Science.gov

Sample records for mosaicism

  1. Mosaicism

    MedlinePlus

    ... A diagnosis of mosaicism may cause confusion and uncertainty. A genetic counselor may help answer any questions ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  2. Garden Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Ann Marie; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes Garden Mosaics, a program funded by the National Science Foundation. Garden Mosaics combines science learning with intergenerational mentoring, multicultural understanding, and community service. The program's mission is "connecting youth and elders to explore the mosaics of plants, people, and cultures in gardens, to learn…

  3. Mosaic Horses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudecki, Maryanna

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a lesson inspired by Sicilian mosaics. The author first presented a PowerPoint presentation of mosaics from the Villa Romana del Casale and reviewed complementary and analogous colors. Students then created mosaics using a variety of art materials. They presented their work to their peers and discussed the thought and…

  4. Mosaic RASopathies

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Christian; Groesser, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    “RASopathies” are a group of developmental syndromes with partly overlapping clinical symptoms that are caused by germline mutations of genes within the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Mutations affecting this pathway can also occur in a mosaic state, resulting in congenital syndromes often distinct from those generated by the corresponding germline mutations. For syndromes caused by mosaic mutations of the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway, the term “mosaic RASopathies” has been proposed. In the following article, genetic and phenotypic aspects of mosaic RASopathies will be discussed. PMID:23255105

  5. Hellas Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic comprises about 50 red-, green-, and violet-filter Viking Orbiter images, mosaiced in an orthographic projection at a scale of 1 km/pixel. The images were acquired in 1980 during late northern summer on Mars. The mosaic covers the region from latitude -70 degrees to 50 degrees and longitude 260 degrees to 360 degrees. The bright white region near the bottom of the image is due to carbon dioxide frost in the Hellas impact basin, which is about 2000 km in diameter. The bright yellow region at top is the Arabia region of Mars.

  6. Mosaic Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldauf, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    Through the generosity of a Lowes Toolbox for Education Grant and a grant from the Bill Graham Foundation, an interdisciplinary mosaic mural was created and installed at Riverview Middle School in Bay Point, California. The actual mural, which featured a theme of nurturing students through music, art, sports, science, and math, took about three…

  7. EUVI Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A mosaic of the extreme ultraviolet images from the STEREO Ahead observatory's SECCHI/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope taken on Dec. 4, 2006, its first day of imaging. These false color images show the sun's atmospheres at a range of different temperatures. Clockwise from top left: 1 million degrees Kelvin (171 A), 1.5 million K (195 A), 60,000-80,000 K (304 A), 2.5 million K (286 A).

  8. Triton mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This picture of Triton is a mosaic of the highest resolution images taken by Voyager 2 on Aug. 25, 1989 from a distance of about 40,000 kilometers (24,800 miles). The mosaic is superimposed on the lower resolution mapping images taken about 2 hours earlier in order to fill in gaps between high resolution images. The smallest features that can be seen on the images are about 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles) across. The terminator (line separating day and night) is at the top of the picture and is centered at about 30 degrees north latitude and 330 degrees longitude. These highest resolution images were targeted for the terminator region to show details of the topography by the shadows it casts. Near the center of the picture is a depression filled with smooth plains that are probably ices which were once erupted in a fluid state. The depth of the depression is about 300 meters (900 feet) and the prominent fresh impact crater on its floor is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter and about 1 kilometer (0.6 mile) deep. On the right is an elongate crater with adjacent dark deposits above it. This feature may be an explosive eruption vent formed by gaps within the ice. The linear structure on the left is probably a fracture along which fresh ice has been extruded. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  9. Mosaic aging

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lary C.; Herndon, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although all multicellular organisms undergo structural and functional deterioration with age, senescence is not a uniform process. Rather, each organism experiences a constellation of changes that reflect the heterogeneous effects of age on molecules, cells, organs and systems, an idiosyncratic pattern that we refer to as mosaic aging. Varying genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors (local and extrinsic) contribute to the aging phenotype in a given individual, and these agents influence the type and rate of functional decline, as well as the likelihood of developing age-associated afflictions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying key factors that drive aging, clarifying their activities in different systems, and in particular understanding how they interact will enhance our comprehension of the aging process, and could yield insights into the permissive role that senescence plays in the emergence of acute and chronic diseases of the elderly. PMID:20110150

  10. Raspberry Mosaic Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry mosaic disease (RMD) is an overarching term used to describe a range of diseases caused by various combinations of different viruses that are each transmitted by aphids. In the scientific literature RMD has been given various alternative names, including red raspberry mosaic, type b mosaic...

  11. North America Mosaic

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Natural Color Mosaic of North America     View Larger ... at lower right. In addition to the contiguous United States, the scene spans from British Columbia in the northwest to Newfoundland ...

  12. Mosaic image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Kapil A.; Reeves, Stanley J.

    2005-02-01

    Most consumer-level digital cameras use a color filter array to capture color mosaic data followed by demosaicking to obtain full-color images. However, many sophisticated demosaicking algorithms are too complex to implement on-board a camera. To use these algorithms, one must transfer the mosaic data from the camera to a computer without introducing compression losses that could generate artifacts in the demosaicked image. The memory required for losslessly stored mosaic images severely restricts the number of images that can be stored in the camera. Therefore, we need an algorithm to compress the original mosaic data losslessly so that it can later be transferred intact for demosaicking. We propose a new lossless compression technique for mosaic images in this paper. Ordinary image compression methods do not apply to mosaic images because of their non-canonical color sampling structure. Because standard compression methods such as JPEG, JPEG2000, etc. are already available in most digital cameras, we have chosen to build our algorithms using a standard method as a key part of the system. The algorithm begins by separating the mosaic image into 3 color (RGB) components. This is followed by an interpolation or down-sampling operation--depending on the particular variation of the algorithm--that makes all three components the same size. Using the three color components, we form a color image that is coded with JPEG. After appropriately reformatting the data, we calculate the residual between the original image and the coded image and then entropy-code the residual values corresponding to the mosaic data.

  13. THEMIS Global Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, N. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2005-12-01

    We have developed techniques to make seamless, controlled global mosaics from the more than 50,000 multi-spectral infrared images of the Mars returned by the THEMIS instrument aboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. These images cover more than 95% of the surface at 100m/pixel resolution at both day and night local times. Uncertainties in the position and pointing of the spacecraft, varying local time, and imaging artifacts make creating well-registered mosaics from these datasets a challenging task. In preparation for making global mosaics, many full-resolution regional mosaics have been made. These mosaics typically cover an area 10x10 degrees or smaller, and are constructed from only a few hundred images. To make regional mosaics, individual images are geo-rectified using the USGS ISIS software. This dead-reckoning is sufficient to approximate position to within 400m in cases where the SPICE information was downlinked. Further coregistration of images is handled in two ways: grayscale differences minimization in overlapping regions through integer pixel shifting, or through automatic tie-point generation using a radial symmetry transformation (RST). The RST identifies points within an image that exhibit 4-way symmetry. Martian craters tend to to be very radially symmetric, and the RST can pin-point a crater center to sub-pixel accuracy in both daytime and nighttime images, independent of lighting, time of day, or seasonal effects. Additionally, the RST works well on visible-light images, and in a 1D application, on MOLA tracks, to provide precision tie-points across multiple data sets. The RST often finds many points of symmetry that aren't related to surface features. These "false-hits" are managed using a clustering algorithm that identifies constellations of points that occur in multiple images, independent of scaling or other affine transformations. This technique is able to make use of data in which the "good" tie-points comprise even less than 1% of total

  14. MOSAIC: a new wavefront metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-02-02

    MOSAIC is a new wavefront metrology that enables complete wavefront characterization from print or aerial image based measurements. Here we describe MOSAIC and verify its utility with a model-based proof of principle.

  15. Callisto Scarp Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic of two images shows an area within the Valhalla region on Jupiter's moon, Callisto. North is to the top of the mosaic and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The smallest details that can be discerned in this picture are knobs and small impact craters about 155 meters (170 yards) across. The resolution is 46 meters (50 yards) per picture element, and the mosaic covers an area approximately 33 kilometers (20 miles) across. A prominent fault scarp crosses the mosaic. This scarp is one of many structural features that form the Valhalla multi-ring structure, which has a diameter of 4,000 kilometers (2,485 miles). Scientists believe Valhalla is the result of a large impact early in the history of Callisto. Several smaller ridges are found parallel to the prominent scarp. Numerous impact craters ranging in size from 155 meters (170 yards) to 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) are seen in the mosaic. The images which form this mosaic were obtained by the solid state imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on Nov. 4, 1996 (Universal Time).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  16. Large-Scale Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Greater Latrobe Senior High School in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, is a school where art is supported both by the administration and the local community. While the school was undergoing renovations, this author was given the task of creating a six-foot round mosaic in the entrance of the school. The design was to be student-created and was to represent…

  17. Middle East Mosaic

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... camera (right) are comprised of data covering World Reference System-2 paths 165-179 for the period August 16 - August 30, ... mosaic. Because these images are created from 400-kilometer wide orbital swaths acquired on different dates, discontinuities are visible ...

  18. Handmade Tile Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

  19. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  20. Moon - North Pole Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the Moon's north pole is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter as the spacecraft flew by on December 7, 1992. The left part of the Moon is visible from Earth; this region includes the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left); Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region.

  1. Mosaic of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This detailed mosaic of the underside of the Cassini Division was obtained by Voyager 1 with a resolution of about 10 kilometers. The classical Cassini Division appears here to the right of center as five bright rings with substantial blacks gap on either side. The inner edge of the A Ring, to the left of center, is the brightest part of this image. The fine-scale wave structure in this region has been interpreted as being the result of gravitational density waves.

  2. Callisto Crater Chain Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic of three images shows an area within the Valhalla region on Jupiter's moon, Callisto. North is to the top of the mosaic and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The smallest details that can be discerned in this picture are knobs and small impact craters about 160 meters (175 yards) across. The mosaic covers an area approximately 45 kilometers (28 miles) across. It shows part of a prominent crater chain located on the northern part of the Valhalla ring structure.

    Crater chains can form from the impact of material ejected from large impacts (forming secondary chains) or by the impact of a fragmented projectile, perhaps similar to the Shoemaker-Levy 9 cometary impacts into Jupiter in July 1994. It is believed this crater chain was formed by the impact of a fragmented projectile. The images which form this mosaic were obtained by the solid state imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on Nov. 4, 1996 (Universal Time).

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http:// www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  3. Mosaic of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mosaic of images of Io acquired during orbit C3, showing more than half of Io's surface. These are the best images available to show topographic features over most of this region. The map projection is called Simple Cylindrical, and the grid lines mark 10 degree intervals of latitude and longitude.

    The mosaic covers an area of about 8 million square kilometers, and the finest details that can discerned are about 2.5 kilometers in size. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The images which form this mosaic were obtained through the clear filter of the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on Nov. 6, 1996 (Universal Time) at a range which varied from 245,719 kilometers to 403,100 kilometers.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Effect of Sugarcane Mosaic caused by Sorghum mosaic virus on sugarcane in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane mosaic is caused by two viruses, Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCVM) or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV). In Louisiana, SrMV is the predominant mosaic pathogen affecting sugarcane. In a field experiment established in 2012, plots were planted with seed cane with or without mosaic symptoms. The mosaic...

  5. In Situ Mosaic Brightness Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Lorre, Jean J.

    2012-01-01

    In situ missions typically have pointable, mast-mounted cameras, which are capable of taking panoramic mosaics comprised of many individual frames. These frames are mosaicked together. While the mosaic software applies radiometric correction to the images, in many cases brightness/contrast seams still exist between frames. This is largely due to errors in the radiometric correction, and the absence of correction for photometric effects in the mosaic processing chain. The software analyzes the overlaps between adjacent frames in the mosaic and determines correction factors for each image in an attempt to reduce or eliminate these brightness seams.

  6. Center of parcel with mosaics. Mosaics consist of everyday throwaway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Center of parcel with mosaics. Mosaics consist of everyday throwaway objects of all kinds set in concrete mortar on ground. Leaning Tower of Bottle Village in front of Rumpus Room primary façade with 12' scale (in tenths). Camera facing north. - Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village, 4595 Cochran Street, Simi Valley, Ventura County, CA

  7. Mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Christine; Schaffer, Julie V

    2008-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with numerous lentigines and multiple cafe-au-lait macules on both sides of the face, neck, and trunk as well as on the proximal area of the upper extremities and in the axillae. The pigmented lesions had a Blaschko-linear distribution on the upper trunk and were limited to the left side of the abdomen, with a sharp demarcation at the midline. Multiple, cutaneous neurofibromas were found on the trunk, and ophthalmologic examination showed a Lisch nodule in the left iris. The clinical findings and their widespread but segmental distribution were consistent with a diagnosis of mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1. PMID:18627742

  8. Global Mercator Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Io's volcanic plains are shown in this Voyager 1 image mosaic which covers the area roughly from latitude 60 degrees N. to latitude 60 degrees S. and longitude 100-345. North is up. Numerous volcanic calderas, lava flows, and volcanic eruption plumes are visible here. The composition of Io's volcanic plains and lava flows has not been determined, but they could consist dominantly of sulfur with surface frosts of sulfur dioxide or of silicates (such as basalt) encrusted with sulfur and sulfur dioxide condensates. The bright whitish patches probably consist of freshly deposited sulfur dioxide frost.

  9. Jovian Ring System Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired this mosaic of Jupiter's ring system (top) when the spacecraft was in Jupiter's shadow looking back toward the Sun. Jupiter's ring system (inset diagram) is composed of three parts: an outermost gossamer ring, a flat main ring, and an innermost donut-shaped halo. These rings are made up of dust-sized particles that are blasted off of the nearby inner satellites by small impacts. This image was taken on November 9, 1996 at a distance of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles).

  10. Rock Garden Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image mosaic of part of the 'Rock Garden' was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 71 (September 14). The rock 'Shark' is at left center and 'Half Dome' is at right. Fine-scale textures on the rocks are clearly seen. Broken crust-like material is visible at bottom center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  11. Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    Description Fact sheet introduces the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) with images from a section of the mosaic over McMurdo Station, descriptions of the four versions of LIMA, where to access and download LIMA, and a brief explanation of the Antarctic Web portal.

  12. Satellite Image Mosaic Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2006-01-01

    A computer program automatically builds large, full-resolution mosaics of multispectral images of Earth landmasses from images acquired by Landsat 7, complete with matching of colors and blending between adjacent scenes. While the code has been used extensively for Landsat, it could also be used for other data sources. A single mosaic of as many as 8,000 scenes, represented by more than 5 terabytes of data and the largest set produced in this work, demonstrated what the code could do to provide global coverage. The program first statistically analyzes input images to determine areas of coverage and data-value distributions. It then transforms the input images from their original universal transverse Mercator coordinates to other geographical coordinates, with scaling. It applies a first-order polynomial brightness correction to each band in each scene. It uses a data-mask image for selecting data and blending of input scenes. Under control by a user, the program can be made to operate on small parts of the output image space, with check-point and restart capabilities. The program runs on SGI IRIX computers. It is capable of parallel processing using shared-memory code, large memories, and tens of central processing units. It can retrieve input data and store output data at locations remote from the processors on which it is executed.

  13. Moon - 18 Image Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This mosaic picture of the Moon was compiled from 18 images taken with a green filter by Galileo's imaging system during the spacecraft's flyby on December 7, 1992, some 11 hours before its Earth flyby at 1509 UTC (7:09 a.m. Pacific Standard Time) December 8. The north polar region is near the top part of the mosaic, which also shows Mare Imbrium, the dark area on the left; Mare Serenitatis at center; and Mare Crisium, the circular dark area to the right. Bright crater rim and ray deposits are from Copernicus, an impact crater 96 kilometers (60 miles) in diameter. Computer processing has exaggerated the brightness of poorly illuminated features near the day/night terminator in the polar regions, giving a false impression of high reflectivity there. The digital image processing was done by DLR the German aerospace research establishment near Munich, an international collaborator in the Galileo mission. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  14. Dermatoglyphics in mosaic Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Priest, J H; Tishler, P V; Rosner, B

    1976-04-01

    To determine whether quanitative dermal indices are useful in ascertaining the liability for or severity of mosaic Down's syndrome (DS), dermatoglyphics of 107 subjects with proven 46/47,+21 DS were scored by four quantitative dermal indices. The distribution of mosaics by weighted mean percentage of +21 cells ranged from 1 to 95 and was bimodal. Mean maternal age at birth of mosaics (32.9 +/- 7.5 years) was elevated when compared with control maternal ages in the literature. The distribution of quantitative dermal indices for the total mosaic population fell roughly midway between those in the literature for normal and full DS individuals: 73% of mosaics were classified as definitively DS, 21% were in the intermediate range, and 6% were normal. For mosaics who were minimally affected, 24% were DS, 53% intermediate, and 23% normal. One can conclude: (1) For any suspect mosaic, a dermal score in the DS range is highly suggestive of karyotypic pathology. (2) The high prevalence of intermediate scores in normal subjects severely restricts their diagnostic value in screening for mosaics in the general population. For a selected population, such as parents of +21 children, the screening value of quantitative dermal indices remains an open question. Weighted regression analyses demonstrate a highly significant correlation (P less than 0.001) of dermal index score with the weighted mean proportion of +21 cells transformed to the logit scale. One may exploit this correlation to predict the ratio of +21/normal cells in infants, in whom early karyotype evolution can preclude an estimate of the ultimate syndrome based on initial degree of mosaicism. Furthermore, this correlation provides additional indirect evidence that dermal microsymptoms in DS are a reflection of the presence of +21 cells. PMID:131014

  15. Earth - Antarctica Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This color picture of the limb of the Earth, looking north past Antarctica, is a mosaic of 11 images taken during a ten-minute period near 5:45 p.m. PST Dec. 8, 1990, by Galileo's imaging system. Red, green and violet filters were used. The picture spans about 1,600 miles across the south polar latitudes of our planet. The morning day/night terminator is toward the right. The South Pole is out of sight below the picture; the visible areas of Antarctica are those lying generally south of South America. The violet-blue envelope of Earth's atmosphere is prominent along the limb to the left. At lower left, the dark blue Amundsen Sea lies to the left of the Walgreen and Bakutis Coasts. Beyond it, Peter Island reacts with the winds to produce a striking pattern of atmospheric waves.

  16. Reconfigurable mosaic annular arrays.

    PubMed

    Thomenius, Kai E; Wodnicki, Robert; Cogan, Scott D; Fisher, Rayette A; Burdick, Bill; Smith, L Scott; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Lin, Der-Song; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Bonitz, Barry; Davies, Todd; Thomas, Glen; Woychik, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Mosaic annular arrays (MAA) based on reconfigurable array (RA) transducer electronics assemblies are presented as a potential solution for future highly integrated ultrasonic transducer subsystems. Advantages of MAAs include excellent beam quality and depth of field resulting from superior elevational focus compared with 1-D electronically scanned arrays, as well as potentially reduced cost, size, and power consumption resulting from the use of a limited number of beamforming channels for processing a large number of subelements. Specific design tradeoffs for these highly integrated arrays are discussed in terms of array specifications for center frequency, element pitch, and electronic switch-on resistance. Large-area RAs essentially function as RC delay lines. Efficient architectures which take into account RC delay effects are presented. Architectures for integration of the transducer and electronics layers of large-area array implementations are reviewed. PMID:24960699

  17. Registration assisted mosaic generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, Jean J.; Handley, Thomas H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a general strategy for assembling mosaics from numerous individual images where uncertainty exists in the position and orientation of those images. Both of the presented applications relate to remotely operated camera platforms, the first being the Galileo solid state imaging (SSI) camera presently in orbit around Jupiter, and the second being the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) stereo camera on Mars. A basic strategy in both applications is to determine the correct relative camera pointing followed by direct map projection of the images. It is assumed that approximate camera pointing exists sufficient to locate adjacent images and to place initial tiepoints within reach of the correlator. Spatial correlation is used to fix tiepoints whose initial locations are predicted by the camera pointing. We use either an fast fourier transform (fft) algorithm or a variant of Gruen's scheme permitting limited image rotation and skew. The Gruen correlator has three hierarchical modes: 1) A classical spatial least squares correlation on integral pixel boundaries used when rotation is small. 2) An annealing non-deterministic search used when rotations are unknown. A simplex deterministic search used for the end game. The correlation operation can be performed either interactively or autonomously. The final camera pointing solution relies upon a simplex downhill search in 2n or 3n dimensions where n is the number of images comprising the mosaic and the objective function to be minimized is the disagreement between tiepoint locations predicted from the camera pointing with those observed by the correlator. For Galileo the 3n unknowns are euler angles defining camera pointing in planet coordinates, and for Mars Pathfinder they are 2n unknowns representing commanded azimuth and elevation in the Lander coordinate system.

  18. Tyrrhena Patera Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image of Tyrrhena Patera is a mosaic of daytime thermal infrared images colorized with a mosaic of nighttime temperature images (purple/blue is coldest, yellow/red is warmest).

    The colder nighttime temperatures (blue hues) in the caldera and on the flanks of the volcano indicate that this area is likely covered with finer-grained materals. This contrasts strongly against the warm (red) area to the northwest. These warmer temperatures indicate a rockier surface, possibly even exposed bedrock. This is especially probably where the red hues conform with the topography.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. The Viking Mosaic Catalog, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N.

    1982-01-01

    A collection of more than 500 mosaics prepared from Viking Orbiter images is given. Accompanying each mosaic is a footprint plot, which identifies by location, picture number, and order number, each frame in the mosaic. Corner coordinates and pertinent imaging information are also included. A short text provides the camera characteristics, image format, and data processing information necessary for using the mosaic plates as a research aide. Procedures for ordering mosaic enlargements and individual images are also provided.

  20. Mars Image Collection Mosaic Builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian; Hare, Trent

    2008-01-01

    A computer program assembles images from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) collection to generate a uniform-high-resolution, georeferenced, uncontrolled mosaic image of the Martian surface. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the mosaic covered 7 percent of the Martian surface and contained data from more than 50,000 source images acquired under various light conditions at various resolutions.

  1. Radar Mosaic of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is an image of equatorial Africa, centered on the equator at longitude 15degrees east. This image is a mosaic of almost 4,000 separate images obtained in 1996 by the L-band imaging radar onboard the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite. Using radar to penetrate the persistent clouds prevalent in tropical forests, the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite was able for the first time to image at high resolution this continental scale region during single flooding seasons. The area shown covers about 7.4 million square kilometers (2.8 million square miles) of land surface, spans more than 5,000 kilometers(3,100 miles) east and west and some 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles) north and south. North is up in this image. At the full resolution of the mosaic (100 meters or 330 feet), this image is more than 500 megabytes in size, and was processed from imagery totaling more than 60 gigabytes.

    Central Africa was imaged twice in 1996, once between January and March, which is the major low-flood season in the Congo Basin, and once between October and November, which is the major high-flood season in the Congo Basin. The red color corresponds to the data from the low-flood season, the green to the high-flood season, and the blue to the 'texture' of the low-flood data. The forests appear green as a result, the flooded and palm forests, as well as urban areas, appear yellow, the ocean and lakes appear black, and savanna areas appear blue, black or green, depending on the savanna type, surface topography and other factors. The areas of the image that are black and white were mapped only between January and March 1996. In these areas, the black areas are savanna or open water, the gray are forests, and the white areas are flooded forests or urban areas. The Congo River dominates the middle of the image, where the nearby forests that are periodically flooded by the Congo and its tributaries stand out as yellow. The Nile River flows north from Lake Victoria in the middle right of

  2. Full Jupiter Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image of Jupiter is produced from a 2x2 mosaic of photos taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), and assembled by the LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The telescopic camera snapped the images during a 3-minute, 35-second span on February 10, when the spacecraft was 29 million kilometers (18 million miles) from Jupiter. At this distance, Jupiter's diameter was 1,015 LORRI pixels -- nearly filling the imager's entire (1,024-by-1,024 pixel) field of view. Features as small as 290 kilometers (180 miles) are visible.

    Both the Great Red Spot and Little Red Spot are visible in the image, on the left and lower right, respectively. The apparent 'storm' on the planet's right limb is a section of the south tropical zone that has been detached from the region to its west (or left) by a 'disturbance' that scientists and amateur astronomers are watching closely.

    At the time LORRI took these images, New Horizons was 820 million kilometers (510 million miles) from home -- nearly 51/2 times the distance between the Sun and Earth. This is the last full-disk image of Jupiter LORRI will produce, since Jupiter is appearing larger as New Horizons draws closer, and the imager will start to focus on specific areas of the planet for higher-resolution studies.

  3. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  4. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  5. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  6. MOSAIC: Software for creating mosaics from collections of images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varosi, F.; Gezari, D. Y.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a powerful, versatile image processing and analysis software package called MOSAIC, designed specifically for the manipulation of digital astronomical image data obtained with (but not limited to) two-dimensional array detectors. The software package is implemented using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), and incorporates new methods for processing, calibration, analysis, and visualization of astronomical image data, stressing effective methods for the creation of mosaic images from collections of individual exposures, while at the same time preserving the photometric integrity of the original data. Since IDL is available on many computers, the MOSAIC software runs on most UNIX and VAX workstations with the X-Windows or Sun View graphics interface.

  7. Mars Digital Image Mosaic Globe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The photomosaic that forms the base for this globe was created by merging two global digital image models (DIM's) of Mars-a medium-resolution monochrome mosaic processed to emphasize topographic features and a lower resolution color mosaic emphasizing color and albedo variations.

    The medium-resolution (1/256 or roughly 231 m/pixel) monochromatic image model was constructed from about 6,000 images having resolutions of 150-350 m/pixel and oblique illumination (Sun 20 o -45 o above the horizon). Radiometric processing was intended to suppress or remove the effects of albedo variations through the use of a high-pass divide filter, followed by photometric normalization so that the contrast of a given topographic slope would be approximately the same in all images.

    The global color mosaic was assembled at 1/64 or roughly 864 m/pixel from about 1,000 red- and green-filter images having 500-1,000 m/pixel resolution. These images were first mosaiced in groups, each taken on a single orbit of the Viking spacecraft. The orbit mosaics were then processed to remove spatially and temporally varying atmospheric haze in the overlap regions. After haze removal, the per-orbit mosaics were photometrically normalized to equalize the contrast of albedo features and mosaiced together with cosmetic seam removal. The medium-resolution DIM was used for geometric control of this color mosaic. A green-filter image was synthesized by weighted averaging of the red- and violet-filter mosaics. Finally, the product seen here was obtained by multiplying each color image by the medium-resolution monochrome image. The color balance selected for images in this map series was designed to be close to natural color for brighter, redder regions, such as Arabia Terra and the Tharsis region, but the data have been stretched so that the relatively dark regions appear darker and less red than they actually are.

    The images are presented in a projection that portrays the entire surface of Mars in a

  8. Asgard Scarp Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Low-resolution color data were combined with a higher resolution mosaic to produce this infrared composite image of a pair of ancient multi-ringed impact basins on Jupiter's moon, Callisto. The region imaged is on the leading hemisphere of Callisto near 26 degrees north, 142 degrees west, and is almost 1,400 kilometers (860 miles) across. North is toward the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the surface from the east. Dominating the scene is the impact structure, Asgard, centered on the smooth, bright region near the middle of the picture and surrounded by concentric rings up to 1,700 kilometers (about 1,050 miles) in diameter. A second ringed structure with a diameter of about 500 kilometers (310 miles) can be seen to the north of Asgard, partially obscured by the more recent, bright-rayed crater, Burr. The icy materials excavated by the younger craters contrast sharply with the darker and redder coatings on older surfaces of Callisto.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on Dec. 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  9. Arsia Mons Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Arsia Mons is the southernmost of the Tharsis volcanoes. It is 270 miles in diameter, almost 12 miles high, and the summit caldera is 72 miles wide. For comparison, the largest volcano on Earth is Mauna Loa. From its base on the sea floor, Mauna Loa measures only 6.3 miles high and 75 miles in diameter. The image here is a mosaic of several daytime IR images. The indentations on the SW and NE sides align with the Pavonis Mons and Ascreaus Mons to the NE. This may indicate a large fracture/vent system was responsible for the eruptions that formed all three volcanoes.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Mosaic Postcards from Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallau, K. G.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hirshon, B.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach Team

    2010-12-01

    On its journey to become the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, NASA’s MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has followed a trajectory that included three flybys of the innermost planet. During the flybys, images captured by the Mercury Dual Imaging System revealed parts of the planet’s surface never before seen at close range, as well as high-resolution views of craters, crater rays, scarps, faults, and volcanic vents and flows. To help students and teachers better understand this revealing new look at Mercury, the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach team will share these high-resolution images of Mercury's surface throughout the upcoming Year of the Solar System. By means of an intriguing format that mimics methods used by the MESSENGER team, a series of images printed at large postcard size will each highlight a small "slice" of Mercury, such as a crater or fault. The individual cards can then be pieced together, puzzle-style, on a poster-sized grid to reveal a larger mosaic view of the planet. Each card contains engaging text, the URL for an accompanying website, and coordinates for that region of the planet, helping students understand scientific concepts related to and revealed by MESSENGER's journey. The first set of cards will feature scarps, volcanic plains, the topography of a crater and the composition of its interior units, rayed craters, nested craters, and a deposit produced by explosive volcanic eruptions. Cards will be available for free on the accompanying website, distributed by MESSENGER Educator Fellows, or handed out at meetings, conferences, and workshops.

  11. Mosaicism for trisomy 21: a review.

    PubMed

    Papavassiliou, Paulie; Charalsawadi, Chariyawan; Rafferty, Kelly; Jackson-Cook, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The clinical and cytogenetic findings associated with mosaicism for trisomy 21/Down syndrome are the focus of this review. The primary topics discussed in this overview of the extant literature include the history of this condition and its diagnosis, the incidence of mosaicism, the meiotic and/or mitotic chromosomal malsegregation events resulting in mosaicism, the observation of mosaicism in the parents of children with the non-mosaic form of Down syndrome, and the variation in phenotypic outcome for both constitutional and acquired traits present in people with mosaicism for trisomy 21/Down syndrome, including cognition, fertility, and overall phenotypic findings. Additional topics reviewed include the social conditions of people with mosaicism, as well as age-related and epigenetic alterations observed in people with mosaicism for trisomy 21/Down syndrome. . PMID:25412855

  12. Somatic mosaicism and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-02-01

    For more than 50 years geneticists have assumed that variations in phenotypic expression are caused by alterations in genotype. Recent evidence shows that 'simple' mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained entirely by a gene or allelic alteration. In certain cases of androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene, phenotypic variability is caused by somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur only in certain androgen-sensitive cells. Recently, more than 30 other genetic conditions that exhibit variable expressivity have been linked to somatic mosaicism. Somatic mutations have also been identified in diseases such as prostate and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the concept of somatic mutations and mosaicism is likely to have far reaching consequences for genetics, in particular in areas such as genetic counseling. PMID:11173116

  13. Neurocutaneous Manifestations of Genetic Mosaicism.

    PubMed

    van Steensel, Maurice A M

    2015-09-01

    Genetic mosaicism is defined as the presence of two or more genetically distinct cell populations in a single individual. Ever more disorders are found to be manifestations of mosaicism and together constitute a significant proportion of the morbidity confronting pediatric specialists. An emerging category is that of overgrowth syndromes with skin manifestations and neurological or developmental abnormalities, such as the well-known Proteus syndrome. In recent years, we have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of these disorders and we now know the genetic basis of many of them. This has profound consequences for diagnosis, counselling, and even treatment, with therapies targeted to specific pathways becoming available for clinical use. Recognizing such overgrowth syndromes, therefore, is more important than ever. Fortunately, their skin manifestations can provide important diagnostic clues when evaluated in the entire phenotypic context. In this review, I provide an overview of the most frequently seen mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes and discuss their molecular basis. PMID:27617125

  14. Mosaic of coded aperture arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Cannon, Thomas M.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a mosaic of coded aperture arrays which is capable of imaging off-axis sources with minimum detector size. Mosaics of the basic array pattern create a circular on periodic correlation of the object on a section of the picture plane. This section consists of elements of the central basic pattern as well as elements from neighboring patterns and is a cyclic version of the basic pattern. Since all object points contribute a complete cyclic version of the basic pattern, a section of the picture, which is the size of the basic aperture pattern, contains all the information necessary to image the object with no artifacts.

  15. Highest Resolution Gaspra Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This picture of asteroid 951 Gaspra is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft from a range of 5,300 kilometers (3,300 miles), some 10 minutes before closest approach on October 29, 1991. The Sun is shining from the right; phase angle is 50 degrees. The resolution, about 54 meters/pixel, is the highest for the Gaspra encounter and is about three times better than that in the view released in November 1991. Additional images of Gaspra remain stored on Galileo's tape recorder, awaiting playback in November. Gaspra is an irregular body with dimensions about 19 x 12 x 11 kilometers (12 x 7.5 x 7 miles). The portion illuminated in this view is about 18 kilometers (11 miles) from lower left to upper right. The north pole is located at upper left; Gaspra rotates counterclockwise every 7 hours. The large concavity on the lower right limb is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) across, the prominent crater on the terminator, center left, about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile). A striking feature of Gaspra's surface is the abundance of small craters. More than 600 craters, 100-500 meters (330-1650 feet) in diameter are visible here. The number of such small craters compared to larger ones is much greater for Gaspra than for previously studied bodies of comparable size such as the satellites of Mars. Gaspra's very irregular shape suggests that the asteroid was derived from a larger body by nearly catastrophic collisions. Consistent with such a history is the prominence of groove-like linear features, believed to be related to fractures. These linear depressions, 100-300 meters wide and tens of meters deep, are in two crossing groups with slightly different morphology, one group wider and more pitted than the other. Grooves had previously been seen only on Mars's moon Phobos, but were predicted for asteroids as well. Gaspra also shows a variety of enigmatic curved depressions and ridges in the terminator region at left. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the

  16. Gaspra - Highest Resolution Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This picture of asteroid 951 Gaspra is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft from a range of 5,300 kilometers (3,300 miles), some 10 minutes before closest approach on October 29, 1991. The Sun is shining from the right; phase angle is 50 degrees. The resolution, about 54 meters/pixel, is the highest for the Gaspra encounter and is about three times better than that in the view released in November 1991. Additional images of Gaspra remain stored on Galileo's tape recorder, awaiting playback in November. Gaspra is an irregular body with dimensions about 19 x 12 x 11 kilometers (12 x 7.5 x 7 miles). The portion illuminated in this view is about 18 kilometers (11 miles) from lower left to upper right. The north pole is located at upper left; Gaspra rotates counterclockwise every 7 hours. The large concavity on the lower right limb is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) across, the prominent crater on the terminator, center left, about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile). A striking feature of Gaspra's surface is the abundance of small craters. More than 600 craters, 100-500 meters (330-1650 feet) in diameter are visible here. The number of such small craters compared to larger ones is much greater for Gaspra than for previously studied bodies of comparable size such as the satellites of Mars. Gaspra's very irregular shape suggests that the asteroid was derived from a larger body by nearly catastrophic collisions. Consistent with such a history is the prominence of groove-like linear features, believed to be related to fractures. These linear depressions, 100-300 meters wide and tens of meters deep, are in two crossing groups with slightly different morphology, one group wider and more pitted than the other. Grooves had previously been seen only on Mars's moon Phobos, but were predicted for asteroids as well. Gaspra also shows a variety of enigmatic curved depressions and ridges in the terminator region at left. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the

  17. Language: Mosaic or Special Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Describes the "special destiny-special faculty" paradigm that has dominated western thinking about the nature and origins of language and argues instead that language systems are like technologies and that language acquisition and use involves a range of capacities and skills, a view that could be called the "mosaic development paradigm." (15…

  18. Map characteristics of Landsat mosaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, A. L.; Bryant, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    Map characteristics of the Landsat mosaics developed at JPL are considered. Procedures for digital mosaicking of Landsat frames to standard map projections were used to mosaic at full resolution ten scenes over the California desert region and twenty-one scenes over Arizona. The procedures are analyzed for horizontal positioning error (global and local) and the potential for classification error associated with the adjustment of brightness of Z values between frames; the use of this technology for the mapping of extensive features is discussed. Mosaicking facilities, techniques, mapping accuracy, and thematic mapping characteristics are described. A comparative analysis of Landsat mosaicking technology developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, IBM Gaithersburg, and USGS Flagstaff is made, and suggestions are given for algorithm development to improve systems capacity and ability to handle a variety of cases.

  19. Near Global Mosaic of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Becker, T. L.; Weller, L. A.; Turner, S.; Nguyen, L.; Selby, C.; Denevi, B. W.; Murchie, S. L.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008 the MESSENGER spacecraft made two close flybys (M1 and M2) of Mercury and imaged about 74% of the planet at a resolution of 1 km per pixel, and at higher resolution for smaller portions of the planet. The Mariner 10 spacecraft imaged about 42% of Mercury’s surface more than 30 years ago. Combining image data collected by the two missions yields coverage of about 83% of Mercury’s surface. MESSENGER will perform its third and final flyby of Mercury (M3) on 29 September 2009. This will yield approximately 86% coverage of Mercury, leaving only the north and south polar regions yet to be imaged by MESSENGER after orbit insertion in March 2011. A new global mosaic of Mercury was constructed using 325 images containing 3566 control points (8110 measures) from M1 and 225 images containing 1465 control points (3506 measures) from M2. The M3 flyby is shifted in subsolar longitude only by 4° from M2, so the added coverage is very small. However, this small slice of Mercury fills a gore in the mosaic between the M1 and M2 data and allows a complete cartographic tie around the equator. We will run a new bundle block adjustment with the additional images acquired from M3. This new edition of the MESSENGER Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) global mosaic of Mercury includes many improvements since the M2 flyby in October 2008. A new distortion model for the NAC camera greatly improves the image-to-image registration. Optical distortion correction is independent of pointing error correction, and both are required for a mosaic of high quality. The new distortion model alone reduced residual pointing errors for both flybys significantly; residual pixel error improved from 0.71 average (3.7 max) to 0.13 average (1.7 max) for M1 and from 0.72 average (4.8 max.) to 0.17 average (3.5 max) for M2. Analysis quantifying pivot motor position has led to development of a new model that improves accuracy of the pivot platform attitude. This model improves

  20. Cutaneous mosaicisms: concepts, patterns and classifications*

    PubMed Central

    Kouzak, Samara Silva; Mendes, Marcela Sena Teixeira; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    A mosaic is an organism composed of two or more genetically distinct cell populations derived from a genetically homogeneous zygote. Cutaneous mosaicisms are the clinical expressions of these disorders. The main event which allows the existence of mosaicism is a genetic mutation, either structural or functional. Cutaneous mosaicisms usually manifest by specific patterns on the skin and the archetypic pattern is the system of Blaschko lines, but others include checkerboard, phylloid, large patches without midline separation and lateralization. Since 1901, when Blaschko lines were first described, the study of mosasicism has helped to elucidate the behavior of numerous genetic diseases, generating therapeutic perspectives for these pathologies, including the promising gene therapy. PMID:24068120

  1. Goltz Syndrome and PORCN Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, D.A.; Chirpich, M.; Contreras, Y.; Hanson, H.; Dent, K.

    2014-01-01

    Goltz syndrome, also known as focal dermal hypoplasia, is characterized primarily by ectodermal and mesodermal defects. Manifestations include cutis aplasia, dermal hypoplasia, papillomas, chorioretinal colobomas, absent/dysplastic teeth, and skeletal anomalies. Goltz syndrome is an X-linked disorder due to mutations in PORCN, with a predominance of females affected. Germline mutations in PORCN are thought to result in embryonically lethality in males. We present a boy with a phenotype consistent with Goltz syndrome with low level mosaicism for a novel mutation in PORCN from peripheral blood (c.956dupA; p.Asn320GlufsX99). PMID:25040319

  2. Making Mosaics Of SAR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.; Kwok, Ronald; Pang, Shirley S.; Pang, Amy A.

    1990-01-01

    Spaceborne synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images useful for mapping of planets and investigations in Earth sciences. Produces multiframe mosaic by combining images along ground track, in adjacent cross-track swaths, or in ascending and descending passes. Images registered with geocoded maps such as ones produced by MAPJTC (NPO-17718), required as input. Minimal intervention by operator required. MOSK implemented on DEC VAX 11/785 computer running VMS 4.5. Most subroutines in FORTRAN, but three in MAXL and one in APAL.

  3. Mental Development in Down Syndrome Mosaicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishler, Karol; Koch, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of the mental status of 30 subjects with Down's Syndrome mosaicism and 30 matched subjects with trisomy 21 Down's Syndrome found that the mean intelligent quotient of the mosaic Down's Syndrome group was significantly higher and that this group showed better verbal abilities and more normal visual-perceptual skills. (Author/DB)

  4. Mosaic: NCSA Internet Network Navigational Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes Mosaic, an Internet resource locator and navigation tool developed at the University of Illinois' National Center for Super-Computing Applications (NCSA). Topics discussed include the relationship with the World Wide Web; flexibility; obtaining Mosaic client software; and file transfer protocol instructions. (Contains seven references.)…

  5. Web Map Services (WMS) Global Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percivall, George; Plesea, Lucian

    2003-01-01

    The WMS Global Mosaic provides access to imagery of the global landmass using an open standard for web mapping. The seamless image is a mosaic of Landsat 7 scenes; geographically-accurate with 30 and 15 meter resolutions. By using the OpenGIS Web Map Service (WMS) interface, any organization can use the global mosaic as a layer in their geospatial applications. Based on a trade study, an implementation approach was chosen that extends a previously developed WMS hosting a Landsat 5 CONUS mosaic developed by JPL. The WMS Global Mosaic supports the NASA Geospatial Interoperability Office goal of providing an integrated digital representation of the Earth, widely accessible for humanity's critical decisions.

  6. The least square optimization in image mosaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-dong; Yang, Yong-yue

    2015-02-01

    Image registration has been a hot research spot in the computer vision technology and image processing. Image registration is one of the key technologies in image mosaic. In order to improve the accuracy of matching feature points, this paper put forward the least square optimization in image mosaic based on the algorithm of matching similarity of matrices. The correlation coefficient method of matrix is used for matching the module points in the overlap region of images and calculating the error between matrices. The error of feature points can be further minimized by using the method of least square optimization. Finally, image mosaic can be achieved by the two pair of feature points with minimized residual sum of squares. The experimental results demonstrate that the least square optimization in image mosaic can mosaic images with overlap region and improve the accuracy of matching feature points.

  7. Moon - North Polar Mosaic, Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft surveyed the Moon on December 7, 1992, on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-1997. The left part of this north pole view is visible from Earth. This color picture is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter. The left part of this picture shows the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left), Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Mosaic two-lengthscale quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Dotera, T; Oshiro, T; Ziherl, P

    2014-02-13

    Over the past decade, quasicrystalline order has been observed in many soft-matter systems: in dendritic micelles, in star and tetrablock terpolymer melts and in diblock copolymer and surfactant micelles. The formation of quasicrystals from such a broad range of 'soft' macromolecular micelles suggests that they assemble by a generic mechanism rather than being dependent on the specific chemistry of each system. Indeed, micellar softness has been postulated and shown to lead to quasicrystalline order. Here we theoretically explore this link by studying two-dimensional hard disks decorated with step-like square-shoulder repulsion that mimics, for example, the soft alkyl shell around the aromatic core in dendritic micelles. We find a family of quasicrystals with 10-, 12-, 18- and 24-fold bond orientational order which originate from mosaics of equilateral and isosceles triangles formed by particles arranged core-to-core and shoulder-to-shoulder. The pair interaction responsible for these phases highlights the role of local packing geometry in generating quasicrystallinity in soft matter, complementing the principles that lead to quasicrystal formation in hard tetrahedra. Based on simple interparticle potentials, quasicrystalline mosaics may well find use in diverse applications ranging from improved image reproduction to advanced photonic materials. PMID:24487618

  9. Mosaicism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011:chap 76. Stankiewicz P, Lupski JR. Gene, genomic, and chromosomal disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  10. Genetic mechanisms of Maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize resistance to viruses has been well-characterized at the genetic level, and loci responsible for resistance to potyviruses including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), have been mapped in several ge...

  11. A MOSAIC for the Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, M. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Costa, D.; Cadigan, J.; Clements, C.; May, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    MOSAIC (Mesospheric Ozone System for Atmospheric Investigations in the Classroom) is a project to engage secondary and undergraduate students in authentic inquiry-based science learning using a network of inexpensive spectrometers monitoring the mesospheric ozone concentration. The MOSAIC system observes the 11 GHz emission line of ozone using electronics built around satellite television equipment. The possibilities for student investigation are broad and scientifically significant. MOSAIC observations have confirmed diurnal variations in mesospheric ozone concentration and detected semiannual variations that may be due to inter-hemispheric meridional circulation of water vapor. Possible future projects include monitoring the temperature of the mesosphere and correlations with the solar cycle. Students are also encouraged to design their own investigations with MOSAIC data. Early results have been reported in a major scientific journal, and further scientific progress is likely as future MOSAIC systems are deployed -- increasing the sensitivity and geographic coverage of the network. Complete teaching units, including slides, laboratory activities, background information, student worksheets, and conformance with national and Massachusetts educational standards, have been developed to integrate MOSAIC into a classroom environment. One unit introduces the layers of the atmosphere, Earth's energy balance, the greenhouse effect, processes of ozone creation and destruction, noctilucent clouds, heat transfer, the laws of thermodynamics, radio waves (including radio astronomy), and fluid behavior. A second unit, currently being tested in classrooms, uses the MOSAIC system to motivate and deepen understanding of a large portion of electromagnetism in a conceptual physics class. MOSAIC has also been used in a local high school chemistry class. MOSAIC is still in development and is funded by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Mosaic organization of DNA nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-range power-law correlations have been reported recently for DNA sequences containing noncoding regions. We address the question of whether such correlations may be a trivial consequence of the known mosaic structure ("patchiness") of DNA. We analyze two classes of controls consisting of patchy nucleotide sequences generated by different algorithms--one without and one with long-range power-law correlations. Although both types of sequences are highly heterogenous, they are quantitatively distinguishable by an alternative fluctuation analysis method that differentiates local patchiness from long-range correlations. Application of this analysis to selected DNA sequences demonstrates that patchiness is not sufficient to account for long-range correlation properties.

  13. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text.

    Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired.

    This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Unrevealed mosaicism in the next-generation sequencing era.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, Marzena

    2016-04-01

    Mosaicism refers to the presence in an individual of normal and abnormal cells that are genotypically distinct and are derived from a single zygote. The incidence of mosaicism events in the human body is underestimated as the genotypes in the mosaic ratio, especially in the low-grade mosaicism, stay unrevealed. This review summarizes various research outcomes and diagnostic questions in relation to different types of mosaicism. The impact of both tested biological material and applied method on the mosaicism detection rate is especially highlighted. As next-generation sequencing technologies constitute a promising methodological solution in mosaicism detection in the coming years, revisions in current diagnostic protocols are necessary to increase the detection rate of the unrevealed mosaicism events. Since mosaicism identification is a complex process, numerous examples of multistep mosaicism investigations are presented and discussed. PMID:26481646

  15. Mars Pathfinder 'Filled Donut' Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is a product of 3data sets: a color mosaic image of the 'Gallery Panorama', an image which indicates the distance to the nearest object at each pixel location, referred to as a range image, and a digital image of a full-scale museum model of the MPF Lander.

    The Gallery Pan image and the range image were projected onto a continuous cylindrical/perspective coordinate system spanning 360 degrees of azimuth. The range image was then treated as a displacement map with respect to a sphere's surface, and the color image mosaic was draped onto the inside of the sphere so that lines of constant azimuth radiate from the center and lines of constant elevation are concentric circles. The position of the camera is fixed at the sphere's center, while its viewing direction is in this case looking at the south pole of the sphere. This projection preserves the resolution of the original panorama.

    The distortion visible near the edges of this image is due to the large field of view, as well as the limitation introduced by using cylindrically-projected images on the sphere - the effects of which are less apparent when smaller fields of view are used.

    The center of the image consists of the museum model image, which has been geometrically warped to spatially register with the projected Gallery Pandata. The position of the camera was fixed above the model so that the IMPMast was roughly at Nadir.

    The image has been rotated so that the main points of interest, which are the 'Rock Garden', the rover Sojourner and the rock 'Yogi', are visible arching across the upper hemisphere. In fixed Mars Surface coordinates, the top of the image looks out towards a point a few degrees north of West. Color has been enhanced to improve contrast in features, and is derived from IMP spectral filters 5, 9 and 0.

  16. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  17. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  18. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  19. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  20. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  1. Recurrence risk for germinal mosaics revisited.

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, M A; van der Meulen, M J; te Meerman, G J

    1995-01-01

    A formula to calculate recurrence risk for germline mosaicism published by Hartl in 1971 has been updated to include marker information. For practical genetic counselling new, more elaborate tables are given. PMID:7760316

  2. NEAR MSI Mosaics of 433 Eros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Edmonds, J.; Lutsey, J.; Milne, A.; Moore, K.; Prockter, L.; Wilcox, B.

    2002-03-01

    We have produced over 300 handlaid mosaics of Eros with resolutions ranging from ~20 m/pixel down to 2 cm pixel. These data are available to assist both the science community and education and outreach activities.

  3. Preparing for Themis Controlled Global Mars Mosaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archinal, B. A.; Weller, L.; Sides, S.; Cushing, G.; Kirk, R. L.; Soderblom, L. A.; Duxbury, T. C.

    2004-01-01

    We have begun work to prepare for producing controlled 2001 Mars Odyssey THEMIS infrared (IR) and visible (VIS) global mosaics of Mars. This effort is being coordinated with colleagues from Arizona State University and on the THEMIS team who plan to address radiometric issues in making such mosaics. We are concentrating on geometric issues. Several areas of investigation are now in progress, including: a) characterizing the absolute pointing accuracy of THEMIS images; b) investigating whether automatic tie point matching algorithms could be used to provide connections between overlapping THEMIS images; c) developing algorithms to allow for the photogrammetric (bundle) adjustment of the THEMIS IR (line scanner) camera images. Our primary goal in this pilot study effort will be to make several test control THEMIS mosaics and better determine which methods could be used, which require development, and what level of effort is required, in order to make large regional or global controlled THEMIS mosaics.

  4. Somatic Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Donald; Stevens, Eric L.; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the occurrence of two genetically distinct populations of cells within an individual, derived from a postzygotic mutation. In contrast to inherited mutations, somatic mosaic mutations may affect only a portion of the body and are not transmitted to progeny. These mutations affect varying genomic sizes ranging from single nucleotides to entire chromosomes and have been implicated in disease, most prominently cancer. The phenotypic consequences of somatic mosaicism are dependent upon many factors including the developmental time at which the mutation occurs, the areas of the body that are affected, and the pathophysiological effect(s) of the mutation. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies has augmented existing array-based and cytogenetic approaches for the identification of somatic mutations. We outline the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and highlight recent insights into the role of somatic mosaicism in causing cancer, neurodegenerative, monogenic, and complex disease. PMID:25513881

  5. A rare case: mosaic trisomy 22.

    PubMed

    Basaran, N; Berkil, H; Ay, N; Durak, B; Ataman, C; Ozdemir, M; Ozon, Y H; Kaya, I

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old female child of healthy parents (mother: 43 years, father: 44 years) was referred to our center because of severe mental retardation. While pedigree analysis was not contributory, two older sibs were normal and healthy. Physical examination revealed facial dysmorphism, microcephaly and hyperflexibility of all joints. Her chromosome constitution showed a mosaic pattern; mos 46,XX[98]/47,XX,+22[2]. So skin biopsy was performed and mosaic trisomy 22 was confirmed with FISH analysis (46,XX[73]/47,XX,+22[27]). Physical features of this case seemed consistent with her mosaic constitution. This report would be a demonstrative example to show the significant contribution of FISH in states of mosaicism. PMID:11755102

  6. Mosaicism and uniparental disomy in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Thomas; Soellner, Lukas; Buiting, Karin; Kotzot, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    Chromosomal mosaicism is the presence of numerous cell lines with different chromosomal complements in the same individual. Uniparental disomy (UPD) is the inheritance of two homologous chromosomes from the same parent. These genetic anomalies arise from errors in meiosis and/or mitosis and can occur independently or in combination. Due to the formation mechanisms of UPD, low-level or undetected mosaicisms are assumed for a significant number of UPD cases. The pre- and postnatal clinical consequences of mosaicism for chromosomal aberrations and/or UPD depend on the gene content of the involved chromosome. In prenatal evaluation of chromosomal mosaicism and UPD, genetic counseling should be offered before any laboratory testing. PMID:25547535

  7. Mosaic Neurocutaneous Disorders and Their Causes.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Martino; Praticò, Andrea D

    2015-12-01

    Neurocutaneous disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions (mainly) affecting the skin [with pigmentary/vascular abnormalities and/or cutaneous tumours] and the central and peripheral nervous system [with congenital abnormalities and/or tumours]. In a number of such disorders, the skin abnormalities can assume a mosaic patterning (usually arranged in archetypical patterns). Alternating segments of affected and unaffected skin or segmentally arranged patterns of abnormal skin often mirror similar phenomena occurring in extra-cutaneous organs/tissues [eg, eye, bone, heart/vessels, lung, kidney and gut]. In some neurocutaneous syndromes the abnormal mosaic patterning involve mainly the skin and the nervous system configuring a (true) mosaic neurocutaneous disorder; or an ordinary trait of a neurocutaneous disorder is sometimes superimposed by a pronounced linear or otherwise segmental involvement; or, lastly, a neurocutaneous disorder can occur solely in a mosaic pattern. Recently, the molecular genetic and cellular bases of an increasing number of neurocutaneous disorders have been unravelled, shedding light on the interplays between common intra- and extra-neuronal signalling pathways encompassing receptor-protein and protein-to-protein cascades (eg, RAS, MAPK, mTOR, PI3K/AKT and GNAQ pathways), which are often responsible of the mosaic distribution of cutaneous and extra-cutaneous features. In this article we will focus on the well known, and less defined mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes and their related molecular/genetic bases, including the mosaic neurofibromatoses and their related forms (ie, spinal neurofibromatosis and schwannomatosis); Legius syndrome; segmental arrangements in tuberous sclerosis; Sturge-Weber and Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes; microcephaly/megalencephaly-capillary malformation; blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome; Wyburn-Mason syndrome; mixed vascular nevus syndrome; PHACE syndrome; Incontinentia pigmenti; pigmentary mosaicism of the Ito

  8. Incidence of Wheat streak mosaic virus, Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus in wheat curl mites recovered from maturing winter wheat spikes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat curl mites (WCM; Aceria tosichella) transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. These viruses can be detected in single, double, or triple combinations i...

  9. Multiplex Real Time PCR For Detection of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TRIMV) are widespread throughout the southwestern Great Plains states. Using conventional diagnostics such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA), these two viruses are commonly found together in infected wheat samples. Methods for m...

  10. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (Genus Potyvirus; Potyviridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are species within the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae and cause some of the most economically important diseases of legume crops worldwide. Both viruses occur essentially wherever bean and cowpea (including Phaseolus...

  11. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  12. Generating Mosaics of Astronomical Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergou, Attila; Berriman, Bruce; Good, John; Jacob, Joseph; Katz, Daniel; Laity, Anastasia; Prince, Thomas; Williams, Roy

    2005-01-01

    "Montage" is the name of a service of the National Virtual Observatory (NVO), and of software being developed to implement the service via the World Wide Web. Montage generates science-grade custom mosaics of astronomical images on demand from input files that comply with the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard and contain image data registered on projections that comply with the World Coordinate System (WCS) standards. "Science-grade" in this context signifies that terrestrial and instrumental features are removed from images in a way that can be described quantitatively. "Custom" refers to user-specified parameters of projection, coordinates, size, rotation, and spatial sampling. The greatest value of Montage is expected to lie in its ability to analyze images at multiple wavelengths, delivering them on a common projection, coordinate system, and spatial sampling, and thereby enabling further analysis as though they were part of a single, multi-wavelength image. Montage will be deployed as a computation-intensive service through existing astronomy portals and other Web sites. It will be integrated into the emerging NVO architecture and will be executed on the TeraGrid. The Montage software will also be portable and publicly available.

  13. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Viurus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully reduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystals grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were visually perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This stylized ribbon model shows the protein coat in white and the nucleic acid in yellow. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California at Irvin.

  14. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully deduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the same time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystal grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were viusally perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This computer model shows the external coating or capsid. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, Univeristy of California at Irvin.

  15. Graph models of habitat mosaics.

    PubMed

    Urban, Dean L; Minor, Emily S; Treml, Eric A; Schick, Robert S

    2009-03-01

    Graph theory is a body of mathematics dealing with problems of connectivity, flow, and routing in networks ranging from social groups to computer networks. Recently, network applications have erupted in many fields, and graph models are now being applied in landscape ecology and conservation biology, particularly for applications couched in metapopulation theory. In these applications, graph nodes represent habitat patches or local populations and links indicate functional connections among populations (i.e. via dispersal). Graphs are models of more complicated real systems, and so it is appropriate to review these applications from the perspective of modelling in general. Here we review recent applications of network theory to habitat patches in landscape mosaics. We consider (1) the conceptual model underlying these applications; (2) formalization and implementation of the graph model; (3) model parameterization; (4) model testing, insights, and predictions available through graph analyses; and (5) potential implications for conservation biology and related applications. In general, and for a variety of ecological systems, we find the graph model a remarkably robust framework for applications concerned with habitat connectivity. We close with suggestions for further work on the parameterization and validation of graph models, and point to some promising analytic insights. PMID:19161432

  16. The categories of cutaneous mosaicism: A proposed classification.

    PubMed

    Happle, Rudolf

    2016-02-01

    Mosaic disorders can most easily be studied in the skin. This article presents a comprehensive overview of the different forms of cutaneous mosaicism. Major categories are genomic versus epigenetic mosaicism and nonsegmental versus segmental mosaicism. The class of nonsegmental mosaics includes single point mosaicism as exemplified by solitary benign or malignant skin tumors; disseminated mosaicism as noted in autosomal dominant tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis 1; and patchy mosaicism without midline separation as found in giant melanocytic nevus. The class of segmental mosaics includes segmental manifestation of lethal genes surviving by mosaicism as noted in Proteus syndrome; type 1 segmental mosaicism of autosomal dominant skin disorders reflecting heterozygosity for a postzygotic new mutation; type 2 segmental mosaicism of autosomal dominant skin disorders reflecting loss of heterozygosity that occurred at an early developmental stage in a heterozygous embryo; and isolated or superimposed segmental mosaicism of common polygenic skin disorders such as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. A particular form of genomic mosaicism is didymosis (twin spotting). Revertant mosaicism is recognizable as one or more areas of healthy skin in patients with epidermolysis bullosa or other serious genodermatoses. The category of epigenetic mosaicism includes several X-linked, male lethal disorders such as incontinentia pigmenti, and the patterns of lyonization as noted in X-linked non-lethal disorders such as hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia of the Christ-Siemens-Touraine type. An interesting field of future research will be the concept of epigenetic autosomal mosaicism that may explain some unusual cases of autosomal transmission of linear hypo- or hypermelanosis. PMID:26494396

  17. Anterior segment dysgenesis in mosaic Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, I; Haigh, P; Clayton-Smith, J; Clayton, P; Price, D; Ridgway, A; Donnai, D

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Females with Turner syndrome commonly exhibit ophthalmological abnormalities, although there is little information in the literature documenting findings specific to Turner syndrome mosaics. Ophthalmic findings are described in four patients with mosaic Turner syndrome. All had anterior chamber abnormalities and all four had karyotypic abnormalities with a 45, X cell line. The possible relation between the karyotypic and the phenotypic findings in these patients is discussed.
METHODS—Four girls with mosaic Turner syndrome underwent a full ophthalmological assessment, including examination under anaesthesia where indicated.
RESULTS—Three of the four patients presented with congenital glaucoma. Two had the karyotype 45, X/46, X, idic(Y) and one a 45, X/47, XXX karyotype. The remaining child had a Rieger malformation of the iris and the karyotype 45, X/46, X, r(X).
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that Turner syndrome mosaicism (where there are two abnormal cell lines) is associated with anterior segment dysgenesis. The findings in these four patients are compared with those seen in other mosaic phenotypes and it is postulated that the presence of two or more genetically different cell lines may have an adverse effect on anterior segment development.

 PMID:9349149

  18. Genetic Mosaics and the Germ Line Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Mark E.; Friedman, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mosaics provide information about cellular lineages that is otherwise difficult to obtain, especially in humans. De novo mutations act as cell markers, allowing the tracing of developmental trajectories of all descendants of the cell in which the new mutation arises. De novo mutations may arise at any time during development but are relatively rare. They have usually been observed through medical ascertainment, when the mutation causes unusual clinical signs or symptoms. Mutational events can include aneuploidies, large chromosomal rearrangements, copy number variants, or point mutations. In this review we focus primarily on the analysis of point mutations and their utility in addressing questions of germ line versus somatic lineages. Genetic mosaics demonstrate that the germ line and soma diverge early in development, since there are many examples of combined somatic and germ line mosaicism for de novo mutations. The occurrence of simultaneous mosaicism in both the germ line and soma also shows that the germ line is not strictly clonal but arises from at least two, and possibly multiple, cells in the embryo with different ancestries. Whole genome or exome DNA sequencing technologies promise to expand the range of studies of genetic mosaics, as de novo mutations can now be identified through sequencing alone in the absence of a medical ascertainment. These technologies have been used to study mutation patterns in nuclear families and in monozygotic twins, and in animal model developmental studies, but not yet for extensive cell lineage studies in humans. PMID:25898403

  19. Detectable Clonal Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic mosaicism is the presence of two or more cellular populations with distinct genotypes in an individual who developed from a single fertilized ovum. While initially observed across a spectrum of rare genetic disorders, detailed assessment of data from genome-wide association studies now reveal that detectable clonal mosaicism involving large structural alterations (> 2 Mb) can also be seen in populations of apparently healthy individuals. The first generation of descriptive studies have generated new interest in understanding the molecular basis of the affected genomic regions, percent of the cellular subpopulation involved, and developmental timing of the underlying mutational event, which could reveal new insights into the initiation, clonal expansion and phenotypic manifestations of mosaic events. Early evidence indicates detectable clonal mosaicism increases in frequency with age and could preferentially occur in males. The observed pattern of recurrent events affecting specific chromosomal regions indicates some regions are more susceptible to these events, which could reflect inter-individual differences in genomic stability. Moreover, it is also plausible that the presence of large structural events could be associated with cancer risk. The characterization of detectable genetic mosaicism reveals that there could be important dynamic changes in the human genome associated with the aging process, which could be associated with risk for common disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurological disorders. PMID:24246702

  20. Thermographic mosaic of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Hasell, Philip G., Jr.; Sellman, Albert N.; Smedes, Harry W.

    1976-01-01

    An uncontrolled thermographic mosaic, which covers most of the area of Yellowstone National Park, has been compiled. The recording of aerial thermographic data on videotape is established as one of the prerequisites for the preparation of more accurate mosaics. Post-mission processing of the videotape record can rectify the nadir line to a topographic map base, correct for v/h variations in adjacent flight lines, correct for yaw distortions, rectify distortions caused by pitch, and rectify distortions produced by non-linearity of the side-wise scan. Installation of a thermal infrared scanning radiometer in a gyrostabilized mount and post-mission processing of the videotape record (principally rectification of side-wise scan distortion) would yield a controlled, photogrammetrically accurate thermographic mosaic. However, the techniques used in the preparation of the uncontrolled thermographic mosaic of Yellowstone National Park can be immediately applied to the preparation of regional thermographic mosaics, important to geologists and other scientists and engineers in studies of geothermal and volcanic areas, and to other types of environmental investigations such as pollution studies of large water bodies (e.g., harbors, estuaries, lakes, etc.), where a precise planimetric image is not critical.

  1. Global Color Mosaic of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by Voyager 2 during its flyby of the Neptune system. Color was synthesized by combining high- resolution images taken through orange, violet, and ultraviolet filters; these images were displayed as red, green, and blue images and combined to create this color version. With a radius of 1,350 (839 mi), about 22% smaller than Earth's moon, Triton is by far the largest satellite of Neptune. It is one of only three objects in the Solar System known to have a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere (the others are Earth and Saturn's giant moon, Titan). Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the Solar System (38 K, about -391 degrees Farenheit); it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost, making it the only satellite in the Solar System known to have a surface made mainly of nitrogen ice. The pinkish deposits constitute a vast south polar cap believed to contain methane ice, which would have reacted under sunlight to form pink or red compounds. The dark streaks overlying these pink ices are believed to be an icy and perhaps carbonaceous dust deposited from huge geyser-like plumes, some of which were found to be active during the Voyager 2 flyby. The bluish-green band visible in this image extends all the way around Triton near the equator; it may consist of relatively fresh nitrogen frost deposits. The greenish areas include what is called the cataloupe terrain, whose origin is unknown, and a set of 'cryovolcanic' landscapes apparently produced by icy-cold liquids (now frozen) erupted from Triton's interior.

  2. Global Color Mosaic of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by Voyager 2 during its flyby of the Neptune system. Color was synthesized by combining high-resolution images taken through orange, violet, and ultraviolet filters; these images were displayed as red, green, and blue images and combined to create this color version. With a radius of 1,350 (839 mi), about 22% smaller than Earth's moon, Triton is by far the largest satellite of Neptune. It is one of only three objects in the Solar System known to have a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere (the others are Earth and Saturn's giant moon, Titan). Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the Solar System (38 K, about -391 degrees Fahrenheit); it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost, making it the only satellite in the Solar System known to have a surface made mainly of nitrogen ice. The pinkish deposits constitute a vast south polar cap believed to contain methane ice, which would have reacted under sunlight to form pink or red compounds. The dark streaks overlying these pink ices are believed to be an icy and perhaps carbonaceous dust deposited from huge geyser-like plumes, some of which were found to be active during the Voyager 2 flyby. The bluish-green band visible in this image extends all the way around Triton near the equator; it may consist of relatively fresh nitrogen frost deposits. The greenish areas includes what is called the cantaloupe terrain, whose origin is unknown, and a set of 'cryovolcanic' landscapes apparently produced by icy-cold liquids (now frozen) erupted from Triton's interior.

  3. Mosaic Convergence of Rodent Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Vincent; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding mechanisms responsible for changes in tooth morphology in the course of evolution is an area of investigation common to both paleontology and developmental biology. Detailed analyses of molar tooth crown shape have shown frequent homoplasia in mammalian evolution, which requires accurate investigation of the evolutionary pathways provided by the fossil record. The necessity of preservation of an effective occlusion has been hypothesized to functionally constrain crown morphological changes and to also facilitate convergent evolution. The Muroidea superfamily constitutes a relevant model for the study of molar crown diversification because it encompasses one third of the extant mammalian biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Combined microwear and 3D-topographic analyses performed on fossil and extant muroid molars allow for a first quantification of the relationships between changes in crown morphology and functionality of occlusion. Based on an abundant fossil record and on a well resolved phylogeny, our results show that the most derived functional condition associates longitudinal chewing and non interlocking of cusps. This condition has been reached at least 7 times within muroids via two main types of evolutionary pathways each respecting functional continuity. In the first type, the flattening of tooth crown which induces the removal of cusp interlocking occurs before the rotation of the chewing movement. In the second type however, flattening is subsequent to rotation of the chewing movement which can be associated with certain changes in cusp morphology. Conclusion/Significance The reverse orders of the changes involved in these different pathways reveal a mosaic evolution of mammalian dentition in which direction of chewing and crown shape seem to be partly decoupled. Either can change in respect to strong functional constraints affecting occlusion which thereby limit the number of the possible pathways. Because convergent

  4. Mosaic of Europa's Ridges, Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This view of the icy surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa, is a mosaic of two pictures taken by the Solid State Imaging system on board the Galileo spacecraft during a close flyby of Europa on February 20, 1997. The pictures were taken from a distance of 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles). The area shown is about 14 kilometers by 17 kilometers (8.7 miles by 10.6 miles), and has a resolution of 20 meters (22 yards) per pixel. Illumination is from the right (east). The picture is centered at about 14.8 north latitude, 273.8 west longitude, in Europa's trailing hemisphere.

    One of the youngest features seen in this area is the double ridge cutting across the picture from the lower left to the upper right. This double ridge is about 2.6 kilometers (1.6 miles) wide and stands some 300 meters (330 yards) high. Small craters are most easily seen in the smooth deposits along the south margin of the prominent double ridge, and in the rugged ridged terrain farther south. The complexly ridged terrain seen here shows that parts of the icy crust of Europa have been modified by intense faulting and disruption, driven by energy from the planet's interior.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  5. Monochorionic twins discordant for mosaic trisomy 14.

    PubMed

    He, Mai; Pepperell, John R; Gundogan, Fusun; De Paepe, Monique E; Maggio, Lindsay; Lu, Shaolei; Kostadinov, Stefan; O'Brien, Barbara; Delamonte, Suzanne; Pinar, Halit; Tantravahi, Umadevi

    2014-05-01

    Monochorionic-diamniotic twins are usually monozygotic twins and known to be associated with adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes. Cases of discordant karyotype of monozygotic twins are rare and most involves sex chromosomes. We present the first case of monochorionic twins with discordant karyotype manifested as mosaic trisomy 14 in one twin (B) and a normal karyotype in the other (A). We describe the postmortem pathological and imaging findings of the trisomic twin and for the first time neuropathological findings of this entity. Metaphase chromosome analysis of twin B using fetal tissue showed a 47,XX, +14 karyotype. Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) using fetal tissue revealed 38% mosaicism. CMA with placental tissue from both sides demonstrated normal karyotype and confirmed monozygosity, highlighting the value of array based testing on diagnosing mosaicism and zygosity. PMID:24458767

  6. An image mosaic method based on corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zetao; Nie, Heting

    2015-08-01

    In view of the shortcomings of the traditional image mosaic, this paper describes a new algorithm for image mosaic based on the Harris corner. Firstly, Harris operator combining the constructed low-pass smoothing filter based on splines function and circular window search is applied to detect the image corner, which allows us to have better localisation performance and effectively avoid the phenomenon of cluster. Secondly, the correlation feature registration is used to find registration pair, remove the false registration using random sampling consensus. Finally use the method of weighted trigonometric combined with interpolation function for image fusion. The experiments show that this method can effectively remove the splicing ghosting and improve the accuracy of image mosaic.

  7. Genetic diversity of viruses causing mosaic in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosaic caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) contributed to the near collapse of Louisiana’s sugarcane industry in the early 20th Century. By the 1950s, the cultivation of resistant cultivars eliminated mosaic as a major disease problem; however, new strains arose among previously resistant cultiv...

  8. Triticum mosaic virus isolates in the southern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, a Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-resistant wheat variety RonL was found to have mosaic symptoms similar to WSMV. The virus inducing the symptoms was determined to be previously unknown and given the name Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV). Since, TriMV has been found in plant samples isolate...

  9. Characterization of the Triticum Mosaic Virus Genome and Interactions between Triticum Mosaic Virus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides encoding a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids. The proteins of TriMV possess only 33-44% (with NIb protein) and 15-29% (with P1 protein) amino acid identity with the reported members of Pot...

  10. Ultrahigh Thermoelectric Performance in Mosaic Crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Lu, Ping; Shi, Xun; Xu, Fangfang; Zhang, Tiansong; Snyder, Gerald Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Chen, Lidong

    2015-06-24

    Successful research strategies to enhance the dimensionless figure of merit zT above 2 rely on either bulk nanomaterials or on single crystals. A new physical mechanism of nanoscale mosaicity is shown that goes beyond the approaches in single crystals or conventional nanomaterials. A zT value of 2.1 at 1000 K in bulk nanomaterials is achieved. PMID:25962487

  11. Barley stripe mosaic and Barley yellow stripe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley stripe mosaic was described in Wisconsin as "barley false stripe" in 1910, making it perhaps the first cereal virus disease described in the United States. The disease has been reported from most barley-producing areas of the world, including North and South America, Asia, Africa, Europe, an...

  12. The Viking Mosaic catalog, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N.

    1982-01-01

    Martian geographic location information for Viking Orbiter mosaic images is provided. The photographic sequences were chosen based upon image content. The footprinting task was carried out, post factor, in order to facilitate research activities. Early activities were centered around the examination of candidate landing sites.

  13. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  14. Mosaic as a Vehicle for Collaborative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Robin; Wilson, Bill

    Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania) developed a program which centered on NCSA Mosaic as a vehicle for collaborative learning. The project involved a select number of incoming freshmen who lived together in the then-experimental residential college program. Goals included mastery of basic library and computer skills, gaining familiarity with…

  15. Multicultural Mosaic: A Family Book Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias-Mitchell, Laurie; Harris, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Authors, a library media specialist and a literature/language arts teacher, both recipients of Theodore R. Sizer Fellowships, describe their joint project, "Multicultural Mosaic: A Family Book Club." Their proposal was to strengthen the home-school connection by establishing a book club accessible to all middle and high school students and their…

  16. Software for Viewing Landsat Mosaic Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Jack; Farve, Catherine L.; Harvey, Craig

    2002-01-01

    A Windows-based computer program has been written to enable novice users (especially educators and students) to view images of large areas of the Earth (e.g., the continental United States) generated from image data acquired in the Landsat observations performed circa the year 1990. The large-area images are constructed as mosaics from the original Landsat images, which were acquired in several wavelength bands and each of which spans an area (in effect, one tile of a mosaic) of 5 in latitude by approximately equal to 6 degrees in longitude. Whereas the original Landsat data are registered on a universal transverse Mercator (UTM) grid, the program converts the UTM coordinates of a mouse pointer in the image to latitude and longitude, which are continuously updated and displayed as the pointer is moved. The mosaic image currently on display can be exported as a Windows bit-map file. Other images (e.g., of state boundaries or interstate highways) can be overlaid on Landsat mosaics. The program interacts with the user via standard toolbar, keyboard, and mouse user interfaces. The program is supplied on a compact disk along with tutorial and educational information.

  17. Software for Viewing Landsat Mosaic Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A Windows-based computer program has been written to enable novice users (especially educators and students) to view images of large areas of the Earth (e.g., the continental United States) generated from image data acquired in the Landsat observations performed circa the year 1990. The large-area images are constructed as mosaics from the original Landsat images, which were acquired in several wavelength bands and each of which spans an area (in effect, one tile of a mosaic) of approx. 5 in latitude by approx. 6 deg in longitude. Whereas the original Landsat data are registered on a universal transverse Mercator (UTM) grid, the program converts the UTM coordinates of a mouse pointer in the image to latitude and longitude, which are continuously updated and displayed as the pointer is moved. The mosaic image currently on display can be exported as a Windows bit-map file. Other images (e.g., of state boundaries or interstate highways) can be overlaid on Landsat mosaics. The program interacts with the user via standard toolbar, keyboard, and mouse user interfaces. The program is supplied on a compact disk along with tutorial and educational information.

  18. Highland's Mosaic Mural: The Project, the Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Jan; Imming, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    Describes how a group of upper-elementary students in Highland, Illinois, designed and constructed a large mosaic mural depicting their city. Students were enthusiastic and highly motivated by the project. Widespread publicity excited intense community interest and involvement. The problems of design and construction are discussed. (AM)

  19. Technique for improving solid state mosaic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saboe, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    Method identifies and corrects mosaic image faults in solid state visual displays and opto-electronic presentation systems. Composite video signals containing faults due to defective sensing elements are corrected by a memory unit that contains the stored fault pattern and supplies the appropriate fault word to the blanking circuit.

  20. Pulling the Internet Together with Mosaic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Presents the history of the Internet with specific emphasis on Mosaic; discusses hypertext and hypermedia information; and describes software and hardware requirements. Sidebars include information on the National Center for Super Computing Applications (NCSA); World Wide Web browsers for use in Windows, Macintosh, and X-Windows (UNIX); and…

  1. Triploid-diploid mosaic chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S E; Buss, E G

    1966-08-12

    Cytological analysis of an underdeveloped chicken embryo at 6 days of incubation revealed a triploid-diploid mosaic condition. Of the 30 metaphases observed, 19 were triploid and 11 diploid. The triploid cells were 3A-ZZZ and diploid cells 2A-ZZ, as determined for the six largest pairs of chromnosomes. PMID:5328678

  2. Software for Viewing Landsat Mosaic Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Zack; Farve, Catharine L.; Harvey, Craig

    2003-01-01

    A Windows-based computer program has been written to enable novice users (especially educators and students) to view images of large areas of the Earth (e.g., the continental United States) generated from image data acquired in the Landsat observations performed circa the year 1990. The large-area images are constructed as mosaics from the original Landsat images, which were acquired in several wavelength bands and each of which spans an area (in effect, one tile of a mosaic) of .5 in latitude by .6 in longitude. Whereas the original Landsat data are registered on a universal transverse Mercator (UTM) grid, the program converts the UTM coordinates of a mouse pointer in the image to latitude and longitude, which are continuously updated and displayed as the pointer is moved. The mosaic image currently on display can be exported as a Windows bitmap file. Other images (e.g., of state boundaries or interstate highways) can be overlaid on Landsat mosaics. The program interacts with the user via standard toolbar, keyboard, and mouse user interfaces. The program is supplied on a compact disk along with tutorial and educational information.

  3. Tobacco mosaic virus: Proof by synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear, non-self-replicating DNA molecule encoding Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was enzymatically synthesized in vitro from DNA templates made from overlapping oligonucleotides. The molecule was a replica of the alphabetic text rendering of the first TMV genome sequence elucidated by Goelet et al. ...

  4. Expanding the phenotype of mosaic trisomy 20.

    PubMed

    Willis, Mary J H; Bird, Lynne M; Dell'Aquilla, Marie; Jones, Marilyn C

    2008-02-01

    Mosaic trisomy 20 is one of the more common cytogenetic abnormalities found on amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Studies have shown that outcome is normal in 90-93% of prenatally diagnosed cases. There are however, reports in the literature of children with mosaic trisomy 20 described as having an assortment of dysmorphic features and varying levels of developmental delay. Unfortunately, the literature has not defined a specific phenotype for this entity. Here we report on three patients with mosaic trisomy 20, two of whom were identified prenatally. Over a number of years of follow-up it has become apparent that there are some striking similarities among the three. Comparison between our patients and the literature cases indicates a more consistent phenotype than has previously been suggested. Recurring features include; spinal abnormalities (including spinal stenosis, vertebral fusion, and kyphosis), hypotonia, lifelong constipation, sloped shoulders, and significant learning disabilities despite normal intelligence. These findings may be overlooked on routine history and physical exam or assumed to be standard pediatric problems. It is not our intention to suggest that there is a distinctive face for this entity but to suggest that a subtle phenotype does exist. We have attempted to identify a set of findings for which any child diagnosed with mosaic trisomy 20 should be assessed or followed even in the presence of an apparently normal physical exam at birth. PMID:18203170

  5. Genetics of seed transmission Soybean mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is an aphid- and seed-transmitted member of the Potyviridae that infects soybean plants and, in years when virus infections are widespread, can cause significant reductions in the quantity and quality of seed harvested. Because seed-borne infections are the primary sources...

  6. Increased chromosome 21 mosaicism in older Down syndrome individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, E.C.; Schupf, N.; Harris, M.

    1994-09-01

    Loss of one chromosome 21 in older Down syndrome individuals has been reported recently. During a study of the familial aggregation of Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease, our preliminary observations indicated increased mosaicism for the loss of a chromosome 21 in whole blood cultures from Down syndrome individuals who were age 50 or over from a cohort of 22 individuals. We retrospectively reviewed our experience in 189 cases of Down syndrome ranging in age from 1 day to 71 years. In a combined total of 212 individuals, 39 were age 50 or more of whom 7 or 18% were mosaic, while 169 were under age 50 of whom 4 or 2% were mosaic. Therefore the occurrence of mosaicism was strikingly increased in the group of individuals who were age 50 or over ({chi}{sup 2}=12.8, p<.001). Our observations confirm the above reports of increased mosaicism for chromosome 21 loss in lymphocyte cultures from older Down syndrome individuals. Since the older individuals were not karyotyped at birth, it is not possible to determine whether the age-related increase in mosaicism is due to increased survival of mosaic individuals or acquired mosaicism. Assuming 1% mosaicism at birth for Down syndrome and assuming the general population`s death rates for these mosaic individuals, life table methods showed that the expected proportion of these individuals at age 70 was 5%. This was less than 1/3 of our observations suggesting that acquired mosaicism was the predominant mechanism for our findings.

  7. MOSAIC for multiple-reward environments.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Norikazu; Haruno, Masahiko; Doya, Kenji; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2012-03-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) can provide a basic framework for autonomous robots to learn to control and maximize future cumulative rewards in complex environments. To achieve high performance, RL controllers must consider the complex external dynamics for movements and task (reward function) and optimize control commands. For example, a robot playing tennis and squash needs to cope with the different dynamics of a tennis or squash racket and such dynamic environmental factors as the wind. In addition, this robot has to tailor its tactics simultaneously under the rules of either game. This double complexity of the external dynamics and reward function sometimes becomes more complex when both the multiple dynamics and multiple reward functions switch implicitly, as in the situation of a real (multi-agent) game of tennis where one player cannot observe the intention of her opponents or her partner. The robot must consider its opponent's and its partner's unobservable behavioral goals (reward function). In this article, we address how an RL agent should be designed to handle such double complexity of dynamics and reward. We have previously proposed modular selection and identification for control (MOSAIC) to cope with nonstationary dynamics where appropriate controllers are selected and learned among many candidates based on the error of its paired dynamics predictor: the forward model. Here we extend this framework for RL and propose MOSAIC-MR architecture. It resembles MOSAIC in spirit and selects and learns an appropriate RL controller based on the RL controller's TD error using the errors of the dynamics (the forward model) and the reward predictors. Furthermore, unlike other MOSAIC variants for RL, RL controllers are not a priori paired with the fixed predictors of dynamics and rewards. The simulation results demonstrate that MOSAIC-MR outperforms other counterparts because of this flexible association ability among RL controllers, forward models, and reward

  8. Landsat Thematic Mapper Image Mosaic of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Noble, Suzanne M.; Blauer, Steven L.; Friesen, Beverly A.; Bauer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC) produced a seamless, cloud-minimized remotely-sensed image spanning the State of Colorado. Multiple orthorectified Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) scenes collected during 2006-2008 were spectrally normalized via reflectance transformation and linear regression based upon pseudo-invariant features (PIFS) following the removal of clouds. Individual Landsat scenes were then mosaicked to form a six-band image composite spanning the visible to shortwave infrared spectrum. This image mosaic, presented here, will also be used to create a conifer health classification for Colorado in Scientific Investigations Map 3103. An archive of past and current Landsat imagery exists and is available to the scientific community (http://glovis.usgs.gov/), but significant pre-processing was required to produce a statewide mosaic from this information. Much of the data contained perennial cloud cover that complicated analysis and classification efforts. Existing Landsat mosaic products, typically three band image composites, did not include the full suite of multispectral information necessary to produce this assessment, and were derived using data collected in 2001 or earlier. A six-band image mosaic covering Colorado was produced. This mosaic includes blue (band 1), green (band 2), red (band 3), near infrared (band 4), and shortwave infrared information (bands 5 and 7). The image composite shown here displays three of the Landsat bands (7, 4, and 2), which are sensitive to the shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. Vegetation appears green in this image, while water looks black, and unforested areas appear pink. The lines that may be visible in the on-screen version of the PDF are an artifact of the export methods used to create this file. The file should be viewed at 150 percent zoom or greater for optimum viewing.

  9. Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    For most of us, Antarctica was at best a distant acquaintance. Now, with the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA), we are on intimate terms. In stunning, up-close and personal detail, LIMA brings Antarctica to life. Explore this virtually cloudless, seamless, most geometrically accurate, and highest resolution satellite mosaic of Antarctica. A team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the British Antarctic Survey, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, with funding from the National Science Foundation, created LIMA in support of the International Polar Year (IPY; 2007?08). As the first major scientific outcome of the IPY, LIMA truly fulfills the IPY goals. LIMA is an international effort, supports current scientific polar research, encourages new projects, and helps the general public visualize Antarctica and changes happening in this southernmost environment. Researchers and the general public can download LIMA and all component Landsat scenes at no charge.

  10. Towards Luminescence Dating Of Mosaic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibila, E.; Villa, I.

    The possibility of dating archaeological glass by means of luminescent techniques has been investigated in recent years, despite the difficulties of this application, mainly linked to the amorphous structure of the material. We focused in particular on mosaic glass, after the encouraging results obtained on byzantine and medieval samples. Further studies were devoted to the comprehension of the luminescent mechanisms in silica glasses, and to the investigation of the relationships between luminescence, colouring or opacifier ions and crystalline phase of the vitreous matrix. The results of a study on the dosimetric characteristics of thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of a few medieval blue-green mosaic glasses from the San Lorenzo church (Milan) are presented, and the experimental protocols established to identify their suitability for dating are discussed.

  11. Mosaic Infrared Sensor for Space Astronomy (MIRSSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development of mosaic infrared detector/focal plane arrays for space astronomy is reported. The Mosaic IR Sensor for Space Astronomy (MIRSSA) Program is an effort to develop PV HgCdTe detector arrays with the spectral response of up to 5 micron and silicon CCDs for low temperature applications. Desired background-limited performance (BLIP) for space applications requires an extremely high R sub A product which can be achieved by selecting the detector materials and the operating temperature. The parameters were determined by measurement of HgCdTe PV detector arrays at various temperatures in the SW and MW spectral bands. It is demonstrated that high performance PV HgCdTe detectors can be fabricated for low temperature applications.

  12. Mosaic double aneuploidy: Down syndrome and XYY.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Mayur; Koshy, Beena; Srivastava, Vivi Miriam

    2013-07-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are seen in nearly 1% of live born infants. We report a 5-year-old boy with the clinical features of Down syndrome, which is the most common human aneuploidy. Cytogenetic analysis showed a mosaicism for a double aneuploidy, Down syndrome and XYY. The karyotype was 47, XY,+21[19]/48, XYY,+21[6]. ish XYY (DXZ1 × 1, DYZ1 × 2). Mosaic double aneuploidies are very rare and features of only one of the aneuploidies may predominate in childhood. Cytogenetic analysis is recommended even if the typical features of a recognized aneuploidy are present so that any associated abnormality may be detected. This will enable early intervention to provide the adequate supportive care and management. PMID:24339550

  13. Digital Elevation Model Mosaic of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. C.; Watters, T. R.; Robinson, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    At CEPS (Center for Earth and Planetary Studies) work has been underway since 2000 to semi-automatically stereo match all Mariner 10 stereo pairs. The resulting matched image coordinates are converted into longitude, latitude, and height points and then combined to form a map projected Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic of the planet's surface. Stereo images from Mariner 10 cover one quarter of the planet's surface, mostly in the southern hemisphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Confined placental mosaicisms and uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalousek, D.K.; Langlois, S.; Harrison, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 2% of pregnancies studied with chorionic villous sampling (CVS) show confined placental mosaicism (CPM) which persists to term in 50-70% of cases. An increased frequency of complications, such as intrauterine fetal growth restriction or intrauterine death, is observed in these pregnancies. As trisomic zygote rescue is a common mechanism responsible for CPM, fetal uniparental disomy (UPD), resulting from the loss of the extra trisomic chromosome in the embryonic stem cells, would be expected to occur in a proportion of pregnancies with CPM. We have studied 27 pregnancies with CPM involving trisomies for chromosomes 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, and 16 for involvement of specific cell lineage(s) and levels of mosaicism in term placentas. Also, DNA from the parents and infant was analyzed for UPD or biparental disomy (BPD). Five infants with UPD for chromosome 16 and one infant with UPD for chromosome 7 were detected. All other infants showed BPD for the chromosome involved in CPM. For trisomy 16 mosaic gestations, a close correlation between high levels of trisomic cells in placenta and intrauterine fetal growth restriction has been found irrespective of the type of disomy present in the infant. The effect of other trisomies (2, 7, 9, 10, 12) on placental function appears to be similar, but the low numbers of pregnancies studied and lack of detection of UPD for chromosomes 2, 9, 10 and 12 does not allow a definitive conclusion.

  15. Forest bird demography in a landscape mosaic

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    A tandem approach of field studies and simulation modeling was used to examine avian demography in a landscape mosaic of habitat patches. A particular goal was to attempt to account for the regional decline in abundance of a subset of bird species sensitive to forest fragmentation. Species abundance patterns in forest patches were framed as the consequence of individual birds' demographics, constrained by their landscape context; this context was partitioned to emphasize habitat availability (or area), accessibility (or isolation), and localized factors affecting reproductive success (nest predation and brood parasitism). Each of these constraints was examined in turn, to assess their relative contribution to species abundance patterns observed in landscape mosaics. A forest simulation model was used to develop a theoretical basis for the importance of microhabitat pattern in forest bird communities. Hypotheses about microhabitat variety and bird species distribution in landscapes were not supported by data from woodlots in Cadiz Township, southern Wisconsin. The hierarchical conceptual model developed in this study represents a synthetic general model, a framework that can be simplified under specified scenarios to provide predictions about bird species abundance patterns in landscape mosaics.

  16. Hypothesis: Somatic Mosaicism and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Mutations causing genetic disorders can occur during mitotic cell division after fertilization, which is called somatic mutations. This leads to somatic mosaicism, where two or more genetically distinct cells are present in one individual. Somatic mutations are the most well studied in cancer where it plays an important role and also have been associated with some neurodegenerative disorders. The study of somatic mosaicism in Parkinson disease (PD) is only in its infancy, and a case with somatic mutation has not yet been described. However, we can speculate that a somatic mutation affecting cells in the central nervous system including substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons could lead to the development of PD through the same pathomechanisms of genetic PD even in the absence of a germ-line mutation. Theoretically, a number of genes could be candidates for genetic analysis for the presence of somatic mosaicism. Among them, SNCA and PARK2 could be the best candidates to analyze. Because analyzing brain tissues in living patients is impossible, alternative tissues could be used to indicate the genetic status of the brain. Performance of the technology is another factor to consider when analyzing the tissues. PMID:25548528

  17. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bindschadler, R.; Vornberger, P.; Fleming, A.; Fox, A.; Mullins, J.; Binnie, D.; Paulsen, S.J.; Granneman, B.; Gorodetzky, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) is the first true-color, high-spatial-resolution image of the seventh continent. It is constructed from nearly 1100 individually selected Landsat-7 ETM+ scenes. Each image was orthorectified and adjusted for geometric, sensor and illumination variations to a standardized, almost seamless surface reflectance product. Mosaicing to avoid clouds produced a high quality, nearly cloud-free benchmark data set of Antarctica for the International Polar Year from images collected primarily during 1999-2003. Multiple color composites and enhancements were generated to illustrate additional characteristics of the multispectral data including: the true appearance of the surface; discrimination between snow and bare ice; reflectance variations within bright snow; recovered reflectance values in regions of sensor saturation; and subtle topographic variations associated with ice flow. LIMA is viewable and individual scenes or user defined portions of the mosaic are downloadable at http://lima.usgs.gov. Educational materials associated with LIMA are available at http://lima.nasa.gov.

  18. A 3D mosaic algorithm using disparity map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bo; Kakeya, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    Conventionally there exist two major methods to create mosaics in 3D videos. One is to duplicate the area of mosaics from the image of one viewpoint (the left view or the right view) to that of the other viewpoint. This method, which is not capable of expressing depth, cannot give viewers a natural perception in 3D. The other method is to create the mosaics separately in the left view and the right view. With this method the depth is expressed in the area of mosaics, but 3D perception is not natural enough. To overcome these problems, we propose a method to create mosaics by using a disparity map. In the proposed method the mosaic of the image from one viewpoint is made with the conventional method, while the mosaic of the image from the other viewpoint is made based on the data of the disparity map so that the mosaic patterns of the two images can give proper depth perception to the viewer. We confirm that the proposed mosaic pattern using a disparity map gives more natural depth perception of the viewer by subjective experiments using a static image and two videos.

  19. Constitutional trisomy 8 mosaicism syndrome: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Kindy, Adila

    2013-01-01

    Trisomy 8 mosaicism (Warkany syndrome) is a rare viable condition with variable phenotypes, ranging from mild dysmorphic features to severe malformations. Karyotyping and fluorescence in-situ hybridization potentially help detecting this low mosaic clone to confirm the diagnosis of patients with classical and unusual clinical presentations. This report reviews few previous cases to describe our case - a boy who had trisomy 8 mosaicism with severe dysmorphic features, born to a consanguineous Arabic couple. This study concludes that careful cytogenetic diagnoses of trisomy 8 mosaicism is essential for appropriate management and follow up of this rare disorder.

  20. Response of maize (Zea mays L.) lines carrying Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3 to the potyviruses Johnsongrass mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize dwarf mosaic disease is one of the most important viral diseases of maize throughout the world. It is caused by a set of related viruses in the family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), and S...

  1. First report of blueberry mosaic disease caused by blueberry mosaic associated virus in Kentucky

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, a grower in Casey County Kentucky observed persistent yellow, green, and red mosaic patterns on leaves of highbush blueberry plants. Twenty-three randomly-scattered ‘Bluecrop’ plants out of approximately 1,400 5-year-old plants showed symptoms, with coverage ranging from 5% to 100%. Asympto...

  2. First report of Sorghum mosaic virus causing mosaic in Miscanthus sinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus is being evaluated as a bioenergy feedstock because of its potentially significant biomass production, perennial habit, and lack of major diseases and pests. It is also a valuable parent in the sugarcane breeding program as source of cold tolerance. Mosaic symptoms were observed on a clo...

  3. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, R.; Vornberger, P.; Fleming, A.; Fox, A.; Morin, P.

    2008-12-01

    The first-ever true-color, high-resolution digital mosaic of Antarctica has been produced from nearly 1100 Landsat-7 ETM+ images collected between 1999 and 2003. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) project was an early benchmark data set of the International Polar Year and represents a close and successful collaboration between NASA, USGS, the British Antarctic Survey and the National Science Foundation. The mosaic was successfully merged with lower resolution MODIS data south of Landsat coverage to produce a complete true-color data set of the entire continent. LIMA is being used as a platform for a variety of education and outreach activities. Central to this effort is the NASA website 'Faces of Antarctica' that offers the web visitor the opportunity to explore the data set and to learn how these data are used to support scientific research. Content is delivered through a set of mysteries designed to pique the user's interest and to motivate them to delve deeper into the website where there are various videos and scientific articles for downloading. Detailed lesson plans written by teachers are provided for classroom use and Java applets let the user track the motion of ice in sequential Landsat images. Web links take the user to other sites where they can roam over the imagery using standard pan and zoom functions, or search for any named feature in the Antarctic Geographic Names data base that returns to the user a centered true-color view of any named feature. LIMA also has appeared is a host of external presentations from museum exhibits, to postcards and large posters. It has attracted various value-added providers that increase LIMA's accessibility by allowing users to specify subsets of the very large data set for individual downloads. The ultimate goal of LIMA in the public and educational sector is to enable everyone to become more familiar with Antarctica.

  4. High-Resolution South Polar Cap Mosaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The layered terrains of the polar regions of Mars are among the most exotic planetary landscapes in our Solar System. The layers exposed in the south polar residual cap, vividly shown in the top view, are thought to contain detailed records of Mars' climate history over the last 100 million years or so. The materials that comprise the south polar layers may include frozen carbon dioxide, water ice, and fine dust. The bottom picture shows complex erosional patterns that have developed on the south polar cap, perhaps by a combination of sublimation, wind erosion, and ground-collapse. Because the south polar terrains are so strange and new to human eyes, no one (yet) has entirely adequate explanations as to what is being seen.

    These images were acquired by the Mars Orbiter Camera aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during the southern spring season in October 1999. Each of these two pictures is a mosaic of many individual MOC images acquired at about 12 m/pixel scale that completely cover the highest latitude (87oS) visible to MOC on each orbital pass over the polar region. Both mosaics cover areas of about 10 x 4 kilometers (6.2 x 2.5 miles) near 87oS, 10oW in the central region of the permanent--or residual--south polar cap. They show features at the scale of a small house. Sunlight illuminates each scene from the left.'Gaps' at the upper and lower right of the second mosaic, above, are areas that were not covered by MOC in October 1999.

  5. Germline mosaicism at the fragile X locus

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X full mutation, which is associated with the phenotypic expression of the disorder, is characterized by an expansion of CGG repeat and hypermethylation of the CpG island adjacent to the FMR1 gene. New mutations leading to amplification of the CGG repeat have not been reported. We have identified a fragile X syndrome pedigree where the disorder is associated with a molecular deletion. The deletion was present in the DNA of two affected sons but was absent in the mother`s somatic cell (lymphocyte) DNA. This was confirmed by dosage analysis of the Southern blot using StB12-3 and an additional probe against the dystrophin gene and by PCR analysis of DXS548 alleles. The results are consistent with the deletion arising as a postzygotic event in the mother, who therefore is germinally mosaic. The case reported here clearly demonstrates that FMR1 deletions, unlike the expansions, are not always inherited and the finding of heterozygosity or normal dosage from lymphocyte DNA in the mother of a deletion case does not necessarily rule out the possibility of having a second affected child. The deletion of FMR1 gene may be responsible for a small but significant number of fragile X cases. Therefore, it is imperative that those involved in genetic counseling recognize this diagnostic pitfall. Since it depends upon the size of the mutant clone in the mosaic mother, the exact recurrence risk in germline carriers is unknown. However, prenatal and carrier testing should be performed independently of the outcome of the mother. Furthermore, it is possible that the deletion may not be restricted to the germline, and therefore the mother may actually be a somatic mosaic.

  6. Goldenhar sequence and mosaic trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pridjian, G.; Gill, W.L.; Shapira, E.

    1995-12-04

    We describe a term infant with facio-auriculo-vertebral {open_quotes}dysplasia{close_quotes} (Goldenhar sequence), hypertelorism, and mosaic trisomy 22: peripheral blood, 46, XY/47, XY,+22 (72%/28%); skin fibroblasts, 47, XY,+22(100%). This is the second report of Goldenbar anomaly with epibulbar dermoids in a live-born infant with aneuploidy. Hypertelorism is rare in Goldenhar sequence, but typical of trisomy 22. We recommend chromosome analysis in all patients with Goldenhar sequence. Those with hypertelorism may be more likely to have aneuploidy as well. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Thermographic mosaic of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.; Hasell, P. G., Jr.; Sellman, A. N.; Smedes, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    An uncontrolled aerial thermographic mosaic of Yellowstone National Park was assembled from the videotape record of 13 individual thermographs obtained with linescan radiometers. Post mission processing of the videotape record rectified the nadir line to a topographic map base, corrected for v/h variations in adjacent flight lanes, corrected for yaw and pitch distortions, and distortions produced by nonlinearity of the side-wise scan. One of the purposes of the thermographic study was to delineate the areas of thermal emission (hot springs, geysers, etc.) throughout the Park, a study which could have great value in reconnaissance surveys of geothermal areas in remote regions or regions of high relief.

  8. Immunochromatographic purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Bujarski, J J; Wiatroszak, I

    1981-01-01

    The method of immunoadsorptional purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus has been worked out. Immunosorbents were obtained by coupling the antibody (IgG) fraction isolated from anti-BYMV and anti-pea leaf protein antisera with CNBr-activated 1% agarose beads. Conditions for preparation of immunosorbents, for BYMV adsorption and elution as well as the method of plant protein separation from BYMV were pointed out. The purity of BYMV was checked by double immunodiffusion as well as by SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Also biological activity was determined. TMV was used as the model virus for further BYMV studies. PMID:7025790

  9. Global Digital Image Mosaics of Mars: Assessment of Geodetic Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R.; Archinal, B. A.; Lee, E. M.; Davies, M. E.; Colvin, T. R.; Duxbury, T. C.

    2001-01-01

    A revised global image mosaic of Mars (MDIM 2.0) was recently completed by USGS. Comparison with high-resolution gridded Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) digital image mosaics will allow us to quantify its geodetic errors; linking the next MDIM to the MOLA data will help eliminate those errors. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Sex mosaics in a male dimorphic ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Juri; Mimori, Kohei; Yamauchi, Katsusuke; Tsuchida, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Gynandromorphy, or the development of organisms with a combination of male and female morphological features, is common in Hymenoptera. The underlying mechanism is likely associated with the sex-determination system, and studying this phenomenon should lead to a deeper understanding of both embryonic development and sex determination. The reproductive capabilities of gynandromorphs (hereafter, sex mosaics) remain unclear. We studied gynandromorphy in the Malaysian ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, which has sex mosaics of queens (gynandromorphs; mosaic of queens and winged male) and workers (ergatandromorphs; mosaic of worker and wingless ergatoid male). These sex mosaics were classified into seven morphological categories. Most individuals had more male than female body areas. Behavioral observations revealed that sex mosaics behave more in accordance with the “sex” of their brain than that of the reproductive organs (gaster). Relative DNA quantities showed that both female and male regions contained haploid and diploid nuclei, irrespective of their phenotypic appearance, indicating that external appearance did not reflect internal tissues. Nearly one third of the adults were sex mosaics and they were not infected with Wolbachia. Our results suggest that the production of sex mosaics in this species does not pose a substantial cost to colonies and that the underlying causes are therefore not strongly selected against.

  11. First Report of Pepino Mosaic Virus Infecting Tomato in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic has become endemic greenhouse tomato disease in many countries around the world. Its occurrence in Mexico has yet to be determined. In early spring of 2010, symptoms of yellow mosaic, chlorotic patches and fruit marbling were observed in approximately 50% of tomato plants in a commerc...

  12. An Experimental Host Range of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus isolated from wheat. This study was conducted to determine an experimental host range for TriMV and identify species that could serve as differential hosts for isolating TriMV from Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV). Plants tested were mechan...

  13. New Viruses Identified in Fig Trees Exhibiting Fig Mosaic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fig mosaic disease has been known for decades, but the causal agent has been elusive. Here we present data on the incidence of at least four new viruses isolated from fig trees exhibiting mosaic symptoms. One of the viruses is closely related to the recently identified European mountain ash ringspo...

  14. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Williams, Dewight; Bian, Wen; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-09-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus.

  15. Mosaic Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Parkin, Patricia; Lara-Corrales, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Confusion is widespread regarding segmental or mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1 (MNF1). Physicians should use the same terms and be aware of its comorbidities and risks. The objective of the current study was to identify and synthesize data for cases of MNF1 published from 1977 to 2012 to better understand its significance and associations. After a literature search in PubMed, we reviewed all available relevant articles and abstracted and synthetized the relevant clinical data about manifestations, associated findings, family history and genetic testing. We identified 111 articles reporting 320 individuals. Most had pigmentary changes or neurofibromas only. Individuals with pigmentary changes alone were identified at a younger age. Seventy-six percent had localized MNF1 restricted to one segment; the remainder had generalized MNF1. Of 157 case reports, 29% had complications associated with NF1. In one large case series, 6.5% had offspring with complete NF1. The terms "segmental" and "type V" neurofibromatosis should be abandoned, and the correct term, mosaic NF1 (MNF1), should be used. All individuals with suspected MNF1 should have a complete physical examination, genetic testing of blood and skin, counseling, and health surveillance. PMID:26338194

  16. Forest bird demography in a landscape mosaic

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, D.L.; Shugart, H.H. Jr.; DeAngelis, D.L.; O'Neill, R.V.

    1988-07-01

    A tandem approach of field studies and simulation modeling was used to examine avian demography in a landscape mosaic of habitat patches. A particular goal was to attempt to account for the regional decline in abundance of a subset of bird species sensitive to forest fragmentation. Species abundance patterns in forest patches were framed as the consequence of individual birds' demographics, constrained by their landscape context; this context was partitioned to emphasize habitat availability (or area), accessibility (or isolation), and localized factors affecting reproductive success (nest predation and brood parasitism). Each of these constraints was examined in turn, to assess their relative contribution to species abundance patterns observed in landscape mosaics. A forest simulation model was used to develop a theoretical basis for the importance of microhabitat pattern in forest bird communities. Simulated patterns in microhabitat availability could provide for successional trends in bird species diversity, a relation between niche position and species abundance, the occurrence of more rare species than common ones, and a species/area effect. Hypotheses about microhabitat variety and bird species distribution in landscapes were not supported by data from woodlots in Cadiz Township, southern Wisconsin. 39 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Quantification of yield loss caused by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus in winter wheat under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) infect winter wheat in the Great Plains region of the United States. The two viruses are transmitted by wheat curl mites, which also transmit High Plains virus. In a field study conducted in 2011 and 2012, winter wheat cultivars Mi...

  18. Resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat lines carrying Wsm1 and Wsm3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are important viruses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of United States. In addition to agronomic practices to prevent damage from these viruses, temperature sensitive resistance genes Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3, have bee...

  19. Attempts to Improve the Method of Screening Cowpea Germplasm for Resistance to Cucumber Mosaic Virus and Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of visual symptom screening for cowpea plants in field plots improved screening for Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus (BICMV)-resistance. However, the method failed to improve the speed or accuracy of screening for Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV)-resistance. Plants that displayed few visual virus sympt...

  20. Detection of Corchorus golden mosaic virus Associated with Yellow Mosaic Disease of Jute (Corchorus capsularis).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Palit, Paramita; Paul, Sujay; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Roy, Anirban

    2012-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease, caused by a whitefly transmitted New World Begomovirus, named Corchorus golden mosaic virus (CoGMV), is emerging as a serious biotic constraint for jute fibre production in Asia. For rapid and sensitive diagnosis of the Begomovirus associated with this disease, a non-radiolabelled diagnostic probe, developed against the DNA A component of the east Indian isolate of CoGMV, detected the presence of the virus in infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies following Southern hybridization and nucleic acid spot hybridization tests. Presence of the virus was also confirmed when polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using virus-specific primers on DNA templates isolated from infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies. PMID:23730007

  1. The eMOSAIC model for humanoid robot control.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Norikazu; Morimoto, Jun; Hyon, Sang-Ho; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we propose an extension of the MOSAIC architecture to control real humanoid robots. MOSAIC was originally proposed by neuroscientists to understand the human ability of adaptive control. The modular architecture of the MOSAIC model can be useful for solving nonlinear and non-stationary control problems. Both humans and humanoid robots have nonlinear body dynamics and many degrees of freedom. Since they can interact with environments (e.g., carrying objects), control strategies need to deal with non-stationary dynamics. Therefore, MOSAIC has strong potential as a human motor-control model and a control framework for humanoid robots. Yet application of the MOSAIC model has been limited to simple simulated dynamics since it is susceptive to observation noise and also cannot be applied to partially observable systems. Our approach introduces state estimators into MOSAIC architecture to cope with real environments. By using an extended MOSAIC model, we are able to successfully generate squatting and object-carrying behaviors on a real humanoid robot. PMID:22366503

  2. Custom Sky-Image Mosaics from NASA's Information Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph; Collier, James; Craymer, Loring; Curkendall, David

    2005-01-01

    yourSkyG is the second generation of the software described in yourSky: Custom Sky-Image Mosaics via the Internet (NPO-30556), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 6 (June 2003), page 45. Like its predecessor, yourSkyG supplies custom astronomical image mosaics of sky regions specified by requesters using client computers connected to the Internet. Whereas yourSky constructs mosaics on a local multiprocessor system, yourSkyG performs the computations on NASA s Information Power Grid (IPG), which is capable of performing much larger mosaicking tasks. (The IPG is high-performance computation and data grid that integrates geographically distributed 18 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2005 computers, databases, and instruments.) A user of yourSkyG can specify parameters describing a mosaic to be constructed. yourSkyG then constructs the mosaic on the IPG and makes it available for downloading by the user. The complexities of determining which input images are required to construct a mosaic, retrieving the required input images from remote sky-survey archives, uploading the images to the computers on the IPG, performing the computations remotely on the Grid, and downloading the resulting mosaic from the Grid are all transparent to the user

  3. Parallel-Processing Software for Creating Mosaic Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Deen, Robert; McCauley, Michael; DeJong, Eric

    2008-01-01

    A computer program implements parallel processing for nearly real-time creation of panoramic mosaics of images of terrain acquired by video cameras on an exploratory robotic vehicle (e.g., a Mars rover). Because the original images are typically acquired at various camera positions and orientations, it is necessary to warp the images into the reference frame of the mosaic before stitching them together to create the mosaic. [Also see "Parallel-Processing Software for Correlating Stereo Images," Software Supplement to NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 9 (September 2007) page 26.] The warping algorithm in this computer program reflects the considerations that (1) for every pixel in the desired final mosaic, a good corresponding point must be found in one or more of the original images and (2) for this purpose, one needs a good mathematical model of the cameras and a good correlation of individual pixels with respect to their positions in three dimensions. The desired mosaic is divided into slices, each of which is assigned to one of a number of central processing units (CPUs) operating simultaneously. The results from the CPUs are gathered and placed into the final mosaic. The time taken to create the mosaic depends upon the number of CPUs, the speed of each CPU, and whether a local or a remote data-staging mechanism is used.

  4. Calibration and Mosaicing of SMART-1 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, J. M.; Grieger, B.; Mora, A.; Almeida, M.; Costa, M.; Antunes, L.; Fernandes, V. A.

    2012-09-01

    Since mid 2010 the scientific community has access to the data collected by SMART-1 mission that orbited the Moon between 2004 and 2006. The onboard camera (AMIE) collected during that period images with the then state-of-the-art resolution and coverage of the lunar surface. The scientific interest of SMART-1 images is historical, as the data offers a snapshot of the lunar surface during the mission period, allowing comparative studies of the lunar surface. Our aim in this work is to build the atlas of the Moon as SMART-1 captured it. During the Earth escape phase, the AMIE CCD was damaged by radiation, invalidating the laboratorial flat field correction algorithm. A new image calibration procedure was developed based on the in-flight images and on theoretical models. This was followed by a mosaicing technique applied to all the 31947 collected images , to select, compensate geometrical distortions and compose a total of 88 maps of the lunar surface.

  5. Two-image mosaic of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This computer-assembled two-image mosaic of Saturn's rings, taken by NASA's Voyager 1 on Nov. 6, 1980 at a range of 8 million kilometers (5 million miles), shows approximately 95 individual concentric features in the rings. The extraordinarily complex structure of the rings is easily seen across the entire span of the ring system. The ring structure, once thought to be produced by the gravitational interaction between Saturn's satellites and the orbit of ring particles, has now been found to be too complex for this explanation alone. The 14th satellite of Saturn, discovered by Voyager 1, is seen (upper left) just inside the narrow F-ring, which is less than 150 kilometers (93 miles wide). The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  6. Methods of Spectral Analysis in C++ (MOSAIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engesser, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stellar spectroscopic classification is most often still done by hand. MOSAIC is a project focused on the collection and classification of astronomical spectra using a computerized algorithm. The code itself attempts to accurately classify stellar spectra according to the broad spectral classes within the Morgan-Keenan system of spectral classification, based on estimated temperature and the relative abundances of certain notable elements (Hydrogen, Helium, etc.) in the stellar atmosphere. The methodology includes calibrating the wavelength for pixels across the image by using the wavelength dispersion of pixels inherent with the spectrograph used. It then calculates the location of the peak in the star's Planck spectrum in order to roughly classify the star. Fitting the graph to a blackbody curve is the final step for a correct classification. Future work will involve taking a closer look at emission lines and luminosity classes.

  7. Think about it: FMR1 gene mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Bonarrigo, Francesca Andrea; Russo, Silvia; Vizziello, Paola; Menni, Francesca; Cogliati, Francesca; Giorgini, Valentina; Monti, Federico; Milani, Donatella

    2014-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the most frequent causes of mental retardation, intellectual disability, and autism. Most cases are the result of an expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene and the subsequent functional loss of the related protein. We describe the case of a 4-year-old boy who clinically presents mild psychomotor delay without any major clinical dysmorphisms. Molecular analysis of the FMR1 gene showed mosaicism in terms of size and methylation, with one normal and 1 fully mutated allele, which is very rare in this syndrome. Physicians should therefore consider a diagnosis of FXS even if the patient's phenotype is mild. Although rare, diagnosing this condition has important consequences for the patient's rehabilitation and the family planning of parents and relatives. PMID:24065579

  8. Uruk Sulcus Mosaic - Galileo over Voyager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo images of the Uruk Sulcus region on Ganymede (Latitude 11 N, Longitude: 170 W) is shown overlayed on the data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1979. North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left, nearly overhead. The area shown is about 120 by 110 kilometers (75 by 68 miles) in extent and the smallest features that can be discerned are 74 meters (243 feet) in size in the Galileo images and 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) in the Voyager data. The higher resolution Galileo images unveil the details of parallel ridges and troughs that are principal features in the brighter regions of Ganymede. High photometric activity (large light contrast at high spatial frequencies) of this ice-rich surface was such that the Galileo camera's hardware data compressor was pushed into truncating lines. The north-south running gap between the left and right halves of the mosaic is a result of line truncation from the normal 800 samples per line to about 540. The images were taken on 27 June, 1996 Universal Time at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4,628 miles) through the clear filter of the Galileo spacecraft's imaging system.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  9. Comparison of barley stripe mosaic virus strains.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Elsayed E; Abdel Aleem, Engy E; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2008-01-01

    BSMV (barley stripe mosaic virus) particles were obtained in a pure state from infected host plant tissues of Hordeum vulgare. The three genomic parities (alpha, beta and gamma) were amplified by PCR using specific primers for each particle; each was cloned. Partial sequence of the alpha, beta and gamma segments was determined for the Egyptian isolate of barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV AE1). Alignment of nucleotide sequences with that of other known strains of the virus, BSMV type strains (CV17, ND18 and China), and the generation of phylogenetic trees was performed. A low level of homology was detected comparing 467 bp of the a and 643 bp of the segments to that of the other strains, and thus BSMV alpha and beta segments were in separate clusters. However, 1154 bp of the gamma segments of BSMV AE1 showed a high level of homology especially to strain BSMV ND18, as they both formed a distinct cluster. Northern blotting of pure BSMV AE1 virus and H. vulgare-infected tissue were compared using an alpha ND18 specific probe. Western blotting using antibodies specific for the coat protein (CP) and the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein, which are both encoded by the beta ND18 segment, still indicated a high level of similarity between proteins produced by BSMV ND18 and AE1. We suggest that the BSMV AE1 isolate is a distinct strain of BSMV which reflects the genetic evolutionary divergence among BSMV strains and members of the Hordeivirus group. PMID:18533473

  10. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes..

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  11. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  12. Mosaicism for a chromosome 8-derived minute marker chromosome in a patient with manifestations of trisomy 8 mosaicism

    SciTech Connect

    Spinner, N.B.; Grace, K.R.; Owens, N.L.

    1995-03-13

    We describe a patient with manifestations of the mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome and mosaicism for a minute marker chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a chromosome 8 probe confirmed that the marker was derived from chromosome 8. This is the smallest piece of chromosome 8 to be reported in a patient with mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome. When the clinical picture is strongly suggestive of trisomy for a specific chromosome region, we believe that FISH can be used to test markers in a guided, rather than random, fashion. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN FLOOR TILE, ASBESTOS CEMENT WALL BOARD, AND OPEN TRANSOM OVER THE SHOWER DOORWAY. VIEW FACING WEST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type D, 111 Beard Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Mosaic Double Aneuploidy of X and G Chromosomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Singh, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    Reported are case histories of three severely retarded adolescents with typical Down's Syndrome features but whose cytogenetic analysis revealed a rare chromosomal anomaly of mosaicism of Down's and Turner's syndromes. (CL)

  15. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. SHOWING ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN TILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. SHOWING ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN TILE FLOOR, TILE WAINSCOT AND SHOWER SURROUND, AND CERAMIC ACCESSORIES. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type J, 701 Beard Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  16. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 2. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 2. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN FLOOR TILE, EXPOSED-CORNER TUB, FLUSH VALVE TOILET, TILE WAINSCOT, AND CERAMIC ACCESSORIES. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type B, 704 Julian Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 8. 451 MADISON AVENUE, MAIN HALL, SOUTH WALL, MOSAIC TYMPANUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. 451 MADISON AVENUE, MAIN HALL, SOUTH WALL, MOSAIC TYMPANUM OF THREE FIGURES IN BOLD RELIEF ABOVE FIREPLACE - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  18. 79. DETAIL, MOSAIC FLOOR IN HALL 355 AT ENTRANCE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. DETAIL, MOSAIC FLOOR IN HALL 355 AT ENTRANCE TO REGENTS' ROOM, THIRD FLOOR - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Detail view of floor mosaic in first floor lobby ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of floor mosaic in first floor lobby - St. Elizabeths Hospital, Hitchcock Hall, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Southeast, 588-604 Redwood Street, Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  1. Update on High-Resolution Geodetically Controlled LROC Polar Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B.; Lee, E.; Weller, L.; Richie, J.; Edmundson, K.; Laura, J.; Robinson, M.; Speyerer, E.; Boyd, A.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Wagner, R.; Nefian, A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe progress on high-resolution (1 m/pixel) geodetically controlled LROC mosaics of the lunar poles, which can be used for locating illumination resources (for solar power or cold traps) or landing site and surface operations planning.

  2. A new national mosaic of state landcover data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, I.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviewed current landcover mapping efforts and presented a new preliminary, national mosaic of Gap Analysis Program (GAP) and Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium (MRLC) landcover data with a discussion of techniques, problems faced, and future refinements.

  3. Global and regional/seasonal color mosaics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    1993-01-01

    Four regional mosaics of Mars acquired during different seasons, along with their composite as a single global mosaic, have been completed in two colors (red and violet) at scales of 1/16 and 1/64 degrees/pixel. These mosaics were put together from a set of 51 separate mosaics, each acquired from a single Viking orbiter spacecraft orbital revolution. Special techniques were developed and applied to suppress large variations between mosaics introcued by highly variable, optically thin, condensate hazes. The techniques utilize a combination of the spatial characteristics of the hazes (generally broad, low-frequency) along with their modulation of the reginal color ratios (strongly enhancing the violet/red ratios). Photometric-function normalization was applied following the haze removal. Most of the single-orbit mosaics consist of red and violet or red, green, and violet filters, but a few mosaics with only red-filter data were included to fill gaps in global coverage at high northern latitudes. Global coverage is approximately 99 percent complete in red-filter mosaics and approximately 95 percent and approximately 60 percent complete in corresponding violet- and green-filter mosaics, respectively. All of the mosaics are geometrically tied to the 1/256 deg per pixel Mars Digital Image Map (MDIM), which is available on Compact Disk (CD), and which will be used as the base map for Mars Observer data sets. Early in 1993, the single-orbit color mosaics will be distributed to the science community in a six-volume set of CDs. Perhaps the most scientifically interesting parts of this dataset are the overlap regions, which show significant temporal variations in surface and atmospheric features. Surface changes can be categorized as (1) changes that probably occurred during the great dust storms of 1977; (2) changes that occurred soon after 1977 storms due to removal of redistribution of recently deposited dust; (3) changes in the northern lowlands that probably occurred

  4. 43. CUTTING APART PIECES OF A MOSAIC. WHEN SEPARATED, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. CUTTING APART PIECES OF A MOSAIC. WHEN SEPARATED, THE PIECES CAN BE INDIVIDUALLY GLAZED, SMOKED, OR FINISH FIRED TO PRODUCE A MULTI-COLORED IMAGE WHEN REASSEMBLED. NOTE THE SUBSTITUTION OF BUFF FOR RED CLAY IN SEVERAL PIECES OF MOSAIC ON THE LEFT. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  5. Detail view looking down at mosaics of everyday objects next ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view looking down at mosaics of everyday objects next to Living Trailer (rear steps seen frame left). "They Last" tile in center surrounded by tiles, irons, glasses, toy guns, license plates, bottle caps, and plastic parts. The mosaic was created in sections as squares and linear strips, as cement was mixed and objects were collected – the edges of these sections and variation of objects is noticeable. View looking north. - Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village, 4595 Cochran Street, Simi Valley, Ventura County, CA

  6. Delineation of a clinical syndrome caused by mosaic trisomy 15

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, E.M.; Bienz, G.; Straumann, E.; Bosceh, N.

    1996-03-15

    We report on a boy with mosaic trisomy 15. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of the few cases reported up to now. A clinical syndrome is delineated consisting of a characteristic shape of the nose and other minor craniofacial anomalies, as well as typical deformities of the hands and feet. Different degrees of mosaicism may explain the more or less severe manifestations in individual patients. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mosaic trisomy 8 detected by fibroblasts cultured of skin

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Ana M; Mora, Lina; Suarez-Obando, Fernando; Moreno, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mosaic trisomy 8 or "Warkany's Syndrome" is a chromosomopathy with an estimated prevalance of 1:25,000 to 1:50,000, whose clinical presentation has a wide phenotypic variability. Case Description: Patient aged 14 years old with antecedents of global retardation of development, moderate cognitive deficit and hypothyroidism of possible congenital origin. Clinical Findings: Physical examination revealed palpebral ptosis, small corneas and corectopia, hypoplasia of the upper maxilla and prognathism, dental crowding, high-arched palate, anomalies of the extremities such as digitalization of the thumbs, clinodactyly and bilateral shortening of the fifth finger, shortening of the right femur, columnar deviation and linear brown blotches that followed Blaschko's lines. Cerebral nuclear magnetic resonance revealed type 1 Chiari's malformation and ventriculomegaly. Although the karyotype was normal in peripheral blood (46,XY), based on the finding of cutaneous mosaicism the lesions were biopsied and cytogenetic analysis demonstrated mosaic trisomy 8: mos 47,XY,+8[7]/46,XY[93]. Clinical Relevance: Trisomy 8 is clinically presented as a mosaic, universal cases being unfailingly lethal. In this particular case, cutaneous lesions identified the mosaic in tissue, although the karyotype was normal in peripheral blood. The cutaneous mosaicism represented by brown linear blotches which follow Blaschko's lines is a clinical finding that has not previously been described in Warkany's syndrome. PMID:27546932

  8. Effects of single and double infections of winter wheat by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus on yield determinants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. It is transmitted by wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella Keifer) which also transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Wheat mosaic virus. In a gree...

  9. Galileo Regio Mosaic - Galileo over Voyager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo images of the Galileo Regio region on Ganymede (Latitude 18 N, Longitude: 149 W) is shown overlayed on the data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1979. North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left, about 58 degrees above the horizon. The smallest features that can be discerned are about 80 meters (262 feet) in size in the Galileo images. These Galileo images show fine details of the dark terrain that makes up about half of the surface of the planet-sized moon. Ancient impact craters of various sizes and states of degradation testify to the great age of the terrain, dating back several billion years. The images reveal distinctive variations in albedo from the brighter rims, knobs, and furrow walls to a possible accumulation of dark material on the lower slopes, and crater floors. High photometric activity (large light contrast at high spatial frequencies) of this ice-rich surface was such that the Galileo camera's hardware data compressor was pushed into truncating lines. The north-south running gap between the left and right halves of the mosaic is a result of line truncation from the normal 800 samples per line to about 540. The images were taken on 27 June, 1996 Universal Time at a range of 7,580 kilometers (4,738 miles) through the clear filter of the Galileo spacecraft's imaging system. Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. Mosaic-Detector-Based Fluorescence Spectral Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    A battery-powered, pen-sized, portable instrument for measuring molecular fluorescence spectra of chemical and biological samples in the field has been proposed. Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is among the techniques used most frequently in laboratories to analyze compositions of chemical and biological samples. Heretofore, it has been possible to measure fluorescence spectra of molecular species at relative concentrations as low as parts per billion (ppb), with a few nm spectral resolution. The proposed instrument would include a planar array (mosaic) of detectors, onto which a fluorescence spectrum would be spatially mapped. Unlike in the larger laboratory-type molecular fluorescence spectrometers, mapping of wavelengths to spatial positions would be accomplished without use of relatively bulky optical parts. The proposed instrument is expected to be sensitive enough to enable measurement of spectra of chemical species at relative concentrations <1 ppb, with spectral resolution that could be tailored by design to be comparable to a laboratory molecular fluorescence spectrometer. The proposed instrument (see figure) would include a button-cell battery and a laser diode, which would generate the monochromatic ultraviolet light needed to excite fluorescence in a sample. The sample would be held in a cell bounded by far-ultraviolet-transparent quartz or optical glass. The detector array would be, more specifically, a complementary metal oxide/ semiconductor or charge-coupled- device imaging photodetector array, the photodetectors of which would be tailored to respond to light in the wavelength range of the fluorescence spectrum to be measured. The light-input face of the photodetector array would be covered with a matching checkerboard array of multilayer thin film interference filters, such that each pixel in the array would be sensitive only to light in a spectral band narrow enough so as not to overlap significantly with the band of an adjacent pixel. The

  11. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-02-01

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat and maize. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus evaded thorough molecular characterization for many years due to the experimental challenges of mite transmission and manipulating multisegmented negative sense RNA genomes. Recently, the complete genome sequence of a Nebraska isolate of WMoV revealed eight segments, plus a variant sequence of the nucleocapsid protein-encoding segment. Here, near-complete and partial consensus sequences of five more WMoV isolates are reported and compared to the Nebraska isolate: an Ohio maize isolate (GG1), a Kansas barley isolate (KS7), and three Ohio wheat isolates (H1, K1, W1). Results show two distinct groups of WMoV isolates: Ohio wheat isolate RNA segments had 84% or lower nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate, whereas GG1 and KS7 had 98% or higher nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate. Knowledge of the sequence variability of WMoV isolates is a step toward understanding virus biology, and potentially explaining observed biological variation. PMID:26590326

  12. A New Moon: Improved Lunar Orbiter Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    Photographs of the five Lunar Orbiter missions in 1965 and 1966 provide comprehensive coverage of the moon at resolutions in the range of about 1 meter to 300 meters. With a few exceptions, they are taken at a moderately low sun angle to clearly show the topography. These photos, especially the set edited by Bowker and Hughes, are still in active use in books, papers, and slide presentations and they are likely to be used in planning the missions of future lunar spacecraft. Scanning artifacts (sometimes called the 'venetian blind effect') detract from the visual quality of the photographs, particularly when they are printed at high contrast to show albedo variations such as rays or subtle topology features such as the margins of lava flows. The author has written a program to estimate and remove the artifacts from the pictures, greatly improving their cosmetic quality. The program detects lines between framelets of a mosaic, removes the lines caused by light leaking between framelets, estimates the systematic streaks caused by cathode ray tube scanning in the spacecraft and the Ground Reconstruction Equipment, and compensates for these streaks. Non-linearity introduced by contrast enhancement in the production of the input photos is considered in the compensation process.

  13. Mosaic nature of the wolbachia surface protein.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Laura; Lo, Nathan; Werren, John H

    2005-08-01

    Lateral gene transfer and recombination play important roles in the evolution of many parasitic bacteria. Here we investigate intragenic recombination in Wolbachia bacteria, considered among the most abundant intracellular bacteria on earth. We conduct a detailed analysis of the patterns of variation and recombination within the Wolbachia surface protein, utilizing an extensive set of published and new sequences from five main supergroups of Wolbachia. Analysis of nucleotide and amino acid sequence variations confirms four hypervariable regions (HVRs), separated by regions under strong conservation. Comparison of shared polymorphisms reveals a complex mosaic structure of the gene, characterized by a clear intragenic recombining of segments among several distinct strains, whose major recombination effect is shuffling of a relatively conserved set of amino acid motifs within each of the four HVRs. Exchanges occurred both within and between the arthropod supergroups. Analyses based on phylogenetic methods and a specific recombination detection program (MAXCHI) significantly support this complex partitioning of the gene, indicating a chimeric origin of wsp. Although wsp has been widely used to define macro- and microtaxonomy among Wolbachia strains, these results clearly show that it is not suitable for this purpose. The role of wsp in bacterium-host interactions is currently unknown, but results presented here indicate that exchanges of HVR motifs are favored by natural selection. Identifying host proteins that interact with wsp variants should help reveal how these widespread bacterial parasites affect and evolve in response to the cellular environments of their invertebrate hosts. PMID:16030235

  14. The mosaic acquisition of grammatical relations.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, M

    1991-10-01

    The view that grammatical relations have substantial essence, designated as 'subject' or 'object' has difficulty in accounting for the variety of naturally acquirable grammatical relations. The acquisition of grammatical relations is examined from a theoretical framework, ROLE AND REFERENCE GRAMMAR, in which grammatical relations are decomposed into two separate types of structure: logical (semantic) structure and information (pragmatic) structure. The acquisition of grammatical relations from four languages is compared: (1) the definite accusative suffix and pragmatically motivated word order of Turkish; (2) Kaluli verb agreement, case and focus marking postpositions, and pragmatically motivated word order; (3) Hungarian definite and indefinite verb conjunction; and (4) Italian participial agreement and anaphoric, accusative case pronouns. Two conditions on structures are found to cause difficulty: the neutralization of a semantic or pragmatic distinction by interfering structures (e.g. Kaluli and Italian), and global case marking which forces the child to discover relevant semantic characteristics of both the actor and the undergoer (e.g. Hungarian and Kaluli). Structures that encode semantic or pragmatic distinctions independently are more easily acquired (e.g. Turkish). Piecing together discrete structures in a mosaic fashion, the child can acquire the great variety of grammatical relations that exist in human languages. PMID:1761612

  15. Further applications for mosaic pixel FPA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.

    2011-06-01

    In previous papers to this SPIE forum the development of novel technology for next generation PIR security sensors has been described. This technology combines the mosaic pixel FPA concept with low cost optics and purpose-designed readout electronics to provide a higher performance and affordable alternative to current PIR sensor technology, including an imaging capability. Progressive development has resulted in increased performance and transition from conventional microbolometer fabrication to manufacture on 8 or 12 inch CMOS/MEMS fabrication lines. A number of spin-off applications have been identified. In this paper two specific applications are highlighted: high performance imaging IRFPA design and forest fire detection. The former involves optional design for small pixel high performance imaging. The latter involves cheap expendable sensors which can detect approaching fire fronts and send alarms with positional data via mobile phone or satellite link. We also introduce to this SPIE forum the application of microbolometer IR sensor technology to IoT, the Internet of Things.

  16. Germline mosaicism in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tajir, Mariam; Fergelot, Patricia; Lancelot, Guenaelle; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Arveiler, Benoit; Lacombe, Didier; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2013-04-15

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with multiple congenital anomalies and genetic heterogeneity. Clinical manifestations include mental retardation, postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic facial features. Mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CREBBP; OMIM 600140) on chromosome 16p13, account for about 50% to 70% of patients. Most of CREBBP mutations are de novo and the rate of recurrence in a family is low. Families with several affected children are extremely rare. We report here a Moroccan family with two children with RSTS and apparently unaffected parents. The molecular studies showed a heterozygous mutation c.4361T>A (p.Leu1454His) in exon 26 of the CREBBP gene in the two affected siblings. Neither the parents, nor the healthy brother, carry this mutation in hematologic cells. The mutation was also absent in buccal epithelial cells of both parents. We discuss the hypothesis of germinal mosaicism. This concept is very important because it complicates genetic counseling of this family who has a risk of recurrence of the mutation in subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23352794

  17. Prenatal studies of a family with 4p- mosaicism

    SciTech Connect

    Pulijaal, V.; Ben-Yishay, M.; Nitowsky, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Mosaicism for an autosomal structural abnormality is rare. Only two cases have been reported for mosaicism involving a deletion of the short arm of number 4 chromosome (one prenatal and one postnatal). We report mosaicism for 4p- in the amniocyte cultures from a G3P2 41-year-old patient who had amniocentesis for advanced maternal age. Chromosome analysis of amniotic cultures by in situ and flask methods in Chang-supplemented McCoy`s medium revealed a mosaic karyotype, 46,XX/46,XX,del(4)(p13) with 15 (62.5%) and 9 (37.5%) metaphases, respectively. Parental blood chromosome studies yielded a paternal mosaic karyotype with 2 out of 98 cells (2%) exhibiting a deletion in the short arm of number 4 chromosome (46,XX,del(4)(p13)) as seen in the fetus. After genetic counseling, the family decided to terminate the pregnancy. Studies of fetal tissue confirmed the amniocentesis results for 4p- mosaicism (18.3%). Cytogenetic studies in father confirmed mosaicism for 4p- in fibroblast cultures from skin (2%). In none of the blood or skin fibroblast cultures was there evidence of a spontaneous fragile site at 4p13. However, cytogenetic studies of peripheral blood under conditions of folate deprivation (medium 199) showed a fragile site at 4q13 in 30% of the metaphases and 4p- cells are absent. The coincidence of the breakpoints and folate-induced fragile site in 4p- may be related phenomena in this family.

  18. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus: Relationships, Biology, and Prospects for Control.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Elizabeth A; Wamonje, Francis O; Mukeshimana, Gerardine; Harvey, Jagger J W; Carr, John P; Mitter, Neena

    2015-01-01

    The closely related potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are major constraints on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production. Crop losses caused by BCMV and BCMNV impact severely not only on commercial scale cultivation of this high-value crop but also on production by smallholder farmers in the developing world, where bean serves as a key source of dietary protein and mineral nutrition. In many parts of the world, progress has been made in combating BCMV through breeding bean varieties possessing the I gene, a dominant gene conferring resistance to most BCMV strains. However, in Africa, and in particular in Central and East Africa, BCMNV is endemic and this presents a serious problem for deployment of the I gene because this virus triggers systemic necrosis (black root disease) in plants possessing this resistance gene. Information on these two important viruses is scattered throughout the literature from 1917 onward, and although reviews on resistance to BCMV and BCMNV exist, there is currently no comprehensive review on the biology and taxonomy of BCMV and BCMNV. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of our knowledge of these two potyviruses including fundamental aspects of classification and phylogeny, molecular biology, host interactions, transmission through seed and by aphid vectors, geographic distribution, as well as current and future prospects for the control of these important viruses. PMID:26111585

  19. Fusion Based Seamless Mosaic for Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Li, Shutao; Fu, Wei

    2014-11-01

    A fusion based seamless mosaic method for stitching remote sensing images is introduced in this paper. The proposed method focuses on one major problem in the process of mosaic: how to generate visually pleasant stitching result in the cases of misalignment, global and local intensity differences between images. First, two partially overlapped images are decomposed into high-frequency components and low-frequency components with Gaussian low-pass filter. Second, by considering the information characteristics contained in both separated components, different mosaic schemes are designed to accomplish stitching process accordingly. For the low-frequency components consisting of coarse shape and illumination information, two-dimension weighted blending rule is utilized to achieve smoothing transition. For the high-frequency components including rich details, an improved seam searching strategy based on dynamic programming is introduced. With the obtained stitching seam guiding the stitching process, visible structural break can be avoided. Finally, the mosaic result is produced by linearly composing both stitching results of different components together. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in generating seamless mosaic results without introducing any unexpected blurring or artifacts.

  20. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  1. Relative time NDVI mosaics as an indicator of crop growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Igor Y.; Negre, Thierry

    2003-03-01

    Relative time NDVI mosaics are proposed as a tool for crop growth monitoring and yield forecasting. The mosaics are constructed for the region of interest for a given phenological phase of crop development (for example, flowering). Mosaics for different years, created for the same characteristic time of crop development, are used for crop growth monitoring and yield forecasting. The approach is illustrated through two case studies: - forecasting of wheat yield in the countries of Northern Africa (relative time NDVI mosaics are constructed for the flowering stage of crop development); - assessing winter crop status in southern areas of Russia after the winter season (mosaics are constructed two dekads before the establishment of snow cover and two dekads after its disappearance). NDVI values, calculated from SPOT4-Vegetation data, were used in both cases. Dates of crop phenological phases were determined applying the WOFOST crop growth model and ECMWF-derived meteorological grid data. Results demonstrate the validity of the approach and the improvements obtained as compared with traditional methods.

  2. Report of a Case with Trisomy 9 Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Shadmani, Zahra; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 9 is a rare chromosome disorder with high neonatal mortality. It is often seen in mosaic form. Most patients who survive are severely mentally retarded. The main features of this syndrome are “bulbous” nose, microphthalmia, dislocated limbs, and other anomalies of skeletal, cardiac, genitourinary, and central nervous system. Most patients have developmental and cognitive impairment. Patients with mosaicism survive longer than non-mosaics, but it was believed that the degree of mosaicism in lymphocytes or fibroblasts does not associate with survival or degree of impairment. In this report, we present a 2.5-year-old male case of mosaic trisomy 9, to show the wide range of clinical findings in this chromosome disorder. The patient had cardiac anomalies, inguinal hernia, and undescendent testes. He had low-set slightly malformed ears, deeply-set malformed eyes, small palpebral fissures, micrognathia, developmental delay and unilateral optic hypoplasia. The most prominent facial anomaly in this patient was eye anomalies. Cytogenetic analysis with G banding showed karyotype 47XY,+9 in 44% of peripheral lymphocytes examined (47XY,+9[22], 46XY[28]). His parents’ karyotypes were normal. Moderate developmental delay, which was detected in this patient shows that the range of motor and cognitive impairment in this chromosomal disorder is quite broad. This fact should be considered in genetic counseling as well as prenatal diagnosis of this chromosomal disorder. PMID:27217611

  3. The mosaic of "seronegative" antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conti, Fabrizio; Capozzi, Antonella; Truglia, Simona; Lococo, Emanuela; Longo, Agostina; Misasi, Roberta; Alessandri, Cristiano; Valesini, Guido; Sorice, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In the clinical practice it is possible to find patients with clinical signs suggestive of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), who are persistently negative for the laboratory criteria of APS, that is, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL), anti-β2-GPI antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. Therefore, it was proposed for these cases the term of seronegative APS (SN-APS). In order to detect autoantibodies with different methodological approaches, sera from 24 patients with SN-APS were analysed for anti-phospholipid antibodies using TLC immunostaining, for anti-vimentin/cardiolipin antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and for anti-annexin V and anti-prothrombin antibodies by ELISA and dot blot. Control groups of our study were 25 patients with APS, 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and 32 healthy controls. Results revealed that 13/24 (54.2%) SN-APS sera were positive for aCL (9 of whom were also positive for lysobisphosphatidic acid) by TLC immunostaining, 11/24 (45.8%) for anti-vimentin/cardiolipin antibodies, 3/24 (12.5%) for anti-prothrombin antibodies, and 1/24 (4.2%) for anti-annexin V antibodies. These findings suggest that in sera from patients with SN-APS, antibodies may be detected using "new" antigenic targets (mainly vimentin/cardiolipin) or methodological approaches different from traditional techniques (mainly TLC immunostaining). Thus, SN-APS represents a mosaic, in which antibodies against different antigenic targets may be detected. PMID:24741593

  4. Robust matching algorithm for image mosaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Luan; Tan, Jiu-bin

    2010-08-01

    In order to improve the matching accuracy and the level of automation for image mosaic, a matching algorithm based on SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features is proposed as detailed below. Firstly, according to the result of cursory comparison with the given basal matching threshold, the collection corresponding SIFT features which contains mismatch is obtained. Secondly, after calculating all the ratio of Euclidean distance from the closest neighbor to the distance of the second closest of corresponding features, we select the image coordinates of corresponding SIFT features with the first eight smallest ratios to solve the initial parameters of pin-hole camera model, and then calculate maximum error σ between transformation coordinates and original image coordinates of the eight corresponding features. Thirdly, calculating the scale of the largest original image coordinates of the eight corresponding features to the entire image size, the scale is regarded as control parameter k of matching error threshold. Finally, computing the difference of the transformation coordinates and the original image coordinates of all the features in the collection of features, deleting the corresponding features with difference larger than 3kσ. We can then obtain the exact collection of matching features to solve the parameters for pin-hole camera model. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is stable and reliable in case of the image having some variation of view point, illumination, rotation and scale. This new method has been used to achieve an excellent matching accuracy on the experimental images. Moreover, the proposed method can be used to select the matching threshold of different images automatically without any manual intervention.

  5. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The “presence” of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its “absence” in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted ∼2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a “soft” polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy. PMID:19261842

  6. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The "presence" of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its "absence" in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted approximately 2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a "soft" polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy. PMID:19261842

  7. Art with Stones: From the Cave Age until Today with Parallels Seen in the Artistic, Symbolic and Creative Development of Young Children's Mosaic Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matejovsky-Nikoltsos, Catherine

    This paper first gives a historical overview of mosaics, discussing mosaic masks made by the Aztecs and floor mosaics made by the Greeks, as well as the Roman mosaics at Pompeii and the Byzantine decorative mosaics exemplified by those at Ravenna. The paper then elaborates on children's mosaic making observed during research conducted between 1986…

  8. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rajbanshi, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  9. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rajbanshi, Naveen; Ali, Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Tomato Mosaic Virus Isolated from Jasmine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Tomato mosaic virus was reported from jasmine in Florida. We present the first complete genome sequence of a tomato mosaic virus isolate from this woody perennial plant in the United States. PMID:26159525

  11. Mosaic KCNJ2 mutation in Andersen-Tawil syndrome: targeted deep sequencing is useful for the detection of mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Ohno, S; Kimura, H; Itoh, H; Makiyama, T; Yoshida, Y; Horie, M

    2015-03-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is an inherited disease characterized by ventricular arrhythmias, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. It results from a heterozygous mutation of KCNJ2, but little is known about mosaicism in ATS. We performed genetic analysis of KCNJ2 in 32 ATS probands and their family members and identified KCNJ2 mutations in 25 probands, 20 families who underwent extensive genetic testing. These tests revealed that seven probands carried de novo mutations while 13 carried inherited mutations from their parents. We then specifically assessed a single proband and the respective family. The proband was a 9 year old girl who fulfilled the ATS triad and carried an insertion mutation (p.75_76insThr). We determined that the proband's mother carried a somatic mosaicism and that the proband's younger brother also carried the ATS phenotype with the same insertion mutation. The mother, who exhibited mosaicism, was asymptomatic, although she exhibited Q(T)U prolongation. Mutant allele frequency was 11% as per TA cloning and 17.3% as per targeted deep sequencing. Our observations suggest that targeted deep sequencing is useful for the detection of mosaicism and that the detection of mosaic mutations in parents of apparently sporadic ATS patients can help in the process of genetic counseling. PMID:24635491

  12. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents. PMID:26561224

  13. Characterization of interfaces in mosaic CVD diamond crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchnikov, Anatoly B.; Radishev, Dmitry B.; Vikharev, Anatoly L.; Gorbachev, Alexei M.; Mitenkin, Anatoly V.; Drozdov, Mikhail N.; Drozdov, Yuri N.; Yunin, Pavel A.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed description of a way to accrete diamond single crystals in one plate using the CVD method is presented. It was found that each region of the mosaic CVD diamond crystal grown over a certain seed substrate "inherits" the crystallographic orientation of its substrate. No correlation was found between the value of misorientation of the accreted crystals and entrance of hydrogen to the boundary. It is shown that successful accretion of single crystal diamond plates in a single mosaic crystal occurs even in the case of great misorientation of crystals. The mechanical stresses appear during the fabrication of the mosaic CVD diamond crystal. Stresses accumulate during accretion of the regions, which grow over substrates with different orientations, in a common structure.

  14. Somatic Mosaicism: Implications for Disease and Transmission Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian M.; Shaw, Chad A.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all of the genetic material among cells within an organism is identical. However, single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels, copy number variants (CNVs), and other structural variants (SVs) continually accumulate as cells divide during development. This process results in an organism composed of countless cells, each with its own unique personal genome. Thus, every human is undoubtedly mosaic. Mosaic mutations can go unnoticed, underlie genetic disease or normal human variation, and may be transmitted to the next generation as constitutional variants. Here, we review the influence of the developmental timing of mutations, the mechanisms by which they arise, methods for detecting mosaic variants, and the risk of passing these mutations on to the next generation. PMID:25910407

  15. Graph theory approach for match reduction in image mosaicing.

    PubMed

    Elibol, Armagan; Gracias, Nuno; Garcia, Rafael; Kim, Jinwhan

    2014-04-01

    One of the crucial steps in image mosaicing is global alignment, which requires finding the best image registration parameters by employing nonlinear minimization methods over correspondences between overlapping image pairs for a dataset. Based on graph theory, we propose a simple but efficient method to reduce the number of overlapping image pairs without any noticeable effect on the final mosaic quality. This reduction significantly lowers the computational cost of the image mosaicing process. The proposed method can be applied in a topology estimation process to reduce the number of image matching attempts. The method has been validated through experiments on challenging underwater image sequences obtained during sea trials with different unmanned underwater vehicles. PMID:24695139

  16. Cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles target surface vimentin on cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Nicole F; Cho, Choi-Fong; Ablack, Amber; Lewis, John D; Manchester, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Aims Vimentin, a type III intermediate filament, is upregulated during epithelial–mesenchymal transition and tumor progression. Vimentin is surface-expressed on cells involved in inflammation; the function remains unknown. We investigated the expression of surface vimentin on cancer cells and evaluated targeting nanoparticles to tumors exploiting vimentin. Materials & methods Cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles that interact with surface vimentin were used as probes. Tumor homing was tested using the chick chorioallantoic membrane model with human tumor xenografts. Results & discussion Surface vimentin levels varied during cell cycle and among the cell lines tested. Surface vimentin expression correlated with cowpea mosaic virus uptake, underscoring the utility of cowpea mosaic virus to detect invasive cancer cells. Targeting to tumor xenografts was observed; homing was based on the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Our data provide novel insights into the role of surface vimentin in cancer and targeting nanoparticles in vivo. PMID:21385137

  17. Image mosaic method based on SIFT features of line segment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Ren, Mingwu

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel image mosaic method based on SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) feature of line segment, aiming to resolve incident scaling, rotation, changes in lighting condition, and so on between two images in the panoramic image mosaic process. This method firstly uses Harris corner detection operator to detect key points. Secondly, it constructs directed line segments, describes them with SIFT feature, and matches those directed segments to acquire rough point matching. Finally, Ransac method is used to eliminate wrong pairs in order to accomplish image mosaic. The results from experiment based on four pairs of images show that our method has strong robustness for resolution, lighting, rotation, and scaling. PMID:24511326

  18. Mosaic acquisition and processing for optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Peng; Shi, Wei; Chee, Ryan K. W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-08-01

    In optical-resolution photo-acoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), data acquisition time is limited by both laser pulse repetition rate (PRR) and scanning speed. Optical-scanning offers high speed, but limited, field of view determined by ultrasound transducer sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a hybrid optical and mechanical-scanning OR-PAM system with mosaic data acquisition and processing. The system employs fast-scanning mirrors and a diode-pumped, nanosecond-pulsed, Ytterbium-doped, 532-nm fiber laser with PRR up to 600 kHz. Data from a sequence of image mosaic patches is acquired systematically, at predetermined mechanical scanning locations, with optical scanning. After all imaging locations are covered, a large panoramic scene is generated by stitching the mosaic patches together. Our proposed system is proven to be at least 20 times faster than previous reported OR-PAM systems.

  19. Characterisation and diagnosis of frangipani mosaic virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Solanki, Vikas; Verma, H N; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-10-01

    Frangipani mosaic virus (FrMV) is known to infect frangipani tree (Plumeria rubra f. acutifolia) in India but the virus has not been characterized at genomic level and diagnosis is not available. In the present study, an isolate of FrMV (FrMV-Ind-1) showing greenish mosaic and vein-banding symptoms in P. rubra f. acutifolia in New Delhi was characterized based on host reactions, serology and genome sequence. The virus isolate induced local symptoms on several new experimental host species: Capsicum annuum (chilli), Nicotiana benthamiana, Solanum lycopersicum and S. melongena. N. benthamiana could be used as an efficient propagation host as it developed systemic mottle mosaic symptoms all round the year. The genome of FrMV-Ind-1 was 6643 (JN555602) nucleotides long with genome organization similar to tobamoviruses. The Indian isolate of FrMV shared a very close genome sequence identity (98.3 %) with the lone isolate of FrMV-P from Australia. FrMV-Ind-1 together with FrMV-P formed a new phylogenetic group i.e. Apocynaceae-infecting tobamovirus. The polyclonal antiserum generated through the purified virus preparation was successfully utilized to detect the virus in field samples of frangipani by ELISA. Of the eight different tobamoviruses tested, FrMV-Ind-1 shared distant serological relationships with only cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, bell pepper mottle virus and kyuri green mottle mosaic virus. RT-PCR based on coat protein gene primer successfully detected the virus in frangipani plants. This study is the first comprehensive description of FrMV occurring in India. PMID:26239043

  20. Clinical features of 58 Japanese patients with mosaic neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Tanito, Katsumi; Ota, Arihito; Kamide, Ryoichi; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Niimura, Michihito

    2014-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutation in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, and may sometimes manifest in a mosaic form. "Segmental NF1" is generally assumed to be the result of somatic mosaicism for a NF1 mutation, and patients with mosaic NF1 have typical features of NF1 limited to specific body segments. The clinical features of 58 patients (42 females and 16 males; aged 1-69 years; mean age, 23.4 years) with mosaic NF1 seen at the Jikei University Hospital during 2004-2007 and at the Jikei University Daisan Hospital during 2007-2011, were retrospectively studied. Somatic or gonosomal mosaicism was not investigated. Patients were classified into four groups: (i) pigmentary changes (café-au-lait spots and freckling) only (n = 32); (ii) neurofibromas only (n = 5); (iii) neurofibromas and pigmentary changes (n = 13); and (iv) solitary plexiform neurofibromas (n = 8). The area of involvement was variable. The majority of patients were asymptomatic, except patients with plexiform neurofibromas who presented most commonly with pain or tenderness. Lisch nodules were rarely seen. Only four of our 58 patients (6.9%) had specific NF1 complications, including language delay (n = 1) and bone deformity (n = 3). Two patients were ascertained through their children with generalized NF1. Patients with mosaic NF1 are at low risk of developing disease-associated complications, except patients with plexiform neurofibromas. However, they need to be aware of the small risk of having a child with generalized NF1. PMID:25041723

  1. Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Peters, Len K.

    2008-07-03

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a new Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC), with a special focus on addressing the long-standing issues associated with solving the dynamic partitioning of semi-volatile inorganic gases (HNO3, HCl, and NH3) to size-distributed atmospheric aerosol particles. The coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE) for dynamic gas-particle mass transfer are extremely stiff, and the available numerical techniques are either too expensive or produce oscillatory and/or inaccurate steady-state solutions. These limitations are overcome in MOSAIC, which couples an accurate and computationally efficient thermodynamic module [Zaveri et al., 2005a,b] with a new dynamic gas-particle partitioning module described here. The algorithm involves time-split integrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile species, and a new concept of “dynamic pH” and an adaptive time-stepping scheme hold the key to smooth, accurate, and efficient solutions over the entire relative humidity range. MOSAIC is found to be in excellent agreement with a benchmark version of the model that uses LSODES (a Gear solver) for rigorously integrating the stiff ODEs. The steady-state MOSAIC results for monodisperse aerosol test cases are also in excellent agreement with those obtained with the benchmark equilibrium model AIM. MOSAIC is also evaluated within a 3-D model, and the average CPU speed is estimated to be over 100 times faster than the dynamic aerosol model MADM [Pilinis et al., 2000]. These results suggest that MOSAIC is highly attractive for use in 3-D aerosol and air quality models in which both accuracy and efficiency are critically important.

  2. Constitutional partial 1q trisomy mosaicism and Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mark, Hon Fong L; Wyandt, Herman; Pan, Agen; Milunsky, Jeff M

    2005-10-15

    We report on a female patient with severe-profound mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies, as well as a history of mosaicism for partial 1q trisomy in the amniotic fluid and a previous Wilms tumor specimen. Peripheral blood and fibroblasts were studied and did not demonstrate the mosaicism initially detected for 1q. Array comparative genomic hybridization yielded negative results. Additional cytogenetic studies helped clarify the previous findings and revealed evidence of partial 1q trisomy mosaicism in normal kidney tissue and in a kidney lesion. GTG-banded results showing low-percentage mosaicism for the structural rearrangement der(1)t(1;1)(p36.1;q23) in both tissues were corroborated by fluorescence in situ hybridization studies. We hypothesize that the partial 1q trisomy predisposed the target tissue (in this case kidney) to neoplasia. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that certain constitutional chromosomal abnormalities can predispose to cancer. As detection of a low-percentage mosaicism may be hampered by the limits imposed by currently available technology and the constraint of a finite sample size, extra vigilance in monitoring other somatic tissues will be needed throughout the patient's lifetime. Anticipatory clinical guidance and prognostication are meaningful only if given accurate cytogenetic diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Wilms tumor associated with constitutional partial 1q trisomy, either in pure or mosaic form, with the particular 1q23 breakpoint in conjunction with a break on 1p36.1. PMID:16213366

  3. Mosaic structural variation in children with developmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    King, Daniel A.; Jones, Wendy D.; Crow, Yanick J.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Foster, Nicola A.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Harris, Jade; Hellens, Stephen W.; Homfray, Tessa; Innes, Josie; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Joss, Shelagh; Kulkarni, Abhijit; Mansour, Sahar; Morris, Andrew D.; Parker, Michael J.; Porteous, David J.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Smith, Blair H.; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Tolmie, John L.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vasudevan, Pradeep C.; Wakeling, Emma; Wright, Michael; Plomin, Robert; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Delineating the genetic causes of developmental disorders is an area of active investigation. Mosaic structural abnormalities, defined as copy number or loss of heterozygosity events that are large and present in only a subset of cells, have been detected in 0.2–1.0% of children ascertained for clinical genetic testing. However, the frequency among healthy children in the community is not well characterized, which, if known, could inform better interpretation of the pathogenic burden of this mutational category in children with developmental disorders. In a case–control analysis, we compared the rate of large-scale mosaicism between 1303 children with developmental disorders and 5094 children lacking developmental disorders, using an analytical pipeline we developed, and identified a substantial enrichment in cases (odds ratio = 39.4, P-value 1.073e − 6). A meta-analysis that included frequency estimates among an additional 7000 children with congenital diseases yielded an even stronger statistical enrichment (P-value 1.784e − 11). In addition, to maximize the detection of low-clonality events in probands, we applied a trio-based mosaic detection algorithm, which detected two additional events in probands, including an individual with genome-wide suspected chimerism. In total, we detected 12 structural mosaic abnormalities among 1303 children (0.9%). Given the burden of mosaicism detected in cases, we suspected that many of the events detected in probands were pathogenic. Scrutiny of the genotypic–phenotypic relationship of each detected variant assessed that the majority of events are very likely pathogenic. This work quantifies the burden of structural mosaicism as a cause of developmental disorders. PMID:25634561

  4. A new ophiovirus is associated with blueberry mosaic disease.

    PubMed

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Ho, Thien; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2014-08-30

    Blueberry mosaic disease (BMD) was first described more than 60 years ago and is caused by a yet unidentified graft transmissible agent. A combination of traditional methods and next generation sequencing disclosed the presence of a new ophiovirus in symptomatic plants. The virus was detected in all BMD samples collected from several production areas of North America and was thus named blueberry mosaic associated virus. Phylogenetic analysis, supported by high bootstrap values, places the virus within the family Ophioviridae. The genome organization resembles that of citrus psorosis virus, the type member of the genus Ophiovirus. The implications of this discovery in BMD control and blueberry virus certification schemes are also discussed. PMID:24874194

  5. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren; Kendall, Amy; Berger, P.H.; Shiel, P.J.; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  6. Digital Mammography with a Mosaic of CCD Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); McAdoo, James A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A digital mammography device uses a mosaic of electronic digital imaging arrays to scan an x-ray image is discussed. The mosaic of arrays is repositioned several times to expose different portions of the image, until the entire image is scanned. The data generated by the arrays during each exposure is stored in a computer. After the final exposure, the computer combines data of the several partial images to produce a composite of the original x-ray image. An aperture plate is used to reduce scatter and the overall exposure of the patient to x-rays.

  7. Acne in Klinefelter Syndrome-46XY/47XXY Mosaicism?

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli; Swarnalakshimi, Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KFS) is the most common non-heritable sex chromosome anomaly caused by nondisjunction during cell division and contains two or more X chromosomes. More than two third of all cases are homogenous (47XXY) and the remaining are mosaic (46XY/47XXY). Lower limb ulcers are frequently observed and attributed to impaired fibrinolysis. A case of KFS with post acne scars and leg ulcers is presented. The rarity of acne in this syndrome is explained by the phenomenon of mosaicism. PMID:26538700

  8. Role of wheat streak mosaic virus-encoded proteins in disease development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are the type species of Tritimovirus and Poacevirus genera, respectively, in the family Potyviridae. TriMV and WSMV exhibit differential symptom phenotypes on wheat: TriMV elicits mild mosaic and mottling ...

  9. First report of Sugarcane mosaic virus infecting Columbus Grass (Sorghum almum) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosaic symptoms in sorghum can be caused by several potyviruses [family Potyviridae], including Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV). SrMV and SCMV are responsible for global economic losses in sorghum, maize, and sugarcane. Ten plants of Columbus grass (Sorghum almum) exhib...

  10. HEXAGON MOSAIC MAPS FOR DISPLAY OF UNIVARIATE AND BIVARIATE GEOGRAPHICAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexagon mosaic maps and hexagon-based ray glyph maps are presented. he phrase "hexagon mosaic map" refers to maps that use hexagons to tessellate major areas of a map such as land masses. exagon mosaic maps are similar to color-contour (isarithm) maps and show broad regional patt...

  11. False Color Mosaic Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    False color representation of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) taken through three different near-infrared filters of the Galileo imaging system and processed to reveal cloud top height. Images taken through Galileo's near-infrared filters record sunlight beyond the visible range that penetrates to different depths in Jupiter's atmosphere before being reflected by clouds. The Great Red Spot appears pink and the surrounding region blue because of the particular color coding used in this representation. Light reflected by Jupiter at a wavelength (886 nm) where methane strongly absorbs is shown in red. Due to this absorption, only high clouds can reflect sunlight in this wavelength. Reflected light at a wavelength (732 nm) where methane absorbs less strongly is shown in green. Lower clouds can reflect sunlight in this wavelength. Reflected light at a wavelength (757 nm) where there are essentially no absorbers in the Jovian atmosphere is shown in blue: This light is reflected from the deepest clouds. Thus, the color of a cloud in this image indicates its height. Blue or black areas are deep clouds; pink areas are high, thin hazes; white areas are high, thick clouds. This image shows the Great Red Spot to be relatively high, as are some smaller clouds to the northeast and northwest that are surprisingly like towering thunderstorms found on Earth. The deepest clouds are in the collar surrounding the Great Red Spot, and also just to the northwest of the high (bright) cloud in the northwest corner of the image. Preliminary modeling shows these cloud heights vary over 30 km in altitude. This mosaic, of eighteen images (6 in each filter) taken over a 6 minute interval during the second GRS observing sequence on June 26, 1996, has been map-projected to a uniform grid of latitude and longitude. North is at the top.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet

  12. Development of a multiplexed PCR detection method for Barley and Cereal Yellow Dwarf Viruses, Wheat Spindle Streak Virus, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Soil-Borne Wheat Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley and Cereal Yellow Dwarf Viruses (B/CYDVs), Wheat Spindle Streak Mosaic (WSSMV), Soil-Borne Wheat Mosaic (SBWMV) Mosaic Virus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) constitute the most economically important group of wheat viruses. In this paper, a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chai...

  13. The mosaics of Mars: As seen by the Viking Lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinthal, E. C.; Jones, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    The mosaics and derivative products produced from many individual high resolution images acquired by the Viking Lander Camera Systems are described: A morning and afternoon mosaic for both cameras at the Lander 1 Chryse Planitia site, and a morning, noon, and afternoon camera pair at Utopia Planitia, the Lander 11 site. The derived products include special geometric projections of the mosaic data sets, polar stereographic (donut), stereoscopic, and orthographic. Contour maps and vertical profiles of the topography were overlaid on the mosaics from which they were derived. Sets of stereo pairs were extracted and enlarged from stereoscopic projections of the mosaics.

  14. Introduction to the World Wide Web and Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, Jim

    1994-01-01

    This tutorial provides an introduction to some of the terminology related to the use of the World Wide Web and Mosaic. It is assumed that the user has some prior computer experience. References are included to other sources of additional information.

  15. Familial recurrences of FOXG1-related disorder: Evidence for mosaicism.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelly Q; Papandreou, Apostolos; Ma, Mandy; Barry, Brenda J; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Dobyns, William B; Scott, Richard H; Trump, Natalie; Kurian, Manju A; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2015-12-01

    FOXG1-related disorders are caused by heterozygous mutations in FOXG1 and result in a spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes including postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, chorea, and corpus callosum abnormalities. The recurrence risk for de novo mutations in FOXG1-related disorders is assumed to be low. Here, we describe three unrelated sets of full siblings with mutations in FOXG1 (c.515_577del63, c.460dupG, and c.572T > G), representing familial recurrence of the disorder. In one family, we have documented maternal somatic mosaicism for the FOXG1 mutation, and all of the families presumably represent parental gonadal (or germline) mosaicism. To our knowledge, mosaicism has not been previously reported in FOXG1-related disorders. Therefore, this report provides evidence that germline mosaicism for FOXG1 mutations is a likely explanation for familial recurrence and should be considered during recurrence risk counseling for families of children with FOXG1-related disorders. PMID:26364767

  16. A DNA polymerase activity is associated with Cauliflower Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Menissier, J; Laquel, P; Lebeurier, G; Hirth, L

    1984-01-01

    A DNA polymerase activity is found within the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) particle. Analysis of the reaction product reveals that the linear form of the virion DNA is preferentially labelled. The molecular weight of the DNA polymerase as determined on an "activity gel" is 76 kDa. Images PMID:6514573

  17. Somatic mosaicism in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, S. D.; Rasmussen, S. A.; Ho, V. T.; Abernathy, C. R.; Wallace, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Using loss of heterozygosity analysis, a method designed to detect moderate to large gene deletions, we have identified a new-mutation neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patient who is somatically mosaic for a large maternally derived deletion in the NF1 gene region. The deletion extends at least from exon 4 near the 5' end of the gene to intron 39 near the 3' end. The gene-coding region is, therefore, mostly or entirely deleted, encompassing a loss of > or = 100 kb. We hypothesize that the deletion occurred at a relatively early developmental timepoint, since signs of NF1 in this patient are not confined to a specific body region, as seen in "segmental" NF, and since both mesodermally and ectodermally derived cells are affected. This report provides the first molecular evidence of somatic mosaicism in NF1 and, taken together with a recent report of germ-line mosaicism in NF1, adds credence to the concept that mosaicism plays an important role in phenotypic and genetic aspects of NF1 and may even be a relatively common phenomenon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8644707

  18. Zucchini tigre mosaic virus infection of cucurbits in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini tigre mosaic virus (ZTMV) was identified infecting cucurbits in Florida in 2002 and again in 2015. This is the first report of ZTMV in the U.S. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants, and research and regulatory scientists....

  19. Real-time mosaicing of fetoscopic videos using SIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Pankaj; Chadebecq, François; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Herrera, Luis Carlos G.; Tella, Marcel; Dwyer, George; David, Anna L.; Deprest, Jan; Stoyanov, Danail; Vercauteren, Tom; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-03-01

    Fetoscopic laser photo-coagulation of the placental vascular anastomoses remains the most effective therapy for twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in monochorionic twin pregnancies. However, to ensure the success of the intervention, complete photo-coagulation of all anastomoses is needed. This is made difficult by the limited field of view of the fetoscopic video guidance, which hinders the surgeon's ability to locate all the anastomoses. A potential solution to this problem is to expand the field of view of the placental surface by creating a mosaic from overlapping fetoscopic images. This mosaic can then be used for anastomoses localization and spatial orientation during surgery. However, this requires accurate and fast algorithms that can operate within the real-time constraints of fetal surgery. In this work, we present an image mosaicing framework that leverages the parallelism of modern GPUs and can process clinical fetoscopic images in real-time. Initial qualitative results on ex-vivo placental images indicate that the proposed framework can generate clinically useful mosaics from fetoscopic videos in real-time.

  20. Identifying a new causal agent of mosaic in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is a pathogen of economic concern that infects maize, sorghum, and sugarcane worldwide. It is a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae and contains a linear, positive sense ssRNA genome 10 kb long. It is transmitted non-persistently via aphids and ...

  1. Detail view looking down at mosaics of everyday objects next ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view looking down at mosaics of everyday objects next to Living Trailer. Bottle Village is spelled out in shell casings, there are also keys, tiles, watch faces, and plastic parts. View looking north. - Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village, 4595 Cochran Street, Simi Valley, Ventura County, CA

  2. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  3. Asymmetry and skin pigmentary anomalies in chromosome mosaicism.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, C G; Bankier, A; Curry, J; Sheffield, L J; Slaney, S F; Smith, K; Voullaire, L; Wellesley, D

    1994-01-01

    We report six persons mosaic for a chromosome anomaly. All were mentally retarded and dysmorphic. Unilateral or asymmetrical features were found in all cases, in one an unusual transverse terminal limb anomaly, and in the others various degrees of hemiatrophy of the left side of the body. Five of the subjects had skin pigmentary anomalies which were distributed in the lines of Blaschko. The abnormal cell lines found were ring chromosome 22, trisomy 22, a large acrocentric marker, a deletion of 18q, a deletion of 8q, and triploidy. In four cases the clinical diagnosis was only confirmed by skin biopsy. In one case low level mosaicism in blood was fortuitously detected because of cytogenetic fragile X screening and confirmed in a skin biopsy. The sixth case was of dynamic mosaicism of a non-mosaic deletion 18q with a chromosome 18 derived marker present in a proportion of cells. Chromosome mosaicisn may cause subtle and asymmetrical clinical features and can require repeated cytogenetic investigations. The diagnosis should be actively sought as it enables accurate genetic counselling to be given. Images PMID:7815438

  4. A nearly real-time UAV video flow mosaic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Jiang, C.; Sun, M.; Li, X. D.; Xiang, R.; Liu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of low accuracy and high computation cost of current video mosaic methods, and also to acquire large field of view images by the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), which have high accuracy and high resolution, this paper propose a method for near real-time mosaic of video flow, so that we can provide essential reference data for the earthquake relief, as well as post-disaster reconstruction and recovery, in time. In this method, we obtain the flight area scope in the route planning process, and calculate the sizes of each frame with sensor sizes and altitudes. Given an overlap degree, time intervals are calculated, and key frames are extracted. After that, feature points are detected in each frame, and they are matched using Hamming distance. The RANSAC algorithm is then applied to remove error matching and calculate parameters of the transformation model. In one-strip case, the newly extracted frame is taken as the reference image in the first half, while after the middle frame is extracted, it is the reference one until the end. Experimental results show that our method can reduce the cascading error, and improve the accuracy and quality of the mosaic images, near real-time mosaic of aerial video flow is feasible.

  5. RNAi mediated, stable resistance to Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), discovered in 2006, affects wheat production systems in the Great Plains of the United States. There are no available TriMV resistant commercial varieties. RNA interference (RNAi) was evaluated as an alternative strategy to generate resistance to TriMV. An RNAi pANDA...

  6. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  7. First report of apple mosaic virus in Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV, family Bromoviridae, genus Ilarvirus) is one of the oldest and most economically important viruses of apples (Malus x domestica Borkh.). Yield losses may vary from negligible to as high as fifty percent, depending on the affected cultivar. Although ApMV is found worldwide...

  8. Mosaic. Hispanic Sub-Cultural Values: Similarities and Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Inst. for Intercultural Relations and Ethnic Studies.

    This issue of Mosaic magazine contains several articles focusing on the similarities and differences between different Hispanic groups. Each article examines a specific Hispanic culture in order to improve existing and future intercultural education and to foster cultural awareness. The following topics are addressed: (1) values involved in…

  9. Research of x-ray automatic image mosaic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Chen, Shunan; Guo, Lianpeng; Xu, Wanpeng

    2013-10-01

    Image mosaic has widely applications value in the fields of medical image analysis, and it is a technology that carries on the spatial matching to a series of image which are overlapped with each other, and finally builds a seamless and high quality image which has high resolution and big eyeshot. In this paper, the method of grayscale cutting pseudo-color enhancement was firstly used to complete the mapping transformation from gray to the pseudo-color, and to extract SIFT features from the images. And then by making use of a similar measure of NCC (normalized cross correlation - Normalized cross-correlation), the method of RANSAC (Random Sample Consensus) was used to exclude the pseudofeature points right in order to complete the exact match of feature points. Finally, seamless mosaic and color fusion were completed by using wavelet multi-decomposition. The experiment shows that the method we used can effectively improve the precision and automation of the medical image mosaic, and provide an effective technical approach for automatic medical image mosaic.

  10. 9. 451 MADISON AVENUE, MAIN HALL, SOUTH WALL, MOSAIC TYMPANUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 451 MADISON AVENUE, MAIN HALL, SOUTH WALL, MOSAIC TYMPANUM WITH SHELL AND URN MOTIF ENTITLED 'PAX' BY AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS TO WEST OF FIREPLACE - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY