25-lb weight loss over 6 weeks. He did not respond to prednisone 50 mg and 6-mercaptopurine 100 mg daily. Abdominal computed tomography findings revealed diffuse submucosal edema consistent with extensive colitis. Colonoscopy demonstrated diffuse inflammation with erythema, friability, and shallow ulcerations in the rectum and colon. Biopsies were consistent with Crohn's colitis. He was admitted for infliximab infusion for his unremitting diarrhea. Five days before admission, the patient noted mild swelling and redness of the left lower eyelid, which progressed to involve the right lower eyelid with frank pus draining from both eyes. He had no visual impairment or eye pain. Two days before admission, an ophthalmologist prescribed a steroid eyedrop with no relief. He also complained of seropurulent painful skin lesions on his face and scalp, which spread to involve his upper trunk and proximal arms. On admission to the hospital, dermatology, ophthalmology, and infectious disease consultations were obtained to rule out disseminated infection before initiation of infliximab therapy. The patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. His oral mucosa was normal. He had prominent bilateral lower eyelid edema, erythema, and superficial erosions with hemorrhagic crusting and frank green purulent drainage from both eyes, with crusting along the lower lash line and bilateral sclera injection (Figure 1). On his scalp, face, trunk, and proximal extremities, he had 25 to 30 erythematous, 4- to 8-mm papulopustules with narrow red halos, some with central necrosis and crusting (Figure 2). Cultures from the purulent ocular drainage and pustules on the trunk and arms were all negative for bacteria, virus, and fungi. Gram stain from the eye drainage showed polymorphonuclear leukocytes without

  1. Noninfectious lung pathology in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Mary B; Tazelaar, Henry D; Myers, Jeffrey L; Hunninghake, Gary W; Kakar, Sanjay; Kalra, Sanjay X; Ashton, Rendell; Colby, Thomas V

    2003-02-01

    Lung involvement in Crohn's disease is not well characterized. We reviewed our experience with 11 lung biopsies (seven wedge and four transbronchial) from patients with Crohn's disease to study this association further. Negative cultures, special stains for organisms Gomori-methenamine-silver [GMS], acid fast), and polymerase chain reaction for (four cases) were required for inclusion. The group included five women and six men with a mean age of 47 years (range 13-84 years). A diagnosis of Crohn's disease preceded the lung disease in nine patients. In two patients the diagnosis of Crohn's disease followed the diagnosis of their pulmonary disease 1 and 15 months later. Radiologically, eight patients had diffuse infiltrates, two had bilateral nodular infiltrates, and one had a mass. Chronic bronchiolitis with nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in four patients, one of whom was taking mesalamine. Two patients had an acute bronchiolitis associated with a neutrophil-rich bronchopneumonia with suppuration and vague granulomatous features. One patient on mesalamine had cellular interstitial pneumonia with rare giant cells. Four patients demonstrated organizing pneumonia with focal granulomatous features, two of whom were taking mesalamine, and one of these two responded to infliximab (anti-tumor necrosis factor) monoclonal antibody therapy. Noninfectious pulmonary disease in patients with Crohn's disease has variable histologic appearances, including granulomatous inflammation and airway-centered disease resembling that seen in patients with ulcerative colitis. Drugs may contribute to pulmonary disease in some patients. PMID:12548168

  2. Genetic studies of Crohn's disease: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jimmy Z.; Anderson, Carl A.

    2014-01-01

    The exact aetiology of Crohn's disease is unknown, though it is clear from early epidemiological studies that a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors contributes to an individual's disease susceptibility. Here, we review the history of gene-mapping studies of Crohn's disease, from the linkage-based studies that first implicated the NOD2 locus, through to modern-day genome-wide association studies that have discovered over 140 loci associated with Crohn's disease and yielded novel insights into the biological pathways underlying pathogenesis. We describe on-going and future gene-mapping studies that utilise next generation sequencing technology to pinpoint causal variants and identify rare genetic variation underlying Crohn's disease risk. We comment on the utility of genetic markers for predicting an individual's disease risk and discuss their potential for identifying novel drug targets and influencing disease management. Finally, we describe how these studies have shaped and continue to shape our understanding of the genetic architecture of Crohn's disease. PMID:24913378

  3. Neoterminal ileal blood flow after ileocolonic resection for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Angerson, W J; Allison, M C; Baxter, J N; Russell, R I

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure neoterminal ileal blood flow in 16 patients who had undergone ileocolonic resection for Crohn's disease and had since remained clinically and biochemically free of disease, and eight control patients who had undergone similar surgery for colonic carcinoma. Four patients with clinically active Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum were also studied. Neoterminal ileal recurrence in those with inactive Crohn's disease was graded endoscopically. The median and minimum of five local blood flow measurements performed in each patient were inversely correlated with the endoscopic recurrence grade (r = -0.52, p = 0.04 and r = -0.63, p = 0.01 respectively). Relative to the control group, median blood flow was non-significantly lower in the inactive Crohn's disease group as a whole (p > 0.05) but was significantly reduced in patients with active disease (p = 0.02). A progressive reduction in tissue perfusion may accompany recurrence of Crohn's disease while at a subclinical stage. PMID:8244138

  4. Early and delayed indium 111 leukocyte imaging in Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Navab, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Diner, W.C.; Subramani, R.; Chan, C.

    1987-10-01

    Twenty-seven patients with Crohn's disease were studied for the presence and location of activity by both early (4 h) and delayed (18-24 h) indium 111 leukocyte imaging. The results were compared with other parameters of disease activity including Crohn's disease activity index, barium studies, and endoscopy. There was a correlation between early images and Crohn's disease activity index (r = 0.78) and between delayed images and index (r = 0.82). Based upon the corresponding Crohn's disease activity index, the sensitivity of early and delayed imaging was 81.0% and 95.2%, respectively. Specificity of early and delayed imaging was 75.0% and 87.0%, respectively. Presence of activity on the early and delayed imaging agreed with activity on barium studies and colonoscopy in approximately 80% of cases. Correlation of location of disease by leukocyte imaging and x-ray was observed in 58.9% of early scans and 55.0% of delayed scans. Correlation of the location of disease by imaging and endoscopy was observed in 71.4% of early and 75.0% of delayed studies. Because of the possibility of occurrence of false-negative results in early images, delayed imaging should always be included in evaluation of disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease who are suspected of having mild activity. Delayed imaging is not required if the early imaging study clearly shows activity.

  5. Development of CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease causes inflammation or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract. The number of patients of Crohn's disease is increasing in Japan. Symptoms of Crohn's disease include intestinal stenosis, longitudinal ulcers, and fistulae. Optical endoscope cannot pass through intestinal stenosis in some cases. We propose a new CAD system using abdominal fecal tagging CT images for efficient diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The system displays virtual unfolded (VU), virtual endoscopic, curved planar reconstruction, multi planar reconstruction, and outside views of both small and large intestines. To generate the VU views, we employ a small and large intestines extraction method followed by a simple electronic cleansing method. The intestine extraction is based on the region growing process, which uses a characteristic that tagged fluid neighbor air in the intestine. The electronic cleansing enables observation of intestinal wall under tagged fluid. We change the height of the VU views according to the perimeter of the intestine. In addition, we developed a method to enhance the longitudinal ulcer on views of the system. We enhance concave parts on the intestinal wall, which are caused by the longitudinal ulcer, based on local intensity structure analysis. We examined the small and the large intestines of eleven CT images by the proposed system. The VU views enabled efficient observation of the intestinal wall. The height change of the VU views helps finding intestinal stenosis on the VU views. The concave region enhancement made longitudinal ulcers clear on the views.

  6. Spheroplastic phase of mycobacteria isolated from patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J; Van Kruiningen, H J; Thayer, W R; Coutu, J A

    1986-01-01

    Two strains of an unclassified Mycobacterium species were isolated after 18 and 30 months of incubation of media inoculated with resected intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease. These strains represented the third and fourth isolates of this organism from Crohn's disease patients. Ultrastructural examination of this strain and two previously isolated strains revealed the presence of spheroplasts which eventually transformed into the bacillary form of a previously unrecognized Mycobacterium species. These cell wall-deficient forms did not stain with conventional dyes and failed to grow on hypertonic media. Restriction polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA genes was used to determine the relationship between the cell wall-deficient and bacillary forms. Identical restriction patterns of the ribosomal DNA genes were found between the spheroplasts and Mycobacterium sp. isolates with EcoRI, BamHI, and XhoI restriction endonucleases, thus providing definitive evidence of their origin. Unidentified spheroplasts were isolated from an additional 12 patients with Crohn's disease, of which 7 of 10 seroagglutinated with antiserum prepared against the Mycobacterium sp. Spheroplasts were isolated from 16 of 26 (61%) patients with Crohn's disease but not from tissues of 13 patients with ulcerative colitis or 13 patients with other diseases of the bowel. These findings support the role of mycobacteria as etiologic agents in some cases of Crohn's disease. Images PMID:3760132

  7. Imaging of perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chidi, Vivian N; Schwartz, David A

    2015-06-01

    Perianal fistula is a complication of Crohn's disease that carries a high morbidity. It is a channel that develops between the lower rectum, anal canal and perianal or perineal skin. The development of perianal fistulas typically connotes a more aggressive disease phenotype and may warrant escalation of treatment to prevent poor outcomes over time. Based on fistula anatomy, debris can form inside these tracts and cause occlusion, which subsequently leads to abscess formation, fever and malaise. The clinical presentation is often with complaints of pain, continuous rectal drainage of fecal matter as well as malodorous discharge. Considering that the presence of fistulas often indicates refractory and aggressive disease, early identification of its presence is important. Some patients may not have the classic symptoms of fistulizing disease at presentation and others may have significant scarring and/or pain from previous fistulizing episodes, which can make an accurate assessment on physical exam alone problematic. As a result, utilizing diagnostic imaging is the best means of identifying the early signs of perianal fistulas or abscess formation in these patients. Several imaging modalities exist which can be used for diagnosis and management. Endoscopic ultrasound and pelvic MRI are considered the most useful in establishing the diagnosis. However, a combination of multiple imaging modalities and/or examination under anesthesia is probably the most ideal. Incomplete characterization of the fistula tract(s) extent or the presence of abscess carries a high morbidity and far-reaching personal expense for the patient - promoting worsening of the disease. PMID:25816833

  8. Herpes simplex virus duodenitis accompanying Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Hoo; Um, Wook Hyun; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Wan Jung; Kim, Jin-Oh; Jin, So Young

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a recognized cause of gastrointestinal infection in immunodeficient patients. Although a few cases of HSV gastritis and colitis in immunocompromised patients have been reported, there are no reports of HSV duodenitis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A 74-year-old female was admitted with general weakness and refractory epigastric pain. She had been diagnosed with CD three years ago. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed diffuse edematous and whitish mucosa with multiple erosions in the duodenum. Considering the possibility of viral co-infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunohistochemical staining, PCR, and cultures of duodenal biopsies were performed, all of which were negative with the exception of the isolation of HSV in culture. After administration of intravenous acyclovir for 1 week, follow-up EGD showed almost complete resolution of the lesions and the patient's symptoms improved. In CD patients with refractory gastro-intestinal symptoms, HSV, as well as CMV, should be considered as a possible cause of infection, so that the diagnosis of viral infection is not delayed and the appropriate antiviral treatment can be initiated. PMID:24262595

  9. Improving the outcome of fistulising Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, Ilse; Peeters, Koen C M J; Baeten, Coen I M; Veenendaal, Roeland A; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E

    2014-06-01

    Fistulas are a frequent manifestation of Crohn's disease (CD) and can result in considerable morbidity. Approximately 35% of all patients with CD will experience one fistula episode during their disease course of which 54% is perianal. The major symptoms of patients with perianal fistulas are constant anal pain, the formation of painful swellings around the anus and continuous discharge of pus and/or blood from the external fistula opening. The exact aetiology of perianal fistulas in CD patients remains unclear, but it is thought that a penetrating ulcer in the rectal mucosa caused by active CD forms an abnormal passage between the epithelial lining of the rectum and the perianal skin. Genetic, microbiological and immunological factors seem to play important roles in this process. Although the incidence of perianal fistulas in patients with CD is quite high, an effective treatment is not yet discovered. In this review all available medical and surgical therapies are discussed and new treatment options and research targets will be highlighted. PMID:24913389

  10. MRI for Crohn's Disease: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kichul; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hong J.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with relapsing-remitting behavior, often causing strictures or penetrating bowel damage. Its lifelong clinical course necessitates frequent assessment of disease activity and complications. Computed tomography (CT) enterography has been used as primary imaging modality; however, the concern for radiation hazard limits its use especially in younger population. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has advantages of avoiding radiation exposure, lower incidence of adverse events, ability to obtain dynamic information, and good soft-tissue resolution. MR enterography (MRE) with oral contrast agent has been used as primary MR imaging modality of CD with high sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement. The extent of inflammation as well as transmural ulcers and fibrostenotic diseases can be detected with MRE. Novel MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), motility study, PET-MRI, and molecular imaging are currently investigated for further improvement of diagnosis and management of CD. MR spectroscopy is a remarkable molecular imaging tool to analyze metabolic profile of CD with human samples such as plasma, urine, or feces, as well as colonic mucosa itself. PMID:26413543

  11. Novel biomarkers of fibrosis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Gianluca; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Selvaggi, Francesco

    2016-08-15

    Fibrosis represents a major challenge in Crohn's disease (CD), and many CD patients will develop fibrotic strictures requiring treatment throughout their lifetime. There is no drug that can reverse intestinal fibrosis, and so endoscopic balloon dilatation and surgery are the only effective treatments. Since patients may need repeated treatments, it is important to obtain the diagnosis at an early stage before strictures become symptomatic with extensive fibrosis. Several markers of fibrosis have been proposed, but most need further validation. Biomarkers can be measured either in biological samples obtained from the serum or bowel of CD patients, or using imaging tools and tests. The ideal tool should be easily obtained, cost-effective, and reliable. Even more challenging is fibrosis occurring in ulcerative colitis. Despite the important burden of intestinal fibrosis, including its detrimental effect on outcomes and quality of life in CD patients, it has received less attention than fibrosis occurring in other organs. A common mechanism that acts via a specific signaling pathway could underlie both intestinal fibrosis and cancer. A comprehensive overview of recently introduced biomarkers of fibrosis in CD is presented, along with a discussion of the controversial areas remaining in this field. PMID:27574564

  12. [Surgical management of intestinal Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Funayama, Yuji; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Ken-Ichi; Haneda, Sho; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Ikezawa, Fumie; Unno, Michiaki

    2015-03-01

    Various intestinal conditions such as stricture, fistula, abscess, perforation, and hemorrhage are complications of Crohn's disease. Surgical intervention remains important, even in the era of biologic therapy. Limited surgical resection is essential to avoid short bowel syndrome after massive resection or multiple operations. Strictureplasty is effective for short, isolated stricture of the small intestine and provides good results equivalent to those of intestinal resection. Fecal diversion in the case of very complicated lesions not suitable for immediate resection can offer patients general and local improvement. Although bypass surgery is currently not performed because of the possibility of deterioration or carcinogenesis of the bypassed segment, bypass surgery is useful for avoiding stoma. Laparoscopic surgery is indicated for patients with nonperforating, localized ileocecal lesions, and for those presenting initially. The cumulative postoperative reoperation rate is about 50% to 60% at 10 years. The risk factors for early recurrence are smoking, perforating type, previous reoperation, and small intestinal disease. During postoperative follow-up and maintenance treatment, the importance of an algorithm comprising regular check-ups with ileocolonoscopy and the use of thioprines and biologics has been proposed. PMID:26050508

  13. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  14. MED-SUV Data policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangianantoni, Agata; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    MED-SUV proposes the development and implementation of a digital infrastructure for data access and for volcanic risk management aimed at applying the rationale of Supersites GEO initiative to Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Mt. Etna. It's fully recognized the clear need of an open data policy in order to ensure that data will be properly and in an ethical manner managed and can be used and accessed from its community. In MED-SUV there is a multitude of different partners with varying scientific, technical, legal and economical interests and therefore data and data products produced will be wide-ranging so it's necessary to set principles and legal arrangements. Within Europe several Directives and Regulations have brought into force which provide the leading guidelines in terms of the principle of openness to knowledge and access to scientific information. So in creating a suite policy the EC Supersites (MarSite and FutureVolc, under the EPOS umbrella) projects need to strength their efforts in defining a common data management strategy. In this presentation we will show the leading principles of the data policy, as for instance Open Access, flexibility of approach in order to harmonize the different methods of data distribution among its partners, Creative Commons licensing, data preservation and unique identification through Persistent Identifiers.

  15. Economic implications of biological therapy for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Paradowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    In the early 90s American authors estimated that if a theoretical new drug was introduced that was capable of changing the natural course of the disease and reducing direct non-drug medical costs (including hospitalisation and surgery) by 20%, despite doubling the overall drugs bill, there would still be a reduction in total direct medical costs of Crohn's disease by 13%. Infliximab proved to be efficacious in reducing and maintaining remission in moderate to severe active Crohn's disease and/or fistulising Crohn's disease. A higher acquisition cost still remains its major limitation. Currently only the use of infliximab in case of treatment for flares seems to be cost-effective. However, this statement may be modified in the near future. PMID:26759625

  16. Monocytes and their pathophysiological role in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Braat, H; Faber, K N; Dijkstra, G; Peppelenbosch, M P

    2009-01-01

    Our immune system shows a stringent dichotomy, on the one hand displaying tolerance towards commensal bacteria, but on the other hand vigorously combating pathogens. Under normal conditions the balance between flora tolerance and active immunity is maintained via a plethora of dynamic feedback mechanisms. If, however, the balancing act goes faulty, an inappropriate immune reaction towards an otherwise harmless intestinal flora causes disease, Crohn's disease for example. Recent developments in the immunology and genetics of mucosal diseases suggest that monocytes and their derivative cells play an important role in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease. In our review, we summarize the recent studies to discuss the dual function of monocytes - on the one hand the impaired monocyte function initiating Crohn's disease, and on the other hand the overactivation of monocytes and adaptive immunity maintaining the disease. With a view to developing new therapies, both aspects of monocyte functions need to be taken into account. PMID:18791847

  17. Role of HLA typing on Crohn's disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Batool Mutar

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is the main type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Evidence from family and twin studies suggests that genetics plays a significant role in predisposing an individual to develop Crohn's disease. A susceptibility locus for Crohn's disease has been mapped 3 to chromosome 16: a frameshift variant and two missense variants of NOD2, encoding a member of the Apaf-1/Ced-4 superfamily of apoptosis regulators which is expressed in hematopoietic compartment cells and intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells, where NOD2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease in the gastrointestinal system. This leads to alteration the structure of either the leucine-rich repeat domain of the protein or the adjacent region. NOD2 activates nuclear factor NF-kB; this activating function is regulated by the carboxy-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, which has two functions, first an inhibitory role and also acts as an intracellular receptor for components of microbial pathogens. Thus, NOD2 gene product confers susceptibility to Crohn's disease by altering the recognition of these components and/or by over-activating NF-kB in intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells. Further confirmation of a genetic predisposition comes from studies of the association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system and CD. The immunogenetic predisposition may be considered an important requirement for the development of CD, as several alleles of human major histocompatibility complex had an association with CD. Although it is difficult to estimate the importance of this region in determining overall genetic susceptibility in a population, studies of HLA allele sharing within families suggest that this region contributes between 10% and 33% of the total genetic risk of Crohn's disease. PMID:26288728

  18. Supplementary enteral nutrition maintains remission in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, M; Sherman, P; Pencharz, P; Davis, L; Corey, M; Griffiths, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Liquid diets given enterally combined with "bowel rest' are efficacious in the treatment of active Crohn's disease, but rapid recrudescence of gastrointestinal symptoms after resumption of a normal diet is common. AIMS--This study examined whether continuation of enteral nutrition as a nocturnal supplement to an ad libitum daytime intake of a normal diet increased the length of remission of Crohn's disease in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Children and adolescents with active Crohn's disease treated successfully with exclusive enteral nutrition were classified retrospectively according to whether they continued supplementary enteral nutrition or not. Time to relapse and linear growth were compared between the two cohorts. RESULTS--Between January 1986 and December 1992, 65 patients aged 7-17 years (mean (SD) 13.6 (2.1) years) (36 males, 29 females) with Crohn's disease in exacerbation were treated for > or = four weeks by bowel rest and nasogastric tube feeding of an oligopeptide or amino acid based formula. At first follow up visit, remission (fall in Paediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index, PCDAI to < or = 20) was achieved in 47 of 65 (72%) patients. Subsequently, 20 of these 47 (43%) relapsed by six months and 28 of 47 (60%) by 12 months. Patients who continued nasogastric supplementary feeding (n = 28) after resumption of an otherwise normal diet remained well longer than those who discontinued nocturnal supplements completely (n = 19) (p < 0.02). Furthermore, continued use of nasogastric supplements before completion of puberty was associated with improved linear growth. CONCLUSION--After successful treatment of active Crohn's disease by exclusive enteral nutrition, supplementary enteral nutrition without restriction of normal diet is associated with prolongation of remission and improved linear growth in children and adolescents. PMID:8707085

  19. Editorial: Smoking Cessation for Crohn's Disease: Clearing the Haze.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2016-03-01

    The TABACROHN Study Group conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study, demonstrating that smoking cessation improved the prognosis of Crohn's disease. Patients who continued to smoke were 50% more likely to relapse compared with non-smokers. Smoking cessation reduced the risk of flaring, regardless of exposure to anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. Despite the evidence that smoking cessation is beneficial, many patients do not quit smoking after their diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Lack of awareness, physical addiction, and social context of smoking inhibit smoking cessation. In spite of this, comprehensive smoking cessation programs have been shown to be effective and reduce costs. PMID:27018116

  20. A "false positive" octreoscan in ileal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alberto; Tabuenca, Olga; Peteiro, Angeles

    2008-09-14

    We present a case report of a patient with a suspicious ileal carcinoid tumour. Clinical examination as well as computer tomography (CT) scan suggested a tumour. Octeotride scan showed uptake in the same bowel loop reported as pathological in CT. The patient underwent surgery and biopsy which reported Crohn's disease (CD). The interest in the case is due to the fact that this is, to the best of our knowledge, the second report of Crohn's disease as a cause of false positive octeotride scan. Unfortunately, no somatostatin receptors could be found in the sample, so further studies should be performed. PMID:18785291

  1. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  2. Small Bowel Imaging in Managing Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Jörg G.

    2012-01-01

    The small bowel is essential to sustain alimentation and small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) may severely limit its function. Small bowel imaging is a crucial element in diagnosing small bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients. PMID:22474438

  3. Elemental diet in the management of Crohn's disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Teahon, K; Pearson, M; Levi, A J; Bjarnason, I

    1991-01-01

    Four patients with Crohn's disease were treated with an elemental diet during pregnancy. Two had active disease and two also had symptoms of small intestinal obstruction. All went into a clinical remission within a few days of starting treatment. Treatment periods varied from two to four weeks, and were followed by elemental diet as a supplement to normal food in two patients. At term, all delivered a healthy infant. These patients indicate that elemental diet is a safe form of treatment for Crohn's disease during pregnancy and may be considered as an alternative to conventional drug treatments which carry a theoretical risk of teratogenesis. Images Figure 2 PMID:1916496

  4. Extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Sharyle; Jones, Jennifer; Hull, Peter R; Ghosh, Subrata

    2015-04-01

    Small, open-label studies show promising results for ECP in the treatment of steroid-dependent and medically-refractory Crohn's disease. However, proper randomized, sham-controlled trials have not yet been performed. Based on the proposed mechanism of action of ECP, induction of a tolerogenic T cell response, ECP should be assessed in patients with early inflammatory disease rather than those who have progressed to fibrotic or stricturing disease. Randomized, sham-controlled trials need to be performed before ECP can be incorporated into standard clinical practice for the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:25747960

  5. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  6. Prevalence of infectious pathogens in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Knösel, Thomas; Schewe, Christiane; Petersen, Nanni; Dietel, Manfred; Petersen, Iver

    2009-01-01

    The importance of infectious pathogens in Crohn's disease (CD) is still under debate. Therefore, we examined a panel of potential viral and bacterial pathogens in a large series of CD patients and controls. Archival tissue from 76 patients, 56 with CD and 20 control patients, with normal colon mucosa (n=10) and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced colitis (n=10) were examined using PCR-based detection methods for human cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus 1, 2 (HSV1,2), adenovirus (AD), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), human herpes virus 6 (HHV6), human herpes virus 8 (HHV8), Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (Mtbc), atypical mycobacteria (nM/MG1), including Mycobacterium avium (subspecies paratuberculosis, MAP), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Sm), and Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye). In CD patients, positive PCR results were achieved in 19 cases (34%). Sm was most frequent in 10 of 56 cases (17.9%) followed by EBV (6/56, 10.7%), nM/MG1 (4/56, 7.1%), including MAP, HHV6, and CMV (2/56, 3.6%), and finally Mtbc and AD (1/56, 1.8%). The control patients showed positive PCR results in 12 patients (12/20, 60%), nine of them with only weak signals, suggesting a persistent infection. In addition, we compared typical pathomorphological features of CD patients with the PCR results and found a significant correlation between EBV infection and mural abscesses (P=0.014). Our data demonstrate that several potential pathogens can be detected in a sizeable fraction of specimens from patients with CD, but also in control patients, suggesting that the analyzed infectious pathogens may be associated with the disease, but do not represent an obligatory cause. PMID:19186006

  7. Fulminant herpes colitis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    el-Serag, H B; Zwas, F R; Cirillo, N W; Eisen, R N

    1996-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a well-recognized cause of gastrointestinal infection, most commonly in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. The esophagus, perianum, and rectum are the most common sites of involvement; however, extensive colitis is rare. We describe a woman with Crohn's disease who developed pathologically proven HSV colitis. We review the literature and present the possible implications of the diagnosis. PMID:8724263

  8. "Miniguts" from plucked human hair meet Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M; Renz, S; Liebau, S; Lin, Q; Lechel, A; Klaus, J; Perkhofer, L; Zenke, M; Seufferlein, T; Illing, A; Müller, M; Kleger, A

    2016-08-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture. While several studies reported the derivation of organoid cultures from adult intestinal tissue, the derivation of intestinal organoids derived from plucked human hair of Crohn's disease patients has not been reported. The current research project reports such successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from hair sheet keratinocyte cultures of a patient with Crohn's disease. Stepwise differentiation along the intestinal lineage showed no differences in intermediate stages such as definitive endoderm formation. We also directed the patterned primitive gut tube toward intestinal organoids resembling the cellular architecture of human "miniguts". As expected from current pathophysiological knowledge on Crohn's disease, there were no obvious morphological differences in the "miniguts" derived from healthy control and diseased patient-induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our platform will enable for detailed and complementary phenotyping of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease in a novel disease-in-a-dish format. PMID:27415403

  9. [A case of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez Perales, J L; Tamarit Ortí, R; Ballester Fayos, J; Jiménez Martínez, A; Antón Conejero, M D; Rodríguez Gil, F J; Moreno Osset, E; González Martínez, M A

    1997-03-01

    The Sweet syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a well characterized cutaneous disease from a clinical and histological point of view and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. Prognosis is favorable with good response to corticoid therapy. A well documented case of Sweet syndrome associated with an outbreak of Crohn's disease with peculiar good therapeutic response is reported. PMID:9162534

  10. Ofloxacin induced Sweet's syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Davut; Korkmaz, Uğur; Sahin, Idris; Sencan, Irfan; Kavak, Ayşe; Küçükbayrak, Abdülkadir; Cakir, Selma

    2006-05-01

    Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis. This syndrome can be idiopathic, para-inflammatory, paraneoplastic, drug-induced, or pregnancy-related. In this paper, a case of Sweet's syndrome associated with ofloxacin therapy in a patient with Crohn's disease is reported. PMID:16213026

  11. On exploration of medical database of Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manerowska, Anna; Dadalski, Maciej; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The primary objective of this article is to find a new, more effective method of diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Having created the database on this disease we wanted to find the most suitable classification models. We used the algorithms with their implementations stored in R environment. Having carried out the investigations we have reached results interesting for clinical practice.

  12. Medical radar considerations for detecting and monitoring Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.; Messaris, Evangelos

    2014-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a condition that causes inflammation and associated complications along any section of the digestive tract. Over the years, numerous radiological and endoscopic methods as well as the use of ultrasound have been developed to examine and diagnose inflammatory bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease. While such techniques have much merit, an alternative medical solution that is safe, non-invasive, and inexpensive is proposed in this paper. Reflections from electromagnetic signals transmitted by an ultra-wide band (UWB) radar allow for not only range (or extent) information but also spectral analysis of a given target of interest. Moreover, the radar cross-section (RCS) of an object measures how detectable the electromagnetic return energy of such an object is to the radar. In the preliminary phase of research, we investigate how disparities in the dielectric properties of diseased versus non-diseased portions of the intestines can aid in the detection of Crohn's disease. RCS analysis from finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method simulations using a simple 3D model of the intestines are presented. The ultimate goal of our research is to design a UWB radar system using a suitable waveform to detect and monitor Crohn's disease.

  13. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  14. Glycoprotein 2 antibodies in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, Dirk; Reinhold, Dirk; Werner, Lael; Schierack, Peter; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Conrad, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CrD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two major inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), remains poorly understood. Autoimmunity is considered to be involved in the triggering and perpetuation of inflammatory processes leading to overt disease. Approximately 30% of CrD patients and less than 8% of UC patients show evidence of humoral autoimmunity to exocrine pancreas, detected by indirect immunofluorescence. Pancreatic autoantibodies (PAB) were described for the first time in 1984, but the autoantigenic target(s) of PABs were identified only in 2009. Utilizing immunoblotting and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the major zymogen granule membrane glycoprotein 2 (GP2) has been discovered as the main PAB autoantigen. The expression of GP2 has been demonstrated at the site of intestinal inflammation, explaining the previously unaddressed contradiction of pancreatic autoimmunity and intestinal inflammation. Recent data demonstrate GP2 to be a specific receptor on microfold (M) cells of intestinal Peyer's patches, which are considered to be the original site of inflammation in CrD. Novel ELISAs, employing recombinant GP2 as the solid phase antigen, have confirmed the presence of IgA and IgG anti-GP2 PABs in CrD patients and revealed an association of anti-GP2 IgA as well as IgG levels with a specific clinical phenotype in CrD. Also, GP2 plays an important role in modulating innate and acquired intestinal immunity. Its urinary homologue, Tamm-Horsfall protein or uromodulin, has a similar effect in the urinary tract, further indicating that GP2 is not just an epiphenomenon of intestinal destruction. This review discusses the role of anti-GP2 autoantibodies as novel CrD-specific markers, the quantification of which provides the basis for further stratification of IBD patients. Given the association with a disease phenotype and the immunomodulating properties of GP2 itself, an important role for GP2

  15. Redefining the MED13L syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adegbola, Abidemi; Musante, Luciana; Callewaert, Bert; Maciel, Patricia; Hu, Hao; Isidor, Bertrand; Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Le Caignec, Cedric; Delle Chiaie, Barbara; Vanakker, Olivier; Menten, Björn; Dheedene, Annelies; Bockaert, Nele; Roelens, Filip; Decaestecker, Karin; Silva, João; Soares, Gabriela; Lopes, Fátima; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia; Cox, Gerald F; Angus, Steven P; Staropoli, John F; Fischer, Ute; Suckow, Vanessa; Bartsch, Oliver; Chess, Andrew; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Kaindl, Angela M; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2015-10-01

    Congenital cardiac and neurodevelopmental deficits have been recently linked to the mediator complex subunit 13-like protein MED13L, a subunit of the CDK8-associated mediator complex that functions in transcriptional regulation through DNA-binding transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. Heterozygous MED13L variants cause transposition of the great arteries and intellectual disability (ID). Here, we report eight patients with predominantly novel MED13L variants who lack such complex congenital heart malformations. Rather, they depict a syndromic form of ID characterized by facial dysmorphism, ID, speech impairment, motor developmental delay with muscular hypotonia and behavioral difficulties. We thereby define a novel syndrome and significantly broaden the clinical spectrum associated with MED13L variants. A prominent feature of the MED13L neurocognitive presentation is profound language impairment, often in combination with articulatory deficits. PMID:25758992

  16. Guillain-Barré syndrome as an extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Fernández, R.; Rubio-Nazabal, E.; de la Iglesia-Martínez, F.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of extraintestinal manifestations, probably immune-mediated, may appear during relapses of Crohn's disease. We report the clinical observation of a 34-year-old woman who developed a Guillain-Barré syndrome, aphthous stomatitis and oligoarthritis during a relapse of Crohn's ileocolitis. This case suggests that the Guillain-Barré syndrome may be another extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:7567741

  17. Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome and Sjögren's syndrome treated with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erina N; Nguyen, Khanh K; Sheikh, Rafiq A; Prindiville, Thomas P

    2005-06-01

    The association of Crohn's disease (CD) and Sweet's syndrome is rare and the presence of Sjögren's syndrome in Crohn's disease is even rarer, with only three reports found in the literature. We describe two cases of Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome, one of which is the first case of CD and Sweet's concomitantly associated with Sjogren's syndrome. Both cases responded rapidly to Infliximab therapy with complete resolution of the skin lesions. PMID:16050146

  18. [Morbus Albers Schonberg osteopetrosis].

    PubMed

    Saracević, Ediba; Hasanbegović, Edo

    2005-01-01

    The patient presented has bone disease, so called "mramor disease". The disease is characterized by insuffiticnty of ostcoclasts which results n persisting of primary spongiosis without normal eroding and bone rebuilding. The discase is diagnosed by X rays where the bone density is increased. The medular space is completly closed by dense bone knitting which, with soft cortical space, seems like bone in bone. This is autosomal recessive disease with serious clinical picture in infants. PMID:15875483

  19. Adalimumab for the treatment of pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Nuti, Federica; Fiorino, Gionata; Danese, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by a chronic relapsing course, high morbidity and impaired quality of life. Their incidence is rising, and about 25% of cases are diagnosed in pediatric age. Anti-TNF-α antibodies, such as infliximab and adalimumab (ADA), are usually administered in patients refractory to conventional therapies. However, increasing evidence suggests that they can be introduced earlier in the course of the disease, especially in patients with aggressive and extensive disease since diagnosis. ADA is a fully human anti-TNF-α antibody recently approved for pediatric Crohn's disease not only in patients unresponsive to infliximab, but also as a first-line anti-TNF-α therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge on the use of ADA in pediatric Crohn's disease and to discuss open issues regarding safety as well as future perspectives. PMID:26211396

  20. Reversibility of Stricturing Crohn's Disease-Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed

    Bettenworth, Dominik; Rieder, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a common feature of Crohn's disease and may appear as a stricture, stenosis, or intestinal obstruction. Fibrostenosing Crohn's disease leads to a significantly impaired quality of life in affected patients and constitutes a challenging treatment situation. In the absence of specific medical antifibrotic treatment options, endoscopic or surgical therapy approaches with their potential harmful side effects are frequently used. However, our understanding of mechanisms of fibrogenesis in general and specifically intestinal fibrosis has emerged. Progression of fibrosis in the liver, lung, or skin can be halted or even reversed, and possible treatment targets have been identified. In face of this observation and given the fact that fibrotic alterations in various organs of the human body share distinct core characteristics, this article aims to address whether reversibility of intestinal fibrosis may be conceivable and to highlight promising research avenues and therapies. PMID:26588089

  1. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.; Moss, A.A.; Baker, E.L.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on small bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    The chronic nature of Crohn's disease (CD) implicates necessity of multiple control assessments throughout patient's life. It is accepted that in patients with CD requiring disease monitoring, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) are--apart from endoscopy--imaging studies of first choice. In practice, diagnostic imaging of patients with CD is troublesome, since MRE is an expensive and complicated study, and CTE exposes patients to high doses of ionizing radiation. Therefore, there is a need for new, both non-invasive and effective, methods of imaging in CD. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (CEUS) is a relatively new method using gas-filled microbubbles serving as contrast agent. It allows for detailed assessment of blood perfusion within intestine wall and peri-intestinal tissues, which enables detection and monitoring of inflammation and its qualitative assessment. The purpose of this paper is to describe CEUS examination technique and its clinical applications in patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:26902030

  3. Crohn's disease confined to the duodenum: A case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong Jin; Whang, Il Soon; Choi, Hyung Wook; Jeong, Cheol Yun; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2016-06-16

    Crohn's disease (CD) can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to anus. However, gastroduodenal CD is rare with a frequency reported to range between 0.5% and 4.0%. Most patients with gastroduodenal CD have concomitant lesions in the terminal ileum or colon, but isolated gastroduodenal Crohn's disease is an extremely rare presentation of the disease accounting for less than 0.07% of all patients with CD. The symptoms of gastroduodenal CD include epigastric pain, dyspepsia, early satiety, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. The diagnosis of gastroduodenal CD requires a high level of clinical suspicion and can be made by comprehensive clinical evaluation. Here we report a rare case of isolated duodenal CD not confirmed by identification of granuloma on biopsy, but diagnosed by clinical evaluation. PMID:27326400

  4. [CanMEDS 2015: better doctors?].

    PubMed

    Borleffs, J C C; Mourits, M J E; Scheele, F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the CanMEDS model, which forms the basis for competency-based learning in both undergraduate and postgraduate training, has been renewed by the introduction of CanMEDS 2015. The most prominent change is the emphasis on leadership skills, which is also reflected by the name change for the role of 'manager' to 'leader'. The addition of milestones provides clearly defined targets for learning and assessment, which facilitates the monitoring of the progression in competence. Furthermore, CanMEDS 2015 strongly focusses on the overall coherence of the separate competencies. CanMEDS, designed as a model that helps to train young doctors to become good doctors, also helps us - the trainers - to become better doctors ourselves. PMID:27438391

  5. MEDLI Will Aid in Understanding of Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    The MEDLI instrument package, contained in the heat shield of the Mars Science Laboratory, will help scientists and engineers improve their computer models and simulations, and provide data to help...

  6. Perioperative Considerations in Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, T Paul; Merchea, Amit

    2016-06-01

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is medically and surgically complex. Numerous patient- and disease-oriented factors must be considered in treating patients with IBD, including nutritional replenishment/support, effect of immunosuppressive medications, extent of resection, and use of proximal diversion. Perioperative planning and optimization of the patient is imperative to ensuring favorable outcomes and limiting morbidity. These perioperative considerations in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are reviewed here. PMID:27247531

  7. Revisiting Crohn's disease as a primary immunodeficiency of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2009-08-31

    Despite two decades of mouse immunology and human genetics studies, the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) remains elusive. New clinical investigations suggest that CD may be caused by inborn errors of macrophages. These errors may result in impaired attraction of granulocytes to the gut wall, causing impaired clearance of intruding bacteria, thereby precipitating the formation of granulomas. This theory paves the way for a macrophage-based Mendelian genetic dissection of CD. PMID:19687225

  8. Risk factors for small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lashner, B A

    1992-08-01

    Suspected risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the small bowel in Crohn's disease include surgically excluded small bowel loops, chronic fistulous disease, and male sex. Review of all seven University of Chicago cases failed to confirm any suspected risk factor. A case-control study was performed to identify possible alternatives. Each case was matched to four randomly selected controls from an inflammatory bowel disease registry matched for year of birth, sex, and confirmed small bowel Crohn's disease. Three factors were significantly associated with the development of cancer: (1) Four cancers developed in the jejunum, and jejunal Crohn's disease was associated with the development of cancer [odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-39.3]. (2) There was an association between the development of cancer and occupations known to be associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk (OR 20.3, CI 2.7-150.5). Three cases (a chemist with exposure to halogenated aromatic compounds and aliphatic amines, a pipefitter with exposure to asbestos, and a machinist with exposures to cutting oils, solvents, and abrasives) and one of 28 controls (a fireman with multiple hazardous exposures) had an occupational risk factor. (3) Among medications taken for at least six months, only 6-mercaptopurine use was associated with cancer (OR 10.8, CI 1.1-108.7). In conclusion, proximal small bowel disease, 6-mercaptopurine use, and hazardous occupations are associated with cancer of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and can be added to the list of suspected risk factors. PMID:1499440

  9. Uncommon Presentation of Isolated Jejunal Lymphoma Masquerading as Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sattavan, Swati; Aggarwal, Lalit; Dikshit, Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is a rare entity, commonly involving stomach, small bowel, and colorectum. The usual location for small bowel B cell lymphoma is distal ileum due to abundant lymphoid tissue. We are reporting the case of a 53-year-old lady presumptively diagnosed as Crohn's disease on clinical and radiological grounds but histopathologically proven to be an unusual variant of isolated primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27313941

  10. Revisiting Crohn's disease as a primary immunodeficiency of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Despite two decades of mouse immunology and human genetics studies, the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) remains elusive. New clinical investigations suggest that CD may be caused by inborn errors of macrophages. These errors may result in impaired attraction of granulocytes to the gut wall, causing impaired clearance of intruding bacteria, thereby precipitating the formation of granulomas. This theory paves the way for a macrophage-based Mendelian genetic dissection of CD. PMID:19687225

  11. Pulmonary Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma in a Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandar, Nanda; Wojtczak, Henry A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (PEH) is a rare neoplasm, largely unresponsive to chemotherapeutic medications, and with varied prognosis. Imaging on computerized tomography may demonstrate perivascular nodules, but diagnosis is ultimately made on biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis. Here we describe a case of PEH in a 14-year-old male with Crohn's disease, which, to our knowledge, has not previously been described in the literature. PMID:25815232

  12. Sclerosing cholangitis associated with Crohn's disease and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Eilam, O.; Goldin, E.; Shouval, D.; Gimon, T.; Brautbar, C.

    1993-01-01

    A middle-aged man was found to have autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Seven years after the first manifestations of the anaemia, he developed jaundice without haemolysis and a diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis was made by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Crohn's colitis was later confirmed by X-rays and colonoscopy. This association is unique to the best of our knowledge and suggests that genetic and immunological mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Images Figure 1 PMID:8234117

  13. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  14. The MED-SUV Multidisciplinary Interoperability Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; D'Auria, Luca; Reitano, Danilo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Roncella, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In accordance with the international Supersite initiative concept, the MED-SUV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes) European project (http://med-suv.eu/) aims to enable long-term monitoring experiment in two relevant geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: Mt. Vesuvio/Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna. This objective requires the integration of existing components, such as monitoring systems and data bases and novel sensors for the measurements of volcanic parameters. Moreover, MED-SUV is also a direct contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) as one the volcano Supersites recognized by the Group on Earth Observation (GEO). To achieve its goal, MED-SUV set up an advanced e-infrastructure allowing the discovery of and access to heterogeneous data for multidisciplinary applications, and the integration with external systems like GEOSS. The MED-SUV overall infrastructure is conceived as a three layer architecture with the lower layer (Data level) including the identified relevant data sources, the mid-tier (Supersite level) including components for mediation and harmonization , and the upper tier (Global level) composed of the systems that MED-SUV must serve, such as GEOSS and possibly other global/community systems. The Data level is mostly composed of existing data sources, such as space agencies satellite data archives, the UNAVCO system, the INGV-Rome data service. They share data according to different specifications for metadata, data and service interfaces, and cannot be changed. Thus, the only relevant MED-SUV activity at this level was the creation of a MED-SUV local repository based on Web Accessible Folder (WAF) technology, deployed in the INGV site in Catania, and hosting in-situ data and products collected and generated during the project. The Supersite level is at the core of the MED-SUV architecture, since it must mediate between the disparate data sources in the layer below, and provide a harmonized view to

  15. Peripheral neutrophil functions and cell signalling in Crohn`s disease.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Nuij, Veerle J A A; van der Woude, C Janneke; Kuipers, Ernst J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Fuhler, Gwenny M

    2013-01-01

    The role of the innate immunity in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), an inflammatory bowel disease, is a subject of increasing interest. Neutrophils (PMN) are key members of the innate immune system which migrate to sites of bacterial infection and initiate the defence against microbes by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), before undergoing apoptosis. It is believed that impaired innate immune responses contribute to CD, but it is as yet unclear whether intrinsic defects in PMN signal transduction and corresponding function are present in patients with quiescent disease. We isolated peripheral blood PMN from CD patients in remission and healthy controls (HC), and characterised migration, bacterial uptake and killing, ROS production and cell death signalling. Whereas IL8-induced migration and signalling were normal in CD, trans-epithelial migration was significantly impaired. Uptake and killing of E. coli were normal. However, an increased ROS production was observed in CD PMN after stimulation with the bacterial peptide analogue fMLP, which was mirrored by an increased fMLP-triggered ERK and AKT signal activation. Interestingly, cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-8 during GMCSF-induced rescue from cell-death was decreased in CD neutrophils, but a reduced survival signal emanating from STAT3 and AKT pathways was concomitantly observed, resulting in a similar percentage of end stage apoptotic PMN in CD patients and HC. In toto, these data show a disturbed signal transduction activation and functionality in peripheral blood PMN from patients with quiescent CD, which point toward an intrinsic defect in innate immunity in these patients. PMID:24367671

  16. Sterile Seroma after Drainage of Purulent Muscle Abscess in Crohn's Disease: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Treitman, Adam; Tabriz, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Purulent skeletal muscle abscesses can occur in Crohn's disease. We report a case of a sterile seroma complicating percutaneous drainage of a purulent skeletal muscle abscess in Crohn's ileitis. We compare and contrast this case with a similar case we published earlier. We emphasize the importance of recognition and differentiation from a septic purulent abscess. PMID:27529038

  17. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease. PMID:26219289

  18. Human melioidosis reported by ProMED

    PubMed Central

    Nasner-Posso, Katherinn Melissa; Cruz-Calderón, Stefania; Montúfar-Andrade, Franco E.; Dance, David A.B.; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective There are limited sources describing the global burden of emerging diseases. A review of human melioidosis reported by ProMED was performed and the reliability of the data retrieved assessed in comparison to published reports. The effectiveness of ProMED was evaluated as a source of epidemiological data by focusing on melioidosis. Methods Using the keyword ‘melioidosis’ in the ProMED search engine, all of the information from the reports and collected data was reviewed using a structured form, including the year, country, gender, occupation, number of infected individuals, and number of fatal cases. Results One hundred and twenty-four entries reported between January 1995 and October 2014 were identified. A total of 4630 cases were reported, with death reported in 505 cases, suggesting a misleadingly low overall case fatality rate (CFR) of 11%. Of 20 cases for which the gender was reported, 12 (60%) were male. Most of the cases were reported from Australia, Thailand, Singapore, Vietnam, and Malaysia, with sporadic reports from other countries. Conclusions Internet-based reporting systems such as ProMED are useful to gather information and synthesize knowledge on emerging infections. Although certain areas need to be improved, ProMED provided good information about melioidosis. PMID:25975651

  19. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  20. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography for the detection and assessment of Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chenjing; Ma, Xuelei; Xue, Luqi; Xu, Jing; Li, Qingfang; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disease. Imaging modalities are essential for the diagnosis and assessment of CD. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a well-tolerated, noninvasive and radiation-free modality and has shown potential in CD assessment. We aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of SICUS in the detection and assessment of small-bowel lesions and complications in CD. Methods: We searched PubMed database for relevant studies published before April 24, 2016. We integrated the true positive, false positive, false negative, and true negative into the pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio. Forest plots were to represent the pooled results of all studies. Results: Thirteen articles were finally considered eligible. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SICUS in detecting small-bowel lesions were 0.883 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.847–0.913) and 0.861 (95% CI 0.828–0.890), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 39.123 (95% CI 20.014–76.476) and the area under the curve of summary receiver operating characteristic was 0.9273 (standard error: 0.0152). In subgroup analyses, SICUS represented fine sensitivity and specificity in proximal and distal small intestine lesion, as well as in CD-related complications such as stricture, dilation, abscess, and fistula. Conclusion: SICUS is accurate enough to make a complete assessment about the location, extent, number, and almost all kinds of complications in CD small-bowel lesions. PMID:27495028

  1. Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Schicho, Rudolf; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In ancient medicine, cannabis has been widely used to cure disturbances and inflammation of the bowel. A recent clinical study now shows that the medicinal plant Cannabis sativa has lived up to expectations and proved to be highly efficient in cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. In a prospective placebo-controlled study, it has been shown what has been largely anticipated from anecdotal reports, i.e. that cannabis produces significant clinical benefits in patients with Crohn's disease. The mechanisms involved are not yet clear but most likely include peripheral actions on cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, and may also include central actions. PMID:24356243

  2. Takayasu's Arteritis and Crohn's Disease in a Young Hispanic Female

    PubMed Central

    Saurabh, Shireesh; Tan, Irene J.

    2014-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic inflammatory granulomatous disorders of undetermined etiology. TA is a large vessel vasculitis with a predilection for the aorta and its branches in young women of Asian descent; whereas CD has characteristic gastrointestinal manifestations more prevalent in young Caucasians. We describe a case of both diseases in a young Hispanic female, review the literature, and impart new insight on possible genetic linkage and the role of interleukin 12 B (IL-12B) as the common autoimmune mechanism and potential therapeutic target in this rare disease combination. PMID:25152825

  3. Organizing Pneumonia in a Patient with Quiescent Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) was admitted to our hospital due to moderate risk of pneumonia while receiving scheduled adalimumab maintenance therapy. Symptoms remained virtually unchanged following administration of antibiotics. A final diagnosis of organizing pneumonia (OP) was made based on findings of intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue and fibrous thickening of the alveolar walls on pathological examination and patchy consolidations and ground glass opacities on computed tomography. Immediate administration of prednisolone provided rapid, sustained improvement. Although a rare complication, OP is a pulmonary manifestation that requires attention in CD patients. PMID:27413560

  4. BALANCE AND PIPETTE CALIBRATION AT MED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yearly, every MED analytical balance and automatic pipette inventoried is certified as working or it is repaired to working condition. - - - The QA office maintains three sets of standard weights that can be used by the staff to verify balance operation routinely after the yearly...

  5. MED-SUV Data Life Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangianantoni, Agata; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Letizia; Tulino, Sabrina

    2015-04-01

    The MED-SUV project aims to implement a digital e-infrastructure for data access in order to promote the monitoring and study of key volcanic regions prone to volcanic hazards, and thus improve hazard assessment, according to the rationale of Supersite GEO initiative to Vesuvius- Campi Flegrei and Mt Etna, currently identified as Permanent Supersites. The present study focuses on the life cycle of MED-SUV data generated in the first period of the project and highlights the managing approach, as well as the crucial steps to be implemented for ensuring that data will be properly and ethically managed and can be used and accessed from both MED-SUV and the external community. The process is conceived outlining how research data being handled as the project progresses, describing what data are collected, processed or generated and how these data are going to be shared and made available through Open Access. Data cycle begins with their generation and ends with the deposit in the digital infrastructure, its key series of stages through which MED-SUV data passes are Collection, Data citation, Categorization of data, Approval procedure, Registration of datasets, Application of licensing models, and PID assignment. This involves a combination of procedures and practices taking into account the scientific core mission and the priorities of the project as well as the potential legal issues related to the management and protection of the Intellectual Property. We believe that the implementation of this process constitutes a significant encouragement in MED-SUV data sharing and as a consequence a better understanding on the volcanic processes, hazard assessment and a better integration with other Supersites projects.

  6. An update of the role of nutritional therapy in the management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Alhagamhmad, Moftah H; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A; Leach, Steven T

    2012-08-01

    Crohn's disease is an increasingly global health concern. Currently without a cure, it significantly alters the quality of life of Crohn's disease sufferers and places a heavy financial burden on the community. Recent reports show that the rising prevalence of Crohn's disease is no longer confined to Western countries, with considerable increases seen particularly in Asia. Nutritional problems are often associated with Crohn's disease, most notably in the paediatric population, with underweight and stunting commonly seen at presentation. In addition, linear growth retardation and pubertal delay can also manifest in these younger patients. Therefore, exclusive enteral nutrition has been used as a therapeutic option to treat Crohn's disease, in part to address the nutritional complications of the disease. Exclusive enteral nutrition can improve nutrition as well as induce remission at a rate equivalent to corticosteroids. It is safe particularly with long-term use and can induce mucosal healing, considered the gold standard for therapy, at a rate superior to corticosteroids. Exclusive enteral nutrition has thus become the preferred therapeutic option in many centres for the treatment of paediatric Crohn's disease. This review discusses the role of exclusive enteral nutrition as a therapeutic option for the treatment of Crohn's disease, as well as the latest findings into its mechanisms of action. PMID:22699323

  7. High frequency of helicobacter negative gastritis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Halme, L; Kärkkäinen, P; Rautelin, H; Kosunen, T U; Sipponen, P

    1996-01-01

    The frequency of gastric Crohn's disease has been considered low. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with Crohn's disease. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed on 62 consecutive patients suffering from ileocolonic Crohn's disease. Biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus were processed for both histological and bacteriological examinations. H pylori antibodies of IgG and IgA classes were measured in serum samples by enzyme immunoassay. Six patients (9.7%) were infected with H pylori, as shown by histology, and in five of them the infection was also verified by serology. Twenty one patients (32%) had chronic H pylori negative gastritis (negative by both histology and serology) and one of them also had atrophy in the antrum and corpus. Granulomas were found in four patients. The characteristic appearance of H pylori negative gastritis was focal and mostly mild inflammation resembling the inflammatory changes seen in the gut in Crohn's disease. Patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis had a significantly more active disease in their gut than those with normal gastric mucosa (p < 0.01). It is concluded that H pylori positive gastritis is rare, while H pylori negative gastritis is relatively common in patients with Crohn's disease. H pylori negative 'Crohn's gastritis' seems to be associated with active Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8675090

  8. Microbial Dysbiosis in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Day, Andrew S.; Huinao, Karina D.; Leach, Steven T.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  9. Microbial dysbiosis in pediatric patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Day, Andrew S; Huinao, Karina D; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A; Dowd, Scot E; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2012-10-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  10. [Surgical management of small bowel localization of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, Tr; Catrina, E; Doran, H; Mihalache, O; Bugă, C; Degeratu, D; Predescu, G

    2009-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic condition with recurrent relapses, difficult to diagnose and requiring a complex medical and surgical treatment. Analyzing 11 patients admitted in the surgical Clinique between 2003 and 2008 with Crohn's disease diagnostic, the authors study at the 7 patients operated the reason of the surgical interventions represented by the complications of the inflammatory disease--intestinal obstruction 2 cases, peritonitic syndrome in 3 cases, malignization 1 case, enterovesical fistulae--1 case. Intraoperatory the differential diagnosis between an inflammatory or tumoral etiology of the lesions was very difficult, and the surgical indication was in almost all cases for enteral resection. Postoperative evolution was in most cases with complications (5 cases)--unique anastomotic fistulae 2 cases, or recurrent fistulae in 3 cases, late bowel obstruction--2 cases. Studying the literature, it can be concluded that the surgical treatment is only one stage of the complex treatment that must be individualized for each case and applied only to the complications of the disease. PMID:20187469

  11. Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome: an uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Catalán-Serra, I; Martín-Moraleda, L; Navarro-López, L; Gil-Borrás, R; Pont-Sanjuán, V; Ferrando-Marco, J; Herrera-García, L; Durbán-Serrano, L; Hontangas-Pla, V; Benlloch-Pérez, S; Escudero-Sanchis, A; Gonzalvo-Sorribes, J M; Bixquert-Jiménez, M

    2010-05-01

    Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (SS) is characterized by the sudden onset of painful erythematous lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques) together with fever and neutrophilia. The lesions are typically located on hands, arms, upper trunk, neck and face, showing an asymmetric distribution. Acute phase reactants are usually elevated and dermal infiltration of neutrophils without vasculitis is seen on skin biopsies. It is considered as a marker of systemic disease in over half of the cases, and is associated with infections, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune connective tissue disorders and various neoplasias. Its association with Crohn's disease (CD) is unusual and it appears mainly in association with colonic involvement. Fewer than 50 cases have been published in the medical literature since its first description in 1964, some concurrent with the first episode of CD. We present two patients with Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome diagnosed in our department at the time of CD diagnosis, as well as their response to treatment, subsequent course of the disease, and a review of the scientific literature. PMID:20524763

  12. Short Bowel Syndrome and Intestinal Failure in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Parian, Alyssa M; Shah, Neha D; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the availability of powerful immunosuppressants, many patients with Crohn's disease still require one or more intestinal resections throughout the course of their disease. Multiple resections and a progressive reduction in bowel length can lead to the development of short bowel syndrome, a form of intestinal failure that compromises fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient absorption. The pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome involves a reduction in intestinal surface area, alteration in the enteric hormonal feedback, dysmotility, and related comorbidities. Most patients will initially require parenteral nutrition as a primary or supplemental source of nutrition, although several patients may eventually wean off nutrition support depending on the residual gut anatomy and adherence to medical and nutritional interventions. Available surgical treatments focus on reducing motility, lengthening the native small bowel, or small bowel transplantation. Care of these complex patients with short bowel syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach of physicians, dietitians, and nurses to provide optimal intestinal rehabilitation, nutritional support, and improvement in quality of life. PMID:26818425

  13. Postoperative outcome of Crohn's disease in 30 children

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, M; Jaby, O; Mougenot, J; Ferkdadji, L; Debrun, A; Faure, C; Delagausie, P; Peuchmaur, M; Aigrain, Y; Navarro, J; Cezard, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Thirty children operated on for Crohn's disease (CD) were reviewed (1975-1994). The aim of the study was to assess their postoperative outcome. 
Patients—19 boys and 11 girls, aged 15.3 (2) years (range 11.3-20) at surgery were studied. 
Results—Surgical indications were acute complications of CD and chronic intestinal illness. Six months after surgery, 11 of 12 patients had been weaned off steroids, and 22 of 23 patients were weaned off nutritional support; 17 patients without recurrrence had a mean (SD) weight gain of 2.1 (8) kg and a height gain of 3.36 (3) cm. During 3.1 (2.7) years follow up, 12 patients (40%) had a recurrence of the disease after 19.4 (14) months (means (SD)): supra-anastomotic recurrence (six), severe perianal disease (two), and chronic illness (four). Six of 14 patients who were treated with mesalazine (13) or azathioprine (one) had recurrences. The postoperative recurrence rate was 50% at two years. 
Conclusion—Surgical treatment modifies the immediate outcome of severe or complicated CD, but does not prevent recurrence, despite localised resection or prophylactic postoperative treatment. Extension of the disease before surgery seems to be a major risk factor for postoperative recurrence in children. 

 Keywords: Crohn's disease; surgery; children PMID:9824343

  14. Guidelines for treatment with infliximab for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hommes, D W; Oldenburg, B; van Bodegraven, A A; van Hogezand, R A; de Jong, D J; Romberg-Camps, M J L; van der Woude, J; Dijkstra, G

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab is an accepted induction and maintenance treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. The effectiveness of infliximab has been demonstrated for both active luminal disease and for enterocutaneous fistulisation. In addition, infliximab can be administered for extraintestinal symptoms of Crohn's disease, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis and arthropathy. Maintenance treatment with infliximab is effective and is regarded as safe as long as the necessary safety measures are heeded. Infusion reactions occur in 3 to 17% of the patients and are associated with the formation of antibodies to infliximab. A reduction in infusion reactions is possible by the concurrent administration of steroids and the use of immunosuppressants (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate). Furthermore, immunosuppressants increase the duration of the response to infliximab. For these reasons, the concomitant use of immunosuppressants with infliximab is recommended. Infections and most specifically tuberculosis need to be ruled out before infliximab is administered. Up to now, there are no indications for a connection between an increased risk for malignancies and treatment with infliximab. PMID:16929083

  15. Practical Approaches to "Top-Down" Therapies for Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Amezaga, Aranzazu Jauregui; Van Assche, Gert

    2016-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, progressive, and disabling disease that leads in most cases to the development of bowel damage presenting as a fistula, abscess, or stricture. For years, therapy for Crohn's disease has been based on a "step-up" approach, in which anti-TNF agents are administered after the failure of steroids and immunosuppressants. However, recent studies have suggested that early introduction of anti-TNF agents combined with immunosuppressants can modify the natural history of the disease. Patients who could benefit more of this "top-down" strategy would be those at elevated risk of a complicated or severe inflammatory bowel disease or with factors that can predict an aggressive disease course. Therefore, the management of a patient with CD should be personalized, taking into account the patient's specific characteristics and comorbidities, disease activity, site and behavior of the disease, and predictable factors of poor prognosis. A balance between medication and potential adverse effects should be achieved, trying to avoid under or overtreatment, always discussing the different therapeutic options with the patient. The natural history of ulcerative colitis differs from CD and, to date, there is not much scientific evidence on the use of early combined immunosuppression. PMID:27184044

  16. Schaumann bodies in Crohn's disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Luisa; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bortesi, Laura; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Liut, Francesca; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2012-08-01

    Schaumann bodies are inclusion bodies, first described by Schaumann in 1941, typically seen in granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis and chronic beryllium diseases. Williams WJ, in 1964, reported Schaumann bodies to occur in 10% of Crohn's disease (CD). We report a case of Crohn's disease, initially misdiagnosed as a schistosoma-related colitis for the presence of numerous calcified bodies resembling calcified ova and scattered granulomas. Subsequent biopsies showed more typical histological features and, in combination with a more complete clinical history, diagnosis of Crohn's disease was made. PMID:22503169

  17. Resident Rounds: Part III - Case Report: Crohn's Disease Presenting as Granulomatous Cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Bryce L; Thomas, R Scott; Howerter, Stephanie S

    2016-02-01

    Cutaneous Crohn's is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease seen in a select group of patients, in which cutaneous lesions similar to those of the intestinal illness appear distant from the gastrointestinal tract. Oral findings may be found in up to 60% of patients with extra-intestinal Crohn's and may appear as the initial symptom underlying disease. We present a case of a 17-year-old male presenting with granulomatous chelitis of the lower lip who was unaware of the underlying diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:26885796

  18. [Coexistence of Crohn disease and Wegener granulomatosis in a 15-year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Sieczkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowski, Piotr; Szumera, Małgorzata; Kamińska, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease is being diagnosed more and more frequently in children and teenagers. Clinical symptoms are mainly related to the gastrointestinal tract, however there are many reports in the literature about the coexistence of Crohn disease with other autoimmunological disorders such as celiac disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism, systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener granulomatosis. We report a 15-year-old patient with Crohn disease who also developed Wegener granulomatosis. The presented case illustrates the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis when symptoms of the original disease are superimposed on symptoms of a different disorder. PMID:22516704

  19. The influence of zinc status and malnutrition on immunological function in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ainley, C; Cason, J; Slavin, B M; Wolstencroft, R A; Thompson, R P

    1991-06-01

    Cellular immunity is likely to be important in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease; whether it is abnormal is not clear. The heterogeneity of patients with Crohn's disease probably underlies the disparity of reports, but attempts to determine which clinical features influence cellular immunity have been largely unsuccessful. This is probably caused by the omission of nutritional status as a potential factor, even though zinc deficiency has frequently been linked with abnormal immunity. Therefore, a detailed study of nutritional and tissue zinc status, nonspecific cellular immunity, and a measure of phagocytic function was performed in 32 patients with Crohn's disease and in a control group of 18 normal subjects and 12 patients with anorexia nervosa. Fourteen patients with Crohn's disease, all patients with anorexia nervosa, but none of the normal controls were malnourished. Peripheral blood lymphocyte population levels were normal in patients with Crohn's disease and in normal controls, but there was a small decrease in the levels of patients with anorexia nervosa. In vivo delayed hypersensitivity skin test responses were profoundly depressed in patients with anorexia nervosa and decreased in patients with Crohn's disease who were malnourished or receiving systemic glucocorticoids. In vitro lymphocyte transformation was reduced in malnourished patients with Crohn's disease, but there were only minor changes in patients with anorexia nervosa. There were alterations of in vitro immunoregulation in Crohn's disease, but they were not responsible for the abnormal lymphocyte transformation responses in malnourished patients. In vitro phagocytic function was reduced in patients with active Crohn's disease. These findings suggest that depressed in vivo and in vitro cellular immunity in malnourished patients with Crohn's disease is caused by a qualitative lymphocyte defect and that depressed in vivo but normal in vitro cellular immunity in anorexia nervosa is caused by a

  20. Crohn's disease and massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic appearance and two case reports

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrity, T.J.; Manasse, J.S.; Koch, K.L.; Weidner, W.A.

    1987-10-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding is described in two patients with Crohn's disease. In case 1, extravasation of contrast material from the ileal branch of the ileocolic artery was seen during selective angiography. In case 2, results of an in vitro labeled /sup 99/Tc pyrophosphate red blood cell scan localized bleeding to the ileum. In both cases, medical management was unsuccessful, and surgical resection of the affected bowel was required to stop the bleeding. Angiographic appearance of Crohn's disease is discussed, and a review of the literature of this unusual feature of Crohn's disease is presented. 16 references.

  1. Laparoscopic Pancreaticoduodenectomy for the Management of Localized Crohn's Disease of the Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Xingjun, Guo; Feng, Zhu; Min, Wang; Renyi, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease of the duodenum is an uncommon condition. Our case was an extremely rare manifestation of Crohn's disease, who presented with obstruction of the pylorus and the first and the second parts of the duodenum. Because of the severity of the obstruction, he underwent laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy. Postoperative pancreatic leakage and bowel fistula were not observed, and there was no morbidity during the follow-up period. There was also no disturbance in digestive function, postoperatively. This is the first case employing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy to cure benign lesions leading to duodenal obstruction. Minimally invasive laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy technology shows a very big advantage in treating this rare benign Crohn's disease. PMID:27574357

  2. MED-SUV final strategic issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, Letizia; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2016-04-01

    Aside the scientific, technical and financial aspects managed by the "Project Management" Work Package (WP1), the great challenge and more time consuming task of this WP has surely been the definition and application of some strategic guidelines crucial to trace the project right path to its final success and for the project outcome sustainability after month 36. In particular, given that one of the main objectives of MED-SUV is that to be compliant with the GEO initiative, particularly concerning the data sharing, great efforts have been made by WP1 at first to define the MED-SUV Data Policy Guidelines, and currently to make it suitable for the EU Supersites. At present, WP1 is also dealing with the exploitation of the achieved foreground among the project's participant and to define a Memorandum of Understanding to sustain the monitoring systems and e-infrastructure developed in the project framework. Whilst the Data Policy guidelines document was implemented in the first year of MED-SUV, WP1 is now focused on the last deliverable 'Strategic and Legal deliverables', which includes the remaining issues. To the aim, WP1 has strategically separated the Exploitation of Foreground document preparation from the Memorandum of Understanding definition. The Exploitation of Foreground process has regarded the identification of Foreground, the exploitable results, the purpose of such Foreground, the collection of information from either the scientific community of MED-SUV or industrial participants; to this aim WP1 circulated an ad hoc questionnaire to put together information on (the) every kind of MED-SUV outcome, on their owners, on the kind of ownership (single/joint), on the outcome exploitation, and on proposals for its sustainability. While the first information will allow us to prepare the final Exploitation Agreement among the project's participant, the information on the exploitation of the outcome and likely sustainability proposals will contribute to the

  3. LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Research News From NIH LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... Javascript on. Photo: Comstock LactMed, a free online database with information on drugs and lactation, is one ...

  4. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  5. Technical development of PubMed Interact: an improved interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Background The project aims to create an alternative search interface for MEDLINE/PubMed that may provide assistance to the novice user and added convenience to the advanced user. An earlier version of the project was the 'Slider Interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches' (SLIM) which provided JavaScript slider bars to control search parameters. In this new version, recent developments in Web-based technologies were implemented. These changes may prove to be even more valuable in enhancing user interactivity through client-side manipulation and management of results. Results PubMed Interact is a Web-based MEDLINE/PubMed search application built with HTML, JavaScript and PHP. It is implemented on a Windows Server 2003 with Apache 2.0.52, PHP 4.4.1 and MySQL 4.1.18. PHP scripts provide the backend engine that connects with E-Utilities and parses XML files. JavaScript manages client-side functionalities and converts Web pages into interactive platforms using dynamic HTML (DHTML), Document Object Model (DOM) tree manipulation and Ajax methods. With PubMed Interact, users can limit searches with JavaScript slider bars, preview result counts, delete citations from the list, display and add related articles and create relevance lists. Many interactive features occur at client-side, which allow instant feedback without reloading or refreshing the page resulting in a more efficient user experience. Conclusion PubMed Interact is a highly interactive Web-based search application for MEDLINE/PubMed that explores recent trends in Web technologies like DOM tree manipulation and Ajax. It may become a valuable technical development for online medical search applications. PMID:17083729

  6. Sweet's syndrome in association with Crohn's disease: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, A; Shaked, M; Landau, M; Dolev, E

    2001-10-01

    A 41-year-old woman developed a skin rash as part of Sweet's syndrome concurrent with the first episode of Crohn's disease of the colon. Sweet's syndrome, acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, may be associated with inflammatory, infectious, or neoplastic diseases. Its association with Crohn's disease is very rare, and when reported it has been mainly associated with Crohn's colitis. This association has been described in various stages of the disease. Sweet's syndrome may be considered one of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn's disease. Early diagnosis of this dermatosis may be important because of the prompt response to treatment with corticosteroids. The value of metronidazole should be considered because this medication may enhance response to treatment. PMID:11598485

  7. Fracture risk is increased in Crohn's disease, but not in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, P; Krogh, K; Rejnmark, L; Laurberg, S; Mosekilde, L

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To study fracture rates and risk factors for fractures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
METHODS—998 self administered questionnaires were issued to members of the Danish Colitis/Crohn Association, and 1000 questionnaires were issued to randomly selected control subjects. 845 patients (84.5%) and 645 controls (65.4%) returned the questionnaire (p<0.01). 817 patients and 635 controls could be analysed.
RESULTS—Analysis was performed on 383 patients with Crohn's disease (median age 39, range 8-82 years; median age at diagnosis 26, range 1-75 years), 434 patients with ulcerative colitis (median age 39, range 11-86 years; median age at diagnosis 29, range 10-78 years), and 635 controls (median age 43, range 19-93 years, p<0.01). The fracture risk was increased in female patients with Crohn's disease (relative risk (RR) = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.6), but not in male patients with Crohn's disease (RR = 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.3) or in patients with ulcerative colitis (RR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.6). An increased proportion of low energy fractures was observed in patients with Crohn's disease (15.7% versus 1.4 % in controls, 2p<0.01), but not in patients with ulcerative colitis (5.4%, 2p=0.30). The increased fracture frequency in Crohn's disease was present for fractures of the spine, feet, and toes and fractures of the ribs and pelvis. Fracture risk increased with increasing duration of systemic corticosteroid use in Crohn's disease (2p=0.028), but not in ulcerative colitis (2p=0.50).
CONCLUSIONS—An increased risk of low energy fractures was observed in female patients with Crohn's disease, but not in male patients with Crohn's disease or in patients with ulcerative colitis.


Keywords: fracture; Crohn's disease; ulcerative colitis; inflammatory bowel disease; osteoporosis PMID:10644310

  8. Crohn's disease and the mycobacterioses: a review and comparison of two disease entities.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J

    1989-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic granulomatous ileocolitis, of unknown etiology, which generally affects the patient during the prime of life. Medical treatment is supportive at best, and patients afflicted with this disorder generally live with chronic pain, in and out of hospitals, throughout their lives. The disease bears the name of the investigator who convincingly distinguished this disease from intestinal tuberculosis in 1932. This distinction was not universally accepted, and the notion of a mycobacterial etiology has never been fully dismissed. Nevertheless, it was 46 years after the distinction of Crohn's disease and intestinal tuberculosis before research attempting to reassociate mycobacteria and Crohn's disease was published. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the possible association of mycobacteria and Crohn's disease due largely to the isolation of genetically identical pathogenic Mycobacterium paratuberculosis from several patients with Crohn's disease in the United States, the Netherlands, Australia, and France. These pathogenic organisms have been isolated from only a few patients, and direct evidence for their involvement in the disease process is not clear; however, M. paratuberculosis is an obligate intracellular organism and strict pathogen, which strongly suggests some etiologic role. Immunologic evidence of a mycobacterial etiology, as assessed by humoral immune determinations, has been conflicting, but evaluation of the more relevant cellular immunity has not been performed. Data from histochemical searches for mycobacteria in Crohn's disease tissues have been equally conflicting, with acid-fast bacilli detected in 0 to 35% of patients. Animal model studies have demonstrated the pathogenic potential of isolates as well as elucidated the complexity of mycobacterial-intestinal interactions. Treatment of Crohn's disease patients with antimycobacterial agent has not been fully assessed, although case reports suggest efficacy. The

  9. Case report of cheilitis granulomatosa and joint complaints as presentation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Schuppen, Joost; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; D'Haens, Geert R; Benninga, Marc A

    2016-04-01

    Cheilitis granulomatosa is characterized by granulomatous lip swelling. We report a case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with orofacial swelling and arthralgia, who eventually was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, which was successfully treated with infliximab and azathioprine combination therapy. Recurrent or persistent orofacial swelling should prompt consideration of cheilitis granulomatosa, and further diagnostic evaluation to exclude the presence of Crohn's disease seems warranted. PMID:27017505

  10. Regression of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease after anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rahier, J F; Lion, L; Dewit, O; Lambert, M

    2005-01-01

    The association of inflammatory bowel disease and acute febrile neutrophilic dermatitis (Sweet's syndrome) has infrequently been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with ileo- anal Crohn's disease who presented simultaneously an erythema nodosum and a Sweet's syndrome. A dramatic regression of the cutaneous lesions was observed after infliximab treatment, indicating that this therapy might be useful for both Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome. PMID:16268426

  11. [Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and erythema nodosum in Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Schlegel Gómez, R; Kiesewetter, F; von den Driesch, P; Hornstein, O P

    1990-07-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) and erythema nodosum in association with Crohn's disease. The first patient showed symmetrical painful erythemas on her cheeks after hemicolectomy. Additionally, red painful nodules appeared on her lower legs. The second patient disclosed typical Sweet's syndrome-like lesions with pustules and plaques on her face, scalp and extremities after activation of Crohn's disease. Simultaneously, erythema nodosum-like lesions appeared on her lower legs. PMID:2144848

  12. Alopecia totalis in a patient with Crohn's disease and its treatment with azathioprine.

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, C. J.; August, P. J.; Whorwell, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    A patient with Crohn's disease and alopecia totalis is described. Despite relative inactivity of the Crohn's disease, treatment with azathioprine was commenced. This led to complete regrowth of hair which was lost when the drug was discontinued. Re-institution of azathioprine restored hair to normal again and the patient has since declined to try stopping the drug despite the knowledge of potential side effects. PMID:2813243

  13. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae in patients with Crohn's disease and their possible pathogenic importance.

    PubMed Central

    Giaffer, M H; Clark, A; Holdsworth, C D

    1992-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) may play an important part in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Because of this the levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against three S cerevisiae strains (NCYC 77, NCYC 79, and NCYC 1108) were assayed in 49 patients with Crohn's disease, 43 with ulcerative colitis, 14 with coeliac disease, and 21 healthy controls. Coded serum samples were tested by ELISA. Similar antibody patterns to all three strains were found. IgG and IgA antibody levels were significantly raised in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.0001 respectively) and with ulcerative colitis patients (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0006 respectively). Raised IgA, but not IgG, yeast antibody levels were found in two patients with Crohn's disease who were intolerant to yeast, but these values were similar to those in other patients without yeast intolerance. In ulcerative colitis, both IgG and IgA levels were similar to normal controls. Patients with small bowel Crohn's disease had significantly higher IgG antibody levels than those with colonic disease (p < 0.01). High levels of IgG, but not IgA, antibody were present in patients with coeliac disease, the antibody responses being indistinguishable from those found in Crohn's disease. It is concluded that the presence of IgG antibody to S cerevisiae is characteristic but not specific to Crohn's disease. Although raised IgA antibody levels are more frequently found in Crohn's disease, their pathogenic importance remains to be established. PMID:1398231

  14. Tracheal Involvement in Crohn Disease: the First Case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seunghyun; Park, Jongha; Kim, Hyun-Kuk; Kim, Ji Yeon; Hur, So Chong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Jae Won; Lee, Juwon

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory involvement in Crohn disease (CD) is rare condition with only about a dozen reported cases. We report the first case of CD with tracheal involvement in Korea. An 18-year-old woman with CD was hospitalized because of coughing, dyspnea, and fever sustained for 3 weeks. Because she had stridor in her neck, we performed computed tomography of the neck, which showed circumferential wall thickening of the larynx and hypopharynx. Bronchoscopy revealed mucosal irregularity, ulceration, and exudates debris in the proximal trachea, and bronchial biopsy revealed chronic inflammation with granulation tissue. Based on these findings, we suspected CD with tracheal involvement and began administering intravenous methylprednisolone at 1 mg/kg per day, after which her symptoms and bronchoscopic findings improved. PMID:26879553

  15. Efficacy and Complications of Surgery for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Crohn's disease commonly undergo surgery during their lifetime. Indications for surgical intervention include obstruction, intra-abdominal or perianal abscess, enterocutaneous fistulas, and complex perianal disease. As medical therapies continue to improve, it is important that surgical therapies are chosen carefully. This is particularly important in the treatment of perianal fistulas; combined surgical and medical therapy offer the best chance for success. In the treatment of small-bowel disease, bowel preservation is key. For the repair of short strictures, endoscopic dilatation is the preferred method when accessible; strictureplasty has been shown to be safe and effective for increasingly longer segments of disease. Intra-abdominal abscesses should be drained percutaneously, if possible. In the presence of colonic disease, segmental resection is recommended. Unfortunately, refractory disease still frequently requires complete proctectomy and permanent diversion. PMID:21088749

  16. Emerging therapeutic targets and strategies in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Furfaro, Federica; Fiorino, Gionata; Allocca, Mariangela; Gilardi, Daniela; Danese, Silvio

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an immune-mediated inflammatory bowel disease, in which inflammation is driven by a complex interaction between the microbiota, immune cells, genes and mediators. New mechanisms of action and several cytokines have been identified as factors involved in the inflammatory process in CD, and many new molecules have been developed to treat this complex disease. New agents have been developed that target leukocyte trafficking, block or adhesion molecules for example, as well as the development of antibodies against classic inflammatory cytokines or therapies directed against IL-12/23 and Janus kinases. The development of selective mechanisms of action and targeting of different cytokines or inflammatory mediators for each patient presents the biggest challenge for the future in CD therapy. Such agents are currently at different phases of development. We aim to review the current literature data on a targeted approach in CD, which could be promising alternative approach for CD patients in the near future. PMID:26766496

  17. [Combination biological therapy for fistular Crohn's disease: clinical demonstration].

    PubMed

    Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L; Konoplyannikov, A G; Ruchkina, I N; Lischchinskaya, A A

    2014-01-01

    Perianal fistulas are the most common and frequently encountered types of fistulas in Crohn's disease (CD). They are incurable, may worsen quality of life in a patient and increase the risk of total bowel resection. Despite the significant impact of biological (anticytokine) therapy for fistular CD, treatment in this category of patients remains a difficult task with the high risk of recurrent CD. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) having immunomodulatory properties and a great regenerative potential are currently also used to treat fistulas in CD and perianal fistulas of another etiology. The given clinical case demonstrates that complete fistula healing could be achieved only after a few local administrations of MSCs in combination with infliximab and azathioprine. World and our experiences indicate that there is a need for randomized controlled trials with a sufficient number of patients to prove the efficacy of MSCs in the combination therapy of fistulas in CD. PMID:24772517

  18. [Overview of diet-related study in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jian'an; Li, Jieshou

    2015-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting any part of the digestive tract which relapses and remits throughout the disease course. It occurs in individuals with genetic susceptibility and involves an abnormal response of the immune system to the external environment. Besides, improved hygiene, abuse of antibiotics, westernization of diet with high sugar and fat are thought to be associated with rapidly increasing incidence of CD. Certain components of foods may influence gut inflammation through antigen presentation and alteration of the microflora. This article aims mainly to review diet-related clinical studies to outline its roles in the pathogenesis and progress of disease, and then give some evidence-based suggestions. PMID:26704014

  19. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  20. Active learning based segmentation of Crohns disease from abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Vos, Franciscus M; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel active learning (AL) framework, and combines it with semi supervised learning (SSL) for segmenting Crohns disease (CD) tissues from abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Robust fully supervised learning (FSL) based classifiers require lots of labeled data of different disease severities. Obtaining such data is time consuming and requires considerable expertise. SSL methods use a few labeled samples, and leverage the information from many unlabeled samples to train an accurate classifier. AL queries labels of most informative samples and maximizes gain from the labeling effort. Our primary contribution is in designing a query strategy that combines novel context information with classification uncertainty and feature similarity. Combining SSL and AL gives a robust segmentation method that: (1) optimally uses few labeled samples and many unlabeled samples; and (2) requires lower training time. Experimental results show our method achieves higher segmentation accuracy than FSL methods with fewer samples and reduced training effort. PMID:27040833

  1. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis the common villain?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic disease of the intestines in dairy cows and a wide range of other animals, including nonhuman primates, called Johne's ("Yo-knee's") disease. MAP has been consistently identified by a variety of techniques in humans with Crohn's disease. The research investigating the presence of MAP in patients with Crohn's disease has often identified MAP in the "negative" ulcerative colitis controls as well, suggesting that ulcerative colitis is also caused by MAP. Like other infectious diseases, dose, route of infection, age, sex and genes influence whether an individual infected with MAP develops ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The apparently opposite role of smoking, increasing the risk of Crohn's disease while decreasing the risk of ulcerative colitis, is explained by a more careful review of the literature that reveals smoking causes an increase in both diseases but switches the phenotype from ulcerative colitis to Crohn's disease. MAP as the sole etiologic agent of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease explains their common epidemiology, geographic distribution and familial and sporadic clusters, providing a unified hypothesis for the prevention and cure of the no longer "idiopathic" inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21167058

  2. Recent Advances in Characterizing the Gastrointestinal Microbiome in Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Emily K.; Teo, Shu Mei; Inouye, Michael; Wagner, Josef; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. A reduction in the diversity of the intestinal microbiota as well as specific taxonomic and functional shifts have been reported in Crohn's disease and may play a central role in the inflammatory process. The aim was to systematically review recent developments in the structural and functional changes observed in the gastrointestinal microbiome in patients with Crohn's Disease. Results: Seventy-two abstracts were included in this review. The effects of host genetics, disease phenotype, and inflammatory bowel disease treatment on the gastrointestinal microbiome in Crohn's disease were reviewed, and taxonomic shifts in patients with early and established disease were described. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes is increased and Firmicutes decreased in Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls. Enterobacteriaceae, specifically Eschericia coli, is enriched in Crohn's disease. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is found at lower abundance in Crohn's disease and in those with postoperative recurrence. Observed functional changes include major shifts in oxidative stress pathways, a decrease in butanoate and propanoate metabolism gene expression, lower levels of butyrate, and other short-chain fatty acids, decreased carbohydrate metabolism, and decreased amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusions: Changes in microbial composition and function have been described, although a causative role remains to be established. Larger, prospective, and longitudinal studies are required with deep interrogation of the microbiome if causality is to be determined, and refined microbial manipulation is to emerge as a focused therapy. PMID:25844959

  3. Toxic megacolon complicating a first course of Crohn's disease: about two cases.

    PubMed

    Hefaiedh, Rania; Cheikh, Mariem; Ennaifer, Rym; Gharbi, Lassad; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2013-08-01

    Toxic megacolon is a rare and serious complication of Crohn's disease. Because of the associated high morbidity and mortality, early recognition and management of toxic megacolon is important. Through two cases of toxic megacolon complicating Crohn's disease, we assessed the clinical, radiologic and therapeutic characteristics of this complication. A 35-year-old man presented a first course of Crohn's disease treated with corticosteroid. He exhibited sudden severe abdominal pain and distension with shock. A plain abdominal radiography revealed toxic megacolon. He underwent medical therapy, but symptoms not relieved. The patient underwent subtotal colectomy with ileostomy. The resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed. Endoscopic evaluation six months later did not shown recurrence. A 57-year-old man presented with severe acute colitis inaugurating Crohn's disease, was treated with corticosteroid and antibiotics. He exhibited signs of general peritonitis. Computed tomographic examination revealed toxic megacolon with free perforation, showing prominent dilation of the transverse colon and linear pneumatosis. The patient underwent emergent subtotal colectomy and ileostomy. The final histological patterns were consisting with diagnosis of Crohn's disease associated with cytomegalovirus infection. The patient underwent antiviral therapy during 15 days. Because of the high risk of postoperative recurrence, he underwent immunosuppressive therapy. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed successfully. Toxic megacolon in Crohn's disease is a serious turning of this disease. We underscore the importance of early diagnosis of toxic megacolon and rapid surgical intervention if improvement is not observed on medical therapy. PMID:24765512

  4. Implementation of the Simple Endoscopic Activity Score in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) was developed as an attempt to simplify Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Since it was constructed from CDEIS, SES-CD performs comparably but also carries similar limitations. Several studies have utilized SES-CD scoring to describe disease severity or response to therapy. Some of them used SES-CD score as a continuous variable while others utilized certain cutoff values to define severity grades. All SES-CD cutoff values reported in published clinical trials were empirically selected by experts. Although in most of the studies that used SEC-CD scoring to define disease severity, a score <3 reflected inactive disease, no study is using score 0 to predefine inactivity. Studies applying SES-CD to define response to treatment used score 0. There is no optimal SES-CD cut-off for endoscopic remission. The quantification of mucosal healing using SES-CD scoring has not been standardized yet. As the definition of mucosal healing by SES-CD is unset, the concept of deep remission is also still evolving. Serum and fecal biomarkers as well as new radiologic imaging techniques are complementary to SES-CD. Current practice as well as important changes in endoscopy should be taken into consideration when defining SES-CD cutoffs. The optimal timing of SES-CD scoring to assess mucosal healing is not defined yet. To conclude, SES-CD represents a valuable tool. However, a consensus agreement on its optimal use is required. PMID:27184635

  5. Crohn's disease and growth deficiency in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Marco; Guariso, Graziella

    2014-10-01

    Nutritional concerns, linear growth deficiency, and delayed puberty are currently detected in up to 85% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) diagnosed at childhood. To provide advice on how to assess and manage nutritional concerns in these patients, a Medline search was conducted using "pediatric inflammatory bowel disease", "pediatric Crohn's disease", "linear growth", "pubertal growth", "bone health", and "vitamin D" as key words. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published between 2008 and 2013 were selected to produce this narrative review. Studies referring to earlier periods were also considered if the data was relevant to our review. Although current treatment strategies for CD that include anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy have been shown to improve patients' growth rate, linear growth deficiencies are still common. In pediatric CD patients, prolonged diagnostic delay, high initial activity index, and stricturing/penetrating type of behavior may cause growth deficiencies (in weight and height) and delayed puberty, with several studies reporting that these patients may not reach an optimal bone mass. Glucocorticoids and inflammation inhibit bone formation, though their impact on skeletal modeling remains unclear. Long-term control of active inflammation and an adequate intake of nutrients are both fundamental in promoting normal puberty. Recent evidence suggests that recombinant growth factor therapy is effective in improving short-term linear growth in selected patients, but is of limited benefit for ameliorating mucosal disease and reducing clinical disease activity. The authors conclude that an intense initial treatment (taking a "top-down" approach, with the early introduction of immunomodulatory treatment) may be justified to induce and maintain remission so that the growth of children with CD can catch up, ideally before puberty. Exclusive enteral nutrition has a key role in inducing remission and improving patients

  6. PubMedMiner: Mining and Visualizing MeSH-based Associations in PubMed.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucan; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Chen, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth of biomedical literature provides the opportunity to develop approaches for facilitating the identification of possible relationships between biomedical concepts. Indexing by Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) represent high-quality summaries of much of this literature that can be used to support hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery tasks using techniques such as association rule mining. Based on a survey of literature mining tools, a tool implemented using Ruby and R - PubMedMiner - was developed in this study for mining and visualizing MeSH-based associations for a set of MEDLINE articles. To demonstrate PubMedMiner's functionality, a case study was conducted that focused on identifying and comparing comorbidities for asthma in children and adults. Relative to the tools surveyed, the initial results suggest that PubMedMiner provides complementary functionality for summarizing and comparing topics as well as identifying potentially new knowledge. PMID:25954472

  7. PubMedMiner: Mining and Visualizing MeSH-based Associations in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yucan; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Chen, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth of biomedical literature provides the opportunity to develop approaches for facilitating the identification of possible relationships between biomedical concepts. Indexing by Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) represent high-quality summaries of much of this literature that can be used to support hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery tasks using techniques such as association rule mining. Based on a survey of literature mining tools, a tool implemented using Ruby and R – PubMedMiner – was developed in this study for mining and visualizing MeSH-based associations for a set of MEDLINE articles. To demonstrate PubMedMiner’s functionality, a case study was conducted that focused on identifying and comparing comorbidities for asthma in children and adults. Relative to the tools surveyed, the initial results suggest that PubMedMiner provides complementary functionality for summarizing and comparing topics as well as identifying potentially new knowledge. PMID:25954472

  8. Pub-Med-dot-com, here we come!

    PubMed

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2016-08-01

    As of April 8, 2016, articles in Neurology® Genetics can be searched using PubMed. Launched in 1996, PubMed is a search engine that accesses citations and abstracts of more than 26 million articles. Its primary sources include the MEDLINE database, which was started in the 1960s, and biomedical and life sciences journal articles that date back to 1946. In addition, PubMed accesses other sources, for example, citations to those life sciences journals that submit full-text articles to PubMed Central (PMC). PubMed Central was launched in 2000 as a free archive of biomedical and life science journals. PMID:27583303

  9. Effect of intestinal resection on serum antibodies to the mycobacterial 45/48 kilodalton doublet antigen in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzpaintner, G; Das, P K; Stronkhorst, A; Slob, A W; Strohmeyer, G

    1995-01-01

    Interest in the role of mycobacterial infection in Crohn's disease has been revived by the cultural detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease. This hypothesis was examined serologically using assays with high specificity for Crohn's disease. The effect of intestinal resection on serum antibodies specific for Crohn's disease was investigated with an immunoblot assay and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using the 45/48 kilodalton doublet antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antibodies were detected in 64.7% of patients with Crohn's disease (n = 17), 10% of patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 10), 5% of patients with carcinoma of the colon (n = 20), and none of 10 healthy subjects with the immunoblot assay. Statistical comparison of the Crohn's disease patients with each control group resulted in p = 0.0000236. Immunoglobulin G was essentially unchanged 75 days (mean) after surgery. After more than 180 days, however, the antibody response was reduced in all of five patients studied, and was no longer demonstrable in two of them (40%). Simultaneously, the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) decreased. Both the high specificity of this assay for Crohn's disease and the diminished antibody response after intestinal resection in parallel with decreased CDAI support a mycobacterial aetiology of Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7590431

  10. COSMO-SkyMed and GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Pietro; Sole, Aurelia; Serio, Carmine

    2013-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing have become key technology tools for the collection, storage and analysis of spatially referenced data. Industries that utilise these spatial technologies include agriculture, forestry, mining, market research as well as the environmental analysis . Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a coherent active sensor operating in the microwave band which exploits relative motion between antenna and target in order to obtain a finer spatial resolution in the flight direction exploiting the Doppler effect. SAR have wide applications in Remote Sensing such as cartography, surface deformation detection, forest cover mapping, urban planning, disasters monitoring , surveillance etc… The utilization of satellite remote sensing and GIS technology for this applications has proven to be a powerful and effective tool for environmental monitoring. Remote sensing techniques are often less costly and time-consuming for large geographic areas compared to conventional methods, moreover GIS technology provides a flexible environment for, analyzing and displaying digital data from various sources necessary for classification, change detection and database development. The aim of this work si to illustrate the potential of COSMO-SkyMed data and SAR applications in a GIS environment, in particular a demostration of the operational use of COSMO-SkyMed SAR data and GIS in real cases will be provided for what concern DEM validation, river basin estimation, flood mapping and landslide monitoring.

  11. Exhaled nitric oxide as a marker of lung involvement in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Ragnoli, B; Buffoli, L; Radaeli, A; Ricci, C; Lanzarotto, F; Lanzini, A

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease associated with a variety of systemic manifestations, including large and small airway involvement. The latter is most often a subclinical one, and requires expensive and invasive diagnostic approaches. Nitric oxide (NO) can be detected non-invasively in the exhaled air (eNO) and be considered as a surrogate marker of airway inflammation. eNO tested at multiple expiratory flows can be used to distinguish the alveolar concentration of NO (CalvNO) from the total amount of fractional eNO (FeNO). The aim of our study is to compare FeNO and concentration of alveolar nitric oxide (CalvNO) levels and to assess their relationship with pulmonary involvement in Crohn's patients differing in clinical stage and therapeutic regimens versus a group of healthy subjects. Thirty Crohn's patients not showing clinical evidence of pulmonary diseases and 21 non-smoking, non-atopic healthy controls were enrolled. FeNO (14.9±10.2 ppb vs 10.1±6.3 ppb, p=0.049) and CalvNO (4.4±2.2 ppb vs 2.6±1.9; p=0.006) values were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's patients than in healthy controls. Both FeNO and CalvNO correlated positively with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. In conclusion, our results for FeNO and CalvNO confirm the presence of subclinical pulmonary involvement in Crohn's disease. eNO measurement may be of clinical value in the follow-up of Crohn's patients. PMID:22230422

  12. MR enterography in Crohn's disease: current consensus on optimal imaging technique and future advances from the SAR Crohn's disease-focused panel.

    PubMed

    Grand, David J; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2015-06-01

    MR enterography is a powerful tool for the non-invasive evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) without ionizing radiation. The following paper describes the current consensus on optimal imaging technique, interpretation, and future advances from the Society of Abdominal Radiology CD-focused panel. PMID:25666967

  13. Pharmacokinetics of budesonide (Entocort EC) capsules for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Edsbäcker, Staffan; Andersson, Tommy

    2004-01-01

    This overview summarises available pharmacokinetic data on budesonide capsules (Entocort EC), approved for the treatment of mild-to-moderate active Crohn's disease involving the ileum and/or ascending colon and for prolongation of symptom control. Budesonide is a locally-acting glucocorticosteroid with an extensive, primarily hepatic, metabolism after oral administration. It is rapidly absorbed and biotransformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A to metabolites with negligible glucocorticoid activity. Entocort EC, a pH- and time-dependent oral formulation of budesonide, was developed to optimise drug delivery to the ileum and throughout the colon. Pharmaco-scintigraphic studies have confirmed that the Entocort EC formulation delays budesonide absorption and prolongs the rate of elimination but maintains complete absorption. This improves the delivery of budesonide to the intestinal lumen relative to a plain formulation. A low systemic availability of 9-21% indicates extensive first-pass elimination. Food appears to have little impact on the absorption of budesonide from Entocort EC capsules and the pharmacokinetics are dose-proportional between 3 and 15 mg. On average, systemic availability was 2.5-fold higher in patients with cirrhosis compared with healthy controls; however, mild liver impairment had little effect on systemic exposure. Pharmacokinetics appear unaffected by gender and age, although this has not been tested in younger children. Renal impairment is not expected to have an impact on the kinetics of Entocort EC. Budesonide is unlikely to inhibit the metabolism of other drugs, including CYP3A4 substrates, mainly because of the very low plasma concentrations obtained with the compound even after high doses of Entocort trade mark EC capsules. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, will inhibit the metabolism of budesonide, resulting in several-fold increases in the area under the concentration-time curve of budesonide. Also, grapefruit juice intake

  14. COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation planner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Fabio; Scopa, Tiziana; Serva, Stefano; Caltagirone, Francesco; De Luca, Giuseppe Francesco; Pacaccio, Alessandro; Profili, Mario

    2014-10-01

    COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation (CSG) system has been conceived, according to Italian Space Agency (ASI) and Italian Ministry of Defence (It-MoD) requirements, at the twofold objective of ensuring operational continuity to the current constellation (COSMO-SkyMed - CSK), while improving functionality and performances. It is an "end-to-end" Italian Earth Observation Dual-Use (Civilian and Defence) Space System with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) operating in X-Band. CSG mission planning purpose is to fully employ the system resources, shared between partners with very different needs, producing a mission plan that satisfies the higher priority requests and optimizes the overall plan with the remaining requests according to the users programming rights consumption. CSG Mission Planning tool provides new performances in terms of adaptability and flexibility of the planning and scheduling algorithms conceived to select and synchronize data acquisition and downloading activities. CSG planning and scheduling problem is characterized by a large size of research space and a particular structure of technical and managerial constraints that has led to the implementation of innovative design of the planning algorithms based on both priority criteria and saturation of system resources. This approach envisages two scheduling strategies: the rank-based and the optimization-based. The former strategy is firstly applied to the most important request categories, with an associated rank value or priority level; the latter is subsequently applied to the unranked or lower priority requests. This is an iterative dynamic process of finding optimal solutions able to better answer the demanding requirements coming from the needs of heterogeneous users.

  15. Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Elaheh; Wendland, Barbara E; Stapleton, Melanie; Raman, Maitreyi; Allard, Johane P

    2007-09-01

    Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of <55%, <35%, and <10% in 39.2%, 27%, and 59.5% of the patients, respectively. Micronutrient intakes were suboptimal most notably for folate, vitamins C, E, and calcium. There were no substantial differences between patients with active and inactive disease in terms of failure to meet the Dietary Reference Intake. In conclusion, in this population sample, a large number of ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease have suboptimal dietary patterns despite a normal BMI and inactive disease. Dietary counseling and supplementation may be warranted in this patient population. PMID:17761234

  16. Possible Association of Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman Disease and Chronic Crohn Disease A Case Series Report

    PubMed Central

    Salva, Katrin A.; Stenstrom, Melissa; Breadon, Jonith Y.; Odland, Paul Blair; Bennett, Daniel; Longley, Jack; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease (CRDD), a variant of Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin, has a wide range of clinical presentations. Rosai-Dorfman disease is believed to result from an aberrant response to antigens, caused by immunosuppressive macrophages. Macrophage-mediated immunosuppression is also implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease, linking these otherwise unrelated entities. To our knowledge, the coexistence of these disorders has been described in only 2 cases, 1 of them confined to the skin and soft tissue. OBSERVATIONS We present a series of 3 patients who developed purely CRDD in the context of long-standing Crohn disease. Statistical estimates suggested that the association of these 2 disorders is not due to chance (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our case series provides the clinical correlate to the pathogenetic parallels between CRDD and Crohn disease. Crohn disease is frequently complicated by various skin manifestations, which may be mimicked by CRDD. Therefore, it may be prudent for clinicians to include CRDD in the list of differential diagnoses when examining skin lesions in patients with Crohn disease. PMID:24305684

  17. Linkage analyses of chromosome 6 loci, including HLA, in familial aggregations of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, J.P.; Laurent-Puig, P.; Gower-Rousseau, C.; Caillat-Zueman, S.; Beaugerie, L.; Dupas, J.L.; Van Gossum, A.; Bonaiti-Pellie, C.; Cortot, A.

    1994-08-15

    Segregation analyses of familial aggregations of Crohn disease have provided consistent results pointing to the involvement of a predisposing gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. Although extensively investigated, the role played by human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes in this inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive and the major histocompatibility complex is a candidate region for the mapping of the Crohn disease susceptibility gene. A total of 25 families with multiple cases of Crohn disease was genotyped for HLA DRB1 and for 16 highly polymorphic loci evenly distributed on chromosome 6. The data were subjected to linkage analysis using the lod score method. Neither individual nor combined lod scores for any family and for any locus tested reached values suggesting linkage or genetic heterogeneity. The Crohn disease predisposing locus was excluded from the whole chromosome 6 with lod scores less than -2. It was excluded from the major histocompatibility complex and from 91% of the chromosome 6 genetic map with lod scores less than -4. The major recessive gene involved in genetic predisposition to Crohn disease does not reside on the major histocompatibility complex nor on any locus mapping to chromosome 6. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Design of a light delivery system for the photodynamic treatment of the Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrecht, Tanja; Borle, Francois; van den Bergh, Hubert; Michetti, Pierre; Ortner, Maria-Anna; Wagnières, Georges

    2007-07-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease originating from an overwhelming response of the mucosal immune system. Low dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) may modify the mucosal immune response and thus serve as a therapy for Crohn's disease. Most patients with Crohn's disease show inflammatory reactions in the terminal ileum or colon where PDT treatment is feasible by low-invasive endoscopic techniques. However, the tube like geometry of the colon, it's folding, and the presences of multiple foci of Crohn's lesions along the colon require the development of adequate light delivery techniques. We present a prototype light delivery system for endoscopic clinical PDT in patients with Crohn's disease. The system is based on a cylindrical light diffuser inserted into a diffusing balloon catheter. Homogenous irradiation is performed with a 4 W diode laser at 635 nm. Light dosimetry is performed using a calibrated integrating sphere. The system can be used with conventional colonoscopes and colonovideoscopes having a 3.8 mm diameter working channel. The feasibility of PDT in colon with our prototype was demonstrated in first clinical trials.

  19. Current management of anal fistulas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Anal fistulas occurring in Crohn's disease (CD) comprise a risk factor of severe course of inflammation. They are frequently intractable due to various factors such as penetration of the anal canal or rectal wall, impaired wound healing, and immunosuppression, among others. Anal fistulas typical to CD develop from fissures or ulcers of the anal canal or rectum. Accurate identification of the type of fistula, such as low and simple or high and complex, is crucial for prognosis as well as for the choice of treatment. If fistulotomy remains the gold standard in the surgical treatment of the former, it is contraindicated in high and complex fistulas due to possible risk of damage to the anal sphincter with subsequent faecal incontinence. Therefore, the latter require a conservative and palliative approach, such as an incision and drainage of abscesses accompanying fistulas or prolonged non-cutting seton placement. Currently, conservative, sphincter-preserving, and definitive procedures such as mucosal advancement or dermal island flaps, the use of plugs or glue, video assisted anal fistula treatment, ligation of the intersphincteric track, and vacuum assisted closure are gaining a great deal of interest. Attempting to close the internal opening without injuring the sphincter is a major advantage of those methods. However, both the palliative and the definitive procedures require adjuvant therapy with medical measures. PMID:26557938

  20. Reduced Paneth cell alpha-defensins in ileal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Wehkamp, Jan; Salzman, Nita H; Porter, Edith; Nuding, Sabine; Weichenthal, Michael; Petras, Robert E; Shen, Bo; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Linzmeier, Rose; Feathers, Ryan W; Chu, Hiutung; Lima, Heriberto; Fellermann, Klaus; Ganz, Tomas; Stange, Eduard F; Bevins, Charles L

    2005-12-13

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, is attributed, in part, to intestinal bacteria that may initiate and perpetuate mucosal inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals. Paneth cells (PC) are the major source of antimicrobial peptides in the small intestine, including human alpha-defensins HD5 and HD6. We tested the hypothesis that reduced expression of PC alpha-defensins compromises mucosal host defenses and predisposes patients to CD of the ileum. We report that patients with CD of the ileum have reduced antibacterial activity in their intestinal mucosal extracts. These specimens also showed decreased expression of PC alpha-defensins, whereas the expression of eight other PC products either remained unchanged or increased when compared with controls. The specific decrease of alpha-defensins was independent of the degree of inflammation in the specimens and was not observed in either CD of the colon, ulcerative colitis, or pouchitis. The functional consequence of alpha-defensin expression levels was examined by using a transgenic mouse model, where we found changes in HD5 expression levels, comparable to those observed in CD, had a pronounced impact on the luminal microbiota. Thus, the specific deficiency of PC defensins that characterizes ileal CD may compromise innate immune defenses of the ileal mucosa and initiate and/or perpetuate this disease. PMID:16330776

  1. Misdiagnosis and Mistherapy of Crohn's Disease as Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Sen-Yang; Chen, Qiu-Yu; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) remains difficult as the clinical symptoms of the 2 digestive diseases are so similar. Here we report a case where a patient was initially misdiagnosed with ITB prior to the correct CD diagnosis. The 46-year-old male patient was hospitalized elsewhere for pain in the right lower abdomen and underwent an appendectomy. The pathological diagnosis was ITB and the patient was administered antituberculosis therapy for 1 year. Afterward, the patient was readmitted to the hospital for a right lower abdominal mass. A computed tomography scan revealed intestinal gas, fistula, and abdominal mass. We performed a right hemicolectomy on the patient. Postoperatively, we diagnosed the patient with CD, based on patient history and pathological examination. According to the CD active index (CDAI), the patient was at high risk and began treatment with infliximab. The patient has remained in complete remission and made a good recovery after 8-months follow-up. We compared this case with the results of a literature review on the misdiagnosis between CD and ITB (26 previously reported cases) to determine the characteristics of misdiagnosed cases. We found that distinguishing between ITB and CD is difficult because of their varied clinical presentation, nonspecific investigative tools, and profound similarities even in pathological specimens. Although a CT scan to determine the morphology of the bowel wall is a key for correct diagnosis, each case still poses challenges for diagnosis and administrating the appropriate treatment. PMID:26735549

  2. Gut Microbial Diversity Is Reduced in Smokers with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Opstelten, Jorrit L.; Plassais, Jonathan; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Achouri, Emna; Pichaud, Matthieu; Siersema, Peter D.; Cervino, Alessandra C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking has a negative impact on Crohn's disease (CD), but the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. We compared the gut microbiota composition of smoking with nonsmoking patients with CD using a metagenomic approach. Methods: Stool samples and clinical data were collected from current smokers and nonsmokers with CD from France and the Netherlands, matched for country, gender, age, disease activity, and body mass index. Fecal DNA was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500. On average, 40 million paired-end reads were generated per sample. Gene richness and the Shannon index were computed to assess microbial diversity. Wilcoxon's signed-rank tests for paired samples were performed to detect differences between the 2 groups. Results: In total, 21 smoking and 21 nonsmoking patients with CD were included. Compared with nonsmoking patients, gut microbial gene richness (P = 0.01), genus diversity (P < 0.01), and species diversity (P = 0.01) were decreased in smoking patients. This was accompanied by a reduced relative abundance of the genera Collinsella (P = 0.02), Enterorhabdus (P = 0.02), and Gordonibacter (P = 0.02) in smokers. No statistically significant differences at the species level were observed, although smokers had lower proportions of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.10). Conclusions: Gut microbial diversity is reduced in smokers with CD compared with nonsmokers with CD. The microbial profile differs between these groups at the genus level. Future studies should evaluate whether intestinal microbes mediate the adverse effects of smoking in CD. PMID:27542127

  3. Intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease: challenging differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia Yi; Tong, Jin Lu; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2016-03-01

    Along with epidemiological changes in tuberculosis (TB) and an increased incidence of Crohn's disease (CD), the differential diagnosis of intestinal TB (ITB) and CD is of vital importance and has become a clinical challenge because treatment based on misdiagnosis may lead to fatal outcomes. In this study, we reviewed the similarities and differences in clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological features of these two diseases. Concomitant pulmonary TB, ascites, night sweats, involvement of fewer than four segments of the bowel, patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, scars or pseudopolyps strongly indicate ITB. Bloody stools, perianal signs, chronic diarrhea, extraintestinal manifestations, anorectal lesions, longitudinal ulcers and a cobblestone appearance are all suggestive of CD. Significant differences in the size, number, location and patterns of granulomas in ITB and CD with regard to their histopathologic features have been noted. Immune stain of cell surface markers is also helpful. Interferon-γ release assay and polymerase chain reaction analysis have achieved satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of ITB. Computed tomography enterographic findings of segmental small bowel or left colon involvement, mural stratification, the comb sign and fibrofatty proliferation are significantly more common in CD, whereas mesenteric lymph node changes (calcification or central necrosis) and focal ileocecal lesions are more frequently seen in ITB. A diagnosis should be carefully established before the initiation of the therapy. In suspicious cases, short-term empirical anti-TB therapy is quite efficient to further confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26854750

  4. Crohn's disease and Takayasu's arteritis: an uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Andrea; Maschio, Massimo; Martelossi, Stefano; Barbi, Egidio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2013-09-21

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) and Crohn's disease (CD) are two rare autoimmune disorders; however some reports describe the presence of both diseases in the same patient. This finding has suggested the possibility that both diseases could share some common etiologic origin. We describe a case of a 13-year-old male affected by CD characterized by fever, diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain and elevation of inflammatory markers. Clinical and histological features from colonic specimens were consistent with CD. Treatment with steroids and azathioprine was started, however disease flared every time steroids were tapered. One year later, while still on treatment, he came back to our attention for dyspnea at rest and at night, tiredness and weakness. At physical examination a diastolic heart murmur was found as well as a left carotid artery bruit. A transthoracic echocardiography showed mild aortic valve insufficiency, left ventricular hypertrophy and a dilated ascending aorta with same findings at the aortic arch. A computed tomography scan showed abdominal aorta thickening, dilated thoracic aorta and the presence of a thoracic aortic aneurysm. TA associated with CD was diagnosed and medical treatment with cyclophosphamide, steroids and aminosalicylic acid was started, with good clinical response at 6 mo follow-up. We discuss the presence of possible common causes for the two diseases and the importance of differential diagnosis in those patients characterized for intractable disease. PMID:24124342

  5. Molecular evidence for two forms of Crohn disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gilberts, E C; Greenstein, A J; Katsel, P; Harpaz, N; Greenstein, R J

    1994-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that there are two forms of Crohn disease (CD): perforating and nonperforating. We hypothesized that, just as with tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy, differences in the two forms of CD would be both identified and determined by differences in the host immune response. Resected intestinal tissue from control patients as well as perforating and nonperforating CD patients was evaluated for mRNA levels. We employed 32P PCR amplification with published or custom-designed primers of a housekeeping gene (beta-actin); a human T-cell marker (CD3-delta); and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-1ra, and IL-6. Differences were identified with IL-1 beta (control = 162 +/- 57 vs. perforating = 464 +/- 154 vs. nonperforating = 12,582 +/- 4733; P < or = 0.02) and IL-1ra (control = 1337 +/- 622 vs. perforating = 2194 +/- 775 vs. nonperforating = 9715 +/- 2988; P < or = 0.02). These data corroborate the epidemiological observation that there are two forms of CD. Nonperforating CD, the more benign form, is associated with increased IL-1 beta and IL-1ra mRNA expression. We conclude that it is the host immune response that determines which form of CD becomes manifest in any given individual and discuss the investigative, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of these observations. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7809109

  6. Genotype profiles of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis recovered from suspected and Crohn's disease patients in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Singh, S V; Sohal, J S; Singh, P K

    2010-06-01

    Present study aimed to genotype Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) recovered from suspected and Crohn' s disease patients. A total of 32 MAP and DNA (directly from clinical samples) recovered from human origin were genotyped using IS 1311 PCR-REA. Isolates were cultured from stool, biopsies and blood clots of Crohn's disease patients, and stool samples of suspected (animal attendants, lab workers etc). Of the 32 MAP isolates belonging to 28 human beings, majority (84.3%) were genotyped as 'Bison type', while 21.7% were of 'cattle' and none was 'sheep' genotype. Study first time reports distribution of 'Cattle' and 'Bison type' 'genotypes in suspected and Crohn's patients on pilot scale in India. 'Bison type' genotype was predominant in the surveyed human population. PMID:22471168

  7. Severe viral oesophagitis, pharyngitis, and stomatitis as antecedents of ileocecal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Waluga, Marek; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Kajor, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male who developed a severe erosive oesophagitis extending to the pharynx and oral cavity without obvious risk factors. Endoscopic image suggested viral aetiology that could not be confirmed by routine serological diagnostics of infections with cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Herpes simplex virus. The histopathological evaluation also gave no definite clues to the aetiology of the inflammation. Treatment with acyclovir was ineffective, but gancyclovir therapy caused spectacular clinical improvement and healing of erosions. Two months later the patient presented febrile diarrhoea that was a symptom of ileocecal Crohn's disease proven by endoscopy, enterography, and histopathology. It is the first report of severe viral oesophagitis preceding clinical manifestation of Crohn's disease. This observation warrants further study towards the viral aetiology of oral, pharyngeal, and oesophageal erosions, frequently associated with Crohn's disease. PMID:25960815

  8. Crohn'z meanz Heinz’: foreign body inflammatory mass mimicking Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Visagan, R; Grossman, R; Dimitriadis, P A; Desai, A

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a patient with a presumed diagnosis of Crohn's disease for 6 years turning out to be an unusual inflammatory mass caused by ileal perforation due to a foreign body. When surgical intervention became necessary for admissions with recurrent obstruction, laparoscopy revealed an inflammatory mass in the terminal ileum, exposing two pieces of plastic bearing the word ‘Heinz’. Resection of the inflammatory mass led to the complete resolution of symptoms. Histology from the operative specimen showed no features of Crohn's disease. There were no granulomas and no fissuring ulcers. This case highlights that an inflammatory mass in the small intestine caused by the perforation of ingested foreign body can mimic Crohn's disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a synthetic plastic packaging causing ileo-caecal junctional perforation mimicking Crohn’s disease. PMID:23749825

  9. Transformation of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Nishida, T.; Yao, T.

    1986-03-01

    In vivo 7 beta-epimerization of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid and the role of 7-ketolithocholic acid as an intermediate in this biotransformation were studied in 11 patients with Crohn's disease and in 5 healthy volunteers. The incorporation of deuterium into biliary ursodeoxycholic acid and 7-ketolithocholic acid was determined by computed gas chromatography-mass fragmentography after ingestion of a dideuterated chenodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic-11,12-d2 acid. The incorporation of deuterium into ursodeoxycholic acid increased to a peak level at 48 h in the patients with Crohn's disease, but was delayed in healthy volunteers. In 8 patients and 2 healthy controls there were small amounts of 7-ketolithocholic acid in bile. The incorporation of deuterium into 7-ketolithocholic acid was confirmed in only 2 patients and the peak level was noted at 48 h. These observations suggest that 7-ketolithocholic acid is an intermediate of this biotransformation in patients with Crohn's disease.

  10. Controlled trial of polymeric versus elemental diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Giaffer, M H; North, G; Holdsworth, C D

    1990-04-01

    30 patients with active Crohn's disease, mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index 301 (SE 32), who would otherwise have been treated with steroids, were randomised to receive for 4 weeks either an elemental diet ('Vivonex') (n = 16) or a polymeric diet ('Fortison') (n = 14). Assessment on days 10 and 28 showed that clinical remission occurred in 5 (36%) of the 14 patients on fortison compared with 12 (75%) of the 16 patients assigned to vivonex. The difference in remission rate was significant (p less than 0.03). Dietary treatment resulted in little change in the nutritional state and various laboratory indices of activity over a 4 week period despite clinical improvement. Polymeric diets do not seem to offer an effective therapeutic alternative to elemental diets in patients with acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease. PMID:1969560

  11. Elemental diet as primary treatment of acute Crohn's disease: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Moráin, C; Segal, A W; Levi, A J

    1984-06-23

    Acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease are usually treated with prednisolone or potentially more toxic immunosuppressive drugs or by surgery. In pilot studies replacing the normal diet by a protein free elemental diet also induced remission. A controlled trial was therefore conducted in which 21 patients acutely ill with exacerbations of Crohn's disease were randomised to receive either prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day or an elemental diet (Vivonex) for four weeks. Assessment at four and 12 weeks showed that the patients treated with the elemental diet had improved as much as and by some criteria more than the steroid treated group. Elemental diet is a safe and effective treatment for acute Crohn's disease. PMID:6428577

  12. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in a 17-year-old boy with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, Irene; Ferrazzi, Anna; Zanetti, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare, acquired, autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of the skin, characterised by blisters and erosions, especially in trauma-prone sites and extensor skin surface, scarring with formation of milia, skin fragility and nail dystrophy. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is extremely rare in childhood and it has been reported to be frequently associated with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autoantibodies against type VII collagen have been found in a large number of patients with Crohn's disease without epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy affected by Crohn's disease who presented with milia on infiltrated erythematous plaques over the back of the hands. The diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita was confirmed by histopathology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence analysis and ELISA. PMID:26163555

  13. Detecting Microbial Dysbiosis Associated with Pediatric Crohn Disease Despite the High Variability of the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Kaplan, Jess L; Gold, Benjamin D; Bhasin, Manoj K; Ward, Naomi L; Kellermayer, Richard; Kirschner, Barbara S; Heyman, Melvin B; Dowd, Scot E; Cox, Stephen B; Dogan, Haluk; Steven, Blaire; Ferry, George D; Cohen, Stanley A; Baldassano, Robert N; Moran, Christopher J; Garnett, Elizabeth A; Drake, Lauren; Otu, Hasan H; Mirny, Leonid A; Libermann, Towia A; Winter, Harland S; Korolev, Kirill S

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between the host and its microbiota is challenging to understand because both microbial communities and their environments are highly variable. We have developed a set of techniques based on population dynamics and information theory to address this challenge. These methods identify additional bacterial taxa associated with pediatric Crohn disease and can detect significant changes in microbial communities with fewer samples than previous statistical approaches required. We have also substantially improved the accuracy of the diagnosis based on the microbiota from stool samples, and we found that the ecological niche of a microbe predicts its role in Crohn disease. Bacteria typically residing in the lumen of healthy individuals decrease in disease, whereas bacteria typically residing on the mucosa of healthy individuals increase in disease. Our results also show that the associations with Crohn disease are evolutionarily conserved and provide a mutual information-based method to depict dysbiosis. PMID:26804920

  14. [Inflammatory changes of oral cavity proceeding appearance of clinical symptoms of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, Katarzyna; Darczuk, Dagmara; Owczarek, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Crohn's disease belongs to the inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammatory changes can be located in any part of the gastrointestinal tract including rarely oral cavity. We present a case of a 21 years old woman with unhealed by the local treatment, and verified by histological examination, inflammatory changes of oral cavity. These changes had proceed the diagnosis of typical changes in gastrointestinal tract for 6 months. Changes were located in terminal ileum and colon and were confirmed by colonoscopic, histologic and radiologic studies. Standard therapy of Crohn's disease with antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs led to the healing of oral changes. We point out on the necessity of proper differential diagnosis of problematic unhealing changes, particularly with ulcerations of oral mucosa in young patients. Dental examination with histological confirmation of mucosal changes may be helpful in proper diagnosis of Crohn's disease in the young group of patients. PMID:21591368

  15. PubMed Informer: Monitoring MEDLINE/PubMed through E-mail Alerts, SMS, PDA downloads and RSS feeds

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Summary PubMed Informer is a Web-based monitoring tool for topics of interest from MEDLINE/PubMed primarily designed for healthcare professionals. Five tracking methods are available: Web access, e-mail, Short Message Service (SMS), PDA downloads and RSS feeds. PubMed Informer delivers focused search updates and specific information to users with varying information-seeking practices. PMID:16779344

  16. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Wright, Henry; White, Todd; Schoenenberger, Mark; Santos, Jose; Karlgaard, Chris; Kuhl, Chris; Oishi, TOmo; Trombetta, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This paper will introduce Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2) on NASA's Mars2020 mission. Mars2020 is a flagship NASA mission with science and technology objectives to help answer questions about possibility of life on Mars as well as to demonstrate technologies for future human expedition. Mars2020 is scheduled for launch in 2020. MEDLI2 is a suite of instruments embedded in the heatshield and backshell thermal protection systems of Mars2020 entry vehicle. The objectives of MEDLI2 are to gather critical aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and TPS performance data during EDL phase of the mission. MEDLI2 builds up the success of MEDLI flight instrumentation on Mars Science Laboratory mission in 2012. MEDLI instrumentation suite measured surface pressure and TPS temperature on the heatshield during MSL entry into Mars. MEDLI data has since been used for unprecedented reconstruction of aerodynamic drag, vehicle attitude, in-situ atmospheric density, aerothermal heating, transition to turbulence, in-depth TPS performance and TPS ablation. [1,2] In addition to validating predictive models, MEDLI data has highlighted extra margin available in the MSL forebody TPS, which can potentially be used to reduce vehicle parasitic mass. MEDLI2 expands the scope of instrumentation by focusing on quantities of interest not addressed in MEDLI suite. The type the sensors are expanded and their layout on the TPS modified to meet these new objectives. The paper will provide key motivation and governing requirements that drive the choice and the implementation of the new sensor suite. The implementation considerations of sensor selection, qualification, and demonstration of minimal risk to the host mission will be described. The additional challenges associated with mechanical accommodation, electrical impact, data storage and retrieval for MEDLI2 system, which extends sensors to backshell will also be described.

  17. Using MedDRA: implications for risk management.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elliot G

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of MedDRA, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities, as a standardised terminology may have a major impact on the performance of risk management. Thus, MedDRA is likely to have an important effect on the analysis of clinical trial safety data. Review of the most commonly used terms in clinical trial tables from the labelling of ten products indicated that each adverse event could be represented by many MedDRA preferred terms; this might theoretically lead to failure to identify differences in adverse event incidence between treatment arms. Possible solutions are proposed. The use of MedDRA in spontaneous reporting systems is a regulatory requirement in some countries. Variability in modes of implementation and use of the terminology are discussed; these may impose additional limitations on any use of spontaneous data for comparative purposes. There are important differences in the ways that safety databases interface with MedDRA and uncertainty about the most appropriate way to manage version changes. The characteristics of MedDRA must be taken into account when establishing methods for signal detection and its use will affect the retrieval of similar cases as required for signal evaluation. The use of MedDRA in the periodic safety update report is discussed. The possible use of MedDRA in pharmacoepidemiology is highly relevant to risk management, and some issues are briefly outlined. With regard to communication of risk, if MedDRA is introduced into existing product labelling, care must be taken that the change itself does not cause misunderstanding; the most appropriate use of MedDRA in this regard remains to be determined. There is a need for careful evaluation of MedDRA in fulfilling its various functions in pharmacovigilance, followed by definitive regulatory guidance on its use. PMID:15154830

  18. Indirect costs of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are lifelong illnesses which have a significant impact on quality of life and personal burden through a reduction in the ability to work, sick leave and restrictions of leisure time. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the indirect costs of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Material and methods The search was carried out in Medline, EMBASE, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, and reference lists of identified articles and reference lists of identified articles were also handsearched. All costs were adjusted to 2013 USD values by using the consumer price index and purchasing power parity. Identified studies were then analysed in order to assess their heterogeneity and possibility of inclusion in the meta-analysis. Results Eleven of the identified publications presented indirect costs of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The range of estimated yearly indirect costs per patient was large, from $1 159.09 for loss of earnings to $14 135.64 for lost productivity and sick leave for Crohn's disease. The values for ulcerative colitis ranged from $926.49 to $6 583.17. Because of the imprecise definition of methods of indirect cost calculations as well as heterogeneity of indirect cost components, a meta-analysis was not performed. Conclusions The indirect costs of ulcerative colitis seem to be slightly lower than in the case of Crohn's disease. A small number of studies referring to indirect costs of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were identified, which indicates the need to conduct further investigations on this problem. PMID:27186172

  19. Interleukin 10 (Tenovil) in the prevention of postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, J; Rutgeerts, P; Malchow, H; Jacyna, M; Nielsen, O; Rask-Madsen, J; Van Deventer, S; Ferguson, A; Desreumaux, P; Forbes, A; Geboes, K; Melani, L; Cohard, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—New lesions of Crohn's disease occur early after ileal or ileocolonic resection and ileocolonic anastomosis. We performed a double blind controlled trial to evaluate the safety and tolerance of recombinant human interleukin 10 (IL-10; Tenovil) in subjects operated on for Crohn's disease. We also assessed the effect of Tenovil in preventing endoscopic recurrence 12 weeks after surgery.
METHODS—Patients with Crohn's disease who underwent curative ileal or ileocolonic resection and primary anastomosis were randomised within two weeks after surgery to receive subcutaneous Tenovil 4 µg/kg once daily (QD) (n=22) or 8 µg/kg twice weekly (TIW) (n=21), or placebo (QD or TIW) (n=22). An ileocolonoscopy was performed after 12 weeks of treatment.
RESULTS—Compliance was excellent. The most frequently observed adverse events were mild and moderate in severity and equally distributed across treatment groups. Thirty seven patients in the pooled Tenovil group and 21 patients in the pooled placebo group were evaluable by endoscopy. At 12 weeks, 11 of 21 patients (52%) in the placebo group had recurrent lesions compared with 17 of 37 patients (46%) in the Tenovil group (ns). The incidence of severe endoscopic recurrence was similar in both groups (9%).
CONCLUSION—Tenovil treatment for 12 consecutive weeks in patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal resection was safe and well tolerated. No evidence of prevention of endoscopic recurrence of Crohn's disease by Tenovil was observed.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; interleukin 10; endoscopic recurrence PMID:11413109

  20. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Amir Y; Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y

    2016-04-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  1. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  2. A case of ileo-caecal Crohn's disease presenting as acute intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, S R; Boksh, Z; Ahaduzzaman, M; Barman, A

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of 42 year old man who presented with one month history of weight loss, gradual abdominal distension and constipation. X-ray of the abdomen showed features of small gut obstruction. A tight stricture at the ileoceacal junction was found to be the cause of obstruction on laparotomy. Distal ileum was found to be severely inflammed with enlarged regional lymph nodes. Right hemicolectomy with resection of distal ileum was done. Histology revealed non caseating granuloma of Chroh's disease. Crohn's disease is relatively rare in Bangladesh. Recent data suggests rising incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) in the Indian sub-continent. PMID:23134927

  3. Development and assessment of a modified Pediatric Crohn Disease Activity Index.

    PubMed

    Leach, Steven T; Nahidi, Lily; Tilakaratne, Samantha; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2010-08-01

    The Pediatric Crohn Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) is an established and validated measure of disease activity in children with Crohn disease. However, its use in the research setting can be limited because of ambiguity of the subjective and anthropometric components of the index. Here we propose and evaluate a modified PCDAI (Mod PCDAI) consisting of the laboratory measures of the PCDAI plus C-reactive protein. This Mod PCDAI can provide an indication of disease activity because it correlates with the PCDAI, physicians' global assessment, and fecal calprotectin, and therefore may provide a suitable alternative to the PCDAI when required. PMID:20479686

  4. Current perspectives on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Johne's disease, and Crohn's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Over, Ken; Crandall, Philip G; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes the disease of cattle, Johne's. The economic impact of this disease includes early culling of infected cattle, reduced milk yield, and weight loss of cattle sold for slaughter. There is a possible link between MAP and Crohn's disease, a human inflammatory bowel disease. MAP is also a potential human food borne pathogen because it survives current pasteurization treatments. We review the current knowledge of MAP, Johne's disease and Crohn's disease and note directions for future work with this organism including rapid and economical detection, effective management plans and preventative measures. PMID:21254832

  5. Virtual colonoscopy-induced perforation in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Wong, Vincent W S; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2007-02-14

    We report a case of sigmoid colon perforation in a patient with Crohn's disease undergoing computed-tomographic (CT) colonography. A 70-year-old patient with Crohn's disease with terminal ileitis and sigmoid stricture underwent CT colonography after incomplete conventional colonoscopy. During the procedure, the colon was inflated by air insufflation and the patient developed abdominal pain with radiological evidence of retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal free gas. Hartmann's operation was performed. This case highlights that CT colonography is not risk-free. The risk of perforation may be higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17352037

  6. Acute stroke revealing Takayasu's arteritis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Gil; Zalmanovich, Anat; Golan, Yitzhak; Jonas Kimchi, Tali; Barenboim, Erez

    2016-08-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male with Crohn's disease exhibited acute ischaemic stroke as the first manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis. Stroke as the first clinical manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis has been rarely reported. Though rare in Western countries, Takayasu's arteritis should be considered as a possibility in young patients presenting with stroke. Both Takayasu's arteritis and Crohn's disease may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke. Furthermore, their coexistence is much higher than that expected by chance and suggest a pathophysiological link between these diseases. PMID:27075786

  7. Musculoskeletal complications of Crohn's disease: the role of computed tomography in diagnosis and patient management.

    PubMed

    Brenner, H I; Fishman, E K; Harris, M L; Bayless, T M

    2000-11-01

    The delayed diagnosis of musculoskeletal complications of Crohn's disease may produce major morbidity in patients. This study compared abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) with conventional radiography in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal complications in 23 of 552 patients with Crohn's disease examined by CT over a 7-year period. Surgical confirmation was available in 15 of 21 patients. The clinical features of psoas/gluteal abscesses, abdominal wall fistulae, and sacral osteomyelitis are described. Because the clinical manifestations of these musculoskeletal complications are often nonspecific, CT is often useful in diagnosing and directing therapeutic interventions. PMID:11103962

  8. [Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis caused by Crohn's disease and macrocytic anemia : a case report].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Sachio; Yamada, Masaru; Fukushima, Yutaka; Utsuki, Satoshi; Shimizu, Satoru; Kurata, Akira; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Kan, Shinichi

    2007-06-01

    A 32-years-old man with a past history of hemorrhoids presenting with hemiparesis was diagnosed as having sagittal sinus thrombosis with hemorrtagic infarction. Laboratory data revealed macrocytic anemia (Hb 11.2 g/d/) with hypoproteinernia (5.5 g/d). After discharge the patient developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema in the leg and sustained anemia. Final diagnosis through colon fiberscope findings was Crohn's disease Macrocytic anemia seemed to be induced by Vit. B12 deficiency due to malabsorption. The mechanism and causal relationship between Crohn's disease and sinus thrombosis is discussed. PMID:17564049

  9. Bosnian and Herzegovinian medical scientists in PubMed database.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    In this paper it is shortly presented PubMed as one of the most important on-line databases of the scientific biomedical literature. Also, the author has analyzed the most cited authors, professors of the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from the published papers in the biomedical journals abstracted and indexed in PubMed. PMID:24341067

  10. MedEdPORTAL: Educational Scholarship for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robby J.; Candler, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    MedEdPORTAL is an online publication service provided at no charge by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The intent is to promote collaboration and educational scholarship by helping educators publish and share educational resources. With MedEdPORTAL, users can quickly locate high-quality, peer-reviewed teaching materials in both…