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Sample records for morphometry reveals reduced

  1. Voxel-based morphometry reveals reduced grey matter volume in the temporal cortex of developmental prosopagnosics

    PubMed Central

    Furl, Nicholas; Draganski, Bogdan; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Stevens, John; Tan, Geoffrey Chern-Yee; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Ray J.; Duchaine, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia exhibit severe and lasting difficulties in recognizing faces despite the absence of apparent brain abnormalities. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate whether developmental prosopagnosics show subtle neuroanatomical differences from controls. An analysis based on segmentation of T1-weighted images from 17 developmental prosopagnosics and 18 matched controls revealed that they had reduced grey matter volume in the right anterior inferior temporal lobe and in the superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus bilaterally. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry analysis based on the segmentation of magnetization transfer parameter maps showed that developmental prosopagnosics also had reduced grey matter volume in the right middle fusiform gyrus and the inferior temporal gyrus. Multiple regression analyses relating three distinct behavioural component scores, derived from a principal component analysis, to grey matter volume revealed an association between a component related to facial identity and grey matter volume in the left superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus plus the right middle fusiform gyrus/inferior temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume in the lateral occipital cortex was associated with component scores related to object recognition tasks. Our results demonstrate that developmental prosopagnosics have reduced grey matter volume in several regions known to respond selectively to faces and provide new evidence that integrity of these areas relates to face recognition ability. PMID:19887506

  2. Meditation effects within the hippocampal complex revealed by voxel-based morphometry and cytoarchitectonic probabilistic mapping.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen; Kurth, Florian; Toga, Arthur W; Narr, Katherine L; Gaser, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Scientific studies addressing anatomical variations in meditators' brains have emerged rapidly over the last few years, where significant links are most frequently reported with respect to gray matter (GM). To advance prior work, this study examined GM characteristics in a large sample of 100 subjects (50 meditators, 50 controls), where meditators have been practicing close to 20 years, on average. A standard, whole-brain voxel-based morphometry approach was applied and revealed significant meditation effects in the vicinity of the hippocampus, showing more GM in meditators than in controls as well as positive correlations with the number of years practiced. However, the hippocampal complex is regionally segregated by architecture, connectivity, and functional relevance. Thus, to establish differential effects within the hippocampal formation (cornu ammonis, fascia dentata, entorhinal cortex, subiculum) as well as the hippocampal-amygdaloid transition area, we utilized refined cytoarchitectonic probabilistic maps of (peri-) hippocampal subsections. Significant meditation effects were observed within the subiculum specifically. Since the subiculum is known to play a key role in stress regulation and meditation is an established form of stress reduction, these GM findings may reflect neuronal preservation in long-term meditators-perhaps due to an attenuated release of stress hormones and decreased neurotoxicity. PMID:23847572

  3. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  4. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Emily L; Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1-6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  5. Tensor-Based Morphometry and Stereology Reveal Brain Pathology in the Complexin1 Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Catherine; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Navarro Negredo, Paloma; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Morton, A. Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Complexins (Cplxs) are small, soluble, regulatory proteins that bind reversibly to the SNARE complex and modulate synaptic vesicle release. Cplx1 knockout mice (Cplx1−/−) have the earliest known onset of ataxia seen in a mouse model, although hitherto no histopathology has been described in these mice. Nevertheless, the profound neurological phenotype displayed by Cplx1−/− mutants suggests that significant functional abnormalities must be present in these animals. In this study, MRI was used to automatically detect regions where structural differences were not obvious when using a traditional histological approach. Tensor-based morphometry of Cplx1−/− mouse brains showed selective volume loss from the thalamus and cerebellum. Stereological analysis of Cplx1−/− and Cplx1+/+ mice brain slices confirmed the volume loss in the thalamus as well as loss in some lobules of the cerebellum. Finally, stereology was used to show that there was loss of cerebellar granule cells in Cplx1−/− mice when compared to Cplx1+/+ animals. Our study is the first to describe pathological changes in Cplx1−/− mouse brain. We suggest that the ataxia in Cplx1−/− mice is likely to be due to pathological changes in both cerebellum and thalamus. Reduced levels of Cplx proteins have been reported in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the effects of Cplx depletion in brains from Cplx1−/− mice may also shed light on the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology in disorders in which loss of Cplx1 occurs. PMID:22393426

  6. Reduced cortical thickness, surface area in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a surface-based morphometry and neuropsychological study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Lin, In-Tsang; Zhang, Haiyan; Lin, Jianzhong; Zheng, Shili; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-06-01

    Neural impairments accompanying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have received growing research attention. Previous neuroimaging studies exclusively used volumetric methods to measure cortical volume as a whole rather than focusing on anatomical and neuropathological distinct indices. Here we decomposed the cortical architecture into cortical thickness (CTh), surface area (SA), and gyrification, for the first time, to provide a more integrative profile of brain damage in COPD. Clinical T1-weighted MRI scans were acquired in 25 stable COPD patients (mean age 69) and 25 age-matched controls. Images were processed using surface-based morphometry to obtain cortical parameters enabling more accurate measurement in deep sulci and localized regional mapping. Demographic, physiological, and cognitive assessments were made and correlated with cortical indices. Compared to controls, COPD patients showed significantly reduced CTh broadly distributed in motor, parietal, and prefrontal cortices, together with more circumscribed SA reduction in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and Broca's area (cluster-level P < 0.05 corrected). No abnormal gyrification was detected. Decreased CTh in parietofrontal networks strongly correlated with visuospatial construction impairment in COPD patients. Furthermore, thinner dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) best predicted poorer performance (r (2)  = 0.315, P = 0.004), and was associated with lower arterial oxygen saturation. These data indicate that cortical thinning is a key morphologic feature associated with COPD that could be partly attributed to oxygen desaturation and contributes to COPD visual memory and drawing deficits. Surface-based morphometry provides valuable information concerning COPD, and could ultimately help us to characterize the neurodegenerative pattern and to clarify neurologic mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in COPD patients. PMID:25986304

  7. Voxel-based morphometry reveals increased gray matter density in Broca's area in male symphony orchestra musicians.

    PubMed

    Sluming, Vanessa; Barrick, Thomas; Howard, Matthew; Cezayirli, Enis; Mayes, Andrew; Roberts, Neil

    2002-11-01

    Broca's area is a major neuroanatomical substrate for spoken language and various musically relevant abilities, including visuospatial and audiospatial localization. Sight reading is a musician-specific visuospatial analysis task, and spatial ability is known to be amenable to training effects. Musicians have been reported to perform significantly better than nonmusicians on spatial ability tests, which is supported by our findings with the Benton judgement of line orientation (JOL) test (P < 0.001). We hypothesised that use-dependent adaptation would lead to increased gray matter density in Broca's area in musicians. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and stereological analyses were applied to high-resolution 3D MR images in male orchestral musicians (n = 26) and sex, handedness, and IQ-matched nonmusicians (n = 26). The wide age range (26 to 66 years) of volunteers permitted a secondary analysis of age-related effects. VBM with small volume correction (SVC) revealed a significant (P = 0.002) region of increased gray matter in Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus in musicians. We observed significant age-related volume reductions in cerebral hemispheres, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex subfields bilaterally and gray matter density in the left inferior frontal gyrus in controls but not musicians; a positive correlation between JOL test score and age in musicians but not controls; a positive correlation between years of playing and the volume of gray matter in a significant region identified by VBM in under-50-year-old musicians. We suggest that orchestral musical performance promotes use-dependent retention, and possibly expansion, of gray matter involving Broca's area and that this provides further support for shared neural substrates underpinning expressive output in music and language. PMID:12414299

  8. Sexual dimorphism of sulcal morphology of the ferret cerebrum revealed by MRI-based sulcal surface morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Aoki, Ichio

    2015-01-01

    The present study quantitatively assessed sexual dimorphism of cortical convolution and sulcal morphology in young adult ferrets by MRI-based sulcal surface morphometry. Ex vivo T1-weighted (short TR/TE) MRI of the ferret cerebrum was acquired with high spatial resolution at 7-tesla. The degree of cortical convolution, evaluated quantitatively based on 3D MRI data by sulcation index (SI), was significantly greater in males (0.553 ± 0.036) than in females (0.502 ± 0.043) (p < 0.001). The rostrocaudal distribution of the cortical convolution revealed a greater convolution in the frontal region of the cortex in males than in females and by a posterior extension of the convolution in the temporo-parieto-occipital region of males. Although the cerebral width in the frontal region was not different between sexes, the rhinal fissure and rostral region of splenial sulcus were more infolded in males than in females. On the contrary, the cerebral width was greater in males in the temporo-parieto-occipital region, and male-prominent posterior extension of infolding was noted in the lateral sulcus, caudal suprasylvian sulcus, pesudosylvian sulcus, hippocampal sulcus, and the caudal region of splenial sulcus. Notably, the caudal descending region of lateral sulcus was clearly infolded in males, but obscured in females. The present results suggest a region-related sexual dimorphism of the sulcal infolding, which is reflected by local cortical expansion in the ferret cerebrum. In particular, male-favored sulcal infolding with expansion of the temporo-parieto-occipital neocortex may be relevant to the human cerebral cortex regarding visuo-spatial and emotion processing, which are known to differ between sexes. The present results will provide fundamental information assessing sex-related changes in the regional sulcal infolding, when ferrets with experimentally-induced gyrification abnormality will be used as models for male-prevalent or male-earlier-onset neurodevelopmental

  9. Prospective motion correction with volumetric navigators (vNavs) reduces the bias and variance in brain morphometry induced by subject motion.

    PubMed

    Tisdall, M Dylan; Reuter, Martin; Qureshi, Abid; Buckner, Randy L; Fischl, Bruce; van der Kouwe, André J W

    2016-02-15

    Recent work has demonstrated that subject motion produces systematic biases in the metrics computed by widely used morphometry software packages, even when the motion is too small to produce noticeable image artifacts. In the common situation where the control population exhibits different behaviors in the scanner when compared to the experimental population, these systematic measurement biases may produce significant confounds for between-group analyses, leading to erroneous conclusions about group differences. While previous work has shown that prospective motion correction can improve perceived image quality, here we demonstrate that, in healthy subjects performing a variety of directed motions, the use of the volumetric navigator (vNav) prospective motion correction system significantly reduces the motion-induced bias and variance in morphometry. PMID:26654788

  10. Isotropic 3D Nuclear Morphometry of Normal, Fibrocystic and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Reveals New Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Hernandez, Kathryn F.; Lintecum, Kelly M.; Senechal, Patti; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Grading schemes for breast cancer diagnosis are predominantly based on pathologists' qualitative assessment of altered nuclear structure from 2D brightfield microscopy images. However, cells are three-dimensional (3D) objects with features that are inherently 3D and thus poorly characterized in 2D. Our goal is to quantitatively characterize nuclear structure in 3D, assess its variation with malignancy, and investigate whether such variation correlates with standard nuclear grading criteria. Methodology We applied micro-optical computed tomographic imaging and automated 3D nuclear morphometry to quantify and compare morphological variations between human cell lines derived from normal, benign fibrocystic or malignant breast epithelium. To reproduce the appearance and contrast in clinical cytopathology images, we stained cells with hematoxylin and eosin and obtained 3D images of 150 individual stained cells of each cell type at sub-micron, isotropic resolution. Applying volumetric image analyses, we computed 42 3D morphological and textural descriptors of cellular and nuclear structure. Principal Findings We observed four distinct nuclear shape categories, the predominant being a mushroom cap shape. Cell and nuclear volumes increased from normal to fibrocystic to metastatic type, but there was little difference in the volume ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C ratio) between the lines. Abnormal cell nuclei had more nucleoli, markedly higher density and clumpier chromatin organization compared to normal. Nuclei of non-tumorigenic, fibrocystic cells exhibited larger textural variations than metastatic cell nuclei. At p<0.0025 by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests, 90% of our computed descriptors statistically differentiated control from abnormal cell populations, but only 69% of these features statistically differentiated the fibrocystic from the metastatic cell populations. Conclusions Our results provide a new perspective on nuclear structure variations

  11. Vertebral Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sharon H; Vokes, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    There is as yet no agreement about the criteria by which to arrive at an imaging diagnosis of a vertebral fracture. Because high-grade fractures result in alterations in vertebral shape, 1 possible avenue of diagnosis has been to quantitate changes in vertebral shape. The result has been a variety of methods for the relative and absolute measurements of vertebral dimensions. Such measurements have also lent themselves to automated computed analysis. The number of techniques reflects the absence of any consensus about the best. The semiquantitative technique proposed by Genant has become the most widely used and has served the field well for comparative purposes. Its use in higher grade fractures has been widely endorsed, if some concepts (e.g., short vertebral height-vertebrae) are at variance with lower grades of fracturing. Vertebral morphometry may be the only recourse in high volume epidemiological and interventional studies. PMID:26349790

  12. Larger mid-dorsolateral prefrontal gray matter volume in young binge drinkers revealed by voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Doallo, Sonia; Cadaveira, Fernando; Corral, Montserrat; Mota, Nayara; López-Caneda, Eduardo; Holguín, Socorro Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking or heavy episodic drinking is a high prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption among young people in several countries. Despite increasing evidence that binge drinking is associated with impairments in executive aspects of working memory (i.e. self-ordered working memory), processes known to depend on the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9), less is known about the impact of binge drinking on prefrontal gray matter integrity. Here, we investigated the effects of binge drinking on gray matter volume of mid- dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in youths. We used voxel-based morphometry on the structural magnetic resonance images of subjects reporting a persistent (at least three years) binge drinking pattern of alcohol use (n = 11; age 22.43 ± 1.03) and control subjects (n = 21; age 22.18 ± 1.08) to measure differences in gray matter volume between both groups. In a region of interest analysis of the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, after co-varying for age and gender, we observed significantly larger gray matter volume in the left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9) in binge drinkers in comparison with control subjects. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume and Self-Ordered Pointing Test (SOPT) total errors score in binge drinkers. The left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume also correlated with the quantity and speed of alcohol intake. These findings indicate that a repeated exposure to alcohol -that does not meet criteria for alcohol dependence- throughout post-adolescent years and young adulthood is linked with structural anomalies in mid-dorsolateral prefrontal regions critically involved in executive aspects of working memory. PMID:24789323

  13. Voxel-based morphometry analysis reveals frontal brain differences in participants with ADHD and their unaffected siblings

    PubMed Central

    Bralten, Janita; Greven, Corina U.; Franke, Barbara; Mennes, Maarten; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Rommelse, Nanda N.J.; Hartman, Catharina; van der Meer, Dennis; O’Dwyer, Laurence; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heslenfeld, Dirk; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on structural brain alterations in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been inconsistent. Both ADHD and brain volumes have a strong genetic loading, but whether brain alterations in patients with ADHD are familial has been underexplored. We aimed to detect structural brain alterations in adolescents and young adults with ADHD compared with healthy controls. We examined whether these alterations were also found in their unaffected siblings, using a uniquely large sample. Methods We performed voxel-based morphometry analyses on MRI scans of patients with ADHD, their unaffected siblings and typically developing controls. We identified brain areas that differed between participants with ADHD and controls and investigated whether these areas were different in unaffected siblings. Influences of medication use, age, sex and IQ were considered. Results Our sample included 307 patients with ADHD, 169 unaffected siblings and 196 typically developing controls (mean age 17.2 [range 8–30] yr). Compared with controls, participants with ADHD had significantly smaller grey matter volume in 5 clusters located in the precentral gyrus, medial and orbitofrontal cortex, and (para)cingulate cortices. Unaffected siblings showed intermediate volumes significantly different from controls in 4 of these clusters (all except the precentral gyrus). Medication use, age, sex and IQ did not have an undue influence on the results. Limitations Our sample was heterogeneous, most participants with ADHD were taking medication, and the comparison was cross-sectional. Conclusion Brain areas involved in decision making, motivation, cognitive control and motor functioning were smaller in participants with ADHD than in controls. Investigation of unaffected siblings indicated familiality of 4 of the structural brain differences, supporting their potential in molecular genetic analyses in ADHD research. PMID:26679925

  14. Larger Mid-Dorsolateral Prefrontal Gray Matter Volume in Young Binge Drinkers Revealed by Voxel-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Doallo, Sonia; Cadaveira, Fernando; Corral, Montserrat; Mota, Nayara; López-Caneda, Eduardo; Holguín, Socorro Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking or heavy episodic drinking is a high prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption among young people in several countries. Despite increasing evidence that binge drinking is associated with impairments in executive aspects of working memory (i.e. self-ordered working memory), processes known to depend on the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9), less is known about the impact of binge drinking on prefrontal gray matter integrity. Here, we investigated the effects of binge drinking on gray matter volume of mid- dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in youths. We used voxel-based morphometry on the structural magnetic resonance images of subjects reporting a persistent (at least three years) binge drinking pattern of alcohol use (n = 11; age 22.43±1.03) and control subjects (n = 21; age 22.18±1.08) to measure differences in gray matter volume between both groups. In a region of interest analysis of the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, after co-varying for age and gender, we observed significantly larger gray matter volume in the left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9) in binge drinkers in comparison with control subjects. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume and Self-Ordered Pointing Test (SOPT) total errors score in binge drinkers. The left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume also correlated with the quantity and speed of alcohol intake. These findings indicate that a repeated exposure to alcohol −that does not meet criteria for alcohol dependence− throughout post-adolescent years and young adulthood is linked with structural anomalies in mid-dorsolateral prefrontal regions critically involved in executive aspects of working memory. PMID:24789323

  15. Quantitative Morphometry of Electrophysiologically Identified CA3b Interneurons Reveals Robust Local Geometry and Distinct Cell Classes

    PubMed Central

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Brown, Kerry M.; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J. Patrick; Galvan, E. J.; Perez-Rosello, T.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. We investigated the branching and spatial patterns, plus the membrane and synaptic properties, of rat CA3b R and L-M interneurons digitally reconstructed after intracellular labeling. We found considerable variability within but no difference between the two layers, and no correlation between morphological and biophysical properties. Nevertheless, two cell types were identified based on the number of dendritic bifurcations, with significantly different anatomical and electrophysiological features. Axons generally branched an order of magnitude more than dendrites. However, interneurons on both sides of the R/L-M boundary revealed surprisingly modular axo-dendritic arborizations with consistently uniform local branch geometry. Both axons and dendrites followed a lamellar organization, and axons displayed a spatial preference towards the fissure. Moreover, only a small fraction of the axonal arbor extended to the outer portion of the invaded volume, and tended to return towards the proximal region. In contrast, dendritic trees demonstrated more limited but isotropic volume occupancy. These results suggest a role of predominantly local feedforward and lateral inhibitory control for both R and L-M interneurons. Such role may be essential to balance the extensive recurrent excitation of area CA3 underlying hippocampal autoassociative memory function. PMID:19496174

  16. Patterns of Quaternary uplift of the Corinth rift southern border (N Peloponnese, Greece) revealed by fluvial landscape morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoulin, A.; Beckers, A.; Hubert-Ferrari, A.

    2015-10-01

    The Rift of Corinth is a world-class example of young active rifting and, as such, is an ideal natural laboratory of continental extension. However, though much investigated for two decades, several aspects of the mechanisms at work are still poorly understood. The aim of this paper is a detailed morphometric study of the fluvial landscape response to the tectonic uplift of the rift southern shoulder in order to reconstruct the rift's Quaternary evolution, with special attention to timing, location, and intensity of uplift episodes. Based on the use of a large set of catchment and long profile metrics complemented by the new R/SR integrative approach of the regional drainage network, we identified three distinct episodes of uplift of the northern Peloponnese coastal tract, of which the intermediate one, dated around 0.35-0.4 Ma, is only recorded in the topography of the central part of the rift shoulder, and the youngest one appears to have propagated from east to west over the last 10-20 ka. While net uplift remained minimum in the eastern part of the study area during the whole Quaternary, it shows a clear maximum in the central part of the rift shoulder since 0.4 Ma and an eastward shift of this maximum in recent times. Maximum uplift rates calculated from the morphometric data are of > 1.05 and 2-5 mm year- 1 for, the mid-Middle Pleistocene and Holocene uplift episodes, respectively. The morphometric evidence reveals an onshore uplift history remarkably consistent with the rift evolution reconstructed from other data sets. In the long term, it shows a stable pattern of maximum activity in the central part of the rift, confirming previous conclusions about the absence of rift propagation. In the short term, it sheds light on a possible E-W migration of the zone of recent uplift, suggesting that in the near future fault activity and seismic hazard might concentrate in the Heliki-Aegion area, at the western tip of this uplift wave.

  17. Dissociations in Cortical Morphometry in Youth with Down Syndrome: Evidence for Reduced Surface Area but Increased Thickness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I; Lin, Amy; Clasen, Liv S; Lalonde, François M; Condon, Ellen; Driver, David I; Shaw, Philip; Gogtay, Nitin; Raznahan, Armin; Giedd, Jay N

    2016-07-01

    Detailed descriptions of cortical anatomy in youth with Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID), are scant. Thus, the current study examined deviations in cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA), at high spatial resolution, in youth with DS, to identify focal differences relative to typically developing (TD) youth. Participants included 31 youth with DS and 45 age- and sex-matched TD controls (mean age ∼16 years; range = 5-24 years). All participants completed T1-weighted ASSET-calibrated magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo scans on a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Replicating prior investigations, cortical volume was reduced in DS compared with controls. However, a novel dissociation for SA and CT was found-namely, SA was reduced (predominantly in frontal and temporal regions) while CT was increased (notably in several regions thought to belong to the default mode network; DMN). These findings suggest that reductions in SA rather than CT are driving the cortical volume reductions reported in prior investigations of DS. Moreover, given the link between DMN functionality and Alzheimer's symptomatology in chromosomally typical populations, future DS studies may benefit from focusing on the cortex in DMN regions, as such investigations may provide clues to the precocious onset of Alzheimer's disease in this at-risk group. PMID:26088974

  18. Pupillometry reveals reduced unconscious emotional reactivity in autism.

    PubMed

    Nuske, Heather J; Vivanti, Giacomo; Hudry, Kristelle; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    Recent theoretical conceptualisations have suggested that emotion processing impairments in autism stem from disruption to the sub-cortical, rapid emotion-processing system. We argue that a clear way to ascertain whether this system is affected in autism is by measuring unconscious emotional reactivity. Using backwards masking, we presented fearful expressions non-consciously (subliminally) as well as consciously (supraliminally), and measured pupillary responses as an index of emotional reactivity in 19 children with autism and 19 typically developing children, aged 2-5 years. The pupillary responses of the children with autism revealed reduced unconscious emotional reactivity, with no group differences on consciously presented emotion. Together, these results indicate a hyporesponsiveness to non-consciously presented emotion suggesting a fundamental difference in emotion processing in autism, which requires consciousness and more time. PMID:25017502

  19. Atlas warping for brain morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Alexei M. C.; Gee, James C.

    1998-06-01

    In this work, we describe an automated approach to morphometry based on spatial normalizations of the data, and demonstrate its application to the analysis of gender differences in the human corpus callosum. The purpose is to describe a population by a reduced and representative set of variables, from which a prior model can be constructed. Our approach is rooted in the assumption that individual anatomies can be considered as quantitative variations on a common underlying qualitative plane. We can therefore imagine that a given individual's anatomy is a warped version of some referential anatomy, also known as an atlas. The spatial warps which transform a labeled atlas into anatomic alignment with a population yield immediate knowledge about organ size and shape in the group. Furthermore, variation within the set of spatial warps is directly related to the anatomic variation among the subjects. Specifically, the shape statistics--mean and variance of the mappings--for the population can be calculated in a special basis, and an eigendecomposition of the variance performed to identify the most significant modes of shape variation. The results obtained with the corpus callosum study confirm the existence of substantial anatomical differences between males and females, as reported in previous experimental work.

  20. Object-based morphometry of the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mangin, J F; Rivière, D; Cachia, A; Duchesnay, E; Cointepas, Y; Papadopoulos-Orfanos, D; Collins, D L; Evans, A C; Régis, J

    2004-08-01

    Most of the approaches dedicated to automatic morphometry rely on a point-by-point strategy based on warping each brain toward a reference coordinate system. In this paper, we describe an alternative object-based strategy dedicated to the cortex. This strategy relies on an artificial neuroanatomist performing automatic recognition of the main cortical sulci and parcellation of the cortical surface into gyral patches. A set of shape descriptors, which can be compared across subjects, is then attached to the sulcus and gyrus related objects segmented by this process. The framework is used to perform a study of 142 brains of the International Consortium for Brain Mapping (ICBM) database. This study reveals some correlates of handedness on the size of the sulci located in motor areas, which was not detected previously using standard voxel based morphometry. PMID:15338731

  1. Object-based strategy for morphometry of the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mangin, J F; Rivière, D; Cachia, A; Papadopoulos-Orfanos, D; Collins, D L; Evans, A C; Régis, J

    2003-07-01

    Most of the approaches dedicated to automatic morphometry rely on a point-by-point strategy based on warping each brain towards a reference coordinate system. In this paper, we describe an alternative object-based strategy dedicated to the cortex. This strategy relies on an artificial neuroanatomist performing automatic recognition of the main cortical sulci and parcellation of the cortical surface into gyral patches. A set of shape descriptors, which can be compared across subjects, is then attached to the sulcus and gyrus related objects segmented by this process. The framework is used to perform a study of 142 brains of the ICBM database. This study reveals some correlates of handedness on the size of the sulci located in motor areas, which seem to be beyond the scope of the standard voxel based morphometry. PMID:15344455

  2. Cortical morphometry in frontoparietal and default mode networks in math-gifted adolescents.

    PubMed

    Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Carmona, Susana; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Sánchez-González, Javier; Guzmán-de-Villoria, Juan; Franco, Carolina; Robles, Olalla; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Math-gifted subjects are characterized by above-age performance in intelligence tests, exceptional creativity, and high task commitment. Neuroimaging studies reveal enhanced functional brain organization and white matter microstructure in the frontoparietal executive network of math-gifted individuals. However, the cortical morphometry of these subjects remains largely unknown. The main goal of this study was to compare the cortical morphometry of math-gifted adolescents with that of an age- and IQ-matched control group. We used surface-based methods to perform a vertex-wise analysis of cortical thickness and surface area. Our results show that math-gifted adolescents present a thinner cortex and a larger surface area in key regions of the frontoparietal and default mode networks, which are involved in executive processing and creative thinking, respectively. The combination of reduced cortical thickness and larger surface area suggests above-age neural maturation of these networks in math-gifted individuals. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1893-1902, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917433

  3. Computer assisted sperm morphometry in mammals: a review.

    PubMed

    Yániz, J L; Soler, C; Santolaria, P

    2015-05-01

    Computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA or ASMA) systems were developed to reduce the subjectivity of sperm morphology assessement. This review focuses on a complete description of the CASMA technique, including recent developments, factors of variation, results in the different species and possible applications. Techniques to study sperm morphometry include light microscopy, phase-contrast microscopy and, more recently, fluorescence microscopy. Most published studies on sperm morphometry have been centered on the whole sperm heads, although some of them also measured other parts of the sperm structure, such as the nucleus, acrosome, midpiece or flagellum. The independent study of sperm components may be more informative than the traditional assessment of the whole sperm head. Morphometric data provided by the CASMA system may be analyzed using classical statistics although, given the heterogeneity of spermatozoa in the ejaculates, the study of sperm subpopulations using clustering procedures may be more informative. Morphometric results may vary depending on factors intrinsic and extrinsic to the semen donor. Intrinsic factors may include, among others, genetic factors, age and sexual maturity. Extrinsic factors may include those related to the influence of environment on the donor, as well as those related with sample processing and the morphometric analysis itself. Once standardized, this technique may provide relevant information in studies focused on evolutionary biology, sperm formation, sperm quality assessment, including prediction of the potential fertility, semen cryopreservation, or the effect of reprotoxicants. PMID:25802026

  4. REVEAL: An Extensible Reduced Order Model Builder for Simulation and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Khushbu; Sharma, Poorva; Ma, Jinliang; Lo, Chaomei; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2013-04-30

    Many science domains need to build computationally efficient and accurate representations of high fidelity, computationally expensive simulations. These computationally efficient versions are known as reduced-order models. This paper presents the design and implementation of a novel reduced-order model (ROM) builder, the REVEAL toolset. This toolset generates ROMs based on science- and engineering-domain specific simulations executed on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. The toolset encompasses a range of sampling and regression methods that can be used to generate a ROM, automatically quantifies the ROM accuracy, and provides support for an iterative approach to improve ROM accuracy. REVEAL is designed to be extensible in order to utilize the core functionality with any simulator that has published input and output formats. It also defines programmatic interfaces to include new sampling and regression techniques so that users can ‘mix and match’ mathematical techniques to best suit the characteristics of their model. In this paper, we describe the architecture of REVEAL and demonstrate its usage with a computational fluid dynamics model used in carbon capture.

  5. Comparative Minicolumnar Morphometry of Three Distinguished Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; Switala, Andrew E.; Trippe, Juan; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that the cell minicolumn is the smallest module capable of information processing within the brain. In this case series, photomicrographs of six regions of interests (Brodmann areas 4, 9, 17, 21, 22, and 40) were analyzed by computerized image analysis for minicolumnar morphometry in the brains of three distinguished…

  6. The effect of selected staining techniques on bull sperm morphometry.

    PubMed

    Banaszewska, Dorota; Andraszek, Katarzyna; Czubaszek, Magdalena; Biesiada-Drzazga, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sperm morphometry has some value as an indicator of reproductive capacity in males. In laboratory practice a variety of slide-staining methods are used during morphological evaluation of semen to predict male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of staining of semen using four different techniques on the morphometry of the bull sperm cell. The material for the study consisted of semen collected from test bulls of the Black-and-White variety of Holstein-Friesians. The results obtained in the study indicate differences in the dimensions of bull sperm heads when different slide staining techniques were used. The most similar results for sperm head dimensions were obtained in the case of SpermBlue(®) and eosin+gentian violet complex, although statistically significant differences were found between all the staining techniques. Extreme values were noted for the other staining techniques - lowest for the Papanicolaou and highest for silver nitrate, which may indicate more interference in the cell by the reagents used in the staining process. However, silver nitrate staining was best at identifying the structures of the sperm cell. Hence it is difficult to determine which of the staining methods most faithfully reveals the dimensions and shape of the bull sperm. PMID:26149220

  7. Mapping abnormal subcortical brain morphometry in an elderly HIV + cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Benjamin S.C.; Valcour, Victor G.; Wendelken-Riegelhaupt, Lauren; Esmaeili-Firidouni, Pardis; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Gutman, Boris A.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50% of HIV + individuals exhibit neurocognitive impairment and subcortical atrophy, but the profile of brain abnormalities associated with HIV is still poorly understood. Using surface-based shape analyses, we mapped the 3D profile of subcortical morphometry in 63 elderly HIV + participants and 31 uninfected controls. The thalamus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, hippocampus, amygdala, brainstem, accumbens, callosum and ventricles were segmented from high-resolution MRIs. To investigate shape-based morphometry, we analyzed the Jacobian determinant (JD) and radial distances (RD) defined on each region's surfaces. We also investigated effects of nadir CD4 + T-cell counts, viral load, time since diagnosis (TSD) and cognition on subcortical morphology. Lastly, we explored whether HIV + participants were distinguishable from unaffected controls in a machine learning context. All shape and volume features were included in a random forest (RF) model. The model was validated with 2-fold cross-validation. Volumes of HIV + participants' bilateral thalamus, left pallidum, left putamen and callosum were significantly reduced while ventricular spaces were enlarged. Significant shape variation was associated with HIV status, TSD and the Wechsler adult intelligence scale. HIV + people had diffuse atrophy, particularly in the caudate, putamen, hippocampus and thalamus. Unexpectedly, extended TSD was associated with increased thickness of the anterior right pallidum. In the classification of HIV + participants vs. controls, our RF model attained an area under the curve of 72%. PMID:26640768

  8. Voxel-based morphometry and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Cendes, Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Voxel-based morphometry is an automated technique for MRI analyses, developed to study differences in brain morphology and frequently used to study patients with diverse disorders. In epilepsy, it has been used to investigate areas with reduction or increase of gray and white matter, in different syndromes (i.e., temporal lobe epilepsy, focal cortical dysplasia and generalized epilepsies). In temporal lobe epilepsy, voxel-based morphometry showed gray/white matter atrophy extending beyond the atrophic hippocampus. These widespread abnormalities have been associated with seizure frequency, epilepsy duration, incidence of precipitating factors, cognitive dysfunction and surgical outcome. In generalized epilepsies, gray matter abnormalities were identified mainly in the thalamus and frontal cortex, reinforcing the role of the thalamocortical network in the mechanisms of generalized seizures. PMID:20518612

  9. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  10. STUDYING VENTRICULAR ABNORMALITIES IN MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT WITH HYPERBOLIC RICCI FLOW AND TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Stonnington, Cynthia M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Chen, Kewei; Gutman, Boris; Reschke, Cole; Baxter, Leslie C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Caselli, Richard J.; Wang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a transitional stage between normal aging and dementia and people with MCI are at high risk of progression to dementia. MCI is attracting increasing attention, as it offers an opportunity to target the disease process during an early symptomatic stage. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures have been the mainstay of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) imaging research, however, ventricular morphometry analysis remains challenging because of its complicated topological structure. Here we describe a novel ventricular morphometry system based on the hyperbolic Ricci flow method and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) statistics. Unlike prior ventricular surface parameterization methods, hyperbolic conformal parameterization is angle-preserving and does not have any singularities. Our system generates a one-to-one diffeomorphic mapping between ventricular surfaces with consistent boundary matching conditions. The TBM statistics encode a great deal of surface deformation information that could be inaccessible or overlooked by other methods. We applied our system to the baseline MRI scans of a set of MCI subjects from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI: 71 MCI converters vs. 62 MCI stable). Although the combined ventricular area and volume features did not differ between the two groups, our fine-grained surface analysis revealed significant differences in the ventricular regions close to the temporal lobe and posterior cingulate, structures that are affected early in AD. Significant correlations were also detected between ventricular morphometry, neuropsychological measures, and a previously described imaging index based on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans. This novel ventricular morphometry method may offer a new and more sensitive approach to study preclinical and early symptomatic stage AD. PMID:25285374

  11. Studying ventricular abnormalities in mild cognitive impairment with hyperbolic Ricci flow and tensor-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie; Stonnington, Cynthia M; Thompson, Paul M; Chen, Kewei; Gutman, Boris; Reschke, Cole; Baxter, Leslie C; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Wang, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a transitional stage between normal aging and dementia and people with MCI are at high risk of progression to dementia. MCI is attracting increasing attention, as it offers an opportunity to target the disease process during an early symptomatic stage. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures have been the mainstay of Alzheimer's disease (AD) imaging research, however, ventricular morphometry analysis remains challenging because of its complicated topological structure. Here we describe a novel ventricular morphometry system based on the hyperbolic Ricci flow method and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) statistics. Unlike prior ventricular surface parameterization methods, hyperbolic conformal parameterization is angle-preserving and does not have any singularities. Our system generates a one-to-one diffeomorphic mapping between ventricular surfaces with consistent boundary matching conditions. The TBM statistics encode a great deal of surface deformation information that could be inaccessible or overlooked by other methods. We applied our system to the baseline MRI scans of a set of MCI subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI: 71 MCI converters vs. 62 MCI stable). Although the combined ventricular area and volume features did not differ between the two groups, our fine-grained surface analysis revealed significant differences in the ventricular regions close to the temporal lobe and posterior cingulate, structures that are affected early in AD. Significant correlations were also detected between ventricular morphometry, neuropsychological measures, and a previously described imaging index based on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans. This novel ventricular morphometry method may offer a new and more sensitive approach to study preclinical and early symptomatic stage AD. PMID:25285374

  12. Declining streamflows reveal nonstationary orographic precipitation enhancement driven by reduced westerly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Charles; Abatzoglou, John; Holden, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    Although orographic enhancement of precipitation lends mountains an important role in water resources, they are dramatically undersampled by long-term precipitation gages. This has led to the widespread practice of extrapolating trends in low-elevation precipitation gage networks to high elevations via simple climatological precipitation ratios developed from isohyetal maps. An implicit assumption in such a process is non-stationarity in orographic precipitation enhancement, an assumption that can lead to large errors in trend detection and attribution of climate change effects. We show an example from the Northwestern United States where streamflows from mountain watersheds show substantial declines over the last 60 years, even while long-term precipitation gage networks in the region show no trend. We demonstrate that these observed streamflow declines are driven by previously unexplored differential trends in precipitation. November to March westerly winds are strongly correlated with high-elevation precipitation but weakly correlated with low-elevation precipitation. Decreases in winter westerlies across the region from 1950 to 2012 are hypothesized to have reduced orographic precipitation enhancement, yielding differential trends in precipitation across elevations leading to the apparent paradox. Climate projections show continued weakening meridional pressure gradients and westerly flow across the region under greenhouse forcing, highlighting an additional stressor that is relevant for climate change impacts on water resources. This study also reveals the potential of wind speed data from circulation reanalysis products to better inform historical precipitation reconstructions.

  13. Revealing, Reducing, and Representing Uncertainties in New Hydrologic Projections for Climate-changed Futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Jeffrey; Clark, Martyn; Gutmann, Ethan; Wood, Andy; Nijssen, Bart; Rasmussen, Roy

    2016-04-01

    The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has had primary responsibility for multi-purpose water resource operations on most of the major river systems in the U.S. for more than 200 years. In that time, the USACE projects and programs making up those operations have proved mostly robust against the range of natural climate variability encountered over their operating life spans. However, in some watersheds and for some variables, climate change now is known to be shifting the hydroclimatic baseline around which that natural variability occurs and changing the range of that variability as well. This makes historical stationarity an inappropriate basis for assessing continued project operations under climate-changed futures. That means new hydroclimatic projections are required at multiple scales to inform decisions about specific threats and impacts, and for possible adaptation responses to limit water-resource vulnerabilities and enhance operational resilience. However, projections of possible future hydroclimatologies have myriad complex uncertainties that require explicit guidance for interpreting and using them to inform those decisions about climate vulnerabilities and resilience. Moreover, many of these uncertainties overlap and interact. Recent work, for example, has shown the importance of assessing the uncertainties from multiple sources including: global model structure [Meehl et al., 2005; Knutti and Sedlacek, 2013]; internal climate variability [Deser et al., 2012; Kay et al., 2014]; climate downscaling methods [Gutmann et al., 2012; Mearns et al., 2013]; and hydrologic models [Addor et al., 2014; Vano et al., 2014; Mendoza et al., 2015]. Revealing, reducing, and representing these uncertainties is essential for defining the plausible quantitative climate change narratives required to inform water-resource decision-making. And to be useful, such quantitative narratives, or storylines, of climate change threats and hydrologic impacts must sample

  14. Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Nikonova, Elena V.; Shockley, Keith R.; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A.; Anafi, Ron C.; Tanis, Keith Q.; Maislin, Greg; Stone, David J.; Renger, John J.; Winrow, Christopher J.; Pack, Allan I.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To address whether changes in gene expression in blood cells with sleep loss are different in individuals resistant and sensitive to sleep deprivation. Design: Blood draws every 4 h during a 3-day study: 24-h normal baseline, 38 h of continuous wakefulness and subsequent recovery sleep, for a total of 19 time-points per subject, with every 2-h psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) assessment when awake. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen subjects who were previously identified as behaviorally resistant (n = 7) or sensitive (n = 7) to sleep deprivation by PVT. Intervention: Thirty-eight hours of continuous wakefulness. Measurements and Results: We found 4,481 unique genes with a significant 24-h diurnal rhythm during a normal sleep-wake cycle in blood (false discovery rate [FDR] < 5%). Biological pathways were enriched for biosynthetic processes during sleep. After accounting for circadian effects, two genes (SREBF1 and CPT1A, both involved in lipid metabolism) exhibited small, but significant, linear changes in expression with the duration of sleep deprivation (FDR < 5%). The main change with sleep deprivation was a reduction in the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of expression of normally cycling probe sets. This reduction was noticeably higher in behaviorally resistant subjects than sensitive subjects, at any given P value. Furthermore, blood cell type enrichment analysis showed that the expression pattern difference between sensitive and resistant subjects is mainly found in cells of myeloid origin, such as monocytes. Conclusion: Individual differences in behavioral effects of sleep deprivation are associated with differences in diurnal amplitude of gene expression for genes that show circadian rhythmicity. Citation: Arnardottir ES, Nikonova EV, Shockley KR, Podtelezhnikov AA, Anafi RC, Tanis KQ, Maislin G, Stone DJ, Renger JJ, Winrow CJ, Pack AI. Blood-gene expression reveals reduced circadian rhythmicity in individuals resistant to

  15. Brain Morphometry using MRI in Schizophrenia Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanshina, I.; Pirogov, Yu.; Kupriyanov, D.; Orlova, V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Although its fundamental pathobiology remains elusive, neuroimaging studies provide evidence of abnormalities of cerebral structure and function in patients with schizophrenia. We used morphometry as a quantitative method for estimation of volume of brain structures. Seventy eight right-handed subjects aged 18-45 years were exposed to MRI-examination. Patients were divided into 3 groups: patients with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy controls. The volumes of interested structures (caudate nucleus, putamen, ventricles, frontal and temporal lobe) were measured using T2-weighted MR-images. Correlations between structural differences and functional deficit were evaluated.

  16. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Developmental Dyscalculia: Combined Evidence from Morphometry and Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Uddin, Lucina Q.; Kondos, Leeza; Menon, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Poor mathematical abilities adversely affect academic and career opportunities. The neuroanatomical basis of developmental dyscalculia (DD), a specific learning deficit with prevalence rates exceeding 5%, is poorly understood. We used structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine macro- and micro-structural impairments in 7- to 9-year-old children with DD, compared to a group of typically developing (TD) children matched on age, gender, intelligence, reading abilities and working memory capacity. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) revealed reduced grey matter (GM) bilaterally in superior parietal lobule, intra-parietal sulcus, fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and right anterior temporal cortex in children with DD. VBM analysis also showed reduced white matter (WM) volume in right temporal-parietal cortex. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in this WM region, pointing to significant right hemisphere micro-structural impairments. Furthermore, FA in this region was correlated with numerical operations but not verbal mathematical reasoning or word reading. Atlas-based tract mapping identified the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and caudal forceps major as key pathways impaired in DD. DTI tractography suggests that long-range WM projection fibers linking the right fusiform gyrus with temporal-parietal WM are a specific source of vulnerability in DD. Network and classification analysis suggest that DD in children may be characterized by multiple dysfunctional circuits arising from a core WM deficit. Our findings link GM and WM abnormalities in children with DD and they point to macro- and micro-structural abnormalities in right hemisphere temporal-parietal WM, and pathways associated with it, as key neuroanatomical correlates of DD. PMID:20046827

  17. Oligodendrocyte Morphometry and Expression of Myelin – Related mRNA in Ventral Prefrontal White Matter in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; Mahajan, Gouri; Maciag, Dorota; Sathyanesan, Monica; Iyo, Abiye H.; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Kyle, Patrick B.; Woolverton, William L.; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Newton, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    White matter disturbance in the ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been noted with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, the cellular and molecular pathology of prefrontal white matter in MDD and potential influence of antidepressant medications is not fully understood. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and myelin-related mRNA and protein expression was examined in the white matter of the vPFC in MDD. Sections of deep and gyral white matter from the vPFC were collected from 20 subjects with MDD and 16 control subjects. Density and size of CNPase-immunoreactive (−IR) oligodendrocytes were estimated using 3-dimensional cell counting. While neither density nor soma size of oligodendrocytes was significantly affected in deep white matter, soma size was significantly decreased in the gyral white matter in MDD. In rhesus monkeys treated chronically with fluoxetine there was no significant effect on oligodendrocyte morphometry. Using quantitative RTPCR to measure oligodendrocyte-related mRNA for CNPase, PLP1, MBP, MOG, MOBP, Olig1 and Olig2, in MDD there was a significantly reduced expression of PLP1 mRNA (which positively correlated with smaller sizes) and increased expression of mRNA for CNPase, OLIG1 and MOG. The expression of CNPase protein was significantly decreased in MDD. Altered expression of four myelin genes and CNPase protein suggests a mechanism for the degeneration of cortical axons and dysfunctional maturation of oligodendrocytes in MDD. The change in oligodendrocyte morphology in gyral white matter may parallel altered axonal integrity as revealed by DTI. PMID:25930075

  18. Reproducibility in Nerve Morphometry: Comparison between Methods and among Observers

    PubMed Central

    Bilego Neto, Antônio Paulo da Costa; Silveira, Fernando Braga Cassiano; Rodrigues da Silva, Greice Anne; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reproducibility of a semiautomated method (computerized with manual intervention) for nerve morphometry (counting and measuring myelinated fibers) between three observers with different levels of expertise and experience with the method. Comparisons between automatic (fully computerized) and semiautomated morphometric methods performed by the same computer software using the same nerve images were also performed. Sural nerves of normal adult rats were used. Automatic and semiautomated morphometry of the myelinated fibers were made through the computer software KS-400. Semiautomated morphometry was conducted by three independent observers on the same images, using the semiautomated method. Automatic morphometry overestimated the myelin sheath area, thus overestimating the myelinated fiber size and underestimating the axon size. Fiber distributions overestimation was of 0.5 μm. For the semiautomated morphometry, no differences were found between observers for myelinated fiber and axon size distributions. Overestimation of the myelin sheath size of normal fibers by the fully automatic method might have an impact when morphometry is used for diagnostic purposes. We suggest that not only semiautomated morphometry results can be compared between different centers in clinical trials but it can also be performed by more than one investigator in one single experiment, being a reliable and reproducible method. PMID:23841086

  19. Hemin-functionalized reduced graphene oxide nanosheets reveal peroxynitrite reduction and isomerization activity.

    PubMed

    Vernekar, Amit A; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2012-11-19

    Facile and efficient reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and novel applications of the reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based materials are of current interest. Herein, we report a novel and facile method for the reduction of GO by using a biocompatible reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Stabilization of DTT by the formation of a six-membered ring with internal disulfide linkage upon oxidation is responsible for the reduction of GO. The reduced graphene oxide is characterized by several spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Dispersion of RGO in DMF remained stable for several weeks suggesting that the RGO obtained by DTT-mediated reduction is hydrophobic in nature. This method can be considered for large scale production of good quality RGO. Treatment of RGO with hemin afforded a functional hemin-reduced graphene oxide (H-RGO) hybrid material that exhibited remarkable protective effects against the potentially harmful peroxynitrite (PN). A detailed inhibition study on PN-mediated oxidation and nitration reactions indicate that the interaction between hemin and RGO results in a synergistic effect, which leads to an efficient reduction of PN to nitrate. The RGO also catalyzes the isomerization of PN to nitrate as the RGO layers facilitate the rapid recombination of (·)NO(2) with Fe(IV)=O species. In the presence of reducing agents such as ascorbic acid, the Fe(IV)=O species can be reduced to Fe(III), thus helping to maintain the PN reductase cycle. PMID:23042238

  20. Crater studies: Part A: lunar crater morphometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, Richard J.

    1973-01-01

    Morphometry, the quantitative study of shape, complements the visual observation and photointerpretation in analyzing the most outstanding landforms of the Moon, its craters (refs. 32-1 and 32-2). All three of these interpretative tools, which were developed throughout the long history of telescopic lunar study preceding the Apollo Program, will continue to be applicable to crater analysis until detailed field work becomes possible. Although no large (>17.5 km diameter) craters were examined in situ on any of the Apollo landings, the photographs acquired from the command modules will markedly strengthen results of less direct investigations of the craters. For morphometry, the most useful materials are the orbital metric and panoramic photographs from the final three Apollo missions. These photographs permit preparation of contour maps, topographic profiles, and other numerical data that accurately portray for the first time the surface geometry of lunar craters of all sizes. Interpretations of craters no longer need be compromised by inadequate topographic data. In the pre-Apollo era, hypotheses for the genesis of lunar craters usually were constructed without any numerical descriptive data. Such speculations will have little credibility unless supported by accurate, quantitative data, especially those generated from Apollo orbital photographs. This paper presents a general study of the surface geometry of 25 far-side craters and a more detailed study of rim-crest evenness for 15 near-side and far-side craters. Analysis of this preliminary sample of Apollo 15 and 17 data, which includes craters between 1.5 and 275 km in diameter, suggests that most genetic interpretations of craters made from pre-Apollo topographic measurements may require no drastic revision. All measurements were made from topographic profiles generated on a stereoplotter at the Photogrammetric Unit of the U.S. Geological Survey, Center of Astrogeology, Flagstaff, Arizona.

  1. Measured and Modeled Morphometry of Simple Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, W. A.; Collins, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the measured diameter dependence of well-preserved simple crater morphometry on Mars and compare with iSALE simulations. We also describe future work to fully characterize the dependence on impactor velocity and mass, and target properties.

  2. Reduced representation bisulphite sequencing of the ten bovine somatic tissues reveals DNA methylation patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a major component epigenetics, DNA methylation has been proved that widely functions in individual development and various diseases. It has been well studied in model organisms and human but includes limited data for the economic animals. Using reduced representation bisulphite sequencing (RRBS),...

  3. So near and yet so far: harmonic radar reveals reduced homing ability of Nosema infected honeybees.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan; McMahon, Dino P; Lim, Ka S; Pull, Christopher D; Clark, Suzanne J; Paxton, Robert J; Osborne, Juliet L

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens may gain a fitness advantage through manipulation of the behaviour of their hosts. Likewise, host behavioural changes can be a defence mechanism, counteracting the impact of pathogens on host fitness. We apply harmonic radar technology to characterize the impact of an emerging pathogen--Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia)--on honeybee (Apis mellifera) flight and orientation performance in the field. Honeybees are the most important commercial pollinators. Emerging diseases have been proposed to play a prominent role in colony decline, partly through sub-lethal behavioural manipulation of their hosts. We found that homing success was significantly reduced in diseased (65.8%) versus healthy foragers (92.5%). Although lost bees had significantly reduced continuous flight times and prolonged resting times, other flight characteristics and navigational abilities showed no significant difference between infected and non-infected bees. Our results suggest that infected bees express normal flight characteristics but are constrained in their homing ability, potentially compromising the colony by reducing its resource inputs, but also counteracting the intra-colony spread of infection. We provide the first high-resolution analysis of sub-lethal effects of an emerging disease on insect flight behaviour. The potential causes and the implications for both host and parasite are discussed. PMID:25098331

  4. So Near and Yet So Far: Harmonic Radar Reveals Reduced Homing Ability of Nosema Infected Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stephan; McMahon, Dino P.; Lim, Ka S.; Pull, Christopher D.; Clark, Suzanne J.; Paxton, Robert J.; Osborne, Juliet L.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens may gain a fitness advantage through manipulation of the behaviour of their hosts. Likewise, host behavioural changes can be a defence mechanism, counteracting the impact of pathogens on host fitness. We apply harmonic radar technology to characterize the impact of an emerging pathogen - Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia) - on honeybee (Apis mellifera) flight and orientation performance in the field. Honeybees are the most important commercial pollinators. Emerging diseases have been proposed to play a prominent role in colony decline, partly through sub-lethal behavioural manipulation of their hosts. We found that homing success was significantly reduced in diseased (65.8%) versus healthy foragers (92.5%). Although lost bees had significantly reduced continuous flight times and prolonged resting times, other flight characteristics and navigational abilities showed no significant difference between infected and non-infected bees. Our results suggest that infected bees express normal flight characteristics but are constrained in their homing ability, potentially compromising the colony by reducing its resource inputs, but also counteracting the intra-colony spread of infection. We provide the first high-resolution analysis of sub-lethal effects of an emerging disease on insect flight behaviour. The potential causes and the implications for both host and parasite are discussed. PMID:25098331

  5. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory mechanisms in a genome-reduced bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mazin, Pavel V; Fisunov, Gleb Y; Gorbachev, Alexey Y; Kapitskaya, Kristina Y; Altukhov, Ilya A; Semashko, Tatiana A; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Govorun, Vadim M

    2014-12-01

    The avian bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a good model for systems studies due to small genome and simplicity of regulatory pathways. In this study, we used RNA-Seq and MS-based proteomics to accurately map coding sequences, transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcript 3'-ends (T3Es). We used obtained data to investigate roles of TSSs and T3Es in stress-induced transcriptional responses. We identified 1061 TSSs at a false discovery rate of 10% and showed that almost all transcription in M. gallisepticum is initiated from classic TATAAT promoters surrounded by A/T-rich sequences. Our analysis revealed the pronounced operon structure complexity: on average, each coding operon has one internal TSS and T3Es in addition to the primary ones. Our transcriptomic approach based on the intervals between the two nearest transcript ends allowed us to identify two classes of T3Es: strong, unregulated, hairpin-containing T3Es and weak, heat shock-regulated, hairpinless T3Es. Comparing gene expression levels under different conditions revealed widespread and divergent transcription regulation in M. gallisepticum. Modeling suggested that the core promoter structure plays an important role in gene expression regulation. We have shown that the heat stress activation of cryptic promoters combined with the hairpinless T3Es suppression leads to widespread, seemingly non-functional transcription. PMID:25361977

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory mechanisms in a genome-reduced bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mazin, Pavel V.; Fisunov, Gleb Y.; Gorbachev, Alexey Y.; Kapitskaya, Kristina Y.; Altukhov, Ilya A.; Semashko, Tatiana A.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2014-01-01

    The avian bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a good model for systems studies due to small genome and simplicity of regulatory pathways. In this study, we used RNA-Seq and MS-based proteomics to accurately map coding sequences, transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcript 3′-ends (T3Es). We used obtained data to investigate roles of TSSs and T3Es in stress-induced transcriptional responses. We identified 1061 TSSs at a false discovery rate of 10% and showed that almost all transcription in M. gallisepticum is initiated from classic TATAAT promoters surrounded by A/T-rich sequences. Our analysis revealed the pronounced operon structure complexity: on average, each coding operon has one internal TSS and T3Es in addition to the primary ones. Our transcriptomic approach based on the intervals between the two nearest transcript ends allowed us to identify two classes of T3Es: strong, unregulated, hairpin-containing T3Es and weak, heat shock-regulated, hairpinless T3Es. Comparing gene expression levels under different conditions revealed widespread and divergent transcription regulation in M. gallisepticum. Modeling suggested that the core promoter structure plays an important role in gene expression regulation. We have shown that the heat stress activation of cryptic promoters combined with the hairpinless T3Es suppression leads to widespread, seemingly non-functional transcription. PMID:25361977

  7. Multiple electron transfer systems in oxygen reducing biocathodes revealed by different conditions of aeration/agitation.

    PubMed

    Rimboud, Mickaël; Bergel, Alain; Erable, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen reducing biocathodes were formed at -0.2V/SCE (+0.04V/SHE) from compost leachate. Depending on whether aeration was implemented or not, two different redox systems responsible for the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction were evidenced. System I was observed at low potential (-0.03V/SHE) on cyclic voltammetries (CVs). It appeared during the early formation of the biocathode (few hours) and resisted the hydrodynamic conditions induced by the aeration. System II was observed at higher potential on CV (+0.46V/SHE); it required a longer lag time (up to 10days) and quiescent conditions to produce an electrochemical signal. The hydrodynamic effects produced by the forced aeration led to its extinction. From their different behaviors and examples in the literature, system I was identified as being a membrane-bound cytochrome-related molecule, while system II was identified as a soluble redox mediator excreted by the biofilm. This study highlighted the importance of controlling the local hydrodynamics to design efficient oxygen reducing biocathodes able to operate at high potential. PMID:27035588

  8. Splicing diversity revealed by reduced spliceosomes in C. merolae and other organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Andrew J; Stark, Martha R; Fast, Naomi M; Russell, Anthony G; Rader, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing has been considered one of the hallmarks of eukaryotes, yet its diversity is astonishing: the number of substrate introns for splicing ranges from hundreds of thousands in humans to a mere handful in certain parasites. The catalytic machinery that carries out splicing, the spliceosome, is similarly diverse, with over 300 associated proteins in humans to a few tens in other organisms. In this Point of View, we discuss recent work characterizing the reduced spliceosome of the acidophilic red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, which further highlights the diversity of splicing in that it does not possess the U1 snRNP that is characteristically responsible for 5′ splice site recognition. Comparisons to other organisms with reduced spliceosomes, such as microsporidia, trypanosomes, and Giardia, help to identify the most highly conserved splicing factors, pointing to the essential core of this complex machine. These observations argue for increased exploration of important biochemical processes through study of a wider ranger of organisms. PMID:26400738

  9. Revealing Optical Properties of Reduced-Dimensionality Materials at Relevant Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Ogletree, D Frank; Schuck, P James; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander F; Borys, Nicholas J; Aloni, Shaul; Bao, Wei; Barja, Sara; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Munechika, Keiko; Whitelam, Stephan; Wickenburg, Sebastian

    2015-10-14

    Reduced-dimensionality materials for photonic and optoelectronic applications including energy conversion, solid-state lighting, sensing, and information technology are undergoing rapid development. The search for novel materials based on reduced-dimensionality is driven by new physics. Understanding and optimizing material properties requires characterization at the relevant length scale, which is often below the diffraction limit. Three important material systems are chosen for review here, all of which are under investigation at the Molecular Foundry, to illustrate the current state of the art in nanoscale optical characterization: 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides; 1D semiconducting nanowires; and energy-transfer in assemblies of 0D semiconducting nanocrystals. For each system, the key optical properties, the principal experimental techniques, and important recent results are discussed. Applications and new developments in near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and cathodoluminescence in the electron microscope are given detailed attention. Work done at the Molecular Foundry is placed in context within the fields under review. A discussion of emerging opportunities and directions for the future closes the review. PMID:26332202

  10. Validation of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xueyu; Chen, Kewei; Guo, Xiaojuan; Yao, Li

    2007-03-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is an automated and objective image analysis technique for detecting differences in regional concentration or volume of brain tissue composition based on structural magnetic resonance (MR) images. VBM has been used widely to evaluate brain morphometric differences between different populations, but there isn't an evaluation system for its validation until now. In this study, a quantitative and objective evaluation system was established in order to assess VBM performance. We recruited twenty normal volunteers (10 males and 10 females, age range 20-26 years, mean age 22.6 years). Firstly, several focal lesions (hippocampus, frontal lobe, anterior cingulate, back of hippocampus, back of anterior cingulate) were simulated in selected brain regions using real MRI data. Secondly, optimized VBM was performed to detect structural differences between groups. Thirdly, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc test were used to assess the accuracy and sensitivity of VBM analysis. The results revealed that VBM was a good detective tool in majority of brain regions, even in controversial brain region such as hippocampus in VBM study. Generally speaking, much more severity of focal lesion was, better VBM performance was. However size of focal lesion had little effects on VBM analysis.

  11. The precision of experienced action video-game players: line bisection reveals reduced leftward response bias.

    PubMed

    Latham, Andrew J; Patston, Lucy L M; Tippett, Lynette J

    2014-11-01

    Twenty-two experienced action video-game players (AVGPs) and 18 non-VGPs were tested on a pen-and-paper line bisection task that was untimed. Typically, right-handers bisect lines 2 % to the left of true centre, a bias thought to reflect the dominance of the right-hemisphere for visuospatial attention. Expertise may affect this bias, with expert musicians showing no bias in line bisection performance. Our results show that experienced-AVGPs also bisect lines with no bias with their right hand and a significantly reduced bias with their left hand compared to non-AVGPs. Bisections by experienced-AVGPs were also more precise than those of non-AVGPs. These findings show the cognitive proficiencies of experienced-AVGPs can generalize beyond computer based tasks, which resemble their training environment. PMID:25341651

  12. Buried iceberg scours reveal reduced North Atlantic Current during the stage 12 deglacial

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew M. W.; Huuse, Mads; Brocklehurst, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing past ocean-climate environments and heat transport requires proxies from which these conditions can be quantified. This is particularly important for the evaluation of numerical palaeoclimate models. Here we present new evidence for a reduced North Atlantic Current (NAC) at the termination of the third last glacial, for which palaeocurrent information was previously unavailable. This is based on an exquisitely preserved set of buried iceberg scours seen in three-dimensional seismic reflection images from the mid-Norwegian slope. The scours were formed ∼430 ka during the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions. The spiral geometry of the scours suggests that they were carved by grounded icebergs influenced by tidal and geostrophic ocean currents. Using the ratio between the estimated tidal and geostrophic current velocities and comparing them with velocities from the Last Glacial Maximum and the present, we show that the stage 12 NAC velocities may have been ∼50% slower than the present. PMID:26979836

  13. Buried iceberg scours reveal reduced North Atlantic Current during the stage 12 deglacial.

    PubMed

    Newton, Andrew M W; Huuse, Mads; Brocklehurst, Simon H

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing past ocean-climate environments and heat transport requires proxies from which these conditions can be quantified. This is particularly important for the evaluation of numerical palaeoclimate models. Here we present new evidence for a reduced North Atlantic Current (NAC) at the termination of the third last glacial, for which palaeocurrent information was previously unavailable. This is based on an exquisitely preserved set of buried iceberg scours seen in three-dimensional seismic reflection images from the mid-Norwegian slope. The scours were formed ∼430 ka during the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions. The spiral geometry of the scours suggests that they were carved by grounded icebergs influenced by tidal and geostrophic ocean currents. Using the ratio between the estimated tidal and geostrophic current velocities and comparing them with velocities from the Last Glacial Maximum and the present, we show that the stage 12 NAC velocities may have been ∼50% slower than the present. PMID:26979836

  14. Buried iceberg scours reveal reduced North Atlantic Current during the stage 12 deglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Andrew M. W.; Huuse, Mads; Brocklehurst, Simon H.

    2016-03-01

    Reconstructing past ocean-climate environments and heat transport requires proxies from which these conditions can be quantified. This is particularly important for the evaluation of numerical palaeoclimate models. Here we present new evidence for a reduced North Atlantic Current (NAC) at the termination of the third last glacial, for which palaeocurrent information was previously unavailable. This is based on an exquisitely preserved set of buried iceberg scours seen in three-dimensional seismic reflection images from the mid-Norwegian slope. The scours were formed ~430 ka during the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions. The spiral geometry of the scours suggests that they were carved by grounded icebergs influenced by tidal and geostrophic ocean currents. Using the ratio between the estimated tidal and geostrophic current velocities and comparing them with velocities from the Last Glacial Maximum and the present, we show that the stage 12 NAC velocities may have been ~50% slower than the present.

  15. Fish otolith asymmetry: morphometry and modeling.

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V; Rebane, Y T; Lombarte, A; Fuiman, L A; Takabayashi, A

    2006-09-01

    Mathematical modeling suggests that relatively large values of otolith mass asymmetry in fishes can alter acoustic functionality and may be responsible for abnormal fish behavior when subjected to weightlessness during parabolic or space flight [D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Otolith mass asymmetry in 18 species of fish and pigeon, J. Grav. Physiol. 11 (3) (2004) 17-34; D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality, Hear. Res. 201 (2005) 55-69]. The results of morphometric studies of otolith mass asymmetry suppose that the absolute value and the sign of the otolith mass asymmetry can change many times during the growth of individual fish within the range +/-20% [D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Otolith mass asymmetry in 18 species of fish and pigeon, J. Grav. Physiol. 11 (3) (2004) 17-34; D.V. Lychakov, Y.T. Rebane, Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality, Hear. Res. 201 (2005) 55-69]. This implies that the adverse effects of otolith asymmetry on acoustic and vestibular functionality could change during the lifetime of an individual fish. The aims of the present article were to examine the nature of otolith mass asymmetry fluctuation and to quantify otolith mass asymmetry in a large number of teleost fishes to verify our previous measurements. A dimensionless measure of otolith mass asymmetry, chi, was calculated as the difference between the masses of the right and left paired otoliths divided by average otolith mass. Saccular otolith mass asymmetry was studied in 59 Mediterranean teleost species (395 otolith pairs), 14 Black Sea teleost species (42 otolith pairs), red drum (196 otolith pairs) and guppy (30 otolith pairs). Utricular otolith mass asymmetry was studied in carp (103 otolith pairs) and goldfish (45 otolith pairs). In accordance with our previous results the value of chi did not depend on fish size (length or mass), systematic or ecological position of the

  16. Analysis of RPE morphometry in human eyes

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shagun K.; Rashid, Alia; Chrenek, Micah A.; Zhang, Qing; Bruce, Beau B.; Klein, Mitchel; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Jiang, Yi; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the RPE morphometry of healthy human eyes regarding age and topographic location using modern computational methods with high accuracy and objectivity. We tested whether there were regional and age-related differences in RPE cell area and shape. Methods Human cadaver donor eyes of varying ages were dissected, and the RPE flatmounts were immunostained for F-actin with AF635-phalloidin, nuclei stained with propidium iodide, and imaged with confocal microscopy. Image analysis was performed using ImageJ (NIH) and CellProfiler software. Quantitative parameters, including cell density, cell area, polygonality of cells, number of neighboring cells, and measures of cell shape, were obtained from these analyses to characterize individual and groups of RPE cells. Measurements were taken from selected areas spanning the length of the temporal retina through the macula and the mid-periphery to the far periphery. Results Nineteen eyes from 14 Caucasian donors of varying ages ranging from 29 to 80 years were used. Along a horizontal nasal to temporal meridian, there were differences in several cell shape and size characteristics. Generally, the cell area and shape was relatively constant and regular except in the far periphery. In the outer third of the retina, the cell area and shape differed from the inner two-thirds statistically significantly. In the macula and the far periphery, an overall decreasing trend in RPE cell density, percent hexagonal cells, and form factor was observed with increasing age. We also found a trend toward increasing cell area and eccentricity with age in the macula and the far periphery. When individuals were divided into two age groups, <60 years and ≥60 years, there was a higher cell density, lower cell area, lower eccentricity, and higher form factor in the younger group in the macula and the far periphery (p<0.05 for all measurements). No statistically significant differences in RPE morphometry between age groups were found

  17. Rice Domestication Revealed by Reduced Shattering of Archaeological rice from the Lower Yangtze valley

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunfei; Crawford, Gary W.; Jiang, Leping; Chen, Xugao

    2016-01-01

    Plant remains dating to between 9000 and 8400 BP from a probable ditch structure at the Huxi site include the oldest rice (Oryza sativa) spikelet bases and associated plant remains recovered in China. The remains document an early stage of rice domestication and the ecological setting in which early cultivation was taking place. The rice spikelet bases from Huxi include wild (shattering), intermediate, and domesticated (non-shattering) forms. The relative frequency of intermediate and non-shattering spikelet bases indicates that selection for, at the very least, non-shattering rice was underway at Huxi. The rice also has characteristics of japonica rice (Oryza sativa subsp. japonica), helping to clarify the emergence of a significant lineage of the crop. Seeds, phytoliths and their context provide evidence of increasing anthropogenesis and cultivation during the occupation. Rice spikelet bases from Kuahuqiao (8000–7700 BP), Tianluoshan (7000–6500 BP), Majiabang (6300–6000 BP), and Liangzhu (5300–4300 BP) sites indicate that rice underwent continuing selection for reduced shattering and japonica rice characteristics, confirming a prolonged domestication process for rice. PMID:27324699

  18. Rice Domestication Revealed by Reduced Shattering of Archaeological rice from the Lower Yangtze valley.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunfei; Crawford, Gary W; Jiang, Leping; Chen, Xugao

    2016-01-01

    Plant remains dating to between 9000 and 8400 BP from a probable ditch structure at the Huxi site include the oldest rice (Oryza sativa) spikelet bases and associated plant remains recovered in China. The remains document an early stage of rice domestication and the ecological setting in which early cultivation was taking place. The rice spikelet bases from Huxi include wild (shattering), intermediate, and domesticated (non-shattering) forms. The relative frequency of intermediate and non-shattering spikelet bases indicates that selection for, at the very least, non-shattering rice was underway at Huxi. The rice also has characteristics of japonica rice (Oryza sativa subsp. japonica), helping to clarify the emergence of a significant lineage of the crop. Seeds, phytoliths and their context provide evidence of increasing anthropogenesis and cultivation during the occupation. Rice spikelet bases from Kuahuqiao (8000-7700 BP), Tianluoshan (7000-6500 BP), Majiabang (6300-6000 BP), and Liangzhu (5300-4300 BP) sites indicate that rice underwent continuing selection for reduced shattering and japonica rice characteristics, confirming a prolonged domestication process for rice. PMID:27324699

  19. DNA Elements Reducing Transcriptional Gene Silencing Revealed by a Novel Screening Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Keiichiro; Ohashi, Yuko; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS)–a phenomenon observed in endogenous genes/transgenes in eukaryotes–is a huge hindrance to transgenic technology and occurs mainly when the genes involved share sequence homology in their promoter regions. TGS depends on chromosomal position, suggesting the existence of genomic elements that suppress TGS. However, no systematic approach to identify such DNA elements has yet been reported. Here, we developed a successful novel screening strategy to identify such elements (anti-silencing regions–ASRs), based on their ability to protect a flanked transgene from TGS. A silenced transgenic tobacco plant in which a subsequently introduced transgene undergoes obligatory promoter-homology dependent TGS in trans allowed the ability of DNA elements to prevent TGS to be used as the screening criterion. We also identified ASRs in a genomic library from a different plant species (Lotus japonicus: a perennial legume); the ASRs include portions of Ty1/copia retrotransposon-like and pararetrovirus-like sequences; the retrotransposon-like sequences also showed interspecies anti-TGS activity in a TGS-induction system in Arabidopsis. Anti-TGS elements could provide effective tools to reduce TGS and ensure proper regulation of transgene expression. Furthermore, the screening strategy described here will also facilitate the efficient identification of new classes of anti-TGS elements. PMID:23382937

  20. Metagenomics Reveals Pervasive Bacterial Populations and Reduced Community Diversity across the Alaska Tundra Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Eric R; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Luo, Chengwei; Yuan, Mengting M; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Schuur, Edward A G; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2016-01-01

    How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 g) are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth) by sequencing, and the recovery of 27 high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness) population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart) tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity). Collectively, our results revealed that

  1. Metagenomics Reveals Pervasive Bacterial Populations and Reduced Community Diversity across the Alaska Tundra Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Eric R.; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Luo, Chengwei; Yuan, Mengting M.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2016-01-01

    How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1–2 g) are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth) by sequencing, and the recovery of 27 high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness) population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100–530 km apart) tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity). Collectively, our results revealed

  2. Voxel-based morphometry in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Mory, Susana Barreto; Li, Li Min; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Guerreiro, Carlos A M; Cendes, Fernando

    2006-08-15

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE) are a group of frequent age-related epilepsy syndromes. IGE are clinically characterized by generalized tonic-clonic, myoclonic and absence seizures. According to predominant seizure type and age of onset, IGE are divided in subsyndromes: childhood absence and juvenile absence epilepsy (AE), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures on awakening (GTCS). The limits between these subsyndromes are not well defined, supporting the existence of only one major syndrome. Visual assessment of routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with IGE is normal. MRI voxel-based morphometry (VBM) uses automatically segmented gray and white matter for comparisons, eliminating the investigator bias. We used VBM to study 120 individuals (47 controls, 44 with JME, 24 with AE and 15 with GTCS) to investigate the presence of subtle structural abnormalities in IGE subsyndromes. VBM was performed searching for abnormalities on gray matter concentration (GMC) between patients groups and controls. Compared to controls, JME presented increased GMC in frontobasal region and AE showed increased GMC in the superior mesiofrontal region. The GTCS group did not differ from controls. There were no areas of reduced GMC with the statistical level selected. Region of interest analysis showed increased GMC in the anterior portion of the thalamus in patients with absence seizures. Our results support subtle GMC abnormalities in patients with JME and AE when compared to controls. These findings suggest the existence of different patterns of cortical abnormalities in IGE subsyndromes. PMID:16702001

  3. A global database of composite volcano morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Euillades, Pablo A.; Euillades, Leonardo D.; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We present a global database on the subaerial morphometry of composite volcanoes. Data was extracted from the 90-m resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM). The 759 volcanoes included in the database are the composite (i.e., polygenetic) volcanoes listed in the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program (GVP) database that are covered by the SRTM DEM, have a constructional topography and a basal width larger than 2 km. The extent of each volcano edifice was defined using the NETVOLC algorithm, which computes outlines by minimizing a cost function based on breaks in slope around the edifices. Morphometric parameters were then calculated using the MORVOLC algorithm. The parameters characterize and quantify volcano size (basal width, summit width, height, and volume), profile shape (height/basal width and summit width/basal width ratios), plan shape (ellipticity and irregularity indexes), and slopes. In addition, 104 well-defined and relatively large summit craters/calderas were manually delineated and specific parameters were computed. Most parameters show large variation without clear separations, indicating a continuum of volcano morphologies. Large overlap between the main GVP morphologic types highlights the need for a more rigorous quantitative classification of volcano morphology. The database will be maintained and updated through a website under construction.

  4. Problems with six-point vertebral morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jill C.; Yaffe, Laurence G.; Johansen, Jennifer M.; von Ingersleben, Gabriel; Chestnut, Charles H., III

    1998-06-01

    In this study we have examined errors in measurements of vertebral heights and vertebral area resulting from spin rotation and projection effects in x-ray images. Measurement errors were evaluated with phantom images, and simulated rotations of a 3D spine model. An active contour model (snake) was used for measurements of vertebral area. The model contained two pressure parameters which were needed to obtain good fits of the snake to upper and lower edges (endplates) of rotated vertebral bodies. Details of the snake model are included in this report. The results of this study indicate that six point vertebral morphometry can result to significant measurement errors, representing an overestimation of vertebral height and area, in cases showing projection effects and concealed endplate contours. In serial studies, such errors could produce the erroneous appearance of `growing' vertebral bodies. One can improve the accuracy of the morphometric analysis by using additional fiducial points placed on corresponding endplate contours. Additional useful information on fracture and vertebral deformity can be obtained by accurately tracking edge contours, using an active contour model, or comparable techniques.

  5. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  6. Correlation between Doppler, Manual Morphometry, and Histopathology Based Morphometry of Radial Artery as a Conduit in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Yadava, Om Prakash; Sharma, Vinod; Prakash, Arvind; Ahlawat, Vikas; Kundu, Anirban; Mohanty, Bikram K; Mishra, Rekha; Dinda, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long-term graft patency is the major factor impacting survival after coronary artery bypass grafting. Arteries are superior in this regard. Radial artery is considered the second best conduit after internal mammary artery. Several studies have shown excellent radial artery patency. We evaluated the morphologic characteristics of radial artery by three modalities, (i) preoperative Doppler ultrasound, (ii) intraoperative manual morphometry, and (iii) postoperative histology-based morphometry, and compared these with the aim of validating Doppler as a noninvasive test of choice for preoperative assessment of radial artery. Methods. This was a prospective study involving 100 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in which radial artery was used. The radial artery was assessed using preoperative Doppler ultrasound studies, intraoperative morphometry, and postoperative histopathology and morphometry. The morphometric measurements included (i) luminal diameter, (ii) intimal and medial thickness, and (iii) intima-media thickness ratio. Results. Using Bland-Altman plots, there was a 95% limit of agreement between the preoperative Doppler measurements and the postoperative histopathology and morphometry. Conclusion. Doppler ultrasound is an accurate screening test for evaluation of radial artery, in terms of intimal/medial thickness and luminal diameter as a conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting and has been validated by both morphometric and histopathology based studies. PMID:27047699

  7. Correlation between Doppler, Manual Morphometry, and Histopathology Based Morphometry of Radial Artery as a Conduit in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Om Prakash; Sharma, Vinod; Prakash, Arvind; Ahlawat, Vikas; Mohanty, Bikram K.; Mishra, Rekha; Dinda, Amit K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long-term graft patency is the major factor impacting survival after coronary artery bypass grafting. Arteries are superior in this regard. Radial artery is considered the second best conduit after internal mammary artery. Several studies have shown excellent radial artery patency. We evaluated the morphologic characteristics of radial artery by three modalities, (i) preoperative Doppler ultrasound, (ii) intraoperative manual morphometry, and (iii) postoperative histology-based morphometry, and compared these with the aim of validating Doppler as a noninvasive test of choice for preoperative assessment of radial artery. Methods. This was a prospective study involving 100 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in which radial artery was used. The radial artery was assessed using preoperative Doppler ultrasound studies, intraoperative morphometry, and postoperative histopathology and morphometry. The morphometric measurements included (i) luminal diameter, (ii) intimal and medial thickness, and (iii) intima-media thickness ratio. Results. Using Bland-Altman plots, there was a 95% limit of agreement between the preoperative Doppler measurements and the postoperative histopathology and morphometry. Conclusion. Doppler ultrasound is an accurate screening test for evaluation of radial artery, in terms of intimal/medial thickness and luminal diameter as a conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting and has been validated by both morphometric and histopathology based studies. PMID:27047699

  8. Brain morphometry and IQ measurements in preterm children.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, E B; Edmonds, C J; Chong, W K; Lucas, A; Morley, R; Gadian, D G

    2004-12-01

    Although IQ is thought to remain relatively stable in the normal population, a decline in IQ has been noted in children born preterm. It is not clear, however, to what extent the inclusion of children with clear neurological damage has influenced these findings. We examined IQ scores obtained in childhood and then again in adolescence from a group of children born at 30 weeks gestation or less who had been classified as neurologically normal at 7.5-8 years. They showed a significant decline in mean IQ scores over time. MRI scans obtained from a subset of children at adolescence were read as normal in approximately 50% of cases and, in the others, there were no consistent relationships between radiological abnormalities and IQ results. Such children can, however, have relatively subtle brain abnormalities that are not seen on conventional MRI, and we hypothesized that these would be related to declines in IQ. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses of the MRI scans revealed that absolute IQ scores were related to areas in both the parietal and temporal lobes. The analyses also showed that frontal and temporal lobe regions were associated with the decline in VIQ, while occipital and temporal lobe regions (including the hippocampi) were associated with the decline in PIQ. Hippocampal volume measurements were consistent with the VBM findings. We concluded that preterm children are at risk of declining IQ over time even if they have not suffered obvious neurological damage and that the decline is associated with specific neural regions. Whether this is true of children born at >30 weeks gestation and what other factors predispose to this decline have yet to be determined. PMID:15371289

  9. Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Christopher J.; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Ben; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational `assay.'

  10. Microbial Community Succession during Lactate Amendment and Electron Acceptor Limitation Reveals a Predominance of Metal-Reducing Pelosinus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Jennifer J.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Podar, Mircea; Hurt, Richard A.; Campbell, James H.; Drake, Meghan M.; Moberly, James G.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of the success of in situ bioremediation strategies is complex. By using controlled laboratory conditions, the influence of individual variables, such as U(VI), Cr(VI), and electron donors and acceptors on community structure, dynamics, and the metal-reducing potential can be studied. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow reactors were inoculated with Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater from the Hanford, WA, 100-H area, amended with lactate, and incubated for 95 days to obtain stable, enriched communities. The reactors were kept anaerobic with N2 gas (9 ml/min) flushing the headspace and were fed a defined medium amended with 30 mM lactate and 0.05 mM sulfate with a 48-h generation time. The resultant diversity decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from 3 phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from 1 phylum). Final communities were dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp., with low levels of other organisms, including methanogens. Four new strains of Pelosinus were isolated, with 3 strains being capable of Cr(VI) reduction while one also reduced U(VI). Under limited sulfate, it appeared that the sulfate reducers, including Desulfovibrio spp., were outcompeted. These results suggest that during times of electron acceptor limitation in situ, organisms such as Pelosinus spp. may outcompete the more-well-studied organisms while maintaining overall metal reduction rates and extents. Finally, lab-scale simulations can test new strategies on a smaller scale while facilitating community member isolation, so that a deeper understanding of community metabolism can be revealed. PMID:22267668

  11. Comparative structural morphometry and elemental composition of three marine sponges from western coast of India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Maushmi S; Shah, Bhaumik

    2014-04-01

    Three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata, Cliono lobata, and Spirastrella pachyspira from the western coastal region of India were compared for their morphometry, biochemical, and elemental composition. One-way analysis of variance was applied for spicule morphometry results. Length, width, and length:width ratio were calculated independently. The ratio of length:width varied from 35 to 42 among the grown samples, which remained in the range of 10-22 in young sample at the beginning of studies. However, no significant change was observed in spicule width compared to length. Elemental compositions of marine sponges were determined by field emission gun-scanning electron microscope. Scanning electron microscopy data revealed that the spicules of all the three sponges were mostly composed of O (47-56%) and Si (30-40%), whereas Al (14.33%) was only detected in the spicules of C. lobata. Apart from these, K, Ni, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, and S were additionally detected in all the three samples. Presence of heavy metals in the sponges was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Results showed that iron was present in a large amount in samples, followed by zinc, lead, and copper. PMID:24500946

  12. The Distribution of Thermophilic Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Along an Estuarine Gradient Reveals Multiple Origins of Endospores in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold marine sediments harbour inactive spores of thermophilic bacteria. These misplaced thermophiles are genetically similar to microorganisms detected in deep biosphere environments, leading to the hypothesis that seabed fluid flow transports thermophiles out of warm subsurface environments and into the ocean. Estuaries form the transition between the marine and the terrestrial biosphere and are influenced by tidal currents, surface run-off and groundwater seepage. Endospores from thermophilic bacteria present in estuarine sediments could therefore originate from a number of sources that may influence the estuary differently. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that this will lead to a gradient in the composition of thermophilic endospore populations in estuarine sediments. The distribution of thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria along an estuarine gradient from freshwater (River Tyne, UK) to marine (North Sea) was investigated. Microbial community analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed changes in the thermophilic population enriched at different locations within the estuary. Certain species were only detected at the marine end, highlighting possible links to deep marine biosphere habitats such as oil reservoirs that harbour closely related Desulfotomaculum spp. Conversely, other taxa were predominantly observed in the freshwater reaches of the estuary indicating dispersal from an upstream or terrestrial source. Different endospore populations were enriched dependent on incubation temperature and spore heat-resistance. Microcosms incubated at 50, 60 or 70°C showed a shift in the dominant species of Desulfotomaculum enriched as the temperature increased. Microcosms triple-autoclaved at 121°C prior to incubation still showed rapid and reproducible sulfate-reduction and some Desulfotomaculum spp. remained active after autoclaving at 130°C. These results show that temperature physiology and biogeographic patterns can be used to

  13. GATA4 variant interaction with brain limbic structure and relapse risk: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Zois, Evangelos; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Hoffmann, Sabine; Reinhard, Iris; Bach, Patrick; Charlet, Katrin; Beck, Anne; Treutlein, Jens; Frank, Josef; Jorde, Anne; Kirsch, Martina; Degenhardt, Franziska; Walter, Henrik; Heinz, Andreas; Kiefer, Falk

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors are highly expressed in the amygdala, caudate and hypothalamus. GATA4 gene encodes a transcription factor of ANP associated with the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence. We have previously demonstrated that the GATA4 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs13273672 revealed stronger alcohol-specific amygdala activation associated with lowered relapse risk to heavy drinking at 90 days in the AA-homozygotes. Our understanding however with respect to GATA4 variation on gray matter (GM) regional amygdala, caudate and hypothalamus volume is limited. We investigated GM differences specific to GATA4 and hypothesized that GM alterations will be predictive of heavy relapse. Eighty-three recently detoxified alcohol dependent patients were included. Neuroimaging data was analyzed using Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM). The main effects of GM volume and genotype as well as their interaction effect on time to heavy relapse (60 and 90 days) were analyzed using cox regression. Significant higher GM volume was found for the AA-genotype group compared with AG/GG-genotype in the hypothalamus and caudate. A significant interaction was revealed between caudate and amygdala GM volume and GATA4 genotype on time to heavy relapse. The interaction was expressed by means of higher GM in the AA genotype group to be associated with reduced risk to relapse whereas in the AG/GG group higher GM was associated with increased risk to relapse. This is the first report on GM regional volume alterations specific to GATA4 genotype [(SNP) rs13273672] and its association with relapse in alcohol dependence. Current findings further support the role of GATA4 in alcoholism. PMID:27397865

  14. Significance of nuclear morphometry in benign and malignant breast aspirates

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha, Aparna; Vasavi, B; Kumar, Harendra ML

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast carcinoma is one of the most common cancers occurring in the female population world-wide. Normal cells gradually transform to form the cancer cells through several stages. Nuclear changes occurring during these transformational steps need to be assessed objectively. Hence nuclear morphometry can be used as a diagnostic tool. Aim: To compare the nuclear morphometric parameters of benign and malignant breast aspirates. Study Design: Cytology was used to categorize aspirates from the breast lumps in to malignant (30 cases), and benign (30 cases). Nuclear parameters were calculated using the Image J 1.44C morphometric software. Several nuclear size parameters were analyzed. Results: The nuclear area, perimeter, diameter, compactness, and concave points were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) parameters in differentiating benign, and malignant aspirates. Conclusion: Nuclear morphometry was thus, a useful objective tool in the differentiating benign, and malignant breast lesions. PMID:23776836

  15. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Ho; Comas, Louise H.; Callahan, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the magnitude of plasticity relative to differences between species, studies of plasticity can ascertain if plasticity is predictable and whether an environmental factor elicits changes in traits that are functionally advantageous. Methods To compare functional traits and trait plasticities in fine root tissues with natural and reduced levels of colonization by microbial symbionts, trimmed and surface-sterilized root segments of 2-year-old Acer rubrum and Quercus rubra seedlings were manipulated. Segments were then replanted into satellite pots filled with control or heat-treated soil, both originally derived from a natural forest. Mycorrhizal colonization was near zero in roots grown in heat-treated soil; roots grown in control soil matched the higher colonization levels observed in unmanipulated root samples collected from field locations. Key Results Between-treatment comparisons revealed negligible plasticity for root diameter, branching intensity and nitrogen concentration across both species. Roots from treated soils had decreased tissue density (approx. 10–20 %) and increased specific root length (approx. 10–30 %). In contrast, species differences were significant and greater than treatment effects in traits other than tissue density. Interspecific trait differences were also significant in field samples, which generally resembled greenhouse samples. Conclusions The combination of experimental and field approaches was useful for contextualizing trait plasticity in comparison with inter- and intra-specific trait variation. Findings that root traits are largely species dependent, with the exception of root tissue density, are discussed in the context of current literature on root

  16. Studies on recombinant single chain Jacalin lectin reveal reduced affinity for saccharides despite normal folding like native Jacalin

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Krishnasastry, M.V.; Khan, M. Islam

    2004-01-01

    Sugar binding studies, inactivation, unfolding, and refolding of native Jacalin (nJacalin) from Artocarpus integrifolia and recombinant single-chain Jacalin (rJacalin) expressed in Escherichia coli were studied by intrinsic fluorescence and thermal and chemical denaturation approaches. Interestingly, rJacalin does not undergo any proteolytic processing in an E. coli environment. It has 100fold less affinity for methyl-α-galactose (Ka: 2.48 × 102) in comparison to nJacalin (Ka: 1.58 × 104), and it also binds Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) disaccharide (Galβ1–3GalNAc) with less affinity. Overall sugar binding characteristics of rJacalin are qualitatively similar to that of nJacalin (Galreveal that the rJacalin behaves like nJacalin. Guanidine hydrochloride-induced denaturation, followed by renaturation, yielded total recovery of sugar binding activity of rJacalin in comparison to partial recovery for nJacalin. This signifies the minor changes in the refolding pathways between native and recombinant lectins. The stability of rJacalin is dramatically reduced in the extreme pH range unlike nJacalin. Both lectins do not bind 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) in the pH range of 5 to 12 but they do in the pH range of 1–3. Solute quenching studies of the lectin using acrylamide, KI, and CsCl indicated that the tryptophan residues have full accessibility to the neutral quencher and poor accessibility to ionic quenchers. In summary, biophysical and biochemical studies on the native versus recombinant Jacalin suggest that post-translational modification, i.e., the processing of Jacalin into two chains is probably not a prerequisite for sugar binding but may be required for higher affinity. PMID:15557267

  17. Morphology, morphometry and ultrastructure of captive six-banded armadillo (Euphractus sexcinctus) sperm.

    PubMed

    Sousa, P C; Santos, E A A; Bezerra, J A B; Lima, G L; Castelo, T S; Fontenele-Neto, J D; Silva, A R

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed the sperm characteristics of captive six-banded armadillos (Euphractus sexcinctus), by the assessment of sperm morphology, morphometry, and ultrastructure. In general, armadillo's ejaculates present more than 80% of sperm within the range considered normal for sperm morphology currently accepted for other mammals. Coiled tails (3.9%) and detached heads (2.8%) were the defects most frequently verified. The morphometric analysis revealed that the total length of six-banded armadillo sperm is 77.6±1.2μm, and the length of the tail is 64.7±1.1μm on average. They also present a big head that corresponds to 16.6% of the entire sperm. Through transmission electron microscopy, we identified the presence of electron lucent points into the nucleus and the presence of about 45 mitochondria spirals in the mitochondrial sheath midpiece as a peculiarity of the six-banded armadillo sperm. PMID:23820069

  18. Persistent Homology in Sparse Regression and Its Application to Brain Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jamie L.; Ye, Jieping; Davidson, Richard J.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2015-01-01

    Sparse systems are usually parameterized by a tuning parameter that determines the sparsity of the system. How to choose the right tuning parameter is a fundamental and difficult problem in learning the sparse system. In this paper, by treating the the tuning parameter as an additional dimension, persistent homological structures over the parameter space is introduced and explored. The structures are then further exploited in drastically speeding up the computation using the proposed soft-thresholding technique. The topological structures are further used as multivariate features in the tensor-based morphometry (TBM) in characterizing white matter alterations in children who have experienced severe early life stress and maltreatment. These analyses reveal that stress-exposed children exhibit more diffuse anatomical organization across the whole white matter region. PMID:25823032

  19. Persistent Homology in Sparse Regression and Its Application to Brain Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Hanson, Jamie L; Ye, Jieping; Davidson, Richard J; Pollak, Seth D

    2015-09-01

    Sparse systems are usually parameterized by a tuning parameter that determines the sparsity of the system. How to choose the right tuning parameter is a fundamental and difficult problem in learning the sparse system. In this paper, by treating the the tuning parameter as an additional dimension, persistent homological structures over the parameter space is introduced and explored. The structures are then further exploited in drastically speeding up the computation using the proposed soft-thresholding technique. The topological structures are further used as multivariate features in the tensor-based morphometry (TBM) in characterizing white matter alterations in children who have experienced severe early life stress and maltreatment. These analyses reveal that stress-exposed children exhibit more diffuse anatomical organization across the whole white matter region. PMID:25823032

  20. The influence of lithium on hippocampal volume in elderly bipolar patients: a study using voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Zung, S; Souza-Duran, F L; Soeiro-de-Souza, M G; Uchida, R; Bottino, C M; Busatto, G F; Vallada, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that lithium (Li) exerts neuronal protective and regenerative effects both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of long-term Li treatment in the brain areas associated with memory impairment of elderly bipolar patients are still unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the hippocampal volumes of elderly bipolar patients using Li, elderly bipolar patients not using Li and healthy controls. Sociodemographic, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data from 30 elderly euthymic bipolar patients who had been using Li for an average of >61 months; 27 elderly euthymic bipolar patients not taking Li for an average of 45 months; and 22 elderly healthy controls were analyzed. Volumetric differences in the hippocampus between groups were investigated with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on the Statistical Parametric Mapping technique. No statistical differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and course of bipolar disorder between the two bipolar groups were observed. Using small volume correction in the VBM analysis (analysis of variance (ANOVA)), one voxel cluster of statistical significance was detected in the left hippocampus (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons, extent threshold >10 voxels). Post hoc unpaired t-tests revealed increased left hippocampal volume in the Li-treated group compared with the non-Li-treated group, and decreased left hippocampal volume in the non-Li group relative to controls. Additional exploratory two-group comparisons indicated trends toward reduced right-hippocampal volumes in the non-Li-treated group relative to both the Li-treated group and controls. The findings suggested that the use of Li may influence the volume of the hippocampus, possibly due to its neuroprotective effects. PMID:27351600

  1. The influence of lithium on hippocampal volume in elderly bipolar patients: a study using voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Zung, S; Souza-Duran, F L; Soeiro-de-Souza, M G; Uchida, R; Bottino, C M; Busatto, G F; Vallada, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that lithium (Li) exerts neuronal protective and regenerative effects both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of long-term Li treatment in the brain areas associated with memory impairment of elderly bipolar patients are still unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the hippocampal volumes of elderly bipolar patients using Li, elderly bipolar patients not using Li and healthy controls. Sociodemographic, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data from 30 elderly euthymic bipolar patients who had been using Li for an average of >61 months; 27 elderly euthymic bipolar patients not taking Li for an average of 45 months; and 22 elderly healthy controls were analyzed. Volumetric differences in the hippocampus between groups were investigated with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on the Statistical Parametric Mapping technique. No statistical differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and course of bipolar disorder between the two bipolar groups were observed. Using small volume correction in the VBM analysis (analysis of variance (ANOVA)), one voxel cluster of statistical significance was detected in the left hippocampus (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons, extent threshold >10 voxels). Post hoc unpaired t-tests revealed increased left hippocampal volume in the Li-treated group compared with the non-Li-treated group, and decreased left hippocampal volume in the non-Li group relative to controls. Additional exploratory two-group comparisons indicated trends toward reduced right-hippocampal volumes in the non-Li-treated group relative to both the Li-treated group and controls. The findings suggested that the use of Li may influence the volume of the hippocampus, possibly due to its neuroprotective effects. PMID:27351600

  2. APPLYING SPARSE CODING TO SURFACE MULTIVARIATE TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY TO PREDICT FUTURE COGNITIVE DECLINE

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Stonnington, Cynthia; Li, Qingyang; Shi, Jie; Bauer, Robert J.; Gutman, Boris A.; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ye, Jieping; Wang, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive brain disease. Accurate diagnosis of AD and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment, is crucial for clinical trial design. There is also growing interests in identifying brain imaging biomarkers that help evaluate AD risk presymptomatically. Here, we applied a recently developed multivariate tensor-based morphometry (mTBM) method to extract features from hippocampal surfaces, derived from anatomical brain MRI. For such surface-based features, the feature dimension is usually much larger than the number of subjects. We used dictionary learning and sparse coding to effectively reduce the feature dimensions. With the new features, an Adaboost classifier was employed for binary group classification. In tests on publicly available data from the Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, the new framework outperformed several standard imaging measures in classifying different stages of AD. The new approach combines the efficiency of sparse coding with the sensitivity of surface mTBM, and boosts classification performance. PMID:27499829

  3. Significant Association between Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Uranium-Reducing Microbial Communities as Revealed by a Combined Massively Parallel Sequencing-Indicator Species Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.; Wu, Wei-min; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Criddle, Craig; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; Gentry, Terry J; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua; Jardine, Philip M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 M and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared.

  4. Significant association between sulfate-reducing bacteria and uranium-reducing microbial communities as revealed by a combined massively parallel sequencing-indicator species approach.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S; Marsh, Terence L; Tiedje, James M

    2010-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 μM and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared. PMID:20729318

  5. A combined massively parallel sequencing indicator species approach revealed significant association between sulfate-reducing bacteria and uranium-reducing microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip; Kelly, Shelly D; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James

    2010-08-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has been mostly used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium (VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee, USA. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 {micro}M, and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner loop injection well towards the outer loop and down-gradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical created conditions. Castellaniella, and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity; while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. Abundance of these bacteria as well as the Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducer Geobacter correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to the electron donor addition and by the groundwater flow path. A false discovery rate approach was implemented to discard false positives by chance given the large amount of data compared.

  6. EFFECTS OF LINDANE AND LINURON ON CALCIUM METABOLISM, MORPHOMETRY, AND THE KIDNEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of lindane and linuron on calcium metabolism, bone morphometry and the kidney. xperiments were performed to investigate the effects of lindane and linuron on calcium metabolism, femur morphometry and nephrotoxicity. ong-Evans hooded rats were dosed daily for 10 weeks ...

  7. Nuclear morphometry and glutathione S-transferase pi expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Bay, B H; Tan, P H

    2000-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) is a phase II detoxification enzyme whose expression is increased in estrogen receptor (ER)-poor breast cancers and in breast cancers resistant to certain chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of GST-pi in invasive breast carcinoma and to correlate the findings with those of nuclear morphometry. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens obtained from 21 invasive breast cancers and 16 adjacent (benign) tissues were immunohistochemically stained using polyclonal anti-human GST-pi antibody. There was positive (defined as >10% immunoreactive tumor cells) but variable expression of GST-pi in 10 (48%) cases. Nuclear morphometry in these 10 tumors revealed immunoreactive malignant cells to be larger (mean area 41.7+/-1.0 microm2) and more rounded in form when compared with non-staining cancer cells (mean area 28.7+/-0.7 microm2). It was also observed that GST-pi immunonegative tumor cells in GST-pi expressing tumors had different morphologies from malignant cells in the remaining 11 (52%) cancers that were regarded as GST-pi negative. Increased GST-pi expression determined by the percentage of positively staining tumor cells, was found to be significantly correlated with increased variability in nuclear area and perimeter (Spearman's rho=0.821, p=0.044 for both) in the subset of node-positive tumors. Our findings suggest that there exists two sub-populations of cancer cells with distinct nuclear morphologies in GST-pi positive tumors; factors other than GST-pi expression are likely to have a phenotypic effect on breast cancer cells; and there may be a special significance of this enzyme in axillary node-positive breast tumors. PMID:10767377

  8. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  9. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khang, Tsung Fei; Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams's K mult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  10. STRUCTURAL CONNECTIVITY VIA THE TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Chung, Moo K.; Hanson, Jamie L.; Avants, Brian B.; Gee, James C.; Davidson, Richard J.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2013-01-01

    The tensor-based morphometry (TBM) has been widely used in characterizing tissue volume difference between populations at voxel level. We present a novel computational framework for investigating the white matter connectivity using TBM. Unlike other diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based white matter connectivity studies, we do not use DTI but only T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To construct brain network graphs, we have developed a new data-driven approach called the ε-neighbor method that does not need any predetermined parcellation. The proposed pipeline is applied in detecting the topological alteration of the white matter connectivity in maltreated children. PMID:24177222

  11. Morphometry and Morphology of Fresh Craters on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Wood, C. A.; Neish, C.; Lucas, A.; Hayes, A. G.; Cassini Radar Team

    2011-12-01

    Cassini RADAR imagery obtained on Titan flyby T77 revealed a 40-km diameter fresh impact crater at 11.6° N 44.6° W. This is only the 8th crater identified with high confidence (Wood et al., 2010, Icarus 206, 334), and the 3rd (after Sinlap D=79 km and Ksa D=30 km) for which the depth can be estimated by comparing the foreshortening of the near and far walls. This "autostereo" technique yields an estimated depth of 680 m. The T77 image forms a stereo pair with the T17 discovery image of Ksa from which we estimate the depth of Ksa at 750-800 m, in close agreement with SARTopo data. The depth of Sinlap is 760 m based on SARTopo. Depth-diameter ratios for these craters thus range from 0.01 to 0.025 and the depths are comparable to but 200-400 m shallower than fresh craters of the same size on Ganymede (Bray et al., 2008, Met. Planet Sci. 43, 1979). The depth differences could be explained by initial crater morphometry, by relaxation in a different thermal environment, or (perhaps most plausibly given the bland floors of even the freshest Titan craters) to sedimentary infill. In contrast, the 18x36 km elliptical depression at Sotra Facula is much deeper than Ganymede craters of similar size (d=1500 m from stereo), supporting the conclusion that it is not an impact crater. All three craters exhibit a relatively radar-bright annulus around the outer edge of the floor, possibly as the result of mass wasting of blocky materials from the crater walls. The central part of each crater is darker. The central darker floor of the new crater is symmetrical and featureless, whereas Ksa has a bright central ring 7 km in diameter. Stereo spot heights indicate the ring is 350±100 m above the outer floor. This height is in close agreement with the scaling for Ganymede crater central peaks from Bray et al. (2008). The darker floor area of Sinlap is substantially asymmetrical with a small bright central spot whose elevation is unknown. The new crater has continuous, radar

  12. Robust tumor morphometry in multispectral fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabesh, Ali; Vengrenyuk, Yevgen; Teverovskiy, Mikhail; Khan, Faisal M.; Sapir, Marina; Powell, Douglas; Mesa-Tejada, Ricardo; Donovan, Michael J.; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2009-02-01

    Morphological and architectural characteristics of primary tissue compartments, such as epithelial nuclei (EN) and cytoplasm, provide important cues for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response prediction. We propose two feature sets for the robust quantification of these characteristics in multiplex immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy images of prostate biopsy specimens. To enable feature extraction, EN and cytoplasm regions were first segmented from the IF images. Then, feature sets consisting of the characteristics of the minimum spanning tree (MST) connecting the EN and the fractal dimension (FD) of gland boundaries were obtained from the segmented compartments. We demonstrated the utility of the proposed features in prostate cancer recurrence prediction on a multi-institution cohort of 1027 patients. Univariate analysis revealed that both FD and one of the MST features were highly effective for predicting cancer recurrence (p <= 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, an MST feature was selected for a model incorporating clinical and image features. The model achieved a concordance index (CI) of 0.73 on the validation set, which was significantly higher than the CI of 0.69 for the standard multivariate model based solely on clinical features currently used in clinical practice (p < 0.0001). The contributions of this work are twofold. First, it is the first demonstration of the utility of the proposed features in morphometric analysis of IF images. Second, this is the largest scale study of the efficacy and robustness of the proposed features in prostate cancer prognosis.

  13. Pelvic Belt Effects on Pelvic Morphometry, Muscle Activity and Body Balance in Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Soisson, Odette; Lube, Juliane; Germano, Andresa; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Josten, Christoph; Sichting, Freddy; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.; Hammer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is frequently involved in low back and pelvic girdle pain. However, morphometrical and functional characteristics related to SIJ pain are poorly defined. Pelvic belts represent one treatment option, but evidence still lacks as to their pain-reducing effects and the mechanisms involved. Addressing these two issues, this case-controlled study compares morphometric, functional and clinical data in SIJ patients and healthy controls and evaluates the effects of short-term pelvic belt application. Methods Morphometric and functional data pertaining to pelvic belt effects were compared in 17 SIJ patients and 17 controls. Lumbar spine and pelvis morphometries were obtained from 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Functional electromyography data of pelvis and leg muscles and center of pressure excursions were measured in one-leg stance. The numerical rating scale was used to evaluate immediate pain-reducing effects. Results Pelvic morphometry was largely unaltered in SIJ patients and also by pelvic belt application. The angle of lumbar lateral flexion was significantly larger in SIJ patients without belt application. Muscle activity and center of pressure were unaffected by SIJ pain or by belt application in one-leg stance. Nine of 17 patients reported decreased pain intensities under moderate belt application, four reported no change and four reported increased pain intensity. For the entire population investigated here, this qualitative description was not confirmed on a statistical significant level. Discussion Minute changes were observed in the alignment of the lumbar spine in the frontal plane in SIJ patients. The potential pain-decreasing effects of pelvic belts could not be attributed to altered muscle activity, pelvic morphometry or body balance in a static short-term application. Long-term belt effects will therefore be of prospective interest. PMID:25781325

  14. Cranial morphometry of early hominids: facial region.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, A; Wood, B A

    1988-05-01

    We report here on early hominid facial diversity, as part of a more extensive morphometric survey of cranial variability in Pliocene and early Pleistocene Hominidae. Univariate and multivariate techniques are used to summarise variation in facial proportions in South and East African hominids, and later Quaternary groups are included as comparators in order to scale the variation displayed. The results indicate that "robust" australopithecines have longer, broader faces than the "gracile" form, but that all australopithecine species show comparable degrees of facial projection. "Robust" crania are characterised by anteriorly situated, deep malar processes that slope forwards and downwards. Smaller hominid specimens, formally or informally assigned to Homo (H. habilis, KNM-ER 1813, etc.), have individual facial dimensions that usually fall within the range of Australopithecus africanus, but which in combination reveal a significantly different morphological pattern; SK 847 shows similarly hominine facial proportions, which differ significantly from those of A. robustus specimens from Swartkrans. KNM-ER 1470 possesses a facial pattern that is basically hominine, but which in some respects mimics that of "robust" australopithecines. Early specimens referred to H. erectus possess facial proportions that contrast markedly with those of other Villafranchian hominids and which suggest differing masticatory forces, possibly reflecting a shift in dietary niche. Overall the results indicate two broad patterns of facial proportions in Hominidae: one is characteristic of Pliocene/basal Pleistocene forms with opposite polarities represented by A. boisei and H. habilis; the other pattern, which typifies hominids from the later Lower Pleistocene onwards, is first found in specimens widely regarded as early representatives of H. erectus, but which differ in which certain respects from the face of later members of that species. PMID:3136656

  15. [THE MORPHOMETRY IN CYTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EXUDATIVE FLUIDS].

    PubMed

    Snikhovskaya, K V; Shabalova, I P

    2015-08-01

    The cytological technique takes a leading position in diagnostic of tumor processes according exudative fluids. However, its results depend on large number of subjective factors. The morphometry is one of techniques by virtue of which objectification of data of cytological analysis is possible. The study was carried out to establish differences of morphometric parameters of benign and malignant cells of pleural effusion. The morphometric analysis of cells of mesothelium, breast cancer, adenocarcinoma of lung and adenocarcinoma of stomach was implemented. The parameters characterizing size (area, perimeter) and form (form factor) of nucleus and cell, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio. The results demonstrated that in pleural effusion between cells of proliferating mesothelium and malignant neoplasms exist significant differences in morphometric parameters (p<0.001). The differences between area of nuclei and cells are especially significant. The comparison of data of morphometry of cells of breast cancer; adenocarcinoma of lung and adenocarcinoma of stomach demonstrated that despite of some morphological similarities, analysis of morphometric parameters can provide important data for proper establishment of cytological diagnosis. PMID:26596045

  16. Deformation-based surface morphometry applied to gray matter deformation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Worsley, Keith J; Robbins, Steve; Paus, Tomás; Taylor, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Evans, Alan C

    2003-02-01

    We present a unified statistical approach to deformation-based morphometry applied to the cortical surface. The cerebral cortex has the topology of a 2D highly convoluted sheet. As the brain develops over time, the cortical surface area, thickness, curvature, and total gray matter volume change. It is highly likely that such age-related surface changes are not uniform. By measuring how such surface metrics change over time, the regions of the most rapid structural changes can be localized. We avoided using surface flattening, which distorts the inherent geometry of the cortex in our analysis and it is only used in visualization. To increase the signal to noise ratio, diffusion smoothing, which generalizes Gaussian kernel smoothing to an arbitrary curved cortical surface, has been developed and applied to surface data. Afterward, statistical inference on the cortical surface will be performed via random fields theory. As an illustration, we demonstrate how this new surface-based morphometry can be applied in localizing the cortical regions of the gray matter tissue growth and loss in the brain images longitudinally collected in the group of children and adolescents. PMID:12595176

  17. Genome-scale study reveals reduced metabolic adaptability in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Jerby, Livnat; Petäjä, Elina M; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Auvinen, Petri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ruppin, Eytan; Orešič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor leading to chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we chart liver metabolic activity and functionality in NAFLD by integrating global transcriptomic data, from human liver biopsies, and metabolic flux data, measured across the human splanchnic vascular bed, within a genome-scale model of human metabolism. We show that an increased amount of liver fat induces mitochondrial metabolism, lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis and a switch from lactate to glycerol as substrate for gluconeogenesis, indicating an intricate balance of exacerbated opposite metabolic processes in glycemic regulation. These changes were associated with reduced metabolic adaptability on a network level in the sense that liver fat accumulation puts increasing demands on the liver to adaptively regulate metabolic responses to maintain basic liver functions. We propose that failure to meet excessive metabolic challenges coupled with reduced metabolic adaptability may lead to a vicious pathogenic cycle leading to the co-morbidities of NAFLD. PMID:26839171

  18. Genome-scale study reveals reduced metabolic adaptability in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Jerby, Livnat; Petäjä, Elina M.; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Auvinen, Petri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ruppin, Eytan; Orešič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor leading to chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we chart liver metabolic activity and functionality in NAFLD by integrating global transcriptomic data, from human liver biopsies, and metabolic flux data, measured across the human splanchnic vascular bed, within a genome-scale model of human metabolism. We show that an increased amount of liver fat induces mitochondrial metabolism, lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis and a switch from lactate to glycerol as substrate for gluconeogenesis, indicating an intricate balance of exacerbated opposite metabolic processes in glycemic regulation. These changes were associated with reduced metabolic adaptability on a network level in the sense that liver fat accumulation puts increasing demands on the liver to adaptively regulate metabolic responses to maintain basic liver functions. We propose that failure to meet excessive metabolic challenges coupled with reduced metabolic adaptability may lead to a vicious pathogenic cycle leading to the co-morbidities of NAFLD. PMID:26839171

  19. Biosynthetic Pathway of the Reduced Polyketide Product Citreoviridin in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus Revealed by Heterologous Expression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Shyang; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Clay C C

    2016-03-18

    Citreoviridin (1) belongs to a class of F1-ATPase β-subunit inhibitors that are synthesized by highly reducing polyketide synthases. These potent mycotoxins share an α-pyrone polyene structure, and they include aurovertin, verrucosidin, and asteltoxin. The identification of the citreoviridin biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus and its reconstitution using heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans are reported. Two intermediates were isolated that allowed the proposal of the biosynthetic pathway of citreoviridin. PMID:26954888

  20. Ultrastructural and histochemical analysis reveals ethylene-induced responses underlying reduced peel collapse in detached citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Cajuste, Jacques F; García-Breijo, Francisco J; Reig-Armiñana, José; Lafuente, María T

    2011-10-01

    Fruits from many citrus cultivars develop depressed areas in the flavedo (outer part of the peel) and albedo (inner part) following detachment. Although ultrastructural analysis may provide important information about multiple plant responses to stresses and external stimuli at the cell and tissue levels, and despite the proved efficacy of ethylene in reducing peel damage in citrus fruit, cytological responses of this horticultural crop to protective ethylene concentrations have not yet been reported. We show that applying high ethylene levels (2 μL L(-1) for 14 days) causes sublethal stress as it favored the alteration of cuticle, vacuole, middle lamella and primary wall, especially in the albedo cells, but reduced peel collapse in detached mature "Navelate" oranges (C. sinensis, L. Osbeck) held under nonstressful environmental conditions (22°C and 90-95% RH). Ethylene did not induce relevant changes in lignification but favored the deposition of pectic exudates and the release of sugars from degradation of cell polysaccharides including starch, cellulose, and pectins. In contrast, inhibiting ethylene perception by applying 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) reduced these ethylene-related responses and favored degradation of cell membranes and peel damage. The overall results reflect that mature oranges tolerate high ethylene levels that might favor the activation of defense responses involving oxidative-stress related mechanisms and recycling of nutrients and carbon supply to enable cells to sustain respiration and cope with carbon deprivation stress caused by detachment. PMID:21509903

  1. Morphometry and land cover based multi-criteria analysis for assessing the soil erosion susceptibility of the western Himalayan watershed.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Sadaff; Meraj, Gowhar; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Complex mountainous environments such as Himalayas are highly susceptibility to natural hazards particular those that are triggered by the action of water such as floods, soil erosion, mass movements and siltation of the hydro-electric power dams. Among all the natural hazards, soil erosion is the most implicit and the devastating hazard affecting the life and property of the millions of people living in these regions. Hence to review and devise strategies to reduce the adverse impacts of soil erosion is of utmost importance to the planners of watershed management programs in these regions. This paper demonstrates the use of satellite based remote sensing data coupled with the observational field data in a multi-criteria analytical (MCA) framework to estimate the soil erosion susceptibility of the sub-watersheds of the Rembiara basin falling in the western Himalaya, using geographical information system (GIS). In this paper, watershed morphometry and land cover are used as an inputs to the MCA framework to prioritize the sub-watersheds of this basin on the basis of their different susceptibilities to soil erosion. Methodology included the derivation of a set of drainage and land cover parameters that act as the indicators of erosion susceptibility. Further the output from the MCA resulted in the categorization of the sub-watersheds into low, medium, high and very high erosion susceptibility classes. A detailed prioritization map for the susceptible sub-watersheds based on the combined role of land cover and morphometry is finally presented. Besides, maps identifying the susceptible sub-watersheds based on morphometry and land cover only are also presented. The results of this study are part of the watershed management program in the study area and are directed to instigate appropriate measures to alleviate the soil erosion in the study area. PMID:25154685

  2. Deformation-based brain morphometry to track the course of alcoholism: differences between intra-subject and inter-subject analysis.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2006-03-31

    two analyses, e.g., reduction of white matter (including corpus callosum) and increase in CSF volume, and these are in agreement with established effects of alcoholism on brain structure. We conclude that intra-subject morphometry of longitudinal data is preferable to inter-subject morphometry for detecting dynamic changes due to a disease, especially when only small samples are available. Our analysis demonstrates that the distinction between group differences observed at a point in time vs. over time is not merely academic but can substantially reduce the validity of the outcomes of actual morphometric studies. This discrepancy in results underscores the importance of distinguishing between volume differences and volume changes in morphometric analyses. PMID:16500088

  3. X-ray Crystallography Reveals a Reduced Substrate Complex of UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Poised for Covalent Catalysis by Flavin

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Westler, William M.; Kiessling, Laura L.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2009-11-04

    The flavoenzyme uridine 5'-diphosphate galactopyranose mutase (UGM or Glf) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. The latter is a key building block for cell wall construction in numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanistic studies of UGM suggested a novel role for the flavin, and we previously provided evidence that the catalytic mechanism proceeds through a covalent flavin-galactose iminium. Here, we describe 2.3 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structures of the substrate-bound enzyme in oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. In the latter, C1 of the substrate is 3.6 {angstrom} from the nucleophilic flavin N5 position. This orientation is consistent with covalent catalysis by flavin.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells from osteoporotic patients reveal reduced migration and invasion upon stimulation with BMP-2 or BMP-7.

    PubMed

    Haasters, Florian; Docheva, Denitsa; Gassner, Christoph; Popov, Cvetan; Böcker, Wolfgang; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias; Prall, Wolf Christian

    2014-09-12

    Fractures to the osteoporotic bone feature a delay in callus formation and reduced enchondral ossification. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), the cellular source of fracture healing, are recruited to the fracture site by cytokines, such as BMP-2 and BMP-7. Aim of the study was to scrutinize hMSC for osteoporosis associated alterations in BMP mediated migration and invasion as well as in extracellular matrix (ECM) binding integrin expression. HMSC were isolated from 18 healthy or osteoporotic donors. Migration was assessed using a collagen IV coated micro-slide linear gradient chamber and time-lapse microscopy. Invasion was analyzed utilizing an ECM coated transmembrane invasion assay. Quantitative real-time RT PCR was performed for the ECM binding integrins α1, α2, α3, α4, α5, α11, αv and β1. HMSC from osteoporotic patients showed a significant increase of migration upon BMP-2 or FCS stimulation, as well as a significant increase of invasion upon BMP-2, BMP-7 or FCS stimulation. Nevertheless, the migration and invasion capacity was significantly decreased compared to healthy controls. Out of all integrins analyzed, collagen binding integrin α2 was significantly downregulated in hMSC from osteoporotic patients. In conclusion, we here demonstrate for the first time osteoporosis associated alterations in BMP mediated hMSC recruitment. These findings may underlie the reduced healing of osteoporotic fractures. Nevertheless, the maintained migration and invasion response upon BMP stimulation illustrates the therapeutic potential of these clinically approved substances in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures. Another therapeutic target may be the downregulation of the collagen binding integrin α2 in hMSC from osteoporotic patients. PMID:25152406

  5. Higher Dimensional Meta-State Analysis Reveals Reduced Resting fMRI Connectivity Dynamism in Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robyn L.; Yaesoubi, Maziar; Turner, Jessica A.; Mathalon, Daniel; Preda, Adrian; Pearlson, Godfrey; Adali, Tulay; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional brain imaging studies of network connectivity have long assumed that functional connections are stationary on the timescale of a typical scan. Interest in moving beyond this simplifying assumption has emerged only recently. The great hope is that training the right lens on time-varying properties of whole-brain network connectivity will shed additional light on previously concealed brain activation patterns characteristic of serious neurological or psychiatric disorders. We present evidence that multiple explicitly dynamical properties of time-varying whole-brain network connectivity are strongly associated with schizophrenia, a complex mental illness whose symptomatic presentation can vary enormously across subjects. As with so much brain-imaging research, a central challenge for dynamic network connectivity lies in determining transformations of the data that both reduce its dimensionality and expose features that are strongly predictive of important population characteristics. Our paper introduces an elegant, simple method of reducing and organizing data around which a large constellation of mutually informative and intuitive dynamical analyses can be performed. This framework combines a discrete multidimensional data-driven representation of connectivity space with four core dynamism measures computed from large-scale properties of each subject’s trajectory, ie., properties not identifiable with any specific moment in time and therefore reasonable to employ in settings lacking inter-subject time-alignment, such as resting-state functional imaging studies. Our analysis exposes pronounced differences between schizophrenia patients (Nsz = 151) and healthy controls (Nhc = 163). Time-varying whole-brain network connectivity patterns are found to be markedly less dynamically active in schizophrenia patients, an effect that is even more pronounced in patients with high levels of hallucinatory behavior. To the best of our knowledge this is

  6. Higher Dimensional Meta-State Analysis Reveals Reduced Resting fMRI Connectivity Dynamism in Schizophrenia Patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robyn L; Yaesoubi, Maziar; Turner, Jessica A; Mathalon, Daniel; Preda, Adrian; Pearlson, Godfrey; Adali, Tulay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional brain imaging studies of network connectivity have long assumed that functional connections are stationary on the timescale of a typical scan. Interest in moving beyond this simplifying assumption has emerged only recently. The great hope is that training the right lens on time-varying properties of whole-brain network connectivity will shed additional light on previously concealed brain activation patterns characteristic of serious neurological or psychiatric disorders. We present evidence that multiple explicitly dynamical properties of time-varying whole-brain network connectivity are strongly associated with schizophrenia, a complex mental illness whose symptomatic presentation can vary enormously across subjects. As with so much brain-imaging research, a central challenge for dynamic network connectivity lies in determining transformations of the data that both reduce its dimensionality and expose features that are strongly predictive of important population characteristics. Our paper introduces an elegant, simple method of reducing and organizing data around which a large constellation of mutually informative and intuitive dynamical analyses can be performed. This framework combines a discrete multidimensional data-driven representation of connectivity space with four core dynamism measures computed from large-scale properties of each subject's trajectory, ie., properties not identifiable with any specific moment in time and therefore reasonable to employ in settings lacking inter-subject time-alignment, such as resting-state functional imaging studies. Our analysis exposes pronounced differences between schizophrenia patients (Nsz = 151) and healthy controls (Nhc = 163). Time-varying whole-brain network connectivity patterns are found to be markedly less dynamically active in schizophrenia patients, an effect that is even more pronounced in patients with high levels of hallucinatory behavior. To the best of our knowledge this is the

  7. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M.; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons. PMID:26047845

  8. Cultivation of a human-associated TM7 phylotype reveals a reduced genome and epibiotic parasitic lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Edlund, Anna; Yooseph, Shibu; Hall, Adam P.; Liu, Su-Yang; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Hunter, Ryan C.; Cheng, Genhong; Nelson, Karen E.; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    The candidate phylum TM7 is globally distributed and often associated with human inflammatory mucosal diseases. Despite its prevalence, the TM7 phylum remains recalcitrant to cultivation, making it one of the most enigmatic phyla known. In this study, we cultivated a TM7 phylotype (TM7x) from the human oral cavity. This extremely small coccus (200–300 nm) has a distinctive lifestyle not previously observed in human-associated microbes. It is an obligate epibiont of an Actinomyces odontolyticus strain (XH001) yet also has a parasitic phase, thereby killing its host. This first completed genome (705 kb) for a human-associated TM7 phylotype revealed a complete lack of amino acid biosynthetic capacity. Comparative genomics analyses with uncultivated environmental TM7 assemblies show remarkable conserved gene synteny and only minimal gene loss/gain that may have occurred as TM7x adapted to conditions within the human host. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles provided the first indications, to our knowledge, that there is signaling interaction between TM7x and XH001. Furthermore, the induction of TNF-α production in macrophages by XH001 was repressed in the presence of TM7x, suggesting its potential immune suppression ability. Overall, our data provide intriguing insights into the uncultivability, pathogenicity, and unique lifestyle of this previously uncharacterized oral TM7 phylotype. PMID:25535390

  9. Absolute pitch: evidence for early cognitive facilitation during passive listening as revealed by reduced P3a amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Rogenmoser, Lars; Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-03-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify or produce different pitches without using reference tones. At least two sequential processing stages are assumed to contribute to this phenomenon. The first recruits a pitch memory mechanism at an early stage of auditory processing, whereas the second is driven by a later cognitive mechanism (pitch labeling). Several investigations have used active tasks, but it is unclear how these two mechanisms contribute to AP during passive listening. The present work investigated the temporal dynamics of tone processing in AP and non-AP (NAP) participants by using EEG. We applied a passive oddball paradigm with between- and within-tone category manipulations and analyzed the MMN reflecting the early stage of auditory processing and the P3a response reflecting the later cognitive mechanism during the second processing stage. Results did not reveal between-group differences in MMN waveforms. By contrast, the P3a response was specifically associated with AP and sensitive to the processing of different pitch types. Specifically, AP participants exhibited smaller P3a amplitudes, especially in between-tone category conditions, and P3a responses correlated significantly with the age of commencement of musical training, suggesting an influence of early musical exposure on AP. Our results reinforce the current opinion that the representation of pitches at the processing level of the auditory-related cortex is comparable among AP and NAP participants, whereas the later processing stage is critical for AP. Results are interpreted as reflecting cognitive facilitation in AP participants, possibly driven by the availability of multiple codes for tones. PMID:25170790

  10. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia-Forner, Nuria; Adams, Henry D.; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Powers, Heath; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; et al

    2015-08-08

    Here, relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P.more » edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies.« less

  11. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Forner, Nuria; Adams, Henry D.; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Powers, Heath; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Mcdowell, Nate G.

    2015-08-08

    Here, relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P. edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies.

  12. Metatranscriptome of an Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture Reveals Involvement of Carboxylation in Benzene Ring Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E.; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. PMID:24795366

  13. Reduced mismatch repair of heteroduplexes reveals "non"-interfering crossing over in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Getz, Tony J; Banse, Stephen A; Young, Lisa S; Banse, Allison V; Swanson, Johanna; Wang, Grace M; Browne, Barclay L; Foss, Henriette M; Stahl, Franklin W

    2008-03-01

    Using small palindromes to monitor meiotic double-strand-break-repair (DSBr) events, we demonstrate that two distinct classes of crossovers occur during meiosis in wild-type yeast. We found that crossovers accompanying 5:3 segregation of a palindrome show no conventional (i.e., positive) interference, while crossovers with 6:2 or normal 4:4 segregation for the same palindrome, in the same cross, do manifest interference. Our observations support the concept of a "non"-interference class and an interference class of meiotic double-strand-break-repair events, each with its own rules for mismatch repair of heteroduplexes. We further show that deletion of MSH4 reduces crossover tetrads with 6:2 or normal 4:4 segregation more than it does those with 5:3 segregation, consistent with Msh4p specifically promoting formation of crossovers in the interference class. Additionally, we present evidence that an ndj1 mutation causes a shift of noncrossovers to crossovers specifically within the "non"-interference class of DSBr events. We use these and other data in support of a model in which meiotic recombination occurs in two phases-one specializing in homolog pairing, the other in disjunction-and each producing both noncrossovers and crossovers. PMID:18385111

  14. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Forner, Núria; Adams, Henry D; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D; Dickman, Lee T; Hudson, Patrick J; Zeppel, Melanie J B; Jenkins, Michael W; Powers, Heath; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Mcdowell, Nate G

    2016-01-01

    Relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P. edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies. PMID:26081870

  15. Computed tomography, anatomy and morphometry of the lower extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogewoud, H.M.; Rager, G.; Burch, H.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents up-to-date information on CT imaging of the lower extremity. It includes an atlas correlating new, high-resolution CT scans with identical thin anatomical slices covering the lower extremity from the crista iliaca to the planta pedis. Additional figures, including CT arthrograms of the hip, knee and ankle, depict the anatomy in detail The technique and clinical relevance of CT measurements especially in orthopedic surgery are also clearly explained. Of special interest is the new method developed by the authors for assessing the coverage of the femoral head. The special morphometry software and a 3D program allowing representation in space make it possible to precisely and accurately measure the coverage with normal CT scans of the hip.

  16. Multivariate analysis of eigenvalues and eigenvectors in tensor based morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Schwartzman, Armin; Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex; Thompson, Paul; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new algorithm to compute voxel-wise shape differences in tensor-based morphometry (TBM). As in standard TBM, we non-linearly register brain T1-weighed MRI data from a patient and control group to a template, and compute the Jacobian of the deformation fields. In standard TBM, the determinants of the Jacobian matrix at each voxel are statistically compared between the two groups. More recently, a multivariate extension of the statistical analysis involving the deformation tensors derived from the Jacobian matrices has been shown to improve statistical detection power.7 However, multivariate methods comprising large numbers of variables are computationally intensive and may be subject to noise. In addition, the anatomical interpretation of results is sometimes difficult. Here instead, we analyze the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrices. Our method is validated on brain MRI data from Alzheimer's patients and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuro Imaging Database.

  17. New experimental results in atlas-based brain morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, James C.; Fabella, Brian A.; Fernandes, Siddharth E.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    1999-05-01

    In a previous meeting, we described a computational approach to MRI morphometry, in which a spatial warp mapping a reference or atlas image into anatomic alignment with the subject is first inferred. Shape differences with respect to the atlas are then studied by calculating the pointwise Jacobian determinant for the warp, which provides a measure of the change in differential volume about a point in the reference as it transforms to its corresponding position in the subject. In this paper, the method is used to analyze sex differences in the shape and size of the corpus callosum in an ongoing study of a large population of normal controls. The preliminary results of the current analysis support findings in the literature that have observed the splenium to be larger in females than in males.

  18. Investigations of Martian Impact Crater Morphologies and Morphometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    2002-01-01

    We have made substantial progress towards completion of the original objectives and are continuing to include new data from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC and TES instruments as they become available (the MOLA instrument has ceased operation as of 2002). The project funding has been used to provide salary support to the PI and several undergraduate students, cover publication charges for two papers, reimburse travel expenses to conferences and workshops incurred by the PI and students, and cover a number of other expenses such as software upgrades and production costs of slides and color prints. This study is revising the PI's Catalog of Large Martian Impact Craters with information obtained from MGS and is utilizing data in the revised Catalog to investigate which planetary factors (such as location, elevation, terrain type, etc.) primarily affect the formation of specific ejecta morphologies and morphometries.

  19. Nucleus Morphometry in Cultured Epithelial Cells Correlates with Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayyad Z; Utheim, Tor P; Jackson, Catherine J; Reppe, Sjur; Lyberg, Torstein; Eidet, Jon R

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype of cultured ocular epithelial transplants has been shown to affect clinical success rates following transplantation to the cornea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cell nucleus morphometry and phenotype in three types of cultured epithelial cells. This study provides knowledge for the development of a non-invasive method of determining the phenotype of cultured epithelium before transplantation. Cultured human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjE), human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPE) were analyzed by quantitative immunofluorescence. Assessments of nucleus morphometry and nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio (N/C ratio) were performed using ImageJ. Spearman's correlation coefficient was employed for statistical analysis. Levels of the proliferation marker PCNA in HCjE, HEK, and HRPE correlated positively with nuclear area. Nuclear area correlated significantly with levels of the undifferentiated cell marker ABCG2 in HCjE. Bmi1 levels, but not p63α levels, correlated significantly with nuclear area in HEK. The N/C ratio did not correlate significantly with any of the immunomarkers in HCjE (ABCG2, CK7, and PCNA) and HRPE (PCNA). In HEK, however, the N/C ratio was negatively correlated with levels of the undifferentiated cell marker CK14 and positively correlated with Bmi1 expression. The size of the nuclear area correlated positively with proliferation markers in all three epithelia. Morphometric indicators of phenotype in cultured epithelia can be identified using ImageJ. Conversely, the N/C ratio did not show a uniform relationship with phenotype in HCjE, HEK, or HRPE. N/C ratio therefore, may not be a useful morphometric marker for in vitro assessment of phenotype in these three epithelia. PMID:27329312

  20. Tensor-Based Morphometry as a Neuroimaging Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease: An MRI Study of 676 AD, MCI, and Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex D.; Parikshak, Neelroop; Lee, Suh; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    In one of the largest brain MRI studies to date, we used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to create 3D maps of structural atrophy in 676 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy elderly controls, scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Using inverse-consistent 3D non-linear elastic image registration, we warped 676 individual brain MRI volumes to a population mean geometric template. Jacobian determinant maps were created, revealing the 3D profile of local volumetric expansion and compression. We compared the anatomical distribution of atrophy in 165 AD patients (age: 75.6 ± 7.6 years), 330 MCI subjects (74.8 ± 7.5), and 181 controls (75.9 ± 5.1). Brain atrophy in selected regions-of-interest was correlated with clinical measurements - the sum-of-boxes clinical dementia rating (CDR-SB), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and the logical memory test scores - at voxel level followed by correction for multiple comparisons. Baseline temporal lobe atrophy correlated with current cognitive performance, future cognitive decline, and conversion from MCI to AD over the following year; it predicted future decline even in healthy subjects. Over half of the AD and MCI subjects carried the ApoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) gene, which increases risk for AD; they showed greater hippocampal and temporal lobe deficits than non-carriers. ApoE2 gene carriers - 1/6 of the normal group - showed reduced ventricular expansion, suggesting a protective effect. As an automated image analysis technique, TBM reveals 3D correlations between neuroimaging markers, genes, and future clinical changes, and is highly efficient for large-scale MRI studies. PMID:18691658

  1. Towards fast and routine analyses of volcanic ash morphometry for eruption surveillance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrandt, Sébastien; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    The morphometry of volcanic ash produced by explosive eruptions yields ample information on fragmentation processes (e.g. magmatic vs magma-water interactions), and on transport and sedimentation mechanisms. Most previous works on volcanic clast morphometry focused on the Apparent (2D-)Projected shape of ASH grains, here termed APASH, to infer processes and eruptive styles. However, textural analyses of ash grains has remained a long and tedious task that made such approaches inappropriate for eruption surveillance duties. In this work we show that new technological advances on automated dispersion of granular materials imaged with a camera-coupled microscope and enhanced computer capabilities enable fast and high resolution image acquisition of thousands of ash grains that resolve this limitation. With a morpho-grainsizer designed for such fast and routine measurements we perform a series of APASH analyses on selected ash fractions of tephra deposits from known eruptive styles. We record the size, aspect ratio, circularity and convexity of APASH images and assess resolution, reproducibility, minimum population size, and total analytical duration, and offer recommendations for the reporting of APASH data for inter-laboratory comparisons. To avoid fractal geometry concerns, our analyses are carried out at constant size range (250-300 μm) and optical magnification (× 5) on ~ 3000 grains per samples collected from homogenized samples. Results from the andesitic 1999-ongoing eruption of Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) show that ash particles from the moderate 2001 phase are relatively equant and convex in shape, while the stronger 2006 subplinian phase produced ash grains with more elongated, less circular and less convex APASH signatures. Ash grains from a basaltic scoria cone-forming eruption show even more ragged APASH characteristics. Overall, our protocol allows obtaining accurate and reproducible morphometric measurements that reveal subtle variations of the

  2. Towards fast and routine analyses of volcanic ash morphometry for eruption surveillance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrandt, Sébastien; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    The morphometry of volcanic ash produced by explosive eruptions yields ample information on fragmentation processes (e.g. magmatic vs magma-water interactions), and on transport and sedimentation mechanisms. Most previous works on volcanic clast morphometry focused on the Apparent (2D-)Projected shape of ASH grains, here called APASH, to infer processes and eruptive styles. However, textural analyses of ash grains has remained a long and tedious task that made such approaches inappropriate for eruption surveillance duties. In this work we show that new technological advances on automated dispersion of granular materials imaged with a camera-coupled microscope and enhanced computer capabilities enable fast and high resolution image acquisition of thousands of ash grains that solve this limitation. With a morpho-grainsizer designed for such fast and routine measurements we perform a series of APASH analyses on selected ash fractions of tephra deposits from known eruptive styles. We record the size, aspect ratio, circularity and convexity of APASH images and assess resolution, reproducibility, minimum population size, and total analytical duration, and offer recommendations for the reporting of APASH data for interlaboratory comparisons. To avoid fractal geometry concerns, our analyses are carried out at constant size range (250-300 um) and optical magnification (x5) on ~3000 grains/samples collected from homogenized samples. Results from the andesitic 1999-ongoing eruption of Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) show that ash particles from the moderate 2001 phase are relatively equant and convex in shape, while the stronger 2006 subplinian phase produced ash grains with more elongated, less circular and less convex APASH signatures. Ash grains from a basaltic scoria cone-forming eruption show even more ragged APASH characteristics. Overall, our protocol allows obtaining accurate and reproducible morphometric measurements that reveal subtle variations of the morphological

  3. The correlation between gray matter volume and perceived social support: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Che, XianWei; Wei, DongTao; Li, WenFu; Li, HaiJiang; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, QingLin; Liu, YiJun

    2014-01-01

    Social support refers to interpersonal exchanges that include the combinations of aid, affirmation and affection. Perceived social support is a kind of subjective judgment of one's availability of social support. In spite of the importance of perceived social support to health, however, its neural substrate remains unknown. To address this question, voxel-based morphometry was employed to investigate the neural bases of individual differences in responses to the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS) in healthy volunteers (144 men and 203 women; mean age = 19.9; SD = 1.33, age range : 17-27). As a result, multiple regression analysis revealed that the PSSS scores were significantly and positively correlated with gray matter volume in a cluster that mainly included areas in posterior parts of posterior cingulate cortex, bilateral lingual cortex, left occipital lobe and cuneus. Highly-supported individuals had larger gray matter volume in these brain regions, implying a relatively high level of ability to engage in self-referential processes and social cognition. Our results provide a biological basis for exploring perceived social support particularly in relationship to various health parameters and outcomes. PMID:24397344

  4. Morphometry of Left Frontal and Temporal Poles Predicts Analogical Reasoning Abilities.

    PubMed

    Aichelburg, Clarisse; Urbanski, Marika; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Humbert, Frederic; Levy, Richard; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    Analogical reasoning is critical for making inferences and adapting to novelty. It can be studied experimentally using tasks that require creating similarities between situations or concepts, i.e., when their constituent elements share a similar organization or structure. Brain correlates of analogical reasoning have mostly been explored using functional imaging that has highlighted the involvement of the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (rlPFC) in healthy subjects. However, whether inter-individual variability in analogical reasoning ability in a healthy adult population is related to differences in brain architecture is unknown. We investigated this question by employing linear regression models of performance in analogy tasks and voxel-based morphometry in 54 healthy subjects. Our results revealed that the ability to reason by analogy was associated with structural variability in the left rlPFC and the anterior part of the inferolateral temporal cortex. Tractography of diffusion-weighted images suggested that these 2 regions have a different set of connections but may exchange information via the arcuate fasciculus. These results suggest that enhanced integrative and semantic abilities supported by structural variation in these areas (or their connectivity) may lead to more efficient analogical reasoning. PMID:25331605

  5. A global database of volcano edifice morphometry using SRTM DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, P.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Petrinovic, I. A.; Euillades, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    The morphometry of volcanic edifices reflects the aggradational and degradational processes that interact during their evolution. In association with VOGRIPA, a global risk identification project, we are currently constructing a database on the morphometry of volcanic edifices using digital elevation models (DEMs) from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Our aim is to compile and make available a global database of morphometric parameters that characterize the shape and size of volcanic edifices. The 90-meter SRTM DEM is presently the best public-access DEM dataset for this task because of its near-global coverage and spatial resolution that is high enough for the analysis of composite volcanic edifices. The Smithsonian Institution database lists 1536 active/potentially active volcanoes worldwide. Of these, ~900 volcano edifices can be analyzed with the SRTM DEMs, discarding volcanoes not covered by the dataset above latitudes 60°N and 56°S, submarine volcanoes, volcanoes with mostly negative topographies (i.e. calderas, maars) and monogenetic cones and domes, which are too small to accurately study with the 90-meter resolution. Morphometric parameters are acquired using an expressly written IDL-language code named MORVOLC. Edifice outline is determined via a semi-automated algorithm that identifies slope-breaks between user-estimated maximum and minimum outlines. Thus, volcanic edifices as topographic entities are considered, excluding aprons or ring plains and other far-reaching volcanic products. Several morphometric parameters are computed which characterize edifice size and shape. Size parameters are height (from base to summit), volume, base and summit areas and widths (average, minimum, maximum). Plan shape is summarized using two independent dimensionless indexes that describe the shape of the elevation contours, ellipticity (quantifies the elongation of each contour) and irregularity (quantifies the irregularity or complexity of each contour

  6. Larger right posterior parietal volume in action video game experts: a behavioral and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hanako; Kasahara, Kazumi; Kato, Ryo; Tsubomi, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Sho K; Mori, Makoto; Hanakawa, Takashi; Sadato, Norihiro; Honda, Manabu; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that action video game players exhibit superior performance in visuospatial cognitive tasks compared with non-game players. However, the neural basis underlying this visuospatial cognitive performance advantage remains largely unknown. The present human behavioral and imaging study compared gray matter volume in action video game experts and non-experts using structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis. The results revealed significantly larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex in experts compared with non-experts. Furthermore, the larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex significantly correlated with individual performance in a visual working memory task in experts. These results suggest that differences in brain structure may be linked to extensive video game play, leading to superior visuospatial cognitive performance in action video game experts. PMID:23776706

  7. Larger Right Posterior Parietal Volume in Action Video Game Experts: A Behavioral and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hanako; Kasahara, Kazumi; Kato, Ryo; Tsubomi, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Sho K.; Mori, Makoto; Hanakawa, Takashi; Sadato, Norihiro; Honda, Manabu; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that action video game players exhibit superior performance in visuospatial cognitive tasks compared with non-game players. However, the neural basis underlying this visuospatial cognitive performance advantage remains largely unknown. The present human behavioral and imaging study compared gray matter volume in action video game experts and non-experts using structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis. The results revealed significantly larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex in experts compared with non-experts. Furthermore, the larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex significantly correlated with individual performance in a visual working memory task in experts. These results suggest that differences in brain structure may be linked to extensive video game play, leading to superior visuospatial cognitive performance in action video game experts. PMID:23776706

  8. Annual research review: progress in using brain morphometry as a clinical tool for diagnosing psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Haubold, Alexander; Peterson, Bradley S; Bansal, Ravi

    2012-05-01

    Brain morphometry in recent decades has increased our understanding of the neural bases of psychiatric disorders by localizing anatomical disturbances to specific nuclei and subnuclei of the brain. At least some of these disturbances precede the overt expression of clinical symptoms and possibly are endophenotypes that could be used to diagnose an individual accurately as having a specific psychiatric disorder. More accurate diagnoses could significantly reduce the emotional and financial burden of disease by aiding clinicians in implementing appropriate treatments earlier and in tailoring treatment to the individual needs. Several methods, especially those based on machine learning, have been proposed that use anatomical brain measures and gold-standard diagnoses of participants to learn decision rules that classify a person automatically as having one disorder rather than another. We review the general principles and procedures for machine learning, particularly as applied to diagnostic classification, and then review the procedures that have thus far attempted to diagnose psychiatric illnesses automatically using anatomical measures of the brain. We discuss the strengths and limitations of extant procedures and note that the sensitivity and specificity of these procedures in their most successful implementations have approximated 90%. Although these methods have not yet been applied within clinical settings, they provide strong evidence that individual patients can be diagnosed accurately using the spatial pattern of disturbances across the brain. PMID:22394424

  9. Comparison of Prostatic Tissue Processed by Microwave and Conventional Technique Using Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Promil; Kumar, Sanjay; Arora, B; Singh, Sneh; Chabbra, Sonia; Sen, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Rapid processing of histopathological specimens and decreased turnaround time is important to fulfill the needs of clinicians treating sick patients, so the present study was conducted to compare the time taken and quality of sections in processing of prostatic tissue by rapid microwave and conventional techniques using morphometry. Methods: Four to five mm thick paired prostate tissue pieces of fifty cases of prostatectomy specimens were taken. One tissue piece of the pair was processed routinely overnight by conventional tissue processing and the other by microwave processing. Time taken for processing by both conventional technique and microwave technique was noted and compared. Then, both were stained with conventional method of hematoxylin and eosin staining and examined for histological typing and grading. Morphometric study was done on slides of prostatic tissue processed by both conventional and microwave technique. Result: The prostatectomy specimens included both benign (86%) and malignant (14%) prostatic lesions in the age range of 46-85 years. The time taken for steps of dehydration, clearing and impregnation in microwave technique was significantly less as compared to histoprocessing done by conventional technique. Morphology, staining patterns of prostatic tissue processed within minutes by microwave technique, whether benign or malignant, were comparable to those sections which were processed in days using standard technique. Conclusion: Domestic microwave oven can be used for histoprocessing to accelerate the processing with preservation of morphology and is cheaper than commercially available microwave ovens and processing time was considerably reduced from days to minutes. PMID:26516319

  10. Morphometry, Bite-Force, and Paleobiology of the Late Miocene Caiman Purussaurus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Aureliano, Tito; Ghilardi, Aline M.; Guilherme, Edson; Souza-Filho, Jonas P.; Cavalcanti, Mauro; Riff, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Purussaurus brasiliensis thrived in the northwestern portion of South America during the Late Miocene. Although substantial material has been recovered since its early discovery, this fossil crocodilian can still be considered as very poorly understood. In the present work, we used regression equations based on modern crocodilians to present novel details about the morphometry, bite-force and paleobiology of this species. According to our results, an adult Purussaurus brasiliensis was estimated to reach around 12.5 m in length, weighing around 8.4 metric tons, with a mean daily food intake of 40.6 kg. It was capable of generating sustained bite forces of 69,000 N (around 7 metric tons-force). The extreme size and strength reached by this animal seems to have allowed it to include a wide range of prey in its diet, making it a top predator in its ecosystem. As an adult, it would have preyed upon large to very large vertebrates, and, being unmatched by any other carnivore, it avoided competition. The evolution of a large body size granted P. brasiliensis many advantages, but it may also have led to its vulnerability. The constantly changing environment on a large geological scale may have reduced its long-term survival, favoring smaller species more resilient to ecological shifts. PMID:25689140

  11. Morphometry, bite-force, and paleobiology of the late miocene caiman Purussaurus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Tito; Ghilardi, Aline M; Guilherme, Edson; Souza-Filho, Jonas P; Cavalcanti, Mauro; Riff, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Purussaurus brasiliensis thrived in the northwestern portion of South America during the Late Miocene. Although substantial material has been recovered since its early discovery, this fossil crocodilian can still be considered as very poorly understood. In the present work, we used regression equations based on modern crocodilians to present novel details about the morphometry, bite-force and paleobiology of this species. According to our results, an adult Purussaurus brasiliensis was estimated to reach around 12.5 m in length, weighing around 8.4 metric tons, with a mean daily food intake of 40.6 kg. It was capable of generating sustained bite forces of 69,000 N (around 7 metric tons-force). The extreme size and strength reached by this animal seems to have allowed it to include a wide range of prey in its diet, making it a top predator in its ecosystem. As an adult, it would have preyed upon large to very large vertebrates, and, being unmatched by any other carnivore, it avoided competition. The evolution of a large body size granted P. brasiliensis many advantages, but it may also have led to its vulnerability. The constantly changing environment on a large geological scale may have reduced its long-term survival, favoring smaller species more resilient to ecological shifts. PMID:25689140

  12. Role of Disgust Proneness in Parkinson’s Disease: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ille, Rottraut; Wabnegger, Albert; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Kögl-Wallner, Mariella; Wenzel, Karoline; Schienle, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge about personality traits in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still limited. In particular, disgust proneness has not been investigated as well as its neuronal correlates. Although several morphometric studies demonstrated that PD is associated with gray matter volume (GMV) reduction in olfactory and gustatory regions involved in disgust processing, a possible correlation with disgust proneness has not been investigated. We conducted a voxel-based morphometry analysis to compare GMV between 16 cognitively normal male PD patients with mild to moderate symptoms and 24 matched control subjects. All participants had answered questionnaires for the assessment of disgust proneness, trait anger and trait anxiety. We correlated questionnaire scores with GMV in both groups. The clinical group reported selectively reduced disgust proneness toward olfactory stimuli associated with spoilage. Moreover, they showed GMV reduction in the central olfactory system [orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and piriform cortex]. Disgust items referring to olfactory processing were positively correlated with OFC volume in PD patients. Our data suggest an association between PD-associated neurodegeneration and olfactory related facets of the personality trait disgust proneness. PMID:25908177

  13. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  14. Regional gray matter abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia determined with optimized voxel-based morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, XiaoJuan; Yao, Li; Jin, Zhen; Chen, Kewei

    2006-03-01

    This study examined regional gray matter abnormalities across the whole brain in 19 patients with schizophrenia (12 males and 7 females), comparing with 11 normal volunteers (7 males and 4 females). The customized brain templates were created in order to improve spatial normalization and segmentation. Then automated preprocessing of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was conducted using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The statistical voxel based analysis was implemented in terms of two-sample t-test model. Compared with normal controls, regional gray matter concentration in patients with schizophrenia was significantly reduced in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral middle frontal and inferior frontal gyrus, right insula, precentral and parahippocampal areas, left thalamus and hypothalamus as well as, however, significant increases in gray matter concentration were not observed across the whole brain in the patients. This study confirms and extends some earlier findings on gray matter abnormalities in schizophrenic patients. Previous behavior and fMRI researches on schizophrenia have suggested that cognitive capacity decreased and self-conscious weakened in schizophrenic patients. These regional gray matter abnormalities determined through structural MRI with optimized VBM may be potential anatomic underpinnings of schizophrenia.

  15. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  16. Computational Morphometry for Detecting Changes in Brain Structure Due to Development, Aging, Learning, Disease and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mietchen, Daniel; Gaser, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The brain, like any living tissue, is constantly changing in response to genetic and environmental cues and their interaction, leading to changes in brain function and structure, many of which are now in reach of neuroimaging techniques. Computational morphometry on the basis of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images has become the method of choice for studying macroscopic changes of brain structure across time scales. Thanks to computational advances and sophisticated study designs, both the minimal extent of change necessary for detection and, consequently, the minimal periods over which such changes can be detected have been reduced considerably during the last few years. On the other hand, the growing availability of MR images of more and more diverse brain populations also allows more detailed inferences about brain changes that occur over larger time scales, way beyond the duration of an average research project. On this basis, a whole range of issues concerning the structures and functions of the brain are now becoming addressable, thereby providing ample challenges and opportunities for further contributions from neuroinformatics to our understanding of the brain and how it changes over a lifetime and in the course of evolution. PMID:19707517

  17. Emotional empathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a behavioural and voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Crespi, Chiara; Iannaccone, Sandro; Corbo, Massimo; Lunetta, Christian; Consonni, Monica; Scola, Elisa; Falini, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F

    2014-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a multisystem condition, in which executive and/or behavioural symptoms can occur. Deficits of social cognition, including defective cognitive and emotional empathy, have been recently reported in ALS subjects. The neurostructural correlates of these disorders in ALS are still unknown. The aims of this study were to evaluate two components of empathy in non-demented ALS subjects, and to associate performance with regional grey-matter density using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty non-demented sporadic probable or definite ALS patients and 56 matched healthy controls (HC) participated in a non-verbal task requiring the attribution of emotional versus cognitive states to identify the correct ending of comic strips, compared with a control condition requiring identifying causal relationships devoid of social components. A subgroup of 14 ALS and 20 HC joined the VBM study. Results demonstrated that, compared with controls, ALS patients showed defective emotional empathy attribution, related with reduced grey-matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus. Our study provided evidence of a specific impairment of emotional empathy in ALS patients, reflecting neural damage in a limbic prefrontal network involved in emotional processing. Social cognition disorders may represent a marker of cognitive dysfunction in ALS. PMID:23586919

  18. Brain structure in post-traumatic stress disorder: A voxel-based morphometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Lu, Guangming; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Jun; Li, Weihui

    2013-09-15

    This study compared the difference in brain structure in 12 mine disaster survivors with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, 7 cases of improved post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and 14 controls who experienced the same mine disaster but did not suffer post-traumatic stress disorder, using the voxel-based morphometry method. The correlation between differences in brain structure and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms was also investigated. Results showed that the gray matter volume was the highest in the trauma control group, followed by the symptoms-improved group, and the lowest in the chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group. Compared with the symptoms-improved group, the gray matter volume in the lingual gyrus of the right occipital lobe was reduced in the chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group. Compared with the trauma control group, the gray matter volume in the right middle occipital gyrus and left middle frontal gyrus was reduced in the symptoms-improved group. Compared with the trauma control group, the gray matter volume in the left superior parietal lobule and right superior frontal gyrus was reduced in the chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group. The gray matter volume in the left superior parietal lobule was significantly positively correlated with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory subscale score in the symptoms-improved group and chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group (r = 0.477, P = 0.039). Our findings indicate that (1) chronic post-traumatic stress disorder patients have gray matter structural damage in the prefrontal lobe, occipital lobe, and parietal lobe, (2) after post-traumatic stress, the disorder symptoms are improved and gray matter structural damage is reduced, but cannot recover to the trauma-control level, and (3) the superior parietal lobule is possibly associated with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress disorder patients exhibit gray matter abnormalities. PMID:25206550

  19. Crystal structure of CobK reveals strand-swapping between Rossmann-fold domains and molecular basis of the reduced precorrin product trap

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuang; Sushko, Oleksandr; Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    CobK catalyzes the essential reduction of the precorrin ring in the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structure of CobK reveals that the enzyme, despite not having the signature sequence, comprises two Rossmann fold domains which bind coenzyme and substrate respectively. The two parallel β-sheets have swapped their last β-strands giving a novel sheet topology which is an interesting variation on the Rossmann-fold. The trapped ternary complex with coenzyme and product reveals five conserved basic residues that bind the carboxylates of the tetrapyrrole tightly anchoring the product. A loop, disordered in both the apoenzyme and holoenzyme structures, closes around the product further tightening binding. The structure is consistent with a mechanism involving protonation of C18 and pro-R hydride transfer from NADPH to C19 of precorrin-6A and reveals the interactions responsible for the specificity of CobK. The almost complete burial of the reduced precorrin product suggests a remarkable form of metabolite channeling where the next enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway triggers product release. PMID:26616290

  20. Crystal structure of CobK reveals strand-swapping between Rossmann-fold domains and molecular basis of the reduced precorrin product trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shuang; Sushko, Oleksandr; Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2015-11-01

    CobK catalyzes the essential reduction of the precorrin ring in the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structure of CobK reveals that the enzyme, despite not having the signature sequence, comprises two Rossmann fold domains which bind coenzyme and substrate respectively. The two parallel β-sheets have swapped their last β-strands giving a novel sheet topology which is an interesting variation on the Rossmann-fold. The trapped ternary complex with coenzyme and product reveals five conserved basic residues that bind the carboxylates of the tetrapyrrole tightly anchoring the product. A loop, disordered in both the apoenzyme and holoenzyme structures, closes around the product further tightening binding. The structure is consistent with a mechanism involving protonation of C18 and pro-R hydride transfer from NADPH to C19 of precorrin-6A and reveals the interactions responsible for the specificity of CobK. The almost complete burial of the reduced precorrin product suggests a remarkable form of metabolite channeling where the next enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway triggers product release.

  1. Investigation of mindfulness meditation practitioners with voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Hölzel, Britta K; Ott, Ulrich; Gard, Tim; Hempel, Hannes; Weygandt, Martin; Morgen, Katrin; Vaitl, Dieter

    2008-03-01

    Mindfulness meditators practice the non-judgmental observation of the ongoing stream of internal experiences as they arise. Using voxel-based morphometry, this study investigated MRI brain images of 20 mindfulness (Vipassana) meditators (mean practice 8.6 years; 2 h daily) and compared the regional gray matter concentration to that of non-meditators matched for sex, age, education and handedness. Meditators were predicted to show greater gray matter concentration in regions that are typically activated during meditation. Results confirmed greater gray matter concentration for meditators in the right anterior insula, which is involved in interoceptive awareness. This group difference presumably reflects the training of bodily awareness during mindfulness meditation. Furthermore, meditators had greater gray matter concentration in the left inferior temporal gyrus and right hippocampus. Both regions have previously been found to be involved in meditation. The mean value of gray matter concentration in the left inferior temporal gyrus was predictable by the amount of meditation training, corroborating the assumption of a causal impact of meditation training on gray matter concentration in this region. Results suggest that meditation practice is associated with structural differences in regions that are typically activated during meditation and in regions that are relevant for the task of meditation. PMID:19015095

  2. Shape Classification Using Wasserstein Distance for Brain Morphometry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Yalin; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Brain morphometry study plays a fundamental role in medical imaging analysis and diagnosis. This work proposes a novel framework for brain cortical surface classification using Wasserstein distance, based on uniformization theory and Riemannian optimal mass transport theory. By Poincare uniformization theorem, all shapes can be conformally deformed to one of the three canonical spaces: the unit sphere, the Euclidean plane or the hyperbolic plane. The uniformization map will distort the surface area elements. The area-distortion factor gives a probability measure on the canonical uniformization space. All the probability measures on a Riemannian manifold form the Wasserstein space. Given any 2 probability measures, there is a unique optimal mass transport map between them, the transportation cost defines the Wasserstein distance between them. Wasserstein distance gives a Riemannian metric for the Wasserstein space. It intrinsically measures the dissimilarities between shapes and thus has the potential for shape classification. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to introduce the optimal mass transport map to general Riemannian manifolds. The method is based on geodesic power Voronoi diagram. Comparing to the conventional methods, our approach solely depends on Riemannian metrics and is invariant under rigid motions and scalings, thus it intrinsically measures shape distance. Experimental results on classifying brain cortical surfaces with different intelligence quotients demonstrated the efficiency and efficacy of our method. PMID:26221691

  3. Shape Classification Using Wasserstein Distance for Brain Morphometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Yalin; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Brain morphometry study plays a fundamental role in medical imaging analysis and diagnosis. This work proposes a novel framework for brain cortical surface classification using Wasserstein distance, based on uniformization theory and Riemannian optimal mass transport theory. By Poincare uniformization theorem, all shapes can be conformally deformed to one of the three canonical spaces: the unit sphere, the Euclidean plane or the hyperbolic plane. The uniformization map will distort the surface area elements. The area-distortion factor gives a probability measure on the canonical uniformization space. All the probability measures on a Riemannian manifold form the Wasserstein space. Given any 2 probability measures, there is a unique optimal mass transport map between them, the transportation cost defines the Wasserstein distance between them. Wasserstein distance gives a Riemannian metric for the Wasserstein space. It intrinsically measures the dissimilarities between shapes and thus has the potential for shape classification. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first. work to introduce the optimal mass transport map to general Riemannian manifolds. The method is based on geodesic power Voronoi diagram. Comparing to the conventional methods, our approach solely depends on Riemannian metrics and is invariant under rigid motions and scalings, thus it intrinsically measures shape distance. Experimental results on classifying brain cortical surfaces with different intelligence quotients demonstrated the efficiency and efficacy of our method. PMID:26221691

  4. Voxel Based Morphometry in Optical Coherence Tomography: Validation & Core Findings

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Al-Louzi, Omar; Solomon, Sharon D.; Saidha, Shiv; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the human retina is now becoming established as an important modality for the detection and tracking of various ocular diseases. Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is a long standing neuroimaging analysis technique that allows for the exploration of the regional differences in the brain. There has been limited work done in developing registration based methods for OCT, which has hampered the advancement of VBM analyses in OCT based population studies. Following on from our recent development of an OCT registration method, we explore the potential benefits of VBM analysis in cohorts of healthy controls (HCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Specifically, we validate the stability of VBM analysis in two pools of HCs showing no significant difference between the two populations. Additionally, we also present a retrospective study of age and sex matched HCs and relapsing remitting MS patients, demonstrating results consistent with the reported literature while providing insight into the retinal changes associated with this MS subtype. PMID:27199503

  5. Long-term nitrogen fertilization of paddy soil shifts iron-reducing microbial community revealed by RNA-(13)C-acetate probing coupled with pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Long-Jun; Su, Jian-Qiang; Xu, Hui-Juan; Jia, Zhong-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-03-01

    Iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process in paddy soils, yet little is known about the microbial coupling between nitrogen and iron reduction. Here, we investigated the shift of acetate-metabolizing iron-reducers under long-term nitrogen fertilization using (13)C-acetate-based ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-stable isotope probing (SIP) and pyrosequencing in an incubation experiment, and the shift of putative iron-reducers in original field samples were investigated by 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. During SIP incubations, in the presence of iron(III) oxyhydroxides, more iron(II) formation and less methane production were detected in nitrogen-fertilized (N) compared with non-fertilized (NF) soil. In (13)C-rRNA from microcosms amended with ferrihydrite (FER), Geobacter spp. were the important active iron-reducers in both soils, and labeled to a greater extent in N (31% of the bacterial classified sequences) than NF soils (11%). Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA transcripts from microcosms at the whole community level further revealed hitherto unknown metabolisms of potential FER reduction by microorganisms including Pseudomonas and Solibacillus spp. in N soil, Dechloromonas, Clostridium, Bacillus and Solibacillus spp. in NF soil. Goethite (GOE) amendment stimulated Geobacter spp. to a lesser extent in both soils compared with FER treatment. Pseudomonas spp. in the N soil and Clostridium spp. in the NF soil may also be involved in GOE reduction. Pyrosequencing results from field samples showed that Geobacter spp. were the most abundant putative iron-reducers in both soils, and significantly stimulated by long-term nitrogen fertilization. Overall, for the first time, we demonstrate that long-term nitrogen fertilization promotes iron(III) reduction and modulates iron-reducing bacterial community in paddy soils. PMID:25171335

  6. Surface-based morphometry reveals distinct cortical thickness and surface area profiles in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Green, Tamar; Fierro, Kyle C; Raman, Mira M; Saggar, Manish; Sheau, Kristen E; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-04-01

    Morphometric investigations of brain volumes in Williams syndrome (WS) consistently show significant reductions in gray matter volume compared to controls. Cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) are two constituent parts of cortical gray matter volume that are considered genetically distinguishable features of brain morphology. Yet, little is known about the independent contribution of cortical CT and SA to these volumetric differences in WS. Thus, our objectives were: (i) to evaluate whether the microdeletion in chromosome 7 associated with WS has a distinct effect on CT and SA, and (ii) to evaluate age-related variations in CT and SA within WS. We compared CT and SA values in 44 individuals with WS to 49 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls. Between-group differences in CT and SA were evaluated across two age groups: young (age range 6.6-18.9 years), and adults (age range 20.2-51.5 years). Overall, we found contrasting effects of WS on cortical thickness (increases) and surface area (decreases). With respect to brain topography, the between-group pattern of CT differences showed a scattered pattern while the between-group surface area pattern was widely distributed throughout the brain. In the adult subgroup, we observed a cluster of increases in cortical thickness in WS across the brain that was not observed in the young subgroup. Our findings suggest that extensive early reductions in surface area are the driving force for the overall reduction in brain volume in WS. The age-related cortical thickness findings might reflect delayed or even arrested development of specific brain regions in WS. PMID:26852730

  7. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Cognitive Functions and Neural Substrates: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, Debora; Pagani, Marco; Caporali, Paola; Galbusera, Alberto; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; Neri, Cristina; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Human and experimental studies have revealed putative neuroprotective and pro-cognitive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in aging, evidencing positive correlations between peripheral n-3 PUFA levels and regional grey matter (GM) volume, as well as negative correlations between dietary n-3 PUFA levels and cognitive deficits. We recently showed that n-3 PUFA supplemented aged mice exhibit better hippocampal-dependent mnesic functions, along with enhanced cellular plasticity and reduced neurodegeneration, thus supporting a role of n-3 PUFA supplementation in preventing cognitive decline during aging. To corroborate these initial results and develop new evidence on the effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation on brain substrates at macro-scale level, here we expanded behavioral analyses to the emotional domain (anxiety and coping skills), and carried out a fine-grained regional GM volumetric mapping by using high-resolution MRI-based voxel-based morphometry. The behavioral effects of 8 week n-3 PUFA supplementation were measured on cognitive (discriminative, spatial and social) and emotional (anxiety and coping) abilities of aged (19 month-old at the onset of study) C57B6/J mice. n-3 PUFA supplemented mice showed better mnesic performances as well as increased active coping skills. Importantly, these effects were associated with enlarged regional hippocampal, retrosplenial and prefrontal GM volumes, and with increased post mortem n-3 PUFA brain levels. These findings indicate that increased dietary n-3 PUFA intake in normal aging can improve fronto-hippocampal GM structure and function, an effect present also when the supplementation starts at late age. Our data are consistent with a protective role of n-3 PUFA supplementation in counteracting cognitive decline, emotional dysfunctions and brain atrophy. PMID:26973513

  8. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Cognitive Functions and Neural Substrates: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study in Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Cutuli, Debora; Pagani, Marco; Caporali, Paola; Galbusera, Alberto; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; Neri, Cristina; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Human and experimental studies have revealed putative neuroprotective and pro-cognitive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in aging, evidencing positive correlations between peripheral n-3 PUFA levels and regional grey matter (GM) volume, as well as negative correlations between dietary n-3 PUFA levels and cognitive deficits. We recently showed that n-3 PUFA supplemented aged mice exhibit better hippocampal-dependent mnesic functions, along with enhanced cellular plasticity and reduced neurodegeneration, thus supporting a role of n-3 PUFA supplementation in preventing cognitive decline during aging. To corroborate these initial results and develop new evidence on the effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation on brain substrates at macro-scale level, here we expanded behavioral analyses to the emotional domain (anxiety and coping skills), and carried out a fine-grained regional GM volumetric mapping by using high-resolution MRI-based voxel-based morphometry. The behavioral effects of 8 week n-3 PUFA supplementation were measured on cognitive (discriminative, spatial and social) and emotional (anxiety and coping) abilities of aged (19 month-old at the onset of study) C57B6/J mice. n-3 PUFA supplemented mice showed better mnesic performances as well as increased active coping skills. Importantly, these effects were associated with enlarged regional hippocampal, retrosplenial and prefrontal GM volumes, and with increased post mortem n-3 PUFA brain levels. These findings indicate that increased dietary n-3 PUFA intake in normal aging can improve fronto-hippocampal GM structure and function, an effect present also when the supplementation starts at late age. Our data are consistent with a protective role of n-3 PUFA supplementation in counteracting cognitive decline, emotional dysfunctions and brain atrophy. PMID:26973513

  9. An evaluation of volume-based morphometry for prediction of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter, Daniel; Roche, Alexis; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Ribes, Delphine; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Bach-Cuadra, Meritxell; Daducci, Alessandro; Granziera, Cristina; Klöppel, Stefan; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Krueger, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry from conventional T1-weighted images has proved effective to quantify Alzheimer's disease (AD) related brain atrophy and to enable fairly accurate automated classification of AD patients, mild cognitive impaired patients (MCI) and elderly controls. Little is known, however, about the classification power of volume-based morphometry, where features of interest consist of a few brain structure volumes (e.g. hippocampi, lobes, ventricles) as opposed to hundreds of thousands of voxel-wise gray matter concentrations. In this work, we experimentally evaluate two distinct volume-based morphometry algorithms (FreeSurfer and an in-house algorithm called MorphoBox) for automatic disease classification on a standardized data set from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Results indicate that both algorithms achieve classification accuracy comparable to the conventional whole-brain voxel-based morphometry pipeline using SPM for AD vs elderly controls and MCI vs controls, and higher accuracy for classification of AD vs MCI and early vs late AD converters, thereby demonstrating the potential of volume-based morphometry to assist diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25429357

  10. Rhesus macaque brain morphometry: a methodological comparison of voxel-wise approaches.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Donald G; Kosmatka, Kristopher J; Kastman, Erik K; Bendlin, Barbara B; Johnson, Sterling C

    2010-03-01

    Voxel-based morphometry studies have become increasingly common in human neuroimaging over the past several years; however, few studies have utilized this method to study morphometry changes in non-human primates. Here we describe the application of voxel-wise morphometry methods to the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) using the 112RM-SL template and priors (McLaren et al. (2009) [42]) and as an illustrative example we describe age-associated changes in grey matter morphometry. Specifically, we evaluated the unified segmentation routine implemented using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software and the FMRIB's Automated Segmentation Tool (FAST) in the FMRIB Software Library (FSL); the effect of varying the smoothing kernel; and the effect of the normalization routine. We found that when studying non-human primates, brain images need less smoothing than in human studies, 2-4mm FWHM. Using flow field deformations (DARTEL) improved inter-subject alignment leading to results that were more likely due to morphometry differences as opposed to registration differences. PMID:19883763

  11. Preemptive heme oxygenase-1 gene delivery reveals reduced mortality and preservation of left ventricular function 1 yr after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Simpson, Jeremy A; Brunt, Keith R; Ward, Christopher A; Hall, Sean R R; Kinobe, Robert T; Barrette, Valerie; Tse, M Yat; Pang, Stephen C; Pachori, Alok S; Dzau, Victor J; Ogunyankin, Kofo O; Melo, Luis G

    2007-07-01

    We reported previously that predelivery of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene to the heart by adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2) markedly reduces ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced myocardial injury. However, the effect of preemptive HO-1 gene delivery on long-term survival and prevention of postinfarction heart failure has not been determined. We assessed the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on long-term survival, myocardial function, and left ventricular (LV) remodeling 1 yr after myocardial infarction (MI) using echocardiographic imaging, pressure-volume (PV) analysis, and histomorphometric approaches. Two groups of Lewis rats were injected with 2 x 10(11) particles of AAV-LacZ (control) or AAV-human HO-1 (hHO-1) in the anterior-posterior apical region of the LV wall. Six weeks after gene transfer, animals were subjected to 30 min of ischemia by ligation of the left anterior descending artery followed by reperfusion. Echocardiographic measurements and PV analysis of LV function were obtained at 2 wk and 12 mo after I/R. One year after acute MI, mortality was markedly reduced in the HO-1-treated animals compared with the LacZ-treated animals. PV analysis demonstrated significantly enhanced LV developed pressure, elevated maximal dP/dt, and lower end-diastolic volume in the HO-1 animals compared with the LacZ animals. Echocardiography showed a larger apical anterior-to-posterior wall ratio in HO-1 animals compared with LacZ animals. Morphometric analysis revealed extensive myocardial scarring and fibrosis in the infarcted LV area of LacZ animals, which was reduced by 62% in HO-1 animals. These results suggest that preemptive HO-1 gene delivery may be useful as a therapeutic strategy to reduce post-MI LV remodeling and heart failure. PMID:17322421

  12. Morphology and digitally aided morphometry of the human paracentral lobule.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Goran; Malobabic, Slobodan; Pilipović-Spasojević, Olivera; Djukić-Macut, Nataša; Maliković, Aleksandar

    2013-02-01

    The human paracentral lobule, the junction of the precentral and postcentral gyri at the medial hemispheric surface, contains several important functional regions, and its variable morphology requires exact morphological and quantitativedata. In order to obtain precise data we investigated the morphology of the paracentral lobule and quantified its visible (extrasulcal) surface. This surface corresponds to commonly used magnetic resonance imaging scout images. We studied 84 hemispheres of adult persons (42 brains; 26 males and 16 females; 20-65 years) fixed in neutral formalin for at least 4 weeks. The medial hemispheric surface was photographed at standard distance and each digital photo was calibrated. Using the intercommissural line system (commissura anterior-commissura posterior or CA-CP line), we performed standardised measurements of the paracentral lobule. Exact determination of its boundaries and morphological types was followed by digital morphometry of its extrasulcal surface using AutoCAD software. We found two distinct morphological types of the human paracentral lobule: continuous type, which was predominant (95.2%), and rare segmented type (4.8%). In hemispheres with segmented cingulate sulcus we also found the short transitional lobulo-limbic gyrus (13.1%). The mean extrasulcal surface of the left paracentral lobule was significantly larger, both in males (left 6.79 cm2 vs. right 5.76 cm2) and in females (left 6.05 cm2 vs. right 5.16 cm2). However, even larger average surfaces in males were not significantly different than the same in females. Reported morphological and quantitative data will be useful during diagnostics and treatment of pathologies affecting the human paracentral lobule, and in further studies of its cytoarchitectonic and functional parcellations. PMID:23749705

  13. Contribution of glomerular morphometry to the diagnosis of pediatric nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Marini, Mariana Barreto; Rocha, Laura Penna; Machado, Juliana Reis; Ramalho, Fernando Silva; Dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda

    2016-05-01

    Only a few studies describe histopathological changes in renal biopsies performed in pediatric patients. This study was conducted to identify an association between morphometric data in renal biopsies and renal function of these patients. Fifty-nine individuals with ages between 2 and 18 years old were selected, who were divided into six groups consisting of frequent nephropathies in children and adolescents and one control group. Proteinuria, urea, and creatinine values of the patients were recorded. Interactive image analysis software Leica QWin[®]was used for morpho- metric analysis of Bowman's capsule, glomerular capillary tuft, and Bowman's space area. The mean glomerular tuft area was higher in the membranous glomerulopathy group than in the podo- cytopathy group (57,101 ± 25,094 vs. 27,420 c ± 6279 µm(2); P <0.05). The median of Bowman's space area was higher in the control group than in the podocytopathy group and in the thin basement membrane/Alport syndrome group [12,210 (7676-26,945) vs. 5801 (3031-7852) µm(2); P <0.01 and 12210 (7676-26,945) vs. 4183 (3797-7992) µm(2); P <0.01, respectively]. There was a positive and significant correlation between Bowman's capsule area and the levels of proteinuria, creatinine, and urea of the patients, as well as between the glomerular tuft area and the levels of proteinuria, creatinine, and urea in the patients, regardless of their nephropathy. Glomerular morphometry may contribute to the diagnosis of some glomerulopathies and the association between glomerular morphometric parameters, and laboratory data may promote a better understanding of the prognosis of these patients. PMID:27215240

  14. A New Fiji-Based Algorithm That Systematically Quantifies Nine Synaptic Parameters Provides Insights into Drosophila NMJ Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Louis; Scheffer-de Gooyert, Jolanda M.; Monedero, Ignacio; Torroja, Laura; Coromina, Lluis; van der Laak, Jeroen A. W. M.; Schenck, Annette

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of synapses is of central interest in neuroscience because of the intimate relation with synaptic efficacy. Two decades of gene manipulation studies in different animal models have revealed a repertoire of molecules that contribute to synapse development. However, since such studies often assessed only one, or at best a few, morphological features at a given synapse, it remained unaddressed how different structural aspects relate to one another. Furthermore, such focused and sometimes only qualitative approaches likely left many of the more subtle players unnoticed. Here, we present the image analysis algorithm ‘Drosophila_NMJ_Morphometrics’, available as a Fiji-compatible macro, for quantitative, accurate and objective synapse morphometry of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a well-established glutamatergic model synapse. We developed this methodology for semi-automated multiparametric analyses of NMJ terminals immunolabeled for the commonly used markers Dlg1 and Brp and showed that it also works for Hrp, Csp and Syt. We demonstrate that gender, genetic background and identity of abdominal body segment consistently and significantly contribute to variability in our data, suggesting that controlling for these parameters is important to minimize variability in quantitative analyses. Correlation and principal component analyses (PCA) were performed to investigate which morphometric parameters are inter-dependent and which ones are regulated rather independently. Based on nine acquired parameters, we identified five morphometric groups: NMJ size, geometry, muscle size, number of NMJ islands and number of active zones. Based on our finding that the parameters of the first two principal components hardly correlated with each other, we suggest that different molecular processes underlie these two morphometric groups. Our study sets the stage for systems morphometry approaches at the well-studied Drosophila NMJ. PMID:26998933

  15. A New Fiji-Based Algorithm That Systematically Quantifies Nine Synaptic Parameters Provides Insights into Drosophila NMJ Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, Bonnie; Castells-Nobau, Anna; Wolf, Louis; Scheffer-de Gooyert, Jolanda M; Monedero, Ignacio; Torroja, Laura; Coromina, Lluis; van der Laak, Jeroen A W M; Schenck, Annette

    2016-03-01

    The morphology of synapses is of central interest in neuroscience because of the intimate relation with synaptic efficacy. Two decades of gene manipulation studies in different animal models have revealed a repertoire of molecules that contribute to synapse development. However, since such studies often assessed only one, or at best a few, morphological features at a given synapse, it remained unaddressed how different structural aspects relate to one another. Furthermore, such focused and sometimes only qualitative approaches likely left many of the more subtle players unnoticed. Here, we present the image analysis algorithm 'Drosophila_NMJ_Morphometrics', available as a Fiji-compatible macro, for quantitative, accurate and objective synapse morphometry of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a well-established glutamatergic model synapse. We developed this methodology for semi-automated multiparametric analyses of NMJ terminals immunolabeled for the commonly used markers Dlg1 and Brp and showed that it also works for Hrp, Csp and Syt. We demonstrate that gender, genetic background and identity of abdominal body segment consistently and significantly contribute to variability in our data, suggesting that controlling for these parameters is important to minimize variability in quantitative analyses. Correlation and principal component analyses (PCA) were performed to investigate which morphometric parameters are inter-dependent and which ones are regulated rather independently. Based on nine acquired parameters, we identified five morphometric groups: NMJ size, geometry, muscle size, number of NMJ islands and number of active zones. Based on our finding that the parameters of the first two principal components hardly correlated with each other, we suggest that different molecular processes underlie these two morphometric groups. Our study sets the stage for systems morphometry approaches at the well-studied Drosophila NMJ. PMID:26998933

  16. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis reveals correlation between higher WRKY61 expression and reduced symptom severity in Turnip crinkle virus infected Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruimin; Liu, Peng; Yong, Yuhan; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a carmovirus that infects many Arabidopsis ecotypes. Most studies mainly focused on discovery of resistance genes against TCV infection, and there is no Next Generation Sequencing based comparative genome wide transcriptome analysis reported. In this study, RNA-seq based transcriptome analysis revealed that 238 (155 up-regulated and 83 down-regulated) significant differentially expressed genes with at least 15-fold change were determined. Fifteen genes (including upregulated, unchanged and downregulated) were selected for RNA-seq data validation using quantitative real-time PCR, which showed consistencies between these two sets of data. GO enrichment analysis showed that numerous terms such as stress, immunity, defence and chemical stimulus were affected in TCV-infected plants. One putative plant defence related gene named WRKY61 was selected for further investigation. It showed that WRKY61 overexpression plants displayed reduced symptoms and less virus accumulation, as compared to wild type (WT) and WRKY61 deficient lines, suggesting that higher WRKY61 expression level reduced TCV viral accumulation. In conclusion, our transcriptome analysis showed that global gene expression was detected in TCV-infected Arabidopsis thaliana. WRKY61 gene was shown to be negatively correlated with TCV infection and viral symptoms, which may be connected to plant immunity pathways. PMID:27086702

  17. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis reveals correlation between higher WRKY61 expression and reduced symptom severity in Turnip crinkle virus infected Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruimin; Liu, Peng; Yong, Yuhan; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a carmovirus that infects many Arabidopsis ecotypes. Most studies mainly focused on discovery of resistance genes against TCV infection, and there is no Next Generation Sequencing based comparative genome wide transcriptome analysis reported. In this study, RNA-seq based transcriptome analysis revealed that 238 (155 up-regulated and 83 down-regulated) significant differentially expressed genes with at least 15-fold change were determined. Fifteen genes (including upregulated, unchanged and downregulated) were selected for RNA-seq data validation using quantitative real-time PCR, which showed consistencies between these two sets of data. GO enrichment analysis showed that numerous terms such as stress, immunity, defence and chemical stimulus were affected in TCV-infected plants. One putative plant defence related gene named WRKY61 was selected for further investigation. It showed that WRKY61 overexpression plants displayed reduced symptoms and less virus accumulation, as compared to wild type (WT) and WRKY61 deficient lines, suggesting that higher WRKY61 expression level reduced TCV viral accumulation. In conclusion, our transcriptome analysis showed that global gene expression was detected in TCV-infected Arabidopsis thaliana. WRKY61 gene was shown to be negatively correlated with TCV infection and viral symptoms, which may be connected to plant immunity pathways. PMID:27086702

  18. Genome, transcriptome and methylome sequencing of a primitively eusocial wasp reveal a greatly reduced DNA methylation system in a social insect.

    PubMed

    Standage, Daniel S; Berens, Ali J; Glastad, Karl M; Severin, Andrew J; Brendel, Volker P; Toth, Amy L

    2016-04-01

    Comparative genomics of social insects has been intensely pursued in recent years with the goal of providing insights into the evolution of social behaviour and its underlying genomic and epigenomic basis. However, the comparative approach has been hampered by a paucity of data on some of the most informative social forms (e.g. incipiently and primitively social) and taxa (especially members of the wasp family Vespidae) for studying social evolution. Here, we provide a draft genome of the primitively eusocial model insect Polistes dominula, accompanied by analysis of caste-related transcriptome and methylome sequence data for adult queens and workers. Polistes dominula possesses a fairly typical hymenopteran genome, but shows very low genomewide GC content and some evidence of reduced genome size. We found numerous caste-related differences in gene expression, with evidence that both conserved and novel genes are related to caste differences. Most strikingly, these -omics data reveal a major reduction in one of the major epigenetic mechanisms that has been previously suggested to be important for caste differences in social insects: DNA methylation. Along with a conspicuous loss of a key gene associated with environmentally responsive DNA methylation (the de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3), these wasps have greatly reduced genomewide methylation to almost zero. In addition to providing a valuable resource for comparative analysis of social insect evolution, our integrative -omics data for this important behavioural and evolutionary model system call into question the general importance of DNA methylation in caste differences and evolution in social insects. PMID:26859767

  19. Trigeminal intersubnuclear neurons: morphometry and input-dependent structural plasticity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Yasmina B; Negredo, Pilar; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose A; Avendaño, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Intersubnuclear neurons in the caudal division of the spinal trigeminal nucleus that project to the principal nucleus (Pr5) play an active role in shaping the receptive fields of other neurons, at different levels in the ascending sensory system that processes information originating from the vibrissae. By using retrograde labeling and digital reconstruction, we investigated the morphometry and topology of the dendritic trees of these neurons and the changes induced by long-term experience-dependent plasticity in adult male rats. Primary afferent input was either eliminated by transection of the right infraorbital nerve (IoN), or selectively altered by repeated whisker clipping on the right side. These neurons do not display asymmetries between sides in basic metric and topologic parameters (global number of trees, nodes, spines, or dendritic ends), although neurons on the left tend to have longer terminal segments. Ipsilaterally, both deafferentation (IoN transection) and deprivation (whisker trimming) reduced the density of spines, and the former also caused a global increase in total dendritic length and a relative increase in more complex arbors. Contralaterally, deafferentation reduced more complex dendritic trees, and caused a moderate decline in dendritic length and spatial reach, and a loss of spines in number and density. Deprivation caused a similar, but more profound, effect on spines. Our findings provide original quantitative descriptions of a scarcely known cell population, and show that denervation- or deprivation-derived plasticity is expressed not only by neurons at higher levels of the sensory pathways, but also by neurons in key subcortical circuits for sensory processing. PMID:24178892

  20. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  1. Sports and brain morphology - a voxel-based morphometry study with endurance athletes and martial artists.

    PubMed

    Schlaffke, L; Lissek, S; Lenz, M; Brüne, M; Juckel, G; Hinrichs, T; Platen, P; Tegenthoff, M; Schmidt-Wilcke, T

    2014-02-14

    Physical exercises and motor skill learning have been shown to induce changes in regional brain morphology, this has been demonstrated for various activities and tasks. Also individuals with special skills show differences in regional brain morphology. This has been indicated for professional musicians, London taxi drivers, as well as for athletes like dancers, golfers and judokas. However little is known about whether sports with different metabolic profiles (aerobic vs. anaerobic) are associated with different patterns of altered brain morphology. In this cross-sectional study we investigated two groups of high-performance athletes, one group performing sports that are thought to be mainly aerobic, and one group performing sports known to have intermittent phases of anaerobic metabolism. Using high-resolution structural imaging and voxel-based morphometry (VBM), we investigated a group of 26 male athletes consisting of 13 martial artists and 13 endurance athletes as well as a group of non-exercising men (n=13). VBM analyses revealed higher gray matter (GM) volumes in the supplementary motor area/dorsal premotor cortex (BA 6) in both athlete groups as compared to the control group. In addition, endurance athletes showed significantly higher GM volume in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), specifically in the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which was not seen in the martial arts group. Our data suggest that high-performance sports are associated with changes in regional brain morphology in areas implicated in motor planning and motor learning. In addition high-level endurance sports seem to affect MTL structures, areas that have previously been shown to be modulated by aerobic exercise. PMID:24291669

  2. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  3. Brain morphometry shows effects of long-term musical practice in middle-aged keyboard players

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, H.; Minnerop, M.; Pieperhoff, P.; Schleicher, A.; Zilles, K.; Altenmüller, E.; Amunts, K.

    2013-01-01

    To what extent does musical practice change the structure of the brain? In order to understand how long-lasting musical training changes brain structure, 20 male right-handed, middle-aged professional musicians and 19 matched controls were investigated. Among the musicians, 13 were pianists or organists with intensive practice regimes. The others were either music teachers at schools or string instrumentalists, who had studied the piano at least as a subsidiary subject, and practiced less intensively. The study was based on T1-weighted MR images, which were analyzed using deformation-based morphometry. Cytoarchitectonic probabilistic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei as well as myeloarchitectonic maps of fiber tracts were used as regions of interest to compare volume differences in the brains of musicians and controls. In addition, maps of voxel-wise volume differences were computed and analyzed. Musicians showed a significantly better symmetric motor performance as well as a greater capability of controlling hand independence than controls. Structural MRI-data revealed significant volumetric differences between the brains of keyboard players, who practiced intensively and controls in right sensorimotor areas and the corticospinal tract as well as in the entorhinal cortex and the left superior parietal lobule. Moreover, they showed also larger volumes in a comparable set of regions than the less intensively practicing musicians. The structural changes in the sensory and motor systems correspond well to the behavioral results, and can be interpreted in terms of plasticity as a result of intensive motor training. Areas of the superior parietal lobule and the entorhinal cortex might be enlarged in musicians due to their special skills in sight-playing and memorizing of scores. In conclusion, intensive and specific musical training seems to have an impact on brain structure, not only during the sensitive period of childhood but throughout life. PMID

  4. Morphometry of in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from control and ozone-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, H.; Tyler, W.S.; Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.

    1983-07-01

    Effects of ambient levels of ozone on cell size and compartments were determined morphometrically for both in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to filtered air or to filtered air with 0.60 ppm ozone. The ozone exposure was 8 hr/day for 3 days. Significant exposure-related compartmental volume density changes of in situ centriacinar macrophages were: decreased endoplasm (p less than 0.01); increased lysosome-like structures (p less than 0.01); decreased primary lysosomes (p less than 0.01); increased small and large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.001); and decreased phagosomes/autophagosomes (p less than 0.05). In lavaged macrophages, the only significant exposure-related change was an increase in the density of large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.01). Mean profile areas of in situ centriacinar macrophages from control and exposed rats were 86.94 micrometers/sup 2/ and 112.04 micrometers/sup 2/, respectively. The average mean cell volume V and mean caliper diameter D of macrophages lavaged from control rats were 1128.45 micrometers/sup 3/ and 12.92 micrometers, respectively, whereas those from exposed rats were 1583.08 micrometers/sup 3/ and 14.46 micrometers, respectively. Exposure-related increases in cell size were seen in both in situ and lavaged macrophages, but more significant differences in cell compartments were seen in the in situ centriacinar macrophages. Morphometry of pulmonary alveolar macrophages after ambient levels of ozone indicated increased uptake, storage, or both rather than cell damage. Comparison of in situ centriacinar and lavaged macrophages from both control and exposed rats revealed significant differences in their volume fractions of nucleus, cytoplasm, ectoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome-like structures, lipid droplets, vacuoles, and phagosome/autophagosomes. These differences between centriacinar and lavaged macrophages indicate different cell populations are sampled by these two methods.

  5. Sperm ultrastructure, morphometry, and abnormal morphology in American black bears (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Brito, L F C; Sertich, P L; Stull, G B; Rives, W; Knobbe, M

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe sperm ultrastructure, morphometry, and abnormal morphology in American black bears. Electroejaculation was successful in 53.8% (7/13) of the attempts, but urine contamination was common. Epididymal sperm samples were also obtained from five bears. Sperm had a paddle-like head shape and the ultrastructure was similar to that of most other mammals. The most striking particularity of black bear sperm ultrastructure was a tightening of the nucleus in the equatorial region. Although the differences were not significant in all bears, the overall decrease in sperm nucleus dimensions during transport from the caput epididymis to the cauda suggested increasing compaction of the nucleus during maturation. For ejaculated sperm, nucleus length, width, and base width were 4.9, 3.7, and 1.8 μm, respectively, whereas sperm head length, width, and base width were 6.6, 4.8, and 2.3 μm, and midpiece, tail (including midpiece), and total sperm lengths were 9.8, 68.8, and 75.3 μm. Evaluation of sperm cytoplasmic droplets in the epididymis revealed that proximal droplets start migrating toward a distal position in the caput epididymis and that the process was mostly completed by the time sperm reached the cauda epididymis. The proportion of morphologically normal sperm in the ejaculate was 35.6%; the most prevalent sperm defects were distal cytoplasmic droplets and bent/coiled tails. The morphology of abnormal sperm and the underlying ultrastructural defects were similar to that in other large domestic animals thus suggesting similar underlying pathogenesis of specific sperm defects and similar effects on fertility. PMID:20708230

  6. Morphometry of impact craters on Mercury from MESSENGER altimetry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susorney, Hannah C. M.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Johnson, Catherine L.

    2016-06-01

    Data acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter and the Mercury Dual Imaging System on the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury provide a means to measure the geometry of many of the impact craters in Mercury's northern hemisphere in detail for the first time. The combination of topographic and imaging data permit a systematic evaluation of impact crater morphometry on Mercury, a new calculation of the diameter Dt at which craters transition with increasing diameter from simple to complex forms, and an exploration of the role of target properties and impact velocity on final crater size and shape. Measurements of impact crater depth on Mercury confirm results from previous studies, with the exception that the depths of large complex craters are typically shallower at a given diameter than reported from Mariner 10 data. Secondary craters on Mercury are generally shallower than primary craters of the same diameter. No significant differences are observed between the depths of craters within heavily cratered terrain and those of craters within smooth plains. The morphological attributes of craters that reflect the transition from simple to complex craters do not appear at the same diameter; instead flat floors first appear with increasing diameter in craters at the smallest diameters, followed with increasing diameter by reduced crater depth and rim height, and then collapse and terracing of crater walls. Differences reported by others in Dt between Mercury and Mars (despite the similar surface gravitational acceleration on the two bodies) are confirmed in this study. The variations in Dt between Mercury and Mars cannot be adequately attributed to differences in either surface properties or mean projectile velocity.

  7. Comparative skeletal muscle fibre morphometry among wild birds with different locomotor behaviour

    PubMed Central

    TORRELLA, J. R.; FOUCES, V.; PALOMEQUE, J.; VISCOR, G.

    1998-01-01

    Six muscles of the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), the common coot (Fulica atra) and the yellow-legged gull (Larus cachinnans) were analysed morphometrically, with special emphasis on their functional implications and physiological needs. Oxidative fibres always had significantly smaller size than anaerobic fibres, although no differences in the number of capillaries per fibre were found. This resulted in greater capillary counts per unit of fibre area and perimeter in oxidative than anaerobic fibres, which indicates that the greater demand for oxygen supply may be achieved by decreasing the size of the muscle fibre rather than by increasing the number of associated capillaries. Fast oxidative fibres of the pectoralis and the triceps of the gull had greater sizes than the fast oxidative fibres of the mallard and the coot, which correlates with the difference in energetic demands between flapping and gliding flight. Greater fibre cross-sectional areas and perimeters seem suited to afford the long-lasting activity with low metabolic demands required during gliding. By contrast, mallards and coots attain a high oxidative metabolism, during sustained flapping flight, by reducing fibre size at the expense of a diminished ability for force generation. Between-species comparisons of the hindlimb muscles only yielded differences for the anaerobic fibres of the gastrocnemius, as an important adaptive response to force generation during burst locomotion. The need to manage sustained swimming abilities effectively may result in similar FOG fibre morphometry of the hindlimb muscles studied, indicating that a compromise between the oxygen flux to the muscle cell and the development of power is highly optimised in oxidative fibres of the bird species studied. PMID:9643422

  8. 3D PATTERN OF BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN WILLIAMS SYNDROME VISUALIZED USING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Reiss, Allan L.; Lee, Agatha D.; Bellugi, Ursula; Galaburda, Albert M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Mills, Debra L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with deletion of ~20 contiguous genes in chromosome band 7q11.23. Individuals with WS exhibit mild to moderate mental retardation, but are relatively more proficient in specific language and musical abilities. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to visualize the complex pattern of gray/white matter reductions in WS, based on fluid registration of structural brain images. Methods 3D T1-weighted brain MRIs of 41 WS subjects (age: 29.2±9.2SD years; 23F/18M) and 39 age-matched healthy controls (age: 27.5±7.4 years; 23F/16M) were fluidly registered to a minimum deformation target. Fine-scale volumetric differences were mapped between diagnostic groups. Local regions were identified where regional structure volumes were associated with diagnosis, and with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. Brain asymmetry was also mapped and compared between diagnostic groups. Results WS subjects exhibited widely distributed brain volume reductions (~10–15% reduction; P < 0.0002, permutation test). After adjusting for total brain volume, the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate, superior temporal gyrus, amygdala, fusiform gyrus and cerebellum were found to be relatively preserved in WS, but parietal and occipital lobes, thalamus and basal ganglia, and midbrain were disproportionally decreased in volume (P < 0.0002). These regional volumes also correlated positively with performance IQ in adult WS subjects (age ≥ 30 years, P = 0.038). Conclusion TBM facilitates 3D visualization of brain volume reductions in WS. Reduced parietal/occipital volumes may be associated with visuospatial deficits in WS. By contrast, frontal lobes, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus are relatively preserved or even enlarged, consistent with unusual affect regulation and language production in WS. PMID:17512756

  9. Cortical abnormalities in bipolar disorder investigated with MRI and voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Allison C; Milham, Michael P; Bain, Earle E; Mah, Linda; Cannon, Dara M; Marrett, Sean; Zarate, Carlos A; Pine, Daniel S; Price, Joseph L; Drevets, Wayne C

    2006-04-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) has been associated with abnormalities of brain structure. Specifically, in vivo volumetric MRI and/or post mortem studies of BD have reported abnormalities of gray matter (GM) volume in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala, hippocampal subiculum and ventral striatum. These structures share anatomical connections with each other and form part of a "visceromotor" network modulating emotional behavior. Areas of the lateral orbital, superior temporal and posterior cingulate cortices project to this network, but morphometric abnormalities in these areas have not been established in BD. The current study assessed tissue volumes within these areas in BD using MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). MRI images were obtained from 36 BD subjects and 65 healthy controls. To account for possible neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of psychotropic medications, BD subjects were divided into medicated and unmedicated groups. Images were segmented into tissue compartments, which were examined on a voxel-wise basis to determine the location and extent of morphometric changes. The GM was reduced in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex and superior temporal gyrus of unmedicated BD subjects relative to medicated BD subjects and in the lateral orbital cortex of medicated BD subjects relative to controls. White matter (WM) was increased in the orbital and posterior cingulate cortices, which most likely reflected alterations in gyral morphology resulting from the reductions in the associated GM. The morphometric abnormalities in the posterior cingulate, superior temporal and lateral orbital cortices in BD support the hypothesis that the extended network of neuroanatomical structures subserving visceromotor regulation contains structural alterations in BD. Additionally, localization of morphometric abnormalities to areas known to exhibit increased metabolism in depression supports the hypothesis that repeated stress and elevated glucocorticoid

  10. Determination of the Relationship between Hydrologic Processes and Basin Morphometry - The Lamos Basin (Mersin, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Ümit; Güler, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    This study has been carried out to determine the relationship between hydrologic processes and basin morphometry in the Lamos Basin, which is located at the northern part of the Mersin (SE Turkey). The morphometric parameters of the basin was derived from the 1:25K scale topographic map sheets that were digitized using ArcGIS 9.3.1 geographic information system (GIS) software. Morphometric parameters considered in this study include basin area, basin length, basin perimeter length, stream order, stream number, stream length, mean stream length, basin relief, drainage density, stream frequency, drainage texture, bifurcation ratio, form factor, elongation ratio, overland flow length, relief ratio, and hypsometric integral. The results have shown that there are 1252 individual stream reaches with a total length of 1414.1 km in the Lamos basin, which covers an area of 1358 km2 and has a length of 103 km in the N-S direction. Furthermore, the basin has a medium drainage density of 1.04 1/km with a stream frequency and drainage texture values of 0.92 and 4.33, respectively. The basin can be classified as elongated because of the low values of elongation ratio (0.48) and form factor (0.12). The hypsometric integral of the basin (0.58) indicates that it is in the youth period and thus reasonably sensitive to erosion. The values of drainage texture, drainage density, and stream frequency indicate that the Lamos basin is moderately well drained, therefore overland flow in the basin is not expected to be so quick. Thus, in case of occurrence of sudden peak flows, sensitivity to the land sliding and erosion may increase further. As a result, it is suggested that human activities in the basin should be limited in areas in fairly close proximity to the present day stream network to prevent or reduce the risk to life and property.

  11. Computed Tomographic Morphometry of the Internal Anatomy of Mandibular Second Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pranjal; Swamy, Dinesh Francis; Shashidara, R; Swamy, Elaine Barretto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Need for the study: The most important procedure for a successful endodontic treatment is the cleaning and shaping of the canal system. Understanding the internal anatomy of teeth provides valuable information to the clinician that would help him achieve higher clinical success during endodontic therapy. Aims: To evaluate by computed tomography—the internal anatomy of mandibular second primary molars with respect to the number of canals, cross-sectional shape of canals, cross-sectional area of canals and the root dentin thickness. Materials and methods: A total of 31 mandibular second primary molars were subjected to computed-tomographic evaluation in the transverse plane, after mounting them in a prefabricated template. The images, thus, obtained were analyzed using De-winter Bio-wizard® software. Results: All the samples demonstrated two canals in the mesial root, while majority of the samples (65.48%) demonstrated two canals in the distal root. The cross-sectional images of the mesial canals demonstrated a round shape, while the distal canals demonstrated an irregular shape. The root dentin thickness was highly reduced on the distal aspect of mesial and mesial aspect of distal canals. Conclusion: The mandibular second primary molars demonstrated wide variation and complexities in their internal anatomy. A thorough understanding of the complexity of the root canal system is essential for understanding the principles and problems of shaping and cleaning, determining the apical limits and dimensions of canal preparations, and for performing successful endodontic procedures. How to cite this article: Kurthukoti AJ, Sharma P, Swamy DF, Shashidara R, Swamy EB. Computed Tomographic Morphometry of the Internal Anatomy of Mandibular Second Primary Molars. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):202-207. PMID:26628855

  12. Neural Correlates of Communication Skill and Symptom Severity in Autism: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Lauren K.; Hill, Dina E.; Thoma, Robert J.; Euler, Matthew J.; Lewine, Jeffrey D.; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have compared the brains of normal controls and individuals with autism, especially older, higher-functioning individuals with autism, little is known of the neural correlates of the vast clinical heterogeneity characteristic of the disorder. In this study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine gray matter…

  13. POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL (AROCLOR 1254) INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY, CHANGES IN FEMUR MORPHOMETRY AND CALCIUM METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to investigate the effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) on calcium metabolism, femur morphometry, and nephrotoxicity. ischer 344 rats Here dosed daily 1G for 5, 10 or 15 weeks with 0, 0.1, 1, 10 or 25 mg PCB/kg body weight. fter 5, 10 and 15 weeks,...

  14. STATISTICAL APPROACH TO BRAIN MORPHOMETRY DATA REQUIRED IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY (DNT) TESTING GUIDELINES: PROFILE ANALYSIS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain morphometry measurements are required in test guidelines proposed by the USEPA to screen chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. Because the DNT is a screening battery, the analysis of this data should be sensitive to dose-related changes in the pattern of brain growt...

  15. Annual Research Review: Progress in Using Brain Morphometry as a Clinical Tool for Diagnosing Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubold, Alexander; Peterson, Bradley S.; Bansal, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Brain morphometry in recent decades has increased our understanding of the neural bases of psychiatric disorders by localizing anatomical disturbances to specific nuclei and subnuclei of the brain. At least some of these disturbances precede the overt expression of clinical symptoms and possibly are endophenotypes that could be used to diagnose an…

  16. Reduced occipital and prefrontal brain volumes in dysbindin-associated schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gary; Frodl, Thomas; Morris, Derek; Spoletini, Ilaria; Cannon, Dara M; Cherubini, Andrea; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bossù, Paola; McDonald, Colm; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden P; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    A three-marker C-A-T dysbindin haplotype identified by Williams et al (PMID: 15066891) is associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, decreased mRNA expression, poorer cognitive performance, and early sensory processing deficits. We investigated whether this same dysbindin risk haplotype was also associated with structural variation in the gray matter volume (GMV). Using voxel-based morphometry, whole-volume analysis revealed significantly reduced GMVs in both the right dorsolateral prefrontal and left occipital cortex, corresponding to the behavioral findings of impaired spatial working memory and EEG findings of impaired visual processing already reported. These data provide important evidence of the influence of dysbindin risk variants on brain structure, and suggest a possible mechanism by which disease risk is being increased. PMID:19794403

  17. Analysis of the ability of pramlintide to inhibit amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide reveals a balance between optimal recognition and reduced amyloidogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ridgway, Zachary; Cao, Ping; Ruzsicska, Bela; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2015-11-10

    The hormone human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) plays a role in glucose metabolism, but forms amyloid in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is associated with β-cell death and dysfunction in the disease. Inhibitors of islet amyloid have therapeutic potential; however, there are no clinically approved inhibitors, and the mode of action of existing inhibitors is not well understood. Rat IAPP (rIAPP) differs from hIAPP at six positions, does not form amyloid, and is an inhibitor of amyloid formation by hIAPP. Five of the six differences are located within the segment of residues 20-29, and three of them are Pro residues, which are well-known disruptors of β-sheet structure. rIAPP is thus a natural example of a "β-breaker inhibitor", a molecule that combines a recognition element with an entity that inhibits β-sheet formation. Pramlintide (PM) is a peptide drug approved for use as an adjunct to insulin therapy for treatment of diabetes. PM was developed by introducing the three Pro substitutions found in rIAPP into hIAPP. Thus, it more closely resembles the human peptide than does rIAPP. Here we examine and compare the ability of rIAPP, PM, and a set of designed analogues of hIAPP to inhibit amyloid formation by hIAPP, to elucidate the factors that lead to effective peptide-based inhibitors. Our results reveal, for this class of molecules, a balance between the reduced amyloidogenicity of the inhibitory sequence on one hand and its ability to recognize hIAPP on the other. PMID:26407043

  18. Voxel Based Morphometry Alterations in Mal de Debarquement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee; Chakrapani, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Background Mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS) is a disorder of chronic self-motion perception that occurs though entrainment to rhythmic background motion, such as from sea voyage, and involves the perception of low-frequency rocking that can last for months or years. The neural basis of this persistent sensory perception abnormality is not well understood. Methods We investigated grey matter volume differences underlying persistent MdDS by performing voxel-based morphometry on whole brain and pre-specified ROIs in 28 individuals with MdDS and comparing them to 18 age, sex, and handedness matched controls. Results MdDS participants exhibited greater grey matter volume in the left inferior parietal lobule, right inferior occipital gyrus (area V3v), right temporal pole, bilateral cerebellar hemispheric lobules VIII/IX and left lobule VIIa/VIIb. Grey matter volumes were lower in bilateral inferior frontal, orbitofrontal, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC) and left superior medial gyri (t = 3.0, p<0.005uncorr). In ROI analyses, there were no volume differences in the middle occipital gyrus (region of V5/MT) or parietal operculum 2 (region of the parietoinsular vestibular cortex). Illness duration was positively related to grey matter volume in bilateral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (IFG/AI), right posterior insula, superior parietal lobule, left middle occipital gyrus (V5/MT), bilateral postcentral gyrus, anterior cerebellum, and left cerebellar hemisphere and vermian lobule IX. In contrast, illness duration was negatively related to volume in pgACC, posterior middle cingulate gyrus (MCC), left middle frontal gyrus (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-DLPFC), and right cerebellar hemispheric lobule VIIIb (t = 3.0, p<0.005uncorr). The most significant differences were decreased volume in the pgACC and increased volume in the left IFG/AI with longer illness duration (qFDRcorr <0.05). Concurrent medication use did not correlate with these findings or have a

  19. Identifying neural correlates of memory and language disturbances in herpes simplex encephalitis: a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Stefan; Thiel, Friederike; Marschhauser, Anke; Villringer, Arno; Horstmann, Annette; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a severe neurological disease that often leads to persistent cognitive deficits in survivors. Memory and naming impairments have been reported most, although direct association between memory and naming performance and disease-related atrophy has not yet been demonstrated in vivo for a larger sample of patients. In the present work, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was conducted on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 13 HSE survivors. The gray matter density values were correlated with scores indicating verbal memory decline, as well as errors/omissions in picture naming; both were obtained through neuropsychological assessment. Analysis of individual lesion patterns revealed a considerable inter-individual variability, mainly with atrophy in the basal forebrain, adjacent frontal cortex, medial and lateral temporal cortex, insula and thalamus. The neuropsychological data analysis revealed correlation between verbal memory decline and atrophy especially in the left hippocampal region, whereas naming problems were associated with gray matter loss especially in the lateral temporal lobe, the thalamus and the left insula. These results confirm, for the first time, the assumptions of earlier studies about the considerable variability of individual lesion patterns in HSE in a whole-brain approach in vivo, and thus the anatomical validity of VBM. PMID:25488475

  20. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Rectal Tissue from Beef Steers Revealed Reduced Host Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Super-Shedders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ou; Liang, Guanxiang; McAllister, Tim A; Plastow, Graham; Stanford, Kim; Selinger, Brent; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Super-shedder cattle are a major disseminator of E. coli O157:H7 into the environment, and the terminal rectum has been proposed as the primary E. coli O157:H7 colonization site. This study aimed to identify host factors that are associated with the super-shedding process by comparing transcriptomic profiles in rectal tissue collected from 5 super-shedder cattle and 4 non-shedder cattle using RNA-Seq. In total, 17,859 ± 354 genes and 399 ± 16 miRNAs were detected, and 11,773 genes were expressed in all animals. Fifty-eight differentially expressed (DE) genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) including 11 up-regulated and 47 down-regulated (log 2 (fold change) ranged from -5.5 to 4.2), and 2 up-regulated DE miRNAs (log 2 (fold change) = 2.1 and 2.5, respectively) were identified in super-shedders compared to non-shedders. Functional analysis of DE genes revealed that 31 down-regulated genes were potentially associated with reduced innate and adaptive immune functions in super-shedders, including 13 lymphocytes membrane receptors, 3 transcription factors and 5 cytokines, suggesting the decreased key host immune functions in the rectal tissue of super-shedders, including decreased quantity and migration of immune cells such as lymphocytes, neutrophils and dendritic cells. The up-regulation of bta-miR-29d-3p and the down regulation of its predicted target gene, regulator of G-protein signaling 13, suggested a potential regulatory role of this miRNA in decreased migration of lymphocytes in super-shedders. Based on these findings, the rectal tissue of super-shedders may inherently exhibit less effective innate and adaptive immune protection. Further study is required to confirm if such effect on host immunity is due to the nature of the host itself or due to actions mediated by E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26959367

  1. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Rectal Tissue from Beef Steers Revealed Reduced Host Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Super-Shedders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ou; Liang, Guanxiang; McAllister, Tim A.; Plastow, Graham; Stanford, Kim; Selinger, Brent; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Super-shedder cattle are a major disseminator of E. coli O157:H7 into the environment, and the terminal rectum has been proposed as the primary E. coli O157:H7 colonization site. This study aimed to identify host factors that are associated with the super-shedding process by comparing transcriptomic profiles in rectal tissue collected from 5 super-shedder cattle and 4 non-shedder cattle using RNA-Seq. In total, 17,859 ± 354 genes and 399 ± 16 miRNAs were detected, and 11,773 genes were expressed in all animals. Fifty-eight differentially expressed (DE) genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) including 11 up-regulated and 47 down-regulated (log 2 (fold change) ranged from -5.5 to 4.2), and 2 up-regulated DE miRNAs (log 2 (fold change) = 2.1 and 2.5, respectively) were identified in super-shedders compared to non-shedders. Functional analysis of DE genes revealed that 31 down-regulated genes were potentially associated with reduced innate and adaptive immune functions in super-shedders, including 13 lymphocytes membrane receptors, 3 transcription factors and 5 cytokines, suggesting the decreased key host immune functions in the rectal tissue of super-shedders, including decreased quantity and migration of immune cells such as lymphocytes, neutrophils and dendritic cells. The up-regulation of bta-miR-29d-3p and the down regulation of its predicted target gene, regulator of G-protein signaling 13, suggested a potential regulatory role of this miRNA in decreased migration of lymphocytes in super-shedders. Based on these findings, the rectal tissue of super-shedders may inherently exhibit less effective innate and adaptive immune protection. Further study is required to confirm if such effect on host immunity is due to the nature of the host itself or due to actions mediated by E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26959367

  2. Effect of Cocaine on Structural Changes in Brain: MRI Volumetry using Tensor-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Datta, Sushmita; Tao, Guozhi; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in cocaine dependent subjects to determine the structural changes in brain compared to non-drug using controls. Cocaine dependent subjects and controls were carefully screened to rule out brain pathology of undetermined origin. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) without and with modulation to adjust for volume changes during normalization. For TBM analysis, unbiased atlases were generated using two different inverse consistent and diffeomorphic nonlinear registration techniques. Two different control groups were used for generating unbiased atlases. Independent of the nonlinear registration technique and normal cohorts used for creating the unbiased atlases, our analysis failed to detect any statistically significant effect of cocaine on brain volumes. These results show that cocaine dependent subjects do not show differences in regional brain volumes compared to non-drug using controls. PMID:20570057

  3. Penalized Fisher Discriminant Analysis and Its Application to Image-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Mo, Yilin; Ozolek, John A.; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2011-01-01

    Image-based morphometry is an important area of pattern recognition research, with numerous applications in science and technology (including biology and medicine). Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA) techniques are often employed to elucidate and visualize important information that discriminates between two or more populations. We demonstrate that the direct application of FLDA can lead to undesirable errors in characterizing such information and that the reason for such errors is not necessarily the ill conditioning in the resulting generalized eigenvalue problem, as usually assumed. We show that the regularized eigenvalue decomposition often used is related to solving a modified FLDA criterion that includes a least-squares-type representation penalty, and derive the relationship explicitly. We demonstrate the concepts by applying this modified technique to several problems in image-based morphometry, and build discriminant representative models for different data sets. PMID:22140290

  4. The relationship between trait positive empathy and brain structure: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tong; Pan, Weigang; Huang, Xiting

    2016-04-13

    Although studies relating to positive empathy have received increased attention in recent years, no studies have been carried out to explore the neural basis of positive empathy. Using a voxel-based morphometry analysis, this study investigates the relationship between trait positive empathy (as measured by the Positive Empathy Scale) and its association with brain structure in 86 healthy college students. The results indicate that an individual's ability to show positive empathy is positively correlated with the volume of gray matter in the right insula, left anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. It may be suggested that the differences between the abilities of emotion processing and regulating play important roles in shaping an individual's positive empathy traits from the perspective of brain morphometry. PMID:26963166

  5. A new monoclonal antibody DAG-6F4 against human alpha-dystroglycan reveals reduced core protein in some, but not all, dystroglycanopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Emma L; Lacey, Erica; Le, Lam T; Feng, Lucy; Sciandra, Francesca; Morris, Charlotte R; Hewitt, Jane E; Holt, Ian; Brancaccio, Andrea; Barresi, Rita; Sewry, Caroline A; Brown, Susan C; Morris, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    We generated a novel monoclonal antibody, DAG-6F4, against alpha-dystroglycan which immunolabels the sarcolemma in human muscle biopsies. Its seven amino-acid epitope, PNQRPEL, was identified using phage-displayed peptides and is located immediately after the highly-glycosylated mucin domain of alpha-dystroglycan. On Western blots of recombinant alpha-dystroglycan, epitope accessibility was reduced, but not entirely prevented, by glycosylation. DAG-6F4 immunolabelling was markedly reduced in muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients consistent with disruption of the dystroglycan complex. In a range of dystroglycanopathy patients with reduced/altered glycosylation, staining by DAG-6F4 was often less reduced than staining by IIH6 (antibody against the glycan epitope added by LARGE and commonly used to identify glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan). Whereas IIH6 was reduced in all patients, DAG-6F4 was hardly changed in a LARGE patient, less reduced than IIH6 in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I, but as reduced as IIH6 in some congenital muscular dystrophy patients. Although absence of the LARGE-dependent laminin-binding site appears not to affect alpha-dystroglycan stability at the sarcolemma, the results suggest that further reduction in aDG glycosylation may reduce its stability. These studies suggest that DAG-6F4 may be a useful addition to the antibody repertoire for evaluating the dystroglycan complex in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25387694

  6. Transient elastography compared to liver biopsy and morphometry for predicting fibrosis in pediatric chronic liver disease: Does etiology matter?

    PubMed Central

    Behairy, Behairy El-Sayed; Sira, Mostafa Mohamed; Zalata, Khaled Refat; Salama, El-Sayed Ebrahem; Abd-Allah, Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate transient elastography (TE) as a noninvasive tool in staging liver fibrosis compared with liver biopsy and morphometry in children with different chronic liver diseases. METHODS: A total of 90 children [50 with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), 20 with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 20 with Wilson disease] were included in the study and underwent liver stiffness measurement (LSM) using TE. Liver biopsies were evaluated for fibrosis, qualitatively, by Ishak score and quantitatively by fibrosis area fraction (FAF) using digital image analysis (morphometry). LSM was correlated with fibrosis and other studied variables using spearman correlation. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was also performed to examine independent factors associated with LSM. Different cut-off values of LSM were calculated for predicting individual fibrosis stages using receiver-operating characteristic curve. Cut-off values with optimal clinical performance (optimal sensitivity and specificity simultaneously) were selected. RESULTS: The majority of HCV group had minimal activity (80%) and no/mild fibrosis (72%). On the other hand, the majority of AIH group had mild to moderate activity (70%) and moderate to severe fibrosis (95%) and all Wilson disease group had mild to moderate activity (100%) and moderate to severe fibrosis (100%). LSM correlated significantly with both FAF and Ishak scores and the correlation appeared better with the latter (r = 0.839 vs 0.879, P < 0.0001 for both). LSM discriminated individual stages of fibrosis with high performance. Sensitivity ranged from 81.4% to 100% and specificity ranged from 75.0% to 97.2%. When we compared LSM values for the same stage of fibrosis, they varied according to the different etiologies. Higher values were in AIH (16.15 ± 7.23 kPa) compared to Wilson disease (8.30 ± 0.84 kPa) and HCV groups (7.43 ± 1.73 kPa). Multiple regression analysis revealed that Ishak fibrosis stage was the only independent variable

  7. A reexamination of age-related variation in body weight and morphometry of Maryland nutria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherfy, M.H.; Mollett, T.A.; McGowan, K.R.; Daugherty, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    Age-related variation in morphometry has been documented for many species. Knowledge of growth patterns can be useful for modeling energetics, detecting physiological influences on populations, and predicting age. These benefits have shown value in understanding population dynamics of invasive species, particularly in developing efficient control and eradication programs. However, development and evaluation of descriptive and predictive models is a critical initial step in this process. Accordingly, we used data from necropsies of 1,544 nutria (Myocastor coypus) collected in Maryland, USA, to evaluate the accuracy of previously published models for prediction of nutria age from body weight. Published models underestimated body weights of our animals, especially for ages <3. We used cross-validation procedures to develop and evaluate models for describing nutria growth patterns and for predicting nutria age. We derived models from a randomly selected model-building data set (n = 192-193 M, 217-222 F) and evaluated them with the remaining animals (n = 487-488 M, 642-647 F). We used nonlinear regression to develop Gompertz growth-curve models relating morphometric variables to age. Predicted values of morphometric variables fell within the 95% confidence limits of their true values for most age classes. We also developed predictive models for estimating nutria age from morphometry, using linear regression of log-transformed age on morphometric variables. The evaluation data set corresponded with 95% prediction intervals from the new models. Predictive models for body weight and length provided greater accuracy and less bias than models for foot length and axillary girth. Our growth models accurately described age-related variation in nutria morphometry, and our predictive models provided accurate estimates of ages from morphometry that will be useful for live-captured individuals. Our models offer better accuracy and precision than previously published models

  8. Morphometry of scoria cones, and their relation to geodynamic setting: A DEM-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Favalli, Massimiliano; Karátson, Dávid; Tarquini, Simone; Boschi, Enzo

    2012-03-01

    The morphometry of a great number of scoria cones, belonging to volcanic fields of various geodynamic settings, has been measured and analyzed, addressing the question whether there is a relation between the prevalent cone shape in a given field and the geodynamic setting of the field itself. Morphometric analysis was carried out on freely downloadable digital elevation models (DEMs). The accuracy of the used DEMs and the associated error in scoria cone morphometry were determined by cross-comparing high-resolution LIDAR-derived DEMs, USGS NED, TINITALY DEM and ASTER GDEM. The 10-m TINITALY/01 and USGS NED DEMs are proven to be suitable for scoria cone morphometry, whereas ASTER GDEM can be used reliably for cones with volume greater than 30 × 106 m3. According to a detailed morphometry of all scoria cones, we propose that the cones related to subductional setting show relatively higher values of Hco/Wco and lower values of Wcr/Wco than the cones related to extensional setting. The detected differences can be imputable to peculiar eruption dynamics resulting in slight but systematic changes in shape, and differences in lithological and sedimentological characteristics that govern post-eruptive erosion. To constrain the pathway of scoria cone erosion, the detected morphometric changes were also interpreted using a simple linear degradation model. Utilizing the obtained simulation results, the inferred initial cone base, and the age of scoria cones, we calculated a diffusion coefficient (K) for several dated cones, which are related to the prevalent climate. Our results, despite the high error associated, allow to assess the median K for all volcanic fields. Due to the complexity of the factors behind, it is not easy to understand if the prevalent shape characterizing a certain volcanic field is due mainly to sin-eruptive or post-eruptive mechanisms; however, our distinction between the two main geodynamic settings may be the first step to decipher these factors.

  9. Widespread structural brain changes in OCD: a systematic review of voxel-based morphometry studies.

    PubMed

    Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Chiapponi, Chiara; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The most widely accepted model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) assumes brain abnormalities in the "affective circuit", mainly consisting of volume reduction in the medial orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate and temporolimbic cortices, and tissue expansion in the striatum and thalamus. The advent of whole-brain, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has provided increasing evidence that regions outside the "affective" orbitofronto-striatal circuit are involved in OCD. Nevertheless, potential confounds from the different image analysis methods, as well as other factors, such as patients' medication and comorbidity status, may limit generalization of results. In the present paper, we systematically reviewed the whole-brain VBM literature on OCD by focussing specifically on degree of consistency between studies, extent to which findings have been replicated and interrelation between clinical variables and OCD anatomy, a potentially crucial factor that has been systematically examined only in a limited number of studies. The PubMed database was searched through February 2012. A total of 156 studies were identified; 18 of them fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria and included 511 patients and 504 controls. Results support the notion that the brain alterations responsible for OCD are represented at the network level, and that widespread structural abnormalities may contribute to neurobiological vulnerability to OCD. Apart from defects in regions within the classic "affective" circuit, volume reduction of the cortical source of the dorsolateral (DL) prefronto-striatal "executive" circuit (dorsomedial, DL, ventrolateral and frontopolar prefrontal cortices), and of reciprocally connected regions (temporo-parieto-occipital associative areas) is consistently described in OCD patients. Moreover, increased volume of the internal capsule and reduced frontal and parietal white matter volumes may account for altered anatomical connectivity in fronto-subcortical circuitry

  10. Use of MODIS satellite images for detailed lake morphometry: Application to basins with large water level fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovakoglou, George; Alexandridis, Thomas K.; Crisman, Thomas L.; Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Vergos, George S.

    2016-09-01

    Lake morphometry is essential for managing water resources and limnetic ecosystems. For reservoirs that receive high sediment loads, frequent morphometric mapping is necessary to define both the effective life of the reservoir and its water storage capacity for irrigation, power generation, flood control and domestic water supply. The current study presents a methodology for updating the digital depth model (DDM) of lakes and reservoirs with wide intra and interannual fluctuations of water levels using satellite remote sensing. A time series of Terra MODIS satellite images was used to map shorelines formed during the annual water level change cycle, and were validated with concurrent Landsat ETM+ satellite images. The shorelines were connected with in-situ observation of water levels and were treated as elevation contours to produce the DDM using spatial interpolation. The accuracy of the digitized shorelines is within the mapping accuracy of the satellite images, while the resulting DDM is validated using in-situ elevation measurements. Two versions of the DDM were produced to assess the influence of seasonal water fluctuation. Finally, the methodology was applied to Lake Kerkini (Greece) to produce an updated DDM, which was compared with the last available bathymetric survey (1991) and revealed changes in sediment distribution within the lake.

  11. Brain changes associated with postural training in patients with cerebellar degeneration: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Burciu, Roxana Gabriela; Fritsche, Nicole; Granert, Oliver; Schmitz, Lutz; Spönemann, Nina; Konczak, Jürgen; Theysohn, Nina; Gerwig, Marcus; van Eimeren, Thilo; Timmann, Dagmar

    2013-03-01

    Recent research indicates that physiotherapy can improve motor performance of patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the known contributions of the cerebellum to motor learning, it remains unclear whether such observable changes in performance are mediated by the cerebellum or cerebral brain areas involved in motor control and learning. The current study addressed this question by assessing the increase in gray matter volume due to sensorimotor training in cerebellar patients using voxel-based morphometry. Nineteen human subjects with pure cerebellar degeneration and matched healthy controls were trained for 2 weeks on a balance task. Postural and clinical assessments along with structural magnetic resonance imaging were performed pretraining and post-training. The main findings were as follows. First, training enhanced balance performance in cerebellar patients. Second, in contrast to controls patients revealed significantly more post-training gray matter volume in the dorsal premotor cortex. Third, training-related increase in gray matter volume was observed within the cerebellum and was more pronounced in controls than in patients. However, statistically cerebellar changes were at the trend level and thus require additional, independent confirmation. We conclude that sensorimotor training of patients with cerebellar neurodegeneration induces gray matter changes primarily within nonaffected neocortical regions of the cerebellar-cortical loop. Residual function of the cerebellum appears to be exploited suggesting either a recovery from degeneration or intact processes of cerebellar plasticity in the remaining healthy tissue. PMID:23467375

  12. A Large Scale (N=400) Investigation of Gray Matter Differences in Schizophrenia Using Optimized Voxel-based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Shashwath A.; Giuliani, Nicole R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Schretlen, David J.; Pulver, Anne; Cascella, Nicola; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kates, Wendy; Buchanan, Robert; Sharma, Tonmoy; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies have employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of MRI images as an automated method of investigating cortical gray matter differences in schizophrenia. However, results from these studies vary widely, likely due to different methodological or statistical approaches. Objective To use VBM to investigate gray matter differences in schizophrenia in a sample significantly larger than any published to date, and to increase statistical power sufficiently to reveal differences missed in smaller analyses. Methods Magnetic resonance whole brain images were acquired from four geographic sites, all using the same model 1.5T scanner and software version, and combined to form a sample of 200 patients with both first episode and chronic schizophrenia and 200 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and scanner location. Gray matter concentration was assessed and compared using optimized VBM. Results Compared to the healthy controls, schizophrenia patients showed significantly less gray matter concentration in multiple cortical and subcortical regions, some previously unreported. Overall, we found lower concentrations of gray matter in regions identified in prior studies, most of which reported only subsets of the affected areas. Conclusions Gray matter differences in schizophrenia are most comprehensively elucidated using a large, diverse and representative sample. PMID:18378428

  13. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results. PMID:25986589

  14. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies in schizophrenia—can white matter changes be reliably detected with VBM?

    PubMed Central

    Melonakos, Eric; Shenton, Martha; Rathi, Yogesh; Terry, Doug; Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) is a hypothesis-free, whole-brain, voxel-by-voxel analytic method that attempts to compare imaging data between populations. Schizophrenia studies have utilized this method to localize differences in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) derived Fractional Anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity, between patients and healthy controls. The number of publications has grown, although it is unclear how reliable and reproducible this method is, given the subtle white matter abnormalities expected in schizophrenia. Here we analyze and combine results from 23 studies published to date that use VBM to study schizophrenia in order to evaluate the reproducibility of this method in DTI analysis. Coordinates of each region reported in DTI VBM studies published thus far in schizophrenia were plotted onto a Montreal Neurological Institute atlas, and their anatomical locations were recorded. Results indicated that the reductions of FA in patients with schizophrenia were scattered across the brain. Moreover, even the most consistently reported regions were reported independently in less than 35% of the papers studied. Other instances of reduced FA were replicated at an even lower rate. Our findings demonstrate striking inconsistency, with none of the regions reported in much more than a third of the published papers. Poor replication rate suggests that the application of VBM to DTI data may not be the optimal way for studying the subtle microstructural abnormalities that are being hypothesized in schizophrenia. PMID:21684124

  15. A voxel-based morphometry study of gray matter correlates of facial emotion recognition in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Neves, Maila de Castro L; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Silva Neves, Fernando; de Souza-Duran, Fábio Luis; Busatto, Geraldo; Corrêa, Humberto

    2015-08-30

    Facial emotion recognition (FER) is one of the many cognitive deficits reported in bipolar disorder (BD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate neuroanatomical correlates of FER impairments in BD type I (BD-I). Participants comprised 21 euthymic BD-I patients without Axis I DSM IV-TR comorbidities and 21 healthy controls who were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging and the Penn Emotion Recognition Test (ER40). Preprocessing of images used DARTEL (diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra) for optimized voxel-based morphometry in SPM8. Compared with healthy subjects, BD-I patients performed poorly in on the ER40 and had reduced gray matter volume (GMV) in the left orbitofrontal cortex, superior portion of the temporal pole and insula. In the BD-I group, the statistical maps indicated a direct correlation between FER on the ER40 and right middle cingulate gyrus GMV. Our findings are consistent with the previous studies regarding the overlap of multiple brain networks of social cognition and BD neurobiology, particularly components of the anterior-limbic neural network. PMID:26123449

  16. Stem Transcriptome Reveals Mechanisms to Reduce the Energetic Cost of Shade-Avoidance Responses in Tomato1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cagnola, Juan Ignacio; Ploschuk, Edmundo; Benech-Arnold, Tomás; Finlayson, Scott A.; Casal, Jorge José

    2012-01-01

    While the most conspicuous response to low red/far-red ratios (R:FR) of shade light perceived by phytochrome is the promotion of stem growth, additional, less obvious effects may be discovered by studying changes in the stem transcriptome. Here, we report rapid and reversible stem transcriptome responses to R:FR in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). As expected, low R:FR promoted the expression of growth-related genes, including those involved in the metabolism of cell wall carbohydrates and in auxin responses. In addition, genes involved in flavonoid synthesis, isoprenoid metabolism, and photosynthesis (dark reactions) were overrepresented in clusters showing reduced expression in the stem of low R:FR-treated plants. Consistent with these responses, low R:FR decreased the levels of flavonoids (anthocyanin, quercetin, kaempferol) and selected isoprenoid derivatives (chlorophyll, carotenoids) in the stem and severely reduced the photosynthetic capacity of this organ. However, lignin contents were unaffected. Low R:FR reduced the stem levels of jasmonate, which is a known inducer of flavonoid synthesis. The rate of stem respiration was also reduced in low R:FR-treated plants, indicating that by downsizing the stem photosynthetic apparatus and the levels of photoprotective pigments under low R:FR, tomato plants reduce the energetic cost of shade-avoidance responses. PMID:22872775

  17. Global and regional brain volumes normalization in weight-recovered adolescents with anorexia nervosa: preliminary findings of a longitudinal voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, Monica; Riva, Anna; Morzenti, Sabrina; Grimaldi, Marco; Neri, Francesca; Nacinovich, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The recent literature on anorexia nervosa (AN) suggests that functional and structural abnormalities of cortico-limbic areas might play a role in the evolution of the disease. We explored global and regional brain volumes in a cross-sectional and follow-up study on adolescents affected by AN. Eleven adolescents with AN underwent a voxel-based morphometry study at time of diagnosis and immediately after weight recovery. Data were compared to volumes carried out in eight healthy, age and sex matched controls. Subjects with AN showed increased cerebrospinal fluid volumes and decreased white and gray matter volumes, when compared to controls. Moreover, significant regional gray matter decrease in insular cortex and cerebellum was found at time of diagnosis. No regional white matter decrease was found between samples and controls. Correlations between psychological evaluation and insular volumes were explored. After weight recovery gray matter volumes normalized while reduced global white matter volumes persisted. PMID:25834442

  18. Individual differences in regional prefrontal gray matter morphometry and fractional anisotropy are associated with different constructs of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Smolker, H. R.; Reineberg, A. E.; Orr, J. M.; Banich, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the relationship between structural differences within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) has been widely explored in cognitively impaired populations, little is known about this relationship in healthy young adults. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), surface-based morphometry (SBM), and fractional anisotropy (FA) we determined the association between regional PFC grey matter (GM) morphometry and white matter tract diffusivity with performance on tasks that tap different aspects of EF as drawn from Miyake et al.’s three-factor model of EF. Reductions in both GM volume (VBM) and cortical folding (SBM) in the ventromedial PFC (vmPFC), ventrolateral PFC (vlPFC), and dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) predicted better common EF, shifting-specific, and updating-specific performance, respectively. Despite capturing different components of GM morphometry, voxel- and surface-based findings were highly related, exhibiting regionally overlapping relationships with EF. Increased white matter FA in fiber tracts that connect the vmPFC and vlPFC with posterior regions of the brain also predicted better common EF and shifting-specific performance, respectively. These results suggest that the neural mechanisms supporting distinct aspects of EF may differentially rely on distinct regions of the PFC, and at least in healthy young adults, are influenced by regional morphometry of the PFC and the FA of major white matter tracts that connect the PFC with posterior cortical and subcortical regions. PMID:24562372

  19. Morphometry of an Ischemic Lesion of Cat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Jonathan

    1973-01-01

    Profiles in random electron micrographs of anterior gray matter of normal and ischemic cat spinal cord were measured with a planimetric computer. Analysis of 5600 area measurements revealed the following differences. Mitochondria of neuron cell bodies, axons, axon terminals and astrocytic processes were two to three times larger after ischemia. However, only 15% of mitochondria of axons and axon terminals and 5% of astrocytic processes lost their matrix density and pattern of cristae, compared to 49% of mitochondria of neuron cell bodies. Ischemia caused no significant changes in mean sizes of axons or axon terminals. Lysosomes in neurons were unchanged. The mean size of astrocytic processes increased more than threefold. PMID:4728890

  20. Exploring the brains of Baduk (Go) experts: gray matter morphometry, resting-state functional connectivity, and graph theoretical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, Sung Nyun; Lee, Tae Young; Jang, Joon Hwan; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2013-01-01

    One major characteristic of experts is intuitive judgment, which is an automatic process whereby patterns stored in memory through long-term training are recognized. Indeed, long-term training may influence brain structure and function. A recent study revealed that chess experts at rest showed differences in structure and functional connectivity (FC) in the head of caudate, which is associated with rapid best next-move generation. However, less is known about the structure and function of the brains of Baduk experts (BEs) compared with those of experts in other strategy games. Therefore, we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and FC analyses in BEs to investigate structural brain differences and to clarify the influence of these differences on functional interactions. We also conducted graph theoretical analysis (GTA) to explore the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Compared to novices, BEs exhibited decreased and increased gray matter volume (GMV) in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NA), respectively. We also found increased FC between the amygdala and medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and decreased FC between the NA and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Further GTA revealed differences in measures of the integration of the network and in the regional nodal characteristics of various brain regions activated during Baduk. This study provides evidence for structural and functional differences as well as altered topological organization of the whole-brain functional networks in BEs. Our findings also offer novel suggestions about the cognitive mechanisms behind Baduk expertise, which involves intuitive decision-making mediated by somatic marker circuitry and visuospatial processing. PMID:24106471

  1. Uranium Bio-accumulation and Cycling as revealed by Uranium Isotopes in Naturally Reduced Sediments from the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Pierre; Noël, Vincent; Jemison, Noah; Weaver, Karrie; Bargar, John; Maher, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Uranium (U) groundwater contamination following oxidized U(VI) releases from weathering of mine tailings is a major concern at numerous sites across the Upper Colorado River Basin (CRB), USA. Uranium(IV)-bearing solids accumulated within naturally reduced zones (NRZs) characterized by elevated organic carbon and iron sulfide compounds. Subsequent re-oxidation of U(IV)solid to U(VI)aqueous then controls the release to groundwater and surface water, resulting in plume persistence and raising public health concerns. Thus, understanding the extent of uranium oxidation and reduction within NRZs is critical for assessing the persistence of the groundwater contamination. In this study, we measured solid-phase uranium isotope fractionation (δ238/235U) of sedimentary core samples from four study sites (Shiprock, NM, Grand Junction, Rifle and Naturita, CO) using a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). We observe a strong correlation between U accumulation and the extent of isotopic fractionation, with Δ238U up to +1.8 ‰ between uranium-enriched and low concentration zones. The enrichment in the heavy isotopes within the NRZs appears to be especially important in the vadose zone, which is subject to variations in water table depth. According to previous studies, this isotopic signature is consistent with biotic reduction processes associated with metal-reducing bacteria. Positive correlations between the amount of iron sulfides and the accumulation of reduced uranium underline the importance of sulfate-reducing conditions for U(IV) retention. Furthermore, the positive fractionation associated with U reduction observed across all sites despite some variations in magnitude due to site characteristics, shows a regional trend across the Colorado River Basin. The maximum extent of 238U enrichment observed in the NRZ proximal to the water table further suggests that the redox cycling of uranium, with net release of U(VI) to the groundwater by

  2. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals Highly-Compact Intermediates in the Collision Induced Dissociation of Charge-Reduced Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornschein, Russell E.; Niu, Shuai; Eschweiler, Joseph; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2016-01-01

    Protocols that aim to construct complete models of multiprotein complexes based on ion mobility and mass spectrometry data are becoming an important element of integrative structural biology efforts. However, the usefulness of such data is predicated, in part, on an ability to measure individual subunits removed from the complex while maintaining a compact/folded state. Gas-phase dissociation of intact complexes using collision induced dissociation is a potentially promising pathway for acquiring such protein monomer size information, but most product ions produced are possessed of high charge states and elongated/string-like conformations that are not useful in protein complex modeling. It has previously been demonstrated that the collision induced dissociation of charge-reduced protein complexes can produce compact subunit product ions; however, their formation mechanism is not well understood. Here, we present new experimental evidence for the avidin (64 kDa) and aldolase (157 kDa) tetramers that demonstrates significant complex remodeling during the dissociation of charge-reduced assemblies. Detailed analysis and modeling indicates that highly compact intermediates are accessed during the dissociation process by both complexes. Here, we present putative pathways that describe the formation of such ions, as well as discuss the broader significance of such data for structural biology applications moving forward.

  3. The Morphometry of Lake Palmas, a Deep Natural Lake in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Gilberto F.; Gonçalves, Monica A.; Garcia, Fábio da C.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Palmas (A = 10.3km2) is located in the Lower Doce River Valley (LDRV), on the southeastern coast of Brazil. The Lake District of the LDRV includes 90 lakes, whose basic geomorphology is associated with the alluvial valleys of the Barreiras Formation (Cenozoic, Neogene) and with the Holocene coastal plain. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of morphometry and thermal pattern of a LDRV deep lake, Lake Palmas. A bathymetric survey carried out in 2011 and the analysis of hydrographic and wind data with a geographic information system allowed the calculation of several metrics of lake morphometry. The vertical profiling of physical and chemical variables in the water column during the wet/warm and dry/mild cold seasons of 2011 to 2013 has furnished a better understanding of the influence of the lake morphometry on its structure and function. The overdeepened basin has a subrectangular elongated shape and is aligned in a NW-SE direction in an alluvial valley with a maximum depth (Zmax) of 50.7m, a volume of 2.2×108 m3 (0.22km3) and a mean depth (Zmv) of 21.4m. These metrics suggest Lake Palmas as the deepest natural lake in Brazil. Water column profiling has indicated strong physical and chemical stratification during the wet/warm season, with a hypoxic/anoxic layer occupying one-half of the lake volume. The warm monomictic pattern of Lake Palmas, which is in an accordance to deep tropical lakes, is determined by water column mixing during the dry and mild cold season, especially under the influence of a high effective fetch associated with the incidence of cold fronts. Lake Palmas has a very long theoretical retention time, with a mean of 19.4 years. The changes observed in the hydrological flows of the tributary rivers may disturb the ecological resilience of Lake Palmas. PMID:25406062

  4. Brain Morphometry on Congenital Hand Deformities based on Teichmüller Space Theory

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Wang, Xu; Duan, Ye; Frey, Scott H.; Gu, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Congenital Hand Deformities (CHD) are usually occurred between fourth and eighth week after the embryo is formed. Failure of the transformation from arm bud cells to upper limb can lead to an abnormal appearing/functioning upper extremity which is presented at birth. Some causes are linked to genetics while others are affected by the environment, and the rest have remained unknown. CHD patients develop prehension through the use of their hands, which affect the brain as time passes. In recent years, CHD have gain increasing attention and researches have been conducted on CHD, both surgically and psychologically. However, the impacts of CHD on brain structure are not well-understood so far. Here, we propose a novel approach to apply Teichmüller space theory and conformal welding method to study brain morphometry in CHD patients. Conformal welding signature reflects the geometric relations among different functional areas on the cortex surface, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, invariant under conformal deformation, and encodes complete information of the functional area boundaries. The computational algorithm is based on discrete surface Ricci flow, which has theoretic guarantees for the existence and uniqueness of the solutions. In practice, discrete Ricci flow is equivalent to a convex optimization problem, therefore has high numerically stability. In this paper, we compute the signatures of contours on general 3D surfaces with surface Ricci flow method, which encodes both global and local surface contour information. Then we evaluated the signatures of pre-central and post-central gyrus on healthy control and CHD subjects for analyzing brain cortical morphometry. Preliminary experimental results from 3D MRI data of CHD/control data demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. The statistical comparison between left and right brain gives us a better understanding on brain morphometry of subjects with Congenital Hand Deformities, in particular, missing

  5. MicroCT Morphometry Analysis of Mouse Cancellous Bone: Intra- and Inter-system Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Verdelis, K.; Lukashova, L.; Atti, E.; Mayer-Kuckuk, P.; Peterson, M.G.E.; Tetradis, S.; Boskey, A.L.; van der Meulen, M.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The agreement between measurements and the relative performance reproducibility among different microcomputed tomography (microCT) systems, especially at voxel sizes close to the limit of the instruments, is not known. To compare this reproducibility 3D morphometric analyses of mouse cancellous bone from distal femoral epiphyses were performed using three different ex vivo microCT systems: GE eXplore Locus SP, Scanco μCT35 and Skyscan 1172. Scans were completed in triplicate at 12μm and 8μm voxel sizes and morphometry measurements, from which relative values and dependence on voxel size were examined. Global and individual visually assessed thresholds were compared. Variability from repeated scans at 12μm voxel size was also examined. Bone volume fraction and trabecular separation values were similar, while values for relative bone surface, trabecular thickness and number varied significantly across the three systems. The greatest differences were measured in trabecular thickness (up to 236%) and number (up to 218%). The relative dependence of measurements on voxel size was highly variable for the trabecular number (from 0% to 20% relative difference between measurements from 12μm and 8μm voxel size scans, depending on the system). The intra-system reproducibility of all trabecular measurements was also highly variable across the systems and improved for BV/TV in all the systems when a smaller voxel size was used. It improved using a smaller voxel size in all the other parameters examined for the Scanco system, but not consistently so for the GE or the Skyscan system. Our results indicate trabecular morphometry measurements should not be directly compared across microCT systems. In addition, the conditions, including voxel size, for trabecular morphometry studies in mouse bone should be chosen based on the specific microCT system and the measurements of main interest. PMID:21621659

  6. The morphometry of Lake Palmas, a deep natural lake in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Gilberto F; Gonçalves, Monica A; Garcia, Fábio da C

    2014-01-01

    Lake Palmas (A = 10.3km2) is located in the Lower Doce River Valley (LDRV), on the southeastern coast of Brazil. The Lake District of the LDRV includes 90 lakes, whose basic geomorphology is associated with the alluvial valleys of the Barreiras Formation (Cenozoic, Neogene) and with the Holocene coastal plain. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of morphometry and thermal pattern of a LDRV deep lake, Lake Palmas. A bathymetric survey carried out in 2011 and the analysis of hydrographic and wind data with a geographic information system allowed the calculation of several metrics of lake morphometry. The vertical profiling of physical and chemical variables in the water column during the wet/warm and dry/mild cold seasons of 2011 to 2013 has furnished a better understanding of the influence of the lake morphometry on its structure and function. The overdeepened basin has a subrectangular elongated shape and is aligned in a NW-SE direction in an alluvial valley with a maximum depth (Zmax) of 50.7 m, a volume of 2.2×10(8) m3 (0.22 km3) and a mean depth (Zmv) of 21.4m. These metrics suggest Lake Palmas as the deepest natural lake in Brazil. Water column profiling has indicated strong physical and chemical stratification during the wet/warm season, with a hypoxic/anoxic layer occupying one-half of the lake volume. The warm monomictic pattern of Lake Palmas, which is in an accordance to deep tropical lakes, is determined by water column mixing during the dry and mild cold season, especially under the influence of a high effective fetch associated with the incidence of cold fronts. Lake Palmas has a very long theoretical retention time, with a mean of 19.4 years. The changes observed in the hydrological flows of the tributary rivers may disturb the ecological resilience of Lake Palmas. PMID:25406062

  7. Some fundamental aspects of morphometry in clinical pathology, demonstrated on a simple, multipurpose analysis system.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, M; Christen, H; Ettlin, R; Buser, M; Oestreicher, M; Gschwind, R

    1991-10-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to investigate the value of morphometry, (2) to fix a set of parameters suitable for analyzing diagnostic problems, and (3) to create a general strategy for data storage and for user-friendly data management. The intrinsic value of morphometry lies in the fact that in contrast to other morphologic methods, it permits the presentation of findings in the form of numbers. The following set of morphometric parameters, in the broad sense of the term morphometry, is standard in our laboratory: planimetric parameters (shape descriptors), parameters of the gray value histogram (descriptors of the general gray value distribution), texture parameters (descriptors of the correlation between various image segments), invariant moments (descriptors of the size and localization of textural image segments) and densitometric parameters. The introduction of morphometric procedures into the daily routine is facilitated if data registration and evaluation are performed separately. Original data generated by direct measurement are primary or raw data, which are stored as such. In a separate, second step these raw data are used to compare more or less complex morphometric parameters, which are called "secondary data". A system designed for separate data registration and evaluation can easily be adapted to new methodologic developments. For instance, primary data on objects (gray values, coordinates of the contour) measured one time in the past can be reused at any other time for computing new features from these data. This procedure is comparable to the possibilities in immunohistochemical staining: new immunohistochemical stains can be applied to newly prepared sections of old tissue blocks. PMID:1801829

  8. [Possibility of the morphometry of the neuronal body and nucleus in cryostat sections of nerve tissue].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, I B

    1982-02-01

    A method of fixation by the Carnoy liquid and of gallocyanine staining is proposed in order to obtain clear-cut boundaries of the neuron body, nucleus and nucleolus in cryostat sections of non-fixed frozen nerve tissue, for subsequent morphometry of the body and nucleus of nerve cells. In the resulting sections, the clearness of boundaries of the body and nucleus in a neuron is sufficient for measuring its diameter with the coefficient of variation not exceeding 2.5%. PMID:7041376

  9. Combining the boundary shift integral and tensor-based morphometry for brain atrophy estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalkiewicz, Mateusz; Pai, Akshay; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sommer, Stefan; Darkner, Sune; Sørensen, Lauge; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-03-01

    Brain atrophy from structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is widely used as an imaging surrogate marker for Alzheimers disease. Their utility has been limited due to the large degree of variance and subsequently high sample size estimates. The only consistent and reasonably powerful atrophy estimation methods has been the boundary shift integral (BSI). In this paper, we first propose a tensor-based morphometry (TBM) method to measure voxel-wise atrophy that we combine with BSI. The combined model decreases the sample size estimates significantly when compared to BSI and TBM alone.

  10. Facial morphometry of Ecuadorian patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency/Laron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G B; Rosenbloom, A L; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Campbell, E A; Ullrich, F; Patil, K; Frias, J L

    1994-01-01

    Facial morphometry using computerised image analysis was performed on patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron syndrome) from an inbred population of southern Ecuador. Morphometrics were compared for 49 patients, 70 unaffected relatives, and 14 unrelated persons. Patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency showed significant decreases in measures of vertical facial growth as compared to unaffected relatives and unrelated persons with short stature from other causes. This report validates and quantifies the clinical impression of foreshortened facies in growth hormone receptor deficiency. Images PMID:7815422

  11. Ultrastructural morphometry of the myocardium of Thunnus alalunga.

    PubMed

    Breisch, E A; White, F; Jones, H M; Laurs, R M

    1983-01-01

    The common ventricle in the heart of the Thunnus alalunga was studied. The ventricular myocardium consists of an outer compact layer and a thick inner spongy layer. The compact layer has slightly larger cells (4-6 microns diameter) than the spongy layer (2.5-5 microns diameter). Ultrastructurally the myocardium displays normal arrangements of myofibrils and mitochondria. The sarcoplasmic reticulum is poorly developed. The intercalated discs are simple with the fascia adherens being the most frequent junctional type observed; occasionally a desmosome was seen. Nexus type junctions are present but are unassociated with the intercalated discs. There are no t-tubules evident but the plasmalemma exhibits numerous caveolae which rarely form couplings with the sarcoplasmic reticulum. A morphometric analysis of the volume percent of mitochondria and myofibrils showed that the myocardial cells in the spongy layer of the heart have a significantly greater volume percentage of mitochondria than the compact layer. No significant differences were found between myocardial regions when the volume percentages of myofibrils were compared. The physiological studies revealed that the albacore tuna has heart rates (120 bpm) and ventricular blood pressures (100 mmHg) that are among the highest reported for fish. PMID:6616575

  12. Extraction of sandy bedforms features through geodesic morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debese, Nathalie; Jacq, Jean-José; Garlan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    State-of-art echosounders reveal fine-scale details of mobile sandy bedforms, which are commonly found on continental shelfs. At present, their dynamics are still far from being completely understood. These bedforms are a serious threat to navigation security, anthropic structures and activities, placing emphasis on research breakthroughs. Bedform geometries and their dynamics are closely linked; therefore, one approach is to develop semi-automatic tools aiming at extracting their structural features from bathymetric datasets. Current approaches mimic manual processes or rely on morphological simplification of bedforms. The 1D and 2D approaches cannot address the wide ranges of both types and complexities of bedforms. In contrast, this work attempts to follow a 3D global semi-automatic approach based on a bathymetric TIN. The currently extracted primitives are the salient ridge and valley lines of the sand structures, i.e., waves and mega-ripples. The main difficulty is eliminating the ripples that are found to heavily overprint any observations. To this end, an anisotropic filter that is able to discard these structures while still enhancing the wave ridges is proposed. The second part of the work addresses the semi-automatic interactive extraction and 3D augmented display of the main lines structures. The proposed protocol also allows geoscientists to interactively insert topological constraints.

  13. Multidetector Computed Tomography-Based Microstructural Analysis Reveals Reduced Bone Mineral Content and Trabecular Bone Changes in the Lumbar Spine after Transarterial Chemoembolization Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Miyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Nakamura, Yuko; Komoto, Daisuke; Kaichi, Yoko; Tani, Chihiro; Date, Shuji; Kiguchi, Masao; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It is well recognized that therapeutic irradiation can result in bone damage. However, long-term bone toxicity associated with computed tomography (CT) performed during interventional angiography has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis and trabecular microstructural changes in patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma therapy using an interventional-CT system. Materials and Methods Spinal microarchitecture was examined by 64-detector CT in 81 patients who underwent TACE, 35 patients with chronic hepatitis, and 79 controls. For each patient, the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIv) during TACE (CTDIv (TACE)), the dose-length product (DLP) during TACE (DLP (TACE)), and CTDIv and DLP of routine dynamic CT scans (CTDIv (CT) and DLP (CT), respectively), were calculated as the sum since 2008. Using a three dimensional (3D) image analysis system, the tissue bone mineral density (tBMD) and trabecular parameters of the 12th thoracic vertebra were calculated. Using tBMD at a reported cutoff value of 68 mg/cm3, the prevalence of osteoporosis was assessed. Results The prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly greater in the TACE vs. the control group (39.6% vs. 18.2% for males, P<0.05 and 60.6% vs. 34.8% for females, P<0.01). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that sex, age, and CTDIv (CT) significantly affected the risk of osteoporosis. Of these indices, CTDIv (CT) had the highest area under the curve (AUC) (0.735). Correlation analyses of tBMD with cumulative radiation dose revealed weak correlations between tBMD and CTDIv (CT) (r2 = 0.194, P<0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly higher in post TACE patients than in control subjects. The cumulative radiation dose related to routine dynamic CT studies was a significant contributor to the prevalence of osteoporosis. PMID:25329933

  14. Microarray Analysis Reveals Increased Transcriptional Repression and Reduced Metabolic Activity but Not Major Changes in the Core Apoptotic Machinery during Maturation of Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Raba, Mikk; Palgi, Jaan; Lehtivaara, Maria; Arumäe, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal maturation of the neurons whose main phenotype and basic synaptic contacts are already established includes neuronal growth, refinement of synaptic contacts, final steps of differentiation, programmed cell death period (PCD) etc. In the sympathetic neurons, postnatal maturation includes permanent end of the PCD that occurs with the same time schedule in vivo and in vitro suggesting that the process could be genetically determined. Also many other changes in the neuronal maturation could be permanent and thus based on stable changes in the genome expression. However, postnatal maturation of the neurons is poorly studied. Here we compared the gene expression profiles of immature and mature sympathetic neurons using Affymetrix microarray assay. We found 1310 significantly up-regulated and 1151 significantly down-regulated genes in the mature neurons. Gene ontology analysis reveals up-regulation of genes related to neuronal differentiation, chromatin and epigenetic changes, extracellular factors and their receptors, and cell adhesion, whereas many down-regulated genes were related to metabolic and biosynthetic processes. We show that termination of PCD is not related to major changes in the expression of classical genes for apoptosis or cell survival. Our dataset is deposited to the ArrayExpress database and is a valuable source to select candidate genes in the studies of neuronal maturation. As an example, we studied the changes in the expression of selected genes Igf2bp3, Coro1A, Zfp57, Dcx, and Apaf1 in the young and mature sympathetic ganglia by quantitative PCR and show that these were strongly downregulated in the mature ganglia. PMID:27013977

  15. Dune Morphometry in the Age of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, N.

    2014-12-01

    Dune patterns can be characterized in many different ways. Relationships between dune height, width and spacing, and the spatial variation in these parameters have been widely employed to provide quantitative information that can be used to describe dune patterns and make comparisons between dunes in widely separated areas, as well as to identify different generations of dunes. Digital elevation models (e.g. ASTER GDEM) provide a rich resource of data for analyses of dune patterns at landscape scales in several ways, including: (1) more extensive analyses using traditional measures, such as relationships between dune height and spacing, and the spatial variation in these parameters; and (2) estimation of sediment thickness on a regional scale. Analyses of data for Arabian and Namibian sand seas and dune fields show that dune height and spacing relationships are much more variable than previously reported and call into question existing models. Regional patterns of sediment thickness reveal areas of erosion, bypass, and accumulation that can be related to transport pathways and wind regimes. The widespread occurrence of complex dune patterns as well as the magnitude of the newly available data sets however requires more sophisticated analyses than simple extraction of dune morphometric parameters using GIS approaches. Geostatistical analyses using spatial autocorrelation, Fourier, and Wavelet methods have been employed in analyses of sub-aqueous bedforms and show promise for dune systems. Automated or semi-automated identification of dune length, width, spacing, and trends using advanced image analysis techniques such as linear segment detection is a potentially transformative approach. The strengths and weaknesses of these methods to provide pertinent geomorphic information are currently being evaluated, but they have the potential to provide new insights into the nature of dune patterns.

  16. Multispectral brain morphometry in Tourette syndrome persisting into adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Davide; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Hutton, Chloe; Orth, Michael; Robertson, Mary M.; Critchley, Hugo D.; Frackowiak, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder with a high prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive-compulsive disorder co-morbidities. Structural changes have been found in frontal cortex and striatum in children and adolescents. A limited number of morphometric studies in Tourette syndrome persisting into adulthood suggest ongoing structural alterations affecting frontostriatal circuits. Using cortical thickness estimation and voxel-based analysis of T1- and diffusion-weighted structural magnetic resonance images, we examined 40 adults with Tourette syndrome in comparison with 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients with Tourette syndrome showed relative grey matter volume reduction in orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices bilaterally. Cortical thinning extended into the limbic mesial temporal lobe. The grey matter changes were modulated additionally by the presence of co-morbidities and symptom severity. Prefrontal cortical thickness reduction correlated negatively with tic severity, while volume increase in primary somatosensory cortex depended on the intensity of premonitory sensations. Orbitofrontal cortex volume changes were further associated with abnormal water diffusivity within grey matter. White matter analysis revealed changes in fibre coherence in patients with Tourette syndrome within anterior parts of the corpus callosum. The severity of motor tics and premonitory urges had an impact on the integrity of tracts corresponding to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections. Our results provide empirical support for a patho-aetiological model of Tourette syndrome based on developmental abnormalities, with perturbation of compensatory systems marking persistence of symptoms into adulthood. We interpret the symptom severity related grey matter volume increase in distinct functional brain areas as evidence of ongoing structural plasticity. The convergence of

  17. Bovine Teat Microbiome Analysis Revealed Reduced Alpha Diversity and Significant Changes in Taxonomic Profiles in Quarters with a History of Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Falentin, Hélène; Rault, Lucie; Nicolas, Aurélie; Bouchard, Damien S; Lassalas, Jacques; Lamberton, Philippe; Aubry, Jean-Marc; Marnet, Pierre-Guy; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a mammary gland inflammatory disease often due to bacterial infections. Like many other infections, it used to be considered as a host-pathogen interaction driven by host and bacterial determinants. Until now, the involvement of the bovine mammary gland microbiota in the host-pathogen interaction has been poorly investigated, and mainly during the infectious episode. In this study, the bovine teat microbiome was investigated in 31 quarters corresponding to 27 animals, which were all free of inflammation at sampling time but which had different histories regarding mastitis: from no episode of mastitis on all the previous lactations (Healthy quarter, Hq) to one or several clinical mastitis events (Mastitic quarter, Mq). Several quarters whose status was unclear (possible history of subclinical mastitis) were classified as NDq. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from foremilk samples and swab samples of the teat canal. Taxonomic profiles were determined by pyrosequencing on 16s amplicons of the V3-4 region. Hq quarters showed a higher diversity compared to Mq ones (Shannon index: ~8 and 6, respectively). Clustering of the quarters based on their bacterial composition made it possible to separate Mq and Hq quarters into two separate clusters (C1 and C2, respectively). Discriminant analysis of taxonomic profiles between these clusters revealed several differences and allowed the identification of taxonomic markers in relation to mastitis history. C2 quarters were associated with a higher proportion of the Clostridia class (including genera such as Ruminococcus, Oscillospira, Roseburia, Dorea, etc.), the Bacteroidetes phylum (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Paludibacter, etc.), and the Bifidobacteriales order (Bifidobacterium), whereas C1 quarters showed a higher proportion of the Bacilli class (Staphylococcus) and Chlamydiia class. These results indicate that microbiota is altered in udders which have already developed mastitis, even far from the infectious episode

  18. Bovine Teat Microbiome Analysis Revealed Reduced Alpha Diversity and Significant Changes in Taxonomic Profiles in Quarters with a History of Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Falentin, Hélène; Rault, Lucie; Nicolas, Aurélie; Bouchard, Damien S.; Lassalas, Jacques; Lamberton, Philippe; Aubry, Jean-Marc; Marnet, Pierre-Guy; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a mammary gland inflammatory disease often due to bacterial infections. Like many other infections, it used to be considered as a host-pathogen interaction driven by host and bacterial determinants. Until now, the involvement of the bovine mammary gland microbiota in the host-pathogen interaction has been poorly investigated, and mainly during the infectious episode. In this study, the bovine teat microbiome was investigated in 31 quarters corresponding to 27 animals, which were all free of inflammation at sampling time but which had different histories regarding mastitis: from no episode of mastitis on all the previous lactations (Healthy quarter, Hq) to one or several clinical mastitis events (Mastitic quarter, Mq). Several quarters whose status was unclear (possible history of subclinical mastitis) were classified as NDq. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from foremilk samples and swab samples of the teat canal. Taxonomic profiles were determined by pyrosequencing on 16s amplicons of the V3-4 region. Hq quarters showed a higher diversity compared to Mq ones (Shannon index: ~8 and 6, respectively). Clustering of the quarters based on their bacterial composition made it possible to separate Mq and Hq quarters into two separate clusters (C1 and C2, respectively). Discriminant analysis of taxonomic profiles between these clusters revealed several differences and allowed the identification of taxonomic markers in relation to mastitis history. C2 quarters were associated with a higher proportion of the Clostridia class (including genera such as Ruminococcus, Oscillospira, Roseburia, Dorea, etc.), the Bacteroidetes phylum (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Paludibacter, etc.), and the Bifidobacteriales order (Bifidobacterium), whereas C1 quarters showed a higher proportion of the Bacilli class (Staphylococcus) and Chlamydiia class. These results indicate that microbiota is altered in udders which have already developed mastitis, even far from the infectious episode

  19. A comparison of manual neuronal reconstruction from biocytin histology or 2-photon imaging: morphometry and computer modeling

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Arne V.; Grabuschnig, Stefan; Legenstein, Robert; Sjöström, P. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Accurate 3D reconstruction of neurons is vital for applications linking anatomy and physiology. Reconstructions are typically created using Neurolucida after biocytin histology (BH). An alternative inexpensive and fast method is to use freeware such as Neuromantic to reconstruct from fluorescence imaging (FI) stacks acquired using 2-photon laser-scanning microscopy during physiological recording. We compare these two methods with respect to morphometry, cell classification, and multicompartmental modeling in the NEURON simulation environment. Quantitative morphological analysis of the same cells reconstructed using both methods reveals that whilst biocytin reconstructions facilitate tracing of more distal collaterals, both methods are comparable in representing the overall morphology: automated clustering of reconstructions from both methods successfully separates neocortical basket cells from pyramidal cells but not BH from FI reconstructions. BH reconstructions suffer more from tissue shrinkage and compression artifacts than FI reconstructions do. FI reconstructions, on the other hand, consistently have larger process diameters. Consequently, significant differences in NEURON modeling of excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) forward propagation are seen between the two methods, with FI reconstructions exhibiting smaller depolarizations. Simulated action potential backpropagation (bAP), however, is indistinguishable between reconstructions obtained with the two methods. In our hands, BH reconstructions are necessary for NEURON modeling and detailed morphological tracing, and thus remain state of the art, although they are more labor intensive, more expensive, and suffer from a higher failure rate due to the occasional poor outcome of histological processing. However, for a subset of anatomical applications such as cell type identification, FI reconstructions are superior, because of indistinguishable classification performance with greater ease of use

  20. From Cortical and Subcortical Grey Matter Abnormalities to Neurobehavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Aghakhanyan, Gayane; Bonanni, Paolo; Randazzo, Giovanna; Nappi, Sara; Tessarotto, Federica; De Martin, Lara; Frijia, Francesca; De Marchi, Daniele; De Masi, Francesco; Kuppers, Beate; Lombardo, Francesco; Caramella, Davide; Montanaro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder due to loss of expression of maternal ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene. It is characterized by severe developmental delay, speech impairment, movement or balance disorder and typical behavioral uniqueness. Affected individuals show normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, although mild dysmyelination may be observed. In this study, we adopted a quantitative MRI analysis with voxel-based morphometry (FSL-VBM) method to investigate disease-related changes in the cortical/subcortical grey matter (GM) structures. Since 2006 to 2013 twenty-six AS patients were assessed by our multidisciplinary team. From those, sixteen AS children with confirmed maternal 15q11-q13 deletions (mean age 7.7 ± 3.6 years) and twenty-one age-matched controls were recruited. The developmental delay and motor dysfunction were assessed using Bayley III and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the clinical and neuropsychological datasets. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired and FSL-VBM approach was applied to investigate differences in the local GM volume and to correlate clinical and neuropsychological changes in the regional distribution of GM. We found bilateral GM volume loss in AS compared to control children in the striatum, limbic structures, insular and orbitofrontal cortices. Voxel-wise correlation analysis with the principal components of the PCA output revealed a strong relationship with GM volume in the superior parietal lobule and precuneus on the left hemisphere. The anatomical distribution of cortical/subcortical GM changes plausibly related to several clinical features of the disease and may provide an important morphological underpinning for clinical and neurobehavioral symptoms in children with AS. PMID:27626634

  1. Childhood adversity is linked to differential brain volumes in adolescents with alcohol use disorder: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Samantha J; Dalvie, Shareefa; Cuzen, Natalie L; Cardenas, Valerie; Fein, George; Stein, Dan J

    2014-06-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies link both alcohol use disorder (AUD) and early adversity to neurobiological differences in the adult brain. However, the association between AUD and childhood adversity and effects on the developing adolescent brain are less clear, due in part to the confound of psychiatric comorbidity. Here we examine early life adversity and its association with brain volume in a unique sample of 116 South African adolescents (aged 12-16) with AUD but without psychiatric comorbidity. Participants were 58 adolescents with DSM-IV alcohol dependence and with no other psychiatric comorbidities, and 58 age-, gender- and protocol-matched light/non-drinking controls (HC). Assessments included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). MR images were acquired on a 3T Siemens Magnetom Allegra scanner. Volumes of global and regional structures were estimated using SPM8 Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM), with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and regression analyses. In whole brain ANCOVA analyses, a main effect of group when examining the AUD effect after covarying out CTQ was observed on brain volume in bilateral superior temporal gyrus. Subsequent regression analyses to examine how childhood trauma scores are linked to brain volumes in the total cohort revealed a negative correlation in the left hippocampus and right precentral gyrus. Furthermore, bilateral (but most significantly left) hippocampal volume was negatively associated with sub-scores on the CTQ in the total cohort. These findings support our view that some alterations found in brain volumes in studies of adolescent AUD may reflect the impact of confounding factors such as psychiatric comorbidity rather than the effects of alcohol per se. In particular, early life adversity may influence the developing adolescent brain in specific brain regions, such as the hippocampus. PMID:24496784

  2. Andean Basins Morphometry: Assesing South American Large Rivers' Source Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, R. A.; Latrubesse, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Presently there are no regional-scale morphometric analyses of Andean fluvial basins. Therefore, we created a continental-scale database of these basins. Our data covers over an area 1,000,000 km2 of the Andes, from Venezuela to Argentina. These basins are the source of some of the largest rivers in the world including the Amazon, Orinoco, Parana, and Magdalena. Morphometric parameters including shape factor, relief ratio, longitudinal profiles and different indices of basin elevation were calculated based on the CGIAR SRTM 4.1 DEM (~90 m resolution). FAO Hydrosheds were used to segment the DEM by major catchment and then manually cut at the Andean zone. In the North and Central Andes, this produced over 500,000 subcatchments, which we reduced to 619 by setting minimum catchment area to 100 km2. We then integrate lithologic data from DNPM geologic data. Our results indicate that sedimentary lithologies dominate Central Andean catchments (n=268,k=4), which cover an area 767,00 km2, while the Northern Andean catchments (covering 350,000 km2) are more varied, dominated by volcanics in the Pacific (n=78), a sedimentary (48%) dominant mix in the Caribbean (n=138) and 60% sedimentary in the Amazon-Orinoco subregion catchments (n=138). Elevation averages are smallest in the north Andes and average maximum elevations (6,026 m) in the Argentinian catchments (n=65) of the Central Andes are the highest. Shape factors range from 0.49 to 0.58 in the North and 0.52 to 0.58 in the Central Andes. There are clear differences in all categories between region and subregion, but that difference does not hinge on a single morphometric or geologic parameter. Morphometric parameters at a watershed scale (listed in Table) are analyzed and hydrologic data from gauging stations throughout the Andes (n=100) are used to compare morphometric parameters with lithology and characteristics from the basin hydrograph (peak discharge timing, minimum and maximum discharge, and runoff).

  3. Generalized Tensor-Based Morphometry of HIV/AIDS Using Multivariate Statistics on Deformation Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Lepore, Natasha; Brun, Caroline; Chou, Yi-Yu; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Dutton, Rebecca A.; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Luders, Eileen; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Becker, James T.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of a new multivariate method for tensor-based morphometry (TBM). Statistics on Riemannian manifolds are developed that exploit the full information in deformation tensor fields. In TBM, multiple brain images are warped to a common neuroanatomical template via 3-D nonlinear registration; the resulting deformation fields are analyzed statistically to identify group differences in anatomy. Rather than study the Jacobian determinant (volume expansion factor) of these deformations, as is common, we retain the full deformation tensors and apply a manifold version of Hotelling’s T 2 test to them, in a Log-Euclidean domain. In 2-D and 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 26 HIV/AIDS patients and 14 matched healthy subjects, we compared multivariate tensor analysis versus univariate tests of simpler tensor-derived indices: the Jacobian determinant, the trace, geodesic anisotropy, and eigenvalues of the deformation tensor, and the angle of rotation of its eigenvectors. We detected consistent, but more extensive patterns of structural abnormalities, with multivariate tests on the full tensor manifold. Their improved power was established by analyzing cumulative p-value plots using false discovery rate (FDR) methods, appropriately controlling for false positives. This increased detection sensitivity may empower drug trials and large-scale studies of disease that use tensor-based morphometry. PMID:18270068

  4. Pedicle Morphometry for Thoracic Screw Fixation in Ethnic Koreans : Radiological Assessment Using Computed Tomographic Myelography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Soo; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Young-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Objective In the thoracic spine, insertion of a pedicle screw is annoying due to small pedicle size and wide morphological variation between different levels of the spine and between individuals. The aim of our study was to analyze radiologic parameters of the pedicle morphometry from T1 to T8 using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) in Korean population. Methods For evaluation of the thoracic pedicle morphometry, the authors prospectively analyzed a consecutive series of 26 patients with stable thoracic spines. With the consent of patients, thoracic CTM were performed, from T1 to T8. We calculated the transverse outer diameters and the transverse angles of the pedicle, distance from the cord to the inner cortical wall of the pedicle, and distance from the cord to the dura. Results Transverse outer pedicle diameter was widest at T1 (7.66 ± 2.14 mm) and narrowest at T4 (4.38 ± 1.55 mm). Transverse pedicle angle was widest at T1 (30.2 ± 12.0°) and it became less than 9.0° below T6 level. Theoretical safety zone of the medial perforation of the pedicle screw, namely, distance from the cord to inner cortical wall of the pedicle was more than 4.5 mm. Conclusion Based on this study, we suggest that the current pedicle screw system is not always suitable for Korean patients. Computed tomography is required before performing a transpedicular screw fixation at the thoracic levels. PMID:19893719

  5. A case study of morphometry as a more sensitive paleoceanographic tool in Globigerinoides ruber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, F. S.; de Lima Toledo, F. A.; Badaraco Costa, K.

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of paleoceanographic tools that take advantage from the wide geographic and temporal occurrence of planktic foraminifers in marine sediments. These tools comprises since simple visual identification and counting to geochemical analysis. Globigerinoides ruber is specially employed due to its high abundance in addition to the advantages mentioned above. That has been attributed to its broad tolerance to most of ecological factors and due to this fact, for this reason, its abundance fluctuation does not provide a significant paleocenographic data like other species do. Globigerinoides ruber has been largely employed in geochemical analysis which demands a higher number of individuals. However, Globigerinoides ruber from brazilian continental margin core tops sediments presents no significant fluctuation either in its abundance and on two of the main paleoceanographic proxies, oxygen and carbon isotope signals, indicating there is no significant environmental difference along brazilian continental margin. Nevertheless, Globigerinoides ruber specimens morphometry does show a significant change between brazilian continental margin core tops. This indicates that morphometry may be a more sensitive tool, enabling a more detailed exploration of paleoceanographical data than other tools do in this species.

  6. Voxel-based morphometry in eating disorders: correlation of psychopathology with grey matter volume.

    PubMed

    Joos, Andreas; Klöppel, Stefan; Hartmann, Armin; Glauche, Volkmar; Tüscher, Oliver; Perlov, Evgeniy; Saum, Barbara; Freyer, Tobias; Zeeck, Almut; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2010-05-30

    Twenty-nine adult female patients with eating disorders (17 with bulimia nervosa, 12 with restrictive anorexia nervosa) were compared with 18 age-matched female healthy controls, using voxel-based morphometry. Restrictive anorexia nervosa patients showed a decrease of grey matter, particularly affecting the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, temporoparietal regions and the precuneus. By contrast, patients with bulimia nervosa did not differ from healthy controls. A positive correlation of "drive for thinness" and grey matter volume of the right inferior parietal lobe was found for both eating disorder groups. The strong reduction of grey matter volume in adult patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa is in line with results of adolescent patients. Contrary to other studies, this first voxel-based morphometry report of bulimic patients did not find any structural abnormalities. The inferior parietal cortex is a critical region for sensory integration of body and spatial perception, and the correlation of "drive for thinness" with grey matter volume of this region points to a neural correlate of this core psychopathological feature of eating disorders. PMID:20400273

  7. How much is there really? Why stereology is essential in lung morphometry.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Ewald R; Hsia, Connie C W; Ochs, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative data on lung structure are essential to set up structure-function models for assessing the functional performance of the lung or to make statistically valid comparisons in experimental morphology, physiology, or pathology. The methods of choice for microscopy-based lung morphometry are those of stereology, the science of quantitative characterization of irregular three-dimensional objects on the basis of measurements made on two-dimensional sections. From a practical perspective, stereology is an assumption-free set of methods of unbiased sampling with geometric probes, based on a solid mathematical foundation. Here, we discuss the pitfalls of lung morphometry and present solutions, from specimen preparation to the sampling scheme in multiple stages, for obtaining unbiased estimates of morphometric parameters such as volumes, surfaces, lengths, and numbers. This is demonstrated on various examples. Stereological methods are accurate, efficient, simple, and transparent; the precision of the estimates depends on the size and distribution of the sample. For obtaining quantitative data on lung structure at all microscopic levels, state-of-the-art stereology is the gold standard. PMID:16973815

  8. Generalized tensor-based morphometry of HIV/AIDS using multivariate statistics on deformation tensors.

    PubMed

    Lepore, N; Brun, C; Chou, Y Y; Chiang, M C; Dutton, R A; Hayashi, K M; Luders, E; Lopez, O L; Aizenstein, H J; Toga, A W; Becker, J T; Thompson, P M

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of a new multivariate method for tensor-based morphometry (TBM). Statistics on Riemannian manifolds are developed that exploit the full information in deformation tensor fields. In TBM, multiple brain images are warped to a common neuroanatomical template via 3-D nonlinear registration; the resulting deformation fields are analyzed statistically to identify group differences in anatomy. Rather than study the Jacobian determinant (volume expansion factor) of these deformations, as is common, we retain the full deformation tensors and apply a manifold version of Hotelling's $T(2) test to them, in a Log-Euclidean domain. In 2-D and 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 26 HIV/AIDS patients and 14 matched healthy subjects, we compared multivariate tensor analysis versus univariate tests of simpler tensor-derived indices: the Jacobian determinant, the trace, geodesic anisotropy, and eigenvalues of the deformation tensor, and the angle of rotation of its eigenvectors. We detected consistent, but more extensive patterns of structural abnormalities, with multivariate tests on the full tensor manifold. Their improved power was established by analyzing cumulative p-value plots using false discovery rate (FDR) methods, appropriately controlling for false positives. This increased detection sensitivity may empower drug trials and large-scale studies of disease that use tensor-based morphometry. PMID:18270068

  9. The effect of cryopreservation on sperm head morphometry in Florida male goat related to sperm freezability.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M; Rodríguez, I; Dorado, J M

    2007-07-01

    The Sperm Class Analyzer was used to investigate the effect of freeze-thawing procedure on Florida buck sperm head morphometry, and to relate possible changes in sperm head dimensions to cryopreservation success. Semen samples (n=76) were frozen with tris and milk-based extenders and thawed. Sperm quality samples (motility, morphology, acrosome), and sperm head morphometric values (length, width, area, perimeter, ellipticity) were compared between fresh and frozen-thawed samples. Sperm freezability was judged according to the sperm quality parameters assessed. Fertility data was obtained after artificial insemination with cryopreserved semen. Cryopreservation success was different between freezing methods. Sperm head dimensions were significantly (p<0.05) smaller in cryopreserved tris and milk spermatozoa respectively than in those of the fresh samples. The sperm head morphometric parameters that had changed after cryopreservation were lower in suitable semen samples after thawing and with successful pregnancies after artificial insemination. These data suggest that changes in sperm head morphometry might reflect spermatozoa injury occurred during cryopreservation. PMID:16904275

  10. Analysis of shallow landslides by morphometry parameters derived from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, A.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; Wiegand, C.; Kringer, K.; Geitner, C.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion by shallow landslides is a widespread and growing phenomenon in mountainous areas. The major consequences are loss of soil and regolith as well as damages on infrastructure and provision of unconsolidated material for secondary processes such as mudflows. In this study we present a concept for extracting morphometry parameters from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds in order to investigate the relation between slope surface structure and regolith depth. TLS is used to collect high-resolution point cloud data of an affected slope in the Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). Regolith depth is considered to be one of the important factors for the development of shallow landslides. However, direct field measurements are labour- and time-consuming. In this study we developed an approach, to investigate the relation between regolith depth and surface morphometry parameters. The reference regolith depth information is derived from lightweight dynamic cone penetrometer tests (DCPT) within the test site. The suggested approach integrates spatial analysis of Geographic Information Systems and point cloud processing algorithms. It will help to enhance the prediction of shallow landslide occurrence by (i) deriving high resolution 3D morphometric parameters and (ii) determining regolith depth with a reasonable effort due to automation. In future we want to be able to contribute with this concept to the detailed modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility on alpine slopes.

  11. Neural Correlates of Aggression in Medication-Naive Children with ADHD: Multivariate Analysis of Morphometry and Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jiook; Fekete, Tomer; Siciliano, Francesco; Biezonski, Dominik; Greenhill, Laurence; Pliszka, Steven R; Blader, Joseph C; Krain Roy, Amy; Leibenluft, Ellen; Posner, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Aggression is widely observed in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and has been frequently linked to frustration or the unsatisfied anticipation of reward. Although animal studies and human functional neuroimaging implicate altered reward processing in aggressive behaviors, no previous studies have documented the relationship between fronto-accumbal circuitry—a critical cortical pathway to subcortical limbic regions—and aggression in medication-naive children with ADHD. To address this, we collected behavioral measures and parental reports of aggression and impulsivity, as well as structural and diffusion MRI, from 30 children with ADHD and 31 healthy controls (HC) (mean age, 10±2.1 SD). Using grey matter morphometry and probabilistic tractography combined with multivariate statistical modeling (partial least squares regression and support vector regression), we identified anomalies within the fronto-accumbal circuit in childhood ADHD, which were associated with increased aggression. More specifically, children with ADHD showed reduced right accumbal volumes and frontal-accumbal white matter connectivity compared with HC. The magnitude of the accumbal volume reductions within the ADHD group was significantly correlated with increased aggression, an effect mediated by the relationship between the accumbal volume and impulsivity. Furthermore, aggression, but not impulsivity, was significantly explained by multivariate measures of fronto-accumbal white matter connectivity and cortical thickness within the orbitofrontal cortex. Our multi-modal imaging, combined with multivariate statistical modeling, indicates that the fronto-accumbal circuit is an important substrate of aggression in children with ADHD. These findings suggest that strategies aimed at probing the fronto-accumbal circuit may be beneficial for the treatment of aggressive behaviors in childhood ADHD. PMID:25645374

  12. Neural Correlates of Aggression in Medication-Naive Children with ADHD: Multivariate Analysis of Morphometry and Tractography.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Fekete, Tomer; Siciliano, Francesco; Biezonski, Dominik; Greenhill, Laurence; Pliszka, Steven R; Blader, Joseph C; Roy, Amy Krain; Leibenluft, Ellen; Posner, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Aggression is widely observed in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and has been frequently linked to frustration or the unsatisfied anticipation of reward. Although animal studies and human functional neuroimaging implicate altered reward processing in aggressive behaviors, no previous studies have documented the relationship between fronto-accumbal circuitry-a critical cortical pathway to subcortical limbic regions-and aggression in medication-naive children with ADHD. To address this, we collected behavioral measures and parental reports of aggression and impulsivity, as well as structural and diffusion MRI, from 30 children with ADHD and 31 healthy controls (HC) (mean age, 10±2.1 SD). Using grey matter morphometry and probabilistic tractography combined with multivariate statistical modeling (partial least squares regression and support vector regression), we identified anomalies within the fronto-accumbal circuit in childhood ADHD, which were associated with increased aggression. More specifically, children with ADHD showed reduced right accumbal volumes and frontal-accumbal white matter connectivity compared with HC. The magnitude of the accumbal volume reductions within the ADHD group was significantly correlated with increased aggression, an effect mediated by the relationship between the accumbal volume and impulsivity. Furthermore, aggression, but not impulsivity, was significantly explained by multivariate measures of fronto-accumbal white matter connectivity and cortical thickness within the orbitofrontal cortex. Our multi-modal imaging, combined with multivariate statistical modeling, indicates that the fronto-accumbal circuit is an important substrate of aggression in children with ADHD. These findings suggest that strategies aimed at probing the fronto-accumbal circuit may be beneficial for the treatment of aggressive behaviors in childhood ADHD. PMID:25645374

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SMALL AIRWAYS AND ALVEOLI FROM CHILDHOOD TO ADULT LUNG MEASURED BY AEROSOL-DERIVED AIRWAY MORPHOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the human development of pulmonary airspaces is important for calculating the dose from exposure to inhaled materials as a function of age. We have measured, in vivo, the airspace caliber of the small airways and alveoli by aerosol-derived airway morphometry (ADAM) ...

  14. Dyslexia and Voxel-Based Morphometry: Correlations between Five Behavioural Measures of Dyslexia and Gray and White Matter Volumes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboer, Peter; Scholte, H. Steven; Vorst, Harrie C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In voxel-based morphometry studies of dyslexia, the relation between causal theories of dyslexia and gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations is still under debate. Some alterations are consistently reported, but others failed to reach significance. We investigated GM alterations in a large sample of Dutch students (37 dyslexics…

  15. Effects of Direct-Fed Microbials on Growth Performance, Gut Morphometry, and Immune Characteristics in Broiler Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare growth performance, gut morphometry, and parameters of local and systemic immunity in broiler chickens fed for 22 consecutive days with a diet supplemented with one of eight Bacillus spp. as a direct-fed microbial (DFM), a commercial product incorporating three DF...

  16. Effects of direct-fed microbials on growth performance, gut morphometry, and immune characteristics in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare growth performance, gut morphometry, and parameters of local and systemic immunity in broiler chickens fed for 22 consecutive days with a diet supplemented with one of eight Bacillus spp. as a direct-fed microbial (DFM), a commercial product incorporating three DF...

  17. GENETIC INFLUENCE OF APOE4 GENOTYPE ON HIPPOCAMPAL MORPHOMETRY - AN N=725 SURFACE-BASED ADNI STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Leporé, Natasha; Gutman, Boris A.; Thompson, Paul M.; Baxter, Leslie C.; Caselli, Richard L.; Wang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Hippocampal volumes are generally smaller in AD patients carrying the e4 allele compared to e4 non-carriers. Here we examined the effect of APOE e4 on hippocampal morphometry in a large imaging database – the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We automatically segmented and constructed hippocampal surfaces from the baseline MR images of 725 subjects with known APOE genotype information including 167 with AD, 354 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 204 normal controls. High-order correspondences between hippocampal surfaces were enforced across subjects with a novel inverse consistent surface fluid registration method. Multivariate statistics consisting of multivariate tensor-based morphometry (mTBM) and radial distance were computed for surface deformation analysis. Using Hotelling’s T2 test, we found significant morphological deformation in APOE e4 carriers relative to non-carriers in the entire cohort as well as in the non-demented (pooled MCI and control) subjects, affecting the left hippocampus more than the right, and this effect was more pronounced in e4 homozygotes than heterozygotes. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that showed e4 carriers exhibit accelerated hippocampal atrophy; we extend these findings to a novel measure of hippocampal morphometry. Hippocampal morphometry has significant potential as an imaging biomarker of early stage AD. PMID:24453132

  18. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Brain Volumes Changes of Postmenopausal Women Revealed by Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhao; Casanova, Ramon; Resnick, Susan M.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Baker, Laura D.; Padual, Claudia B.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Bryan, R. Nick; Espeland, Mark A.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study Magnetic Resonance Imaging (WHIMS-MRI) provides an opportunity to evaluate how menopausal hormone therapy (HT) affects the structure of older women’s brains. Our earlier work based on region of interest (ROI) analysis demonstrated potential structural changes underlying adverse effects of HT on cognition. However, the ROI-based analysis is limited in statistical power and precision, and cannot provide fine-grained mapping of whole-brain changes. Methods We aimed to identify local structural differences between HT and placebo groups from WHIMS-MRI in a whole-brain refined level, by using a novel method, named Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Analysis (ODVBA). ODVBA is a recently proposed imaging pattern analysis approach for group comparisons utilizing a spatially adaptive analysis scheme to accurately locate areas of group differences, thereby providing superior sensitivity and specificity to detect the structural brain changes over conventional methods. Results Women assigned to HT treatments had significant Gray Matter (GM) losses compared to the placebo groups in the anterior cingulate and the adjacent medial frontal gyrus, and the orbitofrontal cortex, which persisted after multiple comparison corrections. There were no regions where HT was significantly associated with larger volumes compared to placebo, although a trend of marginal significance was found in the posterior cingulate cortical area. The CEE-Alone and CEE+MPA groups, although compared with different placebo controls, demonstrated similar effects according to the spatial patterns of structural changes. Conclusions HT had adverse effects on GM volumes and risk for cognitive impairment and dementia in older women. These findings advanced our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of HT effects. PMID:26974440

  19. Quantification and Comparison of Anti-Fibrotic Therapies by Polarized SRM and SHG-Based Morphometry in Rat UUO Model

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, Steve M.; Matera, Damian; Lee, ChungWein; Yang, Haichun; Fryer, Ryan M.; Fogo, Agnes B.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis (IF) is an important pathologic manifestation of disease progression in a variety of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). However, the quantitative and reproducible analysis of IF remains a challenge, especially in experimental animal models of progressive IF. In this study, we compare traditional polarized Sirius Red morphometry (SRM) to novel Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)-based morphometry of unstained tissues for quantitative analysis of IF in the rat 5 day unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. To validate the specificity of SHG for detecting fibrillar collagen components in IF, co-localization studies for collagens type I, III, and IV were performed using IHC. In addition, we examined the correlation, dynamic range, sensitivity, and ability of polarized SRM and SHG-based morphometry to detect an anti-fibrotic effect of three different treatment regimens. Comparisons were made across three separate studies in which animals were treated with three mechanistically distinct pharmacologic agents: enalapril (ENA, 15, 30, 60 mg/kg), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, 2, 20 mg/kg) or the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) neutralizing antibody, EX75606 (1, 3, 10 mg/kg). Our results demonstrate a strong co-localization of the SHG signal with fibrillar collagens I and III but not non-fibrillar collagen IV. Quantitative IF, calculated as percent cortical area of fibrosis, demonstrated similar response profile for both polarized SRM and SHG-based morphometry. The two methodologies exhibited a strong correlation across all three pharmacology studies (r2 = 0.89–0.96). However, compared with polarized SRM, SHG-based morphometry delivered a greater dynamic range and absolute magnitude of reduction of IF after treatment. In summary, we demonstrate that SHG-based morphometry in unstained kidney tissues is comparable to polarized SRM for quantitation of fibrillar collagens, but with an enhanced sensitivity to detect treatment-induced reductions in

  20. Quantification and Comparison of Anti-Fibrotic Therapies by Polarized SRM and SHG-Based Morphometry in Rat UUO Model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hu Sheng; Weldon, Steve M; Matera, Damian; Lee, ChungWein; Yang, Haichun; Fryer, Ryan M; Fogo, Agnes B; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2016-01-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis (IF) is an important pathologic manifestation of disease progression in a variety of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). However, the quantitative and reproducible analysis of IF remains a challenge, especially in experimental animal models of progressive IF. In this study, we compare traditional polarized Sirius Red morphometry (SRM) to novel Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)-based morphometry of unstained tissues for quantitative analysis of IF in the rat 5 day unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. To validate the specificity of SHG for detecting fibrillar collagen components in IF, co-localization studies for collagens type I, III, and IV were performed using IHC. In addition, we examined the correlation, dynamic range, sensitivity, and ability of polarized SRM and SHG-based morphometry to detect an anti-fibrotic effect of three different treatment regimens. Comparisons were made across three separate studies in which animals were treated with three mechanistically distinct pharmacologic agents: enalapril (ENA, 15, 30, 60 mg/kg), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, 2, 20 mg/kg) or the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) neutralizing antibody, EX75606 (1, 3, 10 mg/kg). Our results demonstrate a strong co-localization of the SHG signal with fibrillar collagens I and III but not non-fibrillar collagen IV. Quantitative IF, calculated as percent cortical area of fibrosis, demonstrated similar response profile for both polarized SRM and SHG-based morphometry. The two methodologies exhibited a strong correlation across all three pharmacology studies (r2 = 0.89-0.96). However, compared with polarized SRM, SHG-based morphometry delivered a greater dynamic range and absolute magnitude of reduction of IF after treatment. In summary, we demonstrate that SHG-based morphometry in unstained kidney tissues is comparable to polarized SRM for quantitation of fibrillar collagens, but with an enhanced sensitivity to detect treatment-induced reductions in IF

  1. 3He lung morphometry technique: Accuracy analysis and pulse sequence optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukstanskii, A. L.; Conradi, M. S.; Yablonskiy, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The 3He lung morphometry technique (Yablonskiy et al., JAP, 2009), based on MRI measurements of hyperpolarized gas diffusion in lung airspaces, provides unique information on the lung microstructure at the alveolar level. 3D tomographic images of standard morphological parameters (mean airspace chord length, lung parenchyma surface-to-volume ratio, and the number of alveoli per unit lung volume) can be created from a rather short (several seconds) MRI scan. These parameters are most commonly used to characterize lung morphometry but were not previously available from in vivo studies. A background of the 3He lung morphometry technique is based on a previously proposed model of lung acinar airways, treated as cylindrical passages of external radius R covered by alveolar sleeves of depth h, and on a theory of gas diffusion in these airways. The initial works approximated the acinar airways as very long cylinders, all with the same R and h. The present work aims at analyzing effects of realistic acinar airway structures, incorporating airway branching, physiological airway lengths, a physiological ratio of airway ducts and sacs, and distributions of R and h. By means of Monte-Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate that our technique allows rather accurate measurements of geometrical and morphological parameters of acinar airways. In particular, the accuracy of determining one of the most important physiological parameter of lung parenchyma - surface-to-volume ratio - does not exceed several percent. Second, we analyze the effect of the susceptibility induced inhomogeneous magnetic field on the parameter estimate and demonstrate that this effect is rather negligible at B0 ⩽ 3T and becomes substantial only at higher B0 Third, we theoretically derive an optimal choice of MR pulse sequence parameters, which should be used to acquire a series of diffusion-attenuated MR signals, allowing a substantial decrease in the acquisition time and improvement in accuracy of the

  2. Regionally accentuated reversible brain grey matter reduction in ultra marathon runners detected by voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During the 4,487 km ultra marathon TransEurope-FootRace 2009 (TEFR09), runners showed catabolism with considerable reduction of body weight as well as reversible brain volume reduction. We hypothesized that ultra marathon athletes might have developed changes to grey matter (GM) brain morphology due to the burden of extreme physical training. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) we undertook a cross sectional study and two longitudinal studies. Methods Prior to the start of the race 13 runners volunteered to participate in this study of planned brain scans before, twice during, and 8 months after the race. A group of matched controls was recruited for comparison. Twelve runners were able to participate in the scan before the start of the race and were taken into account for comparison with control persons. Because of drop-outs during the race, VBM could be performed in 10 runners covering the first 3 time points, and in 7 runners who also had the follow-up scan after 8 months. Volumetric 3D datasets were acquired using an MPRAGE sequence. A level of p < 0.05, family-wise corrected for multiple comparisons was the a priori set statistical threshold to infer significant effects from VBM. Results Baseline comparison of TEFR09 participants and controls revealed no significant differences regarding GM brain volume. During the race however, VBM revealed GM volume decreases in regionally distributed brain regions. These included the bilateral posterior temporal and occipitoparietal cortices as well as the anterior cingulate and caudate nucleus. After eight months, GM normalized. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not observe significant differences between TEFR09 athletes and controls at baseline. If this missing difference is not due to small sample size, extreme physical training obviously does not chronically alter GM. However, during the race GM volume decreased in brain regions normally associated with visuospatial and language tasks. The

  3. Voxel-based morphometry predicts shifts in dendritic spine density and morphology with auditory fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Keifer Jr, O. P.; Hurt, R. C.; Gutman, D. A.; Keilholz, S. D.; Gourley, S. L.; Ressler, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging has provided compelling data about the brain. Yet the underlying mechanisms of many neuroimaging techniques have not been elucidated. Here we report a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study of Thy1-YFP mice following auditory fear conditioning complemented by confocal microscopy analysis of cortical thickness, neuronal morphometric features and nuclei size/density. Significant VBM results included the nuclei of the amygdala, the insula and the auditory cortex. There were no significant VBM changes in a control brain area. Focusing on the auditory cortex, confocal analysis showed that fear conditioning led to a significantly increased density of shorter and wider dendritic spines, while there were no spine differences in the control area. Of all the morphology metrics studied, the spine density was the only one to show significant correlation with the VBM signal. These data demonstrate that learning-induced structural changes detected by VBM may be partially explained by increases in dendritic spine density. PMID:26151911

  4. Two-dimensional versus three-dimensional morphometry of monogenoidean sclerites.

    PubMed

    Galli, Paolo; Strona, Giovanni; Villa, Anna Maria; Benzoni, Francesca; Stefani, Fabrizio; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Kritsky, Delane C

    2007-03-01

    A new method of three-dimensional (3-D) analysis of sclerotised structures of monogenoids was performed by processing z-series images using 3D-Doctor. Z-series were obtained from Gomori's trichrome-stained specimens of marine and freshwater monogenoids under laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Measurements obtained from 3-D images were then compared with those from 2-D images taken from both flattened and unflattened specimens. Data comparison demonstrated that 3-D morphometry allowed avoidance of over-estimation due to deformation and the reduction of errors associated with different spatial orientations. Moreover, study of 3-D images permitted observation of morphological details that are not detectable in 2-D representations. PMID:17254585

  5. Volumetric and Voxel-Based Morphometry Findings in Autism Subjects With and Without Macrocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.; Abildskov, Tracy J.; Petrie, Jo Ann; Johnson, Michael; Lange, Nicholas; Chipman, Jonathan; Lu, Jeffrey; McMahon, William; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to replicate Herbert et al. (2003a), which found increased overall white matter (WM) volume in subjects with autism, even after controlling for head size differences. To avoid the possibility that greater WM volume in autism is merely an epiphenomena of macrocephaly over-representation associated with the disorder, the current study included control subjects with benign macrocephaly. The control group also included subjects with a reading disability to insure cognitive heterogeneity. WM volume in autism was significantly larger, even when controlling for brain volume, rate of macrocephaly, and other demographic variables. Autism and controls differed little on whole-brain WM voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses suggesting that the overall increase in WM volume was non-localized. Autism subjects exhibited a differential pattern of IQ relationships with brain volumetry findings from controls. Current theories of brain overgrowth and their importance in the development of autism are discussed in the context of these findings. PMID:20446133

  6. Tensor-based cortical surface morphometry via weighted spherical harmonic representation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Dalton, Kim M; Davidson, Richard J

    2008-08-01

    We present a new tensor-based morphometric framework that quantifies cortical shape variations using a local area element. The local area element is computed from the Riemannian metric tensors, which are obtained from the smooth functional parametrization of a cortical mesh. For the smooth parametrization, we have developed a novel weighted spherical harmonic (SPHARM) representation, which generalizes the traditional SPHARM as a special case. For a specific choice of weights, the weighted-SPHARM is shown to be the least squares approximation to the solution of an isotropic heat diffusion on a unit sphere. The main aims of this paper are to present the weighted-SPHARM and to show how it can be used in the tensor-based morphometry. As an illustration, the methodology has been applied in the problem of detecting abnormal cortical regions in the group of high functioning autistic subjects. PMID:18672431

  7. Evaluation of Pre-Malignant and Malignant Lesions in Cervico Vaginal (PAP) Smears by Nuclear Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Rani M.N, Divya; Kumar ML, Harendra; SR, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer occurring among women worldwide, with almost half a million new cases each year. Normal cells gradually transform to form cancer cells through several stages. So, the changes occurring during the transformational stages need to be assessed. Aim: Our aim was to study various nuclear parameters useful in evaluating pre-malignant and malignant cervico-vaginal pap smears. Materials and Methods: Bethesda System was used to categorize cervical pap smears into premalignant and malignant lesions. Nuclear parameters were calculated using J 1.44C morphometric software. Several nuclear size parameters were analysed. Results: The nuclear area, perimeter, diameter were found to be statistically significant (p<0.05) parameters in differentiating premalignant from malignant cervical smears. Conclusion: Nuclear morphometry was thus a useful objective tool in differentiating premalignant from malignant cervical smears. PMID:25584229

  8. Population based analysis of directional information in serial deformation tensor morphometry.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Colin; Cardenas, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Deformation morphometry provides a sensitive approach to detecting and mapping subtle volume changes in the brain. Population based analyses of this data have been used successfully to detect characteristic changes in different neurodegenerative conditions. However, most studies have been limited to statistical mapping of the scalar volume change at each point in the brain, by evaluating the determinant of the Jacobian of the deformation field. In this paper we describe an approach to spatial normalisation and analysis of the full deformation tensor. The approach employs a spatial relocation and reorientation of tensors of each subject. Using the assumption of small changes, we use a linear modeling of effects of clinical variables on each deformation tensor component across a population. We illustrate the use of this approach by examining the pattern of significance and orientation of the volume change effects in recovery from alcohol abuse. Results show new local structure which was not apparent in the analysis of scalar volume changes. PMID:18044583

  9. Voxel based morphometry in optical coherence tomography: validation and core findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Al-Louzi, Omar; Solomon, Sharon D.; Saidha, Shiv; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the human retina is now becoming established as an important modality for the detection and tracking of various ocular diseases. Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is a long standing neuroimaging analysis technique that allows for the exploration of the regional differences in the brain. There has been limited work done in developing registration based methods for OCT, which has hampered the advancement of VBM analyses in OCT based population studies. Following on from our recent development of an OCT registration method, we explore the potential benefits of VBM analysis in cohorts of healthy controls (HCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Specifically, we validate the stability of VBM analysis in two pools of HCs showing no significant difference between the two populations. Additionally, we also present a retrospective study of age and sex matched HCs and relapsing remitting MS patients, demonstrating results consistent with the reported literature while providing insight into the retinal changes associated with this MS subtype.

  10. Recreational marijuana use impacts white matter integrity and subcortical (but not cortical) morphometry.

    PubMed

    Orr, Joseph M; Paschall, Courtnie J; Banich, Marie T

    2016-01-01

    A recent shift in legal and social attitudes toward marijuana use has also spawned a surge of interest in understanding the effects of marijuana use on the brain. There is considerable evidence that an adolescent onset of marijuana use negatively impacts white matter coherence. On the other hand, a recent well-controlled study demonstrated no effects of marijuana use on the morphometry of subcortical or cortical structures when users and non-users were matched for alcohol use. Regardless, most studies have involved small, carefully selected samples, so the ability to generalize to larger populations is limited. In an attempt to address this issue, we examined the effects of marijuana use on white matter integrity and cortical and subcortical morphometry using data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) consortium. The HCP data consists of ultra-high resolution neuroimaging data from a large community sample, including 466 adults reporting recreational marijuana use. Rather than just contrasting two groups of individuals who vary significantly in marijuana usage as typifies prior studies, we leveraged the large sample size provided by the HCP data to examine parametric effects of recreational marijuana use. Our results indicate that the earlier the age of onset of marijuana use, the lower was white matter coherence. Age of onset also also affected the shape of the accumbens, while the number of lifetime uses impacted the shape of the amygdala and hippocampus. Marijuana use had no effect on cortical volumes. These findings suggest subtle but significant effects of recreational marijuana use on brain structure. PMID:27408790

  11. Aging-related changes in respiratory system mechanics and morphometry in mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Mantilla, Carlos B; Pabelick, Christina M; Roden, Anja C; Sieck, Gary C

    2016-07-01

    Previous work investigating respiratory system mechanics in mice has reported an aging-related increase in compliance and mean linear intercept (Lm). However, these changes were assessed using only a young (2-mo-old) and old (20- and 26-mo-old) group yet were interpreted to reflect a linear evolution across the life span. Therefore, to investigate respiratory system mechanics and lung morphometry across a more complete spectrum of ages, we utilized 2 (100% survival, n = 6)-, 6 (100% survival, n = 12)-, 18 (90% survival, n = 12)-, 24 (75% survival, n = 12)-, and 30 (25% survival, n = 12)-mo-old C57BL/6 mice. We found a nonlinear aging-related decrease in respiratory system resistance and increase in dynamic compliance and hysteresis between 2- and 24-mo-old mice. However, in 30-mo-old mice, respiratory system resistance increased, and dynamic compliance and hysteresis decreased relative to 24-mo-old mice. Respiratory system impedance spectra were measured between 1-20.5 Hz at positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) of 1, 3, 5, and 7 cmH2O. Respiratory system resistance and reactance at each level of PEEP were increased and decreased, respectively, only in 2-mo-old animals. No differences in the respiratory system impedance spectra were observed in 6-, 18-, 24-, and 30-mo-old mice. Additionally, lungs were fixed following tracheal instillation of 4% paraformaldehyde at 25 cmH2O and processed for Lm and airway collagen deposition. There was an aging-related increase in Lm consistent with emphysematous-like changes and no evidence of increased airway collagen deposition. Accordingly, we demonstrate nonlinear aging-related changes in lung mechanics and morphometry in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27288490

  12. Taxonomic Identity of the Invasive Fruit Fly Pest, Bactrocera invadens: Concordance in Morphometry and DNA Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Fathiya M.; Masiga, Daniel K.; Mohamed, Samira A.; Salifu, Daisy; de Meyer, Marc; Ekesi, Sunday

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, a new fruit fly pest species was recorded for the first time in Kenya and has subsequently been found in 28 countries across tropical Africa. The insect was described as Bactrocera invadens, due to its rapid invasion of the African continent. In this study, the morphometry and DNA Barcoding of different populations of B. invadens distributed across the species range of tropical Africa and a sample from the pest's putative aboriginal home of Sri Lanka was investigated. Morphometry using wing veins and tibia length was used to separate B. invadens populations from other closely related Bactrocera species. The Principal component analysis yielded 15 components which correspond to the 15 morphometric measurements. The first two principal axes contributed to 90.7% of the total variance and showed partial separation of these populations. Canonical discriminant analysis indicated that only the first five canonical variates were statistically significant. The first two canonical variates contributed a total of 80.9% of the total variance clustering B. invadens with other members of the B. dorsalis complex while distinctly separating B. correcta, B. cucurbitae, B. oleae and B. zonata. The largest Mahalanobis squared distance (D2 = 122.9) was found to be between B. cucurbitae and B. zonata, while the lowest was observed between B. invadens populations against B. kandiensis (8.1) and against B. dorsalis s.s (11.4). Evolutionary history inferred by the Neighbor-Joining method clustered the Bactrocera species populations into four clusters. First cluster consisted of the B. dorsalis complex (B. invadens, B. kandiensis and B. dorsalis s. s.), branching from the same node while the second group was paraphyletic clades of B. correcta and B. zonata. The last two are monophyletic clades, consisting of B. cucurbitae and B. oleae, respectively. Principal component analysis using the genetic distances confirmed the clustering inferred by the NJ tree. PMID:23028649

  13. APPLYING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY TO PARAMETRIC SURFACES CAN IMPROVE MRI-BASED DISEASE DIAGNOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yalin; Yuan, Lei; Shi, Jie; Greve, Alexander; Ye, Jieping; Toga, Arthur W.; Reiss, Allan L.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for computer-assisted diagnostic classification. Full tensor information and machine learning with 3D maps derived from brain images may help detect subtle differences or classify subjects into different groups. Here we develop a new approach to apply tensor-based morphometry to parametric surface models for diagnostic classification. We use this approach to identify cortical surface features for use in diagnostic classifiers. First, with holomorphic 1-forms, we compute an efficient and accurate conformal mapping from a multiply connected mesh to the so-called slit domain. Next, the surface parameterization approach provides a natural way to register anatomical surfaces across subjects using a constrained harmonic map. To analyze anatomical differences, we then analyze the full Riemannian surface metric tensors, which retain multivariate information on local surface geometry. As the number of voxels in a 3D image is large, sparse learning is a promising method to select a subset of imaging features and to improve classification accuracy. Focusing on vertices with greatest effect sizes, we train a diagnostic classifier using the surface features selected by an ℓ1-norm based sparse learning method. Stability selection is applied to validate the selected feature sets. We tested the algorithm on MRI-derived cortical surfaces from 42 subjects with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and 40 age-matched controls, multivariate statistics on the local tensors gave greater effect sizes for detecting group differences relative to other TBM-based statistics including analysis of the Jacobian determinant and the largest eigenvalue of the surface metric. Our method also gave reasonable classification results relative to the Jacobian determinant, the pair of eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix and volume features. This analysis pipeline may boost the power of morphometry studies, and may assist with image-based classification. PMID:23435208

  14. Reproducibility of Brain Morphometry from Short-Term Repeat Clinical MRI Examinations: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hon-Man; Chen, Shan-Kai; Chen, Ya-Fang; Lee, Chung-Wei; Yeh, Lee-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the inter session reproducibility of automatic segmented MRI-derived measures by FreeSurfer in a group of subjects with normal-appearing MR images. Materials and Methods After retrospectively reviewing a brain MRI database from our institute consisting of 14,758 adults, those subjects who had repeat scans and had no history of neurodegenerative disorders were selected for morphometry analysis using FreeSurfer. A total of 34 subjects were grouped by MRI scanner model. After automatic segmentation using FreeSurfer, label-wise comparison (involving area, thickness, and volume) was performed on all segmented results. An intraclass correlation coefficient was used to estimate the agreement between sessions. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess the population mean rank differences across sessions. Mean-difference analysis was used to evaluate the difference intervals across scanners. Absolute percent difference was used to estimate the reproducibility errors across the MRI models. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine the across-scanner effect. Results The agreement in segmentation results for area, volume, and thickness measurements of all segmented anatomical labels was generally higher in Signa Excite and Verio models when compared with Sonata and TrioTim models. There were significant rank differences found across sessions in some labels of different measures. Smaller difference intervals in global volume measurements were noted on images acquired by Signa Excite and Verio models. For some brain regions, significant MRI model effects were observed on certain segmentation results. Conclusions Short-term scan-rescan reliability of automatic brain MRI morphometry is feasible in the clinical setting. However, since repeatability of software performance is contingent on the reproducibility of the scanner performance, the scanner performance must be calibrated before conducting such studies or before using such software for retrospective

  15. Negative and interactive effects of sex, aging, and alcohol abuse on gray matter morphometry.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Rachel E; Hagerty, Sarah L; Sabbineni, Amithrupa; Claus, Eric D; Hutchison, Kent E; Weiland, Barbara J

    2016-06-01

    Chronic alcohol use is associated with declines in gray matter (GM) volume, as is the normal aging process. Less apparent, however, is how the interaction between aging and heavy alcohol use affects changes in GM across the lifespan. There is some evidence that women are more vulnerable to the negative effects of alcohol use on GM than men. In the current study, we examined whether localized GM was related to measures of alcohol use disorder (e.g., AUDIT score) in a large sample (N = 436) of participants, ages 18-55 years, with a range of disease severity, using both voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and surface-based morphometry (SBM). We also explored whether GM associations with alcohol use disorder (AUD) severity are moderated by sex and age. Results showed significant negative associations between AUD severity and GM volume throughout temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes. Women showed more negative effects of alcohol use than men for cortical thickness in left orbitofrontal cortex, but evidence for increased vulnerability based on sex was limited overall. Similarly, a specific age by alcohol use interaction was observed for volume of right insula, but other regional or global interactions were not statistically supported. However, significant negative associations between heavy alcohol use and GM volumes were observed as early as 18-25 years. These findings support that alcohol has deleterious effects on global and regional GM above and beyond age, and, of particular importance, that regional associations emerge in early adulthood. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2276-2292, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26947584

  16. Morphometry, Morphology and Ultrastructure of Ring-tailed Coati Sperm (Nasua nasua Linnaeus, 1766).

    PubMed

    Silva, H V R; Magalhães, F F; Ribeiro, L R; Souza, A L P; Freitas, C I A; de Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R; Silva, L D M

    2015-12-01

    The ring-tailed coati (Nasua nasua) is a procyonid whose population is in sharp decline. Therefore, studies are needed to better understand the reproduction of this animal. For this reason, this study aimed to evaluate the morphology, morphometry and sperm ultrastructure of ring-tailed coati sperm. Four captive adult males were used for this study. Slides stained with Bengal Rose were used for the morphometric and morphologic analyses. The length and width of the head were measured, as well as the length of the midpiece and tail and the total length of the sperm. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for the ultrastructural analyses. The most obvious morphological abnormalities observed were coiled tails (6.1 ± 8.7%) and the lack of acrosomes (5.4 ± 4.4%). Regarding the morphometry, the measurements of the head (length × width), midpiece (length) and tail (length) were (mean ± SD) 6.2 ± 0.4 × 8.1 ± 0.6 μm, 14.1 ± 0.5 and 63.9 ± 4.1 μm, respectively, and the total length of the sperm was 86.1 ± 4.3 μm. Through electron microscopy, the presence of electron-lucent points in the nucleus and the presence of approximately 55 mitochondrial spirals in the midpiece were identified. The data obtained in this study provide detailed information on the sperm characteristics of coatis and may inform future research on germplasm conservation, both for this species and other threatened procyonids. PMID:26446691

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging and MR morphometry of the central auditory pathway and auditory cortex in aging.

    PubMed

    Profant, O; Škoch, A; Balogová, Z; Tintěra, J; Hlinka, J; Syka, J

    2014-02-28

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is caused mainly by the hypofunction of the inner ear, but recent findings point also toward a central component of presbycusis. We used MR morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a 3T MR system with the aim to study the state of the central auditory system in a group of elderly subjects (>65years) with mild presbycusis, in a group of elderly subjects with expressed presbycusis and in young controls. Cortical reconstruction, volumetric segmentation and auditory pathway tractography were performed. Three parameters were evaluated by morphometry: the volume of the gray matter, the surface area of the gyrus and the thickness of the cortex. In all experimental groups the surface area and gray matter volume were larger on the left side in Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale and slightly larger in the gyrus frontalis superior, whereas they were larger on the right side in the primary visual cortex. Almost all of the measured parameters were significantly smaller in the elderly subjects in Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale and gyrus frontalis superior. Aging did not change the side asymmetry (laterality) of the gyri. In the central part of the auditory pathway above the inferior colliculus, a trend toward an effect of aging was present in the axial vector of the diffusion (L1) variable of DTI, with increased values observed in elderly subjects. A trend toward a decrease of L1 on the left side, which was more pronounced in the elderly groups, was observed. The effect of hearing loss was present in subjects with expressed presbycusis as a trend toward an increase of the radial vectors (L2L3) in the white matter under Heschl's gyrus. These results suggest that in addition to peripheral changes, changes in the central part of the auditory system in elderly subjects are also present; however, the extent of hearing loss does not play a significant role in the central changes. PMID:24333969

  18. Mapping the Regional Influence of Genetics on Brain Structure Variability - A Tensor-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Caroline; Leporé, Natasha; Pennec, Xavier; Lee, Agatha D.; Barysheva, Marina; Madsen, Sarah K.; Avedissian, Christina; Chou, Yi-Yu; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie; Wright, Margaret; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence brain structure and function profoundly The search for heritable anatomical features and their influencing genes would be accelerated with detailed 3D maps showing the degree to which brain morphometry is genetically determined. As part of an MRI study that will scan 1150 twins, we applied Tensor-Based Morphometry to compute morphometric differences in 23 pairs of identical twins and 23 pairs of same-sex fraternal twins (mean age: 23.8 ± 1.8 SD years). All 92 twins’ 3D brain MRI scans were nonlinearly registered to a common space using a Riemannian fluid-based warping approach to compute volumetric differences across subjects. A multi-template method was used to improve volume quantification. Vector fields driving each subject’s anatomy onto the common template were analyzed to create maps of local volumetric excesses and deficits relative to the standard template. Using a new structural equation modeling method, we computed the voxelwise proportion of variance in volumes attributable to additive (A) or dominant (D) genetic factors versus shared environmental (C) or unique environmental factors (E). The method was also applied to various anatomical regions of interest (ROIs). As hypothesized, the overall volumes of the brain, basal ganglia, thalamus, and each lobe were under strong genetic control; local white matter volumes were mostly controlled by common environment. After adjusting for individual differences in overall brain scale, genetic influences were still relatively high in the corpus callosum and in early-maturing brain regions such as the occipital lobes, while environmental influences were greater in frontal brain regions which have a more protracted maturational time-course. PMID:19446645

  19. Diffuse Decreased Gray Matter in Patients with Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Piccinin, Camila C.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Santos, Maria C. A.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; De Campos, Brunno M.; Rezende, Thiago J. R.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have addressed the role of structures other than the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of craniocervical dystonia (CCD). Neuroimaging studies have attempted to identify structural abnormalities in CCD but a clear pattern of alteration has not been established. We performed whole-brain evaluation using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify patterns of gray matter (GM) changes in CCD. Methods: We compared 27 patients with CCD matched in age and gender to 54 healthy controls. VBM was used to compare GM volumes. We created a two-sample t-test corrected for subjects’ age, and we tested with a level of significance of p < 0.001 and false discovery rate (FDR) correction (p < 0.05). Results: Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated significant reductions of GM using p < 0.001 in the cerebellar vermis IV/V, bilaterally in the superior frontal gyrus, precuneus, anterior cingulate and paracingulate, insular cortex, lingual gyrus, and calcarine fissure; in the left hemisphere in the supplementary motor area, inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, temporal pole, supramarginal gyrus, rolandic operculum, hippocampus, middle occipital gyrus, cerebellar lobules IV/V, superior, and middle temporal gyri; in the right hemisphere, the middle cingulate and precentral gyrus. Our study did not report any significant result using the FDR correction. We also detected correlations between GM volume and age, disease duration, duration of botulinum toxin treatment, and the Marsden–Fahn dystonia scale scores. Conclusion: We detected large clusters of GM changes chiefly in structures primarily involved in sensorimotor integration, motor planning, visuospatial function, and emotional processing. PMID:25620953

  20. Fully automated corneal endothelial morphometry of images captured by clinical specular microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucht, Curry; Söderberg, Per; Manneberg, Göran

    2010-02-01

    The corneal endothelium serves as the posterior barrier of the cornea. Factors such as clarity and refractive properties of the cornea are in direct relationship to the quality of the endothelium. The endothelial cell density is considered the most important morphological factor of the corneal endothelium. Pathological conditions and physical trauma may threaten the endothelial cell density to such an extent that the optical property of the cornea and thus clear eyesight is threatened. Diagnosis of the corneal endothelium through morphometry is an important part of several clinical applications. Morphometry of the corneal endothelium is presently carried out by semi automated analysis of pictures captured by a Clinical Specular Microscope (CSM). Because of the occasional need of operator involvement, this process can be tedious, having a negative impact on sampling size. This study was dedicated to the development and use of fully automated analysis of a very large range of images of the corneal endothelium, captured by CSM, using Fourier analysis. Software was developed in the mathematical programming language Matlab. Pictures of the corneal endothelium, captured by CSM, were read into the analysis software. The software automatically performed digital enhancement of the images, normalizing lights and contrasts. The digitally enhanced images of the corneal endothelium were Fourier transformed, using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and stored as new images. Tools were developed and applied for identification and analysis of relevant characteristics of the Fourier transformed images. The data obtained from each Fourier transformed image was used to calculate the mean cell density of its corresponding corneal endothelium. The calculation was based on well known diffraction theory. Results in form of estimated cell density of the corneal endothelium were obtained, using fully automated analysis software on 292 images captured by CSM. The cell density obtained by the

  1. Thumbprint Terrain in Isidis Planitia, Mars: Geology, Ages, Morphology, and Morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Rohkamp, D.; Sturm, S.; Thiessen, F.; Reiss, D.

    2009-04-01

    smaller. Our measurements of the ridge heights revealed that the median height is largest (33 m) for category III. This is similar to the heights of the longer ridges of categories IV (28 m) and V (32 m). The heights of individual cones (13 m) and small ridges with less than 4 cones (21 m) are typically smaller. These heights are comparable to various terrestrial analogues, including pingos, volcanic cones, pseudocraters, and mud volcanoes. In order to further constrain the formation process of TPT, we plotted the basal diameter of the cones against their basal diameter/crater ratio. Comparing these data to terrestrial monogenetic volcanoes [10], we find the best agreement with cinder cones and pseudocraters and to a lesser extent with maars and spatter cones. To constrain the formation age of the TPT, we performed crater counts for the geologic units and nearby rampart craters that are superposed on the TPT. Based on these crater counts, we propose that the TPT in western Isidis Planitia could have formed between approximately 2.5 and 3.0 Ga. If unit Aps [11] in the eastern part of the basin has covered the TPT that was originally exposed throughout the basin, its formation can be further constrained to about 2.7 to 3.0 Ga. On the basis of our study, we conclude that: (1) thumbprint ridges are on average less than 35 m high, but there are a few with heights up to more than 70 m; (2) the occurrence of central depressions associated with the ridges/cones is interpreted as evidence for an explosive origin (e.g., volcanic cones); (3) the basal and central depression diameters are most consistent with terrestrial cinder cones and pseudocraters and to a lesser extent with maars and spatter cones; (4) on the basis of the morphology and morphometry, other origins including various types of moraines, sand ridges, dunes, eskers, drumlins, kames, crevasse fill, beach ridges, berms, table mountains, mud volcanoes, and inverted topography are less likely; (5) TPT was formed sometimes

  2. Thumbprint Terrain in Isidis Planitia, Mars: Geology, Ages, Morphology, and Morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Rohkamp, D.; Sturm, S.; Thiessen, F.; Reiss, D.

    2009-04-01

    smaller. Our measurements of the ridge heights revealed that the median height is largest (33 m) for category III. This is similar to the heights of the longer ridges of categories IV (28 m) and V (32 m). The heights of individual cones (13 m) and small ridges with less than 4 cones (21 m) are typically smaller. These heights are comparable to various terrestrial analogues, including pingos, volcanic cones, pseudocraters, and mud volcanoes. In order to further constrain the formation process of TPT, we plotted the basal diameter of the cones against their basal diameter/crater ratio. Comparing these data to terrestrial monogenetic volcanoes [10], we find the best agreement with cinder cones and pseudocraters and to a lesser extent with maars and spatter cones. To constrain the formation age of the TPT, we performed crater counts for the geologic units and nearby rampart craters that are superposed on the TPT. Based on these crater counts, we propose that the TPT in western Isidis Planitia could have formed between approximately 2.5 and 3.0 Ga. If unit Aps [11] in the eastern part of the basin has covered the TPT that was originally exposed throughout the basin, its formation can be further constrained to about 2.7 to 3.0 Ga. On the basis of our study, we conclude that: (1) thumbprint ridges are on average less than 35 m high, but there are a few with heights up to more than 70 m; (2) the occurrence of central depressions associated with the ridges/cones is interpreted as evidence for an explosive origin (e.g., volcanic cones); (3) the basal and central depression diameters are most consistent with terrestrial cinder cones and pseudocraters and to a lesser extent with maars and spatter cones; (4) on the basis of the morphology and morphometry, other origins including various types of moraines, sand ridges, dunes, eskers, drumlins, kames, crevasse fill, beach ridges, berms, table mountains, mud volcanoes, and inverted topography are less likely; (5) TPT was formed sometimes

  3. Reduced gray matter volume in psychotic disorder patients with a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Julia M; Williams, Lisa E; Woodward, Neil D; Heckers, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with smaller gray matter volume, similar to the pattern seen in psychotic disorders. We explored the relationship between childhood abuse, psychosis, and brain volume in a group of 60 individuals with a psychotic disorder and 26 healthy control subjects. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to quantify gray and white matter volume and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) to measure childhood abuse. Within the psychotic disorder group, total gray matter volume was inversely correlated with the severity of childhood sexual abuse (r=-.34, p=.008), but not the other types of abuse. When the 24 patients with sexual abuse were compared with demographically matched samples of 23 patients without sexual abuse and 26 control subjects, only patients with a history of sexual abuse had reduced total gray matter volume (t(48)=2.3, p=.03; Cohen's d=.63). Voxel-based analysis revealed a cluster in the prefrontal cortex where volume was negatively correlated with sexual abuse severity. Voxel based comparison of the three matched groups revealed a similar pattern of results, with widespread reductions in psychosis patients with sexual abuse relative to controls that were not found in psychosis patients without sexual abuse. These findings indicate that some of the variance of gray matter volume in psychotic disorders can be explained by a history of sexual abuse. PMID:23178105

  4. Voxel-based morphometry at ultra-high fields. a comparison of 7T and 3T MRI data.

    PubMed

    Seiger, Rene; Hahn, Andreas; Hummer, Allan; Kranz, Georg S; Ganger, Sebastian; Küblböck, Martin; Kraus, Christoph; Sladky, Ronald; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-06-01

    Recent technological progress enables MRI recordings at ultra-high fields of 7 T and above leading to brain images of higher resolution and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Despite these benefits, imaging at 7 T exhibits distinct challenges due to B1 field inhomogeneities, causing decreased image quality and problems in data analysis. Although several strategies have been proposed, a systematic investigation of bias-corrected 7 T data for voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is still missing and it is an ongoing matter of debate if VBM at 7 T can be carried out properly. Here, an optimized VBM study was conducted, evaluating the impact of field strength (3T vs. 7 T) and pulse sequence (MPRAGE vs. MP2RAGE) on gray matter volume (GMV) estimates. More specifically, twenty-two participants were measured under the conditions 3T MPRAGE, 7 T MPRAGE and 7 T MP2RAGE. Due to the fact that 7 T MPRAGE data exhibited strong intensity inhomogeneities, an alternative preprocessing pipeline was proposed and applied for that data. VBM analysis revealed higher GMV estimates for 7 T predominantly in superior cortical areas, caudate nucleus, cingulate cortex and the hippocampus. On the other hand, 3T yielded higher estimates especially in inferior cortical areas of the brain, cerebellum, thalamus and putamen compared to 7 T. Besides minor exceptions, these results were observed for 7 T MPRAGE as well for the 7 T MP2RAGE measurements. Results gained in the inferior parts of the brain should be taken with caution, as native GM segmentations displayed misclassifications in these regions for both 7 T sequences. This was supported by the test-retest measurements showing highest variability in these inferior regions of the brain for 7 T and also for the advanced MP2RAGE sequence. Hence, our data support the use of 7 T MRI for VBM analysis in cortical areas, but direct comparison between field strengths and sequences requires careful assessment. Similarly, analysis of the inferior cortical regions

  5. Reduced insulin secretion and glucose intolerance are involved in the fasting susceptibility of common vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mariella B; Queiroz, Joicy F; Dias Gomes, Carolinne I; Collares-Buzato, Carla B; Barbosa, Helena C; Boschero, Antonio C; Gonçalves, Carlos A; Pinheiro, Eliana C

    2013-03-01

    Susceptibility during fasting has been reported for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), to the point of untimely deaths after only 2-3 nights of fasting. To investigate the underlying physiology of this critical metabolic condition, we analyzed serum insulin levels, pancreatic islets morphometry and immunocytochemistry (ICC), static insulin secretion in pancreas fragments, and insulin signaling mechanism in male vampire bats. A glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was also performed. Serum insulin was found to be lower in fed vampires compared to other mammals, and was significantly reduced after 24h fasting. Morphometrical analyses revealed small irregular pancreatic islets with reduced percentage of β-cell mass compared to other bats. Static insulin secretion analysis showed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired, as insulin levels did not reach significance under high glucose concentrations, whereas the response to the amino acid leucin was preserved. Results from ipGTT showed a failure on glucose clearance, indicating glucose intolerance due to diminished pancreatic insulin secretion and/or decreased β-cell response to glucose. In conclusion, data presented here indicate lower insulinemia and impaired insulin secretion in D. rotundus, which is consistent with the limited ability to store body energy reserves, previously reported in these animals. Whether these metabolic and hormonal features are associated with their blood diet remains to be determined. The peculiar food sharing through blood regurgitation, reported to this species, might be an adaptive mechanism overcoming this metabolic susceptibility. PMID:23262275

  6. Cytological Study of Breast Carcinoma Before and After Oncotherapy with Special Reference to Morphometry and Proliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Koley, Sananda; Chakrabarti, Srabani; Pathak, Swapan; Manna, Asim Kumar; Basu, Siddhartha

    2015-12-01

    Our study was done to assess the cytological changes due to oncotherapy in breast carcinoma especially on morphometry and proliferative activity. Cytological aspirates were collected from a total of 32 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma both before and after oncotherapy. Morphometry was done on the stained cytological smears to assess the different morphological parameters of cell dimension by using the ocular morphometer and the software AutoCAD 2007. Staining was done with Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as proliferative markers. Different morphological parameters were compared before and after oncotherapy by unpaired Student's t test. Statistically significant differences were found in morphometric parameters, e.g., mean nuclear diameter, mean nuclear area, mean cell diameter, and mean cell area, and in the expression of proliferative markers (Ki-67 and PCNA). Statistical analysis was done by obtaining p values. There are statistically significant differences between morphological parameter of breast carcinoma cells before and after oncotherapy. PMID:26730066

  7. Brain Morphometry and the Neurobiology of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias: Current Knowledge and Future Potential for Translational Pre-Clinical Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Clare J.; Duty, Susan; Vernon, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine replacement therapy in the form of levodopa results in a significant proportion of patients with Parkinson’s disease developing debilitating dyskinesia. This significantly complicates further treatment and negatively impacts patient quality of life. A greater understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is therefore crucial to develop new treatments to prevent or mitigate LID. Such investigations in humans are largely confined to assessment of neurochemical and cerebrovascular blood flow changes using positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, recent evidence suggests that LID is associated with specific morphological changes in the frontal cortex and midbrain, detectable by structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Current human neuroimaging methods however lack sufficient resolution to reveal the biological mechanism driving these morphological changes at the cellular level. In contrast, there is a wealth of literature from well-established rodent models of LID documenting detailed post-mortem cellular and molecular measurements. The combination therefore of advanced neuroimaging methods and rodent LID models offers an exciting opportunity to bridge these currently disparate areas of research. To highlight this opportunity, in this mini-review, we provide an overview of the current clinical evidence for morphological changes in the brain associated with LID and identify potential cellular mechanisms as suggested from human and animal studies. We then suggest a framework for combining small animal MRI imaging with rodent models of LID, which may provide important mechanistic insights into the neurobiology of LID. PMID:24971074

  8. Comparison of DXA Scans and Conventional X-rays for Spine Morphometry and Bone Age Determination in Children.

    PubMed

    Hoyer-Kuhn, Heike; Knoop, Kai; Semler, Oliver; Kuhr, Kathrin; Hellmich, Martin; Schoenau, Eckhard; Koerber, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Conventional lateral spine and hand radiographs are the standard tools to evaluate vertebral morphometry and bone age in children. Beside bone mineral density analyses, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements with lower radiation exposure provide high-resolution scans which are not approved for diagnostic purposes. Data about the comparability of conventional radiographs and DXA in children are missing yet. The purpose of the trial was to evaluate whether conventional hand and spine radiographs can be replaced by DXA scans to diminish radiation exposure. Thirty-eight children with osteogenesis imperfecta or secondary osteoporosis or short stature (male, n=20; age, 5.0-17.0 yr) were included and assessed once by additional DXA (GE iDXA) of the spine or the left hand. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to express agreement between X-ray and iDXA assessment. Evaluation of the spine morphometry showed reasonable agreement between iDXA and radiography (ICC for fish-shape, 0.75; for wedge-shape, 0.65; and for compression fractures, 0.70). Bone age determination showed excellent agreement between iDXA and radiography (ICC, 0.97). IDXA-scans of the spine in a pediatric population should be used not only to assess bone mineral density but also to evaluate anatomic structures and vertebral morphometry. Therefore, iDXA can replace some radiographs in children with skeletal diseases. PMID:26059565

  9. Salt sensitivity of the morphometry of Artemia franciscana during development: a demonstration of 3D critical windows.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Willis, Eric; Burggren, Warren W

    2016-02-01

    A 3D conceptual framework of 'critical windows' was used to examine whether the morphometry of Artemia franciscana is altered by salinity exposure during certain key periods of development. Artemia franciscana were hatched at 20 ppt (designated control salinity) and were then exposed to 10, 30, 40 or 50 ppt either chronically (days 1-15) or only on days 1-6, 7-9, 10-12 or 13-15. On day 15, maturity was assessed and morphometric characteristics, including mass, total body length, tail length and width, length of the third swimming appendage and eye diameter, were measured. Maturation and morphometry on day 15 were influenced by the exposure window and salinity dose. Artemia franciscana were generally larger following exposure to 10 and 40 ppt during days 1-6 and 7-9 when compared with days 10-12 and 13-15, in part due to a higher percentage of mature individuals. Exposure to different salinities on days 1-6 produced the greatest differences in morphometry, and thus this appears to be a period in development when A. franciscana is particularly sensitive to salinity. Viewing the developmental window as three-dimensional allowed more effective visualization of the complex interactions between exposure window, stressor dose and the magnitude of morphometric changes in A. franciscana. PMID:26685168

  10. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Katuwal, Gajendra J; Baum, Stefi A; Cahill, Nathan D; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Low success (<60%) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7-8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4-5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13-18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD. PMID:27065101

  11. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Stefi A.; Cahill, Nathan D.; Michael, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Low success (<60%) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7–8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4–5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13–18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD. PMID:27065101

  12. Morphometry and parameter assessment of scoria cones fields: a DEM-based morphometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Karátson, Dávid; Favalli, Massimiliano; Tarquini, Simone

    2010-05-01

    Cinder cones are relatively small but common volcanic features that form by the eruption of low-viscosity, generally basaltic magma during strombolian or hawaiian eruptions. Often they appear in volcanic fields, providing geomorphic evidence of a particular eruptive behaviour. Also, when a big number of scoria cones are scattered over a large area, it means that there the magma can find several different ways to reach the Earth's surface. These facts as well as the time-space distribution of the cones have important implications toward the understanding of local geological settings, and have substantial inferences for hazard assessment. The recent availability of freely downloadable topographic data increases the efficiency and precision of the collection of morphometric parameters of scoria cones. Various digital elevation models (DEMs) at different resolution can nowadays be found on the internet: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEMs (SRTM; http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/srtm); the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM; http://www.gdem.aster.ersdac.or.jp); the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED; http://seamless.usgs.gov); TINITALY DEMs (http://kharita.rm.ingv.it); etc. Measurements of scoria cone characteristics using DEMs engage errors that are dependent on the DEM resolution and accuracy. The SRTM DEM was discarded because of the too low resolution. Obviously, the errors involved in scoria cone morphometry are also dependent on the cone dimensions. In this work we measured the discrepancies of the widely used morphometric parameters (V, H,Wco, and H/Wco) between DEMs from different sources (LIDAR = 2 m, TINITALY = 10 m, NED ~ 10 m, ASTER ~ 30 m) as a function of scoria cone volume, in order to assess the precision of these free available DEMs. As a result, we identified cone volume values, depending on resolution, beyond which the morphometric and volumetric measurements are reliable. Based

  13. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  14. The effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinole treatment on gonadal micro-vascularization and affected fertility examined by SEM and 3D-morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlbacher, K. M. T.; Minnich, B.

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the reproductive system in nude rats with special emphasis on how Δ9-THC impacts the vascularization of testes which in turn indirectly influences fertility. Basically, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) causes not only negative (psychoactive) effects in the human body as cannabinole administration in medical use (dose-dependent) offers multiple new treatment opportunities such as pain relief or containment of various cancers. Concerning the reproductive system it strongly influences CB-receptors along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis resulting in reduced plasma testosterone levels. There is also altered sperm quality parameters reported such as sperm motility or sperm count. On the other hand Δ9-THC effects endothelial growth factors (VEGF, Ang-1 etc.) respectively acts on their specific receptors which in turn modify angiogenesis and vascularization of tissues and organs (e.g. tumorous tissues). This leads to new therapeutical strategies in the suppression of various cancers by inhibiting (neo-)vascularization and in turn famishment of tumorous tissues (lack of nutrition supply). Here we studied the micro-vascularization of gonads in a long-term THC-treated nude rat model by vascular corrosion casting, SEM and 3D-morphometry.

  15. High-Dimensional Medial Lobe Morphometry: An Automated MRI Biomarker for the New AD Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medial temporal lobe atrophy assessment via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed in recent criteria as an in vivo diagnostic biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, practical application of these criteria in a clinical setting will require automated MRI analysis techniques. To this end, we wished to validate our automated, high-dimensional morphometry technique to the hypothetical prediction of future clinical status from baseline data in a cohort of subjects in a large, multicentric setting, compared to currently known clinical status for these subjects. Materials and Methods. The study group consisted of 214 controls, 371 mild cognitive impairment (147 having progressed to probable AD and 224 stable), and 181 probable AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, with data acquired on 58 different 1.5 T scanners. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of our technique in a hierarchical fashion, first testing the effect of intensity standardization, then between different volumes of interest, and finally its generalizability for a large, multicentric cohort. Results. We obtained 73.2% prediction accuracy with 79.5% sensitivity for the prediction of MCI progression to clinically probable AD. The positive predictive value was 81.6% for MCI progressing on average within 1.5 (0.3 s.d.) year. Conclusion. With high accuracy, the technique's ability to identify discriminant medial temporal lobe atrophy has been demonstrated in a large, multicentric environment. It is suitable as an aid for clinical diagnostic of AD. PMID:25254139

  16. Effect of Experimental Thyrotoxicosis on Brain Gray Matter: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Anna; Heldmann, Marcus; Göttlich, Martin; Dirk, Anna-Luise; Brabant, Georg; Münte, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-as well hypothyroidism have an effect on behavior and brain function. Moreover, during development thyroid hormones influence brain structure. Objectives This study aimed to demonstrate an effect of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism on brain gray matter in healthy adult humans. Methods High-resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired in 29 healthy young subjects prior to as well as after receiving 250 µg of T4 per day for 8 weeks. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8). Results Laboratory testing confirmed the induction of hyperthyroidism. In the hyperthyroid condition, gray matter volumes were increased in the right posterior cerebellum (lobule VI) and decreased in the bilateral visual cortex and anterior cerebellum (lobules I-IV) compared to the euthyroid condition. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that short periods of hyperthyroidism induce distinct alterations in brain structures of cerebellar regions that have been associated with sensorimotor functions as well as working memory in the literature. PMID:26601082

  17. A comparison between pre- and posthibernation morphometry, hematology, and blood chemistry in viperid snakes.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Christopher J; Taylor, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Snakes from temperate climates are often made to hibernate in zoos to stimulate reproduction. Unfortunately, deaths have occurred during and after hibernation. This study evaluated the health status, pre- and posthibernation, of 31 adult viperid snakes. It included morphometric measurements, hematology, and blood chemistry. No differences were seen in body weights and weight to length ratios between pre- and posthibernation examinations, suggesting that the overall condition of the snakes did not change. No differences were seen in hematologic and blood chemistry parameters, except that bile acids (3alpha-hydroxybile acids) decreased, the implications of which are unknown. Three individuals had markedly high plasma uric acid levels posthibernation; of these, two individuals died from extensive visceral gout and one recovered with fluid therapy. Viperid snakes should be clinically healthy, well hydrated, and in good body condition when they are put into hibernation. They should be maintained in an environment with sufficient humidity and should have access to water. Blood samples should be collected on arousal for measuring plasma uric acid levels. Changes in morphometry, hematology, and blood chemistry appear to be abnormal and should be investigated thoroughly. PMID:12723800

  18. Gray Matter Volume Decreases in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia: A Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Caroline; Schuller, Anne Marie; Paulos, Carlos; Namer, Izzie; Pull, Charles; Danion, Jean Marie; Foucher, Jack René

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aged patients (>50 years old) with residual schizophrenic symptoms differ from young patients. They represent a subpopulation with a more unfavorable Kraepelinian course and have an increased risk (up to 30%) for dementia of unknown origin. However, our current understanding of age-related brain changes in schizophrenia is derived from studies that included less than 17% of patients who were older than 50 years of age. This study investigated the anatomical distribution of gray matter (GM) brain deficits in aged patients with ongoing schizophrenia. Methods: Voxel-based morphometry was applied to 3D-T1 magnetic resonance images obtained from 27 aged patients with schizophrenia (mean age of 60 years) and 40 age-matched normal controls. Results: Older patients with schizophrenia showed a bilateral reduction of GM volume in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex, and in a large posterior region centered on the occipito-temporo-parietal junction. Only the latter region showed accelerated GM volume loss with increasing age. None of these results could be accounted for by institutionalization, antipsychotic medication, or cognitive scores. Conclusions: This study replicated most common findings in patients with schizophrenia with regard to thalamic and frontal GM deficits. However, it uncovered an unexpected large region of GM atrophy in the posterior tertiary cortices. The latter observation may be specific to this aged and chronically symptomatic subpopulation, as atrophy in this region is rarely reported in younger patients and is accelerated with age. PMID:21205677

  19. Morphometry of small recent impact craters on Mars: Size and terrain dependence, short-term modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, W. A.; Geiger, L. M.; Fendrock, M.; Gibson, R.

    2015-02-01

    Most recent studies of crater morphometry on Mars have addressed large craters (D>5 km) using elevation models derived from laser altimetry. In the present work, we examine a global population of small (25 m ≤D≤5 km), relatively well-preserved simple impact craters using HiRISE stereo-derived elevation models. We find that scaling laws from prior studies of large simple craters generally overestimate the depth and volume at small diameters. We show that crater rim curvature exhibits a strong diameter dependence that is well-described by scaling laws for D<1 km. Above this diameter, upper rim slopes begin to exceed typical repose angles and crater rims sharpen significantly. This transition is likely the result of gravity-driven collapse of the upper cavity walls during crater formation or short-term modification. In addition, we identify a tendency for small craters (D<500m) to be more conical than large craters, and we show that the average cavity cross section is well-described by a power law with exponent ˜1.75 (neither conical nor paraboloidal). We also conduct a statistical comparison of crater subpopulations to illuminate trends with increasing modification and target strength. These results have important implications for describing the "initial condition" of simple crater shape as a function of diameter and geological setting and for understanding how impact craters are modified on the Martian surface over time.

  20. Brain correlates of pro-social personality traits: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana F; Sampaio, Adriana; Ferreira, Miguel; Soares, José M; Gonçalves, Oscar F

    2013-09-01

    Of the five personality dimensions described by the Big Five Personality Model (Costa and McCrae 1992), Extraversion and Agreeableness are the traits most commonly associated with a pro-social orientation. In this study we tested whether a pro-social orientation, as expressed in terms of Extraversion and Agreeableness, is associated with a specific grey matter phenotype. Fifty-two healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), a self-report measure of the Big Five personality traits. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to investigate the correlation between brain structure and the personality traits of Agreeableness and Extraversion. We found that Extraversion was negatively correlated with grey matter density in the middle frontal and orbitofrontal gyri while Agreeableness was negatively correlated with grey matter density in the inferior parietal, middle occipital and posterior cingulate gyri. No positive correlations were found. These results suggest that pro-social personality traits seem to be associated with decreases in grey matter density in more frontal regions for Extraversion, and more posterior regions for Agreeableness. PMID:23512407

  1. Possible application of CT morphometry of the calcaneus and talus in forensic anthropological identification.

    PubMed

    Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Mustafa, Asmaa Mohammed Hishmat; Sogawa, Nozomi; Kanou, Tetsuya; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) data provide information for volumetric and radiographic density analysis. The present study investigated the application of virtual CT volumetry of the tarsal bones to estimation of the sex, stature, and body weight using postmortem CT (PMCT) data of forensic autopsy cases. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the bilateral foot bones of intact Japanese subjects after adolescence (age ≥ 15 years, n = 179, 100 males and 79 females) were reconstructed on an automated CT image analyzer system. Measured parameters were mass volume, mean CT value (HU), and total CT value of the talus and calcaneus. Mean CT values of these bones showed age-dependent decreases in elderly subjects over 60 years of age for both sexes, with significant sex-related differences especially in the elderly. The mass volumes and total CT values of the talus and calcaneus showed significant sex-related differences, and also moderate correlations with body height and weight for bilateral bones in all cases (r = 0.58-0.78, p < 0.0001); however, the correlations of these parameters of the female talus with body weight were insufficient (r = 0.41-0.61, p < 0.0001). These observations indicate the applicability of virtual CT morphometry of the talus and calcaneus using an automated analyzer to estimate the sex and stature in forensic identification; however, greater variations should be considered in body weight estimations of females. PMID:26362306

  2. Computerized nuclear morphometry as an objective method for characterizing human cancer cell populations.

    PubMed

    Stenkvist, B; Westman-Naeser, S; Holmquist, J; Nordin, B; Bengtsson, E; Vegelius, J; Eriksson, O; Fox, C H

    1978-12-01

    A new method for measuring differences in nuclear detail in chrome alum gallocyanin-stained nuclei of cells from human breast cancers was compared with conventional subjective grading and classification systems. The new method, termed computerized nuclear morphometry (CNM), gives a multivariate numerical score that correlates well with nuclear atypia and gives a higher reproducibility of classification than do subjective observations with conventional histological preparations. When 100 individual nuclei from each of 137 breast cancers were examined by CNM, there was a broad CNM score variation between patients but a good reproducibility for each tumor. When different parts of the same tumor were sampled, there was good reproducibility between samples, indicating that some breast cancers at least are "geometrically monoclonal." When these cancers were compared by the grading systems of WHO and Black, correlations of 0.43 and 0.48, respectively, were found. There was a poor correlation between CNM and classifications of tumor type, but in general there were high values for CNM in medullary tumors and low values in mucous tumors. Correlations between CNM and tumor progression and prognosis await future study of patients participating in the study. PMID:82482

  3. Noninvasive Evaluation of Nuclear Morphometry in Breast Lesions Using Multispectral Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hajihashemi, Mohammad Reza; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Al-Quran, Samer Z.; Jiang, Huabei

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the main cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. There are limitations associated with the existing clinical tools for breast cancer detection and alternative modalities for early detection and classification of breast cancer are urgently needed. Here we describe an optical imaging technique, called multispectral diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and demonstrate its ability of non-invasively evaluating nuclear morphometry for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. Photon densities along the surface of the breast were measured to allow for the extraction of three statistical parameters including the size, elongation and density of nuclei inside the breast tissue. The results from 14 patients (4 malignant and 10 benign lesions) show that there exist significant contrasts between the diseased and surrounding normal nuclei and that the recovered nuclear morphological parameters agree well the pathological findings. We found that the nuclei of cancer cells were less-spherical compared with those of surrounding normal cells, while the nuclear density or volume fraction provided the highest contrast among the three statistical parameters recovered. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of multispectral DOT as a cellular imaging method for accurate determination of breast cancer. PMID:23029196

  4. Intestinal and liver morphometry of the Yellow Tail Tetra (Astyanax altiparanae) fed with oregano oil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pollyanna M F; Caldas, Débora W; Salaro, Ana Lúcia; Sartori, Sirlene S R; Oliveira, Jerusa M; Cardoso, Alex J S; Zuanon, Jener A S

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of oregano oil on the intestinal and liver morphometry of yellow tail tetra, Astyanax altiparanae. Fish (1.46 ± 0.09 g) were kept in a 60-L aquaria, at a stocking density of 0.5 fi sh L-1. Six diets containing varying amounts of oregano oil were evaluated (0.0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0 and 2.5 g of oregano oil kg-1). At the end of 90 days, the fi sh were euthanised. Four intestines and four livers were collected per treatment, which were fi xed in Bouin and embedded in resin. For height and width folds, the absorption surface area and thickness of the muscular layer a positive linear effect of oregano oil was observed. A decrescent linear effect on the total number of goblet cells was also observed. For the cytoplasmic percentage of hepatocytes and liver glycogen, a positive linear effect of oregano oil was observed. There was a decreasing linear effect on the percentage of nuclei in the hepatocytes and capillaries. Thus, the oregano essential oil promotes increased absorption areas, modulates the amount of goblet cells involved in protecting the intestinal mucosa and promotes cytoplasmic increase with greater deposition of liver glycogen in yellow tail tetra. PMID:27331801

  5. Brain morphometry and cognitive performance in detoxified alcohol-dependents with preserved psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Chanraud, Sandra; Martelli, Catherine; Delain, Francoise; Kostogianni, Nikoletta; Douaud, Gwenaelle; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Reynaud, Michel; Martinot, Jean-Luc

    2007-02-01

    The extent of structural brain damage and related cognitive deficits has been little described in alcohol-dependent individuals with preserved social functioning. Thus, we investigated the relationship between regional alterations, executive performance, and drinking history. Volumes of gray and white matter were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging voxel-based morphometry in healthy men and in detoxified alcohol-dependent men with good psychosocial functioning. Their executive performance was assessed using neuropsychological tests. Regression analyses were carried out in the regions in which volume differences were detected. Decreases in gray matter were detected bilaterally in alcohol-dependents in the dorsolateral frontal cortex (up to 20% lower), and to a lesser extent in the temporal cortex, insula, thalamus, and cerebellum. Decreases in white matter volume were widespread, being up to 10% in corpus callosum. The degradation of neuropsychological performance correlated with gray matter volume decreases in the frontal lobe, insula, hippocampus, thalami and cerebellum, and with white matter decrease in the brainstem. An early age at first drinking was associated with decreased gray matter volumes in the cerebellum, brainstem (pons), and frontal regions. Regional alteration in gray and white matter volume was associated with impairment of executive function despite preserved social and somatic functioning in detoxified patients. Besides involving frontal regions, these findings are consistent with a cerebello-thalamo-cortical model of impaired executive functions in alcohol-dependent individuals. PMID:17047671

  6. Influence of regional cerebral blood volume on voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Cleppien, Dirk; Gass, Natalia; Falfan-Melgoza, Claudia; Vollmayr, Barbara; Hesser, Jürgen; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Sartorius, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The investigation of structural brain alterations is one focus in research of brain diseases like depression. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on high-resolution 3D MRI images is a widely used non-invasive tool for such investigations. However, the result of VBM might be sensitive to local physiological parameters such as regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) changes. In order to investigate whether rCBV changes may contribute to variation in VBM, we performed analyses in a study with the congenital learned helplessness (cLH) model for long-term findings. The 3D structural and rCBV data were acquired with T2 -weighted rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) pulse sequences. The group effects were determined by standard statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and biological parametric mapping (BPM) and examined further using atlas-based regions. In our genetic animal model of depression, we found co-occurrence of differences in gray matter volume and rCBV, while there was no evidence of significant interaction between both. However, the multimodal analysis showed similar gray matter differences compared with the standard VBM approach. Our data corroborate the idea that two group VBM differences might not be influenced by rCBV differences in genetically different strains. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27074152

  7. AOTF based molecular hyperspectral imaging system and its applications on nerve morphometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Xu, Dongrong; He, Xiaofu; Wang, Yiting; Chen, Zenggan; Liu, Hongying; Xu, Qintong; Guo, Fangmin

    2013-06-10

    The neuroanatomical morphology of nerve fibers is an important description for understanding the pathological aspects of nerves. Different from the traditional automatic nerve morphometry methods, a molecular hyperspectral imaging system based on an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was developed and used to identify unstained nerve histological sections. The hardware, software, and system performance of the imaging system are presented and discussed. The gray correction coefficient was used to calibrate the system's spectral response and to remove the effects of noises and artifacts. A spatial-spectral kernel-based approach through the support vector machine formulation was proposed to identify nerve fibers. This algorithm can jointly use both the spatial and spectral information of molecular hyperspectral images for segmentation. Then, the morphological parameters such as fiber diameter, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness, fiber area, and g-ratio were calculated and evaluated. Experimental results show that the hyperspectral-based method has the potential to recognize and measure the nerve fiber more accurately than traditional methods. PMID:23759836

  8. Regional cortical thinning in patients with major depressive disorder: a surface-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Tu, Pei-Chi; Chen, Li-Fen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Bai, Ya-Mai; Li, Cheng-Ta; Su, Tung-Ping

    2012-06-30

    This study uses surfaced-based morphometry to investigate cortical thinning and its functional correlates in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Subjects with MDD (N=36) and healthy control subjects (N=36) were enrolled in the study. Each subject received T1 structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), clinical evaluations, and neuropsychological examinations of executive functions with the Color Trail Test (CTT) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). This study used an automated surface-based method (FreeSurfer) to measure cortical thickness and to generate the thickness maps for each subject. Statistical comparisons were performed using a general linear model. Compared with healthy controls, subjects with MDD showed the largest area of cortical thinning in the prefrontal cortex. This study also noted smaller areas of cortical thinning in the bilateral inferior parietal cortex, left middle temporal gyrus, left entorhinal cortex, left lingual cortex, and right postcentral gyrus. Regression analysis demonstrated cortical thinning in several frontoparietal regions, predicting worse executive performance measured by CTT 2, though the patterns of cortical thickness/executive performance correlation differed in healthy controls and MDD subjects. In conclusion, the results provide further evidence for the significant role of a prefrontal structural deficit and an aberrant structural/functional relationship in patients with MDD. PMID:22521631

  9. Gray matter correlates of creative potential: a latent variable voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Jauk, Emanuel; Neubauer, Aljoscha C; Dunst, Beate; Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2015-05-01

    There is increasing research interest in the structural and functional brain correlates underlying creative potential. Recent investigations found that interindividual differences in creative potential relate to volumetric differences in brain regions belonging to the default mode network, such as the precuneus. Yet, the complex interplay between creative potential, intelligence, and personality traits and their respective neural bases is still under debate. We investigated regional gray matter volume (rGMV) differences that can be associated with creative potential in a heterogeneous sample of N=135 individuals using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). By means of latent variable modeling and consideration of recent psychometric advancements in creativity research, we sought to disentangle the effects of ideational originality and fluency as two independent indicators of creative potential. Intelligence and openness to experience were considered as common covariates of creative potential. The results confirmed and extended previous research: rGMV in the precuneus was associated with ideational originality, but not with ideational fluency. In addition, we found ideational originality to be correlated with rGMV in the caudate nucleus. The results indicate that the ability to produce original ideas is tied to default-mode as well as dopaminergic structures. These structural brain correlates of ideational originality were apparent throughout the whole range of intellectual ability and thus not moderated by intelligence. In contrast, structural correlates of ideational fluency, a quantitative marker of creative potential, were observed only in lower intelligent individuals in the cuneus/lingual gyrus. PMID:25676914

  10. Focal retrograde amnesia: voxel-based morphometry findings in a case without MRI lesions.

    PubMed

    Sehm, Bernhard; Frisch, Stefan; Thöne-Otto, Angelika; Horstmann, Annette; Villringer, Arno; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2011-01-01

    Focal retrograde amnesia (FRA) is a rare neurocognitive disorder presenting with an isolated loss of retrograde memory. In the absence of detectable brain lesions, a differentiation of FRA from psychogenic causes is difficult. Here we report a case study of persisting FRA after an epileptic seizure. A thorough neuropsychological assessment confirmed severe retrograde memory deficits while anterograde memory abilities were completely normal. Neurological and psychiatric examination were unremarkable and high-resolution MRI showed no neuroradiologically apparent lesion. However, voxel-based morphometry (VBM)-comparing the MRI to an education-, age-and sex-matched control group (n = 20) disclosed distinct gray matter decreases in left temporopolar cortex and a region between right posterior parahippocampal and lingual cortex. Although the results of VBM-based comparisons between a single case and a healthy control group are generally susceptible to differences unrelated to the specific symptoms of the case, we believe that our data suggest a causal role of the cortical areas detected since the retrograde memory deficit is the preeminent neuropsychological difference between patient and controls. This was paralleled by grey matter differences in central nodes of the retrograde memory network. We therefore suggest that these subtle alterations represent structural correlates of the focal retrograde amnesia in our patient. Beyond the implications for the diagnosis and etiology of FRA, our results advocate the use of VBM in conditions that do not show abnormalities in clinical radiological assessment, but show distinct neuropsychological deficits. PMID:22028902

  11. MRI Correlates of Parkinson's Disease Progression: A Voxel Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Fioravanti, Valentina; Benuzzi, Francesca; Codeluppi, Luca; Contardi, Sara; Cavallieri, Francesco; Nichelli, Paolo; Valzania, Franco

    2015-01-01

    We investigated structural brain differences between a group of early-mild PD patients at different phases of the disease and healthy subjects using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). 20 mild PD patients compared to 15 healthy at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up. VBM is a fully automated technique, which allows the identification of regional differences in the gray matter enabling an objective analysis of the whole brain between groups of subjects. With respect to controls, PD patients exhibited decreased GM volumes in right putamen and right parietal cortex. After 2 years of disease, the same patients confirmed GM loss in the putamen and parietal cortex; a significant difference was also observed in the area of pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and in the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR). PD is associated with brain morphological changes in cortical and subcortical structures. The first regions to be affected in PD seem to be the parietal cortex and the putamen. A third structure that undergoes atrophy is the part of the inferior-posterior midbrain, attributable to the PPN and MLR. Our findings provide new insight into the brain involvement in PD and could contribute to a better understanding of the sequence of events occurring in these patients. PMID:25628916

  12. Voxel-based Morphometry of Brain MRI in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) using structural brain MRI has been widely used for assessment of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). VBM of MRI data comprises segmentation into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid partitions, anatomical standardization of all the images to the same stereotactic space using linear affine transformation and further non-linear warping, smoothing, and finally performing a statistical analysis. Two techniques for VBM are commonly used, optimized VBM using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 2 or SPM5 with non-linear warping based on discrete cosine transforms and SPM8 plus non-linear warping based on diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL). In normal aging, most cortical regions prominently in frontal and insular areas have been reported to show age-related gray matter atrophy. In contrast, specific structures such as amygdala, hippocampus, and thalamus have been reported to be preserved in normal aging. On the other hand, VBM studies have demonstrated progression of atrophy mapping upstream to Braak's stages of neurofibrillary tangle deposition in AD. The earliest atrophy takes place in medial temporal structures. Stand-alone VBM software using SPM8 plus DARTEL running on Windows has been newly developed as an adjunct to the clinical assessment of AD. This software provides a Z-score map as a consequence of comparison of a patient's MRI with a normal database. PMID:23423504

  13. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry study of children and adolescents with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carducci, Filippo; Onorati, Paolo; Condoluci, Claudia; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Pierallini, Alberto; Sarà, Marco; Miano, Silvia; Cornia, Riccardo; Albertini, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Summary In order to investigate alterations in brain morphology and a possible temporal pattern of neuroanatomical abnormalities in the gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of young patients with Down syndrome (DS), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed on 21 children and adolescents with this chromosomal aberration and 27 age-matched participants as controls. In comparison with control subjects, children and adolescents with DS showed not only an overall smaller whole-brain volume, but also volume reductions of the GM in the cerebellum, frontal lobes, frontal region of the limbic lobe, parahippocampal gyri and hippocampi and of the WM in the cerebellum, frontal and parietal lobes, sub-lobar regions and brainstem. By contrast, volume preservation was observed in the GM of the parietal lobes, temporal lobe and sub-lobar regions and in the WM of the temporal lobe and temporal regions of the limbic lobe. A lower volume of CSF was also detected in the frontal lobes. This study is the first to use the high-resolution MRI VBM method to describe a whole-brain pattern of abnormalities in young DS patients falling within such a narrow age range and it provides new information on the neuroanatomically specific regional changes that occur during development in these patients. PMID:23731912

  14. Three-dimensional morphometry of mammalian cells. II. Areas, volumes, and area-volume ratios.

    PubMed

    Morgado, E; Ocqueteau, C; Cury, M; Becker, L; González, U; Muxica, L; Günther, B

    1990-05-01

    From three-dimensional diameter measurements of eleven kinds of cells pertaining to five different organs, which were excised from eleven adult mammals (nine species) whose body weight range was 40 g to 450 kg, we calculated the corresponding cell soma areas (A), volumes (V), and finally their area-volume ratios (A/V). The dissimilarities among these eleven cell types could be established quantitatively by means of a cluster analysis. The dendrograms for cell areas (A), volumes (V), and their corresponding area-volume ratios (A/V), yielded similar groupings when cell areas and volumes were compared, yet the grouping of the area-volume ratios (A/V) for the eleven types of cells was different. These results were corroborated by means of the principal components analysis, where five distinct cell groupings could be established. The relationship between cellular morphometry, oxidative metabolism, and body mass, was established by means of the fractal geometry of the transport systems (respiration and circulation), which provides the tools for the scale-dependent analysis of the surfaces across which the transport of metabolites is performed. PMID:2152294

  15. Lip morphometry in 600 North Indian adults: a data base study for sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Goel, Archana; Patnaik, Vvg; Puri, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    The study comprised lip morphometry of 600 North Indian adults (300 males and 300 females). The aim of the study was to create base data of various linear and vertical measurements of the upper and lower lips and width of the mouth. This standard may serve as a guideline for sexual dimorphism as well as for restoration or enhancement of esthetic and plastic surgery for the lips in the north Indian population, which will enable the surgeon to offer a better cosmetic result. Prior informed written consent from all the subjects was obtained. The exclusion and inclusion criteria for the subjects were predefined. The analysis shows the sexual dimorphism in most parameters of lips being greater in males. The results were compared with the available data for north white Americans, Malays, Malaysian Indians, Italians, western Indians and Caucasians. In the population under study, the measurements differ in all dimensions with Malays, Italians and Caucasians and show resemblance to the Malaysian Indians. Knowledge of the proportion between the upper and lower lips helps in surgical correction of the region. This study highlights the applied significance of observations of the present study to forensic, namely racial and sex dimorphic, criteria of identification. PMID:24644225

  16. Occurrence of the Foramen of Vesalius and Its Morphometry Relevant to Clinical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Chaisuksunt, Vipavadee; Kwathai, Lanaprai; Namonta, Kritsana; Rungruang, Thanaporn; Apinhasmit, Wandee; Chompoopong, Supin

    2012-01-01

    All 377 dry skulls were examined for the occurrence and morphometry of the foramen of Vesalius (FV) both in the middle cranial fossa and at the extracranial view of the skull base. There were 25.9% and 10.9% of FV found at the extracranial view of the skull base and in the middle cranial fossa, respectively. Total patent FV were 16.1% (11.9% unilaterally and 4.2% bilaterally). Most FV were found in male and on the left side. Comparatively, FV at the extracranial view of the skull base had a larger maximum diameter. The distance between FV and the foramen ovale (FO) was as short as 2.05 ± 1.09 mm measured at the extracranial view of the skull base. In conclusion, although the existence of FV is inconstant, its occurrence could not be negligible. The proximity of FV to FO should remind neurosurgeons to be cautious when performing the surgical approach through FO. PMID:22629207

  17. Gray matter correlates of creative potential: A latent variable voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Jauk, Emanuel; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.; Dunst, Beate; Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing research interest in the structural and functional brain correlates underlying creative potential. Recent investigations found that interindividual differences in creative potential relate to volumetric differences in brain regions belonging to the default mode network, such as the precuneus. Yet, the complex interplay between creative potential, intelligence, and personality traits and their respective neural bases is still under debate. We investigated regional gray matter volume (rGMV) differences that can be associated with creative potential in a heterogeneous sample of N = 135 individuals using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). By means of latent variable modeling and consideration of recent psychometric advancements in creativity research, we sought to disentangle the effects of ideational originality and fluency as two independent indicators of creative potential. Intelligence and openness to experience were considered as common covariates of creative potential. The results confirmed and extended previous research: rGMV in the precuneus was associated with ideational originality, but not with ideational fluency. In addition, we found ideational originality to be correlated with rGMV in the caudate nucleus. The results indicate that the ability to produce original ideas is tied to default-mode as well as dopaminergic structures. These structural brain correlates of ideational originality were apparent throughout the whole range of intellectual ability and thus not moderated by intelligence. In contrast, structural correlates of ideational fluency, a quantitative marker of creative potential, were observed only in lower intelligent individuals in the cuneus/lingual gyrus. PMID:25676914

  18. Neural Correlates of Post-Conventional Moral Reasoning: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Prehn, Kristin; Korczykowski, Marc; Rao, Hengyi; Fang, Zhuo; Detre, John A.; Robertson, Diana C.

    2015-01-01

    Going back to Kohlberg, moral development research affirms that people progress through different stages of moral reasoning as cognitive abilities mature. Individuals at a lower level of moral reasoning judge moral issues mainly based on self-interest (personal interests schema) or based on adherence to laws and rules (maintaining norms schema), whereas individuals at the post-conventional level judge moral issues based on deeper principles and shared ideals. However, the extent to which moral development is reflected in structural brain architecture remains unknown. To investigate this question, we used voxel-based morphometry and examined the brain structure in a sample of 67 Master of Business Administration (MBA) students. Subjects completed the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2) which measures moral development in terms of cognitive schema preference. Results demonstrate that subjects at the post-conventional level of moral reasoning were characterized by increased gray matter volume in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, compared with subjects at a lower level of moral reasoning. Our findings support an important role for both cognitive and emotional processes in moral reasoning and provide first evidence for individual differences in brain structure according to the stages of moral reasoning first proposed by Kohlberg decades ago. PMID:26039547

  19. Neural correlates of post-conventional moral reasoning: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Prehn, Kristin; Korczykowski, Marc; Rao, Hengyi; Fang, Zhuo; Detre, John A; Robertson, Diana C

    2015-01-01

    Going back to Kohlberg, moral development research affirms that people progress through different stages of moral reasoning as cognitive abilities mature. Individuals at a lower level of moral reasoning judge moral issues mainly based on self-interest (personal interests schema) or based on adherence to laws and rules (maintaining norms schema), whereas individuals at the post-conventional level judge moral issues based on deeper principles and shared ideals. However, the extent to which moral development is reflected in structural brain architecture remains unknown. To investigate this question, we used voxel-based morphometry and examined the brain structure in a sample of 67 Master of Business Administration (MBA) students. Subjects completed the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2) which measures moral development in terms of cognitive schema preference. Results demonstrate that subjects at the post-conventional level of moral reasoning were characterized by increased gray matter volume in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, compared with subjects at a lower level of moral reasoning. Our findings support an important role for both cognitive and emotional processes in moral reasoning and provide first evidence for individual differences in brain structure according to the stages of moral reasoning first proposed by Kohlberg decades ago. PMID:26039547

  20. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P < 0.05) sperm motility and membrane integrity, in both nonselected and DCG-selected sperm samples, >60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. PMID:26268795

  1. Parahippocampal gray matter alterations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 identified by voxel based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Hernández-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Pasaye, Erick H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration that result in motor and cognitive alterations. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses have found neurodegenerative patterns associated to SCA2, but they show some discrepancies. Moreover, behavioral deficits related to non-cerebellar functions are scarcely discussed in those reports. In this work we use behavioral and cognitive tests and VBM to identify and confirm cognitive and gray matter alterations in SCA2 patients compared with control subjects. Also, we discuss the cerebellar and non-cerebellar functions affected by this disease. Our results confirmed gray matter reduction in the cerebellar vermis, pons, and insular, frontal, parietal and temporal cortices. However, our analysis also found unreported loss of gray matter in the parahippocampal gyrus bilaterally. Motor performance test ratings correlated with total gray and white matter reductions, but executive performance and clinical features such as CAG repetitions and disease progression did not show any correlation. This pattern of cerebellar and non-cerebellar morphological alterations associated with SCA2 has to be considered to fully understand the motor and non-motor deficits that include language production and comprehension and some social skill changes that occur in these patients. PMID:25263602

  2. Regional gray matter density associated with emotional intelligence: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-09-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to monitor one's own and others' emotions and the ability to use the gathered information to guide one's thinking and action. EI is thought to be important for social life making it a popular subject of research. However, despite the existence of previous functional imaging studies on EI, the relationship between regional gray matter morphology and EI has never been investigated. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and a questionnaire (Emotional Intelligence Scale) to measure EI to identify the gray matter correlates of each factor of individual EI (Intrapersonal factor, Interpersonal factor, Situation Management factor). We found significant negative relationships between the Intrapersonal factor and regional gray matter density (rGMD) (1-a) in an anatomical cluster that included the right anterior insula, (1-b) in the right cerebellum, (1-c) in an anatomical cluster that extends from the cuneus to the precuneus, (1-d) and in an anatomical cluster that extends from the medial prefrontal cortex to the left lateral fronto-polar cortex. We also found significant positive correlations between the Interpersonal factor and rGMD in the right superior temporal sulcus, and significant negative correlations between the Situation Management factor and rGMD in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that each factor of EI in healthy young people is related to the specific brain regions known to be involved in the networks of social cognition and self-related recognition, and in the somatic marker circuitry. PMID:20740644

  3. Anatomical correlates of quality of life: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nagase, Tomomi; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-05-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has been defined in many ways, and these definitions usually emphasize happiness and satisfaction with life. Health-related problems are known to cause lower QOL. However, the neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in QOL measured by questionnaire (QOLMQ) in young healthy subjects are unknown. QOL is essential to our well-being, and investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying QOL in uncompromised subjects is obviously of great scientific and social interest. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and QOLMQ across the brain in healthy young adults (age, 21.4 ± 1.8 years) men (n = 88) and women (n = 68) in humans. We found significant negative relationships between QOLMQ and rGMV in a region in the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex and regions in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate gyrus and contingent cingulate regions. These findings show that structural variations in regions associated with processing of negative emotions such as fear and anger as well as those associated with evaluation of internally generated information are associated with QOLMQ. These findings suggest that these processes might be related to QOLMQ in healthy young adults. PMID:23671021

  4. Surface-based morphometry of the anterior cingulate cortex in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fornito, Alex; Yücel, Murat; Wood, Stephen J; Adamson, Chris; Velakoulis, Dennis; Saling, Michael M; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos

    2008-04-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) appears to be critically involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but past attempts at characterizing pathological changes in the region using magnetic resonance imaging have been restricted by a limited appreciation of its functional and anatomical diversity and a reliance on relatively coarse metrics (e.g., volume) to index anatomical change. In this study, we applied a novel, surface-based protocol to T1-weighted scans acquired from 40 first episode schizophrenia patients and 40 healthy controls individually matched for age, sex, and morphology of the paracingulate sulcus, a major anatomical variation that has been shown to affect morphometric estimates in the region. The surface-based approach enabled calculation of regional grey matter volume, surface area and curvature, cortical thickness, and depth of the cingulate sulcus, with sub-millimeter precision. Relative to controls, schizophrenia patients displayed a bilateral reduction in thickness of paralimbic regions of the ACC, along with a concomitant increase in surface area of both the limbic and paralimbic ACC. No differences were identified for regional grey matter volume, surface curvature, or CS depth. These findings illustrate the advantages of moving beyond traditional volume-based approaches when investigating cortical morphometry, and indicate that the early stages of schizophrenia are associated with a specific pattern of ACC abnormalities that cannot be attributed to variations in sulcal and gyral morphology. PMID:17525988

  5. Spatiotemporal morphometry of adjacent tissue layers with application to the study of sulcal formation.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, François; Glenn, Orit A; Barkovich, A James; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The process of brain growth involves the expansion of tissue at different rates at different points within the brain. As the layers within the developing brain evolve they can thicken or increase in area as the brain surface begins to fold. In this work we propose a new spatiotemporal formulation of tensor based volume morphometry that is derived in relation to tissue boundaries. This allows the study of the directional properties of tissue growth by separately characterizing the changes in area and thickness of the adjacent layers. The approach uses temporally weighted, local regression across a population of anatomies with different ages to model changes in components of the growth radial and tangential to the boundary between tissue layers. The formulation is applied to the study of sulcal formation from in-utero MR imaging of human fetal brain anatomy. Results show that the method detects differential growth of tissue layers adjacent to the cortical surface, particularly at sulcal locations, as early as 22 gestational weeks. PMID:21995063

  6. A comparison between voxel-based cortical thickness and voxel-based morphometry in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Chloe; Draganski, Bogdan; Ashburner, John; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    The morphology of cortical grey matter is commonly assessed using T1-weighted MRI together with automated computerised methods such as voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and cortical thickness measures. In the presented study we investigate how grey matter changes identified using voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT) measures compare with local grey matter volume changes identified using VBM. We use data from a healthy aging population to perform the comparison, focusing on brain regions where age-related changes have been observed in previous studies. Our results show that overall, in healthy aging, VBCT and VBM yield very consistent results but VBCT provides a more sensitive measure of age-associated decline in grey matter compared with VBM. Our findings suggest that while VBCT selectively investigates cortical thickness, VBM provides a mixed measure of grey matter including cortical surface area or cortical folding, as well as cortical thickness. We therefore propose that used together, these techniques can separate the underlying grey matter changes, highlighting the utility of combining these complementary methods. PMID:19559801

  7. MANDIBULAR MORPHOMETRY APPLIED TO ANESTHETIC BLOCKAGE IN THE MANED WOLF (CHRYSOCYON BRACHYURUS).

    PubMed

    de Souza Junior, Paulo; de Moraes, Flavio Machado; de Carvalho, Natan da Cruz; Canelo, Evandro Alves; Thiesen, Roberto; Santos, André Luiz Quagliatto

    2016-03-01

    Chrysocyon brachyurus (maned wolf) is the biggest South American canid and has a high frequency of dental injuries, both in the wild and in captivity. Thus, veterinary procedures are necessary to preserve the feeding capacity of hundreds of captive specimens worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the mandibular morphometry of the maned wolf with emphasis on the establishment of anatomic references for anesthetic block of the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. Therefore, 16 measurements in 22 mandibles of C. brachyurus adults were taken. For extraoral block of the inferior alveolar nerve at the level of the mandibular foramen, the needle should be advanced close to the medial face of the mandibular ramus for 11.4 mm perpendicular to the palpable concavity. In another extraoral approach, the needle may be introduced for 30.4 mm from the angular process at a 20-25° angle to the ventral margin. For blocking only the mental nerve, the needle should be inserted for 10 mm from ventral border, close to the labial surface of the mandibular body, at the level of the lower first premolar. The mandibular foramen showed similar position, size, and symmetry in the maned wolf specimens examined. Comparison of the data observed here with those available for other carnivores indicates the need to determine these anatomic references specifically for each species. PMID:27010268

  8. Supplementation of glutamine and vitamin E on the morphometry of the intestinal mucosa in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A E; Sakamoto, M I; Natali, M R M; Souza, L M G; Franco, J R G

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the influence of Gln and vitamin E (VE) supplementation in the diet of broiler chickens (Cobb-Vantress) on the morphometry of the intestinal mucosa. The design was completely randomized in a 2 x 3 (VE x periods of administering Gln) factorial arrangement. The levels of VE used were 10 and 500 mg/kg of diet and 3 periods of administering (1%) Gln-supplemented starter diet (for the first 7 or 14 d of life or for no added Gln), totaling 6 treatments with 5 replicates of 50 birds per experimental unit. In the growth period (d 22 to 41 posthatch), the treatments consisted only in the respective levels of VE. On d 7, 14, 21, and 41 posthatch, 2 birds per replicate were killed, and samples of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were subsequently removed, fixed in Bouin solution, and later embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The parameters analyzed were villus height and crypt depth. An ANOVA was applied to the obtained data, and the means were compared using Tukey's test (5% significance level). Greater development was observed in the duodenum, followed by the jejunum and ileum. On 41 d of life, diets with 10 mg of VE/kg supplemented with Gln (for the first 7 d of life) provided better development of the intestinal mucosa in broiler chickens. PMID:17297160

  9. Voxel-Based Morphometry ALE meta-analysis of Bipolar Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magana, Omar; Laird, Robert

    2012-03-01

    A meta-analysis was performed independently to view the changes in gray matter (GM) on patients with Bipolar disorder (BP). The meta-analysis was conducted on a Talairach Space using GingerALE to determine the voxels and their permutation. In order to achieve the data acquisition, published experiments and similar research studies were uploaded onto the online Voxel-Based Morphometry database (VBM). By doing so, coordinates of activation locations were extracted from Bipolar disorder related journals utilizing Sleuth. Once the coordinates of given experiments were selected and imported to GingerALE, a Gaussian was performed on all foci points to create the concentration points of GM on BP patients. The results included volume reductions and variations of GM between Normal Healthy controls and Patients with Bipolar disorder. A significant amount of GM clusters were obtained in Normal Healthy controls over BP patients on the right precentral gyrus, right anterior cingulate, and the left inferior frontal gyrus. In future research, more published journals could be uploaded onto the database and another VBM meta-analysis could be performed including more activation coordinates or a variation of age groups.

  10. Regional Gray Matter Density Associated with Cognitive Reflectivity–Impulsivity: Evidence from Voxel-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Nozawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Hanihara, Mayu; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    When faced with a problem or choice, humans can use two different strategies: “cognitive reflectivity,” which involves slow responses and fewer mistakes, or “cognitive impulsivity,” which comprises of quick responses and more mistakes. Different individuals use these two strategies differently. To our knowledge, no study has directly investigated the brain regions involved in reflectivity–impulsivity; therefore, this study focused on associations between these cognitive strategies and the gray matter structure of several brain regions. In order to accomplish this, we enrolled 776 healthy, right-handed individuals (432 men and 344 women; 20.7 ± 1.8 years) and used voxel-based morphometry with administration of a cognitive reflectivity–impulsivity questionnaire. We found that high cognitive reflectivity was associated with greater regional gray matter density in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex. Our finding suggests that this area plays an important role in defining an individual’s trait associated with reflectivity and impulsivity. PMID:25803809

  11. Quantification of airway morphometry: the effect of CT acquisition and reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; McMurray, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Maitz, Glenn S.; Gur, David

    2007-03-01

    This study measured the accuracy of our airway quantification scheme using phantoms airway under different CT protocols. Airway remodeling is associated with several thoracic diseases (e.g., chronic bronchitis, asthma, and bronchiectasis), and, therefore, quantification of airway remodeling may have wide clinical application. Our scheme assigns pixels partial membership in the airway wall and lumen based on the pixel's HU value, which is intended to account for partial volume averaging inherent in CT image reconstruction. Twenty-four phantom airways with an outer diameter from 2.6 to 14.0 mm and wall thicknesses from 0.5 to 2.0 mm were analyzed. The absolute differences between measurements supplied by the manufacture and computed from CT images acquired at 40 mAs and reconstructed at 1.25 mm thickness using GE's "soft" and "lung" reconstruction kernels for lumen area ranged from 1.4% to 49.3% and 0.4% to 33.0%, respectively, and for wall area ranged from 0.3% to 118.0% and 2.1 to 92.9%, respectively. Accuracy typically improved as the kernel's spatial frequency increased. Airways whose wall thickness was close to the pixels dimensions were challenging to quantify. The partial membership assignment of our airway quantification accurately computed airway morphometry across a range of phantom airway sizes.

  12. Investigating structural brain changes of dehydration using voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Streitbürger, Daniel-Paolo; Möller, Harald E; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Hund-Georgiadis, Margret; Schroeter, Matthias L; Mueller, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Dehydration can affect the volume of brain structures, which might imply a confound in volumetric and morphometric studies of normal or diseased brain. Six young, healthy volunteers were repeatedly investigated using three-dimensional T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging during states of normal hydration, hyperhydration, and dehydration to assess volume changes in gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The datasets were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), a widely used voxel-wise statistical analysis tool, FreeSurfer, a fully automated volumetric segmentation measure, and SIENAr a longitudinal brain-change detection algorithm. A significant decrease of GM and WM volume associated with dehydration was found in various brain regions, most prominently, in temporal and sub-gyral parietal areas, in the left inferior orbito-frontal region, and in the extra-nuclear region. Moreover, we found consistent increases in CSF, that is, an expansion of the ventricular system affecting both lateral ventricles, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Similar degrees of shrinkage in WM volume and increase of the ventricular system have been reported in studies of mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease during disease progression. Based on these findings, a potential confound in GM and WM or ventricular volume studies due to the subjects' hydration state cannot be excluded and should be appropriately addressed in morphometric studies of the brain. PMID:22952926

  13. Progression of Brain Atrophy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: A Longitudinal Tensor-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Giannelli, Marco; Ginestroni, Andrea; Soricelli, Andrea; Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Tessa, Carlo; Galli, Lucia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Piacentini, Silvia; Salvatore, Elena; Toschi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials. PMID:24586758

  14. Loss aversion is associated with bilateral insula volume. A voxel based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Markett, S; Heeren, G; Montag, C; Weber, B; Reuter, M

    2016-04-21

    Loss aversion is a decision bias, reflecting a greater sensitivity to losses than to gains in a decision situation. Recent neuroscientific research has shown that mesocorticolimbic structures like ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the ventral striatum constitute a bidirectional neural system that processes gains and losses and exhibits a neural basis of loss aversion. On a functional and structural level, the amygdala and insula also seem to play an important role in the processing of loss averse behavior. By applying voxel-based morphometry to structural brain images in N=41 healthy participants, the current study provides further evidence for the relationship of brain structure and loss aversion. The results show a negative correlation of gray matter volume in bilateral posterior insula as well as left medial frontal gyrus with individual loss aversion. Hence, higher loss aversion is associated with lower gray matter volume in these brain areas. Both structures have been discussed to play important roles in the brain's salience network, where the posterior insula is involved in interoception and the detection of salience. The medial frontal gyrus might impact decision making through its dense connections with the anterior cingulate cortex. A possible explanation for the present finding is that structural differences in these regions alter the processing of losses and salience, possibly biasing decision making towards avoidance of negative outcomes. PMID:27012426

  15. Lymphoid-rich effusions. Diagnosis by morphometry using the CAS 200 System.

    PubMed

    Walts, A E; Svidler, R; Tolmachoff, T; Marchevsky, A M

    1994-04-01

    Lymphoid-rich effusions frequently present diagnostic problems in clinical cytology. In the authors' previous studies, most lymphoid-rich effusions had been correctly classified as benign lymphocytosis or malignant lymphoma by an experimental computerized interactive morphometry system, in which randomly selected lymphoid nuclear profile images were measured in Papanicolaou fixed and stained cytospin smears. The present study used the CAS 200 System and criteria from the previously described rule-based expert system to classify similar preparations of 134 lymphoid rich pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions (90 benign lymphocytoses, 36 malignant lymphomas, and 8 chronic lymphocytic leukemias). A total of 98.9% of the benign lymphocytoses and 88.9% of the malignant lymphomas were correctly classified (predictive values of correct diagnoses 95.7% and 97.3%, respectively). Chronic lymphocytic leukemias could not be distinguished from benign lymphocytoses by nuclear profile areas. Optical density histograms of benign, lymphomatous, and chronic lymphocytic leukemias effusions are described. Advantages and limitations of image analysis and immunocytochemistry are discussed. PMID:8160646

  16. Computerized interactive morphometry and the diagnosis of lymphoid-rich effusions.

    PubMed

    Walts, A E; Morimoto, R; Marchevsky, A M

    1993-05-01

    An experimental computerized interactive morphometry system for the classification of lymphoid-rich effusions is presented. The relatively inexpensive microcomputer-based system was assembled in our laboratory with commercially available hardware and software. One hundred twenty-two effusions (86 benign lymphocytoses, 26 lymphomas, and 10 chronic lymphocytic leukemias) were studied. Lymphoid cells were selected randomly by the system from real-time images of Papanicolaou-fixed and stained cytospin smears of pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions. Parameters of nuclear shape, area, and optical density were measured automatically. Multiparameter statistical procedures of discriminant classificatory analysis analyzed the distribution of lymphoid nuclear profile integrated optical density to yield three groups of effusions, each with a predictive value of diagnosis of 100%. Neither these statistical procedures nor a simple rule-based expert system accurately classified chronic lymphocytic leukemia effusions based on the distribution of lymphoid nuclear profile area. When chronic lymphocytic leukemia effusions were excluded, however, the predictive values of a diagnosis of lymphoma by statistical analysis and by rule-based expert system were 92.3% and 88.9%, respectively, whereas the predictive values of a diagnosis of benign lymphocytosis were 97.7% and 91.3%, respectively. Potential applications and limitations of this technology for the diagnosis of lymphoid-rich effusions are discussed. PMID:8493950

  17. Structural correlates of formal thought disorder in schizophrenia: An ultra-high field multivariate morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Lena; Mahmood, Jenaid; Balain, Vijender; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny A.; Liddle, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent formal thought disorder (FTD) is one of the most characteristic features of schizophrenia. Several neuroimaging studies report spatially distinct neuroanatomical changes in association with FTD. Given that most studies so far have employed a univariate localisation approach that obscures the study of covarying interregional relationships, the present study focussed on the multivariate systemic pattern of anatomical changes that contribute to FTD. Methods Speech samples from nineteen medicated clinically stable schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls were evaluated for subtle formal thought disorder. Ultra high-field (7 T) anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans were obtained from all subjects. Multivariate morphometric patterns were identified using an independent component approach (source based morphometry). Using multiple regression analysis, the morphometric patterns predicting positive and negative FTD scores were identified. Results Morphometric variations in grey matter predicted a substantial portion of inter-individual variance in negative but not positive FTD. A pattern of concomitant striato-insular/precuneus reduction along with frontocingular grey matter increase had a significant association with negative FTD. Conclusions These results suggest that concomitant increase and decrease in grey matter occur in association with persistent negative thought disorder in clinically stable individuals with schizophrenia. PMID:26232240

  18. Comparison of template registration methods for multi-site meta-analysis of brain morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faskowitz, Joshua; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Jahanshad, Neda

    2016-03-01

    Neuroimaging consortia such as ENIGMA can significantly improve power to discover factors that affect the human brain by pooling statistical inferences across cohorts to draw generalized conclusions from populations around the world. Voxelwise analyses such as tensor-based morphometry also allow an unbiased search for effects throughout the brain. Even so, such consortium-based analyses are limited by a lack of high-powered methods to harmonize voxelwise information across study populations and scanners. While the simplest approach may be to map all images to a single standard space, the benefits of cohort-specific templates have long been established. Here we studied methods to pool voxel-wise data across sites using templates customized for each cohort but providing a meaningful common space across all studies for voxelwise comparisons. As non-linear 3D MRI registrations represent mappings between images at millimeter resolution, we need to consider the reliability of these mappings. To evaluate these mappings, we calculated test-retest statistics on the volumetric maps of expansion and contraction. Further, we created study-specific brain templates for ten T1-weighted MRI datasets, and a common space from four study-specific templates. We evaluated the efficacy of using a two-step registration framework versus a single standard space. We found that the two-step framework more reliably mapped subjects to a common space.

  19. Predicting human age using regional morphometry and inter-regional morphological similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xun-Heng; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study is predicting human age using neuro-metrics derived from structural MRI, as well as investigating the relationships between age and predictive neuro-metrics. To this end, a cohort of healthy subjects were recruited from 1000 Functional Connectomes Project. The ages of the participations were ranging from 7 to 83 (36.17+/-20.46). The structural MRI for each subject was preprocessed using FreeSurfer, resulting in regional cortical thickness, mean curvature, regional volume and regional surface area for 148 anatomical parcellations. The individual age was predicted from the combination of regional and inter-regional neuro-metrics. The prediction accuracy is r = 0.835, p < 0.00001, evaluated by Pearson correlation coefficient between predicted ages and actual ages. Moreover, the LASSO linear regression also found certain predictive features, most of which were inter-regional features. The turning-point of the developmental trajectories in human brain was around 40 years old based on regional cortical thickness. In conclusion, structural MRI could be potential biomarkers for the aging in human brain. The human age could be successfully predicted from the combination of regional morphometry and inter-regional morphological similarity. The inter-regional measures could be beneficial to investigating human brain connectome.

  20. A tract-specific framework for white matter morphometry combining macroscopic and microscopic tract features

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Awatea, Suyash P; Das, Sandhitsu R; Woo, John H; Melhem, Elias R; Gee, James C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging plays a key role in our understanding of white matter both in normal populations and in populations with brain disorders. Existing techniques focus primarily on using diffusivity-based quantities derived from diffusion tensor as surrogate measures of microstructural tissue properties of white matter. In this paper, we describe a novel tract-specific framework that enables the examination of white matter morphometry at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales. The framework leverages the skeleton-based modeling of sheet-like white matter fasciculi using the continuous medial representation, which gives a natural definition of thickness and supports its comparison across subjects. The thickness measure provides a macroscopic characterization of white matter fasciculi that complements existing analysis of microstructural features. The utility of the framework is demonstrated in quantifying white matter atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. We show that, compared to using microscopic features alone, combining the macroscopic and microscopic features gives a more complete characterization of the disease. PMID:20547469

  1. A Voxel Based Morphometry Study of Brain Gray Matter Volumes in Juvenile Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jayarajan, Rajan Nishanth; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Viswanath, Biju; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Srinath, Shoba; Chandrashekar, C.R.; Janardhan Reddy, Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adult patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have been shown to have gray matter (GM) volume differences from healthy controls in multiple regions – the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial frontal gyri (MFG), striatum, thalamus, and superior parietal lobule. However, there is paucity of data with regard to juvenile OCD. Hence, we examined GM volume differences between juvenile OCD patients and matched healthy controls using voxel based morphometry (VBM) with the above apriori regions of interest. Method: Fifteen right handed juvenile patients with OCD and age- sex- handedness- matched healthy controls were recruited after administering the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-KID and the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, and scanned using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. VBM methodology was followed. Results: In comparison with healthy controls, patients had significantly smaller GM volumes in left ACC. YBOCS total score (current) showed significant negative correlation with GM volumes in bilateral OFC, and left superior parietal lobule. Conclusion: These findings while reiterating the important role of the orbito-fronto-striatal circuitry, also implicate in the parietal lobe – especially the superior parietal lobule as an important structure involved in the pathogenesis of OCD. PMID:26379719

  2. Chemically Induced Conditional Rescue of the Reduced Epidermal Fluorescence8 Mutant of Arabidopsis Reveals Rapid Restoration of Growth and Selective Turnover of Secondary Metabolite Pools1[C][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Im; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Chapple, Clint; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of diverse and important secondary metabolites including lignin and flavonoids. The reduced epidermal fluorescence8 (ref8) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is defective in a lignin biosynthetic enzyme p-coumaroyl shikimate 3′-hydroxylase (C3′H), exhibits severe dwarfism and sterility. To better understand the impact of perturbation of phenylpropanoid metabolism on plant growth, we generated a chemically inducible C3′H expression construct and transformed it into the ref8 mutant. Application of dexamethasone to these plants greatly alleviates the dwarfism and sterility and substantially reverses the biochemical phenotypes of ref8 plants, including the reduction of lignin content and hyperaccumulation of flavonoids and p-coumarate esters. Induction of C3′H expression at different developmental stages has distinct impacts on plant growth. Although early induction effectively restored the elongation of primary inflorescence stem, application to 7-week-old plants enabled them to produce new rosette inflorescence stems. Examination of hypocotyls of these plants revealed normal vasculature in the newly formed secondary xylem, presumably restoring water transport in the mutant. The ref8 mutant accumulates higher levels of salicylic acid than the wild type, but depletion of this compound in ref8 did not relieve the mutant’s growth defects, suggesting that the hyperaccumulation of salicylic acid is unlikely to be responsible for dwarfism in this mutant. PMID:24381065

  3. Genus-specific and phase-dependent effects of nitrate on a sulfate-reducing bacterial community as revealed by dsrB-based DGGE analyses of wastewater reactors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Morishita, Yui; Ando, Akiko; Tsuchiya, Naofumi; Hirata, Mai; Tanaka, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    The biogenic production of hydrogen sulfide is a serious problem associated with wastewater treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of nitrate on the dynamics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) community in a laboratory-scale wastewater reactor, originating from a denitrifying plant using activated sludge. For this purpose, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis targeting the dsrB (dissimilatory sulfite reductase) gene was used in combination with chemical analyses and measurement of oxidation and reduction potential (ORP). The reactors were initially dosed with 1.0 and 4.0 g/L potassium nitrate and anaerobically incubated for 490 h. Addition of 4.0 g/L nitrate to the reactor was associated with a prolonged inhibition (over 300 h, i.e., 12.5 days) of sulfate reduction and this was consistent with a rapid decrease in ORP associated with nitrate depletion. The DGGE analysis revealed that nitrate addition remarkably attenuated a distinct group of dsrB related to Desulfovibrio, whereas other dsrB groups were not influenced. Furthermore, another sulfate reduction by Syntrophobacter in the later stages of the incubation period occurred in both reactors (regardless of the nitrate concentration), suggesting that different SRB groups are associated with sulfate reduction at different stages of the wastewater treatment process. PMID:22806863

  4. mTOR Inhibition: Reduced Insulin Secretion and Sensitivity in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Jordi; Ramírez-Bajo, María Jose; Banon-Maneus, Elisenda; Moya-Rull, Daniel; Ventura-Aguiar, Pedro; Hierro-Garcia, Natalia; Lazo-Rodriguez, Marta; Revuelta, Ignacio; Torres, Armando; Oppenheimer, Federico; Campistol, Josep M.; Diekmann, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Background Sirolimus (SRL) has been associated with new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation. The aim was to determine the effect of SRL on development of insulin resistance and β-cell toxicity. Methods Lean Zucker rat (LZR) and obese Zucker rat (OZR) were distributed into groups: vehicle and SRL (0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) during 12 or 28 days. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was evaluated at days 0, 12, 28, and 45. Islet morphometry, β-cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed at 12 days. Islets were isolated to analyze insulin content, insulin secretion, and gene expression. Results After 12 days, SRL treatment only impaired IPGTT in a dose-dependent manner in OZR. Treatment prolongation induced increase of area under the curve of IPGTT in LZR and OZR; however, in contrast to OZR, LZR normalized glucose levels after 2 hours. The SRL reduced pancreas weight and islet proliferation in LZR and OZR as well as insulin content. Insulin secretion was only affected in OZR. Islets from OZR + SRL rats presented a downregulation of Neurod1, Pax4, and Ins2 gene. Genes related with insulin secretion remained unchanged or upregulated. Conclusions In conditions that require adaptive β-cell proliferation, SRL might reveal harmful effects by blocking β-cell proliferation, insulin production and secretion. These effects disappeared when removing the therapy.

  5. Validation of image-based method for extraction of coronary morphometry.

    PubMed

    Wischgoll, Thomas; Choy, Jenny Susana; Ritman, Erik L; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2008-03-01

    An accurate analysis of the spatial distribution of blood flow in any organ must be based on detailed morphometry (diameters, lengths, vessel numbers, and branching pattern) of the organ vasculature. Despite the significance of detailed morphometric data, there is relative scarcity of data on 3D vascular anatomy. One of the major reasons is that the process of morphometric data collection is labor intensive. The objective of this study is to validate a novel segmentation algorithm for semi-automation of morphometric data extraction. The utility of the method is demonstrated in porcine coronary arteries imaged by computerized tomography (CT). The coronary arteries of five porcine hearts were injected with a contrast-enhancing polymer. The coronary arterial tree proximal to 1 mm was extracted from the 3D CT images. By determining the centerlines of the extracted vessels, the vessel radii and lengths were identified for various vessel segments. The extraction algorithm described in this paper is based on a topological analysis of a vector field generated by normal vectors of the extracted vessel wall. With this approach, special focus is placed on achieving the highest accuracy of the measured values. To validate the algorithm, the results were compared to optical measurements of the main trunk of the coronary arteries with microscopy. The agreement was found to be excellent with a root mean square deviation between computed vessel diameters and optical measurements of 0.16 mm (<10% of the mean value) and an average deviation of 0.08 mm. The utility and future applications of the proposed method to speed up morphometric measurements of vascular trees are discussed. PMID:18228141

  6. Effect of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Striatal Morphometry in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wade, Benjamin S C; Joshi, Shantanu H; Njau, Stephanie; Leaver, Amber M; Vasavada, Megha; Woods, Roger P; Gutman, Boris A; Thompson, Paul M; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L

    2016-09-01

    Patients with major depression show reductions in striatal and paleostriatal volumes. The functional integrity and connectivity of these regions are also shown to change with antidepressant response. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a robust and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. However, whether morphological changes in the dorsal and ventral striatum/pallidum relate to or predict therapeutic response to ECT is unknown. Using structural MRI, we assessed cross-sectional effects of diagnosis and longitudinal effects of ECT for volume and surface-based shape metrics of the caudate, putamen, pallidum, and nucleus accumbens in 53 depressed patients (mean age: 44.1 years, 13.8 SD; 52% female) and 33 healthy controls (mean age: 39.3 years, 12.4 SD; 57% female). Patients were assessed before ECT, after their second ECT, and after completing an ECT treatment index. Controls were evaluated at two time points. Support vector machines determined whether morphometric measures at baseline predicted ECT-related clinical response. Patients showed smaller baseline accumbens and pallidal volumes than controls (P<0.05). Increases in left putamen volume (P<0.03) occurred with ECT. Global increases in accumbens volume and local changes in pallidum and caudate volume occurred in patients defined as treatment responders. Morphometric changes were absent across time in controls. Baseline volume and shape metrics predicted overall response to ECT with up to 89% accuracy. Results support that ECT elicits structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral striatum/pallidum. The morphometry of these structures, forming key components of limbic-cortical-striatal-pallidal-thalamic circuitry involved in mood and emotional regulation, may determine patients likely to benefit from treatment. PMID:27067127

  7. Regional Grey Matter Structure Differences between Transsexuals and Healthy Controls—A Voxel Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Lajos; Kozák, Lajos R.; Simon, Viktória; Czobor, Pál; Unoka, Zsolt; Szabó, Ádám; Csukly, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID) refers to transsexual individuals who feel that their assigned biological gender is incongruent with their gender identity and this cannot be explained by any physical intersex condition. There is growing scientific interest in the last decades in studying the neuroanatomy and brain functions of transsexual individuals to better understand both the neuroanatomical features of transsexualism and the background of gender identity. So far, results are inconclusive but in general, transsexualism has been associated with a distinct neuroanatomical pattern. Studies mainly focused on male to female (MTF) transsexuals and there is scarcity of data acquired on female to male (FTM) transsexuals. Thus, our aim was to analyze structural MRI data with voxel based morphometry (VBM) obtained from both FTM and MTF transsexuals (n = 17) and compare them to the data of 18 age matched healthy control subjects (both males and females). We found differences in the regional grey matter (GM) structure of transsexual compared with control subjects, independent from their biological gender, in the cerebellum, the left angular gyrus and in the left inferior parietal lobule. Additionally, our findings showed that in several brain areas, regarding their GM volume, transsexual subjects did not differ significantly from controls sharing their gender identity but were different from those sharing their biological gender (areas in the left and right precentral gyri, the left postcentral gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, precuneus and calcarinus, the right cuneus, the right fusiform, lingual, middle and inferior occipital, and inferior temporal gyri). These results support the notion that structural brain differences exist between transsexual and healthy control subjects and that majority of these structural differences are dependent on the biological gender. PMID:24391851

  8. SU-E-QI-12: Morphometry Based Measurements of the Structural Response to Whole Brain Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, D; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although state of the art radiation therapy techniques for treating intracranial malignancies have eliminated acute brain injury, cognitive impairment occurs in 50–90% of patients who survive >6mo post irradiation. Quantitative characterization of therapy response is needed to facilitate therapeutic strategies to minimize radiation induced cognitive impairment [1]. Deformation based morphometry techniques [2, 3] are presented as a quantitative imaging biomarker of therapy response in patients receiving whole brain radiation for treating medulloblastoma. Methods: Post-irradiation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets were retrospectively analyzed in N=15 patients, >60 MR image datasets. As seen in Fig 1(a), volume changes at multiple time points post-irradiation were quantitatively measured in the cerebrum and ventricles with respect to pre-irradiation MRI. A high resolution image Template, was registered to the pre-irradiation MRI of each patient to create a brain atlas for the cerebrum, cerebellum, and ventricles. Skull stripped images for each patient were registered to the initial pre-treatment scan. Average volume changes in the labeled regions were measured using the determinant of the displacement field Jacobian. Results: Longitudinal measurements, Fig 1(b-c), show a negative correlation p=.06, of the cerebral volume change with the time interval from irradiation. A corresponding positive correlation, p=.01, between ventricular volume change and time interval from irradiation is seen. One sample t-test for correlations were computed using a Spearman method. An average decrease in cerebral volume, p=.08, and increase in ventricular volume, p<.001, was observed. The radiation dose was seen directly proportional to the induced volume changes in the cerebrum, r=−.44, p<.001, Fig 1(d). Conclusion: Results indicate that morphometric monitoring of brain tissue volume changes may potentially be used to quantitatively assess toxicity and response to

  9. Regional grey matter structure differences between transsexuals and healthy controls--a voxel based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Lajos; Kozák, Lajos R; Simon, Viktória; Czobor, Pál; Unoka, Zsolt; Szabó, Ádám; Csukly, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID) refers to transsexual individuals who feel that their assigned biological gender is incongruent with their gender identity and this cannot be explained by any physical intersex condition. There is growing scientific interest in the last decades in studying the neuroanatomy and brain functions of transsexual individuals to better understand both the neuroanatomical features of transsexualism and the background of gender identity. So far, results are inconclusive but in general, transsexualism has been associated with a distinct neuroanatomical pattern. Studies mainly focused on male to female (MTF) transsexuals and there is scarcity of data acquired on female to male (FTM) transsexuals. Thus, our aim was to analyze structural MRI data with voxel based morphometry (VBM) obtained from both FTM and MTF transsexuals (n = 17) and compare them to the data of 18 age matched healthy control subjects (both males and females). We found differences in the regional grey matter (GM) structure of transsexual compared with control subjects, independent from their biological gender, in the cerebellum, the left angular gyrus and in the left inferior parietal lobule. Additionally, our findings showed that in several brain areas, regarding their GM volume, transsexual subjects did not differ significantly from controls sharing their gender identity but were different from those sharing their biological gender (areas in the left and right precentral gyri, the left postcentral gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, precuneus and calcarinus, the right cuneus, the right fusiform, lingual, middle and inferior occipital, and inferior temporal gyri). These results support the notion that structural brain differences exist between transsexual and healthy control subjects and that majority of these structural differences are dependent on the biological gender. PMID:24391851

  10. The morphometry of materno—fetal oxygen exchange barrier in a baboon model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Samson, J.E.; Mari, G.; Dick, E.J.; Hubbard, G.B.; Ferry, R.J.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N.E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction More than one-fourth of U.S. women are overweight; more than one-third are obese. Maternal obesity has been linked to an increased incidence of stillbirths, fetal macrosomia, fetal intrauterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia. The placenta plays a key role in the nutrients and oxygen supply to the fetus. The data about structural changes in the placental villous membrane (VM), a major component of the feto-maternal nutrient and oxygen exchange barrier, during obesity are sparse and inconsistent. Our objective was to evaluate the morphometric changes in the placental exchange barrier in a baboon model of obesity. Materials and methods The previously described baboon model of maternal obesity was studied. We compared 4 obese to 4 non-obese baboons. Placental stereology with the use of transmission electron microscopy was performed to estimate VM oxygen diffusing capacities and morphometry. Results The specific placental oxygen diffusing capacities per unit of fetal weight were similar in baboons and humans. Maternal leptin concentrations correlated negatively with placental basement membrane thickness (r = −0.78, p < 0.05), while fetal leptin levels correlated negatively with endothelial thickness of fetal capillaries (r = −0.78, p < 0.05). The total and specific villous membrane oxygen diffusing capacities were not different between the two groups. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of placental oxygen diffusing capacities and placental ultrastructural changes in a baboon model of obesity. Previously reported placental inflammation in maternal obesity is not associated with changes in the VM diffusing capacities and ultrastructure. PMID:21872927

  11. Juggling revisited - a voxel-based morphometry study with expert jugglers.

    PubMed

    Gerber, P; Schlaffke, L; Heba, S; Greenlee, M W; Schultz, T; Schmidt-Wilcke, T

    2014-07-15

    Juggling is a highly interesting tool to investigate neuroplasticity associated with motor-learning. Several brain-imaging studies have reported changes in regional brain morphology in visual association cortices in individuals learning how to juggle a three-ball cascade. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that investigated expert jugglers, looking for specific features in regional brain morphology related to this highly specialized skill. Using T1-weighted images and voxel-based morphometry we investigated in a cross-sectional study design 16 expert jugglers, able to juggle at least five balls and an age- and gender-matched group of non-jugglers. We hypothesized that expert jugglers would show higher gray matter density in regions involved in visual motion perception and eye-hand coordination. Images were pre-processed and analyzed using SPM8. Age was included in the analyses as covariate of no interest. As compared to controls jugglers displayed several clusters of higher, regional gray matter density in the occipital and parietal lobes including the secondary visual cortex, the hMT+/V5 area bilaterally and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Within the jugglers group we also found a correlation between performance and regional gray matter density in the right hMT+/V5 area. Our study provides evidence that expert jugglers show increased gray matter density in brain regions involved in visual motion perception and eye-hand coordination, i.e. brain areas that have previously been shown to undergo dynamic changes in terms of gray matter increases in subjects learning a basic three-ball cascade. The extent to which transient increases in beginners and the differences in experts and non-experts are based on the same neurobiological correlates remains to be fully elucidated. PMID:24736178

  12. The Mechanism for Forming Martian Rampart Craters: Clues from Crater Morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, R. A.; Chuang, F.

    1996-03-01

    Many large craters on the martian surface have ejecta blankets that terminate with a pronounced lobate ridge. These rampart craters represent features unique to Mars, and their morphology suggests that their ejecta was emplaced as a highly mobile fluid instead of ballistically. High velocity experiments into mud have duplicated many of the common morphologic characteristics of rampart craters supporting this hypothesis. However, additional experiments performed at a variety of atmospheric pressures have also been able to duplicate aspects of rampart crater morphology These results suggest that rampart craters form as the result of a low pressure atmosphere. Obviously the presence of ice or water would have an effect on the target properties (i.e., material strength) of the martian substrate, which should also influence the overall crater morphometry, thus allowing us to test these competing hypotheses. In this study we used the photoclinometric algorithm developed by Davis and Soderblom and written for the Planetary Image Cartography System to determined the shape of over 300 fresh lunar-like or rampart impact craters at a variety of diameters (3 to 80 km). Because it is probable that Ethology would also effect the strength of the target material, we confined our study to craters formed in the dissected unit of the Highland Plateau (Npld) as defined by the 1:15M-scale geologic mappers and interpretable to the scale of our images. In addition we confined our study to +30 degrees to omit variations in crater morphology seen at higher latitudes. The images used were radiometrically-calibrated (red and minus-blue filter), moderate resolution (~200 m/pixel) obtained by the Viking orbiters. Our initial results show that there is a slight difference in morphometric relations between fresh lunar-like and rampart craters, supporting the hypothesis that the unique morphology of rampart crater ejecta results from the incorporation of volatile materials contained in the target

  13. Drainage basin morphometry controls on the active depositional area of debris flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihir, Monika; Wasklewicz, Thad; Malamud, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A majority of the research on understanding the connection between alluvial fans and drainage basins to date has focused on coarse-scale relations between total fan area and drainage basin area. Here we take a new approach where we assess relationships between active fan depositional area and drainage basin morphometry using 52 debris flow fans (32 from the White Mountains and 20 from the Inyo Mountains) on the eastern side of Owens Valley, California, USA. The boundaries for fans, drainage basin and active depositional areas were delineated from 10m digital elevation models and 1 m aerial photographs. We examined the relationships between the normalised active depositional area of the fan (Afad/Af, where Afad is the fan active depositional area and Af the entire fan area) and the following four variables for drainage basin: (i) area (Adb), (ii) total stream length (Ls), (iii) relief (BHH), (iv) roughness (R). We find a statistically significant (r2 > 0.40) inverse power-law relationship between recent sediment contribution to the fan and drainage basin area (Afad/Af = 0.29Adb-0.167) drainage network length (Afad/Af = 0.39Ls-0.161) and basin relief (Afad/Af = 3.90BHH-0.401), and a statistically weak (r2 = 0.22) inverse power law with basin roughness (Afad/Af = 0.32R0.5441). Drainage basin size combined with other morphometric variables may largely determine efficiency in sediment transport and delivery to the fan surface. A large proportion of the total fan area of smaller fans are flooded by debris flow indicating less sediment storage in the drainage basins and greater efficiency in sediment delivery. The findings signify the importance of coarse-scale relationships to both long- and short-term fan evolution.

  14. Gray matter abnormalities associated with betel quid dependence: a voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Zhong, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Tao; Pan, Mengjie; Li, Jianjun; Lu, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Betel quid dependence (BQD) patients have a cluster of cognitive, behavioral, and physiological symptoms which are associated with structural abnormalities in brain gray matter. However, so far there have neither been brain structural studies investigating the alterations related to BQD, nor studies assessing the brain structural changes with clinical indexes. Methods: 65 subjects were recruited including 33 ‘pure’ BQD patients and another 32 gender and age matched in the control group. T1 structural voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to investigate the gray matter (GM) volume alterations. In BQD patients, Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate the association between GM segmentations and clinical indexes, including BQD scores, illness duration, SAS and SDS. Results: Compared with that of the control group, the VBM of GM in BQD patients exhibited a significant decrease in volume (All P values > 0.05, AlphaSim correction) in the midbrain, right anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), and also there was an increased volume in right hippocampal and right precuneus. GM volumes of the left DLPFC and right rACC showed negative correlation with the duration of BQD, meanwhile, midbrain volumes were negative correlating with BQD scores (All P values > 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggested that brain structural changes were present in BQD patients, and those may be a neurobiological basis for BQD patients. These findings may provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of BQD. Also, VBM is an effective tool for in vivo investigation of gray matter alterations in patients with BQD. PMID:25901203

  15. Computerized interactive morphometry. An expert system for the diagnosis of lymphoid-rich effusions.

    PubMed

    Walts, A E; Marchevsky, A M

    1989-12-01

    The authors present experimental techniques for the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma and benign lymphocytosis in lymphoid-rich effusions with the use of an inexpensive microcomputer-based video system for computerized interactive morphometry (CIM). Lymphoid cells were randomly selected by a trained observer from real-time images of Papanicolaou-fixed and -stained cytospin smears prepared from pleural, peritoneal, or pericardial effusions. The lymphoid cells were classified by the instrument, based on the size and shape of their nuclear profiles. The morphometric data collected by the instrument were interpreted by a simple rule-based expert system that classified the smears as benign or malignant. One hundred four cases, including 28 malignant lymphomas, 63 benign lymphocytoses, 8 chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and 5 cases with incomplete immunopathologic data, were studied retrospectively. Sixty-three of these effusions had been stained to detect light chain monoclonality. Ninety-one effusions were correctly classified by the expert system. There were four potential false negative diagnoses and one potential false positive diagnosis by the CIM system. Eight effusions from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were consistently classified as benign. Although the author's series of patients with a history of CLL is small, their results suggest that CIM is unsuitable for the diagnosis of malignancy in these effusions. If only those effusions from patients with a history of CLL are excluded, the predictive value of a diagnosis of malignant lymphoma was 96.5%, whereas the predictive value of a diagnosis of benign lymphocytosis was 94.0%. PMID:2686396

  16. Lake morphometry and resource polymorphism determine niche segregation between cool- and cold-water-adapted fish.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Brian; Harrod, Chris; Kahilaineni, Kimmo K

    2014-02-01

    Climate change is increasing ambient temperatures in Arctic and subarctic regions, facilitating latitudinal range expansions of freshwater fishes adapted to warmer water temperatures. The relative roles of resource availability and interspecific interactions between resident and invading species in determining the outcomes of such expansions has not been adequately evaluated. Ecological interactions between a cool-water adapted fish, the perch (Perca fluviatilis), and the cold-water adapted European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), were studied in both shallow and deep lakes with fish communities dominated by (1) monomorphic whitefish, (2) monomorphic whitefish and perch, and (3) polymorphic whitefish and perch. A combination of stomach content, stable-isotope, and invertebrate prey availability data were used to identify resource use and niche overlap among perch, the trophic generalist large sparsely rakered (LSR) whitefish morph, and the pelagic specialist densely rakered (DR) whitefish morph in 10 subarctic lakes at the contemporary distribution limit of perch in northern Scandinavia. Perch utilized its putative preferred littoral niche in all lakes. LSR whitefish utilized both littoral and pelagic resources in monomorphic whitefish-dominated lakes. When found in sympatry with perch, LSR whitefish exclusively utilized pelagic prey in deep lakes, but displayed niche overlap with perch in shallow littoral lakes. DR whitefish was a specialist zooplanktivore, relegating LSR whitefish from pelagic habitats, leading to an increase in niche overlap between LSR whitefish and perch in deep lakes. Our results highlight how resource availability (lake depth and fish community) governs ecological interactions between native and invading species, leading to different outcomes even at the same latitudes. These findings suggest that lake morphometry and fish community structure data should be included in bioclimate envelope-based models of species distribution shifts

  17. Automated Cell Detection and Morphometry on Growth Plate Images of Mouse Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Du, Xia; Harding, James I; Beylerian, Emily N; de Silva, Brian M; Gross, Ben J; Kastein, Hannah K; Wang, Weiguang; Lyons, Karen M; Schaeffer, Hayden

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy imaging of mouse growth plates is extensively used in biology to understand the effect of specific molecules on various stages of normal bone development and on bone disease. Until now, such image analysis has been conducted by manual detection. In fact, when existing automated detection techniques were applied, morphological variations across the growth plate and heterogeneity of image background color, including the faint presence of cells (chondrocytes) located deeper in tissue away from the image’s plane of focus, and lack of cell-specific features, interfered with identification of cell. We propose the first method of automated detection and morphometry applicable to images of cells in the growth plate of long bone. Through ad hoc sequential application of the Retinex method, anisotropic diffusion and thresholding, our new cell detection algorithm (CDA) addresses these challenges on bright-field microscopy images of mouse growth plates. Five parameters, chosen by the user in respect of image characteristics, regulate our CDA. Our results demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed numerical method relative to manual methods. Our CDA confirms previously established results regarding chondrocytes’ number, area, orientation, height and shape of normal growth plates. Our CDA also confirms differences previously found between the genetic mutated mouse Smad1/5CKO and its control mouse on fluorescence images. The CDA aims to aid biomedical research by increasing efficiency and consistency of data collection regarding arrangement and characteristics of chondrocytes. Our results suggest that automated extraction of data from microscopy imaging of growth plates can assist in unlocking information on normal and pathological development, key to the underlying biological mechanisms of bone growth. PMID:25525552

  18. Effect of Polymorphisms of Three Genes Mediating Monoamine Signalling on Brain Morphometry in Schizophrenia and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumari, Anupa A.; John, John P.; Halahalli, Harsha N.; Paul, Pradip; Thirunavukkarasu, Priyadarshini; Purushottam, Meera; Jain, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined the effect of risk alleles of polymorphisms of three schizophrenia risk genes that mediate monoamine signalling in the brain on regional brain volumes of schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. The risk alleles and the gene polymorphisms studied were: Val allele of catechol o-methyltransferase (COMT) rs4680 polymorphism; short allele of 5-hydroxy tryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) polymorphism; and T allele of 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A (5HT2A) rs6314 polymorphism. Methods The study was carried out on patients with recent onset schizophrenia (n=41) recruited from the outpatient department of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India and healthy control subjects (n=39), belonging to South Indian Dravidian ethnicity. Individual and additive effects of risk alleles of the above gene polymorphisms on brain morphometry were explored using voxel-based morphometry. Results Irrespective of phenotypes, individuals with the risk allele T of the rs6314 polymorphism of 5HT2A gene showed greater (at cluster-extent equivalent to family wise error-correction [FWEc] p<0.05) regional brain volumes in the left inferior temporal and left inferior occipital gyri. Those with the risk alleles of the other two polymorphisms showed a trend (at p<0.001, uncorrected) towards lower regional brain volumes. A trend (at p<0.001, uncorrected) towards additive effects of the above 3 risk alleles (subjects with 2 or 3 risk alleles vs. those with 1 or no risk alleles) on brain morphology was also noted. Conclusion The findings of the present study have implications in understanding the role of individual and additive effects of genetic variants in mediating regional brain morphometry in health and disease. PMID:25912540

  19. Evaluation of morphometry-based dating of monogenetic volcanoes—a case study from Bandas del Sur, Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan; Németh, Károly; Dóniz-Páez, F. Javier

    2013-07-01

    Morphometry-based dating provides a first-order estimate of the temporal evolution of monogenetic volcanic edifices located within an intraplate monogenetic volcanic field or on the flanks of a polygenetic volcano. Two widely used morphometric parameters, namely cone height/width ratio ( H max/ W co) and slope angle, were applied to extract chronological information and evaluate their accuracy for morphometry-based ordering. Based on these quantitative parameters extracted from contour-based Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), two event orders for the Bandas del Sur in Tenerife (Canary Islands) were constructed and compared with the existing K-Ar, paleomagnetic and stratigraphic data. The results obtained suggest that the commonly used H max/ W co ratio is not reliable, leading to inappropriate temporal order estimates, while the slope angle gives slightly better results. The overall performance of such descriptive parameters was, however, generally poor (i.e. there is no strong correlation between morphometry and age). The geomorphic/morphometric mismatches could be the result of (1) the diversity of syn-eruptive processes (i.e. diverse initial morphologies causing geomorphic/morphometric variability), (2) contrasting, edifice-specific degradation that depends partly upon the inner facies architecture of the volcanic edifices, (3) various external environmental controls (e.g. tephra mantling from pyroclastic density currents unrelated to the edifice evaluated) and (4) differences in the scale/resolution of input data. The observed degradation trend and changes in morphometric parameters over time do not support a simple degradation model for monogenetic scoria cones volcanoes.

  20. The Common Traits of the ACC and PFC in Anxiety Disorders in the DSM-5: Meta-Analysis of Voxel-Based Morphometry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhengjia; Zhang, Tao; Du, Mingying; Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The core domains of social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia (GA), and specific phobia (SP) are cognitive and physical symptoms that are related to the experience of fear and anxiety. It remains unclear whether these highly comorbid conditions that constitute the anxiety disorder subgroups of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders – Fifth Edition (DSM-5) represent distinct disorders or alternative presentations of a single underlying pathology. Methods A systematic search of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies of SAD, GAD, PD, GA, and SP was performed with an effect-size signed differential mapping (ES-SDM) meta-analysis to estimate the clusters of significant gray matter differences between patients and controls. Results Twenty-four studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Reductions in the right anterior cingulate gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus gray matter volumes (GMVs) were noted in patients with anxiety disorders when potential confounders, such as comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD), age, and antidepressant use were controlled for. We also demonstrated increased GMVs in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in comorbid depression-anxiety (CDA), drug-naïve and adult patients. Furthermore, we identified a reduced left middle temporal gyrus and right precentral gyrus in anxiety patients without comorbid MDD. Conclusion Our findings indicate that a reduced volume of the right ventral anterior cingulate gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus is common in anxiety disorders and is independent of comorbid depression, medication use, and age. This generic effect supports the notion that the four types of anxiety disorders have a clear degree of overlap that may reflect shared etiological mechanisms. The results are consistent with neuroanatomical DLPFC models of physiological responses, such as worry and fear, and

  1. Models and Applications of in Vivo Lung Morphometry with Hyperpolarized 3He MRI in a Mild COPD Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, James D.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; Gierada, David S.; Woods, Jason C.; Conradi, Mark S.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2008-12-01

    Hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI is increasingly used to non-invasively quantify local alveolar structure changes, such as those from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Previously, we described an in vivo lung morphometry technique that decouples the helium apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) into components oriented along the longitudinal (DL) and transverse (DT) axes of the acinar airways. Herein, we discuss our recent expansion of this theory, which relates the anisotropy of the MRI diffusion signal to the geometrical parameters of the acinar airways. We demonstrate the utility of this model in human studies and compare the measured airway radii with prior ex vivo experiments.

  2. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  3. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  4. Intravital Computer Morphometry on Protozoa: A Method for Monitoring of the Morphofunctional Disorders in Cells Exposed in the Cell Phone Communication Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uskalova, D V; Igolkina, Yu V; Sarapultseva, E I

    2016-08-01

    Morphofunctional disorders in unicellular aquatic protozoa - Spirostomum ambiguum infusorians after 30-, 60-, and 360-min exposure in electromagnetic field at a radiation frequency of 1 GHz and energy flow density of 50 μW/cm(2) were analyzed by intravital computer morphometry. Significant disorders in morphometric values correlated with low mobility of the protozoa. The results suggested the use of intravital computer morphometry on the protozoa for early diagnosis of radiation-induced effects of the mobile communication electromagnetic field, for example, low mobility of spermatozoa. PMID:27591872

  5. Self-regulation therapy increases frontal gray matter in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: evaluation by voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Debra W.; Skocic, Jovanka; Nash, Kelly; Stevens, Sara; Turner, Gary R.; Rovet, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder show executive function (EF) deficits, particularly in self-regulation skills, and abnormalities in brain regions critical for these skills. None of the validated EF interventions for these children has been evaluated with regards to impacts on brain structure. Twenty-nine children with FASD were assigned to either an immediate-treatment (TX) or delayed-treatment control (DTC) group (DTC). Nineteen typically developing children served as healthy controls (CT). All received a structural MRI scan and baseline neuropsychological testing, following which the TX group underwent 12 weekly 1.5-h sessions of the Alert Program for Self-Regulation®. After treatment or a period of ~14 weeks, all received a repeat scan and post-intervention testing. Whole-brain and region-of-interest analyses using voxel-based morphometry evaluated group differences and changes over time in gray matter (GM). Exploratory analyses revealed significant group changes: (1) At baseline, combined TX and DTC groups demonstrated global GM reductions compared with the CT group. (2) Region-of-interest analysis using a frontal mask, comparing post-intervention to pre-intervention results, showed significantly increased GM in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA10), right frontal pole (BA11), and right anterior cingulate (BA32) in the TX group. Similar results were not found in the DTC or CT groups. (3) At post-intervention, both TX and CT groups showed larger GM volumes than the DTC group in the left superior frontal gyrus (BA9), which was smaller in the FASD group at baseline. These results suggested that Alert led to improvements in post-intervention testing of self-regulation skills and typical brain development in treated children. PMID:25788884

  6. IMPACT OF EARLY AND LATE VISUAL DEPRIVATION ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: A STUDY COMBINING THICKNESS PROFILE WITH SURFACE TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Collignon, Olivier; Xu, Liang; Wang, Gang; Kang, Yue; Leporé, Franco; Lao, Yi; Joshi, Anand A.

    2015-01-01

    Blindness represents a unique model to study how visual experience may shape the development of brain organization. Exploring how the structure of the corpus callosum (CC) reorganizes ensuing visual deprivation is of particular interest due to its important functional implication in vision (e.g. via the splenium of the CC). Moreover, comparing early versus late visually deprived individuals has the potential to unravel the existence of a sensitive period for reshaping the CC structure. Here, we develop a novel framework to capture a complete set of shape differences in the CC between congenitally blind (CB), late blind (LB) and sighted control (SC) groups. The CCs were manually segmented from T1-weighted brain MRI and modeled by 3D tetrahedral meshes. We statistically compared the combination of local area and thickness at each point between subject groups. Differences in area are found using surface tensor-based morphometry; thickness is estimated by tracing the streamlines in the volumetric harmonic field. Group differences were assessed on this combined measure using Hotelling’s T2 test. Interestingly, we observed that the total callosal volume did not differ between the groups. However, our fine-grained analysis reveals significant differences mostly localized around the splenium areas between both blind groups and the sighted group (general effects of blindness) and, importantly, specific dissimilarities between the LB and CB groups, illustrating the existence of a sensitive period for reorganization. The new multivariate statistics also gave better effect sizes for detecting morphometric differences, relative to other statistics. They may boost statistical power for CC morphometric analyses. PMID:25649876

  7. Association of creative achievement with cognitive flexibility by a combined voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Haijiang; Lei, Qiao; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2014-11-15

    Although researchers generally concur that creativity involves the production of novel and useful products, the neural basis of creativity remains elusive due to the complexity of the cognitive processes involved. Recent studies have shown that highly creative individuals displayed more cognitive flexibility. However, direct evidence supporting the relationship between creativity and cognitive flexibility has rarely been investigated using both structural and functional neuroimaging techniques. We used a combined voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis to investigate the relationship between individual creativity ability assessed by the creative achievement questionnaire (CAQ), and regional gray matter volume (GMV), as well as intrinsic functional connectivity. Results showed that CAQ scores negatively correlated with GMV in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the bilateral dorsal ACC (dACC) extending to supplementary motor area, but positively correlated with GMV in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Further functional connectivity analysis revealed that higher creative achievement was inversely associated with the strength of rsFC between the dACC and medial superior frontal gyrus (mSFG), right middle frontal gyrus, and left orbito-frontal insula. Moreover, the association between the dACC-mSFG connectivity and CAQ scores was mediated by cognitive flexibility, assessed by a task-switching paradigm. These findings indicate that individual differences in creative achievement are associated with both brain structure and corresponding intrinsic functional connectivity involved in cognitive flexibility and deliberate creative processing. Furthermore, dACC-mSFG connectivity may affect creative achievement through its impact on cognitive flexibility. PMID:25123973

  8. Cerebral morphology and dopamine D2/D3receptor distribution in humans: A combined [18F]fallypride and voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Neil D.; Zald, David H.; Ding, Zhaohua; Riccardi, Patrizia; Ansari, M. Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Li, Rui; Kessler, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral morphology and the expression of dopamine receptors has not been extensively studied in humans. Elucidation of such relationships may have important methodological implications for clinical studies of dopamine receptor ligand binding differences between control and patient groups. The association between cerebral morphology and dopamine receptor distribution was examined in 45 healthy subjects who completed T1-weighted structural MRI and PET scanning with the D2/D3 ligand [18F]fallypride. Optimized voxel-based morphometry was used to create grey matter volume and density images. Grey matter volume and density images were correlated with binding potential (BPND) images on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the Biological Parametric Mapping toolbox. Associations between cerebral morphology and BPND were also examined for selected regions-of-interest (ROIs) after spatial normalization. Voxel-wise analyses indicated that grey matter volume and density positively correlated with BPND throughout the midbrain, including the substantia nigra. Positive correlations were observed in medial cortical areas, including anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, and circumscribed regions of the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes. ROI analyses revealed significant positive correlations between BPND and cerebral morphology in the caudate, thalamus, and amygdala. Few negative correlations between morphology and BPND were observed. Overall, grey matter density appeared more strongly correlated with BPND than grey matter volume. Cerebral morphology, particularly grey matter density, correlates with [18F]fallypride BPND in a regionally specific manner. Clinical studies comparing dopamine receptor availability between clinical and control groups may benefit by accounting for potential differences in cerebral morphology that exist even after spatial normalization. PMID:19457373

  9. Retinal Arteriolar Morphometry Based on Full Width at Half Maximum Analysis of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yu Hua; Zhu, Tie Pei; Zhao, Ze Lin; Zhan, Hai Jing; Jiang, Fang Zheng; Lian, Heng Li

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we develop a microdensitometry method using full width at half maximum (FWHM) analysis of the retinal vascular structure in a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) image and present the application of this method in the morphometry of arteriolar changes during hypertension. Methods Two raters using manual and FWHM methods measured retinal vessel outer and lumen diameters in SD-OCT images. Inter-rater reproducibility was measured using coefficients of variation (CV), intraclass correlation coefficient and a Bland-Altman plot. OCT images from forty-three eyes of 43 hypertensive patients and 40 eyes of 40 controls were analyzed using an FWHM approach; wall thickness, wall cross-sectional area (WCSA) and wall to lumen ratio (WLR) were subsequently calculated. Results Mean difference in inter-rater agreement ranged from -2.713 to 2.658 μm when using a manual method, and ranged from -0.008 to 0.131 μm when using a FWHM approach. The inter-rater CVs were significantly less for the FWHM approach versus the manual method (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, the wall thickness, WCSA and WLR of retinal arterioles were increased in the hypertensive patients, particular in diabetic hypertensive patients. Conclusions The microdensitometry method using a FWHM algorithm markedly improved inter-rater reproducibility of arteriolar morphometric analysis, and SD-OCT may represent a promising noninvasive method for in vivo arteriolar morphometry. PMID:26650940

  10. Using tensor-based morphometry to detect structural brain abnormalities in rats with adolescent intermittent alcohol exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniagua, Beatriz; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Budin, Francois; Larson, Garrett; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the effects of adolescent binge drinking that persist into adulthood is a crucial public health issue. Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE) is an animal model that can be used to investigate these effects in rodents. In this work, we investigate the application of a particular image analysis technique, tensor-based morphometry, for detecting anatomical differences between AIE and control rats using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Deformation field analysis is a popular method for detecting volumetric changes analyzing Jacobian determinants calculated on deformation fields. Recent studies showed that computing deformation field metrics on the full deformation tensor, often referred to as tensor-based morphometry (TBM), increases the sensitivity to anatomical differences. In this paper we conduct a comprehensive TBM study for precisely locating differences between control and AIE rats. Using a DTI RARE sequence designed for minimal geometric distortion, 12-directional images were acquired postmortem for control and AIE rats (n=9). After preprocessing, average images for the two groups were constructed using an unbiased atlas building approach. We non-rigidly register the two atlases using Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping, and analyze the resulting deformation field using TBM. In particular, we evaluate the tensor determinant, geodesic anisotropy, and deformation direction vector (DDV) on the deformation field to detect structural differences. This yields data on the local amount of growth, shrinkage and the directionality of deformation between the groups. We show that TBM can thus be used to measure group morphological differences between rat populations, demonstrating the potential of the proposed framework.

  11. Source-Based Morphometry: The Use of Independent Component Analysis to Identify Gray Matter Differences With Application to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lai; Groth, Karyn M.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Schretlen, David J.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a multivariate alternative to the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approach called source-based morphometry (SBM), to study gray matter differences between patients and healthy controls. The SBM approach begins with the same preprocessing procedures as VBM. Next, independent component analysis is used to identify naturally grouping, maximally independent sources. Finally, statistical analyses are used to determine the significant sources and their relationship to other variables. The identified “source networks,” groups of spatially distinct regions with common covariation among subjects, provide information about localization of gray matter changes and their variation among individuals. In this study, we first compared VBM and SBM via a simulation and then applied both methods to real data obtained from 120 chronic schizophrenia patients and 120 healthy controls. SBM identified five gray matter sources as significantly associated with schizophrenia. These included sources in the bilateral temporal lobes, thalamus, basal ganglia, parietal lobe, and frontotemporal regions. None of these showed an effect of sex. Two sources in the bilateral temporal and parietal lobes showed age-related reductions. The most significant source of schizophrenia-related gray matter changes identified by SBM occurred in the bilateral temporal lobe, while the most significant change found by VBM occurred in the thalamus. The SBM approach found changes not identified by VBM in basal ganglia, parietal, and occipital lobe. These findings show that SBM is a multivariate alternative to VBM, with wide applicability to studying changes in brain structure. PMID:18266214

  12. Regional flux analysis for discovering and quantifying anatomical changes: An application to the brain morphometry in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, M; Ayache, N; Pennec, X

    2015-07-15

    In this study we introduce the regional flux analysis, a novel approach to deformation based morphometry based on the Helmholtz decomposition of deformations parameterized by stationary velocity fields. We use the scalar pressure map associated to the irrotational component of the deformation to discover the critical regions of volume change. These regions are used to consistently quantify the associated measure of volume change by the probabilistic integration of the flux of the longitudinal deformations across the boundaries. The presented framework unifies voxel-based and regional approaches, and robustly describes the volume changes at both group-wise and subject-specific level as a spatial process governed by consistently defined regions. Our experiments on the large cohorts of the ADNI dataset show that the regional flux analysis is a powerful and flexible instrument for the study of Alzheimer's disease in a wide range of scenarios: cross-sectional deformation based morphometry, longitudinal discovery and quantification of group-wise volume changes, and statistically powered and robust quantification of hippocampal and ventricular atrophy. PMID:25963734

  13. Association between gray matter volume in the caudate nucleus and financial extravagance: findings from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Nozawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Hanihara, Mayu; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-03-20

    Consumer behavior differs among individuals; one such common individual difference is financial extravagance. Recent research suggests that the activation of the caudate nucleus plays an important role in consumer behavior. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has investigated the specific relationship between the caudate nucleus and consumer financial extravagance. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the association between individual differences in financial extravagance and regional gray matter volume in the caudate nucleus by using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We recruited 776 healthy, right-handed individuals (432 men and 344 women; mean age=20.7 ± 1.8) and used voxel-based morphometry and a financial extravagance questionnaire to determine the association between financial extravagance and gray matter structure in the caudate nucleus. Our measure of financial extravagance was based on the novelty seeking subscales of the Japanese version of the Temperament and Character Inventory. A multiple regression analysis including financial extravagance, age, sex, Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrix score, total intracranial volume, and novelty seeking subscales was conducted to examine what variables were related to regional gray matter volume in the region of interest within the caudate nucleus. A significant positive correlation was found between the obtained financial extravagance score and regional gray matter volume in the caudate nucleus. We found that structural variations in the caudate nucleus contributed to individual differences in financial extravagance. This finding may provide a new neuroscientific approach to understanding individual characteristics of consumers. PMID:24486253

  14. The association between the brain and mind pops: a voxel-based morphometry study in 256 Chinese college students.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Yang, Wenjing; Yang, Ning; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zhang, Qinglin

    2016-06-01

    Mind pops or involuntary semantic memories refer to words, phrases, images, or melodies that suddenly pop into one's mind without any deliberate attempt to recall them. Despite their prevalence in everyday life, research on mind pops has started only recently. Notably, mind pops are very similar to clinical involuntary phenomena such as hallucinations in schizophrenia, suggesting their potential role in pathology. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between mind pops and the brain morphometry measured in 302 healthy young adults; after exclusions, 256 participants were included in our analyses. Specifically, the Mind Popping Questionnaire (MPQ) was employed to measure the degree of individual mind pops, whereas the Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) was used to compute the volumes of both gray and white matter tissues. Multiple regression analyses on MPQ and VBM metrics indicated that high-frequency mind pops were significantly associated with smaller gray matter volume in the left middle temporal gyrus as well as with larger gray and white matter volume in the right medial prefrontal cortex. This increase in mind pops is also linked to higher creativity and the personality trait of 'openness'. These data not only suggest a key role of the two regions in generating self-related thoughts, but also open a possible link between brain and creativity or personality. PMID:25972117

  15. Voxel-based morphometry in epileptic baboons: Parallels to human juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szabó, C Ákos; Salinas, Felipe S

    2016-08-01

    The epileptic baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), closely resembling juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Due to functional neuroimaging and pathological differences between epileptic (SZ+) and asymptomatic control (CTL) baboons, we expected structural differences in gray matter concentration (GMC) using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Standard anatomical (MP-RAGE) MRI scans using a 3T Siemens TIM Trio (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) were available in 107 baboons (67 females; mean age 16±6years) with documented clinical histories and scalp-electroencephalography (EEG) results. For neuroimaging, baboons were anesthetized with isoflurane 1% (1-1.5 MAC) and paralyzed with vecuronium (0.1-0.3mg/kg). Data processing and analysis were performed using FSL's VBM toolbox. GMC was compared between CTL and SZ+ baboons, epileptic baboons with interictal epileptic discharges on scalp EEG (SZ+/IED+), asymptomatic baboons with abnormal EEGs (SZ-/IED+), and IED+ baboons with (IED+/PS+) and without (IED+/PS-) photosensitivity, and the subgroups amongst themselves. Age and gender related changes in gray matter volumes were also included as confound regressors in the VBM analyses of each animal group. Significant increases in GMC were noted in the SZ+/IED+ subgroup compared to the CTL group, including bilaterally in the frontopolar, orbitofrontal and anterolateral temporal cortices, while decreases in GMC were noted in the right more than left primary visual cortices and in the specific nuclei of the thalamus, including reticular, anterior and medial dorsal nuclei. No significant differences were noted otherwise, except that SZ+/IED+ baboons demonstrated increased GMC in the globus pallidae bilaterally compared to the SZ-/IED+ group. Similar to human studies of JME, the epileptic baboons demonstrated GMC decreases in the thalami and occipital cortices, suggesting secondary injury due to chronic epilepsy. Cortical GMC, on the other hand, was increased

  16. Noninvasive quantification of alveolar morphometry in elderly never- and ex-smokers

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Gregory A; Ouriadov, Alexei; Lessard, Eric; Sheikh, Khadija; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a way to generate in vivo lung images with contrast sensitive to the molecular displacement of inhaled gas at subcellular length scales. Here, we aimed to evaluate hyperpolarized 3He MRI estimates of the alveolar dimensions in 38 healthy elderly never-smokers (73 ± 6 years, 15 males) and 21 elderly ex-smokers (70 ± 10 years, 14 males) with (n = 8, 77 ± 6 years) and without emphysema (n = 13, 65 ± 10 years). The ex-smoker and never-smoker subgroups were significantly different for FEV1/FVC (P = 0.0001) and DLCO (P = 0.009); while ex-smokers with emphysema reported significantly diminished FEV1/FVC (P = 0.02) and a trend toward lower DLCO (P = 0.05) than ex-smokers without emphysema. MRI apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) and CT measurements of emphysema (relative area–CT density histogram, RA950) were significantly different (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007) for never-smoker and ex-smoker subgroups. In never-smokers, the MRI estimate of mean linear intercept (260 ± 27 μm) was significantly elevated as compared to the results previously reported in younger never-smokers (210 ± 30 μm), and trended smaller than in the age-matched ex-smokers (320 ± 72 μm, P = 0.06) evaluated here. Never-smokers also reported significantly smaller internal (220 ± 24 μm, P = 0.01) acinar radius but greater alveolar sheath thickness (120 ± 4 μm, P < 0.0001) than ex-smokers. Never-smokers were also significantly different than ex-smokers without emphysema for alveolar sheath thickness but not ADC, while ex-smokers with emphysema reported significantly different ADC but not alveolar sheath thickness compared to ex-smokers without CT evidence of emphysema. Differences in alveolar measurements in never- and ex-smokers demonstrate the sensitivity of MRI measurements to the different effects of smoking and aging on acinar morphometry. PMID:26462748

  17. Prediction of the human thoracic and lumbar articular facet joint morphometry from radiographic images

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Maria E; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The articular facet joints (AFJ) play an important role in the biomechanics of the spine. Although it is well known that some AFJ dimensions (e.g. facet height/width or facet angles) play a major role in spinal deformities such as scoliosis, little is known about statistical correlations between these dimensions and the size of the vertebral bodies. Such relations could allow patient-specific prediction of AFJ morphometry from a few dimensions measurable by X-ray. This would be of clinical interest and could also provide parameters for mathematical modeling of the spine. Our purpose in this study was to generate prediction equations for 20 parameters of the human thoracic and lumbar AFJ from T1 to L4 as a function of only one given parameter, the vertebral body height posterior (VBHP). Linear and nonlinear regression analyses were performed with published anatomical data, including linear and angular dimensions of the AFJ and vertebral body heights, to find the best functions to describe the correlations between these parameters. Third-order polynomial regressions, in contrast to the linear, exponential and logarithmic regressions, provided moderate to high correlations between the AFJ parameters and vertebral body heights; e.g. facet height superior and interfacet width (R2, 0.605–0.880); facet height inferior, interfacet height and sagittal/transverse angle superior (R2, 0.875–0.973). Different correlations were found for facet width and transverse angle inferior in the thoracic (R2, 0.703–0.930) and lumbar (R2, 0.457–0.892) regions. A set of 20 prediction equations for AFJ parameters was generated (P-values < 0.005, anova). Comparison of the AFJ predictions with experimental data indicated mean percent errors < 13%, with the exception of the thoracolumbar junction (T12–L1). It was possible to establish useful predictions for human thoracic and lumbar AFJ dimensions based on the size of the vertebral bodies. The generated set of equations allows the

  18. Morphometry and Cluster Analysis of Low Shield Volcanoes on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, A.; Christiansen, E. H.; Radebaugh, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes are common on all terrestrial planets and their morphology is influenced by eruption mechanisms, volumes, and compositions and temperatures of the magmas; these are in turn influenced by the tectonic setting. In an attempt to better understand the relationship between morphometry and volcanic processes, we compared low-shield volcanoes on Syria Planum, Mars, with basaltic shields of the eastern Snake River Plain (eSRP).We used 133 volcanoes on Syria Planum that are covered by MOLA and HRSC elevation data and 246 eSRP shields covered by the NED. Shields on Syria Planum average 191 +/- 88 m tall, 12 +/- 6 km in diameter, 16 +/- 28 km3 in volume, and have 1.7° +/- 0.8 flank slopes. eSRP shields average 83 +/- 44 m tall, 4 +/- 3 km in diameter, 0.8 +/- 2 km3 in volume, and have 2.5° +/- 1 flank slopes. Bivariate plots of morphometric characteristics show that Syria Planum and eSRP low shields form the extremes of the same morphospace shared with some Icelandic olivine tholeiite shields, but is generally distinct from other terrestrial volcanoes. Cluster analysis of SP and eSRP shields with other terrestrial volcanoes separates these volcanoes into one cluster and the majority of them into the same sub-cluster that is distinct from other terrestrial volcanoes. Principal component and cluster analysis of Syria Planum and eSRP shields using height, area, volume, slope, and eccentricity shows that Syria Planum and eSRP low-shields are similar in shape (slope and eccentricity). Apparently, these low shields formed by similar processes involving Hawaiian-type eruptions of low viscosity (mafic) lavas with fissure controlled eruptions, narrowing to central vents. Initially high eruption rates and long, tube-fed lava flows shifted to the development of small lava lakes that repeatedly overflowed, and on some with late fountaining to form steeper spatter ramparts. However, Syria Planum shields are systematically larger than those on the eastern Snake River Plain. The

  19. Structural Changes Induced by Daily Music Listening in the Recovering Brain after Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M.; Salli, Eero; Laitinen, Sari; Forsblom, Anita; Soinila, Seppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Music is a highly complex and versatile stimulus for the brain that engages many temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and subcortical areas involved in auditory, cognitive, emotional, and motor processing. Regular musical activities have been shown to effectively enhance the structure and function of many brain areas, making music a potential tool also in neurological rehabilitation. In our previous randomized controlled study, we found that listening to music on a daily basis can improve cognitive recovery and improve mood after an acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Extending this study, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis utilizing cost function masking was performed on the acute and 6-month post-stroke stage structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the patients (n = 49) who either listened to their favorite music [music group (MG), n = 16] or verbal material [audio book group (ABG), n = 18] or did not receive any listening material [control group (CG), n = 15] during the 6-month recovery period. Although all groups showed significant gray matter volume (GMV) increases from the acute to the 6-month stage, there was a specific network of frontal areas [left and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), right medial SFG] and limbic areas [left ventral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) and right ventral striatum (VS)] in patients with left hemisphere damage in which the GMV increases were larger in the MG than in the ABG and in the CG. Moreover, the GM reorganization in the frontal areas correlated with enhanced recovery of verbal memory, focused attention, and language skills, whereas the GM reorganization in the SACC correlated with reduced negative mood. This study adds on previous results, showing that music listening after stroke not only enhances behavioral recovery, but also induces fine-grained neuroanatomical changes in the recovering brain. PMID:24860466

  20. Gray matter atrophy in patients with Parkinson’s disease and those with mild cognitive impairment: a voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yun-Ting; Hu, Wei-Dong; Li, Li; Liu, Guang-Yao; Bai, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Mild cognitive impairment is common in Parkinson’s disease, but the underlying pathological mechanism has not been fully understood. To examine the gray matter changes in patients with Parkinson’s disease and those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using voxel based Morphometry (VBM). Methods: Magnetic resonance images were obtained from 35 patients with PD and 20 age and sex-matched healthy control subjects. In the PD group, 14 subjects had no MCI and 21 had MCI. MRI 3D structural images were acquired and analyzed by means of the optimized VBM procedure with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM5). Results: Widespread areas of cortical atrophy were found in patients with PD compared with normal controls (in both temporal, occipital, parietal, frontal lobes and right limbic lobes, posterior lobes of the cerebellum and left caudate nucleus). Gray matter reductions were found in bilateral fusiform gyrus and lingual gyrus, left anterior cingulate cortex and insula, and right superior temporal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, central gyrus and precuneus in patients with PD with MCI compared with normal controls. Inpatients with PD with MCI, areas of reduced gray matter were found in both precentral gyrus and middle temporal gyrus, right cuneus, precuneus, and orbitofrontal cortex, and left fusiform gyrus compared with those without MCI. Conclusions: These findings suggest that PD is associated with the gray matter atrophy in the neocortical areas, and that cognitive impairment in patients with PD may be associated with gray matter changes in the parieto-occipital association cortex, right orbitofrontal cortex, and middle temporal gyrus. PMID:26629027

  1. Structural changes induced by daily music listening in the recovering brain after middle cerebral artery stroke: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M; Salli, Eero; Laitinen, Sari; Forsblom, Anita; Soinila, Seppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Music is a highly complex and versatile stimulus for the brain that engages many temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and subcortical areas involved in auditory, cognitive, emotional, and motor processing. Regular musical activities have been shown to effectively enhance the structure and function of many brain areas, making music a potential tool also in neurological rehabilitation. In our previous randomized controlled study, we found that listening to music on a daily basis can improve cognitive recovery and improve mood after an acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Extending this study, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis utilizing cost function masking was performed on the acute and 6-month post-stroke stage structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the patients (n = 49) who either listened to their favorite music [music group (MG), n = 16] or verbal material [audio book group (ABG), n = 18] or did not receive any listening material [control group (CG), n = 15] during the 6-month recovery period. Although all groups showed significant gray matter volume (GMV) increases from the acute to the 6-month stage, there was a specific network of frontal areas [left and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), right medial SFG] and limbic areas [left ventral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) and right ventral striatum (VS)] in patients with left hemisphere damage in which the GMV increases were larger in the MG than in the ABG and in the CG. Moreover, the GM reorganization in the frontal areas correlated with enhanced recovery of verbal memory, focused attention, and language skills, whereas the GM reorganization in the SACC correlated with reduced negative mood. This study adds on previous results, showing that music listening after stroke not only enhances behavioral recovery, but also induces fine-grained neuroanatomical changes in the recovering brain. PMID:24860466

  2. Early Gray-Matter and White-Matter Concentration in Infancy Predict Later Language Skills: A Whole Brain Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Dilara Deniz; Richards, Todd; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain scans were obtained from 19 infants at 7 months. Expressive and receptive language performance was assessed at 12 months. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) identified brain regions where gray-matter and white-matter concentrations at 7 months correlated significantly with children's language scores at 12 months.…

  3. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  4. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  5. Morphometry of subaerial shield volcanoes and glaciovolcanoes from Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Effects of eruption environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, G. B. M.; Grosse, P.

    2014-08-01

    subaerial fissure eruptions. In terms of classification, quantification of the limits between the four tuya types proposed by Russell et al. (2014) is difficult because of the transitional nature shown by several edifices. A threshold of 1.8 in ellipticity index (E.I.) values can be used to distinguish tindars from the other three types. Flat-topped tuyas are distinguished by their greater overall size, their large and relatively flat summit regions, reflected in bimodal slope distributions, and their low E.I. and low to intermediate irregularity index (I.I.) values. The only analyzed conical tuya has very low E.I. and I.I. values, very small summit regions and very steep flank slopes. The complex tuyas have variable morphometries, but are in general characterized by high I.I. values and very irregular slope distributions. No correlation is observed between edifice-scale morphology and lithology (e.g. pillow dominated or hyaloclastite dominated).

  6. Reducing Teacher Incompetence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin

    1988-01-01

    Suggests how administrators may reduce teacher incompetence. Teacher incompetence can be reduced if administrators fully understand and undertake appropriate preventive and remedial measures. Two sections comprise this article. First, a taxonomy of teacher incompetence reveals the magnitude of the problem. Second, preventive and remedial measures…

  7. A case study of a multiply talented savant with an autism spectrum disorder: neuropsychological functioning and brain morphometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Gregory L; Happé, Francesca; Giedd, Jay N

    2009-05-27

    Neuropsychological functioning and brain morphometry in a savant (case GW) with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and both calendar calculation and artistic skills are quantified and compared with small groups of neurotypical controls. Good memory, mental calculation and visuospatial processing, as well as (implicit) knowledge of calendar structure and 'weak' central coherence characterized the cognitive profile of case GW. Possibly reflecting his savant skills, the superior parietal region of GW's cortex was the only area thicker (while areas such as the superior and medial prefrontal, middle temporal and motor cortices were thinner) than that of a neurotypical control group. Taken from the perspective of learning/practice-based models, skills in domains (e.g. calendars, art, music) that capitalize upon strengths often associated with ASD, such as detail-focused processing, are probably further enhanced through over-learning and massive exposure, and reflected in atypical brain structure. PMID:19528026

  8. A case study of a multiply talented savant with an autism spectrum disorder: neuropsychological functioning and brain morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Gregory L.; Happé, Francesca; Giedd, Jay N.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropsychological functioning and brain morphometry in a savant (case GW) with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and both calendar calculation and artistic skills are quantified and compared with small groups of neurotypical controls. Good memory, mental calculation and visuospatial processing, as well as (implicit) knowledge of calendar structure and ‘weak’ central coherence characterized the cognitive profile of case GW. Possibly reflecting his savant skills, the superior parietal region of GW's cortex was the only area thicker (while areas such as the superior and medial prefrontal, middle temporal and motor cortices were thinner) than that of a neurotypical control group. Taken from the perspective of learning/practice-based models, skills in domains (e.g. calendars, art, music) that capitalize upon strengths often associated with ASD, such as detail-focused processing, are probably further enhanced through over-learning and massive exposure, and reflected in atypical brain structure. PMID:19528026

  9. Measurement of the integral refractive index and dynamic cell morphometry of living cells with digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Marquet, Pierre; Cuche, Etienne; Emery, Yves; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a digital holographic microscope (DHM), in a transmission mode, adapted to the quantitative study of cellular dynamics. Living cells in culture are optically probed by measuring the phase shift they produce on the transmitted wave front. The high temporal stability of the phase signal, equivalent to λ/1800, and the low acquisition time (~20μs) enable to monitor cellular dynamics processes. An experimental procedure allowing to calculate both the integral refractive index and the cellular thickness (morphometry) from the measured phase shift is presented. Specifically, the method has been applied to study the dynamics of neurons in culture during a hypotonic stress. Such stress produces a paradoxical decrease of the phase which can be entirely resolved by applying the methodological approach described in this article; indeed the method allows to determine independently the thickness and the integral refractive index of cells.

  10. Predictive variables for the biological behaviour of basal cell carcinoma of the face: relevance of morphometry of the nuclei.

    PubMed

    Appel, T; Bierhoff, E; Appel, K; von Lindern, J-J; Bergé, S; Niederhagen, B

    2003-06-01

    We did a morphometric analysis of 130 histological sections of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the face to find out whether morphometric variables in the structure of the nuclei of BCC cells could serve as predictors of the biological behaviour. We considered the following variables: maximum and minimum diameters, perimeter, nuclear area and five form factors that characterise and quantify the shape of a structure (axis ratio, shape factor, nuclear contour index, nuclear roundness and circumference ratio). We did a statistical analysis of primary and recurring tumours and four histology-based groups (multifocal superficial BCCs, nodular BCCs, sclerosing BCCs and miscellaneous forms) using a two-sided t test for independent samples. Multifocal superficial BCCs showed significantly smaller values for the directly measured variables (maximum and minimum diameters, perimeter and nuclear area). Morphometry could not distinguish between primary and recurring tumours. PMID:12804537

  11. Alcohol Use Disorder with and without Stimulant Use: Brain Morphometry and Its Associations with Cigarette Smoking, Cognition, and Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, David L.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Abé, Christoph; Mon, Anderson; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the effects of polysubstance use and cigarette smoking on brain morphometry. This study examined neocortical brain morphometric differences between abstinent polysubstance dependent and alcohol-only dependent treatment seekers (ALC) as well as light drinking controls (CON), the associations of cigarette smoking in these polysubstance users (PSU), and morphometric relationships to cognition and inhibitory control. Methods All participants completed extensive neuropsychological assessments and 4 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging. PSU and ALC were abstinent for one month at the time of study. Parcellated morphological data (volume, surface area, thickness) were obtained with FreeSurfer methodology for the following bilateral components: dorso-prefrontal cortex (DPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and insula. Regional group differences were examined and structural data correlated with domains of cognition and inhibitory control. Results PSU had significantly smaller left OFC volume and surface area and trends to smaller right DPFC volume and surface area compared to CON; PSU did not differ significantly from ALC on these measures. PSU, however, had significantly thinner right ACC than ALC. Smoking PSU had significantly larger right OFC surface area than non-smoking PSU. No significant relationships between morphometry and quantity/frequency of substance use, alcohol use, or age of onset of heavy drinking were observed. PSU exhibited distinct relationships between brain structure and processing speed, cognitive efficiency, working memory and inhibitory control that were not observed in ALC or CON. Conclusion Polysubstance users have unique morphometric abnormalities and structure-function relationships when compared to individuals dependent only on alcohol and light drinking controls. Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with structural brain irregularities in polysubstance users. Further

  12. Impact of scale space search on age- and gender-related changes in MRI-based cortical morphometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Boucher, Maxime; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Evans, Alan C

    2013-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging based brain morphometry, Gaussian smoothing is often applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to increase the detection power of statistical parametric maps. However, most existing studies used a single smoothing filter without adequately justifying their choices. In this article, we want to determine the extent for which performing a morphometry analysis using multiple smoothing filters, namely conducting a scale space search, improves or decreases the detection power. We first compared scale space search with single-filter analysis through a simulated population study. The multiple comparisons in our four-dimensional scale space searches were corrected for using a unified P-value approach. Our results illustrate that, compared with a single-filter analysis, a scale space search analysis can properly capture the variations in analysis results caused by variations in smoothing, and more importantly, it can obviously increase the sensitivity for detecting brain morphometric changes. We also show that the cost of an increased critical threshold for conducting a scale space search is very small. In the second experiment, we investigated age and gender effects on cortical volume, thickness, and surface area in 104 normal subjects using scale space search. The obtained results provide a perspective of scale space theory on the morphological changes with age and gender. These results suggest that, in exploratory studies of aging, gender, and disease, conducting a scale space search is essential, if we are to produce a complete description of the structural changes or abnormalities associated with these dimensions. PMID:22422546

  13. Origins of house reinfestation with Triatoma infestans after insecticide spraying in the Argentine Chaco using wing geometric morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Gaspe, M. Sol; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the origins of insect vectors collected after community-wide residual insecticide applications is a relevant challenge in the Gran Chaco region where the main vector of Chagas disease Triatoma infestans usually reinfests human dwellings. Wing geometric morphometry was used to compare the right wings of 63 males and 54 females collected at 4 months post-spraying (MPS) with those from 165 males and 111 females collected before full-coverage spraying with pyrethroids in a well-defined rural area in northeastern Argentina. Male and female wing centroid size resulted significantly larger at 4 MPS than before interventions, but no significant changes in shape were detected. Metric disparity (variance of shape) varied significantly in males but not in females. Using shape variables, a relatively large fraction of post-spraying males (70%) and females (54%) could not be differentiated from those collected at the same source house or at the nearest infested house before interventions. Bugs collected at 4 and 8 MPS in a persistently infested house were mainly assigned to the source house. These results support the hypothesis of persistent bug populations that survived the insecticide application at local spatial scales, and are consistent with the occurrence of vector control failures most likely related to moderate pyrethroid resistance. Wing geometric morphometry is a useful tool for identifying sources of reinfestation, but it is limited by the spatial structure found in the reference populations. Combined with field and genetic data, this approach may contribute to the understanding of the reinfestation process and improvement of vector control strategies. PMID:23557838

  14. An in vivo MRI Template Set for Morphometry, Tissue Segmentation, and fMRI Localization in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro Antonio; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Haga, Risa; Aubert-Vásquez, Eduardo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Riera, Jorge J.; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several papers have focused on the construction of highly detailed mouse high field magnetic resonance image (MRI) templates via non-linear registration to unbiased reference spaces, allowing for a variety of neuroimaging applications such as robust morphometric analyses. However, work in rats has only provided medium field MRI averages based on linear registration to biased spaces with the sole purpose of approximate functional MRI (fMRI) localization. This precludes any morphometric analysis in spite of the need of exploring in detail the neuroanatomical substrates of diseases in a recent advent of rat models. In this paper we present a new in vivo rat T2 MRI template set, comprising average images of both intensity and shape, obtained via non-linear registration. Also, unlike previous rat template sets, we include white and gray matter probabilistic segmentations, expanding its use to those applications demanding prior-based tissue segmentation, e.g., statistical parametric mapping (SPM) voxel-based morphometry. We also provide a preliminary digitalization of latest Paxinos and Watson atlas for anatomical and functional interpretations within the cerebral cortex. We confirmed that, like with previous templates, forepaw and hindpaw fMRI activations can be correctly localized in the expected atlas structure. To exemplify the use of our new MRI template set, were reported the volumes of brain tissues and cortical structures and probed their relationships with ontogenetic development. Other in vivo applications in the near future can be tensor-, deformation-, or voxel-based morphometry, morphological connectivity, and diffusion tensor-based anatomical connectivity. Our template set, freely available through the SPM extension website, could be an important tool for future longitudinal and/or functional extensive preclinical studies. PMID:22275894

  15. Fibrosis progression under maintenance interferon in hepatitis C is better detected by blood test than liver morphometry.

    PubMed

    Calès, P; Zarski, J P; Chapplain, J Marc; Bertrais, S; Sturm, N; Michelet, C; Babany, G; Chaigneau, J; Eddine Charaf, M

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated whether quantitative measurements of liver fibrosis with recently developed diagnostics outperform histological staging in detecting natural or interferon-induced changes. We compared Metavir staging, morphometry (area and fractal dimension) and six blood tests in 157 patients with chronic hepatitis C from two trials testing maintenance interferon for 96 weeks. Paired liver biopsies and blood tests were available for 101 patients, and there was a significant improvement in Metavir activity and a significant increase in blood tests reflecting fibrosis quantity in patients treated with interferon when compared with controls - all per cent changes in histological fibrosis measures were significantly increased in F1 vs F2-4 stages only in the interferon group. For the whole population studied between weeks 0 and 96, there was significant progression only in the area of fibrosis (AOF) (P = 0.026), FibroMeter (P = 0.020) and CirrhoMeter (P = 0.003). With regards to dynamic reproducibility, agreement was good (r(ic) ≥ 0.72) only for Metavir fibrosis score, FibroMeter and CirrhoMeter. The per cent change in AOF was significantly higher than that of fractal dimension (P = 0.003) or Metavir fibrosis score (P = 0.015). CirrhoMeter was the only blood test with a change significantly higher than that of AOF (P = 0.039). AOF and two blood tests, reflecting fibrosis quantity, have high sensitivity and/or reproducibility permitting the detection of a small progression in liver fibrosis over two years. A blood test reflecting fibrosis quantity is more sensitive and reproducible than morphometry. The study also shows that maintenance interferon does not improve fibrosis, whatever its stage. PMID:22239512

  16. An in vivo MRI Template Set for Morphometry, Tissue Segmentation, and fMRI Localization in Rats.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro Antonio; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Haga, Risa; Aubert-Vásquez, Eduardo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Riera, Jorge J; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several papers have focused on the construction of highly detailed mouse high field magnetic resonance image (MRI) templates via non-linear registration to unbiased reference spaces, allowing for a variety of neuroimaging applications such as robust morphometric analyses. However, work in rats has only provided medium field MRI averages based on linear registration to biased spaces with the sole purpose of approximate functional MRI (fMRI) localization. This precludes any morphometric analysis in spite of the need of exploring in detail the neuroanatomical substrates of diseases in a recent advent of rat models. In this paper we present a new in vivo rat T2 MRI template set, comprising average images of both intensity and shape, obtained via non-linear registration. Also, unlike previous rat template sets, we include white and gray matter probabilistic segmentations, expanding its use to those applications demanding prior-based tissue segmentation, e.g., statistical parametric mapping (SPM) voxel-based morphometry. We also provide a preliminary digitalization of latest Paxinos and Watson atlas for anatomical and functional interpretations within the cerebral cortex. We confirmed that, like with previous templates, forepaw and hindpaw fMRI activations can be correctly localized in the expected atlas structure. To exemplify the use of our new MRI template set, were reported the volumes of brain tissues and cortical structures and probed their relationships with ontogenetic development. Other in vivo applications in the near future can be tensor-, deformation-, or voxel-based morphometry, morphological connectivity, and diffusion tensor-based anatomical connectivity. Our template set, freely available through the SPM extension website, could be an important tool for future longitudinal and/or functional extensive preclinical studies. PMID:22275894

  17. [Early diagnosis of dementia with the help of MR-morphometry in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Trufanov, A G; Odinak, M M; Litvinenko, I V; Rezvantsev, M V; Voronkov, L V

    2013-09-01

    54 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were examined. 1,5 Tesla MRI with T1 gradient-echo protocol and following calculating by FreeSurfer software was performed. Dementia was revealed in 23 patients. Significant changes of different zones of brain-cortex were revealed in patients with Parkinson's disease accompanied by dementia. Changes were revealed in the hemispheres, particularly in frontal, temporal and occipital lobes. Thickness of lingual medial occipitotemporal gyrus can be used as a criterion for dementia prognosis. Individual patient monitoring and cortex alteration evaluation allow prognosticating increasing risk of cognitive disorders development and prescribing proper therapy. PMID:24341200

  18. “Over-inlay” block graft and differential morphometry: a novel block graft model to study bone regeneration and host-to-graft interfaces in rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to present new a model that allows the study of the bone healing process, with an emphasis on the biological behavior of different graft-to-host interfaces. A standardized “over-inlay” surgical technique combined with a differential histomorphometric analysis is presented in order to optimize the use of critical-size calvarial defects in pre-clinical testing. Methods Critical-size defects were created into the parietal bone of 8 male Wistar rats. Deproteinized bovine bone (DBBM) blocks were inserted into the defects, so that part of the block was included within the calvarial thickness and part exceeded the calvarial height (an “over-inlay” graft). All animals were sacrificed at 1 or 3 months. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemical evaluation was carried out within distinct regions of interest (ROIs): the areas adjacent to the native bone (BA), the periosteal area (PA) and the central area (CA). Results The animals healed without complications. Differential morphometry allowed the examination of the tissue composition within distinct regions: the BA presented consistent amounts of new bone formation (NB), which increased over time (24.53%±1.26% at 1 month; 37.73%±0.39% at 3 months), thus suggesting that this area makes a substantial contribution toward NB. The PA was mainly composed of fibrous tissue (71.16%±8.06% and 78.30%±2.67%, respectively), while the CA showed high amounts of DBBM at both time points (78.30%±2.67% and 74.68%±1.07%, respectively), demonstrating a slow remodeling process. Blood vessels revealed a progressive migration from the interface with native bone toward the central area of the graft. Osterix-positive cells observed at 1 month within the PA suggested that the periosteum was a source of osteoprogenitor elements. Alkaline phosphatase data on matrix deposition confirmed this observation. Conclusions The present model allowed for a standardized investigation of distinct graft

  19. Morphometry and pattern of a large sample (>20,000) of Canadian eskers and implications for subglacial drainage beneath ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrar, Robert D.; Stokes, Chris R.; Evans, David J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ice sheet flow is strongly influenced by the nature and quantity of meltwater entering the subglacial system. Accessing and monitoring contemporary drainage systems beneath ice sheets is notoriously difficult, but it is possible to utilise the exposed beds of palaeo-ice sheets. In particular, eskers record deposition in glacial drainage channels and are widespread on the exposed beds of former ice sheets. However, unlike some other common glacial landforms (e.g. drumlins) there have been relatively few attempts to investigate and quantify their characteristics at the ice sheet scale. This paper presents data on the distribution, pattern, and morphometry of a large (>20,000) sample of eskers in Canada, formed under the Laurentide Ice Sheet, including quantification of their length, fragmentation, sinuosity, lateral spacing, number of tributaries, and downstream elevation changes. Results indicate that eskers are typically very long (hundreds of km) and often very straight (mean sinuosity approximates 1). We interpret these long esker systems to reflect time-transgressive formation in long, stable conduits under hydrostatic pressure. The longest eskers (in the Keewatin sector) are also the least fragmented, which we interpret to reflect formation at an ice margin experiencing stable and gradual retreat. In many locations, the lateral distance between neighbouring eskers is remarkably consistent and results indicate a preferred spacing of around 12 km, consistent with numerical models which predict esker spacing of 8-25 km. In other locations, typically over soft sediments, eskers are rarer and their patterns are more chaotic, reflecting fewer large R-channels and rapidly changing ice sheet dynamics. Comparison of esker patterns with an existing ice margin chronology reveals that the meltwater drainage system evolved during deglaciation: eskers became more closely spaced with fewer tributaries as deglaciation progressed, which has been interpreted to reflect increased

  20. Descriptive analysis of sperm head morphometry in Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica): optimum sampling procedure and staining methods using Sperm-Class Analyzer ®.

    PubMed

    Esteso, M C; Rodríguez, E; Toledano-Díaz, A; Castaño, C; Pradiee, J; López-Sebastián, A; Santiago-Moreno, J

    2015-04-01

    Sperm morphology has been identified as one characteristic which can be useful in prediction of fertility in a species. The development of computer automated sperm morphometry analysis allows for objective analysis of sperm head dimensions. The aim of the current study was to develop an optimum sampling procedure to characterize the Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) sperm head morphometrically. Fresh semen from 11 males was collected using transrectal ultrasonic-guided massage of accessory sex glands and electroejaculation and prepared on slides for morphometric analysis to evaluate technical variation and standardize automated sperm morphometry analysis procedures by Sperm-Class Analyzer(®). Three staining methods (Diff-Quik(®), Hemacolor(®), Spermblue(®)), number of sperm cells necessary to sample and repeatability of the staining technique were assessed. There were significant differences in size of sperm head depending on stain used. Hemacolor(®) was stain most suitable for sperm head morphometry evaluation (length=8.42 μm; width=4.21 μm; area=29.37 μm(2); perimeter=21.93 μm; elongation=0.33; elipticity=2.01; regularity=0.95; rugosity=0.77). Morphometric values obtained from samples of 50, 100, 150, 175 and 200 sperm heads were compared. The most efficient method of analyzing sperm morphometry was to evaluate 100 sperm cells at 60× objective magnification. Thus, this study has allowed for description of optimal sample processing to determine morphometric parameters of sperm heads (size and shape) in Iberian ibex by Sperm-Class Analyzer(®) and provides a basis for future studies on the relationship with freezability and fertility in this species. PMID:25721563

  1. Observations of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA: Part 2, changes in surface morphometry from terrestrial laser scanning in the summer of 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Kean, Jason W.; McCoy, Scott W.; Tucker, Greg E.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution topographic data that quantify changes in channel form caused by sequential debris flows in natural channels are rare at the reach scale. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) techniques are utilized to capture morphological changes brought about by a high-frequency of debris-flow events at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the topographic response of a natural channel to the documented debris-flow events. TLS survey data allowed for the generation of high-resolution (2-cm) digital terrain models (DTM) of the channel. A robust network of twelve permanent control points permitted repeat scanning sessions that provided multiple DTM to evaluate fine-scale topographic change associated with three debris-flow events. Difference surfaces from the DTM permit the interpretations of spatial variations in channel morphometry and net volume of material deposited and eroded within and between a series of channel reaches. Each channel reach experienced erosion, deposition, and both net volumetric gains and losses were measured. Analysis of potential relationships between erosion and deposition magnitudes yielded no strong correlations with measures of channel-reach morphometry, suggesting that channel reach-specific predictions of potential erosion or deposition locations or rates cannot be adequately derived from statistical analyses of pre-event channel-reach morphometry.

  2. Early cerebral volume reductions and their associations with reduced lupus disease activity in patients with newly-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm; Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Tng, Han-Ying; Koh, Hui Li; Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We examined if cerebral volume reduction occurs very early during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and observed prospectively whether gray (GMV) and white matter volumes (WMV) of the brain would improve with lowered SLE disease activity. T1-weighted MRI brain images were obtained from 14 healthy controls (HC) and 14 newly-diagnosed SLE patients within 5 months of diagnosis (S1) and after achieving low disease activity (S2). Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to detect differences in the GMV and WMV between SLE patients and HC and those between SLE patients at S1 and S2. SLE patients were found to have lower GMV than HC in the middle cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and right supplementary motor area, and lower WMV in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, cingulum cingulate gyrus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at both S1 and S2. Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed increased GMV chiefly in the prefrontal regions at S2 compared to S1 in SLE patients. The GMV increase in the left superior frontal gyrus was significantly associated with lowered SLE disease activity. In conclusion, GMV and WMV reduced very early in SLE patients. Reduction of SLE disease activity was accompanied by region-specific GMV improvement in the prefrontal regions. PMID:26928214

  3. Voxel-based morphometry and fMRI revealed differences in brain gray matter in breastfed and milk formula–fed children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Purpose: Infant diets may have significant impact on brain development in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate brain grey matter structure and function in 8-year-old children who were predominantly breastfed (BF) or fed cow’s milk formula (MF) as infants. Materials and Me...

  4. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis coupled with stratified DNA sequencing reveals reduced sequence variation in the su(s) and su(wa) regions of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Aguadé, M; Meyers, W; Long, A D; Langley, C H

    1994-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by DNA sequencing of stratified sub-samples was used to survey DNA polymorphism in the su(s) and su(wa) regions in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. su(s) and su(wa) are located near the telomere of the X chromosome, where the rate of crossing over per kilobase of DNA monotonically decreases toward the tip. SSCP was assessed in 12 noncoding segments amplified from the su(s) region (3213 bp) and in 8 noncoding segments amplified from the su(wa) region (1955 bp). Sets of segments were multiplexed in a single electrophoretic lane to increase the number of base pairs assayed per lane. Eight segments were monomorphic, and the other 12 segments exhibited two to four SSCP classes. Only four within-SSCP-class DNA sequence differences (a single nucleotide substitution) were observed among 24,360 bp compared within classes. The between-SSCP-class DNA sequence comparisons revealed 27 substitutions and 9 insertion/deletion polymorphisms. The average numbers of substitutional differences per site were 0.0010 and 0.0021 for su(s) and su(wa), respectively. These values are intermediate between those reported for the more distal y-ASC region (0.0004) and the more proximal Pgd locus (0.0024). This observation is consistent with the prediction of the hitchhiking-effect model-i.e., a monotonic increase in polymorphism as a function of crossing over per kilobase. Images PMID:8197115

  5. Over-expression of the bacterial phytase US417 in Arabidopsis reduces the concentration of phytic acid and reveals its involvement in the regulation of sulfate and phosphate homeostasis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Belgaroui, Nibras; Zaidi, Ikram; Farhat, Ameny; Chouayekh, Hichem; Bouain, Nadia; Chay, Sandrine; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane; Masmoudi, Khaled; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Berthomieu, Pierre; Rouached, Hatem; Hanin, Moez

    2014-11-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is the main phosphorus storage form in plant seeds. It is recognized as an anti-nutrient for humans and non-ruminant animals, as well as one of the major sources of phosphorus that contributes to eutrophication. Therefore, engineering plants with low PA content without affecting plant growth capacity has become a major focus in plant breeding. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge on the role of PA seed reserves in regulating plant growth and in maintaining ion homeostasis hinders such an agronomical application. In this context, we report here that the over-expression of the bacterial phytase PHY-US417 in Arabidopsis leads to a significant decrease in seed PA, without any effect on the seed germination potential. Interestingly, this over-expression also induced a higher remobilization of free iron during germination. Moreover, the PHY-over-expressor lines show an increase in inorganic phosphate and sulfate contents, and a higher biomass production after phosphate starvation. Finally, phosphate sensing was altered because of the changes in the expression of genes induced by phosphate starvation or involved in phosphate or sulfate transport. Together, these results show that the over-expression of PHY-US417 reduces PA concentration, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of PA in the regulation of sulfate and phosphate homeostasis and signaling. PMID:25231959

  6. Phase II-I-II Study of Two Different Doses and Schedules of Pralatrexate, a High-Affinity Substrate for the Reduced Folate Carrier, in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma Reveals Marked Activity in T-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Owen A.; Horwitz, Steven; Hamlin, Paul; Portlock, Carol; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Sarasohn, Debra; Neylon, Ellen; Mastrella, Jill; Hamelers, Rachel; MacGregor-Cortelli, Barbara; Patterson, Molly; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Sirotnak, Frank; Fleisher, Martin; Mould, Diane R.; Saunders, Mike; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of pralatrexate in patients with lymphoma. Patients and Methods Pralatrexate, initially given at a dose of 135 mg/m2 on an every-other-week basis, was associated with stomatitis. A redesigned, weekly phase I/II study established an MTD of 30 mg/m2 weekly for six weeks every 7 weeks. Patients were required to have relapsed/refractory disease, an absolute neutrophil greater than 1,000/μL, and a platelet count greater than 50,000/μL for the first dose of any cycle. Results The every-other-week, phase II experience was associated with an increased risk of stomatitis and hematologic toxicity. On a weekly schedule, the MTD was 30 mg/m2 weekly for 6 weeks every 7 weeks. This schedule modification resulted in a 50% reduction in the major hematologic toxicities and abrogation of the grades 3 to 4 stomatitis. Stomatitis was associated with elevated homocysteine and methylmalonic acid, which were reduced by folate and vitamin B12 supplementation. Of 48 assessable patients, the overall response rate was 31% (26% by intention to treat), including 17% who experienced complete remission (CR). When analyzed by lineage, the overall response rates were 10% and 54% in patients with B- and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. All eight patients who experienced CR had T-cell lymphoma, and four of the six patients with a partial remission were positron emission tomography negative. The duration of responses ranged from 3 to 26 months. Conclusion Pralatrexate has significant single-agent activity in patients with relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma. PMID:19652067

  7. Detection of whole-brain abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy using tensor-based morphometry with DARTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Lv, Bin; Li, Meng; Jin, Zhengyu

    2009-10-01

    Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) is an automated technique for detecting the anatomical differences between populations by examining the gradients of the deformation fields used to nonlinearly warp MR images. The purpose of this study was to investigate the whole-brain volume changes between the patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and the controls using TBM with DARTEL, which could achieve more accurate inter-subject registration of brain images. T1-weighted images were acquired from 21 left-TLE patients, 21 right-TLE patients and 21 healthy controls, which were matched in age and gender. The determinants of the gradient of deformation fields at voxel level were obtained to quantify the expansion or contraction for individual images relative to the template, and then logarithmical transformation was applied on it. A whole brain analysis was performed using general lineal model (GLM), and the multiple comparison was corrected by false discovery rate (FDR) with p<0.05. For left-TLE patients, significant volume reductions were found in hippocampus, cingulate gyrus, precentral gyrus, right temporal lobe and cerebellum. These results potentially support the utility of TBM with DARTEL to study the structural changes between groups.

  8. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of the Brain of University Students Majoring in Music and Nonmusic Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kanako; Kirino, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The brain changes flexibly due to various experiences during the developmental stages of life. Previous voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have shown volumetric differences between musicians and nonmusicians in several brain regions including the superior temporal gyrus, sensorimotor areas, and superior parietal cortex. However, the reported brain regions depend on the study and are not necessarily consistent. By VBM, we investigated the effect of musical training on the brain structure by comparing university students majoring in music with those majoring in nonmusic disciplines. All participants were right-handed healthy Japanese females. We divided the nonmusic students into two groups and therefore examined three groups: music expert (ME), music hobby (MH), and nonmusic (NM) group. VBM showed that the ME group had the largest gray matter volumes in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; BA 44), left middle occipital gyrus (BA 18), and bilateral lingual gyrus. These differences are considered to be caused by neuroplasticity during long and continuous musical training periods because the MH group showed intermediate volumes in these regions. PMID:26494943

  9. Grey matter, an endophenotype for schizophrenia? A voxel-based morphometry study in siblings of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Jorien; Gromann, Paula M.; Swart, Marte; de Haan, Lieuwe; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

    2015-01-01

    Background Grey matter, both volume and concentration, has been proposed as an endophenotype for schizophrenia given a number of reports of grey matter abnormalities in relatives of patients with schizophrenia. However, previous studies on grey matter abnormalities in relatives have produced inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine grey matter differences between controls and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and to examine whether the age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms of selected individuals could explain the previously reported inconsistencies. Methods We compared the grey matter volume and grey matter concentration of healthy siblings of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls matched for age, sex and education using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we selected subsamples based on age (< 30 yr), genetic loading and subclinical psychotic symptoms to examine whether this would lead to different results. Results We included 89 siblings and 69 controls in our study. The results showed that siblings and controls did not differ significantly on grey matter volume or concentration. Furthermore, specifically selecting participants based on age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms did not alter these findings. Limitations The main limitation was that subdividing the sample resulted in smaller samples for the subanalyses. Furthermore, we used MRI data from 2 different scanner sites. Conclusion These results indicate that grey matter measured through VBM might not be a suitable endophenotype for schizophrenia. PMID:25768029

  10. Longitudinal gray matter contraction in three variants of primary progressive aphasia: A tenser-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Brambati, Simona Maria; Amici, Serena; Racine, Caroline A; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Zachary; Ogar, Jenny; Dronkers, Nina; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the pattern of longitudinal changes in cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Eight patients with the non-fluent variant of PPA (nfvPPA), 13 patients with the semantic variant (svPPA), seven patients with the logopenic variant (lvPPA), and 29 age-matched, neurologically healthy controls were included in the study. All participants underwent longitudinal MRI, neuropsychological and language testing at baseline and at a 1-year follow-up. Tenser-based morphometry (TBM) was applied to T1-weighted MRI images in order to map the progression of gray and white matter atrophy over a 1-year period. Results showed that each patient group was characterized by a specific pattern of cognitive and anatomical changes. Specifically, nfvPPA patients showed gray matter atrophy progression in the left frontal and subcortical areas as well as a decline in motor speech and executive functions; svPPA patients presented atrophy progression in the medial and lateral temporal lobe and decline in semantic memory abilities; and lvPPA patients showed atrophy progression in lateral/posterior temporal and medial parietal regions with a decline in memory, sentence repetition and calculations. In addition, in all three variants, the white matter fibers underlying the abovementioned cortical areas underwent significant volume contraction over a 1-year period. Overall, these results indicate that the three PPA variants present distinct patterns of neuroanatomical contraction, which reflect their clinical and cognitive progression. PMID:26106560

  11. Voxel-based morphometry in opera singers: Increased gray-matter volume in right somatosensory and auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Boris; Veit, Ralf; Moll, Christina Valérie; Gaser, Christian; Birbaumer, Niels; Lotze, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to instrumental musicians, professional singers do not train on a specific instrument but perfect a motor system that has already been extensively trained during speech motor development. Previous functional imaging studies suggest that experience with singing is associated with enhanced somatosensory-based vocal motor control. However, experience-dependent structural plasticity in vocal musicians has rarely been studied. We investigated voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 27 professional classical singers and compared gray matter volume in regions of the "singing-network" to an age-matched group of 28 healthy volunteers with no special singing experience. We found right hemispheric volume increases in professional singers in ventral primary somatosensory cortex (larynx S1) and adjacent rostral supramarginal gyrus (BA40), as well as in secondary somatosensory (S2) and primary auditory cortices (A1). Moreover, we found that earlier commencement with vocal training correlated with increased gray-matter volume in S1. However, in contrast to studies with instrumental musicians, this correlation only emerged in singers who began their formal training after the age of 14years, when speech motor development has reached its first plateau. Structural data thus confirm and extend previous functional reports suggesting a pivotal role of somatosensation in vocal motor control with increased experience in singing. Results furthermore indicate a sensitive period for developing additional vocal skills after speech motor coordination has matured. PMID:27034024

  12. Functional but not structural changes associated with learning: An exploration of longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Adam G.; Marrett, Sean; Saad, Ziad S.; Ruff, Douglas A.; Martin, Alex; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) has been used for several years to study differences in brain structure between populations. Recently, a longitudinal version of VBM has been used to show changes in gray matter associated with relatively short periods of training. In the present study we use fMRI and three different standard implementations of longitudinal VBM: SPM2, FSL, and SPM5 to assess functional and structural changes associated with a simple learning task. Behavioral and fMRI data clearly showed a significant learning effect. However, initially positive VBM results were found to be inconsistent across minor perturbations of the analysis technique and ultimately proved to be artifactual. When alignment biases were controlled for and recommended statistical procedures were used, no significant changes in grey matter density were found. This work, initially intended to show structural and functional changes with learning, rather demonstrates some of the potential pitfalls of existing longitudinal VBM methods and prescribes that these tools be applied and interpreted with extreme caution. PMID:19520171

  13. Entorhinal volume, aerobic fitness, and recognition memory in healthy young adults: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Andrew S; Young, Daniel E; Budson, Andrew E; Stern, Chantal E; Schon, Karin

    2016-02-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis effects of aerobic exercise and environmental enrichment are beneficial for cognition, in particular for hippocampus-supported learning and memory. Recent work in humans suggests that exercise training induces changes in hippocampal volume, but it is not known if aerobic exercise and fitness also impact the entorhinal cortex. In animal models, aerobic exercise increases expression of growth factors, including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This exercise-enhanced expression of growth hormones may boost synaptic plasticity, and neuronal survival and differentiation, potentially supporting function and structure in brain areas including but not limited to the hippocampus. Here, using voxel based morphometry and a standard graded treadmill test to determine cardio-respiratory fitness (Bruce protocol; ·VO2 max), we examined if entorhinal and hippocampal volumes were associated with cardio-respiratory fitness in healthy young adults (N=33). In addition, we examined if volumes were modulated by recognition memory performance and by serum BDNF, a putative marker of synaptic plasticity. Our results show a positive association between volume in right entorhinal cortex and cardio-respiratory fitness. In addition, average gray matter volume in the entorhinal cortex, bilaterally, was positively associated with memory performance. These data extend prior work on the cerebral effects of aerobic exercise and fitness to the entorhinal cortex in healthy young adults thus providing compelling evidence for a relationship between aerobic fitness and structure of the medial temporal lobe memory system. PMID:26631814

  14. Integration of co-localized glandular morphometry and protein biomarker expression in immunofluorescent images for prostate cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Richard; Khan, Faisal M.; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescent (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. However, while biomarker and glandular morphometric features have been combined as separate predictors in multivariate models, there is a lack of integrative features for biomarkers co-localized within specific morphological sub-types; for example the evaluation of androgen receptor (AR) expression within Gleason 3 glands only. In this work we propose a novel framework employing multiple techniques to generate integrated metrics of morphology and biomarker expression. We demonstrate the utility of the approaches in predicting clinical disease progression in images from 326 prostate biopsies and 373 prostatectomies. Our proposed integrative approaches yield significant improvements over existing IF image feature metrics. This work presents some of the first algorithms for generating innovative characteristics in tissue diagnostics that integrate co-localized morphometry and protein biomarker expression.

  15. Relating Inter-Individual Differences in Verbal Creative Thinking to Cerebral Structures: An Optimal Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feifei; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Creativity can be defined the capacity of an individual to produce something original and useful. An important measurable component of creativity is divergent thinking. Despite existing studies on creativity-related cerebral structural basis, no study has used a large sample to investigate the relationship between individual verbal creativity and regional gray matter volumes (GMVs) and white matter volumes (WMVs). In the present work, optimal voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was employed to identify the structure that correlates verbal creativity (measured by the verbal form of Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking) across the brain in young healthy subjects. Verbal creativity was found to be significantly positively correlated with regional GMV in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which is believed to be responsible for language production and comprehension, new semantic representation, and memory retrieval, and in the right IFG, which may involve inhibitory control and attention switching. A relationship between verbal creativity and regional WMV in the left and right IFG was also observed. Overall, a highly verbal creative individual with superior verbal skills may demonstrate a greater computational efficiency in the brain areas involved in high-level cognitive processes including language production, semantic representation and cognitive control. PMID:24223921

  16. Relating inter-individual differences in verbal creative thinking to cerebral structures: an optimal voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feifei; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Creativity can be defined the capacity of an individual to produce something original and useful. An important measurable component of creativity is divergent thinking. Despite existing studies on creativity-related cerebral structural basis, no study has used a large sample to investigate the relationship between individual verbal creativity and regional gray matter volumes (GMVs) and white matter volumes (WMVs). In the present work, optimal voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was employed to identify the structure that correlates verbal creativity (measured by the verbal form of Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking) across the brain in young healthy subjects. Verbal creativity was found to be significantly positively correlated with regional GMV in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which is believed to be responsible for language production and comprehension, new semantic representation, and memory retrieval, and in the right IFG, which may involve inhibitory control and attention switching. A relationship between verbal creativity and regional WMV in the left and right IFG was also observed. Overall, a highly verbal creative individual with superior verbal skills may demonstrate a greater computational efficiency in the brain areas involved in high-level cognitive processes including language production, semantic representation and cognitive control. PMID:24223921

  17. Voxel-based morphometry with templates and validation in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Sawiak, Stephen J.; Wood, Nigel I.; Williams, Guy B.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Carpenter, T. Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread application to human imaging, voxel-based morphometry (VBM), where images are compared following grey matter (GM) segmentation, is seldom used in mice. Here VBM is performed for the R6/2 model of Huntington’s disease, a progressive neurological disorder. This article discusses issues in translating the methods to mice and shows that its statistical basis is sound in mice as it is in human studies. Whole brain images from live transgenic and control mice are segmented into GM maps after processing and compared to produce statistical parametric maps of likely differences. To assess whether false positives were likely to occur, a large cohort of ex vivo magnetic resonance brain images were sampled with permutation testing. Differences were seen particularly in the striatum and cortex, in line with studies performed ex vivo and as seen in human patients. In validation, the rate of false positives is as expected and these have no discernible distribution through the brain. The study shows that VBM successfully detects differences in the Huntington’s disease mouse brain. The method is rapid compared to manual delineation and reliable. The templates created here for the mouse brain are freely released for other users in addition to an open-source software toolbox for performing mouse VBM. PMID:23835187

  18. Changes in regional gray matter volume in women with chronic pelvic pain: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    As-Sanie, Sawsan; Harris, Richard E; Napadow, Vitaly; Kim, Jieun; Neshewat, Gina; Kairys, Anson; Williams, David; Clauw, Daniel J; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a highly prevalent pain condition, estimated to affect 15%-20% of women in the United States. Endometriosis is often associated with CPP, however, other factors, such as preexisting or concomitant changes of the central pain system, might contribute to the development of chronic pain. We applied voxel-based morphometry to determine whether women with CPP with and without endometriosis display changes in brain morphology in regions known to be involved in pain processing. Four subgroups of women participated: 17 with endometriosis and CPP, 15 with endometriosis without CPP, 6 with CPP without endometriosis, and 23 healthy controls. All patients with endometriosis and/or CPP were surgically confirmed. Relative to controls, women with endometriosis-associated CPP displayed decreased gray matter volume in brain regions involved in pain perception, including the left thalamus, left cingulate gyrus, right putamen, and right insula. Women with CPP without endometriosis also showed decreases in gray matter volume in the left thalamus. Such decreases were not observed in patients with endometriosis who had no CPP. We conclude that CPP is associated with changes in regional gray matter volume within the central pain system. Although endometriosis may be an important risk factor for the development of CPP, acting as a cyclic source of peripheral nociceptive input, our data support the notion that changes in the central pain system also play an important role in the development of chronic pain, regardless of the presence of endometriosis. PMID:22387096

  19. Changes in regional gray matter volume in women with chronic pelvic pain - a voxel based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    As-Sanie, Sawsan; Harris, Richard; Napadow, Vitaly; Kim, Jieun; Neshewat, Gina; Kairys, Anson; Williams, David; Clauw, Daniel; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a highly prevalent pain condition, estimated to affect 15-20% of women in the United States. Endometriosis is often associated with CPP, however other factors, such as pre-existing or concomitant changes of the central pain system, might contribute to the development of chronic pain. We applied voxel-based morphometry to determine whether women with CPP with and without endometriosis display changes in brain morphology in regions known to be involved in pain processing.Four subgroups of women participated: 17 with endometriosis and CPP, 15 with endometriosis without CPP, 6 with CPP without endometriosis, as well as 23 healthy controls. All patients with endometriosis and/or CPP were surgically-confirmed. Relative to controls, women with endometriosis-associated CPP displayed decreased gray matter volume in brain regions involved in pain perception including the left thalamus, left cingulategyrus, right putamen, and right insula. Women with CPP without endometriosis also showed decreases in gray matter volume in the left thalamus. Such decreases were not observed in patients with endometriosis that had no CPP. We conclude thatCPP is associated with changes in regional gray matter volume within the central pain system. Although endometriosis may be an important risk factor for the development of CPP, acting as a cyclic source of peripheral nociceptive input, our data support the notion that changes in the central pain system also play an important role in the development of chronic pain, regardless of the presence of endometriosis. PMID:22387096

  20. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of the Brain of University Students Majoring in Music and Nonmusic Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kanako; Kirino, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The brain changes flexibly due to various experiences during the developmental stages of life. Previous voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have shown volumetric differences between musicians and nonmusicians in several brain regions including the superior temporal gyrus, sensorimotor areas, and superior parietal cortex. However, the reported brain regions depend on the study and are not necessarily consistent. By VBM, we investigated the effect of musical training on the brain structure by comparing university students majoring in music with those majoring in nonmusic disciplines. All participants were right-handed healthy Japanese females. We divided the nonmusic students into two groups and therefore examined three groups: music expert (ME), music hobby (MH), and nonmusic (NM) group. VBM showed that the ME group had the largest gray matter volumes in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; BA 44), left middle occipital gyrus (BA 18), and bilateral lingual gyrus. These differences are considered to be caused by neuroplasticity during long and continuous musical training periods because the MH group showed intermediate volumes in these regions. PMID:26494943

  1. Increased Grey Matter Associated with Long-Term Sahaja Yoga Meditation: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Sergio Elías; Suero, José; Barros, Alfonso; González-Mora, José Luis; Rubia, Katya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate regional differences in grey matter volume associated with the practice of Sahaja Yoga Meditation. Design Twenty three experienced practitioners of Sahaja Yoga Meditation and twenty three non-meditators matched on age, gender and education level, were scanned using structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging and their grey matter volume were compared using Voxel-Based Morphometry. Results Grey matter volume was larger in meditators relative to non-meditators across the whole brain. In addition, grey matter volume was larger in several predominantly right hemispheric regions: in insula, ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex, inferior temporal and parietal cortices as well as in left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and left insula. No areas with larger grey matter volume were found in non-meditators relative to meditators. Conclusions The study shows that long-term practice of Sahaja Yoga Meditation is associated with larger grey matter volume overall, and with regional enlargement in several right hemispheric cortical and subcortical brain regions that are associated with sustained attention, self-control, compassion and interoceptive perception. The increased grey matter volume in these attention and self-control mediating regions suggests use-dependent enlargement with regular practice of this meditation. PMID:26938433

  2. Microarray analysis of E9.5 reduced folate carrier (RFC1; Slc19a1) knockout embryos reveals altered expression of genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Gelineau-van Waes, Janee; Maddox, Joyce R; Smith, Lynette M; van Waes, Michael; Wilberding, Justin; Eudy, James D; Bauer, Linda K; Finnell, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Background The reduced folate carrier (RFC1) is an integral membrane protein and facilitative anion exchanger that mediates delivery of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate into mammalian cells. Adequate maternal-fetal transport of folate is necessary for normal embryogenesis. Targeted inactivation of the murine RFC1 gene results in post-implantation embryolethality, but daily folic acid supplementation of pregnant dams prolongs survival of homozygous embryos until mid-gestation. At E10.5 RFC1-/- embryos are developmentally delayed relative to wildtype littermates, have multiple malformations, including neural tube defects, and die due to failure of chorioallantoic fusion. The mesoderm is sparse and disorganized, and there is a marked absence of erythrocytes in yolk sac blood islands. The identification of alterations in gene expression and signaling pathways involved in the observed dysmorphology following inactivation of RFC1-mediated folate transport are the focus of this investigation. Results Affymetrix microarray analysis of the relative gene expression profiles in whole E9.5 RFC1-/- vs. RFC1+/+ embryos identified 200 known genes that were differentially expressed. Major ontology groups included transcription factors (13.04%), and genes involved in transport functions (ion, lipid, carbohydrate) (11.37%). Genes that code for receptors, ligands and interacting proteins in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex accounted for 9.36% of the total, followed closely by several genes involved in hematopoiesis (8.03%). The most highly significant gene network identified by Ingenuity™ Pathway analysis included 12 genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex. Altered expression of these genes was validated by quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that megalin protein expression disappeared from the visceral yolk sac of RFC1-/- embryos, while cubilin protein was widely misexpressed. Conclusion Inactivation of

  3. Experience with Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine, and Melphalan Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Nonmalignant Diseases Reveals Good Outcomes and That the Risk of Mixed Chimerism Depends on Underlying Disease, Stem Cell Source, and Alemtuzumab Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Rebecca A.; Rao, Marepalli B.; Gefen, Aharon; Bellman, Denise; Mehta, Parinda A.; Khandelwal, Pooja; Chandra, Sharat; Jodele, Sonata; Myers, Kasiani C.; Grimley, Michael; Dandoy, Christopher; El-Bietar, Javier; Kumar, Ashish R.; Leemhuis, Tom; Zhang, Kejian; Bleesing, Jack J.; Jordan, Michael B.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Davies, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens are increasingly used for the hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) of pediatric and young adult patients with nonmalignant diseases. Early experience suggests that these regimens are associated with good survival but a high incidence of mixed chimerism, which we have previously shown to be influenced by the alemtuzumab schedule. We hypothesized that the underlying diagnosis and donor graft source would also affect the development of mixed chimerism and that the majority of patients would survive RIC HCT without graft loss. To examine this, we conducted a retrospective study of 206 patients with metabolic diseases, non-Fanconi anemia marrow failure disorders, and primary immune deficiencies who underwent 210 consecutive RIC HCT procedures at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Ninety-seven percent of the patients engrafted. Mixed donor and recipient chimerism developed in 46% of patients. Patients with marrow failure had a low risk of mixed chimerism (hazard ratio [HR], .208; 95% confidence interval [CI], .061 to .709; P = .012). The risk of mixed chimerism was high in patients who received a cord blood graft (HR, 3.122; 95% CI, 1.236 to 7.888; P = .016). As expected, patients who received a proximal or higher dose per kilogram of alemtuzumab schedule also experienced higher rates of mixed chimerism (all HR > 2, all P < .05). At the time of last follow-up (median, 654 days; range, 13 to 3337), over 75% of patients had greater than 90% whole blood donor chimerism. A second transplantation was performed in 5% of patients. Three-year survival without retransplantation was 84% (95% CI, 71% to 98%) for patients who underwent transplantation with an HLA-matched sibling donor. Survival without retransplantation was negatively affected by lack of a matched related donor, increasing age, and development of grades III and IV acute graft-versus-host disease. We conclude that alemtuzumab

  4. Reducing Dropouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A group of three conference papers, all addressing the subject of effective programs to decrease the number of school dropouts, is presented in this document. The first paper, "Systemic Approaches to Reducing Dropouts" (Michael Timpane), asserts that dropping out is a symptom of failures in the social, economic, and educational systems. Dropping…

  5. Spectroscopy, morphometry, and photoclinometry of Titan's dunefields from Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Sotin, C.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Jaumann, R.; Beyer, R.A.; Buratti, B.J.; Pitman, K.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-resolution (500 m/pixel) Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) T20 observations of Titan resolve that moon's sand dunes. The spectral variability in some dune regions shows that there are sand-free interdune areas, wherein VIMS spectra reveal the exposed dune substrate. The interdunes from T20 are, variously, materials that correspond to the equatorial bright, 5-??m-bright, and dark blue spectral units. Our observations show that an enigmatic "dark red" spectral unit seen in T5 in fact represents a macroscopic mixture with 5-??m-bright material and dunes as its spectral endmembers. Looking more broadly, similar mixtures of varying amounts of dune and interdune units of varying composition can explain the spectral and albedo variability within the dark brown dune global spectral unit that is associated with dunes. The presence of interdunes indicates that Titan's dunefields are both mature and recently active. The spectrum of the dune endmember reveals the sand to be composed of less water ice than the rest of Titan; various organics are consistent with the dunes' measured reflectivity. We measure a mean dune spacing of 2.1 km, and find that the dunes are oriented on the average in an east-west direction, but angling up to 10?? from parallel to the equator in specific cases. Where no interdunes are present, we determine the height of one set of dunes photoclinometrically to be between 30 and 70 m. These results pave the way for future exploration and interpretation of Titan's sand dunes. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in Tourette Syndrome: evidence from voxel-based morphometry and magnetization transfer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R; Kaufmann, Jörn; Grosskreutz, Julian; Dengler, Reinhard; Emrich, Hinderk M; Peschel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Pathophysiological evidence suggests an involvement of fronto-striatal circuits in Tourette syndrome (TS). To identify TS related abnormalities in gray and white matter we used optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) which are more sensitive to tissue alterations than conventional MRI and provide a quantitative measure of macrostructural integrity. Methods Volumetric high-resolution anatomical T1-weighted MRI and MTI were acquired in 19 adult, unmedicated male TS patients without co-morbidities and 20 age- and sex-matched controls on a 1.5 Tesla neuro-optimized GE scanner. Images were pre-processed and analyzed using an optimized version of VBM in SPM2. Results Using VBM, TS patients showed significant decreases in gray matter volumes in prefrontal areas, the anterior cingulate gyrus, sensorimotor areas, left caudate nucleus and left postcentral gyrus. Decreases in white matter volumes were detected in the right inferior frontal gyrus, the left superior frontal gyrus and the anterior corpus callosum. Increases were found in the left middle frontal gyrus and left sensorimotor areas. In MTI, white matter reductions were seen in the right medial frontal gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally and the right cingulate gyrus. Tic severity was negatively correlated with orbitofrontal structures, the right cingulate gyrus and parts of the parietal-temporal-occipital association cortex bilaterally. Conclusion Our MRI in vivo neuropathological findings using two sensitive and unbiased techniques support the hypothesis that alterations in frontostriatal circuitries underlie TS pathology. We suggest that anomalous frontal lobe association and projection fiber bundles cause disinhibition of the cingulate gyrus and abnormal basal ganglia function. PMID:19435502

  7. Droplet morphometry and velocimetry (DMV): a video processing software for time-resolved, label-free tracking of droplet parameters.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amar S

    2013-05-21

    Emerging assays in droplet microfluidics require the measurement of parameters such as drop size, velocity, trajectory, shape deformation, fluorescence intensity, and others. While micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) and related techniques are suitable for measuring flow using tracer particles, no tool exists for tracking droplets at the granularity of a single entity. This paper presents droplet morphometry and velocimetry (DMV), a digital video processing software for time-resolved droplet analysis. Droplets are identified through a series of image processing steps which operate on transparent, translucent, fluorescent, or opaque droplets. The steps include background image generation, background subtraction, edge detection, small object removal, morphological close and fill, and shape discrimination. A frame correlation step then links droplets spanning multiple frames via a nearest neighbor search with user-defined matching criteria. Each step can be individually tuned for maximum compatibility. For each droplet found, DMV provides a time-history of 20 different parameters, including trajectory, velocity, area, dimensions, shape deformation, orientation, nearest neighbour spacing, and pixel statistics. The data can be reported via scatter plots, histograms, and tables at the granularity of individual droplets or by statistics accrued over the population. We present several case studies from industry and academic labs, including the measurement of 1) size distributions and flow perturbations in a drop generator, 2) size distributions and mixing rates in drop splitting/merging devices, 3) efficiency of single cell encapsulation devices, 4) position tracking in electrowetting operations, 5) chemical concentrations in a serial drop dilutor, 6) drop sorting efficiency of a tensiophoresis device, 7) plug length and orientation of nonspherical plugs in a serpentine channel, and 8) high throughput tracking of >250 drops in a reinjection system. Performance metrics

  8. Surface-Based Morphometry of Cortical Thickness and Surface Area Associated with Heschl's Gyri Duplications in 430 Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Damien; Maingault, Sophie; Crivello, Fabrice; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We applied Surface-Based Morphometry to assess the variations in cortical thickness (CT) and cortical surface area (CSA) in relation to the occurrence of Heschl's gyrus (HG) duplications in each hemisphere. 430 healthy brains that had previously been classified as having a single HG, Common Stem Duplication (CSD) or Complete Posterior Duplication (CPD) in each hemisphere were analyzed. To optimally align the HG area across the different groups of gyrification, we computed a specific surface-based template composed of 40 individuals with a symmetrical HG gyrification pattern (20 single HG, 10 CPD, 10 CSD). After normalizing the 430 participants' T1 images to this specific template, we separately compared the groups constituted of participants with a single HG, CPD, and CSD in each hemisphere. The occurrence of a duplication in either hemisphere was associated with an increase in CT posterior to the primary auditory cortex. This may be the neural support of expertise or great abilities in either speech or music processing domains that were related with duplications by previous studies. A decrease in CSA in the planum temporale was detected in cases with duplication in the left hemisphere. In the right hemisphere, a medial decrease in CSA and a lateral increase in CSA were present in HG when a CPD occurred together with an increase in CSA in the depth of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in CSD compared to a single HG. These variations associated with duplication might be related to the functions that they process jointly within each hemisphere: temporal and speech processing in the left and spectral and music processing in the right. PMID:27014013

  9. Dietary effects of Moringa oleifera leaf powder on growth, gastrointestinal morphometry and blood and liver metabolites in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Zvinorova, P I; Lekhanya, L; Erlwanger, K; Chivandi, E

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the effects of Moringa oleifera leaf powder (MOLP) as a dietary supplement on growth performance, gastrointestinal (GIT) morphometry and liver function using weanling Sprague Dawley rats to model humans under ad libitum and restricted feeding. An MOLP-based diet was generated by supplementing normal rat feed with the leaf powder at 20%. Four dietary regimens included normal rat feed fed at 20% of body mass (NRF: ad libitum), NRF fed at 14% of body mass (NRFR, restricted), Moringa-supplemented feeds fed at 20% and 14% of body mass (MOF: ad libitum and MOFR: restrictedly) respectively. Thirty-two pups were randomly assigned to the diets and fed for 5 weeks, after which they were fasted, euthanased and GIT viscera masses, lengths and histology were assessed. Blood was collected for metabolite and markers of liver function assays. Tibiae and femora lengths were used to determine linear growth. Rats fed the restricted diets had lower weekly body mass gains (p = 0.0001) than those on ad libitum feeding; however, they showed compensatory growth by 5 weeks. Terminally, the rats fed MOFR had shorter (p < 0.05) femora and tibiae than their counterparts on the other diets. Except on the caeca, diet had no effect on the absolute masses and lengths of GIT viscera. Relative to tibia length, rats on the MOF had significantly heavier stomachs and caeca and longer small and large intestines than their counterparts on NRF, but this was not supported histologically. Level of feeding and supplementation did not affect blood metabolite concentration, liver glycogen and lipid storage nor the plasma activities AST and ALP in the rats. Supplementing diets with MOLP under restricted access to feed (low calorific supply) might compromise linear growth. PMID:24661493

  10. Holocene flows of the Cima volcanic field, Mojave Desert (California), Part 1: Remote sensing and multi-scale morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, J. R.; Luecke, A.; Polun, S. G.; Robertson, T.; Savage, A.; Soldati, A.; Whittington, A. G.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology and texture can provide insight into rheological and other physical properties of the flow. Studies of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial lava flows rely heavily on remotely sensed observations. This research aims to quantify micromorphology and texture of a Holocene lava flow in the Cima volcanic field (eastern California) using digital elevation models and radar backscatter imagery. We are testing the hypothesis that spatial patterns in morphometry and backscatter roughness correspond with varying rheological conditions during emplacement. The site is ideally suited for morphological study owing to the youthfulness of the flow, as well as the lack of vegetation and minimal surface erosion resulting from the high desert climate. The studied lava flow spans approximately 2.5 km and exhibits well defined lobate forms and lava ropes with clear A'a' to Pahoehoe transitions. This study assesses lava flow micromorphology using a very high resolution (5 cm pixel) digital elevation model (DEM). The DEM was constructed from low-altitude aerial photos acquired using a remotely-controlled model aircraft. In addition to the DEM, the resulting orthoimagery provided a basis for distinguishing pristine lava flow surfaces from areas covered by vegetation and/or eolian deposits. Longer-wavelength morphology (spatial scales greater than 1 meter) is analyzed using a 50 cm pixel DEM produced using stereoscopic NAPP aerial photographs. Roughness estimates are compared with radar backscatter images including steeply incident C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) and L-band (24 cm wavelength) satellite data, as well as shallow incidence Ku-band data (1.7 cm wavelength) acquired using a ground-based imaging radar from an adjacent cinder cone. Photogrammetry and radar provide complementary information on lava flow morphology and micromorphological roughness, which are assessed at different spatial scales using general statistics, as well as the local hypsometric integral.

  11. Evaluation of calabash chalk effect on femur bone morphometry and mineralization in young wistar rats: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ekong, Moses B; Ekanem, Theresa B; Sunday, Abraham O; Aquaisua, Aquaisua N; Akpanabiatu, Monday I

    2012-01-01

    Background: Calabash chalk, a popularly consumed geophagic material in Nigeria has been reported to contain lead, arsenic, alpha lindane, endrin, and endosulfan 11 among other pollutants. Aim: The continuous exposure of young children to this chalk necessitated this study on the bone morphometry and mineralization in young Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Fourteen young (weanling) Wistar rats of both sexes weighing 54-72 g were assigned into two groups of seven animals each. Group I served as control, while group II was the test group (TG). 40 mg/ml of C. chalk was administered as suspension to the test animals in group II. Animals in the control group were orally treated with 1ml of distilled water. Administration of the C. chalk in the animals lasted for 28 days, and the animals were sacrificed on day 29, using chloroform anaesthesia. The femur bones were dissected out, cleaned of flesh and sun-dried. The lengths and weights of the femur bones were measured using graphite furnace atomic mass spectrophotometer. Results: Results showed 1.6% decrease in body weight change in the TG, insignificant decreases in the weights and lengths of both the right and left femur bones, and significant decreased (P < 0.0126) organ-somatic index, and femur bones concentrations (mg/l) of zinc, phosphate, carbonate, calcium, sodium, and potassium (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, this study showed that C. chalk may alter growth rate, and cause de-mineralization in the femur bone, hence, it may be detrimental to bone growth. PMID:23776822

  12. Specific regions display altered grey matter volume in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice: MRI voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazumasu; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kawashima, Ryuta; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE μ Opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice display several behavioural differences from wild-type (WT) littermates including differential responses to nociceptive stimuli. Brain structural changes have been tied to behavioural alterations noted in transgenic mice with targeting of different genes. Hence, we assess the brain structure of MOP-KO mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and histological methods were used to identify structural differences between extensively backcrossed MOP-KO mice and WT mice. KEY RESULTS MOP-KO mice displayed robust increases in regional grey matter volume in olfactory bulb, several hypothalamic nuclei, periaqueductal grey (PAG) and several cerebellar areas, most confirmed by VBM analysis. The largest increases in grey matter volume were detected in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus, ventrolateral PAG (VLPAG) and cerebellar regions including paramedian and cerebellar lobules. Histological analyses confirm several of these results, with increased VLPAG cell numbers and increased thickness of the olfactory bulb granule cell layer and cerebellar molecular and granular cell layers. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MOP deletion causes previously undescribed structural changes in specific brain regions, but not in all regions with high MOP receptor densities (e.g. thalamus, nucleus accumbens) or that exhibit adult neurogenesis (e.g. hippocampus). Volume differences in hypothalamus and PAG may reflect behavioural changes including hyperalgesia. Although the precise relationship between volume change and MOP receptor deletion was not determined from this study alone, these findings suggest that levels of MOP receptor expression may influence a broader range of neural structure and function in humans than previously supposed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity

  13. A tensor-based morphometry analysis of regional differences in brain volume in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, E M; Narr, K L; van der Kouwe, A J W; Molteno, C D; Pirnia, T; Gutman, B; Woods, R P; Thompson, P M; Jacobson, J L; Jacobson, S W

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in brain volumes represent a neurobiological signature of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Less clear is how regional brain tissue reductions differ after normalizing for brain size differences linked with FASD and whether these profiles can predict the degree of prenatal exposure to alcohol. To examine associations of regional brain tissue excesses/deficits with degree of prenatal alcohol exposure and diagnosis with and without correction for overall brain volume, tensor-based morphometry (TBM) methods were applied to structural imaging data from a well-characterized, demographically homogeneous sample of children diagnosed with FASD (n = 39, 9.6-11.0 years) and controls (n = 16, 9.5-11.0 years). Degree of prenatal alcohol exposure was significantly associated with regionally pervasive brain tissue reductions in: (1) the thalamus, midbrain, and ventromedial frontal lobe, (2) the superior cerebellum and inferior occipital lobe, (3) the dorsolateral frontal cortex, and (4) the precuneus and superior parietal lobule. When overall brain size was factored out of the analysis on a subject-by-subject basis, no regions showed significant associations with alcohol exposure. FASD diagnosis was associated with a similar deformation pattern, but few of the regions survived FDR correction. In data-driven independent component analyses (ICA) regional brain tissue deformations successfully distinguished individuals based on extent of prenatal alcohol exposure and to a lesser degree, diagnosis. The greater sensitivity of the continuous measure of alcohol exposure compared with the categorical diagnosis across diverse brain regions underscores the dose dependence of these effects. The ICA results illustrate that profiles of brain tissue alterations may be a useful indicator of prenatal alcohol exposure when reliable historical data are not available and facial features are not apparent. PMID:25057467

  14. Fractal analysis reveals reduced complexity of retinal vessels in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Michele; Falco, Teresa; Frontali, Marina; Romano, Silvia; Bagnato, Francesca; Orzi, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) affects mainly small cerebral arteries and leads to disability and dementia. The relationship between clinical expression of the disease and progression of the microvessel pathology is, however, uncertain as we lack tools for imaging brain vessels in vivo. Ophthalmoscopy is regarded as a window into the cerebral microcirculation. In this study we carried out an ophthalmoscopic examination in subjects with CADASIL. Specifically, we performed fractal analysis of digital retinal photographs. Data are expressed as mean fractal dimension (mean-D), a parameter that reflects complexity of the retinal vessel branching. Ten subjects with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CADASIL and 10 sex and age-matched control subjects were enrolled. Fractal analysis of retinal digital images was performed by means of a computer-based program, and the data expressed as mean-D. Brain MRI lesion volume in FLAIR and T1-weighted images was assessed using MIPAV software. Paired t-test was used to disclose differences in mean-D between CADASIL and control groups. Spearman rank analysis was performed to evaluate potential associations between mean-D values and both disease duration and disease severity, the latter expressed as brain MRI lesion volumes, in the subjects with CADASIL. The results showed that mean-D value of patients (1.42±0.05; mean±SD) was lower than control (1.50±0.04; p = 0.002). Mean-D did not correlate with disease duration nor with MRI lesion volumes of the subjects with CADASIL. The findings suggest that fractal analysis is a sensitive tool to assess changes of retinal vessel branching, likely reflecting early brain microvessel alterations, in CADASIL patients. PMID:21556373

  15. “Where Do Auditory Hallucinations Come From?”—A Brain Morphometry Study of Schizophrenia Patients With Inner or Outer Space Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Plaze, Marion; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Penttilä, Jani; Januel, Dominique; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Bellivier, Franck; Andoh, Jamila; Galinowski, André; Gallarda, Thierry; Artiges, Eric; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Mangin, Jean-François; Martinot, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations are a cardinal symptom of schizophrenia. Bleuler and Kraepelin distinguished 2 main classes of hallucinations: hallucinations heard outside the head (outer space, or external, hallucinations) and hallucinations heard inside the head (inner space, or internal, hallucinations). This distinction has been confirmed by recent phenomenological studies that identified 3 independent dimensions in auditory hallucinations: language complexity, self-other misattribution, and spatial location. Brain imaging studies in schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations have already investigated language complexity and self-other misattribution, but the neural substrate of hallucination spatial location remains unknown. Magnetic resonance images of 45 right-handed patients with schizophrenia and persistent auditory hallucinations and 20 healthy right-handed subjects were acquired. Two homogeneous subgroups of patients were defined based on the hallucination spatial location: patients with only outer space hallucinations (N = 12) and patients with only inner space hallucinations (N = 15). Between-group differences were then assessed using 2 complementary brain morphometry approaches: voxel-based morphometry and sulcus-based morphometry. Convergent anatomical differences were detected between the patient subgroups in the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ). In comparison to healthy subjects, opposite deviations in white matter volumes and sulcus displacements were found in patients with inner space hallucination and patients with outer space hallucination. The current results indicate that spatial location of auditory hallucinations is associated with the rTPJ anatomy, a key region of the “where” auditory pathway. The detected tilt in the sulcal junction suggests deviations during early brain maturation, when the superior temporal sulcus and its anterior terminal branch appear and merge. PMID:19666833

  16. Cortical morphometry and IQ in VLBW children without cerebral palsy born in 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Grunewaldt, Kristine H.; Bjuland, Knut J.; Stavnes, Elisabeth M.; Bastholm, Irén A.; Aanes, Synne; Østgård, Heidi F.; Håberg, Asta; Løhaugen, Gro C.C.; Skranes, Jon; Rimol, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Children born prematurely with very low birth weight (VLBW: bw  ≤ 1500 g) have an increased risk of preterm perinatal brain injury, which may subsequently alter the maturation of the brain, including the cerebral cortex. The aim of study was to assess cortical thickness and surface area in VLBW children compared with term-born controls, and to investigate possible relationships between cortical morphology and Full IQ. In this cross-sectional study, 37 VLBW and 104 term children born between the years 2003–2007 were assessed cognitively at 5–10 years of age, using age appropriate Wechsler tests. The FreeSurfer software was used to obtain estimates of cortical thickness and surface area based on T1-weighted MRI images at 1.5 Tesla. The VLBW children had smaller cortical surface area bilaterally in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. A thicker cortex in the frontal and occipital regions and a thinner cortex in posterior parietal areas were observed in the VLBW group. There were significant differences in Full IQ between groups (VLBW M = 98, SD = 9.71; controls M = 108, SD = 13.57; p < 0.001). There was a positive relationship between IQ and surface area in both groups, albeit significant only in the larger control group. In the VLBW group, reduced IQ was associated with frontal cortical thickening and temporo-parietal thinning. We conclude that cortical deviations are evident in childhood even in VLBW children born in 2003–2007 who have received state of the art medical treatment in the perinatal period and who did not present with focal brain injuries on neonatal ultrasonography. The cortical deviations were associated with reduced cognitive functioning. PMID:26106543

  17. Morphometry of fish inner ear otoliths after development at 3g hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Anken, R H; Kappel, T; Rahmann, H

    1998-07-01

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and right sides) of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish were determined after a long-term stay in moderate hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge), in the course of which the animals completed their ontogenetic development from hatch to freely swimming. Neither the normal morphogenetic development nor the timely onset and gain of performance of swimming behaviour were impaired by the experimental conditions. However, both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure compared to 1g control specimens raised in parallel. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry of lapilli was pronouncedly decreased compared with the 1g controls. These findings suggest that growth and development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths are guided by the environmental gravity vector. Some of the hyper-g animals revealed a kinetotic behaviour on transfer to normal 1g earth conditions, which was similar to the behaviour observed in previous experiments on the transfer from 1g to microgravity (parabolic aircraft flights). The lapillar asymmetry of kinetotic samples was found to be significantly higher than that of normally behaving experimental specimens. No differences in asymmetry of sagittae were obtained between the two groups. This supports an earlier theoretical concept, according to which human static space sickness might be based on asymmetric utricular otoliths. PMID:9726679

  18. Sexual dimorphism of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) in South Korea: Craniodental geometric morphometry

    PubMed Central

    LAU, Alice Ching Ching; ASAHARA, Masakazu; HAN, Sung Yong; KIMURA, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism of the craniodental morphology of the Eurasian otter in South Korea was studied with geometric morphometrics. 29 adult skulls (15 males and 14 females) were used. Images of the dorsal and ventral view of the cranium and right lateral view of the mandible were taken and then digitized, and measurements were taken on the right side. Results showed that size difference between males and females was significant. Correlations between the size and shape variations have not been observed in this study. The bivariate plots with centroid size showed size dimorphism between males and females with some overlapping. Most relative warp (RW) scores were not significantly different between males and females. We observed only RW2 for dorsal and ventral view of the skull, and only RW1 for mandible was significantly different between the sexes. Shape dimorphisms were revealed at the postorbital constriction, temporal-mandibular joint, coronoid process, mandibular condyle and angular process of the skull. Based on our study, sexual dimorphism exists in Eurasian otter from the South Korean population in terms of both the size and shape. Furthermore, the degree of size dimorphism is greater than shape dimorphism. PMID:26983684

  19. DTI and VBM reveal white matter changes without associated gray matter changes in patients with idiopathic restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Belke, Marcus; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Keil, Boris; Rosenow, Felix; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Knake, Susanne; Menzler, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We evaluated cerebral white and gray matter changes in patients with iRLS in order to shed light on the pathophysiology of this disease. Methods Twelve patients with iRLS were compared to 12 age- and sex-matched controls using whole-head diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) techniques. Evaluation of the DTI scans included the voxelwise analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). Results Diffusion tensor imaging revealed areas of altered FA in subcortical white matter bilaterally, mainly in temporal regions as well as in the right internal capsule, the pons, and the right cerebellum. These changes overlapped with changes in RD. Voxel-based morphometry did not reveal any gray matter alterations. Conclusions We showed altered diffusion properties in several white matter regions in patients with iRLS. White matter changes could mainly be attributed to changes in RD, a parameter thought to reflect altered myelination. Areas with altered white matter microstructure included areas in the internal capsule which include the corticospinal tract to the lower limbs, thereby supporting studies that suggest changes in sensorimotor pathways associated with RLS. PMID:26442748

  20. Striatum morphometry is associated with cognitive control deficits and symptom severity in internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxi; Yuan, Kai; Yin, Junsen; Feng, Dan; Bi, Yanzhi; Li, Yangding; Yu, Dahua; Jin, Chenwang; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD), identified in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) Section III as a condition warranting more clinical research, may be associated with impaired cognitive control. Previous IGD-related studies had revealed structural abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex, an important part of prefrontal-striatal circuits, which play critical roles in cognitive control. However, little is known about the relationship between the striatal nuclei (caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens) volumes and cognitive control deficit in individuals with IGD. Twenty-seven adolescents with IGD and 30 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. The volume differences of the striatum were assessed by measuring subcortical volume in FreeSurfer. Meanwhile, the Stroop task was used to detect cognitive control deficits. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between striatal volumes and performance in the Stroop task as well as severity in IGD. Relative to controls, the IGD committed more incongruent condition response errors during the Stroop task and showed increased volumes of dorsal striatum (caudate) and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). In addition, caudate volume was correlated with Stroop task performance and nucleus accumbens (NAc) volume was associated with the internet addiction test (IAT) score in the IGD group. The increased volumes of the right caudate and NAc and their association with behavioral characteristics (i.e., cognitive control and severity) in IGD were detected in the present study. Our findings suggest that the striatum may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of IGD. PMID:25720356

  1. Changes in the morphometry of Las Vegas Wash and the impact on water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roline, Richard A.; Sartoris, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Las Vegas Wash, a natural wash east of Las Vegas, Nevada, carries stormwater, groundwater drainage, and sewage effluent from two sewage treatment plants to Lake Mean. Over 80 percent of the normal discharge of approximately 3.4 m3/s (120 ft3/s) consists of effluent from the City of Las Vegas and Clark County sewage treatment plants. Beginning in the 1950s, a large wetland area developed along the wash that supported waterfowl populations and contributed to some water quality transformations. Heavy rains and subsequent flooding in the area in 1983 and 1984 resulted in erosion and channelization that greatly reduced the wetland area within Las Vegas Wash. The reduction in wetland area shortened water travel time in the wash and affected water quality. The primary impacts on the water entering Lake Mead have been an increase in temperature, a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration, and an increase in ammonia levels. Other physical-chemical parameters and changes in nutrient transformations are also discussed.

  2. Leaf anatomy and morphometry in three eucalypt clones treated with glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Tuffi Santos, L D; Sant'Anna-Santos, B F; Meira, R M S A; Ferreira, F A; Tiburcio, R A S; Machado, A F L

    2009-02-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the effects of simulated drift of glyphosate on the morphoanatomy of three eucalypt clones and to correlate the intoxication symptoms on a microscopic scale with those observed in this visual analysis. The effects of glyphosate drift were proportional to the five doses tested, with Eucalyptus urophylla being more tolerant to the herbicide than E. grandis and urograndis hybrid. The symptoms of intoxication which were similar for the different clones at 7 and 15 days after application were characterized by leaf wilting, chlorosis and curling and, at the highest rates, by necrosis, leaf senescence and death. Anatomically glyphosate doses higher than 86.4 g.ha-1 caused cellular plasmolysis, hypertrophy and hyperplasia, formation of the cicatrization tissue and dead cells on the adaxial epidermis. The spongy parenchyma had a decrease, and the palisade parenchyma and leaf blade thickness had an increase. The increased thickness in leaf blade and palisade parenchyma may be related to the plant response to glyphosate action, as a form of recovering the photosynthetically active area reduced by necroses and leaf senescence caused by the herbicide. PMID:19347155

  3. NEOCIVET: Towards accurate morphometry of neonatal gyrification and clinical applications in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Lepage, Claude; Maheshwary, Romir; Jeon, Seun; Evans, Alan C; Hess, Christopher P; Barkovich, A James; Xu, Duan

    2016-09-01

    , and furthermore, revealed impairment of cortical folding in extremely preterm newborns relative to relatively late preterm newborns, demonstrating its potential to provide biomarkers of prematurity-related developmental outcome. PMID:27184202

  4. Role of morphometry and proliferative parameters in grading of urothelial neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sunita; Kumar, Santosh; Chabbra, Sonia; Sen, Rajeev; Rana, Praveen; Malik, Shivani; Singh, Sonia; Lamba, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mean nuclear area of 10 nuclei (MNA–10), mitotic activity index (MAI) and Ki–67 are highly reproducible and can be routinely used as adjuncts to histopathological grading in classifying tumors. Assays of these biomarkers are non–invasive, rapid, easy to perform, more objective and accurate, with high sensitivity and specificity, and correlate well with tumor grade. Material and methods This study was conducted at the Department of Pathology PGIMS, Rohtak on 50 cases, of which 25 cases were high–grade, 15 low–grade, 6 Papillary Urothelial Neoplasm of Low Malignant Potentialand 4 reactive lesions as per the 2004 ISUP/WHO classification. MNA–10, MAI and Ki–67 immunoquantitation were performed on stained sections. Results The age of the patients varied from 35 to 87 years. Male: female ratio was 3.5:1. The mean MNA–10 (μm2) for High Grade Malignant Potential was 104.52 ±25.64 μm2, which was significantly higher than in PUNLMP (47.64 ±10.23) and LMP (51.57 ±15.66). MAI (/10 HPF) showed an increasing trend from reactive lesions to HMP, with a mean of (3 ±1.16)/10 HPF to (21.36 ±5.31)/10 HPF respectively. Ki–67 labelling index, a proliferative marker, revealed increasing trend lowest with reactive lesions (10 ±2.83%) and highest in high grade tumors (65.96 ±14.44). Spearman's correlation showed maximum correlation between MAI and Ki–67 and the increasing grade of tumor. Conclusions MNA–10 in combination with Ki–67 and MAI was found to be stronger than MNA–10 alone. MAI has high reproducibility in differentiating low and high grade, with simple assessment in paraffin embedded sections allowing adequate histopathological analysis and visualization of proliferating cells simultaneously. This multivariate grading model should be applied in routine grading to overcome interobserver variability and to increase reproducibility of grading. PMID:25914836

  5. Banded Terrain in Hellas Basin, Mars: Results from Geomorphological Investigations and Morphometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, Xavier; Ramy El Maary, Mohamed; Schlunegger, Fritz; Thomas, Nicolas; Norton, Kevin P.

    2014-05-01

    Hellas basin is a large impact basin situated in the southern highland of Mars. The north-western part of the basin has the lowest elevation (~ -7.5 km) on the planet and contains a unique terrain type, which we informally call "banded terrain". The banded terrain is composed of smooth-looking banded deposits that display signs of fluid behavior and a paucity of superimposed impact craters. In this study, we use newly acquired high spatial resolution images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) in addition to existing datasets to characterize the architecture of the banded terrain using a geomorphological and morphometric approach. The banded terrain is generally confined to the NW scarp of the Alpheus Colle region. The individual band-like features are ~5-15 km-long and are separated by narrows inter-band depressions, which are on average ~60 m-wide and at least 10 m-deep. The bands display several morphologies that can vary from linear to concentric forms. Morphometric analysis reveals that the banded terrain is present on relatively steep slopes of ~7° and in a pro-scarp trough. Crater-size frequency analysis yields a late Amazonian age for the terrain (~1.02 Gyr ± 0.09), which along with the presence of very few degraded craters; either implies a recent emplacement or a resurfacing. The apparent sensitivity to local topography and preference for concentrating in localized depressions are compatible with deformation as a viscous fluid. In addition, the bands display clear signs of degradation and slumping in its margins along with a suite of other features that include fractured mounds, polygonal cracking at many size-scales, and knobby/hummocky textures. Together, these features suggest an ice-rich composition for at least the upper layers of the terrain, which is currently being heavily modified through loss of ice and intense weathering. However, the nature of the material composing the bands is still not well understood and need

  6. Comparative morphology and morphometry of the nasal fossae of four species of North American shrews (Soricinae).

    PubMed

    Larochelle, R; Baron, G

    1989-11-01

    The present study compares the morphology of the nasal conchae and the relative development (i.e., surface area and neurosensory cell number) of the olfactory epithelium between four species of shrews occupying different ecotopes (Blarina brevicauda, Sorex cinereus, S. fumeus, S. palustris). The number of olfactory cells was corrected for split cell error. Data were analyzed by using size indices based on the allometric method. The convoluted shape of the maxilloturbinal in Blarina, with large respiratory epithelial surface area, could not be related with certainty to the subterranean ecotope. From the comparison between Soricinae and Crocidurinae, one major difference concerned the shape and attachment of ectoturbinal 3. Differences in the relative development of the olfactory organ are discussed with regard to differences in the use of chemical signals. The semi-fossorial B. brevicauda, with the more developed olfactory organ, is reported to possess more scent-glands and to manifest active scent-marking behaviors and fecal deposits associated with territoriality. The two terrestrial species, S. cinereus and S. fumeus, have olfactory epithelia showing an intermediate development. Published accounts of fewer scent-glands and a lack of active scent-marking behavior indicate a lesser use of olfactory communication in these two species where mutual avoidance seems the rule. Indication of an even more reduced use of olfactory signals in social interactions by the semiaquatic S. palustris is suggested by its least-developed olfactory epithelium. The comparison between Soricinae and Crocidurinae supports a relationship between the development of the olfactory organ and the relative use of olfactory communication known to occur in social interactions. PMID:2618929

  7. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Jeff L.; Kuster, John K.; Levenstein, Jacob M.; Makris, Nikos; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha J.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Breiter, Hans C.; Sharma, Nutan; Blood, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by abnormal fixed positions and/or twisting postures, is associated with dysfunction of motor control networks. While gross brain lesions can produce secondary dystonias, advanced neuroimaging techniques have been required to identify network abnormalities in primary dystonias. Prior neuroimaging studies have provided valuable insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia, but few directly assessed the gross volume of motor control regions, and to our knowledge, none identified abnormalities common to multiple types of idiopathic focal dystonia. Methods We used two gross volumetric segmentation techniques and one voxelwise volumetric technique (voxel based morphometry, VBM) to compare regional volume between matched healthy controls and patients with idiopathic primary focal dystonia (cervical, n = 17, laryngeal, n = 7). We used (1) automated gross volume measures of eight motor control regions using the FreeSurfer analysis package; (2) blinded, anatomist-supervised manual segmentation of the whole thalamus (also gross volume); and (3) voxel based morphometry, which measures local T1-weighted signal intensity and estimates gray matter density or volume at the level of single voxels, for both whole-brain and thalamus. Results Using both automated and manual gross volumetry, we found a significant volume decrease only in the thalamus in two focal dystonias. Decreases in whole-thalamic volume were independent of head and brain size, laterality of symptoms, and duration. VBM measures did not differ between dystonia and control groups in any motor control region. Conclusions Reduced thalamic gross volume, detected in two independent analyses, suggests a common anatomical abnormality in cervical dystonia and spasmodic dysphonia. Defining the structural underpinnings of dystonia may require such complementary approaches. PMID:27171035

  8. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    control points, and hence the dimension of variables in the statistical model, are drastically reduced. The analysis may even suggest that parsimonious models have an increased statistical performance. The method has been implemented in the software Deformetrica, which is publicly available at www.deformetrica.org. PMID:24973601

  9. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters

    PubMed Central

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R.; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2016-01-01

    control points, and hence the dimension of variables in the statistical model, are drastically reduced. The analysis may even suggest that parsimonious models have an increased statistical performance. The method has been implemented in the software Deformetrica, which is publicly available at www.deformetrica.org. PMID:24973601

  10. [Fiber morphometry of the external intercostal muscle. Comparison of dominant and nondominant sides in patients with severe COPD].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fuentes, M A; Gea, J; Pallás, O; Gallego, F; Félez, M A; Broquetas, J M

    1998-04-01

    The general morphometric characteristics of the external intercostal muscle (EIM) of patients with chronic respiratory disease have been well described. Because this muscle is highly accessible, it can provide an ideal model for longitudinal studies using consecutive biopsies of both sides. Whether or not the EIM fiber phenotype is homogeneous on dominant (D) and non dominant (ND) sides is unknown, however. To evaluate possible structural differences in right and left EIM in patients with COPD, eight patients (63 +/- 7 years of age) were enrolled. Lung function, respiratory muscle power, general muscle power and nutritional state were evaluated. Biopsies of the fifth EIM were taken from both sides. Specimens were processed in parallel manner to determine conventional morphometry (hematoxylin-eosin staining), including minimum diameter (Dm) and fiber area (Ar) in cross sections. Fibers were typed by ATPase (at pH 4.2, 4.6 and 9.4) and NADH-TR staining. Nutrition was normal in all patients. All patients had severe COPD (FEV1 27 +/- 7% of reference, limits 13 to 38% of reference) with air entrapment (RV 163 +/- 36% of reference, limits 181 to 276% of reference). None of the patients showed respiratory insufficiency at rest (PaO2 72 +/- 7 mmHg). Peripheral musculoskeletal power measured by manual dynamometer showed no significant right-left differences: D 29 +/- 2 and ND 28 +/- 3 dynes. Morphometric study of 16 muscle specimens showed no significant differences between fiber size on D and ND sides. DmD was 47 +/- 10 microns and ArD, was 2,595 +/- 1,249 microns2. DmD was 49 +/- 9 microns and ArD was 2,636 +/- 953 microns2. Likewise, no significant differences were found between D and ND fiber types: type ID 51 +/- 4% and type IID 49 +/- 5% versus type IND 52 +/- 4% and type IIND 48 +/- 4%. EIM on N and ND sides is homogeneous at the fifth intercostal space. This finding, along with the scarcely invasive nature of the technique for collecting specimens leads us to

  11. Renal Medullary and Cortical Correlates in Fibrosis, Epithelial Mass, Microvascularity, and Microanatomy Using Whole Slide Image Analysis Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Farris, Alton B; Ellis, Carla L; Rogers, Thomas E; Lawson, Diane; Cohen, Cynthia; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial injury often leads to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA is typically assessed in the renal cortex and can be objectively quantitated with computerized image analysis (IA). However, the human medulla accounts for a substantial proportion of the nephron; therefore, medullary scarring will have important cortical consequences and may parallel overall chronic renal injury. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), and collagen III immunohistochemistry (IHC) were visually examined and quantitated on scanned whole slide images (WSIs) (N = 67 cases). When tuned to measure fibrosis, IA of trichrome and Trichrome-PAS (T-P) WSIs correlated for all anatomic compartments (among cortex, medulla, and entire tissue, r = 0.84 to 0.89, P all <0.0001); and collagen III deposition correlated between compartments (r = 0.69 to 0.89, P <0.0001 to 0.0002); however, trichrome and T-P measures did not correlate with collagen deposition, suggesting heterogeneous contributions to extracellular matrix deposition. Epithelial cell mass (EPCM) correlated between cortex and medulla when measured with cytokeratin IHC and with the trichrome red portion (r = 0.85 and 0.66, respectively, all P < 0.0001). Visual assessment also correlated between compartments for fibrosis and EPCM. Correlations were found between increasing medullary inner stripe (IS) width and fibrosis in all of the tissue and the medulla by trichrome morphometry (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.48, P = 0.00008, respectively). Weak correlations were found between increasing IS width and decreasing visual assessment of all tissue EPCM. Microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel area (MVA) measured using a MVD algorithm applied to CD34 IHC correlated significantly between all compartments (r = 0.76 to 0.87 for MVD and 0.71 to 0.87 for MVA, P all < 0.0001). Overall, these findings demonstrate the interrelatedness of the cortex and medulla and the importance of considering the renal parenchyma

  12. Micro-Focus X-Ray Tomography Study of the Microstructure and Morphometry of the Eggshell of Ostriches (Struthio Camerus).

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Bronwyn; Steyn, Lindi; Bam, Lunga; Olivier, Adriaan J; Devey, Richard; Maina, John N

    2016-08-01

    In ostrich husbandry, economic losses have mainly been attributed to low hatchability of eggs, which has mostly been attributed to the structure of the eggshell. The main aim of this study was to investigate the morphology and the morphometry of the ostrich eggshell using micro-focus X-ray computer tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The mean weight and volume of the eggs were 1,312 ± 56SE g and 1,333 ± 44SE cm(3) , respectively. The mean thickness and the mean surface area of the eggshell was 1.83 ± 0.10SE mm and 619 ± 15SE cm(2) respectively and the mean total number of pores in the shell was 40,596 ± 1832SE. No significant correlations were found between the thickness of the shell and the weight of the eggs, the volume of the egg and the thickness of the shell, the diameter of the pores and the number of pores, the volume of the pores and the number of pores or the surface area of the pores and the number of pores. The mean diameters of the pores on the blunt (air cell) - (0.02 ± 0.04SE mm) and the sharp (0.26 ± 0.36SE mm) parts of the eggshell were significantly different (P = 0.0001) while the mean volumes and the surface areas of the pores in these parts were not significantly different (P = 0.203 and P = 0.089, respectively). The sizes of the pores differed in different parts of the eggshell, which consisted mainly of tightly arranged mammillary cones that that fused to the palisade columns. The external surface of the ostrich eggshell was covered by a cuticle. Anat Rec, 299:1015-1026, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27097768

  13. Renal Medullary and Cortical Correlates in Fibrosis, Epithelial Mass, Microvascularity, and Microanatomy Using Whole Slide Image Analysis Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Alton B.; Ellis, Carla L.; Rogers, Thomas E.; Lawson, Diane; Cohen, Cynthia; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial injury often leads to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA is typically assessed in the renal cortex and can be objectively quantitated with computerized image analysis (IA). However, the human medulla accounts for a substantial proportion of the nephron; therefore, medullary scarring will have important cortical consequences and may parallel overall chronic renal injury. Trichrome, periodic acid–Schiff (PAS), and collagen III immunohistochemistry (IHC) were visually examined and quantitated on scanned whole slide images (WSIs) (N = 67 cases). When tuned to measure fibrosis, IA of trichrome and Trichrome-PAS (T-P) WSIs correlated for all anatomic compartments (among cortex, medulla, and entire tissue, r = 0.84 to 0.89, P all <0.0001); and collagen III deposition correlated between compartments (r = 0.69 to 0.89, P <0.0001 to 0.0002); however, trichrome and T-P measures did not correlate with collagen deposition, suggesting heterogeneous contributions to extracellular matrix deposition. Epithelial cell mass (EPCM) correlated between cortex and medulla when measured with cytokeratin IHC and with the trichrome red portion (r = 0.85 and 0.66, respectively, all P < 0.0001). Visual assessment also correlated between compartments for fibrosis and EPCM. Correlations were found between increasing medullary inner stripe (IS) width and fibrosis in all of the tissue and the medulla by trichrome morphometry (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.48, P = 0.00008, respectively). Weak correlations were found between increasing IS width and decreasing visual assessment of all tissue EPCM. Microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel area (MVA) measured using a MVD algorithm applied to CD34 IHC correlated significantly between all compartments (r = 0.76 to 0.87 for MVD and 0.71 to 0.87 for MVA, P all < 0.0001). Overall, these findings demonstrate the interrelatedness of the cortex and medulla and the importance of considering the renal

  14. Effect of Non-rigid Registration Algorithms on Deformation Based Morphometry: A Comparative Study with Control and Williams Syndrome Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhaoying; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-01-01

    Deformation Based Morphometry (DBM) is a widely used method for characterizing anatomical differences across groups. DBM is based on the analysis of the deformation fields generated by non-rigid registration algorithms, which warp the individual volumes to a DBM atlas. Although several studies have compared non-rigid registration algorithms for segmentation tasks, few studies have compared the effect of the registration algorithms on group differences that may be uncovered through DBM. In this study, we compared group atlas creation and DBM results obtained with five well-established non-rigid registration algorithms using thirteen subjects with Williams Syndrome (WS) and thirteen Normal Control (NC) subjects. The five non-rigid registration algorithms include: (1) The Adaptive Bases Algorithm (ABA); (2) The Image Registration Toolkit (IRTK); (3) The FSL Nonlinear Image Registration Tool (FSL); (4) The Automatic Registration Tool (ART); and (5) the normalization algorithm available in SPM8. Results indicate that the choice of algorithm has little effect on the creation of group atlases. However, regions of differences between groups detected with DBM vary from algorithm to algorithm both qualitatively and quantitatively. The unique nature of the data set used in this study also permits comparison of visible anatomical differences between the groups and regions of difference detected by each algorithm. Results show that the interpretation of DBM results is difficult. Four out of the five algorithms we have evaluated detect bilateral differences between the two groups in the insular cortex, the basal ganglia, orbitofrontal cortex, as well as in the cerebellum. These correspond to differences that have been reported in the literature and that are visible in our samples. But our results also show that some algorithms detect regions that are not detected by the others and that the extent of the detected regions varies from algorithm to algorithm. These results suggest

  15. Reduced gray matter volume in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex and thalamus as a function of mild depressive symptoms: a voxel-based morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, C. A.; Weber, M.; Mundy, E. A.; Killgore, W. D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies investigating structural brain abnormalities in depression have typically employed a categorical rather than dimensional approach to depression [i.e. comparing subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-defined major depressive disorder (MDD) v. healthy controls]. The National Institute of Mental Health, through their Research Domain Criteria initiative, has encouraged a dimensional approach to the study of psychopathology as opposed to an over-reliance on categorical (e.g. DSM-based) diagnostic approaches. Moreover, subthreshold levels of depressive symptoms (i.e. severity levels below DSM criteria) have been found to be associated with a range of negative outcomes, yet have been relatively neglected in neuroimaging research. Method To examine the extent to which depressive symptoms – even at subclinical levels – are linearly related to gray matter volume reductions in theoretically important brain regions, we employed whole-brain voxel-based morphometry in a sample of 54 participants. Results The severity of mild depressive symptoms, even in a subclinical population, was associated with reduced gray matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, thalamus, superior temporal gyrus/temporal pole and superior frontal gyrus. A conjunction analysis revealed concordance across two separate measures of depression. Conclusions Reduced gray matter volume in theoretically important brain regions can be observed even in a sample that does not meet DSM criteria for MDD, but who nevertheless report relatively elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight the need for additional research using dimensional conceptual and analytic approaches, as well as further investigation of subclinical populations. PMID:25066703

  16. Morphometry of Alluvial Fans in a Polar Desert (Svalbard, Norway): Implications for Interpreting Martian Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauber, E.; Preusker, F.; Trauthan, F.; Reiss, D.; Zanetti, M.; Jaumann, R.; Hiesinger, H.

    2009-04-01

    Alluvial fan-like landforms have been identified on Mars [e.g., 1-3]. Alluvial fans contain information on several controlling factors (tectonism, climate, lithology/geology), and therefore the investigation of possible Martian fans can reveal information about the planet`s climate. In lieu of direct observations of active depositional processes on Martian fans, comparisons with terrestrial analogues can constrain models of Martian fan formation derived from remote sensing data. Since present-day Mars is cold and dry, alluvial fans formed in cold deserts should be considered as useful analogues. The probably closest climatic analogue to Mars on Earth are the Antarctic Dry Valleys [5], but polar deserts can also be found in the Arctic. We report on our field work in summer 2008 and a simultaneous flight campaign with an airborne version (HRSC-AX) of the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard Mars Express [6]. The results are compared with measurements of Martian fans, based on HRSC DEM. Our study area is in Svalbard near Longyearbyen (78°13'0"N, 15°38'0"E), around mountains of Mesozoic layered sandstones and shales) on the northern side of Adventfjorden. Climate data are available from the nearby Longyearbyen airport (just a few km from the study area). The present climate is arctic [7], with low mean annual air temperatures and very low precipitation, mostly as snow. Stereo images acquired in July 2008 (at the end of the snow melting season) were processed to orthoimages with a spatial resolution of 20 cm/pixel, and corresponding Digital Elevation Models (DEM) with a grid spacing of 50 cm/pixel. Simultaneous field measurements focused on channels and levees (widths, depths, heights), which were determined at vertical increments of 10 m, together with the local slope. Alluvial fans in the study area are present on slopes of all orientations. They typically coalesce into bajadas. Basically all alluvial fans in the study area are characterized by sinuous

  17. Morphometry, ultrastructure, myosin isoforms, and metabolic capacities of the "mini muscles" favoured by selection for high activity in house mice.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Houle-Leroy, Philippe; Diffee, Gary M; Camp, Dana M; Garland, Theodore

    2006-07-01

    Prolonged selective breeding of mice (Mus musculus) for high levels of voluntary wheel running has favoured an unusual phenotype ("mini muscles"), apparently caused by a single Mendelian recessive allele, in which most hind-limb muscles are markedly reduced in mass, but have increased mass-specific activities of mitochondrial enzymes. We examined whether these changes reflect changes in fibre size, number or ultrastructure in normal and "mini-muscle" mice within the two (of four) selectively bred lines (lab designations L3 and L6) that exhibit the phenotype at generations 26 and 27. In both lines, the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles are smaller in mass (by >50% and 20%, respectively) in affected individuals. The mass-specific activities of mitochondrial enzymes in the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles were increased in the mini phenotype in both lines, with stronger effects in the gastrocnemius muscle. In the gastrocnemius, the % myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb was reduced by 50% in L3 and by 30% in L6, whereas the % MHC IIa and I were higher, particularly in L3. Fibre number in the plantaris muscle did not significantly differ between mini and normal muscles, although muscle mass was a significant positive correlate of fibre number. Small fibres were more abundant in mini than normal muscles in L3. Mitochondrial volume density was significantly higher in mini than normal muscle fibres in L3, but not in L6. Microscopy revealed a surprising attribute of the mini muscles: an abundance of small, minimally differentiated, myofibril-containing cells positioned in a disorderly fashion, particularly in the surface layer. We hypothesise that these unusual cells may be satellite cells or type IIb fibres that did not complete their differentiation. Together, these observations suggest that mice with the mini phenotype have reduced numbers of type IIb fibres in many of their hind-limb muscles, leading to a decrease in mass and an increase in mass-specific aerobic capacity

  18. Topography and morphometry of the common bile duct and major duodenal papilla of man and principal domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M M; Islam, M N; Khalil, M M; Khan, Z I; Adiluzzaman, A A; Hossain, M I

    2005-01-01

    A comparative topography and morphometry of the common bile duct and major duodenal papilla was studied on the extrahepatic biliary apparatus of human and major domesticated animals such as horse, ox, Black Bengal (BB) goat, sheep, dog and cat of local breed. In Black Bengal goat, sheep, dog and cat, the extrahepatic biliary system seemed to be the continuation of the cystic duct, which was found to continue as the common hepatic/common bile duct into which all the hepatic/lobar ducts open. In man, the mean length and the mean diameter of the common bile duct were 7.67+/-0.58 cm. and 7.27+/-0.77 mm. respectively. In the ox, these values were 1.57+/-0.72 cm. and 11.82+/-0.79 mm. respectively; in the Black Bengal goat, 7.23+/-0.74 cm. and 4.45+/-0.72 mm. respectively; in the sheep, 5.27+/-0.66 cm. and 3.75+/-0.79 mm. respectively; in the dog, 4.72+/-0.67 cm. and 6.43+/-0.55 mm. respectively and in the cat, 3.26+/-0.87 cm. and 5.63+/-0.43 mm. respectively. In man, the mean length and the mean diameter at the base of the MDP were 4.37+/-0.56 mm. and 3.97+/-0.72 mm. respectively. In horse, these were 52.36+/-0.67 mm. and 12.47+/-0.63 mm. respectively; in ox, 12.53+/-0.73 mm. and 8.83+/-0.68 mm. respectively; in Black Bengal goat, 14.36+/-0.55 mm. and 5.23+/-0.57 mm. respectively; in sheep, 11.27+/-0.69 mm. and 4.51+/-0.74 mm. respectively; in dog, 17.43+/-0.82 mm. and 6.72+/-0.64 mm. respectively and in cat, these values were 12.36+/-0.47 mm. and 7.12+/-0.87 mm. The distance of the Major Duodenal Papilla (MDP) form the pyloric end of the stomach was proportionately shorter in the meat-eaters, i.e., the omnivorous man (9.76+/-0.88 cm), and the carnivores, dog (6.37+/-0.73 cm) and cat (2.75+/-0.87 cm.) when compared to that of the herbivores, i.e., ox (55.37+/-0.68 cm.), BB goat (23.27+/-0.89 cm.) and sheep (25.62+/-0.77 cm.). In the horse, the major duodenal papilla was perpendicular to the duodenal mucosal surface with the largest mean length and the mean diameter. In

  19. Bias in Estimation of Hippocampal Atrophy using Deformation-Based Morphometry Arises from Asymmetric Global Normalization: An Illustration in ADNI 3 Tesla MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.; Avants, Brian B.; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Pluta, John; Altinay, Murat; Craige, Caryne

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of brain change due to neurodegenerative disease and treatment is one of the fundamental tasks of neuroimaging. Deformation-based morphometry (DBM) has been long recognized as an effective and sensitive tool for estimating the change in the volume of brain regions over time. This paper demonstrates that a straightforward application of DBM to estimate the change in the volume of the hippocampus can result in substantial bias, i.e., an overestimation of the rate of change in hippocampal volume. In ADNI data, this bias is manifested as a non-zero intercept of the regression line fitted to the 6 and 12 month rates of hippocampal atrophy. The bias is further confirmed by applying DBM to repeat scans of subjects acquired on the same day. This bias appears to be the result of asymmetry in the interpolation of baseline and followup images during longitudinal image registration. Correcting this asymmetry leads to bias-free atrophy estimation. PMID:20005963

  20. Numerical Transcoding Proficiency in 10-Year-Old Schoolchildren is Associated with Gray Matter Inter-Individual Differences: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Amélie; Rossi, Sandrine; Simon, Grégory; Lanoë, Céline; Leroux, Gaëlle; Poirel, Nicolas; Pineau, Arlette; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Are individual differences in numerical performance sustained by variations in gray matter volume in schoolchildren? To our knowledge, this challenging question for neuroeducation has not yet been investigated in typical development. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry method to search for possible structural brain differences between two groups of 10-year-old schoolchildren (N = 22) whose performance differed only in numerical transcoding between analog and symbolic systems. The results indicated that children with low numerical proficiency have less gray matter volume in the parietal (particularly in the left intraparietal sulcus and the bilateral angular gyri) and occipito-temporal areas. All the identified regions have previously been shown to be functionally involved in transcoding between analog and symbolic numerical systems. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the intertwined relationships between mathematics learning and brain structure in healthy schoolchildren. PMID:23630510

  1. Numerical Transcoding Proficiency in 10-Year-Old Schoolchildren is Associated with Gray Matter Inter-Individual Differences: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Amélie; Rossi, Sandrine; Simon, Grégory; Lanoë, Céline; Leroux, Gaëlle; Poirel, Nicolas; Pineau, Arlette; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Are individual differences in numerical performance sustained by variations in gray matter volume in schoolchildren? To our knowledge, this challenging question for neuroeducation has not yet been investigated in typical development. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry method to search for possible structural brain differences between two groups of 10-year-old schoolchildren (N = 22) whose performance differed only in numerical transcoding between analog and symbolic systems. The results indicated that children with low numerical proficiency have less gray matter volume in the parietal (particularly in the left intraparietal sulcus and the bilateral angular gyri) and occipito-temporal areas. All the identified regions have previously been shown to be functionally involved in transcoding between analog and symbolic numerical systems. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the intertwined relationships between mathematics learning and brain structure in healthy schoolchildren. PMID:23630510

  2. Density abnormalities in normal-appearing gray matter in the middle-aged brain with white matter hyperintense lesions: a DARTEL-enhanced voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Li, Shenhong; Zhuang, Ying; Liu, Xiaojia; Wu, Lin; Gong, Honghan; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Fuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is known about the structural alterations within gray matter (GM) in middle-aged subjects with white matter hyperintense (WMH) lesions. Here, we aimed to examine the anatomical changes within the GM and their relationship to WMH lesion loads in middle-aged subjects. Participants and methods Twenty-three middle-aged subjects with WMH lesions (WMH group) and 23 demographically matched healthy control subjects participated in the study. A Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Liealgebra-enhanced voxel-based morphometry was used to measure the GM density, and the correlations between WMH lesion volume and extracted GM values in abnormal regions were identified by voxel-based morphometry analysis. Results Compared with the healthy control subjects, the WMH group had a significantly decreased GM density in the left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, left and right premotor cortex, and left and right middle cingulate cortex and an increased GM density in the bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, right temporoparietal junction, left and right prefrontal cortex (PFC), and left inferior parietal lobule. A relationship was observed between the normalized WMH lesion volume and the decreased GM density, including the left middle frontal gyrus (ρ=−0.629, P=0.002), bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ρ=−0.507, P=0.019), right middle cingulate cortex (ρ=−0.484, P=0.026), and right premotor cortex (ρ=−0.438, P=0.047). The WMH lesion loads also negatively correlated with increased GM density in the right temporoparietal junction (ρ=−0.484, P=0.026), left PFC (ρ=−0.469, P=0.032), and right PFC (ρ=−0.438, P=0.047). Conclusion We observed that lesion load-associated structural plasticity corresponds to bidirectional changes in regional GM density in the WMH group. PMID:27274211

  3. Virtual CT morphometry of lower limb long bones for estimation of the sex and stature using postmortem Japanese adult data in forensic identification.

    PubMed

    Hishmat, Asmaa Mohammed; Michiue, Tomomi; Sogawa, Nozomi; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Takaki; Fawzy, Irene Atef; Hashem, Mohamed Abdel Mohsen; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    The application of computed tomography (CT) is useful for the documentation of whole-body anatomical data on routine autopsy, virtual reconstruction of skeletal structure, objective measurements, and reassessment by repetitive analyses. In addition, CT data processing facilitates volumetric and radiographic density analyses. Furthermore, a recently developed automated analysis system markedly improved the performance and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. The present study investigated virtual CT morphometry of lower limb long bones, including the femur, tibia, fibula, and first metatarsus, to estimate the sex and stature using postmortem CT data of forensic autopsy cases of Japanese over 19 years of age (total n = 259, 150 males and 109 females). Bone mass volumes, lengths, and total CT attenuation values of bilateral femurs, tibias, and fibulas correlated with the stature; however, the mean CT attenuation (HU) values showed age-dependent decreases. Correlations with the stature were similar for the lengths and mass volumes of the femur, tibia, and fibula (r = 0.77-0.85) but were higher for the mass volume of the first metatarsus (r = 0.77 for right and r = 0.58 for left). In addition, the ratio of the bone volume to the length of each bone showed the most significant sex-related differences (males > females with accuracy of 75.8-98.1 %). These findings indicate the usefulness of virtual CT morphometry of individual lower limb long bones, including volumetry, to estimate the sex and stature in identification. PMID:26156452

  4. Assessment of pingo distribution and morphometry using an IfSAR derived digital surface model, western Arctic Coastal Plain, Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Grosse, G.; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Arp, C.D.; Walker, S.; Beck, R.A.; Galloway, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Pingos are circular to elongate ice-cored mounds that form by injection and freezing of pressurized water in near-surface permafrost. Here we use a digital surface model (DSM) derived from an airborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) system to assess the distribution and morphometry of pingos within a 40,000km2 area on the western Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. We have identified 1247 pingo forms in the study region, ranging in height from 2 to 21m, with a mean height of 4.6m. Pingos in this region are of hydrostatic origin, with 98% located within 995 drained lake basins, most of which are underlain by thick eolian sand deposits. The highest pingo density (0.18km-2) occurs where streams have reworked these deposits. Morphometric analyses indicate that most pingos are small to medium in size (<200m diameter), gently to moderately sloping (<30??), circular to slightly elongate (mean circularity index of 0.88), and of relatively low height (2 to 5m). However, 57 pingos stand higher than 10m, 26 have a maximum slope greater than 30??, and 42 are larger than 200m in diameter. Comparison with a legacy pingo dataset based on 1950s stereo-pair photography indicates that 66 may have partially or completely collapsed over the last half-century. However, we mapped over 400 pingos not identified in the legacy dataset, and identified only three higher than 2m to have formed between ca. 1955 and ca. 2005, indicating that caution should be taken when comparing contemporary and legacy datasets derived by different techniques. This comprehensive database of pingo location and morphometry based on an IfSAR DSM may prove useful for land and resource managers as well as aid in the identification of pingo-like features on Mars. ?? 2011.

  5. Assessment of pingo distribution and morphometry using an IfSAR derived digital surface model, western Arctic Coastal Plain, Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Grosse, Guido; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Arp, Christopher D.; Walker, Shane; Beck, Richard A.; Galloway, John P.

    2012-02-01

    Pingos are circular to elongate ice-cored mounds that form by injection and freezing of pressurized water in near-surface permafrost. Here we use a digital surface model (DSM) derived from an airborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) system to assess the distribution and morphometry of pingos within a 40,000 km 2 area on the western Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. We have identified 1247 pingo forms in the study region, ranging in height from 2 to 21 m, with a mean height of 4.6 m. Pingos in this region are of hydrostatic origin, with 98% located within 995 drained lake basins, most of which are underlain by thick eolian sand deposits. The highest pingo density (0.18 km - 2 ) occurs where streams have reworked these deposits. Morphometric analyses indicate that most pingos are small to medium in size (< 200 m diameter), gently to moderately sloping (< 30°), circular to slightly elongate (mean circularity index of 0.88), and of relatively low height (2 to 5 m). However, 57 pingos stand higher than 10 m, 26 have a maximum slope greater than 30°, and 42 are larger than 200 m in diameter. Comparison with a legacy pingo dataset based on 1950s stereo-pair photography indicates that 66 may have partially or completely collapsed over the last half-century. However, we mapped over 400 pingos not identified in the legacy dataset, and identified only three higher than 2 m to have formed between ca. 1955 and ca. 2005, indicating that caution should be taken when comparing contemporary and legacy datasets derived by different techniques. This comprehensive database of pingo location and morphometry based on an IfSAR DSM may prove useful for land and resource managers as well as aid in the identification of pingo-like features on Mars.

  6. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  7. Lava dome morphometry and geochronology of the youngest eruptive activity in Eastern Central Europe: Ciomadul (Csomád), East Carpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karátson, D.; Telbisz, T.; Harangi, Sz.; Magyari, E.; Kiss, B.; Dunkl, I.; Veres, D.; Braun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic evolution of the Ciomadul (Csomád) lava dome complex, site of the youngest (Late Pleistocene, late Marine Isotope Stage 3) eruptive activity in the Carpathians, has been studied by advanced morphometry and radiometric (U/Pb, U/He and 14C) geochronology. The volcano produced alternating effusive and intermittent explosive eruptions from individual domes, typical of common andesitic-dacitic lava domes. A comparative morphometry shows steep ≥30° mean slopes of domes' upper flank and the Csomád domes fit well to the 100-200 ka domes worldwide. Morphometric ages obtained from the mean slope vs age precipitation correlation results in ≤100 ka ages. The morphometric approach is supported by U/Pb and U/He chronology: preliminary results of zircon dating indicate ages ranging between 200(250) and 30 ka. The youngest ages of the data set obtained both from lavas and pumiceous pyroclastics argue for a more or less coeval effusive and explosive volcanism. Based also on volcanological data, we propose vulcanian eruptions and explosive dome collapses especially toward the end of volcanic activity. Moreover, radiometric chronology suggests that, possibly subsequently to the peripheral domes, a central lava dome complex built up ≤100 ka ago. This dome complex, exhibiting even more violent, up to sub-plinian explosions, emplaced pumiceous pyroclastic flow and fall deposits as far as 17 km. We propose that the explosive activity produced caldera-forming eruptions as well, creating a half-caldera. This caldera rim is manifested by the asymmetric morphology of the central edifice: the present-day elevated ridge of Ciomadul Mare (Nagy Csomád), encompassing the twin craters of Mohoş (Mohos) peat bog and Sf. Ana (Szent [St.] Anna). These latter craters may have been formed subsequently, ca. ~100-30 ka ago, after the caldera formation. Drilling of lacustrine sediments in the St. Anna crater shows that beneath the Holocene gyttja several meters of Late Pleistocene

  8. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  9. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis of regional grey and white matter volume abnormalities within the speech production network of children who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Gracco, Vincent L.; Brettschneider, Jane; Kroll, Robert M.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that neuroanatomical differences exist between adults who stutter and their fluently speaking peers. Specifically, adults who stutter have been found to have more grey matter volume (GMV) in speech relevant regions including inferior frontal gyrus, insula and superior temporal gyrus (Beal et al., 2007; Song et al., 2007). Despite stuttering having its onset in childhood only one study has investigated the neuroanatomical differences between children who do and do not stutter. Chang et al. (2008) reported children who stutter had less GMV in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and middle temporal gyrus relative to fluently speaking children. Thus it appears that children who stutter present with unique neuroanatomical abnormalities as compared to those of adults who stutter. In order to better understand the neuroanatomical correlates of stuttering earlier in its development, near the time of onset, we used voxel-based morphometry to examine volumetric differences between 11 children who stutter and 11 fluent children. Children who stutter had less GMV in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left putamen but more GMV in right Rolandic operculum and superior temporal gyrus relative to fluent children. Children who stutter also had less white matter volume bilaterally in the forceps minor of the corpus callosum. We discuss our findings of widespread anatomic abnormalities throughout the cortical network for speech motor control within the context of the speech motor skill limitations identified in people who stutter (Namasivayam and van Lieshout, 2008; Smits-Bandstra et al., 2006). PMID:23140891

  10. Small animal bone density and morphometry analysis with a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry bone densitometer using a 2D digital radiographic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudousq, V.; Bordy, T.; Gonon, G.; Dinten, J. M.

    2005-04-01

    The LEXXOS (DMS, Montpellier, France) is the first axial and total body cone beam bone densitometer using a 2D digital radiographic detector. Technical principles and performances for BMD measurements have been presented in previous papers. Bone densitometers are also used on small animals for drug development. In this paper, we show how the LEXXOS system can be adapted to small animals examinations, and its performances are evaluated. At first, in order to take advantage of the whole area of the digital flat panel X-ray detector, the geometrical configuration has been adapted. Secondly, as small animals present low BMD, a specific dual energy calibration has been defined. This adapted system has then been evaluated on two sets of mice: six reference mice and six ovariectomized mice. Each month, these two populations have been examined and the total body BMD has been measured. This evaluation has shown that the right order of BMD magnitude has been obtained and, as expected, BMD increases on the two sets until age of puberty and after this period, decreases significantly for the ovariectomized set. Moreover, the bone image obtained by dual energy processing on LEXXOS presents a radiographic image quality providing with useful complementary information on bone morphometry and architecture.

  11. Effects of fructans-containing yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius Poepp and Endl.) flour on caecum mucosal morphometry, calcium and magnesium balance, and bone calcium retention in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Alexandre R; Colli, Célia; Alvares, Eliana P; Filisetti, Tullia M C C

    2007-04-01

    Yacon roots have been considered a functional food due to the high levels of fructans they contains. In the present study, Ca and Mg balance, bone mass and strength, and caecum mucosal morphometry were evaluated. Growing male Wistar rats (n 24) were fed ad libitum control diets or diets supplemented with yacon flour (5 or 7.5 % fructooligosaccharides) for 27 d. Mineral balance was evaluated in three periods of 5 d (starting on the 4th, 10th and 16th days). After the rats were killled, the bones were removed and bone mineral density was measured. Ca analyses were performed on left femurs and tibias and biomechanical testing on right femurs. The caecum was removed and tissue samples were collected for histological analysis. Caecal histology changed noticeably in rats fed yacon flour: there was an increase in the depth and number of total and bifurcated crypts as well. Yacon flour consumption significantly (P < 0.05) resulted in a positive Ca and Mg balance, leading to higher values of bone mineral retention and biomechanical properties (peak load and stiffness) when compared to the control group. The positive effects on mineral intestinal absorption, bone mass and biomechanical properties showed an important role of yacon roots in the maintenance of healthy bones. The increased number of bifurcating crypts might be related to the higher mineral absorption caused by the enlargement of the absorbing surface in the large intestine of the animals. PMID:17349092

  12. FKBP5 is associated with amygdala volume in the human brain and mood state: A voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hirofumi; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Muronaga, Masaaki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Inoue, Ayako; Oshita, Harumi; Aizawa, Saeko; Masuda, Koji; Higuma, Haruka; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Ninomiya, Taiga; Kawano, Yoshihisa

    2016-06-01

    The present study was to investigate the effects of 6 FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on brain structure using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the psychological tests to psychological stress. We genotyped 112 healthy controls with respect to 6 SNPs (rs) of FKBP5. We examined the Beck Depression Inventory and the State (STAI-S) and Trait (STAI-T) versions of the Spielberger Anxiety Inventory and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) to evaluate mood. The right amygdala was larger in subjects with the minor allele (C) of rs3800373 and rs992105 and the minor allele (T) of rs1360780. The right middle orbitofrontal region in those with the minor allele (C) of rs3800373 and the right inferior orbitofrontal region in those with the minor allele (T) of rs9470080 was larger. Both the amygdala volumes were associated significantly with FKBP5 SNPs. We found significant relationships between factors in POMS and the right and left amygdala and left insula. Our results suggest that FKBP5 SNPs are associated with the alternations of volumes in right amygdala and the right middle and inferior orbitofrontal region. Genetic variants of FKBP5 may be associated with depressive and anxiety state