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Sample records for morphology enhances escape

  1. Wind enhanced planetary escape: Collisional modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Hartle, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of thermal escape is considered in which both the effects of thermospheric winds at the exobase and collisions below the exobase are included in a Monte Carlo calculation. The collisions are included by means of a collisional relaxation layer of a background gas which models the transition region between the exosphere and the thermosphere. The wind effects are considered in the limiting cases of vertical and horizontal flows. Two species are considered: terrestrial hydrogen and terrestrial helium. In the cases of terrestrial hydrogen the escape fluxes were found to be strongly filtered or throttled by collisions at high exospheric temperatures. The model is applied to molecular hydrogen diffusing through a methane relaxation layer under conditions possible on Titan. The results are similar to the case of terrestrial hydrogen with wind enhanced escape being strongly suppressed by collisions. It is concluded that wind enhanced escape is not an important process on Titan.

  2. Wind and Rotation Enhanced Escape from the Early Terrestrial Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The earliest atmospheres of the terrestrial planets are thought to have been hotter, have stronger winds and rotate faster than atmospheres of today. Since these primitive atmospheres were weakly bound, they evolved rapidly because atmospheric escape was very strong, often referred to as "blowoff." Such escape has been treated as hydrodynamic, transonic flow; similar to solar wind flow dynamics. However, in many cases, although the outward flow is hydrodynamic at low altitudes, it becomes collisionless at higher altitudes, before sonic speeds are ever attained. Recent models dealing with the transition from fluid to kinetic flow have applied the Jeans escape flux at the exobase. This approach leads to escape rates that are too low, because thermospheric winds and planetary rotation are known to increase the escape flux above the corresponding Jeans flux. In particular, for a given density and temperature at the exobase, the escape flux increases as the wind speed and/or the rotation rate increase. Also, for a given wind speed and rotation rate, the escape flux enhancement over the Jeans flux increases as the mass of an escaping constituent increases, an important factor in isotope fractionation, especially the enrichment of deuterium on Mars. Accounting for a range of possible temperatures, thermospheric wind speeds and planetary rotation rates in the primitive atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, estimates are made of light constituent escape flux increases over the corresponding Jeans fluxes.

  3. Wind and Rotation Enhanced Escape From the Early Terrestrial Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, R. E.

    2001-05-01

    The earliest atmospheres of the terrestrial planets are thought to have been hotter, have stronger winds and rotate faster than atmospheres of today. Since these primitive atmospheres were weakly bound, they evolved rapidly because atmospheric escape was very strong, often referred to as "blowoff." Such escape has been treated as hydrodynamic, transonic flow, similar to solar wind flow dynamics. However, in many cases the outward flow is hydrodynamic at low altitudes only to become collisionless at higher altitudes, well before sonic speeds are ever attained. Recent models dealing with such transition from fluid to kinetic flow have applied the Jeans escape flux at the exobase. This approach has lead to escape rates that are too low due to the fact that thermospheric winds and planetary rotation increase escape fluxes considerably over the corresponding Jeans fluxes (1). In particular, for a given density and temperature at the exobase, the escape flux increases as the wind speed and/or the rotation rate increase. Also, for a given wind speed and rotation rate, the escape flux enhancement over the Jeans flux increases as the mass of an escaping constituent increases, an important factor in isotope fractionation, especially the enrichment of deuterium on Mars. Accounting for a range of possible temperatures, thermospheric wind speeds and planetary rotation rates in the primitive atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, estimates are made of light constituent escape flux increases over the corresponding Jeans fluxes. (1) Hartle, R. E. and H. G. Mayr, J. Geophys. Res., 81, 1207, 1976.

  4. Enhancing endosomal escape for nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Da

    2014-05-01

    Gene therapy with siRNA is a promising biotechnology to treat cancer and other diseases. To realize siRNA-based gene therapy, a safe and efficient delivery method is essential. Nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery is of great importance to overcome biological barriers for systemic delivery in vivo. Based on recent discoveries, endosomal escape is a critical biological barrier to be overcome for siRNA delivery. This feature article focuses on endosomal escape strategies used for nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery, including cationic polymers, pH sensitive polymers, calcium phosphate, and cell penetrating peptides. Work has been done to develop different endosomal escape strategies based on nanoparticle types, administration routes, and target organ/cell types. Also, enhancement of endosomal escape has been considered along with other aspects of siRNA delivery to ensure target specific accumulation, high cell uptake, and low toxicity. By enhancing endosomal escape and overcoming other biological barriers, great progress has been achieved in nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery.

  5. Enhancing Endosomal Escape for Intracellular Delivery of Macromolecular Biologic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lönn, Peter; Kacsinta, Apollo D; Cui, Xian-Shu; Hamil, Alexander S; Kaulich, Manuel; Gogoi, Khirud; Dowdy, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive macromolecular peptides and oligonucleotides have significant therapeutic potential. However, due to their size, they have no ability to enter the cytoplasm of cells. Peptide/Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can promote uptake of macromolecules via endocytosis. However, overcoming the rate-limiting step of endosomal escape into the cytoplasm remains a major challenge. Hydrophobic amino acid R groups are known to play a vital role in viral escape from endosomes. Here we utilize a real-time, quantitative live cell split-GFP fluorescence complementation phenotypic assay to systematically analyze and optimize a series of synthetic endosomal escape domains (EEDs). By conjugating EEDs to a TAT-PTD/CPP spilt-GFP peptide complementation assay, we were able to quantitatively measure endosomal escape into the cytoplasm of live cells via restoration of GFP fluorescence by intracellular molecular complementation. We found that EEDs containing two aromatic indole rings or one indole ring and two aromatic phenyl groups at a fixed distance of six polyethylene glycol (PEG) units from the TAT-PTD-cargo significantly enhanced cytoplasmic delivery in the absence of cytotoxicity. EEDs address the critical rate-limiting step of endosomal escape in delivery of macromolecular biologic peptide, protein and siRNA therapeutics into cells. PMID:27604151

  6. Enhancing Endosomal Escape for Intracellular Delivery of Macromolecular Biologic Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lönn, Peter; Kacsinta, Apollo D.; Cui, Xian-Shu; Hamil, Alexander S.; Kaulich, Manuel; Gogoi, Khirud; Dowdy, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive macromolecular peptides and oligonucleotides have significant therapeutic potential. However, due to their size, they have no ability to enter the cytoplasm of cells. Peptide/Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can promote uptake of macromolecules via endocytosis. However, overcoming the rate-limiting step of endosomal escape into the cytoplasm remains a major challenge. Hydrophobic amino acid R groups are known to play a vital role in viral escape from endosomes. Here we utilize a real-time, quantitative live cell split-GFP fluorescence complementation phenotypic assay to systematically analyze and optimize a series of synthetic endosomal escape domains (EEDs). By conjugating EEDs to a TAT-PTD/CPP spilt-GFP peptide complementation assay, we were able to quantitatively measure endosomal escape into the cytoplasm of live cells via restoration of GFP fluorescence by intracellular molecular complementation. We found that EEDs containing two aromatic indole rings or one indole ring and two aromatic phenyl groups at a fixed distance of six polyethylene glycol (PEG) units from the TAT-PTD-cargo significantly enhanced cytoplasmic delivery in the absence of cytotoxicity. EEDs address the critical rate-limiting step of endosomal escape in delivery of macromolecular biologic peptide, protein and siRNA therapeutics into cells. PMID:27604151

  7. Modelling rip current flow and bather escape strategies across a transverse bar and rip channel morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarroll, R. Jak; Castelle, Bruno; Brander, Robert W.; Scott, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    . Critically, no strategy succeeded in all scenarios at all locations across the surfzone, and small changes to input conditions (water level, start time and location, swim direction) had major impacts on outcomes. Future modelling efforts should examine additional surf zone rip current morphologies and wave-tide inputs, with a goal of determining generalised rip escape principles that may be communicated to the general public.

  8. Wind Enhanced Escape, Ion Pickup and the Evolution of Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Preferential loss of hydrogen over deuterium from Mars has produced a deuterium rich atmosphere possessing a D/B ratio 5.2 times that of terrestrial water. Rayleigh fractionation is applied, constrained by the deuterium enrichment factor, to determine the magnitudes of ancient and present water reservoirs on the planet. The dominant lose mechanisms of R and D from the current atmosphere are thought to be thermal escape and solar wind ion pickup of the neutral and ion forms of theme constituents, respectively. During an earlier martian epoch, only thermal escape was significant because Mars had a terrestrial sized magnetosphere that protected the atmosphere from solar wind scavenging processes. The magnitudes of present and ancient water reservoirs are estimated when thermal escape is considered alone and subsequently when the effects of ion pickup are added. The escape fluxes of R and D are significantly increased above the respective Jeans fluxes when the effects of thermospheric winds and planetary rotation are accounted for at the exobase. Such wind enhanced escape also increases as the mass of an escaping constituent increases; thus, the increase in the escape flux of D is greater than that of H. When the fractionation process is also constrained by the D/H ratio observed in hydrous minerals of SNC meteorites, an ancient crustal reservoir of Martian water in derived, tens of meters in global-equivalent depth, considerably exceeding that obtained with no winds. The reservoir becomes even larger when ion pickup processes are added.

  9. Nonlinear enhancement of the fractal structure in the escape dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Kevin A.; Ilan, Boaz

    2009-10-15

    We consider the escape dynamics of an ensemble of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms from an optical-dipole trap consisting of two overlapping Gaussian wells. Earlier theoretical studies (based on a model of quantum evolution using ensembles of classical trajectories) predicted that self-similar fractal features could be visible in this system by measuring the escaping flux as a function of time for varying initial conditions. Here, direct numerical quantum simulations show the clear influence of quantum interference on the escape data. Fractal features are still evident in the data, albeit with interference fringes superposed. Furthermore, the nonlinear influence of atom-atom interactions is also considered, in the context of the (2+1)-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Of particular note is that an attractive nonlinear interaction enhances the resolution of fractal structures in the escape data. Thus, the interplay between nonlinear focusing and dispersion results in dynamics that resolve the underlying classical fractal more faithfully than the noninteracting quantum (or classical) dynamics.

  10. Global analysis of fungal morphology exposes mechanisms of host cell escape

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Veri, Amanda O.; Ketela, Troy; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry; Cowen, Leah E.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental transitions between single-cell yeast and multicellular filaments underpin virulence of diverse fungal pathogens. For the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, filamentation is thought to be required for immune cell escape via induction of an inflammatory programmed cell death. Here we perform a genome-scale analysis of C. albicans morphogenesis and identify 102 negative morphogenetic regulators and 872 positive regulators, highlighting key roles for ergosterol biosynthesis and N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate that C. albicans filamentation is not required for escape from host immune cells; instead, macrophage pyroptosis is driven by fungal cell-wall remodelling and exposure of glycosylated proteins in response to the macrophage phagosome. The capacity of killed, previously phagocytized cells to drive macrophage lysis is also observed with the distantly related fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This study provides a global view of morphogenetic circuitry governing a key virulence trait, and illuminates a new mechanism by which fungi trigger host cell death. PMID:25824284

  11. Augmenting the Efficacy of Immunotoxins and Other Targeted Protein Toxins by Endosomal Escape Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander; Gilabert-Oriol, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The toxic moiety of almost all protein-based targeted toxins must enter the cytosol of the target cell to mediate its fatal effect. Although more than 500 targeted toxins have been investigated in the past decades, no antibody-targeted protein toxin has been approved for tumor therapeutic applications by the authorities to date. Missing efficacy can be attributed in many cases to insufficient endosomal escape and therefore subsequent lysosomal degradation of the endocytosed toxins. To overcome this drawback, many strategies have been described to weaken the membrane integrity of endosomes. This comprises the use of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, calcium channel antagonists, various cell-penetrating peptides of viral, bacterial, plant, animal, human and synthetic origin, other organic molecules and light-induced techniques. Although the efficacy of the targeted toxins was typically augmented in cell culture hundred or thousand fold, in exceptional cases more than million fold, the combination of several substances harbors new problems including additional side effects, loss of target specificity, difficulties to determine the therapeutic window and cell type-dependent variations. This review critically scrutinizes the chances and challenges of endosomal escape enhancers and their potential role in future developments. PMID:27376327

  12. Augmenting the Efficacy of Immunotoxins and Other Targeted Protein Toxins by Endosomal Escape Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander; Gilabert-Oriol, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The toxic moiety of almost all protein-based targeted toxins must enter the cytosol of the target cell to mediate its fatal effect. Although more than 500 targeted toxins have been investigated in the past decades, no antibody-targeted protein toxin has been approved for tumor therapeutic applications by the authorities to date. Missing efficacy can be attributed in many cases to insufficient endosomal escape and therefore subsequent lysosomal degradation of the endocytosed toxins. To overcome this drawback, many strategies have been described to weaken the membrane integrity of endosomes. This comprises the use of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, calcium channel antagonists, various cell-penetrating peptides of viral, bacterial, plant, animal, human and synthetic origin, other organic molecules and light-induced techniques. Although the efficacy of the targeted toxins was typically augmented in cell culture hundred or thousand fold, in exceptional cases more than million fold, the combination of several substances harbors new problems including additional side effects, loss of target specificity, difficulties to determine the therapeutic window and cell type-dependent variations. This review critically scrutinizes the chances and challenges of endosomal escape enhancers and their potential role in future developments. PMID:27376327

  13. TAP-independent self-peptides enhance T cell recognition of immune-escaped tumors

    PubMed Central

    Doorduijn, Elien M.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Querido, Bianca J.; Oliveira, Cláudia C.; Achour, Adnane; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van Hall, Thorbald

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells frequently escape from CD8+ T cell recognition by abrogating MHC-I antigen presentation. Deficiency in processing components, like the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), results in strongly decreased surface display of peptide/MHC-I complexes. We previously identified a class of hidden self-antigens known as T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing (TEIPP), which emerge on tumor cells with such processing defects. In the present study, we analyzed thymus selection and peripheral behavior of T cells with specificity for the prototypic TEIPP antigen, the “self” TRH4 peptide/Db complex. TEIPP T cells were efficiently selected in the thymus, egressed with a naive phenotype, and could be exploited for immunotherapy against immune-escaped, TAP-deficient tumor cells expressing low levels of MHC-I (MHC-Ilo). In contrast, overt thymus deletion and functionally impaired TEIPP T cells were observed in mice deficient for TAP1 due to TEIPP antigen presentation on all body cells in these mice. Our results strongly support the concept that TEIPPs derive from ubiquitous, nonmutated self-antigens and constitute a class of immunogenic neoantigens that are unmasked during tumor immune evasion. These data suggest that TEIPP-specific CD8+ T cells are promising candidates in the treatment of tumors that have escaped from conventional immunotherapies. PMID:26784543

  14. Intra-specific variation in wing morphology and its impact on take-off performance in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) during escape flights.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Laura; Altringham, John D; Askew, Graham N

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal and seasonal increases in body mass and seasonal reductions in wing area may compromise a bird's ability to escape, as less of the power available from the flight muscles can be used to accelerate and elevate the animal's centre of mass. Here, we investigated the effects of intra-specific variation in wing morphology on escape take-off performance in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Flights were recorded using synchronised high-speed video cameras and take-off performance was quantified as the sum of the rates of change of the kinetic and potential energies of the centre of mass. Individuals with a lower wing loading, WL (WL=body weight/wing area) had higher escape take-off performance, consistent with the increase in lift production expected from relatively larger wings. Unexpectedly, it was found that the total power available from the flight muscles (estimated using an aerodynamic analysis) was inversely related to WL. This could simply be because birds with a higher WL have relatively smaller flight muscles. Alternatively or additionally, variation in the aerodynamic load on the wing resulting from differences in wing morphology will affect the mechanical performance of the flight muscles via effects on the muscle's length trajectory. Consistent with this hypothesis is the observation that wing beat frequency and relative downstroke duration increase with decreasing WL; both are factors that are expected to increase muscle power output. Understanding how wing morphology influences take-off performance gives insight into the potential risks associated with feather loss and seasonal and diurnal fluctuations in body mass. PMID:26994175

  15. Intra-specific variation in wing morphology and its impact on take-off performance in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) during escape flights

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Laura; Altringham, John D.; Askew, Graham N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diurnal and seasonal increases in body mass and seasonal reductions in wing area may compromise a bird's ability to escape, as less of the power available from the flight muscles can be used to accelerate and elevate the animal's centre of mass. Here, we investigated the effects of intra-specific variation in wing morphology on escape take-off performance in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Flights were recorded using synchronised high-speed video cameras and take-off performance was quantified as the sum of the rates of change of the kinetic and potential energies of the centre of mass. Individuals with a lower wing loading, WL (WL=body weight/wing area) had higher escape take-off performance, consistent with the increase in lift production expected from relatively larger wings. Unexpectedly, it was found that the total power available from the flight muscles (estimated using an aerodynamic analysis) was inversely related to WL. This could simply be because birds with a higher WL have relatively smaller flight muscles. Alternatively or additionally, variation in the aerodynamic load on the wing resulting from differences in wing morphology will affect the mechanical performance of the flight muscles via effects on the muscle's length trajectory. Consistent with this hypothesis is the observation that wing beat frequency and relative downstroke duration increase with decreasing WL; both are factors that are expected to increase muscle power output. Understanding how wing morphology influences take-off performance gives insight into the potential risks associated with feather loss and seasonal and diurnal fluctuations in body mass. PMID:26994175

  16. New ESCAP-type resist with enhanced etch resistance and its application to future DRAM and logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Will; Brunsvold, William R.; Buehrer, Fred; DellaGuardia, Ronald; Dobuzinsky, David; Farrell, Timothy R.; Ho, Hok; Katnani, Ahmad D.; Keller, Robin; Marsh, James T.; Muller, Paul; Nunes, Ronald; Ng, Hung Y.; Oberschmidt, James M.; Pike, Michael; Ryan, Deborah; Cotler-Wagner, Tina; Schulz, Ron; Ito, Hiroshi; Hofer, Donald C.; Breyta, Gregory; Fenzel-Alexander, Debra; Wallraff, Gregory M.; Opitz, Juliann; Thackeray, James W.; Barclay, George G.; Cameron, James F.; Lindsay, Tracy K.; Cronin, Michael F.; Moynihan, Matthew L.; Nour, Sassan; Georger, Jacque H., Jr.; Mori, Mike; Hagerty, Peter; Sinta, Roger F.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    1997-07-01

    This new photoresist system extends the capability of the ESCAP platform previously discussed. (1) This resist material features a modified ESCAP type 4-hydroxystyrene-t-butyl acrylate polymer system which is capable of annealing due to the increased stability of the t-butyl ester blocking group. The resist based on this polymer system exhibits excellent delay stability and enhanced etch resistance versus previous DUV resists, APEX and UV2HS. Improved stabilization of chemically amplified photoresist images can be achieved through reduction of film volume by film densification. When the host polymer provides good thermal stability the soft bake conditions can be above or near the Tg (glass transition) temperature of the polymer. The concept of annealing (film densification) can significantly improve the environmental stability of the photoresist system. Improvements in the photoacid generator, processing conditions and overall formulation coupled with high NA (numerical aperture) exposure systems, affords linear lithography down to 0.15 micrometer for isolated lines with excellent post exposure delay stability. In this paper, we discuss the UV4 and UV5 photoresist systems based on the ESCAP materials platform. The resist based on this polymer system exhibits excellent delay stability and enhanced etch resistance versus APEX-E and UV2HS. Due to lower acrylate content, the Rmax for this system can be tuned for feature-type optimization. We demonstrate sub-0.25 micrometer process window for isolated lines using these resists on a conventional exposure tool with chrome on glass masks. We also discuss current use for various device levels including gate structures for advanced microprocessor designs. Additional data will be provided on advanced DRAM applications for 0.25 micrometer and sub-0.25 micrometer programs.

  17. Swimming away or clamming up: the use of phasic and tonic adductor muscles during escape responses varies with shell morphology in scallops.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Isabelle; Guderley, Helga E; Himmelman, John H

    2012-12-01

    The simple locomotor system of scallops facilitates the study of muscle use during locomotion. We compared five species of scallops with different shell morphologies to see whether shell morphology and muscle use change in parallel or whether muscle use can compensate for morphological constraints. Force recordings during escape responses revealed that the use of tonic and phasic contractions varied markedly among species. The active species, Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus and Pecten fumatus, made more phasic contractions than the more sedentary species, Mimachlamys asperrima and Crassadoma gigantea. Tonic contractions varied considerably among these species, with the two more sedentary species often starting their response to the predator with a tonic contraction and the more active species using shorter tonic contractions between series of phasic contractions. Placopecten magellanicus made extensive use of short tonic contractions. Pecten fumatus mounted an intense series of phasic contractions at the start of its response, perhaps to overcome the constraints of its unfavourable shell morphology. Valve closure by the more sedentary species suggests that their shell morphology protects them against predation, whereas swimming by the more active species relies upon intense phasic contractions together with favourable shell characteristics. PMID:22972884

  18. mPGES-1 deletion impairs aldosterone escape and enhances sodium appetite

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhanjun; Aoyagi, Toshinori; Kohan, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is a major sodium-retaining hormone that reduces renal sodium excretion and also stimulates sodium appetite. In the face of excess Aldo, the sodium-retaining action of this steroid is overridden by an adaptive regulatory mechanism, a phenomenon termed Aldo escape. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is not well defined but appeared to involve a number of natriuretic factors such prostaglandins (PGs). Here, we investigated the role of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the response to excess Aldo. A 14-day Aldo infusion at 0.35 mg·kg−1·day−1 via an osmotic minipump in conjunction with normal salt intake did not produce obvious disturbances in fluid metabolism in WT mice as suggested by normal sodium and water balance, plasma sodium concentration, hematocrit, and body weight, despite the evidence of a transient sodium accumulation on days 1 or 2. In a sharp contrast, the 14-day Aldo treatment in mPGES-1 knockoute (KO) mice led to increased sodium and water balance, persistent reduction of hematocrit, hypernatremia, and body weight gain, all evidence of fluid retention. The escaped wild-type (WT) mice displayed a remarkable increase in urinary PGE2 excretion in parallel with coinduction of mPGES-1 in the proximal tubules, accompanied by a remarkable, widespread downregulation of renal sodium and water transporters. The increase in urinary PGE2 excretion together with the downregulation of renal sodium and water transporters were all significantly blocked in the KO mice. Interestingly, compared with WT controls, the KO mice exhibited consistent increases in sodium and water intake during Aldo infusion. Together, these results suggest an important role of mPGES-1 in antagonizing the sodium-retaining action of Aldo at the levels of both the central nervous system and the kidney. PMID:20335314

  19. Multiscale Micro-Nano Nested Structures: Engineered Surface Morphology for Efficient Light Escaping in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Dong, Xiaoxuan; Zhou, Yun; Su, Wenming; Chen, Xiaolian; Zhu, Yufu; Shen, Su

    2015-12-01

    Various micro-to-nanometer scale structures are extremely attractive for light escaping in organic light-emitting diodes. To develop and optimize such structures, an innovative approach was demonstrated for the first time to fabricate multiscale micro-nano nested structures by photolithography with a well-designed mask pattern followed by a controllable thermal reflow process. The experimental and theoretical characterizations verify that these unique nested structures hold the capability of light concentration, noticeable low haze, and efficient antireflection. As a proof-of-concept, the incorporation of this pattern onto the glass substrate efficiently facilitates light escaping from the device, resulting in current efficiency 1.60 times and external quantum efficiency 1.63 times that of a control flat device, respectively. Moreover, compared to a hexagonally arranged microlens array and quasi-random biomimetic moth eye nanostructures, the nested structures proposed here can magically tune the spatial emission profile to comply with the Lambertian radiation pattern. Hence, this novel structure is expected to be of great potential in related ubiquitous optoelectronic applications and provide scientific inspiration to other novel multiscale micro-nanostructure research. PMID:26575428

  20. Morphological operators for enhanced polarimetric image target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, João. M.; Rosario, Dalton S.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an algorithm based on morphological filters with the Stokes parameters that augments the daytime and nighttime detection of weak-signal manmade objects immersed in a predominant natural background scene. The approach features a tailored sequence of signal-enhancing filters, consisting of core morphological operators (dilation, erosion) and higher level morphological operations (e.g., spatial gradient, opening, closing) to achieve a desired overarching goal. Using representative data from the SPICE database, the results show that the approach was able to automatically and persistently detect with a high confidence level the presence of three mobile military howitzer surrogates (targets) in natural clutter.

  1. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with short oligopeptides for early endosomal escape and enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Le Thi; Mallick, Sudipta; Choi, Joon Sig

    2015-08-15

    Recently, non-viral vectors have become a popular research topic in the field of gene therapy. In this study, we conjugated short oligopeptides to polyamidoamine-generation 4 (PAMAM G4) to achieve higher transfection efficiency. Previous reports have shown that the PAMAM G4-histidine (H)-arginine (R) dendrimer enhances gene delivery by improving cell penetration and internalization mechanisms. Therefore, we synthesized PAMAM G4-H phenylalanine (F) R, PAMAM G4-FHR and PAMAM G4-FR derivatives to determine the best gene carrier with the lowest toxicity. Physicochemical studies were performed to determine mean diameters and surface charge of PAMAM derivatives/pDNA polyplexes. DNA condensation was confirmed using a gel retardation assay. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency were analyzed using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Similar levels of transfection were achieved in both cell lines by using gold standard transfection reagent PEI 25 kD. Therefore, our results show that these carriers are promising and may help achieve higher transfection with negligible cytotoxicity. PMID:26187169

  2. Light-activated endosomal escape using upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced delivery of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasammandhan, Muthu Kumara; Bansal, Akshaya; Zhang, Yong

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs has gained a lot of prominence recently but the main problem hampering efficient delivery of payload is the clearing or degradation of nanoparticles by endosomes. Various strategies have been used to overcome this issue and one such effective solution is Photochemical Internalization (PCI). This technique involves the activation of certain photosensitizing compounds by light, which accumulate specifically in the membranes of endocytic vesicles. The activated photosensitizers induce the formation of reactive oxygen species which in turn induces localized disruption of endosomal membranes. But the drawback of this technique is that it needs blue light for activation and hence confined to be used only in in-vitro systems due to the poor tissue penetration of blue light. Here, we report the use of Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) as a transducer for activation of the photosensitizer, TPPS 2a. NIR light has good tissue penetrating ability and thus enables PCI in greater depths. Highly monodisperse, uniformly-sized, sub-100 nm, biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles were synthesized with a mesoporous silica coating. These UCNs activated TPPS 2a efficiently in solution and in cells. Paclitaxel, an anti-cancer drug was used as a model drug and was loaded into the mesoporous silica coating. B16F0 cells transfected with drug-loaded UCNs and irradiated with NIR showed significantly higher nanoparticle uptake and in turn higher cell death caused by the delivered drug. This technique can be used to enhance the delivery of any therapeutic molecule and thus increase the therapeutic efficiency considerably.

  3. Paclitaxel-Loaded Mixed Micelles Enhance Ovarian Cancer Therapy through Extracellular pH-Triggered PEG Detachment and Endosomal Escape.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haijun; Li, Qian; Hong, Zehui

    2016-07-01

    Although PEGylation allows a drug delivery vehicle to have prolonged blood circulation time, it faces the problem of reduced cellular uptake. Removal of the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-shell at the appropriate time through tumor-microenvironment triggers could be a feasible solution to this problem. Here, paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded mixed micelles (PTX-mM) self-assembled from stearate-modified hyaluronic acid (SHA), mPEG-b-poly(β-amino ester) (mPEG-b-PAE), and ethylene acetyl-b-poly(β-amino ester) (EA-b-PAE) were developed. In the preparation of PTX-mM, SHA micelles were coated with EA-b-PAE followed by coloading of PTX and mPEG-b-PAE. PTX-mM were capable of extracellular pH-triggered PEG-detachment and poly(β-amino ester) (PAE)-mediated endosomal escape. When the pH was changed from pH 7.4 to pH 6.8, the particle size of PTX-mM significantly decreased from 97.5 ± 4.4 to 71.5 ± 2.3 nm. It also resulted in rapid and complete release of mPEG-b-PAE from PTX-mM as monitored using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technology. PTX-mM capable of PEG detachment provided significant enhancement of PTX accumulation in SKOV-3 cells compared to PEG nondetachable PTX-mM. Interestingly, intracellular transport studies using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that EA-b-PAE could promote the escape of micelles from endolysosomes. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PTX-mM against SKOV-3 cells was 5.7 μg/mL, and PTX-mM containing 20 μg/mL of PTX induced apoptosis in 53.0% of the cell population. PTX-mM exhibited a highly prolonged elimination half-life (t1/2, 2.83 ± 0.37 h) and improved area under the curve (AUC, 7724.82 ± 1190.75 ng/mL/h) than the PTX-loaded SHA micelles (PTX-M). Furthermore, PTX-mM showed the highest tumor inhibition rate (64.9%) and the longest survival time (53 days) against the SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenograft models among all formulations. Taken together, the results suggested that PTX-mM have potential as an efficient

  4. Enhancement of textural differences based on morphological component analysis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jianning; Eramian, Mark

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a new texture enhancement method which uses an image decomposition that allows different visual characteristics of textures to be represented by separate components in contrast with previous methods which either enhance texture indirectly or represent all texture information using a single image component. Our method is intended to be used as a preprocessing step prior to the use of texture-based image segmentation algorithms. Our method uses a modification of morphological component analysis (MCA) which allows texture to be separated into multiple morphological components each representing a different visual characteristic of texture. We select four such texture characteristics and propose new dictionaries to extract these components using MCA. We then propose procedures for modifying each texture component and recombining them to produce a texture-enhanced image. We applied our method as a preprocessing step prior to a number of texture-based segmentation methods and compared the accuracy of the results, finding that our method produced results superior to comparator methods for all segmentation algorithms tested. We also demonstrate by example the main mechanism by which our method produces superior results, namely that it causes the clusters of local texture features of each distinct image texture to mutually diverge within the multidimensional feature space to a vastly superior degree versus the comparator enhancement methods. PMID:25935032

  5. Biocompatible mannosylated endosomal-escape nanoparticles enhance selective delivery of short nucleotide sequences to tumor associated macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ryan A.; Barham, Whitney J.; Kumar, Bharat; Tikhomirov, Oleg; McFadden, Ian D.; Yull, Fiona E.; Giorgio, Todd D.

    2014-12-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) can modify the tumor microenvironment to create a pro-tumor niche. Manipulation of the TAM phenotype is a novel, potential therapeutic approach to engage anti-cancer immunity. siRNA is a molecular tool for knockdown of specific mRNAs that is tunable in both strength and duration. The use of siRNA to reprogram TAMs to adopt an immunogenic, anti-tumor phenotype is an attractive alternative to ablation of this cell population. One current difficulty with this approach is that TAMs are difficult to specifically target and transfect. We report here successful utilization of novel mannosylated polymer nanoparticles (MnNP) that are capable of escaping the endosomal compartment to deliver siRNA to TAMs in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with MnNP-siRNA complexes did not significantly decrease TAM cell membrane integrity in culture, nor did it create adverse kidney or liver function in mice, even at repeated doses of 5 mg kg-1. Furthermore, MnNP effectively delivers labeled nucleotides to TAMs in mice with primary mammary tumors. We also confirmed TAM targeting in the solid tumors disseminated throughout the peritoneum of ovarian tumor bearing mice following injection of fluorescently labeled MnNP-nucleotide complexes into the peritoneum. Finally, we show enhanced uptake of MnNP in lung metastasis associated macrophages compared to untargeted particles when using an intubation delivery method. In summary, we have shown that MnNP specifically and effectively deliver siRNA to TAMs in vivo.

  6. Image enhancement and segmentation using weighted morphological connected slope filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiola-Santibañez, Jorge D.; Terol-Villalobos, Iván R.

    2013-04-01

    The morphological connected slope filters (MCSFs) are studied as gray level transformations, and two contributions are made on these operators with the purpose of modifying the gradient criterion performance. The proposals consist of: (a) the introduction of three weighting functions and (b) the application of a displacement parameter. The displacement parameter will permit the image segmentation in a certain intensity interval and the contrast improvement at the same time. This characteristic is an important difference among the MCSFs introduced previously, together with the other transformations defined in the current literature utilized uniquely to enhance contrast. Also, an application example of the weighted morphological slope filters is provided. In such an example, white matter is separated from brain magnetic resonance images T1.

  7. Morphologies, classification and genesis of pockmarks, mud volcanoes and associated fluid escape features in the northern Zhongjiannan Basin, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiangxin; Song, Haibin; Guan, Yongxian; Yang, Shengxiong; Pinheiro, Luis M.; Bai, Yang; Liu, Boran; Geng, Minghui

    2015-12-01

    Based on new high-resolution multi-beam bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection data, two new groups of numerous pockmarks and mud volcanoes were discovered in the northern Zhongjiannan Basin at water depths between 600 and 1400 m. Individual pockmarks are circular, elliptical, crescent-shaped or elongated, with diameters ranging from several hundreds to thousands of meters and tens or hundreds of meters in depth, and they often form groups or strings. Crescent pockmarks, approximately 500-1500 m wide in cross-section and 50-150 m deep, occur widely in the southern study area, both as individual features and in groups or curvilinear chains, and they are more widespread and unique in this area than anywhere else in the world. Conical mud volcanoes, mostly with kilometer-wide diameters and ca. 100 m high, mainly develop in the northern study area as individual features or in groups. Seismic data show that the observed pockmarks are associated with different kinds of fluid escape structures and conduits, such as gas chimneys, diapirs, zones of acoustic blanking, acoustic turbidity and enhanced reflections, inclined faults, small fractures and polygonal faults. The mapped mud volcanoes appear to be fed from deep diapirs along two main conduit types: the conventional conduits with downward tapering cones and another other conduit type with a narrow conduit in the lower half and emanative leakage passages in the upper half. Various types of pockmarks are found and a comprehensive pockmark classification scheme is proposed, according to: (a) their shape in plan view, which includes circular, elliptical, crescent, comet-shape, elongated and irregular; (b) their magnitude, which includes small, normal, giant and mega-pockmarks; and (c) their composite pattern, which includes composite pockmarks, pockmark strings and pockmark groups. For the genesis of the crescent pockmark (strings), a 5-stage speculative formation model is proposed, implying possible controlling

  8. Morphology optimization for enhanced performance in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodo, Olga; Zola, Jaroslaw; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2015-03-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential for widespread usage due to their low cost-per-watt and mechanical flexibility. Their wide spread use, however, is bottlenecked primarily by their low solar efficiencies. Experimental evidence suggests that a key property determining the solar efficiency of such devices is the final morphological distribution of the electron-donor and electron-acceptor constituents. By carefully designing the morphology of the device, one could potentially significantly enhance their performance. This is an area of intense experimental effort that is mostly trial-and-error based, and serves as a fertile area for introducing mechanics and computational thinking. In this work, we use optimization techniques coupled with computational modeling to identify the optimal structures for high efficiency solar cells. In particular, we use adaptive population-based incremental learning method linked to graph-based surrogate model to evaluate properties for given structure. We study several different criterions and find optimal structure that that improve the performance of currently hypothesized optimal structures by 29%.

  9. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  10. Advanced Crew Escape Suit.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Design of the S1032 Launch Entry Suit (LES) began following the Challenger loss and NASA's decision to incorporate a Shuttle crew escape system. The LES (see Figure 1) has successfully supported Shuttle missions since NASA's Return to Flight with STS-26 in September 1988. In 1990, engineers began developing the S1035 Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) to serve as a replacement for the LES. The ACES was designed to be a simplified, lightweight, low-bulk pressure suit which aided self donning/doffing, provided improved comfort, and enhanced overall performance to reduce crew member stress and fatigue. Favorable crew member evaluations of a prototype led to full-scale development and qualification of the S1035 ACES between 1990 and 1992. Production of the S1035 ACES began in February 1993, with the first unit delivered to NASA in May 1994. The S1035 ACES first flew aboard STS-68 in August 1994 and will become the primary crew escape suit when the S1032 LES ends its service life in late 1995. The primary goal of the S1035 development program was to provide improved performance over that of the S1032 to minimize the stress and fatigue typically experienced by crew members. To achieve this, five fundamental design objectives were established, resulting in various material/configuration changes. PMID:11540717

  11. Plasmonic nanobubble-enhanced endosomal escape processes for selective and guided intracellular delivery of chemotherapy to drug-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Belyanin, Andrey; Kashinath, Shruti; Wu, Xiangwei; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapies suffer from multi drug resistance, high non-specific toxicity and heterogeneity of tumors. We report a method of plasmonic nanobubble-enhanced endosomal escape (PNBEE) for the selective, fast and guided intracellular delivery of drugs through a self-assembly by cancer cells of separately targeted gold nanoparticles and encapsulated drug (Doxil). The co-localized with Doxil plasmonic nanobubbles optically generated in cancer cells released the drug into the cytoplasm thus increasing the therapeutic efficacy against these drug-resistant cells by 31-fold, reducing drug dose by 20-fold, the treatment time by 3-fold and the non-specific toxicity by 10-fold compared to standard treatment. Thus the PNBEE mechanism provided selective, safe and efficient intracellular drug delivery in heterogeneous environment opening new opportunities for drug therapies. PMID:22137124

  12. Balancing Cationic and Hydrophobic Content of PEGylated siRNA Polyplexes Enhances Endosome Escape, Stability, Blood Circulation Time, and Bioactivity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Ann; Shannon, Joshua M.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    A family of pH-responsive diblock polymers composed of poly[(ethylene glycol)–b-[(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-co-(butyl methacrylate)] PEG-(DMAEMA-co-BMA) was reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) synthesized with 0-75 mole% BMA in the second polymer block. The relative mole% of DMAEMA and BMA was varied in order to identify a polymer that can be used to formulate PEGylated, siRNA-loaded polyplex nanoparticles (NPs) with an optimized balance of cationic and hydrophobic content in the NP core based on siRNA packaging, cytocompatibility, blood circulation half-life, endosomal escape, and in vivo bioactivity. The polymer with 50:50 mole% of DMAEMA:BMA (polymer “50B”) in the RAFT-polymerized block efficiently condensed siRNA into 100-nm NPs that displayed pH-dependent membrane disruptive behavior finely tuned for endosomal escape. In vitro delivery of siRNA with polymer 50B produced up to 94% protein-level knockdown of the model gene luciferase. The PEG corona of the NPs blocked nonspecific interactions with constituents of human whole blood, and the relative hydrophobicity of polymer 50B increased NP stability in the presence of human serum or the polyanion heparin. When injected intravenously, 50B NPs enhanced blood circulation half-life 3-fold relative to more standard PEG-DMAEMA (0B) NPs (p<0.05), due to improved stability and a reduced rate of renal clearance. The 50B NPs enhanced siRNA biodistribution to the liver and other organs and significantly increased gene silencing in the liver, kidneys, and spleen relative to the benchmark polymer 0B (p<0.05). These collective findings validate the functional significance of tuning the balance of cationic and hydrophobic content of polyplex NPs utilized for systemic siRNA delivery in vivo. PMID:24041122

  13. Photodynamic Therapy-mediated Cancer Vaccination Enhances Stem-like Phenotype and Immune Escape, Which Can Be Blocked by Thrombospondin-1 Signaling through CD47 Receptor Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Zou, Fangyuan; Wang, Jingjing; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Fei, Zhewei; Liu, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Like most of the strategies for cancer immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy-mediated vaccination has shown poor clinical outcomes in application. The aim of this study is to offer a glimpse at the mechanisms that are responsible for the failure based on cancer immuno-editing theory and to search for a positive solution. In this study we found that tumor cells were able to adapt themselves to the immune pressure exerted by vaccination. The survived tumor cells exhibited enhanced tumorigenic and stem-like phenotypes as well as undermined immunogenicity. Viewed as a whole, immune-selected tumor cells showed more malignant characteristics and the ability of immune escape, which might contribute to the eventual relapse. Thrombospondin-1 signaling via CD47 helped prevent tumor cells from becoming stem-like and rendered them vulnerable to immune attack. These findings prove that the TSP-1/CD47/SIRP-α signal axis is important to the evolution of tumor cells in the microenvironment of immunotherapy and identify thrombospondin-1 as a key signal with therapeutic benefits in overcoming long term relapse, providing new evidence for the clinical promise of cancer vaccination. PMID:25697354

  14. Morphological selection and the evaluation of potential tradeoffs between escape from predators and the climbing of waterfalls in the Hawaiian stream goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni.

    PubMed

    Blob, Richard W; Kawano, Sandy M; Moody, Kristine N; Bridges, William C; Maie, Takashi; Ptacek, Margaret B; Julius, Matthew L; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2010-12-01

    Environmental pressures may vary over the geographic range of a species, exposing subpopulations to divergent functional demands. How does exposure to competing demands shape the morphology of species and influence the divergence of populations? We explored these questions by performing selection experiments on juveniles of the Hawaiian goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni, an amphidromous fish that exhibits morphological differences across portions of its geographic range where different environmental pressures predominate. Juvenile S. stimpsoni face two primary and potentially opposing selective pressures on body shape as they return from the ocean to freshwater streams on islands: (1) avoiding predators in the lower reaches of a stream; and (2) climbing waterfalls to reach the habitats occupied by adults. These pressures differ in importance across the Hawaiian Islands. On the youngest island, Hawai'i, waterfalls are close to shore, thereby minimizing exposure to predators and placing a premium on climbing performance. In contrast, on the oldest major island, Kaua'i, waterfalls have eroded further inland, lengthening the exposure of juveniles to predators before migrating juveniles begin climbing. Both juvenile and adult fish show differences in body shape between these islands that would be predicted to improve evasion of predators by fish from Kaua'i (e.g., taller bodies that improve thrust) and climbing performance for fish from Hawai'i (e.g., narrower bodies that reduce drag), matching the prevailing environmental demand on each island. To evaluate how competing selection pressures and functional tradeoffs contribute to the divergence in body shape observed in S. stimpsoni, we compared selection imposed on juvenile body shape by (1) predation by the native fish Eleotris sandwicensis versus (2) climbing an artificial waterfall (∼100 body lengths). Some variables showed opposing patterns of selection that matched predictions: for example, survivors of predation had

  15. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  16. The great escape

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms precisely regulate sex chromosome inactivation as well as genes that escape the silencing process. In male germ cells, DNA damage response factor RNF8 establishes active epigenetic modifications on the silent sex chromosomes during meiosis, and activates escape genes during a state of sex chromosome-wide silencing in postmeiotic spermatids. During the course of evolution, the gene content of escape genes in postmeiotic spermatids recently diverged on the sex chromosomes. This evolutionary feature mirrors the epigenetic processes of sex chromosomes in germ cells. In this article, we describe how epigenetic processes have helped to shape the evolution of sex chromosome-linked genes. Furthermore, we compare features of escape genes on sex chromosomes in male germ cells to escape genes located on the single X chromosome silenced during X-inactivation in females, clarifying the distinct evolutionary implications between male and female escape genes. PMID:23880818

  17. Crew Escape Certification Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This video tape shows the Shuttle hatch jettison test at Rockwell facilities. The video also shows a Shuttle escape pole deployment test from a NASA aircraft, and an emergency egress test performed by a volunteer Navy parachutist using the pole and a parachute escape system.

  18. Dust escape from Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  19. Multi-functional bio-synthetic hybrid nanostructures for enhanced cellular uptake, endosomal escape and targeted delivery toward diagnostics and therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Ritu

    -assembly of the nanoparticles enhanced cellular uptake and knockdown of nucleolin (a shuttling protein overexpressed at the sites of angiogenesis) and thus inhibiting tumor cell growth. Furthermore, these polymer precursors of the cSCKs were modified with partial to full incorporation of histamines to facilitate their endosomal escape for efficient delivery into the cytosol. The cSCKs were further templated onto high aspect ratio anionic cylinders to form hierarchically-assembled nanostructures that bring together individual components with unique functions, such as one carrying a therapeutic payload and the other with sites for radiolabeling. These higher order nanoobjects enhance circulation in vivo, have capabilities to package nucleic acids electrostatically and contain sites for radiolabeling, providing an overall advantage over the individual components, which could each facilitate only one or the other of the combined functions. Hierarchically-assembled nanostructures were investigated for their cellular uptake, transfection behavior and radiolabeling efficiency, as the next generation of theranostic agents.

  20. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert E.

    2010-06-20

    Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

  1. Effects of tidally enhanced stellar wind on the horizontal branch morphology of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.-X.; Chen, X.-F.; Zhang, F.-H.; Han, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Metallicity is the first parameter to influence the horizontal branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs). It has been found, however, that some other parameters may also play an important role in affecting the morphology. While the nature of these important parameters remains unclear, they are believed to be likely correlated with wind mass-loss of red giants, since this mass loss determines their subsequent locations on the HB. Unfortunately, the mass loss during the red giant stages of the stellar evolution is poorly understood at present. Aims: The stellar winds of red giants may be tidally enhanced by companion stars if they are in binary systems. We investigate the evolutionary consequences of red giants in binaries by including tidally enhanced stellar winds, and examine the effects on the HB morphology of GCs. Methods: We used Eggleton's stellar evolution code to study the binary evolution. The tidally enhanced stellar-wind model of Tout & Eggleton is incorporated into this code, where the tidal enhancement parameter, Bw, has various values (e.g., 10 000 and 500) to examine the dependency of the final results on this parameter. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to generate a group of binary systems. The position of each primary star on the HB in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in this sample is obtained through interpolations among the constructed HB evolutionary tracks. Finally, a synthetic HB in the color-magnitude diagram is obtained by transforming the effective temperature and luminosity of each primary star on the HB into B - V colors and absolute magnitude. Results: We find that red, blue, and extreme horizontal branch stars are all produced under the effects of tidally enhanced stellar wind without any additional assumptions on the mass-loss dispersion. Furthermore, the horizontal branch morphology is found to be insensitive to the tidal enhancement parameter, Bw. We compare our theoretical results with the observed horizontal

  2. An escape from crowding.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Pelli, Denis G

    2007-01-01

    Crowding occurs when nearby flankers jumble the appearance of a target object, making it hard to identify. Crowding is feature integration over an inappropriately large region. What determines the size of that region? According to bottom-up proposals, the size is that of an anatomically determined isolation field. According to top-down proposals, the size is that of the spotlight of attention. Intriligator and Cavanagh (2001) proposed the latter, but we show that their conclusion rests on an implausible assumption. Here we investigate the role of attention in crowding using the change blindness paradigm. We measure capacity for widely and narrowly spaced letters during a change detection task, both with and without an interstimulus cue. We find that standard crowding manipulations-reducing spacing and adding flankers-severely impair uncued change detection but have no effect on cued change detection. Because crowded letters look less familiar, we must use longer internal descriptions (less compact representations) to remember them. Thus, fewer fit into working memory. The memory limit does not apply to the cued condition because the observer need remember only the cued letter. Cued performance escapes the effects of crowding, as predicted by a top-down account. However, our most parsimonious account of the results is bottom-up: Cued change detection is so easy that the observer can tolerate feature degradation and letter distortion, making the observer immune to crowding. The change detection task enhances the classic partial report paradigm by making the test easier (same/different instead of identifying one of many possible targets), which increases its sensitivity, so it can reveal degraded memory traces. PMID:18217837

  3. Escape behaviors in insects.

    PubMed

    Card, Gwyneth M

    2012-04-01

    Escape behaviors are, by necessity, fast and robust, making them excellent systems with which to study the neural basis of behavior. This is especially true in insects, which have comparatively tractable nervous systems and members who are amenable to manipulation with genetic tools. Recent technical developments in high-speed video reveal that, despite their short duration, insect escape behaviors are more complex than previously appreciated. For example, before initiating an escape jump, a fly performs sophisticated posture and stimulus-dependent preparatory leg movements that enable it to jump away from a looming threat. This newfound flexibility raises the question of how the nervous system generates a behavior that is both rapid and flexible. Recordings from the cricket nervous system suggest that synchrony between the activity of specific interneuron pairs may provide a rapid cue for the cricket to detect the direction of an approaching predator and thus which direction it should run. Technical advances make possible wireless recording from neurons while locusts escape from a looming threat, enabling, for the first time, a direct correlation between the activity of multiple neurons and the time-course of an insect escape behavior. PMID:22226514

  4. Enhanced wettability performance of ultrathin ZnO nanotubes by coupling morphology and size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peihua; Wang, Kun; Liang, Zhiwen; Mai, Wenjie; Wang, Cheng-Xin; Xie, Weiguang; Liu, Pengyi; Zhang, Long; Cai, Xiang; Tan, Shaozao; Song, Jinhui

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we report on the detailed characterization and mechanism analysis of the improved wettability performance of a new type of ZnO nanostructure, the ultrathin ZnO nanotube, whose growth is induced by screw-dislocation. The newly discovered enhanced wettability properties are suggested to be caused by coupling the morphology and size effects of the nanostructured surface. These ultrathin nanotubes with low density and small dimension form a wet-hair-like hierarchical morphology, which shows a further improved superhydrophobic property with an 8.6 +/- 1.6° larger contact angle than that of ZnO nanorods due to the morphology effect. In addition, owing to the large surface to volume ratio and increased effective UV-irradiated area of the ultrathin tubular structure, the ZnO nanotubes exhibit ~5 times faster superhydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity conversion speed than nanorods under 254 nm UV illumination. Furthermore, UV light with a wavelength of 254 nm exhibits ~40 times faster wettability conversion speed for nanotubes than that of 365 nm, which is suggested to be a result of the band gap shift at the nanoscale. The combined advantages of enhanced superhydrophobicity, improved sensitivity, and faster conversion speed by coupling morphology and size effects of these ZnO nanotubes should give them broad applications in self-cleaning surfaces and wettability switches.

  5. Pure Nanoscale Morphology Effect Enhancing the Energy Storage Characteristics of Processable Hierarchical Polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Wannapob, Rodtichoti; Vagin, Mikhail Yu; Jeerapan, Itthipon; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2015-11-01

    We report a new synthesis approach for the precise control of wall morphologies of colloidal polypyrrole microparticles (PPyMPs) based on a time-dependent template-assisted polymerization technique. The resulting PPyMPs are water processable, allowing the simple and direct fabrication of multilevel hierarchical PPyMPs films for energy storage via a self-assembly process, whereas convention methods creating hierarchical conducting films based on electrochemical polymerization are complicated and tedious. This approach allows the rational design and fabrication of PPyMPs with well-defined size and tunable wall morphology, while the chemical composition, zeta potential, and microdiameter of the PPyMPs are well characterized. By precisely controlling the wall morphology of the PPyMPs, we observed a pure nanoscale morphological effect of the materials on the energy storage performance. We demonstrated by controlling purely the wall morphology of PPyMPs to around 100 nm (i.e., thin-walled PPyMPs) that the thin-walled PPyMPs exhibit typical supercapacitor characteristics with a significant enhancement of charge storage performance of up to 290% compared to that of thick-walled PPyMPs confirmed by cyclic voltametry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We envision that the present design concept could be extended to different conducting polymers as well as other functional organic and inorganic dopants, which provides an innovative model for future study and understanding of the complex physicochemical phenomena of energy-related materials. PMID:26467112

  6. Escape and rescue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvord, D.; Nelson, H. E.

    The Escape and Rescue model is a discrete-event simulation program written in Simscript. It was developed to simulate the emergency movement involved in escape and/or rescue of people from a Board and Care Home housing a group of persons with varying degrees of physical or mental disabilities along with a small live-in staff. It may, however, be used in a much more general setting. It can reasonably handle a building with up to 100 residents and 100 rooms.

  7. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths < 200 meters is estimated to have DCS risk < 6%. Saturation at raised DISSUB pressure markedly increases risk, with > 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models. PMID:25109085

  8. ChAcNLS, a Novel Modification to Antibody-Conjugates Permitting Target Cell-Specific Endosomal Escape, Localization to the Nucleus, and Enhanced Total Intracellular Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Simon; Rondeau, Andreanne; Martel, Olivier; Bonin, Marc-Andre; van Lier, Johan E; Leyton, Jeffrey V

    2016-06-01

    The design of antibody-conjugates (ACs) for delivering molecules for targeted applications in humans has sufficiently progressed to demonstrate clinical efficacy in certain malignancies and reduced systemic toxicity that occurs with standard nontargeted therapies. One area that can advance clinical success for ACs will be to increase their intracellular accumulation. However, entrapment and degradation in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, on which ACs are reliant for the depositing of their molecular payload inside target cells, leads to reduced intracellular accumulation. Innovative approaches that can manipulate this pathway may provide a strategy for increasing accumulation. We hypothesized that escape from entrapment inside the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and redirected trafficking to the nucleus could be an effective approach to increase intracellular AC accumulation in target cells. Cholic acid (ChAc) was coupled to the peptide CGYGPKKKRKVGG containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) from SV-40 large T-antigen, which is termed ChAcNLS. ChAcNLS was conjugated to the mAb 7G3 (7G3-ChAcNLS), which has nanomolar affinity for the cell-surface leukemic antigen interleukin-3 receptor-α (IL-3Rα). Our aim was to determine whether 7G3-ChAcNLS increased intracellular accumulation while retaining nanomolar affinity and IL-3Rα-positive cell selectivity. Competition ELISA and cell treatment assays were performed. Cell fractionation, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blot techniques were used to determine the level of antibody accumulation inside cells and in corresponding nuclei. In addition, the radioisotope copper-64 ((64)Cu) was also utilized as a surrogate molecular cargo to evaluate nuclear and intracellular accumulation by radioactivity counting. 7G3-ChAcNLS effectively escaped endosome entrapment and degradation resulting in a unique intracellular distribution pattern. mAb modification with ChAcNLS maintained 7G3 nM affinity and produced high

  9. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  10. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  11. Trade-offs between performance and variability in the escape responses of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Amanda C.; Chen, Tiffany; Connolly, Erin; Darakananda, Karin; Jeong, Janet; Quist, Arbor; Robbins, Allison; Ellerby, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful predator evasion is essential to the fitness of many animals. Variation in escape behaviour may be adaptive as it reduces predictability, enhancing escape success. High escape velocities and accelerations also increase escape success, but biomechanical factors likely constrain the behavioural range over which performance can be maximized. There may therefore be a trade-off between variation and performance during escape responses. We have used bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) escape responses to examine this potential trade-off, determining the full repertoire of escape behaviour for individual bluegill sunfish and linking this to performance as indicated by escape velocity and acceleration. Fish escapes involve an initial C-bend of the body axis, followed by variable steering movements. These generate thrust and establish the escape direction. Directional changes during the initial C-bend were less variable than the final escape angle, and the most frequent directions were associated with high escape velocity. Significant inter-individual differences in escape angles magnified the overall variation, maintaining unpredictability from a predator perspective. Steering in the latter stages of the escape to establish the final escape trajectory also affected performance, with turns away from the stimulus associated with reduced velocity. This suggests that modulation of escape behaviour by steering may also have an associated performance cost. This has important implications for understanding the scope and control of intra- and inter-individual variation in escape behaviour and the associated costs and benefits. PMID:25910940

  12. Trade-offs between performance and variability in the escape responses of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Amanda C; Chen, Tiffany; Connolly, Erin; Darakananda, Karin; Jeong, Janet; Quist, Arbor; Robbins, Allison; Ellerby, David J

    2015-01-01

    Successful predator evasion is essential to the fitness of many animals. Variation in escape behaviour may be adaptive as it reduces predictability, enhancing escape success. High escape velocities and accelerations also increase escape success, but biomechanical factors likely constrain the behavioural range over which performance can be maximized. There may therefore be a trade-off between variation and performance during escape responses. We have used bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) escape responses to examine this potential trade-off, determining the full repertoire of escape behaviour for individual bluegill sunfish and linking this to performance as indicated by escape velocity and acceleration. Fish escapes involve an initial C-bend of the body axis, followed by variable steering movements. These generate thrust and establish the escape direction. Directional changes during the initial C-bend were less variable than the final escape angle, and the most frequent directions were associated with high escape velocity. Significant inter-individual differences in escape angles magnified the overall variation, maintaining unpredictability from a predator perspective. Steering in the latter stages of the escape to establish the final escape trajectory also affected performance, with turns away from the stimulus associated with reduced velocity. This suggests that modulation of escape behaviour by steering may also have an associated performance cost. This has important implications for understanding the scope and control of intra- and inter-individual variation in escape behaviour and the associated costs and benefits. PMID:25910940

  13. Enhanced copper adsorption and morphological alterations of cells of copper-stressed Mucor rouxii

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Cano-Aguilera, I.; Webb, R.; Gutierrez-Corona, F.

    1997-03-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous and can become dominant in metal-polluted habitats. Some fungal strains are tolerant to metal toxicity. The presence of a high copper concentration in the culture medium induced morphological changes in the copper-tolerant strain of Mucor rouxii. Copper binding by strains of M. rouxii cultured at a trace copper concentration was less effective than those cultured at a high copper concentration. These experiments were performed at an optimum time of 30 min and a pH of 5 for Cu{sup 2+} binding. The results suggest that a passive metal-binding mechanism makes the majority of total copper binding. These preliminary findings suggest that the presence of high levels of copper in the culture medium allow the development of chemical functional groups on the fungal surface, which led to an enhanced copper-binding ability and induced important morphological changes in M. rouxii.

  14. Gas image enhancement based on adaptive time-domain filtering and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changxing; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Long, Yunting; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    The fingerprint region of most gases is within 3 to 14μm. A mid-wave or long-wave infrared thermal imager is therefore commonly applied in gas detection. With further influence of low gas concentration and heterogeneity of infrared focal plane arrays, the image has numerous drawbacks. These include loud noise, weak gas signal, gridding, and dead points, all of which are particularly evident in sequential images. In order to solve these problems, we take into account the characteristics of the leaking gas image and propose an enhancement method based on adaptive time-domain filtering with morphology. The adaptive time-domain filtering which operates on time sequence images is a hybrid method combining the recursive filtering and mean filtering. It segments gas and background according to a selected threshold; removes speckle noise according to the median; and removes background domain using weighted difference image. The morphology method can not only dilate the gas region along the direction of gas diffusion to greatly enhance the visibility of the leakage area, but also effectively remove the noise, and smooth the contour. Finally, the false color is added to the gas domain. Results show that the gas infrared region is effectively enhanced.

  15. Spacecraft Escape Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Charles, Dingell W.; Bufkin, Ann L.; Rodriggs, Liana M.; Peterson, Wayne; Cuthbert, Peter; Lee, David E.; Westhelle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses the Gumdrop capsule a conceptual spacecraft that would enable the crew to escape safely in the event of a major equipment failure at any time from launch through atmospheric re-entry. The scaleable Gumdrop capsule would comprise a command module (CM), a service module (SM), and a crew escape system (CES). The CM would contain a pressurized crew environment that would include avionic, life-support, thermal control, propulsive attitude control, and recovery systems. The SM would provide the primary propulsion and would also supply electrical power, life-support resources, and active thermal control to the CM. The CES would include a solid rocket motor, embedded within the SM, for pushing the CM away from the SM in the event of a critical thermal-protection-system failure or loss of control. The CM and SM would normally remain integrated with each other from launch through recovery, but could be separated using the CES, if necessary, to enable the safe recovery of the crew in the CM. The crew escape motor could be used, alternatively, as a redundant means of de-orbit propulsion for the CM in the event of a major system failure in the SM.

  16. Linckosides enhance proliferation and induce morphological changes in human olfactory ensheathing cells.

    PubMed

    Tello Velasquez, Johana; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Lim, Filip; Han, Chunguang; Ojika, Makoto; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Quinn, Ronald J; John, James A St

    2016-09-01

    Linckosides are members of the steroid glycoside family isolated from the starfish Linckia laevigata. These natural compounds have notable neuritogenic activity and synergistic effects on NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Neurogenic factors or molecules that are able to mimic their activities are known to be involved in the survival, proliferation and migration of neurons and glial cells; however how glial cells respond to specific neurogenic molecules such as linckosides has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the effect of three different linckosides (linckoside A, B and granulatoside A) on the morphological properties, proliferation and migration of human olfactory ensheathing cells (hOECs). The proliferation rate after all the treatments was higher than control as detected by MTS assay. Additionally, hOECs displayed dramatic morphological changes characterized by a higher number of processes after linckoside treatment. Interestingly changes in microtubule organization and expression levels of some early neuronal markers (GAP43 and βIII-tubulin) were also observed. An increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 after addition of the compounds suggests that this pathway may be involved in the linckoside-mediated effects particularly those related to morphological changes. These results are the first description of the stimulating effects of linckosides on hOECs and raise the potential for this natural compound or its derivatives to be used to regulate and enhance the therapeutic properties of OECs, particularly for cell transplantation therapies. PMID:27343824

  17. [A novel hyperspectra absorption enhancing method based on morphological top-hat transformation].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Lin, Qi-zhong; Wang, Qin-jun; Liu, Qing-jie; Chen, Yu

    2010-09-01

    Hyperspectral characteristics analysis of ground features is the basis for applications of high-resolution imaging technology to ground target identification and ground features classification. Based on morphological multi-scale Top-Hat transformation, a novel spectral absorption enhancing algorithms was put forward, which enhanced spectral absorption features while maintaining shape features of the absorption peak bands. Eleven reflectance spectra of different mineral groups were chosen from the mineral spectral library of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and we used a K-means clustering analysis on both the absorption-enhanced spectra and the original reflectance spectra. Results showed that, firstly, clustering groups of the absorption-enhanced spectra (AES) had better similarity within the same clustering group, and greater difference between different groups, furthermore, they were more consistent with the geological background of these minerals compared with clustering result of the original spectra (OS). Secondly, while all the original spectra were re-sampled to their ASTER spectra and the AES clustering result was displayed in the form of ASTER spectra of the minerals, we could easily describe both the representative spectral feature of each clustering group, and the typical spectral differences between every two groups. These fully demonstrate that the absorption-enhanced spectra have enhanced absorption features of the mineral spectra, and improved the separability of hyper-spectra. Accordingly, feature analysis based on absorption enhanced spectra can be used as reference for information extracting based on multi-spectral remote sensing image data, and it is a very useful method of hyperspectral analysis. PMID:21105412

  18. Infrared image enhancement based on the edge detection and mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Xiaohua; Yu, Xiaomei; Hui, Mei; Chu, Xuhong; Gong, Cheng

    2010-11-01

    The development of the un-cooled infrared imaging technology from military necessity. At present, It is widely applied in industrial, medicine, scientific and technological research and so on. The infrared radiation temperature distribution of the measured object's surface can be observed visually. The collection of infrared images from our laboratory has following characteristics: Strong spatial correlation, Low contrast , Poor visual effect; Without color or shadows because of gray image , and has low resolution; Low definition compare to the visible light image; Many kinds of noise are brought by the random disturbances of the external environment. Digital image processing are widely applied in many areas, it can now be studied up close and in detail in many research field. It has become one kind of important means of the human visual continuation. Traditional methods for image enhancement cannot capture the geometric information of images and tend to amplify noise. In order to remove noise and improve visual effect. Meanwhile, To overcome the above enhancement issues. The mathematical model of FPA unit was constructed based on matrix transformation theory. According to characteristics of FPA, Image enhancement algorithm which combined with mathematical morphology and edge detection are established. First of all, Image profile is obtained by using the edge detection combine with mathematical morphological operators. And then, through filling the template profile by original image to get the ideal background image, The image noise can be removed on the base of the above method. The experiments show that utilizing the proposed algorithm can enhance image detail and the signal to noise ratio.

  19. Chemical and morphological characterization of sugarcane bagasse submitted to a delignification process for enhanced enzymatic digestibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years, biorefining of lignocellulosic biomass to produce multi-products such as ethanol and other biomaterials has become a dynamic research area. Pretreatment technologies that fractionate sugarcane bagasse are essential for the successful use of this feedstock in ethanol production. In this paper, we investigate modifications in the morphology and chemical composition of sugarcane bagasse submitted to a two-step treatment, using diluted acid followed by a delignification process with increasing sodium hydroxide concentrations. Detailed chemical and morphological characterization of the samples after each pretreatment condition, studied by high performance liquid chromatography, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, is reported, together with sample crystallinity and enzymatic digestibility. Results Chemical composition analysis performed on samples obtained after different pretreatment conditions showed that up to 96% and 85% of hemicellulose and lignin fractions, respectively, were removed by this two-step method when sodium hydroxide concentrations of 1% (m/v) or higher were used. The efficient lignin removal resulted in an enhanced hydrolysis yield reaching values around 100%. Considering the cellulose loss due to the pretreatment (maximum of 30%, depending on the process), the total cellulose conversion increases significantly from 22.0% (value for the untreated bagasse) to 72.4%. The delignification process, with consequent increase in the cellulose to lignin ratio, is also clearly observed by nuclear magnetic resonance and diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy experiments. We also demonstrated that the morphological changes contributing to this remarkable improvement occur as a consequence of lignin removal from the sample. Bagasse unstructuring is favored by the loss of cohesion between neighboring cell walls, as

  20. Modulating the Morphology of Gold Graphitic Nanocapsules for Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Fang; Zou, Yu-Xiu; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zheng, Meng-Jie; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Liang, Hao; Xu, Yi-Ting; Wang, Xue-Wei; Ding, Ding; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2016-05-17

    With their unique optical properties and distinct Raman signatures, graphitic nanomaterials can serve as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) or provide signal amplification for bioanalysis and detection. However, a relatively weak Raman signal has limited further biomedical applications. This has been addressed by encapsulating gold nanorods (AuNRs) in a thin graphitic shell to form gold graphitic nanocapsules. This step improves plasmon resonance, which enhances Raman intensity, and has the potential for integrating two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging capability. However, changing the morphology of gold graphitic nanocapsules such that high quality and stability are achieved remains a challenge. To address this task, we herein report a confinement chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to prepare the construction of AuNR-encapsulated graphitic nanocapsules with these properties. Specifically, through morphological modulation, we (1) achieved higher plasmon resonance with near-IR incident light, thus achieving greater Raman intensity, and (2) successfully integrated two-photon luminescence dual-modal (Raman/TPL) bioimaging capabilities. Cancer-cell-specific aptamers were further modified on the AuNR@G graphitic surface through simple, but strong, π-π interactions to achieve imaging selectivity through differential cancer cell recognition. PMID:27089383

  1. Adaptive bill morphology for enhanced tool manipulation in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Hunt, Gavin R.; Oberhofer, Katja; Ogihara, Naomichi; McGowan, Kevin J.; Mithraratne, Kumar; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Gray, Russell D.; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Early increased sophistication of human tools is thought to be underpinned by adaptive morphology for efficient tool manipulation. Such adaptive specialisation is unknown in nonhuman primates but may have evolved in the New Caledonian crow, which has sophisticated tool manufacture. The straightness of its bill, for example, may be adaptive for enhanced visually-directed use of tools. Here, we examine in detail the shape and internal structure of the New Caledonian crow’s bill using Principal Components Analysis and Computed Tomography within a comparative framework. We found that the bill has a combination of interrelated shape and structural features unique within Corvus, and possibly birds generally. The upper mandible is relatively deep and short with a straight cutting edge, and the lower mandible is strengthened and upturned. These novel combined attributes would be functional for (i) counteracting the unique loading patterns acting on the bill when manipulating tools, (ii) a strong precision grip to hold tools securely, and (iii) enhanced visually-guided tool use. Our findings indicate that the New Caledonian crow’s innovative bill has been adapted for tool manipulation to at least some degree. Early increased sophistication of tools may require the co-evolution of morphology that provides improved manipulatory skills. PMID:26955788

  2. Adaptive bill morphology for enhanced tool manipulation in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Hunt, Gavin R; Oberhofer, Katja; Ogihara, Naomichi; McGowan, Kevin J; Mithraratne, Kumar; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Gray, Russell D; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Early increased sophistication of human tools is thought to be underpinned by adaptive morphology for efficient tool manipulation. Such adaptive specialisation is unknown in nonhuman primates but may have evolved in the New Caledonian crow, which has sophisticated tool manufacture. The straightness of its bill, for example, may be adaptive for enhanced visually-directed use of tools. Here, we examine in detail the shape and internal structure of the New Caledonian crow's bill using Principal Components Analysis and Computed Tomography within a comparative framework. We found that the bill has a combination of interrelated shape and structural features unique within Corvus, and possibly birds generally. The upper mandible is relatively deep and short with a straight cutting edge, and the lower mandible is strengthened and upturned. These novel combined attributes would be functional for (i) counteracting the unique loading patterns acting on the bill when manipulating tools, (ii) a strong precision grip to hold tools securely, and (iii) enhanced visually-guided tool use. Our findings indicate that the New Caledonian crow's innovative bill has been adapted for tool manipulation to at least some degree. Early increased sophistication of tools may require the co-evolution of morphology that provides improved manipulatory skills. PMID:26955788

  3. -based catalysts with engineered morphologies for soot oxidation to enhance soot-catalyst contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, Paolo; Bensaid, Samir; Russo, Nunzio; Fino, Debora

    2014-05-01

    As morphology plays a relevant role in solid/solid catalysis, where the number of contact points is a critical feature in this kind of reaction, three different ceria morphologies have been investigated in this work as soot oxidation catalysts: ceria nanofibers, which can become organized as a catalytic network inside diesel particulate filter channels and thus trap soot particles at several contact points but have a very low specific surface area (4 m2/g); solution combustion synthesis ceria, which has an uncontrolled morphology but a specific surface area of 31 m2/g; and three-dimensional self-assembled (SA) ceria stars, which have both high specific surface area (105 m2/g) and a high availability of contact points. A high microporous volume of 0.03 cm3/g and a finer crystallite size compared to the other morphologies suggested that self-assembled stars could improve their redox cycling capability and their soot oxidation properties. In this comparison, self-assembled stars have shown the best tendency towards soot oxidation, and the temperature of non-catalytic soot oxidation has dropped from 614°C to 403°C in tight and to 552°C in loose contact conditions, respectively. As far as the loose contact results are concerned, this condition being the most realistic and hence the most significant, self-assembled stars have exhibited the lowest T 10% onset temperature of this trio (even after ageing), thus proving their higher intrinsic activity. Furthermore, the three-dimensional shape of self-assembled stars may involve more of the soot cake layer than the solution combustion synthesis or nanofibers of ceria and thus enhance the total number of contact points. The results obtained through this work have encouraged our efforts to understand soot oxidation and to transpose these results to real diesel particulate filters.

  4. Morphology modification of gold nanoparticles from nanoshell to C-shape: Improved surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Ting-Yang; Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2016-06-01

    Morphology modification of nanostructures is of great interest, because it can be used to fabricate nanostructures which are hard to be done using other methods. Different from traditional lithographic technique which is slow and expensive, morphology modification is easy, cheap, and reproducible. In this paper, modification of the optical and morphological properties of a hollow gold nanoshell (HGNS) is achieved by using H2O2 as an oxidizer. The reshaping of these nanostructures has been demonstrated as a consequence of an oxidation process in which HGNSs are dissolved by H2O2 under the acidic conditions provided by HCl. We investigate the oxidation process by a transmission electron microscope and propose a reshaping model involving four different shapes (HGNS, HGNS with hole, gold nanoring, and C-shaped gold nanoparticle) which are corresponding to the oxidation products of HGNSs at different pH values. Besides, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of each oxidation product has been evaluated by using rhodamine 6G as the Raman active probe. It has been observed that the C-shaped gold nanoparticles which are corresponding to the oxidation products at the minimum pH value have the highest SERS activity and this result can also be interpreted by discrete-dipole approximation simulations. We demonstrate that the morphology modification of HGNSs becomes possible in a controlled manner using wet chemistry and can be used in preparation of gold nanoparticles such as HGNS with hole, gold nanoring, and C-shaped gold nanoparticle with large SERS activity. These nanostructures must have potential use in many plasmonic areas, including sensing, catalysis, and biomedicine.

  5. MEMO: Mars Escape and Magnetic Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Langlais, B.; Leblanc, F.; Sotin, C.; Barabash, S.; Dehant, V.; Dougherty, M.; Lammer, H.; Mandea, M.; Vennerstrom, S.

    There are several reasons to believe that Mars could have become an Earth like planet rather than the present dry and cold planet. In particular, many elements suggest the presence of liquid water at the Martian surface during a relatively short period at an early stage of its history. Since liquid water may have been the birthplace for life on Earth, the fate of Martian water is one of the major key and yet unanswered question to be solved. Mars Escape and Magnetic Orbiter (MEMO) is a low periapsis orbiter of Mars devoted to the measurement of present escape and the characterization of the fossil magnetic field of Mars. The use of a low periapsis altitude orbit (120-150 km) is required to detect and quantify all populations of atoms and molecules involved in escape. It is also required to measure the magnetic field of Mars with an unprecedented spatial resolution that would allow getting a more precise timing of the dynamo and its disappearance. Achieving a full characterization of atmospheric escape, and extrapolating it back to the past requires: (i) to measure escape fluxes of neutral and ion species, and characterize the dynamics and chemistry of the regions of the atmosphere where escape occurs (thermosphere, ionosphere, exosphere), as well as their responses to solar activity, and (ii) to characterize the lateral variations of the magnetic field of lithospheric origin, and by extension, the timing of the Martian dynamo. Of particular interest is the extinction of the dynamo that is thought to have enhanced the atmospheric escape processes still operating today. The proposed low-periapsis orbiter will consist of the following elements: • An "Escape Package" to characterize by both in-situ and remote measurements the thermosphere, ionosphere, exosphere and solar wind interaction regions (from one hundred to several thousand km), including thermal, suprathermal 1 and energetic particles. • A "Magnetic Field Package", to characterize the magnetization of the

  6. Orbiter escape pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Winston D. (Inventor); Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Pelischek, Timothy E. (Inventor); Becker, Bruce H. (Inventor); Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); McManamen, John P. (Inventor); Castro, Edgar O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A Shuttle type of aircraft (10) with an escape hatch (12) has an arcuately shaped pole housing (16) attachable to an interior wall and ceiling with its open end adjacent to the escape hatch. The pole housing 16 contains a telescopically arranged and arcuately shaped primary pole member (22) and extension pole member (23) which are guided by roller assemblies (30,35). The extension pole member (23) is slidable and extendable relative to the primary pole member (22). For actuation, a spring actuated system includes a spring (52) in the pole housing. A locking member (90) engages both pole members (22,23) through notch portions (85,86) in the pole members. The locking member selectively releases the extension pole member (23) and the primary pole member (22). An internal one-way clutch or anti-return mechanism prevents retraction of the extension pole member from an extended position. Shock absorbers (54)(150,152) are for absoring the energy of the springs. A manual backup deployment system is provided which includes a canted ring (104) biased by a spring member (108). A lever member (100) with a slot and pin connection (102) permits the mechanical manipulation of the canted ring to move the primary pole member. The ring (104) also prevents retraction of the main pole. The crew escape mechanism includes a magazine (60) and a number of lanyards (62), each lanyard being mounted by a roller loop (68) over the primary pole member (22). The strap on the roller loop has stitching for controlled release, a protection sheath (74) to prevent tangling and a hook member (69) for attachment to a crew harness.

  7. Hydrogen Escape from early Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zugger, M. E.; Ramirez, R. M.; Kasting, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    A controversy regarding hydrodynamic escape rates arose when Tian et al. (2005) published transonic escape rates for an atmosphere composed of pure H2. Tian et al. concluded that the hydrogen escape rate from early Earth would have been a factor of 20 or more slower than the diffusion limit, even if the solar EUV (extreme ultraviolet) flux was enhanced by a factor of 5 relative to today. This conclusion was challenged by Catling (2006), who pointed out that solar EUV fluxes could have been much higher than this so that plenty of energy should have been available to power escape. This controversy has remained unresolved to date. Hydrogen escape from early Mars is also of interest. As discussed in this session in a complementary paper by Ramirez et al., collision-induced absorption by molecular hydrogen could have helped to warm early Mars, perhaps explaining the formation of valleys and valley networks. Ramirez et al. have shown that a mixture of 90% CO2 and 10% H2 is capable raising early Mars' surface temperature above the freezing point of water, for surface pressures exceeding ~3 bar. However, we need to understand whether H2 mixing ratios of 10% are physically plausible. The H2 partial pressure in Mars' early atmosphere would have been determined by the balance between volcanic outgassing and escape to space. The 10% mixing ratio is high compared to the value of ~10-3 typically assumed for early Earth. But Mars' early atmosphere may have been more reduced than Earth's (Wadwha, 2001); if the hydrogen escape rate on Mars was also slower than on Earth, then additional increases in atmospheric hydrogen concentration are possible. To answer these questions about the early atmospheres of Earth and Mars, we have modified an existing model of hydrodynamic escape, developed by F. Tian, J. Kasting, and others, to converge for atmospheres with a wide range of hydrogen mixing ratios. The model finds subsonic solutions to the hydrodynamic equations; these can be shown to

  8. Controlling filamentous fungi morphology with microparticles to enhanced β-mannanase production.

    PubMed

    Yatmaz, Ercan; Karahalil, Ercan; Germec, Mustafa; Ilgin, Merve; Turhan, İrfan

    2016-09-01

    β-mannanase was produced mainly by Aspergillus species and can degrade the β-1,4-mannose linkages of galactomannans. This study was undertaken to enhance mannanase production using talcum and aluminum oxide as the microparticles, which control cell morphology of recombinant Aspergillus sojae in glucose and carob extract medium. Both microparticles improved fungal growth in glucose and carob pod extract medium. Aluminum oxide (1 g/L) was the best agent for glucose medium which resulted in 514.0 U/ml. However, the highest mannanase activity was found as 568.7 U/ml with 5 g/L of talcum in carob extract medium. Increase in microparticle concentration resulted in decreasing the pellet size diameter. Furthermore, more than 10 g/L of talcum addition changed the filamentous fungi growth type from pellet to pellet/mycelium mixture. Results showed that right type and concentration of microparticle in fermentation media improved the mannanase activity and production rate by controlling the growth morphology. PMID:27129457

  9. Martian Atmospheric and Ionospheric plasma Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Rickard

    2016-04-01

    Solar forcing is responsible for the heating, ionization, photochemistry, and erosion processes in the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of the terrestrial planets. Of the four terrestrial planets, the Earth is the only one with a fully developed biosphere, while our kin Venus and Mars have evolved into arid inhabitable planets. As for Mars, there are ample evidences for an early Noachian, water rich period on Mars. The question is, what made Mars evolve so differently compared to the Earth? Various hydrosphere and atmospheric evolution scenarios for Mars have been forwarded based on surface morphology, chemical composition, simulations, semi-empiric (in-situ data) models, and the long-term evolution of the Sun. Progress has been made, but the case is still open regarding the changes that led to the present arid surface and tenuous atmosphere at Mars. This presentation addresses the long-term variability of the Sun, the solar forcing impact on the Martian atmosphere, and its interaction with the space environment - an electromagnetic wave and particle interaction with the upper atmosphere that has implications for its photochemistry, composition, and energization that governs thermal and non-thermal escape. Non-thermal escape implies an electromagnetic upward energization of planetary ions and molecules to velocities above escape velocity, a process governed by a combination of solar EUV radiation (ionization), and energy and momentum transfer by the solar wind. The ion escape issue dates back to the early Soviet and US-missions to Mars, but the first more accurate estimates of escape rates came with the Phobos-2 mission in 1989. Better-quality ion composition measurement results of atmospheric/ionospheric ion escape from Mars, obtained from ESA Mars Express (MEX) instruments, have improved our understanding of the ion escape mechanism. With the NASA MAVEN spacecraft orbiting Mars since Sept. 2014, dual in-situ measurement with plasma instruments are now

  10. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  11. Evaluating some computer enhancement algorithms that improve the visibility of cometary morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S. M.; Slaughter, C. D.

    1991-01-01

    The observed morphology of cometary comae is determined by ejection circumstances and the interaction of the ejected material with the local environment. Anisotropic emission can provide useful information on such things as orientation of the nucleus, location of active areas on the nucleus, and the formation of ion structure near the nucleus. However, discrete coma features are usually diffuse, of low amplitude, and superimposed on a steep intensity gradient radial to the nucleus. To improve the visibility of these features, a variety of digital enhancement algorithms were employed with varying degrees of success. They usually produce some degree of spatial filtering, and are chosen to optimize visibility of certain detail. Since information in the image is altered, it is important to understand the effects of parameter selection and processing artifacts can have on subsequent interpretation. Using the criteria that the ideal algorithm must enhance low contrast features while not introducing misleading artifacts (or features that cannot be seen in the stretched, unprocessed image), the suitability of various algorithms that aid cometary studies were assessed. The strong and weak points of each are identified in the context of maintaining positional integrity of features at the expense of photometric information.

  12. Alirocumab inhibits atherosclerosis, improves the plaque morphology, and enhances the effects of a statin[S

    PubMed Central

    Kühnast, Susan; van der Hoorn, José W. A.; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Sasiela, William J.; Gusarova, Viktoria; Peyman, Anusch; Schäfer, Hans-Ludwig; Schwahn, Uwe; Jukema, J. Wouter; Princen, Hans M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibition is a potential novel strategy for treatment of CVD. Alirocumab is a fully human PCSK9 monoclonal antibody in phase 3 clinical development. We evaluated the antiatherogenic potential of alirocumab in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice. Mice received a Western-type diet and were treated with alirocumab (3 or 10 mg/kg, weekly subcutaneous dosing) alone and in combination with atorvastatin (3.6 mg/kg/d) for 18 weeks. Alirocumab alone dose-dependently decreased total cholesterol (−37%; −46%, P < 0.001) and TGs (−36%; −39%, P < 0.001) and further decreased cholesterol in combination with atorvastatin (−48%; −58%, P < 0.001). Alirocumab increased hepatic LDL receptor protein levels but did not affect hepatic cholesterol and TG content. Fecal output of bile acids and neutral sterols was not changed. Alirocumab dose-dependently decreased atherosclerotic lesion size (−71%; −88%, P < 0.001) and severity and enhanced these effects when added to atorvastatin (−89%; −98%, P < 0.001). Alirocumab reduced monocyte recruitment and improved the lesion composition by increasing the smooth muscle cell and collagen content and decreasing the macrophage and necrotic core content. Alirocumab dose-dependently decreases plasma lipids and, as a result, atherosclerosis development, and it enhances the beneficial effects of atorvastatin in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice. In addition, alirocumab improves plaque morphology. PMID:25139399

  13. Oxygen escape from the Earth during geomagnetic reversals: Implications to mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Pu, Zuyin; Zong, Qiugang; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Fraenz, Markus; Dubinin, Eduard; Tian, Feng; Shi, Quanqi; Fu, Suiyan; Hong, Minghua

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of life is affected by variations of atmospheric oxygen level and geomagnetic field intensity. Oxygen can escape into interplanetary space as ions after gaining momentum from solar wind, but Earth's strong dipole field reduces the momentum transfer efficiency and the ion outflow rate, except for the time of geomagnetic polarity reversals when the field is significantly weakened in strength and becomes Mars-like in morphology. The newest databases available for the Phanerozoic era illustrate that the reversal rate increased and the atmospheric oxygen level decreased when the marine diversity showed a gradual pattern of mass extinctions lasting millions of years. We propose that accumulated oxygen escape during an interval of increased reversal rate could have led to the catastrophic drop of oxygen level, which is known to be a cause of mass extinction. We simulated the oxygen ion escape rate for the Triassic-Jurassic event, using a modified Martian ion escape model with an input of quiet solar wind inferred from Sun-like stars. The results show that geomagnetic reversal could enhance the oxygen escape rate by 3-4 orders only if the magnetic field was extremely weak, even without consideration of space weather effects. This suggests that our hypothesis could be a possible explanation of a correlation between geomagnetic reversals and mass extinction. Therefore, if this causal relation indeed exists, it should be a "many-to-one" scenario rather the previously considered "one-to-one", and planetary magnetic field should be much more important than previously thought for planetary habitability.

  14. Tidally Enhanced Stellar Wind in Binaries as a Second Parameter for the Horizontal Branch Morphology of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Lei, Z.

    2014-04-01

    Metallicity is the first parameter to influence the horizontal branch morphology of globular clusters. It has been found, however, that some other parameters may also play an important role in affecting the morphology. While the nature of these other important parameters remains unclear, they are believed to be correlated with the mass loss during the red giant stages, from which the horizontal branch stars have descended. Unfortunately, the mass loss during the red giant stages of stellar evolution are poorly understood at present. In this talk, we investigate the physical consequences of tidally-enhanced stellar winds during the evolution of binary stars on enhancing the mass loss of red giant primaries, with accompanying effects for the horizontal branch morphology of globular clusters. In a binary system, the stellar wind of the red giant primary star may be largely enhanced by its companion star. Different separation of the binary system, however, will lead to a different mass loss rate of the primary star. We found that red, blue, and extreme horizontal branch stars are all produced under the effects of tidally-enhanced stellar wind without any additional assumptions on the mass loss dispersion. Furthermore, the horizontal branch morphology is found to be insensitive to the tidal enhancement parameter, B.

  15. From Morphology to Interfaces to Tandem Geometries: Enhancing the Performance of Perovskite/Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    We have taken a new approach to develop mesoporous lead iodide scaffolds, using the nucleation and growth of lead iodide crystallites in a wet film. A simple time-dependent growth control enabled the manipulation of the mesoporous lead iodide layer quality in a continuous manner. The morphology of lead iodide is shown to influence the subsequent crystallization of methyamoniumleadiodide film by using angle-dependent grazing incidence x-ray scattering. The morphology of lead iodide film can be fine-tuned, and thus the methyamoniumleadiodide film quality can be effectively controlled, leading to an optimization of the perovskite active layer. Using this strategy, perovskite solar cells with inverted PHJ structure showed a PCE of 15.7 per cent with little hysteresis. Interface engineering is critical for achieving efficient solar cells, yet a comprehensive understanding of the interface between metal electrode and electron transport layer (ETL) is lacking. A significant power conversion efficiency (PCE) improvement of fullerene/perovskite planar heterojunction solar cells was achieved by inserting a fulleropyrrolidine interlayer between the silver electrode and electron transport layer. The interlayer was found to enhance recombination resistance, increases electron extraction rate and prolongs free carrier lifetime. We also uncovered a facile solution-based fabrication of high performance tandem perovskite/polymer solar cells where the front sub-cell consists of perovskite and the back sub-cell is a polymer-based layer. A record maximum PCE of 15.96 per cent was achieved, demonstrating the synergy between the perovskite and semiconducting polymers. This design balances the absorption of the perovskite and the polymer, eliminates the adverse impact of thermal annealing during perovskite fabrication, and affords devices with no hysteresis. This work was performed in collaboration with Y. Liu, Z. Page, D. Venkataraman and T. Emrick (UMASS), F. Liu (LBNL) and Q. Hu and R

  16. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE: TRANSITION FROM HYDRODYNAMIC TO JEANS ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Johnson, Robert E.; Tucker, Orenthal J.; Erwin, Justin T.

    2011-03-10

    Thermally driven escape from planetary atmospheres changes in nature from an organized outflow (hydrodynamic escape) to escape on a molecule-by-molecule basis (Jeans escape) with increasing Jeans parameter, {lambda}, the ratio of the gravitational to thermal energy of the atmospheric molecules. This change is described here for the first time using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. When heating is predominantly below the lower boundary of the simulation region, R{sub 0}, and well below the exobase of a single-component atmosphere, the nature of the escape process changes over a surprisingly narrow range of Jeans parameters, {lambda}{sub 0}, evaluated at R{sub 0}. For an atomic gas, the transition occurs over {lambda}{sub 0} {approx} 2-3, where the lower bound, {lambda}{sub 0} {approx} 2.1, corresponds to the upper limit for isentropic, supersonic outflow. For {lambda}{sub 0} > 3 escape occurs on a molecule-by-molecule basis and we show that, contrary to earlier suggestions, for {lambda}{sub 0} > {approx}6 the escape rate does not deviate significantly from the familiar Jeans rate. In a gas composed of diatomic molecules, the transition shifts to {lambda}{sub 0} {approx} 2.4-3.6 and at {lambda}{sub 0} > {approx}4 the escape rate increases a few tens of percent over that for the monatomic gas. Scaling by the Jeans parameter and the Knudsen number, these results can be applied to thermally induced escape of the major species from solar and extrasolar planets.

  17. Escape from Vela X

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, J.; Funk, S.; Parsons, R.D.; Ohm, S.; /Leicester U. /Leeds U.

    2012-02-15

    While the Vela pulsar and its associated nebula are often considered as the archetype of a system powered by a {approx} 10{sup 4} year old isolated neutron star, many features of the spectral energy distribution of this pulsar wind nebula are both puzzling and unusual. Here we develop a model that for the first time relates the main structures in the system, the extended radio nebula (ERN) and the X-ray cocoon through continuous injection of particles with a fixed spectral shape. We argue that diffusive escape of particles from the ERN can explain the steep Fermi-LAT spectrum. In this scenario Vela X should produce a distinct feature in the locally-measured cosmic ray electron spectrum at very high energies. This prediction can be tested in the future using the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). If particles are indeed released early in the evolution of PWNe and can avoid severe adiabatic losses, PWN provide a natural explanation for the rising positron fraction in the local CR spectrum.

  18. Suicide as Escape from Self.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Roy F.

    1990-01-01

    Suicide is analyzed as a motivation to escape from adversive self-awareness. The causal chain is traced from initial failures that are attributed internally because of a cognitively deconstructed state. (SLD)

  19. Enhancement of Morphological Plasticity in Hippocampal Neurons by a Physically Modified Saline via Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K.; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias. PMID:25007337

  20. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias. PMID:25007337

  1. Nano-morphology induced additional surface plasmon resonance enhancement of SERS sensitivity in Ag/GaN nanowall network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharvani, S.; Upadhayaya, Kishor; Kumari, Gayatri; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    The GaN nanowall network, formed by opening the screw dislocations by kinetically controlled MBE growth, possesses a large surface and high conductivity. Sharp apexed nanowalls show higher surface electron concentration in the band-tail states, in comparison to blunt apexed nanowalls. Uncapped silver nanoparticles are vapor deposited on the blunt and sharp GaN nanowall networks to study the morphological dependence of band-edge plasmon-coupling. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies performed with a rhodamine 6G analyte on these two configurations clearly show that the sharp nanowall morphology with smaller Ag nanoparticles shows higher enhancement of the Raman signal. A very large enhancement factor of 2.8 × 107 and a very low limit of detection of 10-10 M is observed, which is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance owing to the high surface electron concentration on the GaN nanowall in addition to that of the Ag nanoparticles. The significantly higher sensitivity with same-sized Ag nanoparticles confirms the unconventional role of morphology-dependent surface charge carrier concentration of GaN nanowalls in the enhancement of Raman signals.

  2. Nano-morphology induced additional surface plasmon resonance enhancement of SERS sensitivity in Ag/GaN nanowall network.

    PubMed

    Sharvani, S; Upadhayaya, Kishor; Kumari, Gayatri; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shivaprasad, S M

    2015-11-20

    The GaN nanowall network, formed by opening the screw dislocations by kinetically controlled MBE growth, possesses a large surface and high conductivity. Sharp apexed nanowalls show higher surface electron concentration in the band-tail states, in comparison to blunt apexed nanowalls. Uncapped silver nanoparticles are vapor deposited on the blunt and sharp GaN nanowall networks to study the morphological dependence of band-edge plasmon-coupling. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies performed with a rhodamine 6G analyte on these two configurations clearly show that the sharp nanowall morphology with smaller Ag nanoparticles shows higher enhancement of the Raman signal. A very large enhancement factor of 2.8 × 10(7) and a very low limit of detection of 10(-10) M is observed, which is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance owing to the high surface electron concentration on the GaN nanowall in addition to that of the Ag nanoparticles. The significantly higher sensitivity with same-sized Ag nanoparticles confirms the unconventional role of morphology-dependent surface charge carrier concentration of GaN nanowalls in the enhancement of Raman signals. PMID:26502004

  3. Endosomal escape: a bottleneck in intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic science, apart from drugs, newer bioactive moieties like oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides, enzymes and antibodies are constantly being introduced for the betterment of therapeutic efficacy. These moieties have intracellular components of the cells like cytoplasm and nucleus as one of their pharmacological sites for exhibiting therapeutic activity. Despite their promising efficacy, their intracellular bioavailability has been critically hampered leading to failure in the treatment of numerous diseases and disorders. The endosomal uptake pathway is known to be a rate-limiting barrier for such systems. Bioactive molecules get trapped in the endosomal vesicles and degraded in the lysosomal compartment, necessitating the need for effective strategies that facilitate the endosomal escape and enhance the cytosolic bioavailability of bioactives. Microbes like viruses and bacteria have developed their innate mechanistic tactics to translocate their genome and toxins by efficiently penetrating the host cell membrane. Understanding this mechanism and exploring it further for intracellular delivery has opened new avenues to surmount the endosomal barrier. These strategies include membrane fusion, pore formation and proton sponge effects. On the other hand, progress in designing a novel smart polymeric carrier system that triggers endosomal escape by undergoing modulations in the intracellular milieu has further led to an improvement in intracellular delivery. These comprise pH, enzyme and temperature-induced modulators, synthetic cationic lipids and photo-induced physical disruption. Each of the aforementioned strategies has its own unique mechanism to escape the endosome. This review recapitulates the numerous strategies designed to surmount the bottleneck of endosomal escape and thereby achieve successful intracellular uptake of bioactives. PMID:24730275

  4. Enhancing evaluation of post-storm morphologic response using aerial orthoimagery from Hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Jacquelyn Rose; Long, Joseph W.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Birchler, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    Improved identification of morphological responses to storms is necessary for developing and maintaining predictive models of coastal change. Morphological responses to Hurricane Sandy were measured using lidar and orthophotos taken before and after the storm. Changes to dune features measured from lidar were compared to the occurrence of overwash deposits measured using orthophotos. Thresholds on morphologic change (e.g. overwash volume and dune height change) were defined to optimize agreement between the classification of lidar and orthophoto-derived dune erosion and overwash. A linear regression showed that overwash volume can be calculated from orthophoto-derived overwash extent.

  5. Enhanced performance and functionality of titanium dioxide papermaking pigments with controlled morphology and surface coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kimberly L.

    Novel, tailored titanium dioxide pigments with controllable nanoscale morphological features were shown to significantly enhance the optical and strength properties of paper. The opacifying power of synthesized polycrystalline TiO2 particles in a cellulose matrix was found experimentally to be superior to that of a commercial rutile pigment, depending on the crystal structure of the synthesized particles. High aspect ratio polycrystalline rutile pigments composed of a linear linkage of several individual rutile crystals gave 6% more opacity than the commercial rutile pigment. Theoretical light scattering calculations using the T-Matrix Method showed the light scattering efficiency of linearly arranged polycrystalline rutile particles to depend on number and size of crystals composing the particle and confirmed the higher efficiency of the synthesized polycrystalline rutile pigments over commercial rutile. The opacifying power of hollow polycrystalline rutile particles was found experimentally to be superior to that of a commercial rutile pigment in a highly pressed bleached fiber matrix, depending on cavity size, while the opacifying power of silica-rutile titania core-shell particles was found comparable to commercial rutile at constant titania loading. The light scattering efficiency of titania core-shell particles was also shown to be dependant on the light scattering efficiency of the core material. The overall particle shape and aspect ratio of titania core-shell and hollow nanoparticles were shown to be tunable by choosing an appropriate template and coating thickness in layer-by-layer or sol-gel templating synthesis. Inorganic-cellulose core-shell and hollow cellulose nanoparticles were prepared by self-encapsulation with regenerated cellulose via precipitation of cellulose in a polyacrylic acid hydrogel layer surrounding inorganic particle templates in 4-Methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) monohydrate solution. This discrete encapsulation of inorganic pigments

  6. Plasma Escape from Unmagnetized Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    A considerable fraction of atmospheric loss at Venus and Titan is in the form of plasma escape. This is due in part to the fact that the ionospheres of these unmagnetized bodies interact directly with the high speed plasmas flowing around them. The similarities of the interactions help reinforce interpretations of measurements made at each body, especially when instruments and measurement sites differ. For example, it is well established through this method that ions born in the exospheres above the ionopauses are picked up and carried away by the solar wind at Venus and the rotating plasma in Saturn's magnetosphere. On the other hand, it is more difficult to relate the observations associated with escape of cooler ionospheric plasma down the ionotails of each body. A clear example of ionospheric plasma escaping Titan was observed as it flowed down its ionotail (1). Measurements at Venus have not as yet clearly distinguished between ionospheric and pickup ion escape in the ionotail; however, cold ions detected in the distant wake at 1 AU by the CELIAS/CTOF instrument on SOHO have been interpreted as ionospheric in origin (2). An algorithm to determine ionospheric flow from Pioneer Venus aeronomical measurements is used to show that escape of cold ionospheric plasma is likely to occur. These results along with plasma flow measurements made in the ionotail of Venus are combined and compared to the corresponding flow at Titan.

  7. Viral escape from antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Jacobson, A; Badgett, M R; Molineux, I J

    1998-05-01

    RNA coliphage SP was propagated for several generations on a host expressing an inhibitory antisense RNA complementary to bases 31-270 of the positive-stranded genome. Phages evolved that escaped inhibition. Typically, these escape mutants contained 3-4 base substitutions, but different sequences were observed among different isolates. The mutations were located within three different types of structural features within the predicted secondary structure of SP genomic RNA: (i) hairpin loops; (ii) hairpin stems; and (iii) the 5' region of the phage genome complementary to the antisense molecule. Computer modelling of the mutant genomic RNAs showed that all of the substitutions within hairpin stems improved the Watson-Crick pairing of the stem. No major structural rearrangements were predicted for any of the mutant genomes, and most substitutions in coding regions did not alter the amino acid sequence. Although the evolved phage populations were polymorphic for substitutions, many substitutions appeared independently in two selected lines. The creation of a new, perfect, antisense RNA against an escape mutant resulted in the inhibition of that mutant but not of other escape mutants nor of the ancestral, unevolved phage. Thus, at least in this system, a population of viruses that evolved to escape from a single antisense RNA would require a cocktail of several antisense RNAs for inhibition. PMID:9643550

  8. Collective Predation and Escape Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, Luca

    2012-09-01

    The phenomenon of collective predation is analyzed by using a simple individual-based model reproducing spatial animal movements. Two groups of self-propelled organisms are simulated by using Vicseklike models including steric intragroup repulsion. Chase and escape are described by intergroups interactions, attraction (for predators) or repulsion (for preys) from nearest particles of the opposite group. The quantitative analysis of some relevant quantities (total catch time, lifetime distribution, predation rate) allows us to characterize many aspects of the predation phenomenon and gives insights into the study of efficient escape strategies. The reported findings could be of relevance for many basic and applied disciplines, from statistical physics, to ecology, and robotics.

  9. Automated Escape Guidance Algorithms for An Escape Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanary, Ronald; Hammen, David; Ito, Daigoro; Rabalais, Bruce; Rishikof, Brian; Siebold, Karl

    2002-01-01

    An escape vehicle was designed to provide an emergency evacuation for crew members living on a space station. For maximum escape capability, the escape vehicle needs to have the ability to safely evacuate a station in a contingency scenario such as an uncontrolled (e.g., tumbling) station. This emergency escape sequence will typically be divided into three events: The fust separation event (SEP1), the navigation reconstruction event, and the second separation event (SEP2). SEP1 is responsible for taking the spacecraft from its docking port to a distance greater than the maximum radius of the rotating station. The navigation reconstruction event takes place prior to the SEP2 event and establishes the orbital state to within the tolerance limits necessary for SEP2. The SEP2 event calculates and performs an avoidance burn to prevent station recontact during the next several orbits. This paper presents the tools and results for the whole separation sequence with an emphasis on the two separation events. The fust challenge includes collision avoidance during the escape sequence while the station is in an uncontrolled rotational state, with rotation rates of up to 2 degrees per second. The task of avoiding a collision may require the use of the Vehicle's de-orbit propulsion system for maximum thrust and minimum dwell time within the vicinity of the station vicinity. The thrust of the propulsion system is in a single direction, and can be controlled only by the attitude of the spacecraft. Escape algorithms based on a look-up table or analytical guidance can be implemented since the rotation rate and the angular momentum vector can be sensed onboard and a-priori knowledge of the position and relative orientation are available. In addition, crew intervention has been provided for in the event of unforeseen obstacles in the escape path. The purpose of the SEP2 burn is to avoid re-contact with the station over an extended period of time. Performing this maneuver properly

  10. Surfactant-free Synthesis of CuO with Controllable Morphologies and Enhanced Photocatalytic Property.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Yang, Jiao; Shi, Liuxue; Gao, Meizhen

    2016-12-01

    A green synthesis for nanoleave, nanosheet, spindle-like, rugby-like, dandelion-like and flower-like CuO nanostructures (from 2D to 3D) is successfully achieved through simply hydrothermal synthetic method without the assistance of surfactant. The morphology of CuO nanostructures can be easily tailored by adjusting the amount of ammonia and the source of copper. By designing a time varying experiment, it is verified that the flower- and dandelion-like CuO structures are synthesized by the self-assembly and Ostwald ripening mechanism. Structural and morphological evolutions are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra. Additionally, the CuO nanostructures with different morphologies could serve as a potential photocatalyst on the photodecomposition of rhodamine B (RhB) aqueous solutions in the presence of H2O2 under visible light irradiation. PMID:26935305

  11. Surfactant-free Synthesis of CuO with Controllable Morphologies and Enhanced Photocatalytic Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Yang, Jiao; Shi, Liuxue; Gao, Meizhen

    2016-03-01

    A green synthesis for nanoleave, nanosheet, spindle-like, rugby-like, dandelion-like and flower-like CuO nanostructures (from 2D to 3D) is successfully achieved through simply hydrothermal synthetic method without the assistance of surfactant. The morphology of CuO nanostructures can be easily tailored by adjusting the amount of ammonia and the source of copper. By designing a time varying experiment, it is verified that the flower- and dandelion-like CuO structures are synthesized by the self-assembly and Ostwald ripening mechanism. Structural and morphological evolutions are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra. Additionally, the CuO nanostructures with different morphologies could serve as a potential photocatalyst on the photodecomposition of rhodamine B (RhB) aqueous solutions in the presence of H2O2 under visible light irradiation.

  12. Silver nanocrystals of various morphologies deposited on silicon wafer and their applications in ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Limiao Jing, Qifeng; Chen, Jun; Wang, Bodong; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, Younian

    2013-11-15

    Silver nanostructures with dendritic, flower-like and irregular morphologies were controllably deposited on a silicon substrate in an aqueous hydrogen fluoride solution at room temperature. The morphology of the Ag nanostructures changed from dendritic to urchin-like, flowerlike and pinecone-like with increasing the concentration of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (MW = 55,000) from 2 to 10 mM. The Ag nanostructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction. Through a series of time-dependent morphological evolution studies, the growth processes of Ag nanostructures have been systematically investigated and the corresponding growth mechanisms have been discussed. In addition, the morphology-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering of as-synthesized Ag nanostructures were investigated. The results indicated that flower-like Ag nanostructure had the highest activity than the other Ag nanostructures for Rhodamine 6G probe molecules. Highlights: • A simple method was developed to prepare dendritic and flower-like Ag nanostructures. • The flower-like Ag nanoparticles exhibit highest SERS activity. • The SERS substrate based on flower-like Ag particles can be used to detect melamine.

  13. Enhancing L2 Students' Listening Transcription Ability through a Focus on Morphological Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Mohammad Nabi

    2013-01-01

    Morphological awareness (MA), defined as the ability to understand the morphemic structure of the words, has been reported to affect various aspects of second language performance including reading comprehension ability, spelling performance, etc. But the concept has been far less treated with reference to l2 listening. Against this background,…

  14. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  15. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  16. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  17. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  18. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  19. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  20. Lise Meitner's escape from Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    1990-03-01

    Lise Meitner (1878-1968) achieved prominence as a nuclear physicist in Germany; although of Jewish origin, her Austrian citizenship exempted her from Nazi racial laws until the annexation of Austria in 1938 precipitated her dismissal. Forbidden to emigrate, she narrowly escaped to the Netherlands with the help of concerned friends in the international physics community.

  1. Lunar escape systems feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzenauer, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a study conducted to determine the feasibility of simple lunar escape system concepts, to develop a spectrum of operational data, and to identify techniques and configurations suitable for the emergency escape mission. The study demonstrated the feasibility of the lunar emergency escape-to-orbit system (LESS) designed to provide a means for the two-man crew of a lunar module (LM) or extended-stay LM (ELM) to escape from the lunar surface in the event that the LM/ELM ascent stage becomes unsafe or is otherwise unable to take off. The LESS is to carry the two astronauts to a safe lunar orbit, where the Apollo command and service modules (CSM) are to be used for rendezvous and rescue, all within the lifetime of the backpack life support system (about 4 hr). It is concluded that simple manual control modes are sufficient, that simple boost profiles are acceptable, and that one man can deploy and set up the LESS. Initial guidance data can be calculated for the LESS by Mission Control and transmitted via the LM/ELM uplink.

  2. Mechanisms of Ionospheric Mass Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of ionospheric O+ escape flux on electromagnetic energy flux and electron precipitation into the ionosphere is derived for a hypothetical ambipolar pick-up process, powered the relative motion of plasmas and neutral upper atmosphere, and by electron precipitation, at heights where the ions are magnetized but influenced by photo-ionization, collisions with gas atoms, ambipolar and centrifugal acceleration. Ion pick-up by the convection electric field produces "ring-beam" or toroidal velocity distributions, as inferred from direct plasma measurements, from observations of the associated waves, and from the spectra of incoherent radar echoes. Ring-beams are unstable to plasma wave growth, resulting in rapid relaxation via transverse velocity diffusion, into transversely accelerated ion populations. Ion escape is substantially facilitated by the ambipolar potential, but is only weakly affected by centrifugal acceleration. If, as cited simulations suggest, ion ring beams relax into non-thermal velocity distributions with characteristic speed equal to the local ion-neutral flow speed, a generalized "Jeans escape" calculation shows that the escape flux of ionospheric O+ increases with Poynting flux and with precipitating electron density in rough agreement with observations.

  3. Shear-induced enhancements of crystallization kinetics and morphological transformation for long chain branched polylactides with different branching degrees

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junyang; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Yaqiong; Fang, Huagao; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of long chain branching (LCB) degree on the shear-induced isothermal crystallization kinetics of a series of LCB polylactides (LCB PLAs) have been investigated by using rotational rheometer, polarized optical microscopy (POM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dynamic viscoelastic properties obtained by small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) tests indicate that LCB PLAs show more broadened relaxation time spectra with increasing LCB degree. Upon a pre-shear at the shear rate of 1 s−1 LCB PLAs show much faster crystallization kinetics than linear PLA and the crystallization kinetics is enhanced with increasing LCB degree. By modeling the system as a suspension the quantitative evaluation of nucleation density can be derived from rheological experiments. The nucleation density is greatly enhanced with increasing LCB degree and a saturation in shear time is observed. Crystalline morphologies for LCB PLAs observed by POM and SEM demonstrate the enhancement of nucleation density with increasing LCB degree and a transformation from spherulitic to orientated crystalline morphologies. The observation can be ascribed to longer relaxation time of the longest macromolecular chains and broadened, complex relaxation behaviors due to the introduction of LCB into PLA, which is essential in stabilizing the orientated crystal nuclei after pre-shear. PMID:27246803

  4. Shear-induced enhancements of crystallization kinetics and morphological transformation for long chain branched polylactides with different branching degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junyang; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Yaqiong; Fang, Huagao; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The effects of long chain branching (LCB) degree on the shear-induced isothermal crystallization kinetics of a series of LCB polylactides (LCB PLAs) have been investigated by using rotational rheometer, polarized optical microscopy (POM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dynamic viscoelastic properties obtained by small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) tests indicate that LCB PLAs show more broadened relaxation time spectra with increasing LCB degree. Upon a pre-shear at the shear rate of 1 s‑1 LCB PLAs show much faster crystallization kinetics than linear PLA and the crystallization kinetics is enhanced with increasing LCB degree. By modeling the system as a suspension the quantitative evaluation of nucleation density can be derived from rheological experiments. The nucleation density is greatly enhanced with increasing LCB degree and a saturation in shear time is observed. Crystalline morphologies for LCB PLAs observed by POM and SEM demonstrate the enhancement of nucleation density with increasing LCB degree and a transformation from spherulitic to orientated crystalline morphologies. The observation can be ascribed to longer relaxation time of the longest macromolecular chains and broadened, complex relaxation behaviors due to the introduction of LCB into PLA, which is essential in stabilizing the orientated crystal nuclei after pre-shear.

  5. Influence of C{sub 60} morphology on high-order harmonic generation enhancement in fullerene-containing plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhami, T. S.; Joshi, M. P.; Gupta, P. D.

    2009-11-15

    The morphologies of the fullerene targets and the ablated fullerenes to determine the optimal conditions of excitation of the C{sub 60}-containing targets have been analyzed. The optimization of fullerene-containing plasma conditions allowed the enhanced harmonic generation in these plasmas using laser radiation of different wavelengths, pulse durations, and phase modulation. A comparison between the harmonic generation in single-atom/ion-containing plasmas (using bulk carbon, silver, and indium targets) and fullerene-rich plasma plumes showed better conversion efficiency for the latter medium. The influence of phase modulation of the fundamental radiation in fullerene plasmas on the spectral properties of harmonics has been studied.

  6. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    PubMed

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach. PMID:25041843

  7. Blue Origin Conducts Pad Escape Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin conducted a successful pad escape test Oct. 19 at the company's West Texas launch site, firing its pusher escape motor and launching a full-scale suborbital crew capsule from a simulate...

  8. Competing Contingencies for Escape Behavior: Effects of Negative Reinforcement Magnitude and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has shown that problem behavior maintained by social-negative reinforcement can be treated without escape extinction by enhancing the quality of positive reinforcement for an appropriate alternative response such as compliance. By contrast, negative reinforcement (escape) for compliance generally has been ineffective in the…

  9. Fractionation of the Early Terrestrial Atmospheres: Dynamical Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrodynamic escape may have played a significant role in the early fractionation of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. This possibility has been demonstrated in the last two decades by numerous models that show radial, transonic flow of hydrogen can occur in the presence of sufficient solar EUV Hydrodynamic escape may have played a significant role in the early fractionation of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. This possibility has been demonstrated in the last two decades by numerous models that show radial, transonic flow of hydrogen can occur in the presence of sufficient solar EUV flux, thought to exist in the first 500 My. The models show that the larger the solar flux the greater the mass of the fractionating species, which are accelerated to escape speeds by the hydrogen wind through drag processes. As the atmospheres evolve and the solar EUV flux wanes, the maximum mass of flowing gas constituents decreases until all gases become static. We show that fractionation can continue beyond this point when non-radial flow and dynamically enhanced Jeans escape are considered. For example, the early terrestrial atmospheres are thought to have had large hydrogen contents, resulting in exobase altitudes of a planetary radius or more. In this case, rotational speeds at the exobases of Earth and Mars would be large enough so that light constituents would "spin" off and fractionate, especially at equatorial latitudes. Also, in the presence of transonic flow of hydrogen only, non-radial expansion throws heavier gases to high altitudes in the exosphere, accompanied by strong bulk speeds at the exobase, which results in enhanced thermal escape fluxes and fractionation. flux, thought to exist in the first 500 My. The models show that the larger the solar flux the greater the mass of the fractionating species, which are accelerated to escape speeds by the hydrogen wind through drag processes. As the atmospheres evolve and the solar EUV flux wanes, the

  10. Orbital Effects on Mercury's Escaping Sodium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Carl A.; Wilson, Jody K.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present results from coronagraphic imaging of Mercury's sodium tail over a 7 deg field of view. Several sets of observations made at the McDonald Observatory since May 2007 show a tail of neutral sodium atoms stretching more than 1000 Mercury radii (R(sub m)) in length, or a full degree of sky. However, no tail was observed extending beyond 120 R(sub m) during the January 2008 MESSENGER Fly-by period, or during a similar orbital phase of Mercury in July 2008. Large changes in Mercury's heliocentric radial velocity cause Doppler shifts about the Fraunhofer absorption features; the resultant change in solar flux and radiation pressure is the primary cause of the observed variation in tail brightness. Smaller fluctuations in brightness may exist due to changing source rates at the surface, but we have no explicit evidence for such changes in this data set. The effects of radiation pressure on Mercury's escaping atmosphere are investigated using seven observations spanning different orbital phases. Total escape rates of atmospheric sodium are estimated to be between 5 and 13 x 10(exp 23) atoms/s and show a correlation to radiation pressure. Candidate sources of Mercury's sodium exosphere include desorption by UV sunlight, thermal desorption, solar wind channeled along Mercury's magnetic field lines, and micro-meteor impacts. Wide-angle observations of the full extent of Mercury's sodium tail offer opportunities to enhance our understanding of the time histories of these source rates.

  11. Genetic Algorithms with Local Minimum Escaping Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroki; Sakata, Kenichiro; Tang, Zheng; Ishii, Masahiro

    In this paper, we propose a genetic algorithm(GA) with local minimum escaping technique. This proposed method uses the local minimum escaping techique. It can escape from the local minimum by correcting parameters when genetic algorithm falls into a local minimum. Simulations are performed to scheduling problem without buffer capacity using this proposed method, and its validity is shown.

  12. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymer-enhanced morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jihua; Li, Dawen

    2015-05-01

    N,N'-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN2 film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN2 single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PαMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PαMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm2/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN2 film with the pre-deposition of PαMS polymer.

  13. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymer-enhanced morphology

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Li, Dawen; Chen, Jihua

    2015-05-04

    N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN{sub 2} film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN{sub 2} single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PαMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN{sub 2} thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PαMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN{sub 2} polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm{sup 2}/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN{sub 2} film with the pre-deposition of PαMS polymer.

  14. Controllable synthesis of ZnO nanograss with different morphologies and enhanced performance in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shibu; Chen Xiangnan; Zuo Feibiao; Jiang Man; Zhou Zuowan; Hui, David

    2013-01-15

    A series of ZnO nanograss films grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide coated glass substrates were synthesized via hydrothermal method by using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as adjusting agent. The films were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the PEI not only affected the aspect ratios of ZnO nanograss but also changed the geometrical shape of ZnO nanograss. A possible mechanism based on PEI adsorbed on the non-polar facets of ZnO that governed the growth rate of different directions were proposed to elucidate the effect of PEI on morphology of ZnO. The ZnO nanograss films were applied to dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The results showed that the photocurrent density significantly enhanced, and the power conversion efficiency increased by 55% based on ZnO nanograss synthesized in a growth solution containing 7 mmol/L PEI, resulting from the dye loading properties related to the different morphologies. - Graphical abstract: Effect of PEI on ZnO nanograss: controlling the aspect ratio and morphology of ZnO and enhancing their photovoltaic performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanograss with different aspect ratios were synthesized by adjusting PEI content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI affects both on the aspect ratios and geometrical shapes of ZnO nanograss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanograss with high aspect ratio and needle-like tip was advantageous for improved photovoltaic conversion performance.

  15. CeO2-based catalysts with engineered morphologies for soot oxidation to enhance soot-catalyst contact

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As morphology plays a relevant role in solid/solid catalysis, where the number of contact points is a critical feature in this kind of reaction, three different ceria morphologies have been investigated in this work as soot oxidation catalysts: ceria nanofibers, which can become organized as a catalytic network inside diesel particulate filter channels and thus trap soot particles at several contact points but have a very low specific surface area (4 m2/g); solution combustion synthesis ceria, which has an uncontrolled morphology but a specific surface area of 31 m2/g; and three-dimensional self-assembled (SA) ceria stars, which have both high specific surface area (105 m2/g) and a high availability of contact points. A high microporous volume of 0.03 cm3/g and a finer crystallite size compared to the other morphologies suggested that self-assembled stars could improve their redox cycling capability and their soot oxidation properties. In this comparison, self-assembled stars have shown the best tendency towards soot oxidation, and the temperature of non-catalytic soot oxidation has dropped from 614°C to 403°C in tight and to 552°C in loose contact conditions, respectively. As far as the loose contact results are concerned, this condition being the most realistic and hence the most significant, self-assembled stars have exhibited the lowest T10% onset temperature of this trio (even after ageing), thus proving their higher intrinsic activity. Furthermore, the three-dimensional shape of self-assembled stars may involve more of the soot cake layer than the solution combustion synthesis or nanofibers of ceria and thus enhance the total number of contact points. The results obtained through this work have encouraged our efforts to understand soot oxidation and to transpose these results to real diesel particulate filters. PMID:24940178

  16. CeO2-based catalysts with engineered morphologies for soot oxidation to enhance soot-catalyst contact.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Paolo; Bensaid, Samir; Russo, Nunzio; Fino, Debora

    2014-01-01

    AS MORPHOLOGY PLAYS A RELEVANT ROLE IN SOLID/SOLID CATALYSIS, WHERE THE NUMBER OF CONTACT POINTS IS A CRITICAL FEATURE IN THIS KIND OF REACTION, THREE DIFFERENT CERIA MORPHOLOGIES HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED IN THIS WORK AS SOOT OXIDATION CATALYSTS: ceria nanofibers, which can become organized as a catalytic network inside diesel particulate filter channels and thus trap soot particles at several contact points but have a very low specific surface area (4 m(2)/g); solution combustion synthesis ceria, which has an uncontrolled morphology but a specific surface area of 31 m(2)/g; and three-dimensional self-assembled (SA) ceria stars, which have both high specific surface area (105 m(2)/g) and a high availability of contact points. A high microporous volume of 0.03 cm(3)/g and a finer crystallite size compared to the other morphologies suggested that self-assembled stars could improve their redox cycling capability and their soot oxidation properties. In this comparison, self-assembled stars have shown the best tendency towards soot oxidation, and the temperature of non-catalytic soot oxidation has dropped from 614°C to 403°C in tight and to 552°C in loose contact conditions, respectively. As far as the loose contact results are concerned, this condition being the most realistic and hence the most significant, self-assembled stars have exhibited the lowest T 10% onset temperature of this trio (even after ageing), thus proving their higher intrinsic activity. Furthermore, the three-dimensional shape of self-assembled stars may involve more of the soot cake layer than the solution combustion synthesis or nanofibers of ceria and thus enhance the total number of contact points. The results obtained through this work have encouraged our efforts to understand soot oxidation and to transpose these results to real diesel particulate filters. PMID:24940178

  17. A transhumanist fault line around disability: morphological freedom and the obligation to enhance.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Heather G; ter Meulen, Ruud

    2010-12-01

    The transhumanist literature encompasses diverse non-novel positions on questions of disability and obligation reflecting long-running political philosophical debates on freedom and value choice, complicated by the difficulty of projecting values to enhanced beings. These older questions take on a more concrete form given transhumanist uses of biotechnologies. This paper will contrast the views of Hughes and Sandberg on the obligations persons with "disabilities" have to enhance and suggest a new model. The paper will finish by introducing a distinction between the responsibility society has in respect of the presence of impairments and the responsibility society has not to abandon disadvantaged members, concluding that questions of freedom and responsibility have renewed political importance in the context of enhancement technologies. PMID:21076073

  18. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein.

  19. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein. PMID:26957181

  20. Mechanical property enhancement in laminates through control of morphology and crystal orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, A.; Daniel, R.; Stefenelli, M.; Sartory, B.; Chitu, L.; Burghammer, M.; Schöberl, T.; Kolednik, O.; Keckes, J.; Mitterer, C.

    2015-07-01

    This article shows the successful implementation of biological design principles into synthetic laminate materials in order to enhance their mechanical properties. We demonstrate and provide a strategy for laminate thin films, which reveals that the control of local crystal anisotropy across laminates together with the optimized layered arrangement are essential for their mechanical behavior. By the example of a laminate consisting of brittle CrN and ductile Cr layers, enhanced material properties are achieved by taking advantage of the self assembly mechanisms of the heterogeneous material during film growth. The usage of local microstructure analysis by a synchrotron based technique as well as miniature mechanical tests allow to understand the relationship between the apparent local microstructure and the accompanied mechanical properties. A crystallographic orientation relationship between Cr and CrN is elucidated, which leads to decisive mechanical enhancement due to microstructural benefits in terms of texture. This results in enhanced strength and fracture toughness of the laminate compared to its single constituents. The systematic approach gives an insight into the complex coherences of laminate materials, where the used techniques and design principles are universally applicable.

  1. Enhanced Output Power of PZT Nanogenerator by Controlling Surface Morphology of Electrode.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Lee, Won-Hee; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-11-01

    Piezoelectric power generation using Pb(Zr,Ti)O3(PZT) nanowires grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3(nb:STO) substrate has been demonstrated. The epitaxial PZT nanowires prepared by a hydrothermal method, with a diameter and length of approximately 300 nm and 7 μm, respecively, were vertically aligned on the substrate. An embossed Au top electrode was applied to maximize the effective power generation area for non-uniform PZT nanowires. The PZT nanogenerator produced output power density of 0.56 μW/cm2 with a voltage of 0.9 V and current of 75 nA. This research suggests that the morphology control of top electrode can be useful to improve the efficiency of piezoelectric power generation. PMID:26726616

  2. [Escape Behaviors and Its Underlying Neuronal Circuits].

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Escape behaviors are crucial to survive predator encounters or aversive stimuli. The neural circuits mediating escape behaviors of different animal species have a common framework to trigger extremely fast and robust movement with minimum delay. Thus, the neuronal escape circuits possibly represent functional architectures that perform the most efficient sensory-motor processing in the brain. Here, I review the escape behaviors and underlying neuronal circuits of several invertebrates and fish by focusing on the Mauthner cells, a pair of giant reticulospinal neurons in the hindbrain, that trigger fast escape behavior in goldfish and zebrafish. PMID:26450070

  3. Morphologically manipulated Ag/ZnO nanostructures as surface enhanced Raman scattering probes for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha; Hamad, Syed; Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Soma, Venugopal Rao; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of secondary explosive molecules (e.g., ANTA, FOX-7, and CL-20) using Ag decorated ZnO nanostructures as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes is demonstrated. ZnO nanostructures were grown on borosilicate glass substrates by rapid thermal oxidation of metallic Zn films at 500 °C. The oxide nanostructures, including nanosheets and nanowires, emerged over the surface of the Zn film leaving behind the metal residue. We demonstrate that SERS measurements with concentrations as low as 10 μM, of the three explosive molecules ANTA, FOX-7, and CL-20 over ZnO/Ag nanostructures, resulted in enhancement factors of ˜107, ˜107, and ˜104, respectively. These measurements validate the high sensitivity of detection of explosive molecules using Ag decorated ZnO nanostructures as SERS substrates. The Zn metal residue and conditions of annealing play an important role in determining the detection sensitivity.

  4. Wide housing space and chronic exercise enhance physical fitness and adipose tissue morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Scariot, Pedro Paulo Menezes; de Barros Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia; Torsoni, Adriana Souza; Torsoni, Marcio Alberto; dos Reis, Ivan Gustavo Masselli; Beck, Wladimir Rafael; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    The current cages commonly used in animal experiments can prevent rats from engaging in most forms of natural locomotion behaviors. These animals tend to exhibit sedentary habits. Here, we show that a combination of wide housing space and training exercise helps to reduce white adipose mass and to increase brown adipose mass. Thus, this combination is a useful strategy for truly enhancing the physical fitness of captive rats commonly used in exercise-related interventional studies and to maximize their welfare. PMID:25906078

  5. Brain size as a driver of avian escape strategy

    PubMed Central

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Pape Møller, Anders; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    After detecting an approaching predator, animals make a decision when to flee. Prey will initiate flight soon after detecting a predator so as to minimize attentional costs related to on-going monitoring of the whereabouts of the predator. Such costs may compete with foraging and other maintenance activities and hence be larger than the costs of immediate flight. The drivers of interspecific variation in escape strategy are poorly known. Here we investigated the morphological, life history and natural history traits that correlate with variation in avian escape strategy across a sample of 96 species of birds. Brain mass, body size, habitat structure and group size were the main predictors of escape strategy. The direction of the effect of these traits was consistent with selection for a reduction of monitoring costs. Therefore, attentional costs depend on relative brain size, which determines the ability to monitor the whereabouts of potential predators and the difficulty of this task as reflected by habitat and social complexity. Thus brain size, and the cognitive functions associated with it, constitute a general framework for explaining the effects of body size, habitat structure and sociality identified as determinants of avian escape strategy. PMID:26139474

  6. On ion escape from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, Riku

    2011-04-01

    This doctoral thesis is about the solar wind influence on the atmosphere of the planet Venus. A numerical plasma simulation model was developed for the interaction between Venus and the solar wind to study the erosion of charged particles from the Venus upper atmosphere. The developed model is a hybrid simulation where ions are treated as particles and electrons are modelled as a fluid. The simulation was used to study the solar wind induced ion escape from Venus as observed by the European Space Agency's Venus Express and NASA's Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft. Especially, observations made by the ASPERA-4 particle instrument onboard Venus Express were studied. The thesis consists of an introductory part and four peer-reviewed articles published in scientific journals. In the introduction Venus is presented as one of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System and the main findings of the work are discussed within the wider context of planetary physics. Venus is the closest neighbouring planet to the Earth and the most earthlike planet in its size and mass orbiting the Sun. Whereas the atmosphere of the Earth consists mainly of nitrogen and oxygen, Venus has a hot carbon dioxide atmosphere, which is dominated by the greenhouse effect. Venus has all of its water in the atmosphere, which is only a fraction of the Earth's total water supply. Since planets developed presumably in similar conditions in the young Solar System, why Venus and Earth became so different in many respects? One important feature of Venus is that the planet does not have an intrinsic magnetic field. This makes it possible for the solar wind, a continuous stream of charged particles from the Sun, to flow close to Venus and to pick up ions from the planet's upper atmosphere. The strong intrinsic magnetic field of the Earth dominates the terrestrial magnetosphere and deflects the solar wind flow far away from the atmosphere. The region around Venus where the planet's atmosphere interacts with the

  7. On ion escape from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, R.

    2011-04-01

    This doctoral thesis is about the solar wind influence on the atmosphere of the planet Venus. A numerical plasma simulation model was developed for the interaction between Venus and the solar wind to study the erosion of charged particles from the Venus upper atmosphere. The developed model is a hybrid simulation where ions are treated as particles and electrons are modelled as a fluid. The simulation was used to study the solar wind induced ion escape from Venus as observed by the European Space Agency's Venus Express and NASA's Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft. Especially, observations made by the ASPERA-4 particle instrument onboard Venus Express were studied. The thesis consists of an introductory part and four peer-reviewed articles published in scientific journals. In the introduction Venus is presented as one of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System and the main findings of the work are discussed within the wider context of planetary physics.Venus is the closest neighbouring planet to the Earth and the most earthlike planet in its size and mass orbiting the Sun. Whereas the atmosphere of the Earth consists mainly of nitrogen and oxygen, Venus has a hot carbon dioxide atmosphere, which is dominated by the greenhouse effect. Venus has all of its water in the atmosphere, which is only a fraction of the Earth's total water supply. Since planets developed presumably in similar conditions in the young Solar System, why Venus and Earth became so different in many respects?One important feature of Venus is that the planet does not have an intrinsic magnetic field. This makes it possible for the solar wind, a continuous stream of charged particles from the Sun, to flow close to Venus and to pick up ions from the planet's upper atmosphere. The strong intrinsic magnetic field of the Earth dominates the terrestrial magnetosphere and deflects the solar wind flow far away from the atmosphere. The region around Venus where the planet's atmosphere interacts with the

  8. Escape Dynamics in Quasihomogeneous Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile; Stavinschi, Magda

    The escape in the two-body problem associated to a quasihomogeneous potential (a sum of homogeneous potentials) is being tackled. The basic equations of the problem are put in a form for which the infinity is a singularity, then they are regularized via McGehee-type transformations. The singularity is replaced by a manifold pasted on the phase space, and the flow on this manifold is described; it is identical with the analogous flows corresponding to already studied concrete astronomical and physical situations.

  9. Polyolefin Nanocomposites with Enhanced Photostability Weathering Effect on Morphology and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Bishnu P.; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K.

    2014-09-01

    This research aims to study the effect of accelerated weathering conditions on the photodegradation characteristics for fibrillar silicate clay-filled Polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites in the presence of metallocene linear low density polyethylene (m-LLDPE). Silane-treated attapulgite (ATP) clay along with ethylene octene elastomer-grafted maleic anhydride (POE-g-MAH) was used to compatibilize both blend and nanocomposite system. The result showed that developed PP/m-LLDPE nanocomposites displayed good UV resistance with little change in retained stress-at-break and elongation-at-break values. Balanced loss of toughness values noted maintaining higher fracture toughness values for nanocomposites containing 5 phr ATP clay. Infrared analysis was used to detect progress of degradation followed by change in carbonyl index revealed predominated chain scission in late irradiation, while crosslinking was dominant for initial irradiation period. An increase in crystallinity during UV exposure (chemi-crystallization) was detected with exposure time for all compositions and virtually independent of initial structure of the polymer. The highest value of crystallization observed for PP and the lowest one for nanocomposites containing 5 phr of ATP clay revealed good oxidation stability. Surface morphology revealed induced degradation throughout cross-section of PP, while severity of the surface degradation was significantly reduced for developed nanocomposites.

  10. Specialized Postsynaptic Morphology Enhances Neurotransmitter Dilution and High-Frequency Signaling at an Auditory Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Graydon, Cole W.; Cho, Soyoun; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Kachar, Bechara; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Sensory processing in the auditory system requires that synapses, neurons, and circuits encode information with particularly high temporal and spectral precision. In the amphibian papillia, sound frequencies up to 1 kHz are encoded along a tonotopic array of hair cells and transmitted to afferent fibers via fast, repetitive synaptic transmission, thereby promoting phase locking between the presynaptic and postsynaptic cells. Here, we have combined serial section electron microscopy, paired electrophysiological recordings, and Monte Carlo diffusion simulations to examine novel mechanisms that facilitate fast synaptic transmission in the inner ear of frogs (Rana catesbeiana and Rana pipiens). Three-dimensional anatomical reconstructions reveal specialized spine-like contacts between individual afferent fibers and hair cells that are surrounded by large, open regions of extracellular space. Morphologically realistic diffusion simulations suggest that these local enlargements in extracellular space speed transmitter clearance and reduce spillover between neighboring synapses, thereby minimizing postsynaptic receptor desensitization and improving sensitivity during prolonged signal transmission. Additionally, evoked EPSCs in afferent fibers are unaffected by glutamate transporter blockade, suggesting that transmitter diffusion and dilution, and not uptake, play a primary role in speeding neurotransmission and ensuring fidelity at these synapses. PMID:24920639

  11. Morphology-controlled In2O3 nanostructures enhance the performance of photoelectrochemical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changlong; Moir, Jonathon; Soheilnia, Navid; Mahler, Benoit; Hoch, Laura; Liao, Kristine; Hoepfner, Veronika; O'Brien, Paul; Qian, Chenxi; He, Le; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-02-28

    Nanotower- and nanowall-like indium oxide structures were grown directly on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)/In2O3 seeded substrates and pristine FTO substrates, respectively, by a straightforward solvothermal method. The tower-like nanostructures are proposed to form via a self-assembly process on the In2O3 seeds. The wall-like nanostructures are proposed to form via epitaxial growth from the exposed edges of SnO2 crystals of the FTO substrate. The nanotowers and nanowalls are composed of highly crystalline and ordered nanocrystals with preferred orientations in the [111] and [110] directions, respectively. The two structures display remarkably different activities when used as photoanodes in solar light-driven water splitting. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest an increased density of hydroxyl groups in the nanowalls, which results in a decrease of the work function and a concomitant shift in the onset potential of the photocurrent in the linear sweep voltammograms, which is further confirmed by Mott-Schottky and flat-band potential measurements, indicating the importance of hydroxyl content in determining the photoelectrochemical properties of the films. Morphology-controlled, nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrodes of the kind described in this paper are envisioned to provide valuable platforms for supporting catalysts and co-catalysts that are intentionally tailored for efficient light-assisted oxidation of water and reduction of carbon dioxide. PMID:25641562

  12. Control of cell morphology of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus for enhanced cell stability during industrial processing.

    PubMed

    Senz, Martin; van Lengerich, Bernhard; Bader, Johannes; Stahl, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The viability of bacteria during industrial processing is an essential quality criterion for bacterial preparations, such as probiotics and starter cultures. Therefore, producing stable microbial cultures during proliferation is of great interest. A strong correlation between the culture medium and cellular morphology was observed for the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which is commonly used in the dairy industry as a probiotic supplement and as a starter culture. The cell shapes ranged from single short rods to long filamentous rods. The culture medium composition could control this phenomenon of pleomorphism, especially the use of peptone in combination with an adequate heating of the medium during preparation. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between the cell size and stability of the microorganisms during industrial processing steps, such as freeze-drying, extrusion encapsulation and storage following dried preparations. The results revealed that short cells are more stable than long cells during each of the industrially relevant processing steps. As demonstrated for L. acidophilus NCFM, the adaptation of the medium composition and optimized medium preparation offer the possibility to increase the concentration of viable cells during up- and survival rate during down-stream processing. PMID:25305442

  13. Contrast enhancement for satellite image segmentation with fuzzy cluster means using morphological filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsiti; Munandar, T. A.; Suhendar, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Rohendi, D.

    2016-04-01

    Image segmentation is a stage in image processing, responsible for dividing an image into regions homogeneous, based on the similarity. Suppose the grey level of a pixel by pixel gray neighbors. The quality of image segmentation is generally influenced by the characteristics and the handling of images to be processed. This paper presents the results of satellite image segmentation using a fuzzy cluster region means (FCM). To improve the contrast of the image, conducted morphological filtering techniques. Satellite image analysis performed on five districts in the province of Banten Indonesia. Difference’s segmentation results evident when non-negative parameter value is converted to a 2 and 4. The higher the value of a non-negative parameter is given, then the details of the edges of objects clearer segmentation results. The combined use of a top-hat and boots-hat filtering on objects before satellite imagery analysed by FCM, indicating that it merges with the background object. Background object in the original image is the object of rice fields and is not part of observation in this study. It was identified to have the same gray level similarity with the object of building.

  14. Fractal morphology of black carbon aerosol enhances absorption in the thermal infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Heinson, William R; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-02-15

    In this Letter, we numerically calculate the mass absorption cross sections (MACs) of black carbon fractal aggregates in the thermal infrared solar spectrum. Compared to equivalent-size spheres, the MAC values of aggregates show a percent enhancement of ≈150 and 400 at small and large length scales, respectively. The absorption properties of aggregates with size parameters >1 surprisingly continued to remain in the Rayleigh optics regime. We explain this phenomenon using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory and the concept of phase shift parameter. PMID:26872194

  15. Action of cocaine and chronic sympathetic denervation on vagal escape

    PubMed Central

    Campos, H. A.; Urquilla, P. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of cocaine has been studied on vagal escape and on the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. All the dogs were submitted to acute cervical section of the spinal cord and acute or chronic sympathetic denervation. 2. Cocaine, 5 mg/kg or 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., induces a significant enhancement of the ventricular escape. The effects of a continuous infusion of cocaine are more reproducible than those of a single injection of the drug. 3. Cocaine, 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., potentiates the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. 4. Chronic thoracic sympathectomy markedly retards the recovery of the ventricular rate from the inhibitory action of the vagus. Under this condition, the infusion of cocaine does not significantly enhance the ventricular escape. 5. These findings suggest that an adrenergic mechanism located at the sympathetic nerves supplying the heart is substantially involved in the phenomenon of vagal escape. PMID:5249864

  16. Reproductive, morphological, and phytochemical responses of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to enhanced UV-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbull, V.L.; McCloud, E.S.; Paige, K.N. )

    1994-06-01

    Two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, collected from Libya and Norway, were grown in the greenhouse under. UV-B doses of 0 and 10.5 kJ m[sup [minus]2] UV-B[sub BE]. The high UV-B dose simulated midsummer ambient conditions over Libya and a 40% reduction in stratospheric ozone over Norway. The Libyan ectotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is high, showed no UV-B induced damage to plant growth. However the Norwegian ecotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is low, showed a significant reduction in plant height, inflorescence weight, and rosette weight in response to enhanced UV-B. Although fruit and seed number for both ecotypes were unaffected by enhanced UV-B radiation the germination success of the seeds harvested from the irradiated Norwegian plants were significantly reduced. The two ecotypes also differed with respect to their accumulation of kaempferol, a putative UV-B protective filter. The Libyan ecotype increased kaempferol concentration by 38% over the 0 kJ treatment whereas the Norwegian ecotype increased by only 15%. These data suggest that, for these ecotypes, variation in UV-B sensitivity may be explained by the differential induction of UV-absorbing leaf pigments.

  17. Citric Acid Induced Synthesis of a Series of Morphology-Controllable Ag Microspheres and Their Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Wang, F.; Li, Y.; Li, Q.

    2015-11-01

    A facile route has been used to synthesize a series of morphology-controllable 3D hierarchical Ag microspheres (AgMS) by using citric acid as a morphology directing-reagent. The AgMS are self-assembled by Ag nanosheets which can be controlled, including the thickness of the nanosheets and the distance between two nanosheets by varying the concentration of citric acid. The average thickness of the Ag nanosheets decreased from ~107 to ~22 nm with increasing citric acid concentration. The distance between two of Ag nanosheets is at a range of 15 to 35 nm. The SERS activity of the products has been investigated in detail by using rhodamine 6G (R6G). The results show that R6G can be detected in a concentration as low as 10-7 M. The appropriate interstitial sites of interlaced Ag nanosheets assembled on AgMS provide "hot spots" which result in a strong SERS response, and the electromagnetic enhancement may play the main role in SERS. The SERS activity of a sample has been studied by using melamine, and the limit of detection is found to be 0.6 ppm.

  18. Enhanced crystalline morphology of a ladder-type polymer bulk-heterojunction device by blade-coating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Jung, Jae Woong; Williams, Spencer T; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2015-07-01

    A blade-coating process was employed to fabricate bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells based on a ladder-type polymer (PIDT-PhanQ) with low crystallinity. Compared to the devices processed by a conventional spin-coating method, an intriguing morphology with enhanced phase-separation and increased crystallinity was achieved. As a result, power conversion efficiency up to 7.25% could be achieved from the blade-coated PIDT-PhanQ:PC71BM BHJ film, surpassing the original value obtained by spin-coating (6.29%). This improved photovoltaic performance is attributed to the improved charge carrier mobilities, which correlates well with the increased crystallinity and the organized network of the donor-acceptor phases that produce efficient charge-transporting pathways. PMID:26058494

  19. Impacts of enhanced central Pacific ENSO on wave climate and headland-bay beach morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortlock, Thomas R.; Goodwin, Ian D.

    2016-06-01

    Wave climate and Pacific basin coastal behaviour associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is understood at a reconnaissance level, but the coastal response to different central Pacific (CP) versus eastern Pacific (EP) flavours of ENSO is unknown. We show that CP ENSO events produce different patterns of directional wave power to EP ENSO along the southeast Australian shelf and southwest Pacific region, because of significant variability in trade-wind wave generation. The modulation of the trade wind wave climate during CP ENSO has thus far been neglected in existing coastal process studies. We also show that coastal change between CP and EP ENSO cannot be inferred from shifts in the deepwater wave climate. This is because variability in trade wind wave generation is masked in deepwater by the persistence of high power extra-tropical waves that have reduced impact on nearshore processes due to high wave refraction. Morphodynamic modelling in a headland-bay beach indicates that CP ENSO leads to higher coastal erosion potential and slower post-storm recovery than EP ENSO during an El Niño/La Niña cycle. We show that the alongshore variability in beach morphological type can be used to model the static equilibrium planform response for each ENSO phase. Results indicate that shoreline response to ENSO in most headland-bay beach coasts is not as simple as the existing paradigm that (anti-) clockwise rotation occurs during El Niño (La Niña). Our methods provide a second-order approach to project coastal response and predict the discrete shoreline rotations for ENSO flavours.

  20. The density and thermal structure of Pluto's atmosphere and associated escape processes and rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xun; Strobel, Darrell F.; Erwin, Justin T.

    2014-01-01

    The original Strobel et al. (Strobel, D.F., Zhu, X., Summers, M.E., Stevens, M.E. [1996]. Icarus 120, 266-289) model for Pluto's stratospheric density and thermal structure is augmented to include a radial momentum equation with radial velocity associated with atmospheric escape of N2 and in the energy equation to also include the solar far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet (FUV-EUV) heating in the upper atmosphere and adiabatic cooling due to hydrodynamic expansion. The inclusion of radial velocity introduces important negative feedback processes such as increased solar heating leading to enhanced escape rate and higher radial velocity with stronger adiabatic cooling in the upper atmosphere accompanied by reduced temperature. The coupled set of equations for mass, momentum, and energy are solved subject to two types of upper boundary conditions that represent two different descriptions of atmospheric escape: Jeans escape and hydrodynamic escape. For the former which is physically correct, an enhanced Jeans escape rate is prescribed at the exobase and parameterized according to the direct simulation Monte Carlo kinetic model results. For the latter, the atmosphere is assumed to remain a fluid to infinity with the escape rate determined by the temperature and density at the transonic point subject to vanishing temperature and pressure at infinity. For Pluto, the two escape descriptions approach the same limit when the exobase coincides with the transonic level and merge to a common escape rate ˜1028 N2 s-1 under elevated energy input. For Pluto's current atmosphere, the hydrodynamic approach underestimates the escape rate by about 13%. In all cases, the escape rate is limited by the solar FUV-EUV power input.

  1. Removal of Micrometer Size Morphological Defects and Enhancement of Ultraviolet Emission by Thermal Treatment of Ga-Doped ZnO Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Umair; Kim, Do K.; Islam, Mohammad; Bhatti, Arshad S.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed morphologies of Ga-doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are synthesized by vapor transport method. Systematic scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of different morphologies, after periodic heat treatments, gives direct evidence of sublimation. SEM micrographs give direct evidence that morphological defects of nanostructures can be removed by annealing. Ultra Violet (UV) and visible emission depends strongly on the annealing temperatures and luminescent efficiency of UV emission is enhanced significantly with each subsequent heat treatment. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) results suggest that crystal quality improved by annealing and phase separation may occur at high temperatures. PMID:24489725

  2. Escape manoeuvres in the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Domenici, Paolo; Standen, Emily M; Levine, Robert P

    2004-06-01

    The locomotor performance of dogfish during escape responses was observed by means of high-speed video. Dogfish show C-type escape responses that are comparable with those shown previously in teleosts. Dogfish show high variability of turning rates of the anterior part of the body (head to centre of mass), i.e. with peak values from 434 to 1023 deg. s(-1). We suggest that this variability may be due to the presence of two types of escape manoeuvres, i.e. responses with high and low turning rates, as previously found in a teleost species. Fast responses (i.e. with high maximum turning rates, ranging between 766 and 1023 deg. s(-1)) showed significantly higher locomotor performance than slow responses (i.e. with low maximum turning rates, ranging between 434 and 593 deg. s(-1)) in terms of distance covered, speed and acceleration, although no differences were found in the turning radius of the centre of mass during the escape manoeuvres. The existence of two types of escape responses would have implications in terms of both neural control and muscular activation patterns. When compared with literature data for the locomotor performance of bony fishes, dogfish showed relatively low speed and acceleration, comparable turning rates and a turning radius that is in the low part of the range when compared with teleosts, indicating relatively high manoeuvrability. The locomotor performance observed in dogfish is consistent with their morphological characteristics: (1) low locomotor performance associated with low thrust developed by their relatively small posterior depth of section and (2) relatively high manoeuvrability associated with their high flexibility. PMID:15159438

  3. Mars atmosphere evolution: Escape to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The loss mechanisms and the rates of escape, to space, of Martian atmosphere constituents have changed throughout the history of the solar system. For the first billion years, Mars' atmosphere escape was probably dominated by impact erosion related to the presence of debris left over from the accretionary phase. This loss was further augmented by hydrodynamic outflows related to the presence of an early denser atmosphere and a sun that was brighter in the EUV wavelengths. Following this initial 'catastrophic' phase, during which a large fraction of the original atmosphere was lost but then replaced by volcanism and cometary impact, the 'modern' loss mechanisms which still operate today would have taken over. Those mechanisms that now contribute to escape to space consist of classical thermal or Jeans escape, nonthermal escape due to chemical reaction in the atmosphere, and solar wind-related losses. Both the loss mechanisms and the rates of escape are discussed.

  4. Mechanically-enhanced three-dimensional scaffold with anisotropic morphology for tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Zuyong; Fuh, Jerry Ying Hsi; Wong, Yoke San; Wang, Wilson; Thian, Eng San

    2016-07-01

    Tissue engineering has showed promising results in restoring diseased tendon tissue functions. Herein, a hybrid three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffold comprising an outer portion rolled from an electrohydrodynamic jet printed poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) fiber mesh, and an inner portion fabricated from uniaxial stretching of a heat-sealed PCL tube, was developed for tendon tissue engineering (TE) application. The outer portion included three layers of micrometer-scale fibrous bundles (fiber diameter: ~25 µm), with an interconnected spacing and geometric anisotropy along the scaffold length. The inner portion showed orientated micro-ridges/grooves in a parallel direction to that of the outer portion. Owning to the addition of the inner portion, the as-fabricated scaffold exhibited comparable mechanical properties to those of the human patellar tendon in terms of Young's modulus (~227 MPa) and ultimate tensile stress (~50 MPa). Compared to the rolled electrospun fibers, human tenocytes cultured in the tendon scaffolds showed increased cellular metabolism. Furthermore, the 3D tendon scaffold resulted in up-regulated cell alignment, cell elongation and formation of collagen type I. These results demonstrated the potential of mechanically-enhanced 3D fibrous scaffold for applications in tendon TE, with desired cell alignment and functional differentiation. PMID:27215211

  5. Microparticle-enhanced Aspergillus ficuum phytase production and evaluation of fungal morphology in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Turhan, Irfan

    2015-06-01

    Phytase can be used in animal's diets to increase the absorption of several divalent ions, amino acids and proteins and to decrease the excessive phosphorus release in manure to prevent negative effects on the environment. This study aimed to enhance the current submerged fungal phytase productions with a novel fermentation technique by evaluating the effect of the various microparticles on Aspergillus ficuum phytase production. It was observed that microparticles prevented bulk fungal pellet growth, decreased average fungal pellet size and significantly increased phytase activity in the submerged fermentation. Microbial structure imaging results showed that the average fungal pellet radius decreased from 800 to 500 and 200 µm by addition of 15 g/L aluminum oxide and talcum, respectively, in shake-flask fermentation. Also, addition of 15 g/L of talcum and aluminum oxide increased phytase activity to 2.01 and 2.93 U/ml, respectively, compared to control (1.02 U/ml) in shake-flask fermentation. Additionally, phytase activity reached 6.49 U/ml within 96 h of fermentation with the addition of 15 g/L of talcum, whereas the maximum phytase activity was only 3.45 U/ml at 120 h of fermentation for the control in the 1-L working volume bioreactors. In conclusion, microparticles significantly increased fungal phytase activity and production yield compared to control fermentation. PMID:25555703

  6. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-02-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA.

  7. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080

  8. On the optical and morphological properties of microstructured Black Silicon obtained by cryogenic-enhanced plasma reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, K. N.; Basset, P.; Marty, F.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Bourouina, T.

    2013-05-01

    Motivated by the need for obtaining low reflectivity silicon surfaces, we report on (sub-) micro-texturing of silicon using a high throughput fabrication process involving SF6/O2 reactive ion etching at cryogenic temperatures, leading to Black Silicon (BS). The corresponding high aspect ratio conical spikes of the microstructured surface give rise to multiple reflections and hence, enhanced absorption under electromagnetic radiation. Aiming a better understanding of this mechanism, we performed a systematic study by varying several plasma process parameters: O2/SF6 gas flow rate ratio, silicon temperature, bias voltage, and etching time. We determined the process window which leads to BS formation and we studied the influence of the process parameters on the surface morphology of the obtained BS samples, through analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The measured optical reflectance of BS is in the order of 1% in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-950 nm). We noticed that the lowest reflectance is obtained close to the threshold parameters of BS formation. Absorptance spectral response of BS is measured from 1.3 to 17 μm, and we observed a great enhancement of absorptance up to about 75% compared to flat silicon. We also obtained through these experiments, a clear evidence of a correlation between the excellent optical properties and the aspect ratio of the BS conical microstructures in the measured wavelength ranges.

  9. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080

  10. Lead-enhanced siderophore production and alteration in cell morphology in a Pb-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 4EA.

    PubMed

    Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2011-02-01

    A lead-resistant bacterial strain 4EA from soil contaminated with car battery waste from Goa, India was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This lead-resistant bacterial isolate interestingly revealed lead-enhanced siderophore (pyochelin and pyoverdine) production up to 0.5 mM lead nitrate whereas cells exhibit a significant decline in siderophore production above 0.5 mM lead nitrate. The bacterial cells also revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as size reduction when exposed to 0.8 mM lead nitrate. Enhanced production of siderophore was evidently detected by chrome azurol S agar diffusion (CASAD) assay as increase in diameter of orange halo, and reduction in bacterial size along with significant biosorption of lead was recorded by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 4EA also exhibits cross tolerance to other toxic metals viz. cadmium, mercury, and zinc besides resistance to multiple antibiotics such as ampicillin, erythromycin, amikacin, cephalexin, co-trimoxazole, mecillinam, lincomycin, ciphaloridine, oleondamycin, and nalidixic acid. PMID:20661573

  11. Escape nightmares and postescape stressful events.

    PubMed

    Cernovsky, Z Z

    1988-04-01

    Correlation matrix based on questionnaire item responses by 38 Czechoslovak refugees suggested that "escape nightmares" (recurrent nightmares about being back in the exhomeland, wanting to or trying to re-escape to the free world) are unrelated to postescape incidence of various stressful events (e.g., illness, job difficulties, financial problems). However, refugees who reported a greater number of the stressful events also reported a somewhat higher incidence of nightmares on themes other than escape from homeland (r = .34). PMID:3399334

  12. Conditional Immune Escape during Chronic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gellerup, Dane D.; Balgeman, Alexis J.; Nelson, Chase W.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Scarlotta, Matthew; Hughes, Austin L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anti-HIV CD8 T cells included in therapeutic treatments will need to target epitopes that do not accumulate escape mutations. Identifying the epitopes that do not accumulate variants but retain immunogenicity depends on both host major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genetics and the likelihood for an epitope to tolerate variation. We previously found that immune escape during acute SIV infection is conditional; the accumulation of mutations in T cell epitopes is limited, and the rate of accumulation depends on the number of epitopes being targeted. We have now tested the hypothesis that conditional immune escape extends into chronic SIV infection and that epitopes with a preserved wild-type sequence have the potential to elicit epitope-specific CD8 T cells. We deep sequenced simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from Mauritian cynomolgus macaques (MCMs) that were homozygous and heterozygous for the M3 MHC haplotype and had been infected with SIV for about 1 year. When interrogating variation within individual epitopes restricted by M3 MHC alleles, we found three categories of epitopes, which we called categories A, B, and C. Category B epitopes readily accumulated variants in M3-homozygous MCMs, but this was less common in M3-heterozygous MCMs. We then determined that chronic CD8 T cells specific for these epitopes were more likely preserved in the M3-heterozygous MCMs than M3-homozygous MCMs. We provide evidence that epitopes known to escape from chronic CD8 T cell responses in animals that are homozygous for a set of MHC alleles are preserved and retain immunogenicity in a host that is heterozygous for the same MHC alleles. IMPORTANCE Anti-HIV CD8 T cells that are part of therapeutic treatments will need to target epitopes that do not accumulate escape mutations. Defining these epitope sequences is a necessary precursor to designing approaches that enhance the functionality of CD8 T cells with the potential to control virus replication during chronic

  13. Deformation-driven fluid escape in the Levant Basin, offshore southern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eruteya, Ovie Emmanuel; Waldmann, Nicolas; Reshef, Moshe; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2016-04-01

    Submarine fluid emissions are global phenomena, which can be inferred from the presence of seafloor morphologies (e.g. pockmarks, mud volcanoes) occurring in various geological settings. However, despite the Levant Basin been a prolific hydrocarbon province, only a paucity of fluid escape morphologies have been identified on the present-day seafloor. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of a newly available high-resolution 3D seismic reflection dataset from offshore southern Israel. Evidences of subsurface fluid plumbing and escape are manifested here as present-day seafloor pockmarks, paleo-pockmarks, pipe structures and enhanced reflectivity patterns. Interestingly, these pockmarks are situated on and around bathymetric highs, which are ridges related to the Palmachim Disturbance. Our initial results show the fluid flow structures are spatially localized above a region of complex evaporites evacuation at depth, and likewise proximal to a shallower region characterized by high amplitude reflectors. The latter may be evidences for a shallow gas system. Our initial hypothesis proposes a dual shallow-source driven focused fluid flow system. Yet, we favour a deeper Messinian plumbing system driving fluid flow across the overburden in the study area. Corroborating this are fault systems characterized near the pipes feeding the seafloor pockmarks and paleo-pockmark, detaching in the upper Messinian evaporite. We further suggest that a combined supra-salt deformation system arising from the evacuation of the Messinian evaporites coupled with gravitational tectonics are in charge of modulating focused fluid flow. Under this scenario the emplaced mass transport complex acts as a transient reservoir for fluid flow, dewatering under deformation and channelling fluids towards the seafloor for expulsion. However, the contributions from microbially-generated methane in the shallow Quaternary overburden associated with the channel-levee complex cannot be neglected.

  14. Model of a mechanical clock escapement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, David; Wagner, John; Volk, Eugene

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical tower clock originated in Europe during the 14th century to sound hourly bells and later display hands on a dial. An important innovation was the escapement mechanism, which converts stored energy into oscillatory motion for fixed time intervals through the pendulum swing. Previous work has modeled the escapement mechanism in terms of inelastic and elastic collisions. We derive and experimentally verify a theoretical model in terms of impulsive differential equations for the Graham escapement mechanism in a Seth Thomas tower clock. The model offers insight into the clock's mechanical behavior and the functionality of the deadbeat escapement mechanism.

  15. Enhanced the photocatalytic activity of Ni-doped ZnO thin films: Morphological, optical and XPS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Jilani, Asim; Yahia, I. S.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure and Ni-doped ZnO thin films with different concentration of Ni (3.5 wt%, 5 wt%, 7 wt%) were prepared by DC/RF magnetron sputtering technique. The X-rays diffraction pattern showed the polycrystalline nature of pure and Ni-doped ZnO thin films. The surface morphology of pure and Ni doped ZnO thin films were investigated through atomic force microscope, which indicated the increase in the grain dimension and surface roughness with increasing the Ni doping. The UV-Visible transmission spectra showed the decrease in the transmittance of doped ZnO thin films with the incorporation of Ni dopants. The surface and chemical state analysis of pure and Ni doped ZnO thin films were investigated by X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by an aqueous solution of methyl green dye. The tungsten lamp of 500 W was used as a source of visible light for photocatalytic study. The degradation results showed that the Ni-doped ZnO thin films exhibit highly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the pure ZnO thin films. The enhanced photocatalytic activities of Ni-doped ZnO thin films were attributed to the enhanced surface area (surface defects), surface roughness and decreasing the band gap of Ni-doped ZnO thin films. Our work supports the applications of thin film metal oxides in waste water treatment.

  16. X-Ray Morphology,Kinematics and Geometry of the Eridanus Soft X-Ray Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiyu; Burrows, David N.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Snowden, Steve L.; Penprase, Bryan E.

    1994-12-01

    We present mosaics of X-ray intensity maps and spectral fit results for selected regions of the Eridanus soft X-ray Enhancement (EXE), as well as kinematics of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region and geometrical properties of this X-ray emitting bubble. The work is based on pointed observations with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, 21 cm observations with the NRAO 140 foot telescope at Green Bank and interstellar Na D line observations with the NOAO Coude Feed telescope at Kitt Peak. The ROSAT pointed observations examine two regions of the EXE. The first is an X-ray absorption lane produced by an IR filament which is located at galactic coordinates of about (199(deg) , -45(deg) ). The second is in the vicinity of the northern (galactic) boundary of the 1/4 keV EXE, at galactic coordinates of about (200(deg) , -25(deg) ). Both our spatial and spectral analysis suggest that variations in emission measure and NH are primarily reponsible for the observed variations of the X-ray intensity. Using 100mu intensities obtained from IRAS maps and NH column densities obtained from our X-ray spectral fits, we find 100 microns/NH ratios across the IR filament that are compatible with typical high latitude values. Maps of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region at 21 cm reveal that these clouds may belong to two different expanding systems, with one possibly associated with our Local Bubble and the other with the boundary of the EXE. Combination of 21 cm data with interstellar Na D line observations toward stars in the directions of some of the X-ray absorbing clouds along (l,b) ~ (200(deg) ,-40(deg) ) indicate that the near side of the EXE is farther than 151 pc and the distance to the center of the EXE at this latitude is about 226 pc. The density and the thermal pressure found for this X-ray emitting superbubble are 0.015 cm(-3) and 4.9 times 10(4) cm(-3) K.

  17. Electronic Escape Trails for Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Schipper, John; Betts, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    A proposed wireless-communication and data-processing system would exploit recent advances in radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) and software to establish information lifelines between firefighters in a burning building and a fire chief at a control station near but outside the building. The system would enable identification of trails that firefighters and others could follow to escape from the building, including identification of new trails should previously established trails become blocked. The system would include a transceiver unit and a computer at the control station, portable transceiver units carried by the firefighters in the building, and RFID tags that the firefighters would place at multiple locations as they move into and through the building (see figure). Each RFID tag, having a size of the order of a few centimeters, would include at least standard RFID circuitry and possibly sensors for measuring such other relevant environmental parameters as temperature, levels of light and sound, concentration of oxygen, concentrations of hazardous chemicals in smoke, and/or levels of nuclear radiation. The RFID tags would be activated and interrogated by the firefighters and control-station transceivers. Preferably, RFID tags would be configured to communicate with each other and with the firefighters units and the control station in an ordered sequence, with built-in redundancy. In a typical scenario, as firefighters moved through a building, they would scatter many RFID tags into smoke-obscured areas by use of a compressed-air gun. Alternatively or in addition, they would mark escape trails by dropping RFID tags at such points of interest as mantraps, hot spots, and trail waypoints. The RFID tags could be of different types, operating at different frequencies to identify their functions, and possibly responding by emitting audible beeps when activated by signals transmitted by transceiver units carried by nearby firefighters.

  18. Escape of H and D from Mars' Atmosphere and the Evolution of its Crustal Water Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of water on Mars involves preferential escape of hydrogen over deuterium, producing its deuterium rich atmosphere with a D/H ratio 5.2 times that of terrestrial water. In the past decade, several estimates have been made of the magnitudes of current and ancient crustal water reservoirs on Mars that freely exchange with its atmosphere. Some of the differences in the magnitudes of the reservoirs are influenced by differences in the following basic parameters: composition of H, D, H2 and HD at the exobase; thermal history of the atmosphere; escape mechanisms; and the D/H ratio of earlier epochs as inferred from meteorites. The dominant escape mechanism used in the estimates is Jeans escape. However, the Jeans escape flux is enhanced considerably when atmospheric winds and rotation are applied at the exobase . This constraint is of particular importance because the enhancement of the D escape flux can be an order of magnitude greater than the enhancement of the H escape flux. This preferential enhancement of the D escape flux over that of H means that a great deal more H must escape (than in the case without winds and rotation) to attain the same D/H ratio in the today's atmosphere. Another new constraint on reservoir magnitudes comes from the recent interpretation of Martian meteorite data, which suggests that the D/H ratio was 2 times that of terrestrial water at the end of the heavy bombardment period (1). These two constraints together lead to larger current and ancient crustal water reservoirs. Applying Rayleigh fractionation, new estimates of the sizes of the water reservoirs are made using the above constraints along with plausible values for hydrogen and deuterium densities, temperatures, wind speeds and rotation rates at the exobase.

  19. Escape of H and D From Mars' Atmosphere and the Evolution of its Crustal Water Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, R. E.

    2001-12-01

    The evolution of water on Mars involves preferential escape of hydrogen over deuterium, producing its deuterium rich atmosphere with a D/H ratio 5.2 times that of terrestrial water. In the past decade, several estimates have been made of the magnitudes of current and ancient crustal water reservoirs on Mars that freely exchange with its atmosphere. Some of the differences in the magnitudes of the reservoirs are influenced by differences in the following basic parameters: composition of H, D, H2 and HD at the exobase; thermal history of the atmosphere; escape mechanisms; and the D/H ratio of earlier epochs as inferred from meteorites. The dominant escape mechanism used in the estimates is Jeans escape. However, the Jeans escape flux is enhanced considerably when atmospheric winds and rotation are applied at the exobase . This constraint is of particular importance because the enhancement of the D escape flux can be an order of magnitude greater than the enhancement of the H escape flux. This preferential enhancement of the D escape flux over that of H means that a great deal more H must escape (than in the case without winds and rotation) to attain the same D/H ratio in the today's atmosphere. Another new constraint on reservoir magnitudes comes from the recent interpretation of Martian meteorite data, which suggests that the D/H ratio was 2 times that of terrestrial water at the end of the heavy bombardment period (1). These two constraints together lead to larger current and ancient crustal water reservoirs. Applying Rayleigh fractionation, new estimates of the sizes of the water reservoirs are made using the above constraints along with plausible values for hydrogen and deuterium densities, temperatures, wind speeds and rotation rates at the exobase. (1) Leshin, L. A., 27, 2017-2020, 2000.

  20. Escape as Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, Robert H.; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Patel, Meeta R.; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of…

  1. MEMO: Mars Escape and Magnetic Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Langlais, B.; Chassefiere, E.; Sotin, C.; Barabash, S.; Dehant, V.; Dougherty, M.; Lammer, H.; Mandea, M.; Vennerstrom, S.

    2007-03-01

    MEMO is a new orbiter devoted to the characterization of present atmospheric escape and of the fossile magnetic field. The low periapsis (~130 km) is required to detect and quantify atoms and molecules involved in the escape, and to measure the magnetic f

  2. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  3. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    PubMed

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  4. Atmospheric escape, redox evolution, and planetary habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Through the greenhouse effect, the presence and composition of an atmosphere is critical for defining a (conventional) circumstellar habitable zone in terms of planetary surface temperatures suitable for liquid water. Lack of knowledge of planetary atmospheres is likely to frustrate attempts to say with any certainty whether detected terrestrial-sized exoplanets may or may not be habitable. Perhaps an underappreciated role in such considerations is the evolutionary effect of atmospheric escape for determining atmospheric composition or whether an atmosphere exists in the first place. Whether atmospheres exist at all on planets is demonstrably connected to the effect of integrated atmospheric escape. When we observe our own Solar System and transiting exoplanets, the existence of an atmosphere is clearly delineated by a relative vulnerability to thermal escape and impact erosion. The prevalence of thermal escape as a key evolutionary determinant for the presence of planetary atmosphere is shown by a relationship between the relative solar (or stellar) heating and the escape velocity. Those bodies with too much stellar heating and too smaller escape velocity end up devoid of atmospheres. Impact erosion is evident in the relationship between impact velocity and escape velocity. Escape due to impacts is particularly important for understanding the large differences in the atmospheres of giant planet moons, such as Ganymede versus Titan. It is also significant for Mars-sized planets. The oxidation state of atmospheres is important for some theories of the origin of life (where an early reducing atmosphere is helpful for organic synthesis) and the evolution of advanced life (where free molecular oxygen is the best source of high energy metabolism). Surfaces on some relatively small planets and moons are observed to have evolved to an oxidized state, which theory and observation can explain through atmospheric escape. There are several examples in the Solar System where a

  5. Performance Enhancement of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on TiO₂ Thick Mesoporous Photoanodes by Morphological Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Reza; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Moghadam, Majid; Tangestaninejad, Shahram; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj

    2015-10-27

    This study is an attempt to give an account of the preparation of mesoporous TiO2 thick templated films of nonsimilar pore architecture and their use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Highly crystallized mesoporous titania thick templated films with four different morphologies including hexagonal, wormlike, cubic, and gridlike mesostructure, have been successfully synthesized through an evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) route followed by layer-by-layer deposition. Stabilization, followed by each coating, and calcinations, carried out after every five layers, were used to produce crack-free thick films. These mesoporous templated titanium dioxide samples were characterized by TEM, XRD, SEM, BET, and UV-vis measurements and used as a photoelectrode material in DSSCs. The mesostructured films with a thickness of about 7 μm demonstrated better performance in comparison to nanocrystalline TiO2 films (NC-TiO2) at a film thickness of 13 μm as the most typical films utilized in DSSCs. The findings reveal that a surfactant/Ti ratio change undergone for developing cubic mesostructures can enhance the crystallinity and roughness factor and therefore increase the energy conversion efficiency of DSSC. The cell performances derived from these mesofilms were enhanced compared to the efficiencies reported thus far. The best photovoltaic performance of 8.73% came from DSSC using the cubic mesoporous TiO2 photoelectrode with the following properties: open circuit voltage of 743 mV, short circuit photocurrent density of 16.35 mA/cm(2), and fill factor of 0.72. PMID:26421504

  6. Phonological and orthographic cues enhance the processing of inflectional morphology. ERP evidence from L1 and L2 French

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Ortiz, Haydee; Frenck-Mestre, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of two event-related potential (ERP) experiments in which Spanish learners of French and native French controls show graded sensitivity to verbal inflectional errors as a function of the presence of orthographic and/or phonological cues when reading silently in French. In both experiments, verbal agreement was manipulated in sentential context such that subject verb agreement was either correct, ill-formed and orally realized, involving both orthographic and phonological cues, or ill-formed and silent which involved only orthographic cues. The results of both experiments revealed more robust ERP responses to orally realized than to silent inflectional errors. This was true for L2 learners as well as native controls, although the effect in the learner group was reduced in comparison to the native group. In addition, the combined influence of phonological and orthographic cues led to the largest differences between syntactic/phonological conditions. Overall, the results suggest that the presence of phonological cues may enhance L2 readers’ sensitivity to morphology but that such may appear in L2 processing only when sufficient proficiency is attained. Moreover, both orthographic and phonological cues are used when available. PMID:25165460

  7. Micellar Effects on Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Aqueous Solutions Revisited: Dramatic Enhancement of Cage Escape Yields in Surfactant Ru(II) Diimine Complex/[Ru(NH3)6](2+) Systems.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rebecca E; Schmehl, Russell H

    2016-08-30

    The effect of cationic micelle incorporation on light induced electron transfer, charge separation and back electron transfer between an aqueous electron donor, [Ru(NH3)6](2+), and a series of Ru(II) diimine complex chromophores/acceptors, is presented. The chromophores have the general formula [(bpy)2Ru(LL)](2+) (LL = bpy; 4-R-4'-methyl-2,2'-bpy, R = pentyl (MC5), terdecyl (MC13), heptadecyl (MC17); 4,4'-di(heptadecyl)-2,2'-bpy (DC17)). Of the five chromophores, the MC13, MC17, and DC17 complexes associate with the added micelle forming surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Quenching of the luminescence of the bpy and MC5 complexes by [Ru(NH3)6](2+) is unaffected by addition of surfactant, while rate constants for quenching of the MC13 and MC17 complexes are decreased. Cage escape yields following photoinduced electron transfer to generate [(bpy)2Ru(LL)](+) and [Ru(NH3)6](3+) are approximately 0.1 for all the water-soluble chromophores (excluding DC17) in the absence of added CTAB. In the presence of surfactant, the cage escape yields dramatically increase for the MC13 (0.4) and MC17 (0.6) complexes, while remaining unchanged for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and the MC5 complex. Back electron transfer of the solvent separated ions is also strongly influenced by the presence of surfactant. For the MC13 and MC17 complexes, back electron transfer rate constants decrease by factors of 270 and 190, respectively. The MC5 complex exhibits two component back electron transfer, with the fast component having a rate constant close to that in the absence of surfactant and a slow component nearly 200 times smaller. Results are interpreted in terms of the partitioning of the 2+ and 1+ forms of the chromophores between aqueous and micellar phases. The extended lifetimes of the radical ions may prove useful in coupling the strong reductants formed to kinetically facile catalysts for reduction of water to hydrogen. PMID:27486891

  8. Light weight escape capsule for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Emergency crew escape capabilities have been less than adequate for fighter aircraft since before WW II. From the over-the-side bailout of those days through the current ejection seat with a rocket catapult, escaping from a disabled aircraft has been risky at best. Current efforts are underway toward developing a high-tech, smart ejection seat that will give fighter pilots more room to live in the sky, but an escape capsule is needed to meet current and future fighter envelopes. Escape capsules have a bad reputation due to past examples of high weight, poor performance and great complexity. However, the advantages available demand that a capsule be developed. This capsule concept will minimize the inherent disavantages and incorporate the benefits while integrating all aspects of crew station design. The resulting design is appropriate for a crew station of the year 2010 and includes improved combat acceleration protection, chemical or biological combat capability, improved aircraft to escape system interaction, and the highest level of escape performance achievable. The capsule is compact, which can allow a reduced aircraft size and weighs only 1200 lb. The escape system weight penalty is only 120 lb higher than that for the next ejection seat and the capsule has a corresponding increase in performance.

  9. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  10. Simultaneous morphology manipulation and upconversion luminescence enhancement of β-NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ microcrystals by simply tuning the KF dosage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingye; Chen, Daqin; Yin, Shilong; Ji, Zhenguo; Zhong, Jiasong; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2015-01-01

    A strategy has been adopted for simultaneous morphology manipulation and upconversion luminescence enhancement of β-NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ microcrystals by simply tuning the KF dosage. X-ray power diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) were used to characterize the samples. The influence of molar ratio of KF to Y3+ on the crystal phase and morphology has been systematically investigated and discussed. It is found that the molar ratio of KF to Y3+ can strongly control the morphology of the as-synthesized β-NaYF4 samples because of the different capping effect of F− ions on the different crystal faces. The possible formation mechanism has been proposed on the basis of a series of time-dependent experiments. More importantly, the upconversion luminescence of β-NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ was greatly enhanced by increasing the molar ratio of KF to RE3+ (RE = Y, Yb, Er), which is attributed to the distortion of local crystal field symmetry around lanthanide ions through K+ ions doping. This synthetic methodology is expected to provide a new strategy for simultaneous morphology control and remarkable upconversion luminescence enhancement of yttrium fluorides, which may be applicable for other rare earth fluorides. PMID:26235808

  11. Apollo experience report: Launch escape propulsion subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo launch escape propulsion subsystem contained three solid rocket motors. The general design, development, and qualification of the solid-propellant pitch-control, tower-jettison, and launch-escape motors of the Apollo launch escape propulsion subsystem were completed during years 1961 to 1966. The launch escape system components are described in general terms, and the sequence of events through the ground-based test programs and flight-test programs is discussed. The initial ground rules established for this system were that it should use existing technology and designs as much as possible. The practicality of this decision is proved by the minimum number of problems that were encountered during the development and qualification program.

  12. Biogeochemistry: Nocturnal escape route for marsh gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Katey Walter; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-07-01

    A field study of methane emissions from wetlands reveals that more of the gas escapes through diffusive processes than was thought, mostly at night. Because methane is a greenhouse gas, the findings have implications for global warming.

  13. Do malaria parasites manipulate the escape behaviour of their avian hosts? An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Longoria, Luz; Møller, Anders P; Balbontín, Javier; de Lope, Florentino; Marzal, Alfonso

    2015-12-01

    Escape behaviour is the behaviour that birds and other animals display when already caught by a predator. An individual exhibiting higher intensity of such anti-predator behaviour could have greater probabilities of escape from predators. Parasites are known to affect different aspects of host behaviour to increase their own fitness. Vector-transmitted parasites such as malaria parasites should gain by manipulating their hosts to enhance the probability of transmission. Several studies have shown that malaria parasites can manipulate their vectors leading to increased transmission success. However, little is known about whether malaria parasites can manipulate escape behaviour of their avian hosts thereby increasing the spread of the parasite. Here we used an experimental approach to explore if Plasmodium relictum can manipulate the escape behaviour of one of its most common avian hosts, the house sparrow Passer domesticus. We experimentally tested whether malaria parasites manipulate the escape behaviour of their avian host. We showed a decrease in the intensity of biting and tonic immobility after removal of infection with anti-malaria medication compared to pre-experimental behaviour. These outcomes suggest that infected sparrows performed more intense escape behaviour, which would increase the likelihood of individuals escaping from predators, but also benefit the parasite by increasing its transmission opportunities. PMID:26337268

  14. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ikonen, Timo; Jónsson, Hannes; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2014-02-01

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  15. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ikonen, Timo; Jónsson, Hannes; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  16. 46 CFR 28.390 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Means of escape. 28.390 Section 28.390 Shipping COAST... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.390 Means of escape. (a) Each space which is used by... two widely separated means of escape. At least one of the means of escape must be independent...

  17. 46 CFR 28.390 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Means of escape. 28.390 Section 28.390 Shipping COAST... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.390 Means of escape. (a) Each space which is used by... two widely separated means of escape. At least one of the means of escape must be independent...

  18. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST...) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided in... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means...

  19. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST...) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided in... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means...

  20. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST...) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided in... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means...

  1. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST...) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided in... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means...

  2. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST...) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided in... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means...

  3. 46 CFR 28.390 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Means of escape. 28.390 Section 28.390 Shipping COAST... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.390 Means of escape. (a) Each space which is used by... two widely separated means of escape. At least one of the means of escape must be independent...

  4. Compensatory escape mechanism at low Reynolds number

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Brad J.; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite high predation pressure, planktonic copepods remain one of the most abundant groups on the planet. Their escape response provides one of most effective mechanisms to maximize evolutionary fitness. Owing to their small size (100 µm) compared with their predators (>1 mm), increasing viscosity is believed to have detrimental effects on copepods’ fitness at lower temperature. Using high-speed digital holography we acquire 3D kinematics of the nauplius escape including both location and detailed appendage motion. By independently varying temperature and viscosity we demonstrate that at natural thermal extremes, contrary to conventional views, nauplii achieve equivalent escape distance while maintaining optimal velocity. Using experimental results and kinematic simulations from a resistive force theory propulsion model, we demonstrate that a shift in appendage timing creates an increase in power stroke duration relative to recovery stroke duration. This change allows the nauplius to limit losses in velocity and maintain distance during escapes at the lower bound of its natural thermal range. The shift in power stroke duration relative to recovery stroke duration is found to be regulated by the temperature dependence of swimming appendage muscle groups, not a dynamic response to viscosity change. These results show that copepod nauplii have natural adaptive mechanisms to compensate for viscosity variations with temperature but not in situations in which viscosity varies independent of temperature, such as in some phytoplankton blooms. Understanding the robustness of escapes in the wake of environmental changes such as temperature and viscosity has implications in assessing the future health of performance compensation. PMID:23487740

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir. PMID:25860317

  6. Changing the habitat: the evolution of intercorrelated traits to escape from predators.

    PubMed

    Mikolajewski, D J; Scharnweber, K; Jiang, B; Leicht, S; Mauersberger, R; Johansson, F

    2016-07-01

    Burst escape speed is an effective and widely used behaviour for evading predators, with burst escape speed relying on several different morphological features. However, we know little about how behavioural and underlying morphological attributes change in concert as a response to changes in selective predation regime. We studied intercorrelated trait differentiation of body shape and burst-swim-mediating morphology in response to a habitat shift-related reduction in burst escape speed using larvae of the dragonfly genus Leucorrhinia. Species in this genus underwent a well-known habitat shift from predatory fish lakes (fish lakes) to predatory fish-free lakes dominated by large predatory dragonflies (dragonfly lakes) accompanied by relaxed selection on escape burst speed. Results revealed that species from fish lakes that possess faster burst speed have evolved a suite of functionally intercorrelated traits, expressing a wider abdomen, a higher abdominal muscles mass and a larger branchial chamber compared with species from dragonfly lakes. In contrast, populations within species did not show significant differences in muscle mass and branchial chamber size between lake types in three of the species. High multicollinearity among variables suggests that traits have evolved in concert rather than independently when Leucorrhinia shifted from fish lakes to dragonfly lakes. Thus, relaxed selection on burst escape speed in dragonfly-lake species resulted in a correlated reduction of abdominal muscles and a smaller branchial chamber, likely to save production and/or maintenance costs. Our results highlight the importance of studying integrated behavioural and morphological traits to fully understand the evolution of complex phenotypes. PMID:27062155

  7. Automated analysis of non-mass-enhancing lesions in breast MRI based on morphological, kinetic, and spatio-temporal moments and joint segmentation-motion compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie D.; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) represents an established method for the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions. While mass-like enhancing lesions can be easily categorized according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon, a majority of diagnostically challenging lesions, the so called non-mass-like enhancing lesions, remain both qualitatively as well as quantitatively difficult to analyze. Thus, the evaluation of kinetic and/or morphological characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have no well-defined and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these difficulties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphological descriptors separately and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions, and additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  8. Radiative equilibrium and escape of Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Justin; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of Pluto’s extend atmosphere by the New Horizons spacecraft motivate an update to our modeling effort on Pluto’s atmosphere. New Horizons observations have already improved our constraints on planet radius and surface pressure, which are key to modeling the atmospheric structure. We model the radiative conductive equilibrium in the lower atmosphere combined with the UV driven escape model of the upper atmosphere. The non-LTE radiative transfer model in the lower atmosphere include heating and cooling by CH4, CO, and HCN. The escape model of the upper atmosphere is updated to include diffusion and escape of each molecular component. These results will be used to aid in the analysis and better understanding of the full atmospheric structure.

  9. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J; Yelle, Roger V

    2014-04-28

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres. PMID:24664923

  10. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Tommi T.; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres. PMID:24664923

  11. Novel WO3/Sb2S3 Heterojunction Photocatalyst Based on WO3 of Different Morphologies for Enhanced Efficiency in Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zhihua; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-04-20

    We report the fabrication of tungsten trioxide (WO3) with different morphologies applied in photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. The antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) was incorporated onto WO3 for the first time with the aim of improving its photoelectrocatalytic activity under visible-light illumination. In the present work, WO3 of different morphologies were fabricated on FTO glass via adjusting the pH value via a facile hydrothermal method and the morphological effect on the photoelectrocatalytic activity of the obtained samples has been discussed. WO3/Sb2S3 heterojunction photoelectrocatalysts were subsequently synthesized successfully to further improve the photoelectrocatalytic activity. Among them, WO3/Sb2S3 heterojunction photoelectrocatalyst based on WO3 micro crystals achieved an enhanced photocurrent of 1.79 mA/cm(2) at 0.8 V versus RHE under simulated sunlight, compared to 0.45 mA/cm(2) of pristine WO3 micro crystals. This excellent PEC performance benefits from the enhanced light absorbance, construction of suitable energy band gap, the improved photogenerated electron-hole pairs separation and transfer efficiency, which potentially provides new insights into PEC water splitting systems. PMID:27032422

  12. Enhanced performance in hole transport material free perovskite solar cells via morphology control of PbI2 film by solvent treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Nian; Liu, Pei; Bai, Sihang; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    The morphology of PbI2 film plays a critical role in determining the quality of the resultant CH3NH3PbI3 film and power conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cell. Here, we propose a solvent treatment method in the two-step sequential deposition process to control the morphology of PbI2 film, which leads to enhanced power conversion efficiency. Hole transport material free perovskite solar cell is chosen as a paradigm to demonstrate this idea. Solvent (isopropanol, chlorobenzene, or ethanol) treated PbI2 films exhibit dendrite-like or flake-like morphologies, which facilitate more complete conversion of PbI2 to CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite in ambient atmosphere with a relative high humidity. Therefore, enhanced performance is obtained with the solvent treated PbI2 films. Average power conversion efficiency has been improved from 9.42% in the traditional two-step sequential deposition to 11.22% in solar cells derived from ethanol treated PbI2 films.

  13. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of morphologically tuned Bi2S3 NPs in the degradation of organic pollutants under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Arpita; Ghosh, Abhisek Brata; Saha, Namrata; Srivastava, Divesh N; Paul, Parimal; Adhikary, Bibhutosh

    2016-12-01

    Here in, morphologically tuned Bi2S3 NPs were successfully synthesized from a single-source precursor complex [Bi(ACDA)3] [HACDA=2-aminocyclopentene-1-dithiocarboxylic acid] by decomposing in various solvents using a simple solvothermal method. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, TEM, UV-vis spectroscopy and BET surface area measurements. Structural analyses revealed that the as-prepared Bi2S3 NPs can be tuned to different morphologies by varying various solvents and surfactants. The interplay of factors that influenced the size and morphology of the nanomaterials has been studied. Moreover, mastery over the morphology of nanoparticles enables control of their properties and enhancement of their usefulness for a given application. These materials emerged as a highly active visible light-driven photocatalyst towards degradation of methylene blue dye and the efficiencies are dependent on size and surface area of the NPs. In addition, photocatalytic degradation of highly toxic dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane was studied using synthesized Bi2S3 NPs as catalyst and the rate of degradation has been found to be much better compared to that exhibited by commercial WO3. We believe that this new synthesis approach can be extended to the synthesis of other metal sulfide nanostructures and open new opportunities for device applications. PMID:27552413

  14. A seed-mediated approach to the morphology-controlled synthesis of bimetallic copper-platinum alloy nanoparticles with enhanced electrocatalytic performance for the methanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Cui, Penglei; He, Hongyan; Liu, Hui; Peng, Zhijian; Yang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Mastery over the morphology of nanomaterials usually enables control of their properties and enhancement of their usefulness for a given application. Herein, we report a seed-mediated approach for the fabrication of bimetallic copper-platinum (CuPt) alloy nanoparticles with different morphologies. This strategy involves the first synthesis of Cu seed particles with multiple twins, and subsequent nucleation and growth of Pt metal. Then upon the Cu/Pt molar ratios in the synthesis, the rapid interdiffusion of Cu and Pt atoms results in the formation of bimetallic CuPt alloy nanoparticles with polyhedral, stellated, or dendritic morphologies. It has been found that both the morphology and electronic coupling effect between Cu and Pt components have significant effect on the electrochemical property of the alloy particles. In particular, the dendritic CuPt alloy nanoparticles display the highest specific activity for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) due to their abundant atomic steps, edges, and corner atoms in the dendritic structure, while the polyhedral CuPt alloy particles show best carbon monoxide (CO) tolerant behavior due to the strong electronic donation effect from Cu to Pt atoms.

  15. Statistical theory of asteroid escape rates.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Charles; Ross, Shane D; Lo, Martin W; Marsden, Jerrold; Farrelly, David; Uzer, T

    2002-07-01

    Transition states in phase space are identified and shown to regulate the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured in circumplanetary orbits. The transition states, similar to those occurring in chemical reaction dynamics, are then used to develop a statistical semianalytical theory for the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured by Mars. Theory and numerical simulations are found to agree to better than 1%. These calculations suggest that further development of transition state theory in celestial mechanics, as an alternative to large-scale numerical simulations, will be a fruitful approach to mass transport calculations. PMID:12097024

  16. Enhanced permittivity and energy density in neat poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorotrifluoroethylene) terpolymer films through control of morphology.

    PubMed

    Smith, O'Neil L; Kim, Yunsang; Kathaperumal, Mohanalingam; Gadinski, Matthew R; Pan, Ming-Jen; Wang, Qing; Perry, Joseph W

    2014-06-25

    Polymer materials with large dielectric constants are desirable for the development of high energy density capacitors. We show that the dielectric properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorotrifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE)] can be improved by the use of processing conditions that favor formation of a highly crystalline morphology of the nonpolar α-phase. Through the use of spin coating, thermal treatment above the melting temperature, and quenching, we were able to attain a highly crystalline, α-phase rich morphology that has a quite large dielectric constant of 77 ± 10 at 1 kHz. The final morphology and phase composition of the terpolymer films depend strongly on the postprocessing thermal treatment and the quality of the solvent. Evaluation of the polarization behavior of the terpolymer films as a function of electric field reveal that the polymer exhibits a relaxor-ferroelectric behavior and has a substantial energy density of 9.7 J/cm(3) at fields of up to approximately 470 V/μm. Under millisecond pulsed charge-discharge measurements a 3-fold increase in energy density (27 J/cm(3)) is obtained at high fields (∼600 V/μm). Our study demonstrates that the processing conditions and morphology of fluorinated terpolymer films are controlling factors for achievement of high dielectric permittivity and energy density that are critical for high performance capacitors. PMID:24873348

  17. Dynamical Effects on the Escape of H and D: Martian Water Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of water on Mars is dependent on the loss rates of H and D from its atmosphere, where the dominant loss mechanism for these constituents is Jeans escape. Throughout time, preferential escape of H over D has produced a deuterium rich atmosphere with a D/H ratio 5.2 times that of terrestrial water. Motion in the atmosphere of Mars is shown to change the Jeans escape rates of H and D in two important ways: (1) Atmospheric wind and rotation at the exobase increase the escape fluxes of H and D above the corresponding Jeans fluxes. (2) The percentage increase in escape flux due to motion is greatest for D. Recently, several models have been used to estimate the magnitudes of current and ancient crustal water reservoirs on Mars that freely exchange with its atmosphere. Differences in the reservoir sizes are influenced by differences in the composition at the exobase, thermal history of the atmosphere and the D/H ratio of earlier epochs as inferred from meteorites. When motion enhanced Jeans escape is applied to each of these models, it is shown in every case that factors (1) and (2) above lead to current and ancient crustal water reservoirs that are larger than those obtained without motion.

  18. ENHANCED NITROGEN IN MORPHOLOGICALLY DISTURBED BLUE COMPACT GALAXIES AT 0.20 < z < 0.35: PROBING GALAXY MERGING FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jiwon; Rey, Soo-Chang; Yeom, Bum-Suk; Yi, Wonhyeong; Sung, Eon-Chang; Kyeong, Jaemann; Humphrey, Andrew E-mail: screy@cnu.ac.kr

    2013-04-10

    We present a study of correlations between the elemental abundances and galaxy morphologies of 91 blue compact galaxies (BCGs) at z = 0.20-0.35 with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 data. We classify the morphologies of the galaxies as either ''disturbed'' or ''undisturbed'' by visual inspection of the SDSS images, and using the Gini coefficient and M{sub 20}. We derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances using the T{sub e} method. We find that a substantial fraction of BCGs with disturbed morphologies, indicative of merger remnants, show relatively high N/O and low O/H abundance ratios. The majority of the disturbed BCGs exhibit higher N/O values at a given O/H value compared to the morphologically undisturbed galaxies, implying more efficient nitrogen enrichment in disturbed BCGs. We detect Wolf-Rayet (WR) features in only a handful of the disturbed BCGs, which appears to contradict the idea that WR stars are responsible for high nitrogen abundance. Combining these results with Galaxy Evolution Explorer GR6 ultraviolet (UV) data, we find that the majority of the disturbed BCGs show systematically lower values of the H{alpha} to near-UV star formation rate ratio. The equivalent width of the H{beta} emission line is also systematically lower in the disturbed BCGs. Based on these results, we infer that disturbed BCGs have undergone star formation over relatively longer timescales, resulting in a more continuous enrichment of nitrogen. We suggest that this correlation between morphology and chemical abundances in BCGs is due to a difference in their recent star formation histories.

  19. Sex differences in lizard escape decisions vary with latitude, but not sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Samia, Diogo S M; Møller, Anders Pape; Blumstein, Daniel T; Stankowich, Theodore; Cooper, William E

    2015-04-22

    Sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary mechanism that has shaped the physiology, behaviour and morphology of the sexes to the extent that it can reduce viability while promoting traits that enhance reproductive success. Predation is one of the underlying mechanisms accounting for viability costs of sexual displays. Therefore, we should expect that individuals of the two sexes adjust their anti-predator behaviour in response to changes in predation risk. We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies (42 species) of sex differences in risk-taking behaviour in lizards and tested whether these differences could be explained by sexual dichromatism, by sexual size dimorphism or by latitude. Latitude was the best predictor of the interspecific heterogeneity in sex-specific behaviour. Males did not change their escape behaviour with latitude, whereas females had increasingly reduced wariness at higher latitudes. We hypothesize that this sex difference in risk-taking behaviour is linked to sex-specific environmental constraints that more strongly affect the reproductive effort of females than males. This novel latitudinal effect on sex-specific anti-predator behaviour has important implications for responses to climate change and for the relative roles of natural and sexual selection in different species. PMID:25788595

  20. Sex differences in lizard escape decisions vary with latitude, but not sexual dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Møller, Anders Pape; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Stankowich, Theodore; Cooper, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary mechanism that has shaped the physiology, behaviour and morphology of the sexes to the extent that it can reduce viability while promoting traits that enhance reproductive success. Predation is one of the underlying mechanisms accounting for viability costs of sexual displays. Therefore, we should expect that individuals of the two sexes adjust their anti-predator behaviour in response to changes in predation risk. We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies (42 species) of sex differences in risk-taking behaviour in lizards and tested whether these differences could be explained by sexual dichromatism, by sexual size dimorphism or by latitude. Latitude was the best predictor of the interspecific heterogeneity in sex-specific behaviour. Males did not change their escape behaviour with latitude, whereas females had increasingly reduced wariness at higher latitudes. We hypothesize that this sex difference in risk-taking behaviour is linked to sex-specific environmental constraints that more strongly affect the reproductive effort of females than males. This novel latitudinal effect on sex-specific anti-predator behaviour has important implications for responses to climate change and for the relative roles of natural and sexual selection in different species. PMID:25788595

  1. Listeria species escape from the phagosomes of interleukin-4-deactivated human macrophages independent of listeriolysin.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katja; Eppler, Elisabeth; Filgueira, Luis; Groscurth, Peter; Gasal, Eduard; Schaffner, Andreas; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schneemann, Markus

    2003-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of infections like sepsis and meningitis, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Human macrophages are able to phagocytose and digest L. monocytogenes but IL-4 prevents human macrophages from killing the bacteria, the mechanisms of which are unknown. In the present study, we examined various listeria species and strains including wild-type and deletion mutants in human macrophages pretreated with IL-4. To analyse the IL-4-mediated deactivation process, we combined quantitative infection assays with various morphologic methods. IL-4 facilitates survival and escape of the pathogenic L. monocytogenes wild-type strain 10403S from the macrophage phagosomes. In untreated macrophages, the isogenic listeriolysin deletion mutant strain DP-L2161 was killed and did not escape from the phagolysosomes. However, after macrophage deactivation with IL-4 DP-L2161 survived and escaped from the phagosomes. This was also the case, but to a lesser extent, even for the naturally avirulent L. innocua. As detected by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy, IL-4 permitted the escape of all listeria species tested, including DP-L2161 and L. innocua from the phagosomal compartment of the macrophages. We conclude that escape from the phagosome and survival of the listeria species tested in IL-4-deactivated human macrophages is independent of the virulence factor listeriolysin. PMID:14636240

  2. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  3. Developing the E-Scape Software System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Most innovations have contextual pre-cursors that prompt new ways of thinking and in their turn help to give form to the new reality. This was the case with the e-scape software development process. The origins of the system existed in software components and ideas that we had developed through previous projects, but the ultimate direction we took…

  4. Nociception and escape behavior in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoetz Collins, Eva-Maria

    2015-03-01

    Planarians are famous and widely studied for their regenerative capabilities. When a moving planarian is cut through the middle, the resulting head and tail pieces instantaneously retract and exhibit a characteristic escape response that differs from normal locomotion. In asexual animals, a similar reaction is observed when the planarian undergoes fission, suggesting that reproduction through self-tearing is a rather traumatic event for the animal. Using a multiscale approach, we unravel the dynamics, mechanics, and functional aspects of the planarian escape response. This musculature-driven gait was found to be a dominating response that supersedes the urge to feed or reproduce and quantitatively differs from other modes of planarian locomotion (gliding, peristalsis). We show that this escape gait constitutes the animal's pain response mediated by TRP like receptors and the neurotransmitter histamine, and that it can be induced through adverse thermal, mechanical, electrical or chemical stimuli. Ultimately, we will examine the neuronal subpopulations involved in mediating escape reflexes in planarians and how they are functionally restored during regeneration, thereby gaining mechanistic insight into the neuronal circuits required for specific behaviors. Supported by BWF CASI and Sloan Foundation.

  5. Evolution: Escaping the Inevitability of Ageing.

    PubMed

    Archer, C Ruth; Hosken, David J

    2016-03-01

    William Hamilton argued that even species inhabiting the farthest flung corners of the universe should age. However, a recent study shows that to find a species that escapes ageing, you only need to look as far as your local pond. PMID:26954440

  6. Animal escapology II: escape trajectory case studies

    PubMed Central

    Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Escape trajectories (ETs; measured as the angle relative to the direction of the threat) have been studied in many taxa using a variety of methodologies and definitions. Here, we provide a review of methodological issues followed by a survey of ET studies across animal taxa, including insects, crustaceans, molluscs, lizards, fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. Variability in ETs is examined in terms of ecological significance and morpho-physiological constraints. The survey shows that certain escape strategies (single ETs and highly variable ETs within a limited angular sector) are found in most taxa reviewed here, suggesting that at least some of these ET distributions are the result of convergent evolution. High variability in ETs is found to be associated with multiple preferred trajectories in species from all taxa, and is suggested to provide unpredictability in the escape response. Random ETs are relatively rare and may be related to constraints in the manoeuvrability of the prey. Similarly, reports of the effect of refuges in the immediate environment are relatively uncommon, and mainly confined to lizards and mammals. This may be related to the fact that work on ETs carried out in laboratory settings has rarely provided shelters. Although there are a relatively large number of examples in the literature that suggest trends in the distribution of ETs, our understanding of animal escape strategies would benefit from a standardization of the analytical approach in the study of ETs, using circular statistics and related tests, in addition to the generation of large data sets. PMID:21753040

  7. Innovative Bayesian and Parsimony Phylogeny of Dung Beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae) Enhanced by Ontology-Based Partitioning of Morphological Characters

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Sergei; Génier, François

    2015-01-01

    Scarabaeine dung beetles are the dominant dung feeding group of insects and are widely used as model organisms in conservation, ecology and developmental biology. Due to the conflicts among 13 recently published phylogenies dealing with the higher-level relationships of dung beetles, the phylogeny of this lineage remains largely unresolved. In this study, we conduct rigorous phylogenetic analyses of dung beetles, based on an unprecedented taxon sample (110 taxa) and detailed investigation of morphology (205 characters). We provide the description of morphology and thoroughly illustrate the used characters. Along with parsimony, traditionally used in the analysis of morphological data, we also apply the Bayesian method with a novel approach that uses anatomy ontology for matrix partitioning. This approach allows for heterogeneity in evolutionary rates among characters from different anatomical regions. Anatomy ontology generates a number of parameter-partition schemes which we compare using Bayes factor. We also test the effect of inclusion of autapomorphies in the morphological analysis, which hitherto has not been examined. Generally, schemes with more parameters were favored in the Bayesian comparison suggesting that characters located on different body regions evolve at different rates and that partitioning of the data matrix using anatomy ontology is reasonable; however, trees from the parsimony and all the Bayesian analyses were quite consistent. The hypothesized phylogeny reveals many novel clades and provides additional support for some clades recovered in previous analyses. Our results provide a solid basis for a new classification of dung beetles, in which the taxonomic limits of the tribes Dichotomiini, Deltochilini and Coprini are restricted and many new tribes must be described. Based on the consistency of the phylogeny with biogeography, we speculate that dung beetles may have originated in the Mesozoic contrary to the traditional view pointing to a

  8. Morphological tuned preparation of zinc oxide: reduced graphene oxide composites for non-enzymatic fluorescence glucose sensing and enhanced photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivalingam, Muthu Mariappan; Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide: reduced graphene oxide (ZnO:rgo) composites with varying ZnO morphologies have been synthesized towards the application of non-enzymatic fluorescence (FL) glucose sensor and photocatalysis for methylene blue (MB) degradation. The phase structure of ZnO has confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies, and the band gap calculations were done by UV absorption spectra. Scanning electron microscope and Raman spectra revealed the morphological change and the vibrational studies of the prepared samples, respectively. The quenching of the FL emission band of ZnO:rgo composite sample confirmed the transfer of electrons from ZnO to rgo which inhibit the exciton recombination process. The non-enzymatic FL glucose sensing was carried out by the addition of dextrose glucose ( d-glucose) into the ZnO:rgo composite solution, which shows strong relationship between glucose concentration and the FL intensity. The photocatalytic studies showed that composite with high surface to volume ratio exhibits a maximum degradation of MB over 93 %. Our combined results ensured that the ZnO:rgo composites with varying morphologies could be an effective system for applications such as FL-based glucose sensing and photocatalytic degradation.

  9. The production and escape of nitrogen atoms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The lack of agreement between our previously computed values and those measured by Viking of the N-15:N-14 isotope enhancement ratio has led us to reevaluate our model of the Martian ionosphere. In previous models, we were unable to reproduce the ion profiles measured by the RPA on Viking using electron temperatures that were higher that the ion temperatures. When we increased the electron temperatures to 2500-3000 K and with a zero flux upper boundary condition, the ion densities at high altitudes exceeded the measured values by a large factor. We found that we can better fit the observed profiles if we impose a loss process at the upper boundary of our model. If the horizontal fluxes of ions do not constitute a net loss of ions, then the escape of N due to dissociative recombination is also inhibited and better agreement with the measured isotope ratio is found. The production of escaping nitrogen atoms is closely related to the production of thermospheric odd nitrogen; therefore, the densities of NO measured by Viking provide a convenient check on our nitrogen escape model. Our standard model NO densities are less that the measured values by a factor of 2-3, as are those of previous models. We find that reasonable agreement can be obtained by assuming that the rate coefficient for loss of odd nitrogen in the reaction of N with NO is smaller at temperatures that prevail in the lower Martian thermosphere than the standard value, which applies to temperatures of 200-400 K. Other aspects of this investigation are presented.

  10. Effects of FGF-2 on human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells morphology and chondrogenesis enhancement in Transwell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiri, Azadeh; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Hashemibeni, Batool; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mardani, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated effects of FGF-2 on hADSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the level of gene expressions of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF-2 induces chondrogenesis in hADSCs, which Bullet Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result of this study may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering. -- Abstract: Injured cartilage is difficult to repair due to its poor vascularisation. Cell based therapies may serve as tools to more effectively regenerate defective cartilage. Both adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) are regarded as potential stem cell sources able to generate functional cartilage for cell transplantation. Growth factors, in particular the TGF-b superfamily, influence many processes during cartilage formation, including cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, and induction of MSCs towards chondrogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the effects of FGF-2 on hADSC morphology and chondrogenesis in Transwell culture. hADSCs were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgery, and then cultured in expansion medium alone or in the presence of FGF-2 (10 ng/ml). mRNA expression levels of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The morphology, doubling time, trypsinization time and chondrogenesis of hADSCs were also studied. Expression levels of SOX-9, collagen type II, and aggrecan were all significantly increased in hADSCs expanded in presence of FGF-2. Furthermore FGF-2 induced a slender morphology, whereas doubling time and trypsinization time decreased. Our results suggest that FGF-2 induces hADSCs chondrogenesis in Transwell culture, which may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering.

  11. Measuring the morphology and density of internally mixed black carbon with SP2 and VTDMA: new insight into the absorption enhancement of black carbon in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Kecorius, Simonas; Wang, Zhibin; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong; Wiedensohler, Alfred; He, Kebin

    2016-04-01

    The morphology and density of black carbon (BC) cores in internally mixed BC (In-BC) particles affect their mixing state and absorption enhancement. In this work, we developed a new method to measure the morphology and effective density of the BC cores of ambient In-BC particles using a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) during the CAREBeijing-2013 campaign from 8 to 27 July 2013 at Xianghe Observatory. This new measurement system can select size-resolved ambient In-BC particles and measure the mobility diameter and mass of the In-BC cores. The morphology and effective density of the ambient In-BC cores are then calculated. For the In-BC cores in the atmosphere, changes in their dynamic shape factor (χ) and effective density (ρeff) can be characterized as a function of the aging process (Dp/Dc) measured by SP2 and VTDMA. During an intensive field study, the ambient In-BC cores had an average shape factor χ of ˜ 1.2 and an average density of ˜ 1.2 g cm-3, indicating that ambient In-BC cores have a near-spherical shape with an internal void of ˜ 30 %. From the measured morphology and density, the average shell / core ratio and absorption enhancement (Eab) of ambient BC were estimated to be 2.1-2.7 and 1.6-1.9, respectively, for In-BC particles with sizes of 200-350 nm. When the In-BC cores were assumed to have a void-free BC sphere with a density of 1.8 g cm-3, the shell / core ratio and Eab were overestimated by ˜ 13 and ˜ 17 %, respectively. The new approach developed in this work improves the calculations of the mixing state and optical properties of ambient In-BC particles by quantifying the changes in the morphology and density of ambient In-BC cores during aging.

  12. Launch Pad Escape System Design (Human Spaceflight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Kelli

    2011-01-01

    A launch pad escape system for human spaceflight is one of those things that everyone hopes they will never need but is critical for every manned space program. Since men were first put into space in the early 1960s, the need for such an Emergency Escape System (EES) has become apparent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made use of various types of these EESs over the past 50 years. Early programs, like Mercury and Gemini, did not have an official launch pad escape system. Rather, they relied on a Launch Escape System (LES) of a separate solid rocket motor attached to the manned capsule that could pull the astronauts to safety in the event of an emergency. This could only occur after hatch closure at the launch pad or during the first stage of flight. A version of a LES, now called a Launch Abort System (LAS) is still used today for all manned capsule type launch vehicles. However, this system is very limited in that it can only be used after hatch closure and it is for flight crew only. In addition, the forces necessary for the LES/LAS to get the capsule away from a rocket during the first stage of flight are quite high and can cause injury to the crew. These shortcomings led to the development of a ground based EES for the flight crew and ground support personnel as well. This way, a much less dangerous mode of egress is available for any flight or ground personnel up to a few seconds before launch. The early EESs were fairly simple, gravity-powered systems to use when thing's go bad. And things can go bad very quickly and catastrophically when dealing with a flight vehicle fueled with millions of pounds of hazardous propellant. With this in mind, early EES designers saw such a passive/unpowered system as a must for last minute escapes. This and other design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at the safety design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at

  13. Effects of morphology, diameter and periodic distance of the Ag nanoparticle periodic arrays on the enhancement of the plasmonic field absorption in the CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnehpoushi, Saman; Eskandari, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Yousefirad, Mansooreh; Nabavi, Elham

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the numerical calculations of plasmonic field absorption of Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) periodic arrays in the CdSe quantum dot (QD) film are investigated by the three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD). Diameter (D), periodic distance (P), and morphology effects of Ag NPs are investigated on the improvement of the plasmonic field absorption in CdSe QD film. Results show that plasmonic field absorption in CdSe QD film is enhanced with reduction of D of Ag NPs until 5 nm and reduces thereafter. It is observed that with raising D of Ag NPs, optimum plasmonic field absorption in CdSe QD film is shifted toward the higher P. Moreover, with varying morphology of Ag NPs from spherical to cylindrical, cubic, ringing and pyramid, the plasmonic field absorption is considerably enhanced in CdSe QD film and position of quadrupole plasmon mode (QPPM) is shifted toward further wavelength. For cylindrical Ag NPs, the QPPM intensity increased with raising height (H) until 15 nm and reduces thereafter.

  14. Syndecan-2 enhances E-cadherin shedding and fibroblast-like morphological changes by inducing MMP-7 expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bohee; Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Moon, Byung-In; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-08-12

    E-cadherin plays a mechanical role in mediating cell-cell interactions and maintaining epithelial tissue integrity, and the loss of E-cadherin function has been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Syndecan-2, a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is upregulated during the development of colon cancer. Here, we assessed the functional relationship between E-cadherin and syndecan-2. We found that stable overexpression of syndecan-2 in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) enhanced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin to conditioned-media. Either knockdown of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) or inhibition of MMP-7 activity using GM6001 significantly reduced the extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, suggesting that syndecan-2 mediates E-cadherin shedding via MMP-7. Consistent with this notion, enhancement of MMP-7 expression by interleukin-1α treatment increased the shedding of E-cadherin. Conversely, the specific reduction of either syndecan-2 or MMP-7 reduced the shedding of E-cadherin. HT29 cells overexpressing syndecan-2 showed significantly lower cell-surface expression of E-cadherin, decreased cell-cell contact, a more fibroblastic cell morphology, and increased expression levels of ZEB-1. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 induces extracellular shedding of E-cadherin and supports the acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology by regulating MMP-7 expression in a colon cancer cell line. PMID:27270030

  15. 17. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ELEVATOR TO 18-FOOT LOCK, LOOKING EAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  16. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING HOLDDOWN RODS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING HOLD-DOWN RODS, LOOKING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  17. 15. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING EAST ACROSS MEZZANINE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING EAST ACROSS MEZZANINE, SHOWING ENTRANCE TO SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110-FOOT LEVEL - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  18. 34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION OF BLISTERS IN 1959, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  19. 21. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING INTERIOR OF CUPOLA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING INTERIOR OF CUPOLA AND TOP OF THE TANK, LOOKING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  20. 18. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM 50-FOOT LOCK TO ELEVATOR, LOOKING WEST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  1. 23. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING TWOLOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING TWO-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER IN PASSAGEWAY FROM ELEVATOR TO CUPOLA - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  2. 33 CFR 143.101 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, one or more “secondary means of escape.” (d) Unmanned OCS facilities... board, unmanned facilities shall also be provided with one or more “secondary means of escape,” but...

  3. 33 CFR 143.101 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, one or more “secondary means of escape.” (d) Unmanned OCS facilities... board, unmanned facilities shall also be provided with one or more “secondary means of escape,” but...

  4. 33 CFR 143.101 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, one or more “secondary means of escape.” (d) Unmanned OCS facilities... board, unmanned facilities shall also be provided with one or more “secondary means of escape,” but...

  5. Analysis of cartilage matrix fixed charge density and three-dimensional morphology via contrast-enhanced microcomputed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ashley W.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Levenston, Marc E.

    2006-01-01

    Small animal models of osteoarthritis are often used for evaluating the efficacy of pharmacologic treatments and cartilage repair strategies, but noninvasive techniques capable of monitoring matrix-level changes are limited by the joint size and the low radiopacity of soft tissues. Here we present a technique for the noninvasive imaging of cartilage at micrometer-level resolution based on detecting the equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography. The approach exploits electrochemical interactions between the molecular charges present in the cartilage matrix and an ionic contrast agent, resulting in a nonuniform equilibrium partitioning of the ionic contrast agent reflecting the proteoglycan distribution. In an in vitro model of cartilage degeneration we observed changes in x-ray attenuation magnitude and distribution consistent with biochemical and histological analyses of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and x-ray attenuation was found to be a strong predictor of sulfated glycosaminoglycan density. Equilibration with the contrast agent also permits direct in situ visualization and quantification of cartilage surface morphology. Equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography thus provides a powerful approach to quantitatively assess 3D cartilage composition and morphology for studies of cartilage degradation and repair. PMID:17158799

  6. Effect of morphology of aluminium oxide nanoparticles on viscosity and interfacial tension (IFT) and the recovery efficiency in enhanced oil recovery (EOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Hasnah Mohd; Radzi, Nur Shahbinar Ahmad; Latiff, Noor Rasyada Ahmad; Shafie, Afza

    2014-10-01

    Conventional enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods failed to extract the remaining oil from unconventional, high salinity and high temperature high pressure (HTHP) oil reservoirs. In surfactant flooding method, surfactants are injected to reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water hence sufficiently displaces oil from the reservoir. In steam flooding, high temperature steam is injected into a reservoir to heat oil to make it less viscous, making it easier to move to the production wells. However these methods fail to failed to perform because injection agents start to change its properties under the extreme condition. Therefore, nanoparticles are introduced to mitigate these challenges because of its ability to change certain factor in certain condition. Previous studies had shown that increments in the oil recovery were observed when core-flooding experiments using Aluminum Oxide (Al2O3) nanofluid were conducted. In this research, the effect of morphology of Al2O3 nanoparticles on viscosity and interfacial tension (IFT) and the recovery efficiency in EOR was studied. Al2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized and the morphology was altered by hydrothermal treatment using different concentration of NaOH. After being treated, the morphology of Al2O3 changed from hexagonal to thin lath. The IFT between crude oil and the nanofluids of the treated Al2O3 showed lower values compared to the untreated ones. It was also observed from core-flooding experiment that the Al2O3 nanofluid which had undergone treatment with 10 M NaOH gave the highest recovery of 52.50% of residual oil in place (ROIP). The change in morphology could have resulted in better dispersion and thus lead to higher recovery.

  7. Enhanced morphological transformation of early passage Syrian hamster embryo cells cultured in medium with a reduced bicarbonate concentration and pH.

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, R A; Kerchaert, G A

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that clonal cell proliferation of early passage Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells is optimal at a bicarbonate concentration in the culture medium of 8.9 mM (pH 6.65-6.75) under the experimental conditions reported. The purpose of the studies reported here was to examine whether morphological transformation induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BP) was enhanced under optimal culture conditions for SHE cell proliferation. Culture media of pH 6.70, 7.11 and 7.34 under incubator conditions of 10% CO2 in air were obtained by the addition of 0.75 (8.9 mM), 2.25 (26.8 mM) and 3.75 g/l (44.6 mM) of NaHCO3 respectively to a modified formulation of Dulbecco's modified Eagles medium. The frequency of morphological transformation of SHE cells was increased at 8.9 mM bicarbonate (pH 6.70) relative to media containing 26.8 or 44.6 mM bicarbonate (pH 7.11 and 7.34 respectively). Additionally, the isolate of embryo cells and lot of fetal bovine serum used supported transformation induced by BP at 8.9 mM bicarbonate (pH 6.70), but did not with media of higher bicarbonate concentration and pH. The duration of cell culture and the no. of colonies per plate influenced the amount of increase of morphological transformation observed at 8.9 mM bicarbonate relative to media of higher bicarbonate concentration. Initial studies have shown that a fraction of morphologically transformed colonies generated at reduced bicarbonate concentration were tumorigenic in newborn hamsters. These results are discussed in terms of the potential utility of low bicarbonate concentration cultured SHE cells for transformation studies. PMID:3581427

  8. [Escape mutants of hepatitis B virus].

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Carlos Mario; Navas, María-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a public health problem worldwide. Considering HBV morbidity and mortality and the economic consequences .of this infection, policies and strategies to control it have been implemented, especially in regions where HBV infection is endemic, with high rates of vertical and horizontal infection. One of these strategies is the development of the recombinant vaccine. A 92% of the countries in the world have implemented the vaccine with a global coverage of 69%. The escape variants of HBV correspond to isolates with mutations in the sequence coding for the "a" determinant; these mutations result in changes in the amino acid sequence of the surface antigen (HBsAg) that prevent neutralization of viral particles by antibodies generated in response to vaccination or infection. The escape variants can infect vaccinated individuals and have been identified in the population of countries with different epidemiological patterns. PMID:26065452

  9. Escape of atmospheres and loss of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.; Donahue, T. M.; Walker, J. C. G.; Kasting, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The properties and limitations of several loss processes for atmospheric gases are presented and discussed. They include thermal loss (Jeans and hydrodynamic); nonthermal loss (all processes involve charged particles); and impact erosion, including thermal escape from a molten body heated by rapid accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, or 'blowoff', is of particular interest because it offers the prospect of processing large quantities of gas and enriching the remainder in heavy elements and isotopes. In a second part, the water budgets and likely evolutionary histories of Venus, Earth and Mars are assessed. Although it is tempting to associate the great D/H enrichment on Venus with loss of a large initial endowment, a steady state with juvenile water (perhaps from comets) is equally probable.

  10. Morphology and Vocabulary Acquisition: Using Visual Cues from Word Parts to Enhance Recall and Decode Newly Encountered Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellomo, Tom

    2012-01-01

    An enhanced replication of an original quasi-experiment (Tom Bellomo, 2009b) was conducted to quantify the extent of long term retention of word parts and vocabulary. Such were introduced as part of a vocabulary acquisition strategy in a developmental reading course at one southeast four-year college. Aside from incorporating changes to the test…

  11. CRV Escape Trajectories from the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foti, Tony M.

    1999-01-01

    The Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) slated for use on the International Space Station (ISS) provides a safe return for up to seven crew members under various emergency conditions. One of the most demanding situations for executing the escape involves separating from a tumbling ISS Current requirements specify a maximum Root Sum Square (RSS) tumble rate of 2 degrees/second, with the additional requirement for an expedited departure from any ISS attitude. The design of a trajectory that ensures no re-contact with the ISS poses many challenges on the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) system of the vehicle. To ensure no re-contact the trajectory design employs a two burn sequence, with the first burn preventing near-term collision and the second burn preventing far-field re-contact This presentation describes the approach used to design and to evaluate trajectories for CRV departure from the baselined location on the ISS Node 3 starboard. This approach involved performing a parametric search of selected control variables vital in escaping the tumbling ISS The presentation provides a candidate targeting methodology for escape using minimal information from available navigation devices, and presents the quantitative results from the analysis.

  12. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  13. Cold ion escape from the Martian ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the cold ionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007-2014 at 2.8 ± 0.4 ×1025 atoms / s which is in good agreement with model estimates. A possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside.

  14. Cold Ion Escape from the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Nilsson, H.; Barabash, S.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-10-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the coldionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007 to 2014 at 2.9±0.2×10 25 atoms/s which is in good agreement with model estimates. In this talk we will also try to compare these results with more recent observations by the MAVEN spacecraft. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  15. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  16. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, 'scrunching', which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration. PMID:26356147

  17. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Fire Protection § 77.1101 Escape and evacuation; plan. (a) Before September 30, 1971, each operator of... event of a fire. (b) All employees shall be instructed on current escape and evacuation plans, fire alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Fire Protection § 77.1101 Escape and evacuation; plan. (a) Before September 30, 1971, each operator of... event of a fire. (b) All employees shall be instructed on current escape and evacuation plans, fire alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape...

  19. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... controls. (b) Every mechanical escape facility with a platform, cage, or other device shall be equipped with brakes that can stop the fully loaded platform, cage, or other device. (c) Mechanical escape... cages, platforms, or elevators. (e) Mechanical escape facilities shall have rated capacities...

  20. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... controls. (b) Every mechanical escape facility with a platform, cage, or other device shall be equipped with brakes that can stop the fully loaded platform, cage, or other device. (c) Mechanical escape... cages, platforms, or elevators. (e) Mechanical escape facilities shall have rated capacities...

  1. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... controls. (b) Every mechanical escape facility with a platform, cage, or other device shall be equipped with brakes that can stop the fully loaded platform, cage, or other device. (c) Mechanical escape... cages, platforms, or elevators. (e) Mechanical escape facilities shall have rated capacities...

  2. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... controls. (b) Every mechanical escape facility with a platform, cage, or other device shall be equipped with brakes that can stop the fully loaded platform, cage, or other device. (c) Mechanical escape... cages, platforms, or elevators. (e) Mechanical escape facilities shall have rated capacities...

  3. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... controls. (b) Every mechanical escape facility with a platform, cage, or other device shall be equipped with brakes that can stop the fully loaded platform, cage, or other device. (c) Mechanical escape... cages, platforms, or elevators. (e) Mechanical escape facilities shall have rated capacities...

  4. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST... and Arrangement Hull Structure § 169.313 Means of escape. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (f) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape from all areas generally accessible to...

  5. 46 CFR 127.240 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Means of escape. 127.240 Section 127.240 Shipping COAST... Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.240 Means of escape. (a) Except as provided by paragraphs (l) and (m) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape, exclusive of windows...

  6. 46 CFR 127.240 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Means of escape. 127.240 Section 127.240 Shipping COAST... Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.240 Means of escape. (a) Except as provided by paragraphs (l) and (m) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape, exclusive of windows...

  7. 46 CFR 127.240 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Means of escape. 127.240 Section 127.240 Shipping COAST... Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.240 Means of escape. (a) Except as provided by paragraphs (l) and (m) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape, exclusive of windows...

  8. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST... and Arrangement Hull Structure § 169.313 Means of escape. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (f) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape from all areas generally accessible to...

  9. 46 CFR 116.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Means of escape. 116.500 Section 116.500 Shipping COAST... and Embarkation Station Requirements § 116.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided in... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means...

  10. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST... and Arrangement Hull Structure § 169.313 Means of escape. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (f) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape from all areas generally accessible to...