Science.gov

Sample records for motion control applications

  1. Controlled motion: an enabling technology for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Galen D.; Fasick, John C.; Xu, Qin

    2002-07-01

    Assembly and measurement of photonic subsystems or integrated optical components is transitioning from manual to semi-automated and fully automated configurations. Controlled motion, which allows movement in the 10-millimeter range with resolution of nanometers, is a critical requirement for successful assembly or functional verification of an assembly. Application specific requirements may include holding position at sub-micrometer levels for hours, repeatability of 0.1 percent over 100 micrometers to 0.005 percent over 10 millimeters, and simple controls for systems as basic as 2 degrees of freedom to multiple robots with 6 degrees of freedom each. New clamping technology, in an INCHWORM(brand motor, utilizes a combination of MEMS fabricated features and proprietary clamp interface materials to increase the clamp friction. This allows much higher push forces to be generated or the design freedom to trade force for size. Power versus Force curves are presented. Resolution, velocity, stiffness, and simple control are maintained in a much smaller package. Single mode fiber optic devices have active areas in the 5-10 micrometer range. Assembly needs are going smaller. A relatively powerful motor with dimensional resolution and time stability that can be incorporated into ever smaller robots will be needed to meet future photonic automation requirements.

  2. An open architecture motion controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossol, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    Nomad, an open architecture motion controller, is described. It is formed by a combination of TMOS, C-WORKS, and other utilities. Nomad software runs in a UNIX environment and provides for sensor-controlled robotic motions, with user replaceable kinematics. It can also be tailored for highly specialized applications. Open controllers such as Nomad should have a major impact on the robotics industry.

  3. Magnetic Control of Atomic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Tom; Bannerman, Travis; Chavez, Isaac; Clark, Rob; Libson, Adam; Raizen, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Using a sequence of pulsed electromagnetic coils, known as the atomic coilgun, we slowed supersonic beams of atomic neon and molecular oxygen. We report our progress toward adapting the atomic coilgun for magnetically trapping hydrogen isotopes. This work has motivated us to investigate other methods for magnetic control of atomic motion. We describe these techniques, and present calculations suggesting their utility in controlling atomic motion. We then outline our plans for using these methods in certain applications.

  4. Viscoelastic model based force control for soft tissue interaction and its application in physiological motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Zemiti, Nabil; Liu, Chao; Poignet, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Controlling the interaction between robots and living soft tissues has become an important issue as the number of robotic systems inside the operating room increases. Many researches have been done on force control to help surgeons during medical procedures, such as physiological motion compensation and tele-operation systems with haptic feedback. In order to increase the performance of such controllers, this work presents a novel force control scheme using Active Observer (AOB) based on a viscoelastic interaction model. The control scheme has shown to be stable through theoretical analysis and its performance was evaluated by in vitro experiments. In order to evaluate how the force control scheme behaves under the presence of physiological motion, experiments considering breathing and beating heart disturbances are presented. The proposed control scheme presented a stable behavior in both static and moving environment. The viscoelastic AOB presented a compensation ratio of 87% for the breathing motion and 79% for the beating heart motion. PMID:24612709

  5. Cognitively inspired reinforcement learning architecture and its application to giant-swing motion control.

    PubMed

    Uragami, Daisuke; Takahashi, Tatsuji; Matsuo, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Many algorithms and methods in artificial intelligence or machine learning were inspired by human cognition. As a mechanism to handle the exploration-exploitation dilemma in reinforcement learning, the loosely symmetric (LS) value function that models causal intuition of humans was proposed (Shinohara et al., 2007). While LS shows the highest correlation with causal induction by humans, it has been reported that it effectively works in multi-armed bandit problems that form the simplest class of tasks representing the dilemma. However, the scope of application of LS was limited to the reinforcement learning problems that have K actions with only one state (K-armed bandit problems). This study proposes LS-Q learning architecture that can deal with general reinforcement learning tasks with multiple states and delayed reward. We tested the learning performance of the new architecture in giant-swing robot motion learning, where uncertainty and unknown-ness of the environment is huge. In the test, the help of ready-made internal models or functional approximation of the state space were not given. The simulations showed that while the ordinary Q-learning agent does not reach giant-swing motion because of stagnant loops (local optima with low rewards), LS-Q escapes such loops and acquires giant-swing. It is confirmed that the smaller number of states is, in other words, the more coarse-grained the division of states and the more incomplete the state observation is, the better LS-Q performs in comparison with Q-learning. We also showed that the high performance of LS-Q depends comparatively little on parameter tuning and learning time. This suggests that the proposed method inspired by human cognition works adaptively in real environments. PMID:24296286

  6. Predictive fuzzy controller for robotic motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.J.; Hu, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    A system output prediction strategy incorporated with a fuzzy controller is proposed to manipulate the robotic motion control. Usually, the current position and velocity errors are used to operate the fuzzy logic controller for picking out a corresponding rule. When the system has fast planning speed or time varying behavior, the required tracking accuracy is difficult to achieve by adjusting the fuzzy rules. In order to improve the position control accuracy and system robustness for the industrial application, the current position error in the fuzzy rules look-up table is substituted by the predictive position error of the next step by using the grey predictive algorithm. This idea is implemented on a five degrees of freedom robot. The experimental results show that this fuzzy controller has effectively improve the system performance and achieved the facilitation of fuzzy controller implementation.

  7. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  8. Vibration Control For Ultraprecision Motion Machineries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Akira; Miyashita, Masakazu; Yoshioka, Junichi; Hashimoto, Fukuo

    1987-08-01

    Development of ultraprecision machines requires motion mechanisms with dynamic characteristics being sufficiently resistive to environmental disturbances as well as vibration control devices isolating from them. In the paper active application of frictional forces to the machines are proposed in viewpoint of this point. Further, new strategies for various problems resulting from application of frictional forces are also proposed for linear feed mechanism and the test results are shown. They are load compensation unit, composite bearing guideway and force operation feed mechanism.

  9. Machine learning in motion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng; Kermiche, Noureddine

    1989-01-01

    The existing methodologies for robot programming originate primarily from robotic applications to manufacturing, where uncertainties of the robots and their task environment may be minimized by repeated off-line modeling and identification. In space application of robots, however, a higher degree of automation is required for robot programming because of the desire of minimizing the human intervention. We discuss a new paradigm of robotic programming which is based on the concept of machine learning. The goal is to let robots practice tasks by themselves and the operational data are used to automatically improve their motion performance. The underlying mathematical problem is to solve the problem of dynamical inverse by iterative methods. One of the key questions is how to ensure the convergence of the iterative process. There have been a few small steps taken into this important approach to robot programming. We give a representative result on the convergence problem.

  10. Validation results of specifications for motion control interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Sandor; Proctor, Frederick M.

    1997-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is participating in the Department of Energy Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) program to establish interface standards for machine tool, robot, and coordinate measuring machine controllers. At NIST, the focus is to validate potential application programming interfaces (APIs) that make it possible to exchange machine controller components with a minimal impact on the rest of the system. This validation is taking place in the enhanced machine controller (EMC) consortium and is in cooperation with users and vendors of motion control equipment. An area of interest is motion control, including closed-loop control of individual axes and coordinated path planning. Initial tests of the motion control APIs are complete. The APIs were implemented on two commercial motion control boards that run on two different machine tools. The results for a baseline set of APIs look promising, but several issues were raised. These include resolving differing approaches in how motions are programmed and defining a standard measurement of performance for motion control. This paper starts with a summary of the process used in developing a set of specifications for motion control interoperability. Next, the EMC architecture and its classification of motion control APIs into two classes, Servo Control and Trajectory Planning, are reviewed. Selected APIs are presented to explain the basic functionality and some of the major issues involved in porting the APIs to other motion controllers. The paper concludes with a summary of the main issues and ways to continue the standards process.

  11. Controlling the motion of dark solitons by means of periodic potentials: Application to Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharis, G.; Frantzeskakis, D.J.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Kevrekidis, P.G.; Malomed, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that the motion of dark solitons (DSs) can be controlled by means of periodic potentials. The mechanism is realized in terms of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a harmonic magnetic potential, in the presence of an optical lattice (OL). In the case when the OL period is comparable to the width of the DS, we demonstrate that (a) a moving dark soliton can be captured, switching on the OL, and (b) a stationary DS can be dragged by a moving OL.

  12. Optimum control forces for multibody systems with intermittent motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ider, Sitki Kemal; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to address the continuity of motion when a dynamical system is suddenly subjected to constraint conditions. Motion discontinuity due to the initial constraint violation is avoided by prior control forces that adjust the motion and yield velocity and acceleration consistent at the point of application of the constraint. The optimum control forces are determined for a specified control interval. The method proposed provides an optimum adjustment of the system's motion and assures that the stresses developed at the system components are kept within acceptable limits. The procedures developed will be illustrated making use of inequality constraints applied to obstacle avoidance problems in robotics.

  13. Visually guided control of self motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Andersen, G. John; Flach, John M.; Riccio, Gary E.; Bennett, C. Thomas; Johnson, Walter W.

    1989-01-01

    A workshop entitled 'Visually Guided Control of Movement' was held at NASA Ames Research Center on June 26 - July 14, 1989. The workshop brought together individuals with diverse backgrounds related to the areas of the visual perception and control of motion. During the workshop, participants designed and conducted experiments using NASA Ames flight simulation research facilities. These studies contrasted participants' alternative theoretical approaches to the visual control of self motion. Panel members, drawn from the workshop's participants, will discuss their approaches to the study of the control of self motion and will present interpretations of the outcomes of the workshop.

  14. Control of joint motion simulators for biomechanical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a hierarchical adaptive algorithm for controlling upper extremity human joint motion simulators. A joint motion simulator is a computer-controlled, electromechanical system which permits the application of forces to the tendons of a human cadaver specimen in such a way that the cadaver joint under study achieves a desired motion in a physiologic manner. The proposed control scheme does not require knowledge of the cadaver specimen dynamic model, and solves on-line the indeterminate problem which arises because human joints typically possess more actuators than degrees of freedom. Computer simulation results are given for an elbow/forearm system and wrist/hand system under hierarchical control. The results demonstrate that any desired normal joint motion can be accurately tracked with the proposed algorithm. These simulation results indicate that the controller resolved the indeterminate problem redundancy in a physiologic manner, and show that the control scheme was robust to parameter uncertainty and to sensor noise.

  15. A Programmable System for Motion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlin, Brent C.

    2003-01-01

    The need for improved flow measurements in the flow path of aeronautics testing facilities has led the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a new motion control system. The new system is programmable, offering a flexibility unheard of in previous systems. The motion control system is PLC-based, which leads to highly accurate positioning ability, as well as reliability. The user interface is a software-based HMI package, which also adds flexibility to the overall system. The system also has the ability to create and execute motion profiles. This paper discusses the system's operation, control implementation, and experiences.

  16. Adaptive Force Control in Compliant Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a manipulator in compliant motion while in contact with an environment having an unknown stiffness. Two classes of solutions are discussed: adaptive admittance control and adaptive compliance control. In both admittance and compliance control schemes, compensator adaptation is used to ensure a stable and uniform system performance.

  17. Security Applications Of Computer Motion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernat, Andrew P.; Nelan, Joseph; Riter, Stephen; Frankel, Harry

    1987-05-01

    An important area of application of computer vision is the detection of human motion in security systems. This paper describes the development of a computer vision system which can detect and track human movement across the international border between the United States and Mexico. Because of the wide range of environmental conditions, this application represents a stringent test of computer vision algorithms for motion detection and object identification. The desired output of this vision system is accurate, real-time locations for individual aliens and accurate statistical data as to the frequency of illegal border crossings. Because most detection and tracking routines assume rigid body motion, which is not characteristic of humans, new algorithms capable of reliable operation in our application are required. Furthermore, most current detection and tracking algorithms assume a uniform background against which motion is viewed - the urban environment along the US-Mexican border is anything but uniform. The system works in three stages: motion detection, object tracking and object identi-fication. We have implemented motion detection using simple frame differencing, maximum likelihood estimation, mean and median tests and are evaluating them for accuracy and computational efficiency. Due to the complex nature of the urban environment (background and foreground objects consisting of buildings, vegetation, vehicles, wind-blown debris, animals, etc.), motion detection alone is not sufficiently accurate. Object tracking and identification are handled by an expert system which takes shape, location and trajectory information as input and determines if the moving object is indeed representative of an illegal border crossing.

  18. High bandwidth control of precision motion instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Douglas A.; Dong, Jingyan; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Ferreira, Placid; Salapaka, Srinivas

    2008-10-01

    This article presents a high-bandwidth control design suitable for precision motion instrumentation. Iterative learning control (ILC), a feedforward technique that uses previous iterations of the desired trajectory, is used to leverage the repetition that occurs in many tasks, such as raster scanning in microscopy. Two ILC designs are presented. The first design uses the motion system dynamic model to maximize bandwidth. The second design uses a time-varying bandwidth that is particularly useful for nonsmooth trajectories such as raster scanning. Both designs are applied to a multiaxis piezoelectric-actuated flexure system and evaluated on a nonsmooth trajectory. The ILC designs demonstrate significant bandwidth and precision improvements over the feedback controller, and the ability to achieve precision motion control at frequencies higher than multiple system resonances.

  19. Controlled motion in an elastic world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Wayne J.

    1993-01-01

    The flexibility of the drives and structures of controlled motion systems are presented as an obstacle to be overcome in the design of high performance motion systems, particularly manipulator arms. The task and the measure of performance to be applied determine the technology appropriate to overcome this obstacle. Included in the technologies proposed are control algorithms (feedback and feed forward), passive damping enhancement, operational strategies, and structural design. Modeling of the distributed, nonlinear system is difficult, and alternative approaches are discussed. The author presents personal perspectives on the history, status, and future directions in this area.

  20. The AFIT gross motion control project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, M. B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Gross Motion Control project is to study alternative control approaches that will provide payload invariant high speed trajectory tracking for nonrepetitive motions in free space. The research has concentrated on modifications to the model-based control structure. Development and evaluation is being actively pursued of both adaptive primary (inner loop) and robust secondary (output loop) controllers. In-house developments are compared and contrasted to the techniques proposed by other researchers. The case study for the evaluation is the first three links of a PUMA-560. Incorporating the principals of multiple model adaptive estimation, artificial neural networks, and Lyapunov theory into the model based paradigm has shown the potential for enhanced tracking. Secondary controllers based on Quantitative Feedback Theory, or augmented with auxiliary inputs, significantly improve the robustness to payload variations and unmodeled drive system dynamics. An overview is presented of the different concepts under investigation and a sample is provided of the latest experimental results.

  1. Galvanometer control system design of aerial camera motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Mingrui; Cao, Jianzhong; Wang, Huawei; Guo, Yunzeng; Hu, Changchang; Tang, Hong; Niu, Yuefeng

    2015-10-01

    Aerial cameras exist the image motion on the flight. The image motion has seriously affected the image quality, making the image edge blurred and gray scale loss. According to the actual application situation, when high quality and high precision are required, the image motion compensation (IMC) should be adopted. This paper designs galvanometer control system of IMC. The voice coil motor as the actuator has a simple structure, fast dynamic response and high positioning accuracy. Double-loop feedback is also used. PI arithmetic and Hall sensors are used at the current feedback. Fuzzy-PID arithmetic and optical encoder are used at the speed feedback. Compared to conventional PID control arithmetic, the simulation results show that the control system has fast response and high control accuracy.

  2. Decentralized digital adaptive control of robot motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarokh, M.

    1990-01-01

    A decentralized model reference adaptive scheme is developed for digital control of robot manipulators. The adaptation laws are derived using hyperstability theory, which guarantees asymptotic trajectory tracking despite gross robot parameter variations. The control scheme has a decentralized structure in the sense that each local controller receives only its joint angle measurement to produce its joint torque. The independent joint controllers have simple structures and can be programmed using a very simple and computationally fast algorithm. As a result, the scheme is suitable for real-time motion control.

  3. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application Project (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubbs, Rodney P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA) Project. A detailed description of the MIRA camera service software architecture, encoder features, and on-board communications are presented. A description of a candidate camera under development is also shown.

  4. Motion control design of the Bearcat II mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming; Liao, Xiaoqun; Hall, Ernest L.

    1999-08-01

    Motion control is one of the most critical factors in the design of a robot. The purpose of this paper is to describe the research for applying motion control principles for a mobile robot systems design, which is on going at the University of Cincinnati Robotics Center. The mobile robot was constructed during the 1998-1999 academic year, and called BEARCAT II. Its design has inherited many features of its predecessor, BEARCAT II, such as vision guidance, sonar detection and digital control. In addition, BEARCAT II achieved many innovative motion control features as rotating sonar, zero turning radius, current control loop, and multi- level controller. This paper will focus on the motion control design, development and programming for the vehicle steering control and rotating sonar systems. The systems have been constructed and tested at the 1999 International Ground Robotics Competition with the BEARCAT II running an obstacle course for 153.5 feet and finishing fourth in the competition. The significance of this work is in the increased understanding of robot control and the potential application of autonomous guided vehicle technology for industry, defense and medicine.

  5. Sensor motion control and mobile platforms for aquatic remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    2006-09-01

    Modern remote sensing systems used in repetitive environmental monitoring and surveillance applications are used on various platforms. These platforms can be categorized as stationary (fixed) or moving platforms. The sensing systems monitor the ambient environment which also may have inherent motion, such as the water surface with water waves. This is particularly the case for airborne or ship borne sensing of aquatic environments and is true for ground based walking or crawling systems. The time sequential comparison and spatial registration of sensor images, particularly "hyperspectral imagery" requires pixel to pixel registration for science based change and target (or medium) detection applications. These applications require sensor motion control combined with platform motion control. If the pixel sizes are small - on the order of 1 meter to less than 1 mm, then "nano-positioning accuracy" may be necessary for various aspects of the camera or surveillance sensor system, and/or related sensors used to control the moving platform. In this paper and presentation, an overview of converging technologies to sensor motion control and nano-positioning is discussed. The paper and presentation will demonstrate that the technologies converging on this aspect of remote sensing monitoring systems will require professionals with a combination of skills that are not readily available in today's workforce nor taught in educational programs today - especially at the undergraduate level. Thus there is a need to consider new avenues for educating professionals necessary to engineer and apply these converging technologies to important social environmental monitoring and surveillance needs.

  6. Scalable Photogrammetric Motion Capture System "mosca": Development and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Wide variety of applications (from industrial to entertainment) has a need for reliable and accurate 3D information about motion of an object and its parts. Very often the process of movement is rather fast as in cases of vehicle movement, sport biomechanics, animation of cartoon characters. Motion capture systems based on different physical principles are used for these purposes. The great potential for obtaining high accuracy and high degree of automation has vision-based system due to progress in image processing and analysis. Scalable inexpensive motion capture system is developed as a convenient and flexible tool for solving various tasks requiring 3D motion analysis. It is based on photogrammetric techniques of 3D measurements and provides high speed image acquisition, high accuracy of 3D measurements and highly automated processing of captured data. Depending on the application the system can be easily modified for different working areas from 100 mm to 10 m. The developed motion capture system uses from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for video sequences of object motion acquisition. All cameras work in synchronization mode at frame rate up to 100 frames per second under the control of personal computer providing the possibility for accurate calculation of 3D coordinates of interest points. The system was used for a set of different applications fields and demonstrated high accuracy and high level of automation.

  7. Redundancy, Self-Motion, and Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    Martin, V.; Scholz, J. P.; Schöner, G.

    2011-01-01

    Outside the laboratory, human movement typically involves redundant effector systems. How the nervous system selects among the task-equivalent solutions may provide insights into how movement is controlled. We propose a process model of movement generation that accounts for the kinematics of goal-directed pointing movements performed with a redundant arm. The key element is a neuronal dynamics that generates a virtual joint trajectory. This dynamics receives input from a neuronal timer that paces end-effector motion along its path. Within this dynamics, virtual joint velocity vectors that move the end effector are dynamically decoupled from velocity vectors that do not. Moreover, the sensed real joint configuration is coupled back into this neuronal dynamics, updating the virtual trajectory so that it yields to task-equivalent deviations from the dynamic movement plan. Experimental data from participants who perform in the same task setting as the model are compared in detail to the model predictions. We discover that joint velocities contain a substantial amount of self-motion that does not move the end effector. This is caused by the low impedance of muscle joint systems and by coupling among muscle joint systems due to multiarticulatory muscles. Back-coupling amplifies the induced control errors. We establish a link between the amount of self-motion and how curved the end-effector path is. We show that models in which an inverse dynamics cancels interaction torques predict too little self-motion and too straight end-effector paths. PMID:19718817

  8. An Iterative Rate-Control Technique for Motion JPEG2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannes, Alexis P.

    2002-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling the bit rate for image sequences compressed using the Motion JPEG2000 Standard. We propose a computationally efficient iterative technique that is intended for applications where real time (or near real time) encoding is required. Using real world video sequences, we analyze the rate control accuracy and image quality performance of the proposed technique. Although the effectiveness of the technique was demonstrated on high action video sequences, the proposed technique is also applicable to other video sequence encoding applications such as security and surveillance systems or video over the internet.

  9. Tracking Motions Of Manually Controlled Welding Torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Gangl, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Techniques for measuring motions of manually controlled welding torches undergoing development. Positions, orientations, and velocities determined in real time during manual arc welding. Makes possible to treat manual welding processes more systematically so manual welds made more predictable, especially in cases in which mechanical strengths and other properties of welded parts highly sensitive to heat inputs and thus to velocities and orientations of welding torches.

  10. Motion control of 7-DOF arms - The configuration control approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark K.; Lee, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    Graphics simulation and real-time implementation of configuration control schemes for a redundant 7-DOF Robotics Research arm are described. The arm kinematics and motion control schemes are described briefly. This is followed by a description of a graphics simulation environment for 7-DOF arm control on the Silicon Graphics IRIS Workstation. Computer simulation results are presented to demonstrate elbow control, collision avoidance, and optimal joint movement as redundancy resolution goals. The laboratory setup for experimental validation of motion control of the 7-DOF Robotics Research arm is then described. The configuration control approach is implemented on a Motorola-68020/VME-bus-based real-time controller, with elbow positioning for redundancy resolution. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of configuration control for real-time control.

  11. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  12. Development of motion control method for laser soldering process

    SciTech Connect

    Yerganian, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Development of a method to generate the motion control data for sealing an electronic housing using laser soldering is described. The motion required to move the housing under the laser is a nonstandard application and was performed with a four-axis system using the timed data streaming mode capabilities of a Compumotor AT6400 indexer. A Microsoft Excel 5.0 spreadsheet (named Israuto.xls) was created to calculate the movement of the part under the laser, and macros were written into the spreadsheet to allow the user to easily create this data. A data verification method was developed for simulating the motion data. The geometry of the assembly was generated using Parametric Technology Corporation Pro/E version 15. This geometry was then converted using Pro/DADS version 3.1 from Computer Aided Design Software Inc. (CADSI), and the simulation was carried out using DADS version 8.0 from CADSI.

  13. A Realization of Motion Copying System Based on Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokura, Yuki; Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    This paper proposes a motion copying system in order to reproduce motion of human operators. The motion copying system consists of both motion saving system and motion loading system based on multilateral controller. The motion saving system is realized by master systems and a slave system. The motion saving system saves motion of a slave system when human operator moves the master systems. At the same time, identity ratio is introduced to decouple the masters motions. The identity ratio of each master system is calculated by force of all master systems, and are saved to memory. On the contrary, real-world master systems and a virtual-world slave system realize the motion loading system. The motion loading system reproduces the motion using saved motion data and value of the identity ratio. The paper confirms that the motion saving system and motion loading system based on multilateral controller is generalized. The reproduced position and force correspond to the saved ones by the proposed method.

  14. Optical motion control of maglev graphite.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Abe, Jiro

    2012-12-26

    Graphite has been known as a typical diamagnetic material and can be levitated in the strong magnetic field. Here we show that the magnetically levitating pyrolytic graphite can be moved in the arbitrary place by simple photoirradiation. It is notable that the optical motion control system described in this paper requires only NdFeB permanent magnets and light source. The optical movement is driven by photothermally induced changes in the magnetic susceptibility of the graphite. Moreover, we demonstrate that light energy can be converted into rotational kinetic energy by means of the photothermal property. We find that the levitating graphite disk rotates at over 200 rpm under the sunlight, making it possible to develop a new class of light energy conversion system. PMID:23234502

  15. Validation of the Leap Motion Controller using markered motion capture technology.

    PubMed

    Smeragliuolo, Anna H; Hill, N Jeremy; Disla, Luis; Putrino, David

    2016-06-14

    The Leap Motion Controller (LMC) is a low-cost, markerless motion capture device that tracks hand, wrist and forearm position. Integration of this technology into healthcare applications has begun to occur rapidly, making validation of the LMC׳s data output an important research goal. Here, we perform a detailed evaluation of the kinematic data output from the LMC, and validate this output against gold-standard, markered motion capture technology. We instructed subjects to perform three clinically-relevant wrist (flexion/extension, radial/ulnar deviation) and forearm (pronation/supination) movements. The movements were simultaneously tracked using both the LMC and a marker-based motion capture system from Motion Analysis Corporation (MAC). Adjusting for known inconsistencies in the LMC sampling frequency, we compared simultaneously acquired LMC and MAC data by performing Pearson׳s correlation (r) and root mean square error (RMSE). Wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation showed good overall agreement (r=0.95; RMSE=11.6°, and r=0.92; RMSE=12.4°, respectively) with the MAC system. However, when tracking forearm pronation/supination, there were serious inconsistencies in reported joint angles (r=0.79; RMSE=38.4°). Hand posture significantly influenced the quality of wrist deviation (P<0.005) and forearm supination/pronation (P<0.001), but not wrist flexion/extension (P=0.29). We conclude that the LMC is capable of providing data that are clinically meaningful for wrist flexion/extension, and perhaps wrist deviation. It cannot yet return clinically meaningful data for measuring forearm pronation/supination. Future studies should continue to validate the LMC as updated versions of their software are developed. PMID:27102160

  16. Control strategies for planetary rover motion and manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trautwein, W.

    1973-01-01

    An unusual insect-like vehicle designed for planetary surface exploration is made the occasion for a discussion of control concepts in path selection, hazard detection, obstacle negotiation, and soil sampling. A control scheme which actively articulates the pitching motion between a single-loop front module and a dual loop rear module leads to near optimal behavior in soft soil; at the same time the vehicle's front module acts as a reliable tactile forward probe with a detection range much longer than the stopping distance. Some optimal control strategies are discussed, and the photos of a working scale model are displayed.

  17. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  18. Tracking 3-D body motion for docking and robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donath, M.; Sorensen, B.; Yang, G. B.; Starr, R.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced method of tracking three-dimensional motion of bodies has been developed. This system has the potential to dynamically characterize machine and other structural motion, even in the presence of structural flexibility, thus facilitating closed loop structural motion control. The system's operation is based on the concept that the intersection of three planes defines a point. Three rotating planes of laser light, fixed and moving photovoltaic diode targets, and a pipe-lined architecture of analog and digital electronics are used to locate multiple targets whose number is only limited by available computer memory. Data collection rates are a function of the laser scan rotation speed and are currently selectable up to 480 Hz. The tested performance on a preliminary prototype designed for 0.1 in accuracy (for tracking human motion) at a 480 Hz data rate includes a worst case resolution of 0.8 mm (0.03 inches), a repeatability of plus or minus 0.635 mm (plus or minus 0.025 inches), and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 2.0 mm (plus or minus 0.08 inches) within an eight cubic meter volume with all results applicable at the 95 percent level of confidence along each coordinate region. The full six degrees of freedom of a body can be computed by attaching three or more target detectors to the body of interest.

  19. Motion sickness: Can it be controlled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, David

    1988-01-01

    NASA is one of the few research centers concerned with motion sickness. Since the physiology of man has been developed in the one-gravity field Earth, the changes experienced by man in space are unique, and often result in symptoms that resemble motion sickness on Earth. NASA is concerned with motion sickness because it is very uncomfortable for the astronauts. Another concern of NASA is the possibility of a motion sickness astronaut regurgitating while he or she is sealed in an airtight space suit. This could be fatal. Motivated by these reasons, NASA spent thousands of dollars in research and development for a drug or technique for combating motion sickness. Several different treatments were developed for this disorder. Three of the most effective ways of combatting motion sickness are discussed.

  20. Applications of Motion Study in Developmental Disabilities: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Levan; Lin, Chien-Hui; Browder, Diane M.

    2002-01-01

    A review of applications of motion study in developmental disabilities identifies two eras of research focus in the 1990s: (1) studies establishing the effectiveness and efficiency of tasks designed with motion study principles and (2) studies examining the interaction between motion study-based task designs and other variables such as choice,…

  1. Adaptive Animation of Human Motion for E-Learning Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Frederick W. B.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Komura, Taku; Wang, Meng; Siu, Becky

    2007-01-01

    Human motion animation has been one of the major research topics in the field of computer graphics for decades. Techniques developed in this area help present human motions in various applications. This is crucial for enhancing the realism as well as promoting the user interest in the applications. To carry this merit to e-learning applications,…

  2. Modular motion control produces cost-effective conveying

    SciTech Connect

    Yackel, R.A.

    1997-08-01

    Collectively, US power plants move as much as 800 million tons of coal a year through the mining, transport, off-loading, stockpiling and consumption sequence, most typically through the use of belt conveyors. Plant operators oversee a process that moves mountains of coal accurately and dependably, guarding against overloading, loss of conveyor-to-conveyor synchronization, belt slippage and other malfunctions. A coal-conveying motion-control system should consist of modular, turnkey motion-sensing components that can be assembled and interconnected for any application without custom engineering. Such a system can be fail-safe, provide uninterrupted protection, resist difficult environmental conditions, integrate complex multiple functions and allow power plant operators to take instant action to protect against damage in the event of a system fault.

  3. New virtual laboratories presenting advanced motion control concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubej, Martin; Krejčí, Alois; Reitinger, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with development of software framework for rapid generation of remote virtual laboratories. Client-server architecture is chosen in order to employ real-time simulation core which is running on a dedicated server. Ordinary web browser is used as a final renderer to achieve hardware independent solution which can be run on different target platforms including laptops, tablets or mobile phones. The provided toolchain allows automatic generation of the virtual laboratory source code from the configuration file created in the open- source Inkscape graphic editor. Three virtual laboratories presenting advanced motion control algorithms have been developed showing the applicability of the proposed approach.

  4. Proposal of Method for Control of Muscle Activation Level for Limbs during Motion and Application of this Method in Strength Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, Satoshi; Murakami, Yosuke; Hirai, Junji

    With an increase in the number of elderly people in our society, the need for equipments that ensure activities of daily living and that can be used in strength training for reducing the need for nursing care is increasing. In this paper, we propose a method for controlling the level of muscle activation for a particular muscle group without EMG sensors; the force exerted by the tips of the limbs during motion is used to control the level of muscle activation. The method is based on a musculoskeletal model for limbs called functionally different effective muscles of three antagonistic pairs of six muscles in 2D space. Hill's equation is incorporated in the method to consider force-velocity characteristics of muscles. EMG measurement results for two muscles under isokinetic contraction in the lower limbs of a subject show that difference between the achieved activation level and the desired activation level is less than the error of the output force distribution. Moreover, the control method is applied to strength training. A manipulator that can facilitate the isokinetic contraction with more than the desired activation level for a specific muscle group is developed.

  5. Human Motion Energy Harvesting for AAL Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Becker, P.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Research and development into the topic of ambient assisted living has led to an increasing range of devices that facilitate a person's life. The issue of the power supply of these modern mobile systems however has not been solved satisfactorily yet. In this paper a flat inductive multi-coil harvester for integration into the shoe sole is presented. The device is designed for ambient assisted living (AAL) applications and particularly to power a self-lacing shoe. The harvester exploits the horizontal swing motion of the foot to generate energy. Stacks of opposing magnets move through a number of equally spaced coils to induce a voltage. The requirement of a flat structure which can be integrated into the shoe sole is met by a reduced form factor of the magnet stack. In order to exploit the full width of the shoe sole, supporting structures are used to parallelize the harvester and therefore increase the number of active elements, i.e. magnets and coils. The development and characterization of different harvester variations is presented with the best tested design generating an average power of up to 2.14 mW at a compact device size of 75 × 41.5 × 15 mm3 including housing.

  6. Force and motion control of a constrained flexible manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fon-Lin

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation reports the results of a comprehensive research study on the combined joint motion control, vibration control, and force control of a constrained rigid-flexible robot arm. An efficient and accurate approach to modeling for controller design is provided. Both regulation and tracking problems are considered, and a modified version of a Corless-Leitmann controller is developed. Experimental studies, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods, are presented. In this work, the dynamic modeling of a constrained spherical coordinate robot arm, whose last link is very flexible, is studied for the purpose of combined force and motion control. The model is derived using a consistent modeling procedure which accounts for the axial force effects due to contract, and the coupling due to the effects of flexible motions on the rigid body motions. These effects are shown to be important in the prediction of the vibration frequencies. Galerkin's method is employed for spatial discretization of the flexible link deflections. A convergence study is presented to evaluate the appropriateness of the spatial approximating functions and to determine the number of modes required for obtaining accurate simulation results. Linear control design methods are shown to be adequate for solving the problem of hybrid force and position regulation for the constrained flexible robot arm. However, nonlinear control strategies show advantages (i.e., good response of the joint motion and contact force, and small magnitude of the structural vibration) in the tracking control of motion and force. A modified Corless-Leitmann controller is presented to enhance the control of the flexible motion using only joint actuators. Finally, an experimental implementation is used to validate the proposed controller designs, to assess the merit of measuring and feeding back the flexible motion and the contact force, and to evaluate the feasibility of combined force and motion control

  7. Motion control, motion sickness, and the postural dynamics of mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Thomas A; Chen, Yi-Chou; Koslucher, Frank C

    2014-04-01

    Drivers are less likely than passengers to experience motion sickness, an effect that is important for any theoretical account of motion sickness etiology. We asked whether different types of control would affect the incidence of motion sickness, and whether any such effects would be related to participants' control of their own bodies. Participants played a video game on a tablet computer. In the Touch condition, the device was stationary and participants controlled the game exclusively through fingertip inputs via the device's touch screen. In the Tilt condition, participants held the device in their hands and moved the device to control some game functions. Results revealed that the incidence of motion sickness was greater in the Touch condition than in the Tilt condition. During game play, movement of the head and torso differed as a function of the type of game control. Before the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness, movement of the head and torso differed between participants who later reported motion sickness and those that did not. We discuss implications of these results for theories of motion sickness etiology. PMID:24504199

  8. Multi-application controls: Robust nonlinear multivariable aerospace controls applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enns, Dale F.; Bugajski, Daniel J.; Carter, John; Antoniewicz, Bob

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the general methodology used to apply Honywell's Multi-Application Control (MACH) and the specific application to the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) including piloted simulation handling qualities evaluation. The general steps include insertion of modeling data for geometry and mass properties, aerodynamics, propulsion data and assumptions, requirements and specifications, e.g. definition of control variables, handling qualities, stability margins and statements for bandwidth, control power, priorities, position and rate limits. The specific steps include choice of independent variables for least squares fits to aerodynamic and propulsion data, modifications to the management of the controls with regard to integrator windup and actuation limiting and priorities, e.g. pitch priority over roll, and command limiting to prevent departures and/or undesirable inertial coupling or inability to recover to a stable trim condition. The HARV control problem is characterized by significant nonlinearities and multivariable interactions in the low speed, high angle-of-attack, high angular rate flight regime. Systematic approaches to the control of vehicle motions modeled with coupled nonlinear equations of motion have been developed. This paper will discuss the dynamic inversion approach which explicity accounts for nonlinearities in the control design. Multiple control effectors (including aerodynamic control surfaces and thrust vectoring control) and sensors are used to control the motions of the vehicles in several degrees-of-freedom. Several maneuvers will be used to illustrate performance of MACH in the high angle-of-attack flight regime. Analytical methods for assessing the robust performance of the multivariable control system in the presence of math modeling uncertainty, disturbances, and commands have reached a high level of maturity. The structured singular value (mu) frequency response methodology is presented

  9. Equations of motion for control of the SCOLE laboratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Quinn, R. D.; Norris, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this study are listed as follows: (1) to develop Lagrange's equations of motion for the shuttle antenna configuration in orbit; (2) to modify equations using the Lagrange multiplier method to develop equations of motion for the laboratory experiment; and (3) to discuss methods for simulation and control. The equations are presented in graph form.

  10. Pebble bed pebble motion: Simulation and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This dissertation presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to

  11. Orientation Control Method and System for Object in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark Stephen (Inventor); Redmon, Jr., John W. (Inventor); Cox, Mark D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An object in motion has a force applied thereto at a point of application. By moving the point of application such that the distance between the object's center-of-mass and the point of application is changed, the object's orientation can be changed/adjusted.

  12. Toolkits Control Motion of Complex Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    That space is a hazardous environment for humans is common knowledge. Even beyond the obvious lack of air and gravity, the extreme temperatures and exposure to radiation make the human exploration of space a complicated and risky endeavor. The conditions of space and the space suits required to conduct extravehicular activities add layers of difficulty and danger even to tasks that would be simple on Earth (tightening a bolt, for example). For these reasons, the ability to scout distant celestial bodies and perform maintenance and construction in space without direct human involvement offers significant appeal. NASA has repeatedly turned to complex robotics for solutions to extend human presence deep into space at reduced risk and cost and to enhance space operations in low Earth orbit. At Johnson Space Center, engineers explore the potential applications of dexterous robots capable of performing tasks like those of an astronaut during extravehicular activities and even additional ones too delicate or dangerous for human participation. Johnson's Dexterous Robotics Laboratory experiments with a wide spectrum of robot manipulators, such as the Mitsubishi PA-10 and the Robotics Research K-1207i robotic arms. To simplify and enhance the use of these robotic systems, Johnson researchers sought generic control methods that could work effectively across every system.

  13. Motion and force control for multiple cooperative manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The motion and force control of multiple robot arms manipulating a commonly held object is addressed. A general control paradigm that decouples the motion and force control problems is introduced. For motion control, there are three natural choices: (1) joint torques, (2) arm-tip force vectors, and (3) the acceleration of a generalized coordinate. Choice (1) allows a class of relatively model-independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open-loop system; (2) and (3) require the full model information but produce simpler problems. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, the allocation of the desired end-effector control force to the joint actuators can be optimized; otherwise the internal force can be controlled about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  14. Dual-Arm Generalized Compliant Motion With Shared Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-01-01

    Dual-Arm Generalized Compliant Motion (DAGCM) primitive computer program implementing improved unified control scheme for two manipulator arms cooperating in task in which both grasp same object. Provides capabilities for autonomous, teleoperation, and shared control of two robot arms. Unifies cooperative dual-arm control with multi-sensor-based task control and makes complete task-control capability available to higher-level task-planning computer system via large set of input parameters used to describe desired force and position trajectories followed by manipulator arms. Some concepts discussed in "A Generalized-Compliant-Motion Primitive" (NPO-18134).

  15. The influence of ship motion of manual control skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, P.; Poulton, C.; Duross, H.; Lewis, W.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ship motion on a range of typical manual control skills were examined on the Warren Spring ship motion simulator driven in heave, pitch, and roll by signals taken from the frigate HMS Avenger at 13 m/s (25 knots) into a force 4 wind. The motion produced a vertical r.m.s. acceleration of 0.024g, mostly between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz, with comparatively little pitch or roll. A task involving unsupported arm movements was seriously affected by the motion; a pursuit tracking task showed a reliable decrement although it was still performed reasonably well (pressure and free moving tracking controls were affected equally by the motion); a digit keying task requiring ballistic hand movements was unaffected. There was no evidence that these effects were caused by sea sickness. The differing response to motion of the different tasks, from virtual destruction to no effect, suggests that a major benefit could come from an attempt to design the man/control interface onboard ship around motion resistant tasks.

  16. Motion and force control of multiple robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the motion and force control problem of multiple robot arms manipulating a cooperatively held object. A general control paradigm is introduced which decouples the motion and force control problems. For motion control, different control strategies are constructed based on the variables used as the control input in the controller design. There are three natural choices; acceleration of a generalized coordinate, arm tip force vectors, and the joint torques. The first two choices require full model information but produce simple models for the control design problem. The last choice results in a class of relatively model independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open loop system. The motion control only determines the joint torque to within a manifold, due to the multiple-arm kinematic constraint. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, an optimization can be performed to best allocate the desired and effector control force to the joint actuators. The other possibility is to control the internal force about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  17. The Digital Motion Control System for the Submillimeter Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Wilson, R. W.; Kimberk, R.; Leiker, P. S.; Patel, N. A.; Blundell, R.; Christensen, R. D.; Diven, A. R.; Maute, J.; Plante, R. J.; Riddle, P.; Young, K. H.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and performance of the digital servo and motion control system for the 6-meter parabolic antennas of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The system is divided into three nested layers operating at a different, appropriate bandwidth. (1) A rack-mounted, real-time Unix system runs the position loop which reads the high resolution azimuth and elevation encoders and sends velocity and acceleration commands at 100 Hz to a custom-designed servo control board (SCB). (2) The microcontroller-based SCB reads the motor axis tachometers and implements the velocity loop by sending torque commands to the motor amplifiers at 558 Hz. (3) The motor amplifiers implement the torque loop by monitoring and sending current to the three-phase brushless drive motors at 20 kHz. The velocity loop uses a traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm, while the position loop uses only a proportional term and implements a command shaper based on the Gauss error function. Calibration factors and software filters are applied to the tachometer feedback prior to the application of the servo gains in the torque computations. All of these parameters are remotely adjustable in the software. The three layers of the control system monitor each other and are capable of shutting down the system safely if a failure or anomaly occurs. The Unix system continuously relays the antenna status to the central observatory computer via reflective memory. In each antenna, a Palm Vx hand controller displays the complete system status and allows full local control of the drives in an intuitive touchscreen user interface. The hand controller can also be connected outside the cabin, a major convenience during the frequent reconfigurations of the interferometer. Excellent tracking performance ( 0.3‧‧ rms) is achieved with this system. It has been in reliable operation on 8 antennas for over 10 years and has required minimal maintenance.

  18. Motion cue effects on human pilot dynamics in manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Endo, S.; Itoko, T.

    1977-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the motion cue effects on human pilots during tracking tasks. The moving-base simulator of National Aerospace Laboratory was employed as the motion cue device, and the attitude director indicator or the projected visual field was employed as the visual cue device. The chosen controlled elements were second-order unstable systems. It was confirmed that with the aid of motion cues the pilot workload was lessened and consequently the human controllability limits were enlarged. In order to clarify the mechanism of these effects, the describing functions of the human pilots were identified by making use of the spectral and the time domain analyses. The results of these analyses suggest that the sensory system of the motion cues can yield the differential informations of the signal effectively, which coincides with the existing knowledges in the physiological area.

  19. Sensing human hand motions for controlling dexterous robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Beth A.; Churchill, Philip J.; Little, Arthur D.

    1988-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM) system is designed to control dexterous robot hands such as the UTAH/MIT and Stanford/JPL hands. It is the first commercially available device which makes it possible to accurately and confortably track the complex motion of the human finger joints. The DHM is adaptable to a wide variety of human hand sizes and shapes, throughout their full range of motion.

  20. Robotic Implementation of Realistic Reaching Motion Using a Sliding Mode/Operational Space Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Adam; Herrmann, Guido; Melhuish, Chris; Pipe, Tony; Lenz, Alexander

    It has been shown that a task-level controller with minimal-effort posture control produces human-like motion in simulation. This control approach is based on the dynamic model of a human skeletal system superimposed with realistic muscle like actuators whose effort is minimised. In practical application, there is often a degree of error between the dynamic model of a system used for controller derivation and the actual dynamics of the system. We present a practical application of the task-level control framework with simplified posture control in order to produce life-like and compliant reaching motions for a redundant task. The addition of a sliding mode controller improves performance of the physical robot by compensating for unknown parametric and dynamic disturbances without compromising the human-like posture.

  1. A versatile motion control system for astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Karl; Alter, Matthias; Bideaux, André; Klein, Ralf; Lehmitz, Michael; Mohr, Lars; Ramos, José Ricardo

    2010-07-01

    With steadily increasing telescope sizes and the growing complexity of scientific instruments, there is an ever-growing demand for improved electronics, controlling all the different optical parts on moving mechanisms. Among competing requirements are, on one hand, the increasing number of actuators, with high-precision positioning in closed and open loop, and on the other hand, smaller sizes, low power and restricted heat emission. A specific challenge is accommodating mechanisms that operate in infrared instrumentation at cryogenic temperatures down to 60 Kelvin. In this area piezo motors offer promising solutions. To fulfill these different demands a competitive motion control system has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) in Heidelberg, Germany. A modular chassis with standardized boards provides best solutions for extensive tasks. High and low power DC servo motors, brushless DC servo motors, stepper motors and piezo motors with different technologies are supported. Diversity position feedback capabilities, like incremental and absolute encoders for non cryogenic and capacitive sensors and resolvers for cryogenic applications, are provided.

  2. New human-centered linear and nonlinear motion cueing algorithms for control of simulator motion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telban, Robert J.

    While the performance of flight simulator motion system hardware has advanced substantially, the development of the motion cueing algorithm, the software that transforms simulated aircraft dynamics into realizable motion commands, has not kept pace. To address this, new human-centered motion cueing algorithms were developed. A revised "optimal algorithm" uses time-invariant filters developed by optimal control, incorporating human vestibular system models. The "nonlinear algorithm" is a novel approach that is also formulated by optimal control, but can also be updated in real time. It incorporates a new integrated visual-vestibular perception model that includes both visual and vestibular sensation and the interaction between the stimuli. A time-varying control law requires the matrix Riccati equation to be solved in real time by a neurocomputing approach. Preliminary pilot testing resulted in the optimal algorithm incorporating a new otolith model, producing improved motion cues. The nonlinear algorithm vertical mode produced a motion cue with a time-varying washout, sustaining small cues for longer durations and washing out large cues more quickly compared to the optimal algorithm. The inclusion of the integrated perception model improved the responses to longitudinal and lateral cues. False cues observed with the NASA adaptive algorithm were absent. As a result of unsatisfactory sensation, an augmented turbulence cue was added to the vertical mode for both the optimal and nonlinear algorithms. The relative effectiveness of the algorithms, in simulating aircraft maneuvers, was assessed with an eleven-subject piloted performance test conducted on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator (VMS). Two methods, the quasi-objective NASA Task Load Index (TLX), and power spectral density analysis of pilot control, were used to assess pilot workload. TLX analysis reveals, in most cases, less workload and variation among pilots with the nonlinear algorithm. Control input

  3. Visual Features Involving Motion Seen from Airport Control Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion

    2010-01-01

    Visual motion cues are used by tower controllers to support both visual and anticipated separation. Some of these cues are tabulated as part of the overall set of visual features used in towers to separate aircraft. An initial analyses of one motion cue, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers detect and use it for spacing aircraft on or near the surface. Understanding cues like it will help determine if they can be safely used in a remote/virtual tower in which their presentation may be visually degraded.

  4. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOEpatents

    Bernitsas, Michael M.; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2011-11-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  5. Robust, Flexible Motion Control for the Mars Explorer Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimone, Mark; Biesiadecki, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The Mobility Flight Software, running on computers aboard the Mars Explorer Rover (MER) robotic vehicles Spirit and Opportunity, affords the robustness and flexibility of control to enable safe and effective operation of these vehicles in traversing natural terrain. It can make the vehicles perform specific maneuvers commanded from Earth, and/or can autonomously administer multiple aspects of mobility, including choice of motion, measurement of actual motion, and even selection of targets to be approached. Motion of a vehicle can be commanded by use of multiple layers of control, ranging from motor control at a low level, direct drive operations (e.g., motion along a circular arc, motion along a straight line, or turn in place) at an intermediate level to goal-position driving (that is, driving to a specified location) at a high level. The software can also perform high-level assessment of terrain and selection of safe paths across the terrain: this involves processing of the digital equivalent of a local traversability map generated from images acquired by stereoscopic pairs of cameras aboard the vehicles. Other functions of the software include interacting with the rest of the MER flight software and performing safety checks.

  6. DAVID: A new video motion sensor for outdoor perimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    To be effective, a perimeter intrusion detection system must comprise both sensor and rapid assessment components. The use of closed circuit television (CCTV) to provide the rapid assessment capability, makes possible the use of video motion detection (VMD) processing as a system sensor component. Despite it's conceptual appeal, video motion detection has not been widely used in outdoor perimeter systems because of an inability to discriminate between genuine intrusions and numerous environmental effects such as cloud shadows, wind motion, reflections, precipitation, etc. The result has been an unacceptably high false alarm rate and operator work-load. DAVID (Digital Automatic Video Intrusion Detector) utilizes new digital signal processing techniques to achieve a dramatic improvement in discrimination performance thereby making video motion detection practical for outdoor applications. This paper begins with a discussion of the key considerations in implementing an outdoor video intrusion detection system, followed by a description of the DAVID design in light of these considerations.

  7. Micro manipulator motion control to counteract macro manipulator structural vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, J.Y.; Trudnowski, D.J.; Evans, M.S.; Bennett, D.W.

    1995-02-01

    Inertial force damping control by micro manipulator modulation is proposed to suppress the vibrations of a micro/macro manipulator system. The proposed controller, developed using classical control theory, is added to the existing control system. The proposed controller uses real-time measurements of macro manipulator flexibility to adjust the motion of the micro manipulator to counteract structural vibrations. Experimental studies using an existing micro/macro flexible link manipulator testbed demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to suppression of vibrations in the macro/micro manipulator system using micro-manipulator-based inertial active damping control.

  8. Stabilization control of a hovering model insect: lateral motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lai; Sun, Mao

    2011-10-01

    Our previous study shows that the lateral disturbance motion of a model drone fly does not have inherent stability (passive stability), because of the existence of an unstable divergence mode. But drone flies are observed to fly stably. Constantly active control must be applied to stabilize the flight. In this study, we investigate the lateral stabilization control of the model drone fly. The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the lateral control derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis and modal decomposition are used for solving the equations of motion. Controllability analysis shows that although inherently unstable, the lateral disturbance motion is controllable. By feeding back the state variables (i.e. lateral translation velocity, yaw rate, roll rate and roll angle, which can be measured by the sensory system of the insect) to produce anti-symmetrical changes in stroke amplitude and/or in angle of attack between the left and right wings, the motion can be stabilized, explaining why the drone flies can fly stably even if the flight is passively unstable.

  9. Controlling the motion of multiple objects on a Chladni plate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Sariola, Veikko; Latifi, Kourosh; Liimatainen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the idea of moving objects by acoustic vibration can be traced back to 1787, when Ernst Chladni reported the first detailed studies on the aggregation of sand onto nodal lines of a vibrating plate. Since then and to this date, the prevailing view has been that the particle motion out of nodal lines is random, implying uncontrollability. But how random really is the out-of-nodal-lines motion on a Chladni plate? Here we show that the motion is sufficiently regular to be statistically modelled, predicted and controlled. By playing carefully selected musical notes, we can control the position of multiple objects simultaneously and independently using a single acoustic actuator. Our method allows independent trajectory following, pattern transformation and sorting of multiple miniature objects in a wide range of materials, including electronic components, water droplets loaded on solid carriers, plant seeds, candy balls and metal parts. PMID:27611347

  10. Precision Motion Control of Linear DC Solenoid Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    High speed and high precision control has been required in various cases. Hence, a new linear actuator based on Linear DC Solenoid Motor (LDSM), is developed for that purpose. In addition, we propose a precision motion control for LDSM. LDSM is composed of solenoid stator and moving permanent magnet. It has simple and light structure. Moreover, the solenoid form provides small leakage and generates more power than non-linear motor. Nevertheless, the nonlinear disturbance force such as friction force prevents LDSM from controlling precisely. In this paper, the high gain disturbance observer is applied to LDSM to suppress the force. The observer is able to estimate and compensate the nonlinear disturbance force. It is confirmed that the proposed precision motion control provides LDSM with precise observer control position and force through the experiments.

  11. Analysis of the Accuracy and Robustness of the Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Frank; Bachmann, Daniel; Rudak, Bartholomäus; Fisseler, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Leap Motion Controller is a new device for hand gesture controlled user interfaces with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. However, up to this point its capabilities in real environments have not been analyzed. Therefore, this paper presents a first study of a Leap Motion Controller. The main focus of attention is on the evaluation of the accuracy and repeatability. For an appropriate evaluation, a novel experimental setup was developed making use of an industrial robot with a reference pen allowing a position accuracy of 0.2 mm. Thereby, a deviation between a desired 3D position and the average measured positions below 0.2 mm has been obtained for static setups and of 1.2 mm for dynamic setups. Using the conclusion of this analysis can improve the development of applications for the Leap Motion controller in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. PMID:23673678

  12. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Lindolfo; Rich, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives include: I. Prototype a camera service leveraging the CCSDS Integrated protocol stack (MIRA/SM&C/AMS/DTN): a) CCSDS MIRA Service (New). b) Spacecraft Monitor and Control (SM&C). c) Asynchronous Messaging Service (AMS). d) Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). II. Additional MIRA Objectives: a) Demo of Camera Control through ISS using CCSDS protocol stack (Berlin, May 2011). b) Verify that the CCSDS standards stack can provide end-to-end space camera services across ground and space environments. c) Test interoperability of various CCSDS protocol standards. d) Identify overlaps in the design and implementations of the CCSDS protocol standards. e) Identify software incompatibilities in the CCSDS stack interfaces. f) Provide redlines to the SM&C, AMS, and DTN working groups. d) Enable the CCSDS MIRA service for potential use in ISS Kibo camera commanding. e) Assist in long-term evolution of this entire group of CCSDS standards to TRL 6 or greater.

  13. Guaranteeing Isochronous Control of Networked Motion Control Systems Using Phase Offset Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ikhwan; Kim, Taehyoun

    2015-01-01

    Guaranteeing isochronous transfer of control commands is an essential function for networked motion control systems. The adoption of real-time Ethernet (RTE) technologies may be profitable in guaranteeing deterministic transfer of control messages. However, unpredictable behavior of software in the motion controller often results in unexpectedly large deviation in control message transmission intervals, and thus leads to imprecise motion. This paper presents a simple and efficient heuristic to guarantee the end-to-end isochronous control with very small jitter. The key idea of our approach is to adjust the phase offset of control message transmission time in the motion controller by investigating the behavior of motion control task. In realizing the idea, we performed a pre-runtime analysis to determine a safe and reliable phase offset and applied the phase offset to the runtime code of motion controller by customizing an open-source based integrated development environment (IDE). We also constructed an EtherCAT-based motion control system testbed and performed extensive experiments on the testbed to verify the effectiveness of our approach. The experimental results show that our heuristic is highly effective even for low-end embedded controller implemented in open-source software components under various configurations of control period and the number of motor drives. PMID:26076407

  14. Guaranteeing Isochronous Control of Networked Motion Control Systems Using Phase Offset Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ikhwan; Kim, Taehyoun

    2015-01-01

    Guaranteeing isochronous transfer of control commands is an essential function for networked motion control systems. The adoption of real-time Ethernet (RTE) technologies may be profitable in guaranteeing deterministic transfer of control messages. However, unpredictable behavior of software in the motion controller often results in unexpectedly large deviation in control message transmission intervals, and thus leads to imprecise motion. This paper presents a simple and efficient heuristic to guarantee the end-to-end isochronous control with very small jitter. The key idea of our approach is to adjust the phase offset of control message transmission time in the motion controller by investigating the behavior of motion control task. In realizing the idea, we performed a pre-runtime analysis to determine a safe and reliable phase offset and applied the phase offset to the runtime code of motion controller by customizing an open-source based integrated development environment (IDE). We also constructed an EtherCAT-based motion control system testbed and performed extensive experiments on the testbed to verify the effectiveness of our approach. The experimental results show that our heuristic is highly effective even for low-end embedded controller implemented in open-source software components under various configurations of control period and the number of motor drives. PMID:26076407

  15. Voltage Controlled Magnetic Skyrmion Motion for Racetrack Memory.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zheng, Chentian; Lv, Weifeng; Lei, Na; Zhang, Youguang; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmion, vortex-like swirling topologically stable spin configurations, is appealing as information carrier for future nanoelectronics, owing to the stability, small size and extremely low driving current density. One of the most promising applications of skyrmion is to build racetrack memory (RM). Compared to domain wall-based RM (DW-RM), skyrmion-based RM (Sky-RM) possesses quite a few benefits in terms of energy, density and speed etc. Until now, the fundamental behaviors, including nucleation/annihilation, motion and detection of skyrmion have been intensively investigated. However, one indispensable function, i.e., pinning/depinning of skyrmion still remains an open question and has to be addressed before applying skyrmion for RM. Furthermore, Current research mainly focuses on physical investigations, whereas the electrical design and evaluation are still lacking. In this work, we aim to promote the development of Sky-RM from fundamental physics to realistic electronics. First, we investigate the pinning/depinning characteristics of skyrmion in a nanotrack with the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect. Then, we propose a compact model and design framework of Sky-RM for electrical evaluation. This work completes the elementary memory functionality of Sky-RM and fills the technical gap between the physicists and electronic engineers, making a significant step forward for the development of Sky-RM. PMID:26975697

  16. Voltage Controlled Magnetic Skyrmion Motion for Racetrack Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zheng, Chentian; Lv, Weifeng; Lei, Na; Zhang, Youguang; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmion, vortex-like swirling topologically stable spin configurations, is appealing as information carrier for future nanoelectronics, owing to the stability, small size and extremely low driving current density. One of the most promising applications of skyrmion is to build racetrack memory (RM). Compared to domain wall-based RM (DW-RM), skyrmion-based RM (Sky-RM) possesses quite a few benefits in terms of energy, density and speed etc. Until now, the fundamental behaviors, including nucleation/annihilation, motion and detection of skyrmion have been intensively investigated. However, one indispensable function, i.e., pinning/depinning of skyrmion still remains an open question and has to be addressed before applying skyrmion for RM. Furthermore, Current research mainly focuses on physical investigations, whereas the electrical design and evaluation are still lacking. In this work, we aim to promote the development of Sky-RM from fundamental physics to realistic electronics. First, we investigate the pinning/depinning characteristics of skyrmion in a nanotrack with the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect. Then, we propose a compact model and design framework of Sky-RM for electrical evaluation. This work completes the elementary memory functionality of Sky-RM and fills the technical gap between the physicists and electronic engineers, making a significant step forward for the development of Sky-RM. PMID:26975697

  17. Voltage Controlled Magnetic Skyrmion Motion for Racetrack Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zheng, Chentian; Lv, Weifeng; Lei, Na; Zhang, Youguang; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic skyrmion, vortex-like swirling topologically stable spin configurations, is appealing as information carrier for future nanoelectronics, owing to the stability, small size and extremely low driving current density. One of the most promising applications of skyrmion is to build racetrack memory (RM). Compared to domain wall-based RM (DW-RM), skyrmion-based RM (Sky-RM) possesses quite a few benefits in terms of energy, density and speed etc. Until now, the fundamental behaviors, including nucleation/annihilation, motion and detection of skyrmion have been intensively investigated. However, one indispensable function, i.e., pinning/depinning of skyrmion still remains an open question and has to be addressed before applying skyrmion for RM. Furthermore, Current research mainly focuses on physical investigations, whereas the electrical design and evaluation are still lacking. In this work, we aim to promote the development of Sky-RM from fundamental physics to realistic electronics. First, we investigate the pinning/depinning characteristics of skyrmion in a nanotrack with the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect. Then, we propose a compact model and design framework of Sky-RM for electrical evaluation. This work completes the elementary memory functionality of Sky-RM and fills the technical gap between the physicists and electronic engineers, making a significant step forward for the development of Sky-RM.

  18. Motion Control of Urea-Powered Biocompatible Hollow Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Xu; Hahn, Kersten; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-03-22

    The quest for biocompatible microswimmers powered by compatible fuel and with full motion control over their self-propulsion is a long-standing challenge in the field of active matter and microrobotics. Here, we present an active hybrid microcapsule motor based on Janus hollow mesoporous silica microparticles powered by the biocatalytic decomposition of urea at physiological concentrations. The directional self-propelled motion lasts longer than 10 min with an average velocity of up to 5 body lengths per second. Additionally, we control the velocity of the micromotor by chemically inhibiting and reactivating the enzymatic activity of urease. The incorporation of magnetic material within the Janus structure provides remote magnetic control on the movement direction. Furthermore, the mesoporous/hollow structure can load both small molecules and larger particles up to hundreds of nanometers, making the hybrid micromotor an active and controllable drug delivery microsystem. PMID:26863183

  19. Stepping-Motion Motor-Control Subsystem For Testing Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Control subsystem closed-loop angular-position-control system causing motor and bearing under test to undergo any of variety of continuous or stepping motions. Also used to test bearing-and-motor assemblies, motors, angular-position sensors including rotating shafts, and like. Monitoring subsystem gathers data used to evaluate performance of bearing or other article under test. Monitoring subsystem described in article, "Monitoring Subsystem For Testing Bearings" (GSC-13432).

  20. Evaluation of Grasping Motion Using a Virtual Prosthetic Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Osamu; Bu, Nan; Ueno, Naohiro

    Electromyogram (EMG) signals can be measured from human muscles and can be used to anticipate movements. In fact, many researchers have tried to use these signals as an interface tool for a prosthetic hand. However, most of these studies focused on the discrimination performance of the EMG signals, and only discussed the control method for the prosthetic hand. Evaluation of the operating performance was seldom reported. This paper proposes a virtual prosthetic control system and presents the analyses of a grasp motion under two different EMG control methods: on/off control and proportional control. The proportional control is able to proportionally control the grasping velocity based on the amplitude of the EMG signal. The on/off control controls the hand at a uniform rate while the amplitude of the EMG signal is greater than a predefined threshold. We conducted experiments with five subjects, and confirmed the usefulness of the developed system.

  1. Model for human use of motion cues in vehicular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1990-01-01

    A feedback model for human use of motion cues in tracking and regulation tasks is offered. The motion cue model is developed as a simple extension of a structural model of the human pilot, although other equivalent dynamic representations of the pilot could be used in place of the structural model. In the structural model,it is hypothesized that proprioceptive cues and an internal representation of the vehicle dynamics allow the human to create compensation characteristics that are appropriate for the dynamics of the particular vehicle being controlled. It is shown that an additional loop closure involving motion feedback can improve the pilot/vehicle dynamics by decreasing high-frequency phase lags in the effective open-loop system transfer function. Data from a roll-attitude tracking/regulation task conducted on a moving base simulator are used to verify the modeling approach.

  2. Dynamical and thermodynamical control of open quantum Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya

    Open quantum Brownian motion was introduced as a new type of quantum Brownian motion for Brownian particles with internal quantum degrees of freedom. Recently, an example of the microscopic derivation of open quantum Brownian motion has been presented [I. Sinayskiy and F. Petruccione, Phys. Scr. T165, 014017 (2015)]. The microscopic derivation allows to relate the dynamical properties of open Quantum Brownian motion and the thermodynamical properties of the environment. In the present work, we study the possibility of control of the external degrees of freedom of the ''walker'' (position) by manipulating the internal one, e.g. spin, polarization, occupation numbers. In the particular example of the known microscopic derivation the connection between dynamics of the ''walker'' and thermodynamical parameters of the system is established. For the system of open Brownian walkers coupled to the same environment controllable creation of quantum correlations is investigated. This work is based upon research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  3. Knowledge-Based Motion Control of AN Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Can

    An Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System (IMAS), which is equipped with vision and low level sensors to cope with unknown obstacles, is modeled as a hierarchy of path planning and motion control. This dissertation concentrates on the lower level of this hierarchy (Pilot) with a knowledge-based controller. The basis of a theory of knowledge-based controllers is established, using the example of the Pilot level motion control of IMAS. In this context, the knowledge-based controller with a linguistic world concept is shown to be adequate for the minimum time control of an autonomous mobile robot motion. The Pilot level motion control of IMAS is approached in the framework of production systems. The three major components of the knowledge-based control that are included here are the hierarchies of the database, the rule base and the rule evaluator. The database, which is the representation of the state of the world, is organized as a semantic network, using a concept of minimal admissible vocabulary. The hierarchy of rule base is derived from the analytical formulation of minimum-time control of IMAS motion. The procedure introduced for rule derivation, which is called analytical model verbalization, utilizes the concept of causalities to describe the system behavior. A realistic analytical system model is developed and the minimum-time motion control in an obstacle strewn environment is decomposed to a hierarchy of motion planning and control. The conditions for the validity of the hierarchical problem decomposition are established, and the consistency of operation is maintained by detecting the long term conflicting decisions of the levels of the hierarchy. The imprecision in the world description is modeled using the theory of fuzzy sets. The method developed for the choice of the rule that prescribes the minimum-time motion control among the redundant set of applicable rules is explained and the usage of fuzzy set operators is justified. Also included in the

  4. Hummingbirds control hovering flight by stabilizing visual motion.

    PubMed

    Goller, Benjamin; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2014-12-23

    Relatively little is known about how sensory information is used for controlling flight in birds. A powerful method is to immerse an animal in a dynamic virtual reality environment to examine behavioral responses. Here, we investigated the role of vision during free-flight hovering in hummingbirds to determine how optic flow--image movement across the retina--is used to control body position. We filmed hummingbirds hovering in front of a projection screen with the prediction that projecting moving patterns would disrupt hovering stability but stationary patterns would allow the hummingbird to stabilize position. When hovering in the presence of moving gratings and spirals, hummingbirds lost positional stability and responded to the specific orientation of the moving visual stimulus. There was no loss of stability with stationary versions of the same stimulus patterns. When exposed to a single stimulus many times or to a weakened stimulus that combined a moving spiral with a stationary checkerboard, the response to looming motion declined. However, even minimal visual motion was sufficient to cause a loss of positional stability despite prominent stationary features. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that hummingbirds control hovering position by stabilizing motions in their visual field. The high sensitivity and persistence of this disruptive response is surprising, given that the hummingbird brain is highly specialized for sensory processing and spatial mapping, providing other potential mechanisms for controlling position. PMID:25489117

  5. Decentralized reinforcement-learning control and emergence of motion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinin, Mikhail; Yamada, Kazuyaki; Okhura, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Kanji

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we propose a system for studying emergence of motion patterns in autonomous mobile robotic systems. The system implements an instance-based reinforcement learning control. Three spaces are of importance in formulation of the control scheme. They are the work space, the sensor space, and the action space. Important feature of our system is that all these spaces are assumed to be continuous. The core part of the system is a classifier system. Based on the sensory state space analysis, the control is decentralized and is specified at the lowest level of the control system. However, the local controllers are implicitly connected through the perceived environment information. Therefore, they constitute a dynamic environment with respect to each other. The proposed control scheme is tested under simulation for a mobile robot in a navigation task. It is shown that some patterns of global behavior--such as collision avoidance, wall-following, light-seeking--can emerge from the local controllers.

  6. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part II – Adaptive Motion Control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of adaptive motion control of smart versatile rehabilitation devices using MR fluids. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Adaptive controls are developed to regulate resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. Special consideration has been given to the human–machine interaction in the adaptive control that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue of the human subject. PMID:18548131

  7. Heralded Control of Mechanical Motion by Single Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Momenzadeh, S. Ali; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method to achieve a high degree of control of nanomechanical oscillators by coupling their mechanical motion to single spins. Manipulating the spin alone and measuring its quantum state heralds the cooling or squeezing of the oscillator even for weak spin-oscillator couplings. We analytically show that the asymptotic behavior of the oscillator is determined by a spin-induced thermal filter function whose overlap with the initial thermal distribution of the oscillator determines its cooling, heating, or squeezing. Counterintuitively, the rate of cooling dependence on the instantaneous thermal occupancy of the oscillator renders robust cooling or squeezing even for high initial temperatures and damping rates. We further estimate how the proposed scheme can be used to control the motion of a thin diamond cantilever by coupling it to its defect centers at low temperature.

  8. Heralded Control of Mechanical Motion by Single Spins.

    PubMed

    Rao, D D Bhaktavatsala; Momenzadeh, S Ali; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-12

    We propose a method to achieve a high degree of control of nanomechanical oscillators by coupling their mechanical motion to single spins. Manipulating the spin alone and measuring its quantum state heralds the cooling or squeezing of the oscillator even for weak spin-oscillator couplings. We analytically show that the asymptotic behavior of the oscillator is determined by a spin-induced thermal filter function whose overlap with the initial thermal distribution of the oscillator determines its cooling, heating, or squeezing. Counterintuitively, the rate of cooling dependence on the instantaneous thermal occupancy of the oscillator renders robust cooling or squeezing even for high initial temperatures and damping rates. We further estimate how the proposed scheme can be used to control the motion of a thin diamond cantilever by coupling it to its defect centers at low temperature. PMID:27563995

  9. Optimal Robust Motion Controller Design Using Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Svečko, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a multiobjective genetic algorithm for robust motion controller design. Motion controller structure is based on a disturbance observer in an RIC framework. The RIC approach is presented in the form with internal and external feedback loops, in which an internal disturbance rejection controller and an external performance controller must be synthesised. This paper involves novel objectives for robustness and performance assessments for such an approach. Objective functions for the robustness property of RIC are based on simple even polynomials with nonnegativity conditions. Regional pole placement method is presented with the aims of controllers' structures simplification and their additional arbitrary selection. Regional pole placement involves arbitrary selection of central polynomials for both loops, with additional admissible region of the optimized pole location. Polynomial deviation between selected and optimized polynomials is measured with derived performance objective functions. A multiobjective function is composed of different unrelated criteria such as robust stability, controllers' stability, and time-performance indexes of closed loops. The design of controllers and multiobjective optimization procedure involve a set of the objectives, which are optimized simultaneously with a genetic algorithm—differential evolution. PMID:24987749

  10. Motion Control of the Soccer Robot Based on Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coman, Daniela; Ionescu, Adela

    2009-08-01

    Robot soccer is a challenging platform for multi-agent research, involving topics such as real-time image processing and control, robot path planning, obstacle avoidance and machine learning. The conventional robot control consists of methods for path generation and path following. When a robot moves away the estimated path, it must return immediately, and while doing so, the obstacle avoidance behavior and the effectiveness of such a path are not guaranteed. So, motion control is a difficult task, especially in real time and high speed control. This paper describes the use of fuzzy logic control for the low level motion of a soccer robot. Firstly, the modelling of the soccer robot is presented. The soccer robot based on MiroSoT Small Size league is a differential-drive mobile robot with non-slipping and pure-rolling. Then, the design of fuzzy controller is describes. Finally, the computer simulations in MATLAB Simulink show that proposed fuzzy logic controller works well.

  11. What Is Being Done to Control Motion Sickness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Y. D.

    1985-01-01

    AFT (Autogenic Feedback Training) involves practicing a series of mental exercises to speed up or slow down the control of autonomic activity. This produces a reduced tendency for autonomic activity levels to diverge from baseline (at rest) under stressful motion-sickness-inducing conditions. Subjects conditions. Subjects engaged in applying AFT exercises are required to closely monitor their own bodily sensations during motion-sickness-eliciting tests. These tests include the Coriolis Sickness Susceptibility Index (CSSI), which consists of sitting a subject into a rotating chair that moves at various speeds while a visual background turns at differing speeds and directions, and the Vertical Acceleration Rotation Device (VARD) test, which involves the placing of a subject in a drum that moves in an upward and downward motion until he or she is sick, while simultaneously monitoring the subject's vital signs. These tests provide investigators with evidence of slight changes in autonomic activities such as increases in heart rate, skin temperature, and sweat. All of these symptoms occur in subjects that experience bodily weakness or discomfort with the onset of motion sickness.

  12. Motion Controlled Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Handzic, Ismet; Vasudevan, Erin V.; Reed, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01

    Walking on a split-belt treadmill, which has two belts that can be run at different speeds, has been shown to improve walking patterns post-stroke. However, these improvements are only temporarily retained once individuals transition to walking over ground. We hypothesize that longer-lasting effects would be observed if the training occurred during natural walking over ground, as opposed to on a treadmill. In order to study such long-term effects, we have developed a mobile and portable device which can simulate the same gait altering movements experienced on a split-belt treadmill. The new motion controlled gait enhancing mobile shoe improves upon the previous version’s drawbacks. This version of the GEMS has motion that is continuous, smooth, and regulated with on-board electronics. A vital component of this new design is the Archimedean spiral wheel shape that redirects the wearer’s downward force into a horizontal backward motion. The design is passive and does not utilize any motors. Its motion is regulated only by a small magnetic particle brake. Further experimentation is needed to evaluate the long-term after-effects. PMID:22275620

  13. Active Motion Control of Tetrahymena pyriformis by Galvanotaxis and Geotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-11-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the swimming behavior of microorganisms and biologically inspired micro-robots. These microorganisms naturally accompanied by complex motions. Therefore it is important to understand the flow characteristics as well as control mechanisms. One of eukaryotic cells, the protozoa are a diverse group of unicellular organisms, many of which are motile cilia. Motile cilia are cover on the surface of cell in large numbers and beat in oriented waves. Sequential beating motions of a single cilium form metachronal strokes, producing a propagation wave, and therefore the body is achieved propulsion force. So preliminary studies are achieved to understand the flow induced by swimming microorganisms. Based on hydrodynamic results, the follow study of a few micro-scale protozoa cell, such as the Tetrahymena pyriformis, has provided active or passive control into several external stimuli. In typical control methods, the galvanotaxis and geotaxis were adopted active and passive control, respectively. The validation of galvanotaxis is used DC and AC voltage. In terms of geotaxis, corrugated microstructures were used to control in the microchannel. This research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST, 2011-0016461), National Science Foundation (NSF) CMMI Control Systems Program (#1000255) and Army Research Office (W911NF-11-1-0490).

  14. 14 CFR 23.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 23... Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 23.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit...) Aerodynamic controls: Motion and effect (1) Primary controls: Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing...

  15. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 25... Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they.... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose...

  16. 14 CFR 23.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 23... Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 23.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit...) Aerodynamic controls: Motion and effect (1) Primary controls: Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing...

  17. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 25... Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they.... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose...

  18. 14 CFR 27.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 27... Accommodations § 27.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they... collective pitch control, must operate with a sense of motion which corresponds to the effect on...

  19. 14 CFR 29.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 29... Accommodations § 29.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they... collective pitch control, must operate with a sense of motion which corresponds to the effect on...

  20. Development of PC motion control system based on LAN environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bo; Wang, Pengfei; Liu, Yanwu

    2001-10-01

    The system combines the motion control technology and LAN advantages. Usually there are one center computer and several or more subordinate computers, which form star-topotaxy mode. The data transmission strategy makes use of mature database management system SQLSERVER, which can automatically deal with data communication, so the programmer can avoid complicated communication programming. The system construction is simple and mainly oriented to small-middle scale enterprise and CIMS project. By practice, the system has been developed and used for industry production and control successfully.

  1. Autonomous vehicle motion control, approximate maps, and fuzzy logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruspini, Enrique H.

    1993-01-01

    Progress on research on the control of actions of autonomous mobile agents using fuzzy logic is presented. The innovations described encompass theoretical and applied developments. At the theoretical level, results of research leading to the combined utilization of conventional artificial planning techniques with fuzzy logic approaches for the control of local motion and perception actions are presented. Also formulations of dynamic programming approaches to optimal control in the context of the analysis of approximate models of the real world are examined. Also a new approach to goal conflict resolution that does not require specification of numerical values representing relative goal importance is reviewed. Applied developments include the introduction of the notion of approximate map. A fuzzy relational database structure for the representation of vague and imprecise information about the robot's environment is proposed. Also the central notions of control point and control structure are discussed.

  2. Influence of Vibrotactile Feedback on Controlling Tilt Motion After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Rupert, A. H.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the vestibular system are integrated with other sensory information leads to perceptual disturbances and impaired manual control following transitions between gravity environments. The primary goals of this ongoing post-flight investigation are to quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion following short-duration spaceflight and to evaluate vibrotactile feedback of tilt as a sensorimotor countermeasure. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on 9 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius) in a darkened room is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant canal or visual cues. A Tilt-Translation Sled (TTS) is capable of synchronizing pitch tilt with fore-aft translation to align the resultant gravitoinertial vector with the longitudinal body axis, thereby eliciting canal reflexes without concordant otolith or visual cues. A simple 4 tactor system was implemented to provide feedback when tilt position exceeded predetermined levels in either device. Closed-loop nulling tasks are performed during random tilt steps or sum-of-sines (TTS only) with and without vibrotactile feedback of chair position. RESULTS. On landing day the manual control performance without vibrotactile feedback was reduced by >30% based on the gain or the amount of tilt disturbance successfully nulled. Manual control performance tended to return to baseline levels within 1-2 days following landing. Root-mean-square position error and tilt velocity were significantly reduced with vibrotactile feedback. CONCLUSIONS. These preliminary results are consistent with our hypothesis that adaptive changes in vestibular processing corresponds to reduced manual control performance following G-transitions. A simple vibrotactile prosthesis improves the ability to null out tilt motion within a

  3. Pharmacology in space. Part 2. Controlling motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    In this second article in the two-part series on pharmacology in space, Claire Lathers and colleagues discuss the pharmacology of drugs used to control motion sickness in space and note that the pharmacology of the 'ideal' agent has yet to be worked out. That motion sickness may impair the pharmacological action of a drug by interfering with its absorption and distribution because of alteration of physiology is a problem unique to pharmacology in space. The authors comment on the problem of designing suitable ground-based studies to evaluate the pharmacological effect of drugs to be used in space and discuss the use of salivary samples collected during space flight to allow pharmacokinetic evaluations necessary for non-invasive clinical drug monitoring.

  4. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose up. Rudder Right pedal forward for nose right. (2) Secondary. Controls Motion and effect Flaps (or...

  5. A Digital Motion Control System for Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Wilson, R. W.; Kimberk, R.; Leiker, P. S.

    2001-05-01

    We have designed and programmed a digital motion control system for large telescopes, in particular, the 6-meter antennas of the Submillimeter Array on Mauna Kea. The system consists of a single robust, high-reliability microcontroller board which implements a two-axis velocity servo while monitoring and responding to critical safety parameters. Excellent tracking performance has been achieved with this system (0.3 arcsecond RMS at sidereal rate). The 24x24 centimeter four-layer printed circuit board contains a multitude of hardware devices: 40 digital inputs (for limit switches and fault indicators), 32 digital outputs (to enable/disable motor amplifiers and brakes), a quad 22-bit ADC (to read the motor tachometers), four 16-bit DACs (that provide torque signals to the motor amplifiers), a 32-LED status panel, a serial port to the LynxOS PowerPC antenna computer (RS422/460kbps), a serial port to the Palm Vx handpaddle (RS232/115kbps), and serial links to the low-resolution absolute encoders on the azimuth and elevation axes. Each section of the board employs independent ground planes and power supplies, with optical isolation on all I/O channels. The processor is an Intel 80C196KC 16-bit microcontroller running at 20MHz on an 8-bit bus. This processor executes an interrupt-driven, scheduler-based software system written in C and assembled into an EPROM with user-accessible variables stored in NVSRAM. Under normal operation, velocity update requests arrive at 100Hz from the position-loop servo process running independently on the antenna computer. A variety of telescope safety checks are performed at 279Hz including routine servicing of a 6 millisecond watchdog timer. Additional ADCs onboard the microcontroller monitor the winding temperature and current in the brushless three-phase drive motors. The PID servo gains can be dynamically changed in software. Calibration factors and software filters can be applied to the tachometer readings prior to the application of

  6. On Motion Planning and Control of Multi-Link Lightweight Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cetinkunt, Sabri

    1987-01-01

    A general gross and fine motion planning and control strategy is needed for lightweight robotic manipulator applications such as painting, welding, material handling, surface finishing, and spacecraft servicing. The control problem of lightweight manipulators is to perform fast, accurate, and robust motions despite the payload variations, structural flexibility, and other environmental disturbances. Performance of the rigid manipulator model based computed torque and decoupled joint control methods are determined and simulated for the counterpart flexible manipulators. A counterpart flexible manipulator is defined as a manipulator which has structural flexibility, in addition to having the same inertial, geometric, and actuation properties of a given rigid manipulator. An adaptive model following control (AMFC) algorithm is developed to improve the performance in speed, accuracy, and robustness. It is found that the AMFC improves the speed performance by a factor of two over the conventional non-adaptive control methods for given accuracy requirements while proving to be more robust with respect to payload variations. Yet there are clear limitations on the performance of AMFC alone as well, which are imposed by the arm flexibility. In the search to further improve speed performance while providing a desired accuracy and robustness, a combined control strategy is developed. Furthermore, the problem of switching from one control structure to another during the motion and implementation aspects of combined control are discussed.

  7. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  8. Topography-Dependent Motion Compensation: Application to UAVSAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    The UAVSAR L-band synthetic aperture radar system has been designed for repeat track interferometry in support of Earth science applications that require high-precision measurements of small surface deformations over timescales from hours to years. Conventional motion compensation algorithms, which are based upon assumptions of a narrow beam and flat terrain, yield unacceptably large errors in areas with even moderate topographic relief, i.e., in most areas of interest. This often limits the ability to achieve sub-centimeter surface change detection over significant portions of an acquired scene. To reduce this source of error in the interferometric phase, we have implemented an advanced motion compensation algorithm that corrects for the scene topography and radar beam width. Here we discuss the algorithm used, its implementation in the UAVSAR data processor, and the improvement in interferometric phase and correlation achieved in areas with significant topographic relief.

  9. Controlling the Motion of Ferrofluid Droplets Using Surface Tension Gradients and Magnetoviscous Pinning.

    PubMed

    Ody, T; Panth, M; Sommers, A D; Eid, K F

    2016-07-12

    This work demonstrates the controlled motion and stopping of individual ferrofluid droplets due to a surface tension gradient and a uniform magnetic field. The surface tension gradients are created by patterning hydrophilic aluminum regions, shaped as wedges, on a hydrophobic copper surface. This pattern facilitates the spontaneous motion of water-based ferrofluid droplets down the length of the wedge toward the more hydrophilic aluminum end due to a net capillarity force created by the underlying surface wettability gradient. We observed that applying a magnetic field parallel to the surface tension gradient direction has little or no effect on the droplet's motion, while a moderate perpendicular magnetic field can stop the motion altogether effectively "pinning" the droplet. In the absence of the surface tension gradient, droplets elongate in the presence of a parallel field but do not travel. This control of the motion of individual droplets might lend itself to some biomedical and lab-on-a-chip applications. The directional dependence of the magnetoviscosity observed in this work is believed to be the consequence of the formation of nanoparticle chains in the fluid due to the existence of a minority of relatively larger magnetic particles. PMID:27269182

  10. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas–Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography. PMID:24587692

  11. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas-Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography.

  12. 78 FR 35015 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    .... n. Comments, Protests, or Motions to Intervene: Anyone may submit comments, a protest, or a motion... all protests or other comments filed, but only those who file a motion to intervene in accordance with...'', ``PROTEST'', or ``MOTION TO INTERVENE'' as applicable; (2) set forth in the heading the name of...

  13. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  14. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  15. LQR Controller for Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission in Reverse Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensler, Michel; Kawabe, Taketoshi; Joe, Shinichiro

    The system considered in this paper is a Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission (TCVT) system for cars. This system is unstable in reverse motion as some mechanical parts have been removed from the original one for cost reduction, and the gear ratio has to be regulated around its nominal value for car reverse motion. The control theory used here is the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) associated to a gain-scheduling technique, as the TCVT system is nonlinear according to the car speed. Moreover, as the LQR method requires the entire TCVT state vector and as the only available signal is the gear ratio, a full-order observer is designed. In order to take the other nonlinearities of the system into account, the observer is nonlinear: a diffeomorphism is then used for converting the variables provided by the nonlinear observer into the needed variables. In order to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the controller against the car speed and the torque shift disturbance phenomenon, several experiments with a test-bed and with an actual vehicle have been performed and showed the efficiency of the proposed controller.

  16. Controlled motion of electrically neutral microparticles by pulsed direct current

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinfang; Qin, Rongshan

    2015-01-01

    A controlled motion of electrically neutral microparticles in a conductive liquid at high temperatures has not yet been realized under the uniform direct electric current field. We propose a simple method, which employs pulsed direct current to a conductive liquid metal containing low-conductivity objects at high temperature. The electric current enables the low-conductivity particles to pass from the centre towards the various surfaces of the high-conductivity liquid metal. Most interestingly, the directionality of microparticles can be controlled and their speed can be easily regulated by adjusting pulsed current density. We find that the movement may arise from the configuration of electrical domains which generates a driving force which exceeds the force of gravity and viscous friction. All of these features are of potential benefit in separating the particles of nearly equal density but distinctly different electrical conductivities, and also offer considerable promise for the precise and selective positioning of micro-objects or the controlled motion of minute quantities of surrounding fluids. PMID:25955864

  17. Adaptive Force Control For Compliant Motion Of A Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1995-01-01

    Two adaptive control schemes offer robust solutions to problem of stable control of forces of contact between robotic manipulator and objects in its environment. They are called "adaptive admittance control" and "adaptive compliance control." Both schemes involve use of force-and torque sensors that indicate contact forces. These schemes performed well when tested in computational simulations in which they were used to control seven-degree-of-freedom robot arm in executing contact tasks. Choice between admittance or compliance control is dictated by requirements of the application at hand.

  18. Motion control solution for new PLC-based standard development platform for VLT instrument control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, D.; Brast, R.; Di Lieto, N.; Kiekebusch, M.; Knudstrup, J.; Lucuix, C.

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade ago, due to obsolescence issues, ESO initiated the design and implementation of a custom-made CANbus based motion controller (CAN-RMC) to provide, together with a tailor-made software library (motor library), the motion control capabilities for the VME platform needed for the second generation VLT/VLTI instruments. The CAN-RMC controller has been successfully used in a number of VLT instruments but it has high production costs compared to the commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) industrial solutions available on the market today. In the scope of the selection of a new PLC-based platform for the VLT instrument control systems, ESO has evaluated motion control solutions from the company Beckhoff. This paper presents the investigation, implementation and testing of the PLC/TwinCAT/EtherCAT motion controllers for DC and stepper motors and their adaptation and integration into the VLT instrumentation framework. It reports functional and performance test results for the most typical use cases of astronomical instruments like initialization sequences, tracking, switch position detections, backslash compensation, brake handling, etc. In addition, it gives an overview of the main features of TwinCAT NC/PTP, PLCopen MC, EtherCAT motion control terminals and the engineering tools like TwinCAT Scope that are integrated into the development environment and simplify software development, testing and commissioning of motorized instrument functions.

  19. Design and simulation of a motion controller for a wheeled mobile-robot autonomous navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhaj Ali, Souma M.; Hall, Ernest L.

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes the development of PD, PID Computed-Torque (CT), and a PD digital motion controller for the autonomous navigation of a Wheeled Mobile Robot (WMR) in outdoor environments. The controllers select the suitable control torques, so that the WMR follows the desired path produced from a navigation algorithm described in a previous paper. PD CT, PID CT, and PD digital controllers were developed using a linear system design procedure to select the feedback control signal that stabilizes the tracking error equation. The torques needed for the motors were computed by using the inverse of the dynamic equation for the WMR. Simulation software was developed to simulate the performance and efficiency of the controllers. Simulation results verified the effectiveness of the controllers under different motion trajectories, comparing the performance of the three controllers shows that the PD digital controller was the best where the tracking error did not exceed .05 using 20 msec sample period. The significance of this work lies in the development of CT and digital controllers for WMR navigation, instead of robot manipulators. These CT controllers will facilitate the use of WMRs in many applications including defense, industrial, personal, and medical robots.

  20. A motion control function evaluation system employing a pen tablet.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sata, Koji; Nomura, Naonobu; Hamada, Shingo; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new pen tablet based system for evaluation of hand motion control function as influenced by brain disease. The system consists of a laptop computer and a pen tablet data entry device. The pen tablet is placed in front of the subject who is instructed to tap the pen at a constant location. When the subject taps the pen, the tablet transfers the pen position to the laptop computer. The computer then saves the tap position, along with the time elapsed between each tap. The subject is instructed to tap 50 times with each hand with the eyes closed. The absolute distance moved between each two successive tap positions is detected. Tapping period, total tapping time and total distance moved are also calculated. Measurements were performed on ten normal subjects and three subjects with cerebral infarction. The results indicate that cerebral infarction subjects' average total tap point distance moved and absolute distance moved are greater than in the normal subjects. Conversely, all subjects in both groups produced only normal variations in tapping period and total tapping time. Our system can therefore quantitatively evaluate hand motion control function by the total and absolute distance moved. PMID:15850121

  1. Relative dynamics and motion control of nanosatellite formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimnoo, Ammarin; Hiraki, Koju

    2016-04-01

    Orbit selection is a necessary factor in nanosatellite formation mission design/meanwhile, to keep the formation, it is necessary to consume fuel. Therefore, the best orbit design for nanosatellite formation flying should be one that requires the minimum fuel consumption. The purpose of this paper is to analyse orbit selection with respect to the minimum fuel consumption, to provide a convenient way to estimate the fuel consumption for keeping nanosatellite formation flying and to present a simplified method of formation control. The formation structure is disturbed by J2 gravitational perturbation and other perturbing accelerations such as atmospheric drag. First, Gauss' Variation Equations (GVE) are used to estimate the essential ΔV due to the J2 perturbation and atmospheric drag. The essential ΔV presents information on which orbit is good with respect to the minimum fuel consumption. Then, the linear equations which account for J2 gravitational perturbation of Schweighart-Sedwick are presented and used to estimate the fuel consumption to maintain the formation structure. Finally, the relative dynamics motion is presented as well as a simplified motion control of formation structure by using GVE.

  2. Towards controlling molecular motions in fluorescence microscopy and optical trapping: a spatiotemporal approach

    PubMed Central

    Kumar De, Arijit; Goswami, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    This account reviews some recent studies pursued in our group on several control experiments with important applications in (one-photon) confocal and two-photon fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy and optical trapping with laser tweezers. We explore the simultaneous control of internal and external (i.e. centre-of-mass motion) degrees of freedom, which require the coupling of various control parameters to result in the spatiotemporal control. Of particular interest to us is the implementation of such control schemes in living systems. A live cell is a system of a large number of different molecules which combine and interact to generate complex structures and functions. These combinations and interactions of molecules need to be choreographed perfectly in time and space to achieve intended intra-cellular functions. Spatiotemporal control promises to be a versatile tool for dynamical control of spatially manipulated bio-molecules. PMID:23814326

  3. A Decoupled MPC for Motion Control in Robotino Using a Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straßberger, Daniel; Mercorelli, Paolo; Sergiyenko, Oleg

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a controller for motion control of the Robotino. The proposed controller considers a functional decoupling control strategy realized using a geometric approach and the invertibility property of the DC-drives with which the Robotino is equipped. Horizontal, Vertical and Angular motions are considered and once the decoupling between these motions is obtained, a Model Predictive Control (MPC) strategy is used in combination with the inverse DC-drive model. Simulation results using real data of Robotino are shown.

  4. Development of a cost-effective PC-based motion control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    A cost-effective PC-based motion control system was developed and evaluated for use on a laser welding system. The motion system is capable of X-Y simultaneous contouring and provides a rotary axis of motion also. The system motion paths can be specified in either Relative or Absolute motion. The PC controls all of the laser power supply and shutter I/O operations. All of the motion programming and operator interfacing is via the Windows {reg_sign}95 operating system.

  5. Space motion sickness: The sensory motor controls and cardiovascular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvestre, Philippe A.; Blaber, Andrew P.; Landrock, Clinton K.

    Background and PurposeSpace motion sickness (SMS) and related symptoms remain a major limiting factor in Space operations. A recent comprehensive literature review [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y] concluded that SMS does not represent a unique diagnostic entity, and there is no adequate predictor of SMS' susceptibility and severity. No countermeasure has been found reliable to prevent or treat SMS symptoms onset. Recent neurophysiological findings on sensory-motor controls monitoring [P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] and heart-rate variability (HRV) measurements relationship could explain post-flight orthostatic intolerance (PFOI) in astronauts [A.P. Blaber, R.L. Bondar, M.S. Kassam, Heart rate variability and short duration space flight: relationship to post-flight orthostatic intolerance, BMC Physiology 4 (2004) 6]. These two methodologies are generally overlooked in SMS' analysis. In this paper we present the case for a strong relationship between sensory-motor controls related symptoms, including orthostatic intolerance (OI) and SMS symptoms. MethodsThis paper expands on several previously published papers [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y; P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] along with an updated literature review. An analysis of a 10-year period clinical data from trauma patients experiencing postural deficiency syndrome (PDS) show assessment and monitoring techniques which successfully identify trauma

  6. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Yuya; Habuka, Satoru; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices. PMID:26665080

  7. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Yuya; Habuka, Satoru; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices. PMID:26665080

  8. Attitude motion of a non-attitude-controlled cylindrical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, two non-attitude-controlled satellites were each placed in a low earth orbit by the Scout Launch Vehicle. The satellites were cylindrical in shape and contained reservoirs of hydrazine fuel. Three-axis magnetometer measurements, telemetered in real time, were used to derive the attitude motion of each satellite. Algorithms are generated to deduce possible orientations (and magnitudes) of each vehicle's angular momentum for each telemetry contact. To resolve ambiguities at each contact, a force model was derived to simulate the significant long-term effects of magnetic, gravity gradient, and aerodynamic torques on the angular momentum of the vehicles. The histories of the orientation and magnitude of the angular momentum are illustrated.

  9. Motion-mode energy method for vehicle dynamics analysis and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Wang, Lifu; Du, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle motion and vibration control is a fundamental motivation for the development of advanced vehicle suspension systems. In a vehicle-fixed coordinate system, the relative motions of the vehicle between body and wheel can be classified into several dynamic stages based on energy intensity, and can be decomposed into sets of uncoupled motion-modes according to modal parameters. Vehicle motions are coupled, but motion-modes are orthogonal. By detecting and controlling the predominating vehicle motion-mode, the system cost and energy consumption of active suspensions could be reduced. A motion-mode energy method (MEM) is presented in this paper to quantify the energy contribution of each motion-mode to vehicle dynamics in real time. The control of motion-modes is prioritised according to the level of motion-mode energy. Simulation results on a 10 degree-of-freedom nonlinear full-car model with the magic-formula tyre model illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed MEM. The contribution of each motion-mode to the vehicle's dynamic behaviour is analysed under different excitation inputs from road irregularities, directional manoeuvres and braking. With the identified dominant motion-mode, novel cost-effective suspension systems, such as active reconfigurable hydraulically interconnected suspension, can possibly be used to control full-car motions with reduced energy consumption. Finally, discussion, conclusions and suggestions for future work are provided.

  10. Controlled motion of domain walls in submicron amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťibu, Mihai; Lostun, Mihaela; Allwood, Dan A.; Rotǎrescu, Cristian; Atiťoaie, Alexandru; Lupu, Nicoleta; Óvári, Tibor-Adrian; Chiriac, Horia

    2016-05-01

    Results on the control of the domain wall displacement in cylindrical Fe77.5Si7.5B15 amorphous glass-coated submicron wires prepared by rapid quenching from the melt are reported. The control methods have relied on conical notches with various depths, up to a few tens of nm, made in the glass coating and in the metallic nucleus using a focused ion beam (FIB) system, and on the use of small nucleation coils at one of the sample ends in order to apply magnetic field pulses aimed to enhance the nucleation of reverse domains. The notch-based method is used for the first time in the case of cylindrical ultrathin wires. The results show that the most efficient technique of controlling the domain wall motion in this type of samples is the simultaneous use of notches and nucleation coils. Their effect depends on wire diameter, notch depth, its position on the wire length, and characteristics of the applied pulse.

  11. Passive Motion Paradigm: An Alternative to Optimal Control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vishwanathan; Morasso, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, optimal control theory (OCT) has emerged as the leading approach for investigating neural control of movement and motor cognition for two complementary research lines: behavioral neuroscience and humanoid robotics. In both cases, there are general problems that need to be addressed, such as the “degrees of freedom (DoFs) problem,” the common core of production, observation, reasoning, and learning of “actions.” OCT, directly derived from engineering design techniques of control systems quantifies task goals as “cost functions” and uses the sophisticated formal tools of optimal control to obtain desired behavior (and predictions). We propose an alternative “softer” approach passive motion paradigm (PMP) that we believe is closer to the biomechanics and cybernetics of action. The basic idea is that actions (overt as well as covert) are the consequences of an internal simulation process that “animates” the body schema with the attractor dynamics of force fields induced by the goal and task-specific constraints. This internal simulation offers the brain a way to dynamically link motor redundancy with task-oriented constraints “at runtime,” hence solving the “DoFs problem” without explicit kinematic inversion and cost function computation. We argue that the function of such computational machinery is not only restricted to shaping motor output during action execution but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility, consequence, understanding and meaning of “potential actions.” In this sense, taking into account recent developments in neuroscience (motor imagery, simulation theory of covert actions, mirror neuron system) and in embodied robotics, PMP offers a novel framework for understanding motor cognition that goes beyond the engineering control paradigm provided by OCT. Therefore, the paper is at the same time a review of the PMP rationale, as a computational theory, and a perspective presentation of

  12. Two-Step System Identification and Primitive-Based Motion Planning for Control of Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grymin, David J.

    This dissertation addresses motion planning, modeling, and feedback control for autonomous vehicle systems. A hierarchical approach for motion planning and control of nonlinear systems operating in obstacle environments is presented. To reduce computation time during the motion planning process, dynamically feasible trajectories are generated in real-time through concatenation of pre-specified motion primitives. The motion planning task is posed as a search over a directed graph, and the applicability of informed graph search techniques is investigated. Specifically, a locally greedy algorithm with effective backtracking ability is developed and compared to weighted A* search. The greedy algorithm shows an advantage with respect to solution cost and computation time when larger motion primitive libraries that do not operate on a regular state lattice are utilized. Linearization of the nonlinear system equations about the motion primitive library results in a hybrid linear time-varying model, and an optimal control algorithm using the l 2-induced norm as the performance measure is applied to ensure that the system tracks the desired trajectory. The ability of the resulting controller to closely track the trajectory obtained from the motion planner, despite various disturbances and uncertainties, is demonstrated through simulation. Additionally, an approach for obtaining dynamically feasible reference trajectories and feedback controllers for a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based on an aerodynamic model derived from flight tests is presented. The modeling approach utilizes the two step method (TSM) with stepwise multiple regression to determine relevant explanatory terms for the aerodynamic models. Dynamically feasible trajectories are then obtained through the solution of an optimal control problem using pseudospectral optimal control software. Discretetime feedback controllers are then obtained to regulate the vehicle along the desired reference trajectory

  13. 78 FR 64486 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... submit comments, a protest, or a motion to intervene in accordance with the requirements of Rules of... motion to intervene in accordance with the Commission's Rules may become a party to the proceeding. Any... capital letters the title ``COMMENTS'', ``PROTEST'', or ``MOTION TO INTERVENE'' as applicable; (2)...

  14. SISMA (Site of Italian Strong Motion Accelerograms): a Web-Database of Ground Motion Recordings for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scasserra, Giuseppe; Lanzo, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Beniamino; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes a new website called SISMA, i.e. Site of Italian Strong Motion Accelerograms, which is an Internet portal intended to provide natural records for use in engineering applications for dynamic analyses of structural and geotechnical systems. SISMA contains 247 three-component corrected motions recorded at 101 stations from 89 earthquakes that occurred in Italy in the period 1972-2002. The database of strong motion accelerograms was developed in the framework of a joint project between Sapienza University of Rome and University of California at Los Angeles (USA) and is described elsewhere. Acceleration histories and pseudo-acceleration response spectra (5% damping) are available for download from the website. Recordings can be located using simple search parameters related to seismic source and the recording station (e.g., magnitude, V{sub s30}, etc) as well as ground motion characteristics (e.g. peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, peak ground displacement, Arias intensity, etc.)

  15. Space motion sickness: The sensory motor controls and cardiovascular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvestre, Philippe A.; Blaber, Andrew P.; Landrock, Clinton K.

    Background and PurposeSpace motion sickness (SMS) and related symptoms remain a major limiting factor in Space operations. A recent comprehensive literature review [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y] concluded that SMS does not represent a unique diagnostic entity, and there is no adequate predictor of SMS' susceptibility and severity. No countermeasure has been found reliable to prevent or treat SMS symptoms onset. Recent neurophysiological findings on sensory-motor controls monitoring [P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] and heart-rate variability (HRV) measurements relationship could explain post-flight orthostatic intolerance (PFOI) in astronauts [A.P. Blaber, R.L. Bondar, M.S. Kassam, Heart rate variability and short duration space flight: relationship to post-flight orthostatic intolerance, BMC Physiology 4 (2004) 6]. These two methodologies are generally overlooked in SMS' analysis. In this paper we present the case for a strong relationship between sensory-motor controls related symptoms, including orthostatic intolerance (OI) and SMS symptoms. MethodsThis paper expands on several previously published papers [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y; P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] along with an updated literature review. An analysis of a 10-year period clinical data from trauma patients experiencing postural deficiency syndrome (PDS) show assessment and monitoring techniques which successfully identify trauma

  16. An intelligent control scheme for precise tip-motion control in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Hu, Xiaodong; Xu, Linyan

    2016-03-01

    The paper proposes a new intelligent control method to precisely control the tip motion of the atomic force microscopy (AFM). The tip moves up and down at a high rate along the z direction during scanning, requiring the utilization of a rapid feedback controller. The standard proportional-integral (PI) feedback controller is commonly used in commercial AFMs to enable topography measurements. The controller's response performance is determined by the set of the proportional (P) parameter and the integral (I) parameter. However, the two parameters cannot be automatically altered simultaneously according to the scanning speed and the surface topography during continuors scanning, leading to an inaccurate measurement. Thus a new intelligent controller combining the fuzzy controller and the PI controller is put forward in the paper. The new controller automatically selects the most appropriate PI parameters to achieve a fast response rate on basis of the tracking errors. In the experimental setup, the new controller is realized with a digital signal process (DSP) system, implemented in a conventional AFM system. Experiments are carried out by comparing the new method with the standard PI controller. The results demonstrate that the new method is more robust and effective for the precise tip motion control, corresponding to the achievement of a highly qualified image by shortening the response time of the controller. SCANNING 38:93-99, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26183109

  17. Attitude control of a space platform/manipulator system using internal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Chris; Gurvits, Leonid; Li, Zexiang

    1994-08-01

    Attitude control of a space platform/manipulator system, using internal motion, is an example of a nonholonomic motion planning (NMP) problem arising from symmetry and conservation laws. Common to NMP problems are that an admissible configuration space path is constrained to a given nonholonomic distribution. We formulate the dynamic equations of a system consisting of a 3-DOF PUMA-like manipulator attached to a space platform (e.g., a space station or a satellite) as an NMP problem and discuss the cotrollability of the system. Then we describe the application of a simple algorithm for obtaining approximate optimal solutions. We conclude with a description of simulation software implementing the algorithm and simulation results for two experiments.

  18. Analysis of achievable disturbance attenuation in a precision magnetically-suspended motion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander V.; Holmes, Michael L.; Behrouzjou, Roxana; Trumper, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the achievable disturbance attenuation to get an Angstrom motion control resolution and macroscopic travel in a precision magnetically-suspended motion control system are presented in this paper. Noise sources in the transducers, electronics, and mechanical vibrations are used to develop the control design.

  19. Critical frequency control in harmonic quantum Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo; Petruccione, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The dissipative effects of a quantum harmonic oscillator, initially set in a coherent state and linearly coupled to a continuous distribution of frequency modes, are analyzed over long time scales in relation to the behavior of the spectral density near an arbitrary band gap, arbitrarily shaped at the higher frequencies. The reservoir is initially set either in the vacuum state or in continuous distributions of coherent states. These distributions are arbitrarily shaped at high frequencies and structured in sub- or super-ohmic configurations near an arbitrary band gap frequency. Similarly to certain decoherence processes of a qubit, critical conditions emerge, such that arbitrarily slow inverse power law relaxations of the expectation values of the observables, are obtained by approaching the boundary between the sub- and the super-ohmic regimes. Also, in such critical conditions, a trapping of the number of excitations appears in the super-ohmic regime. The technique of critical frequency control, emerging in the scenario of the environment-induced decoherence of a qubit via the reservoir engineering approach, is extended to the harmonic quantum Brownian motion.

  20. Development of FPGA based NURBS interpolator and motion controller with multiprocessor technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huan; Zhu, Limin; Xiong, Zhenhua; Ding, Han

    2013-09-01

    The high-speed computational performance is gained at the cost of huge hardware resource, which restricts the application of high-accuracy algorithms because of the limited hardware cost in practical use. To solve the problem, a novel method for designing the field programmable gate array(FPGA)-based non-uniform rational B-spline(NURBS) interpolator and motion controller, which adopts the embedded multiprocessor technique, is proposed in this study. The hardware and software design for the multiprocessor, one of which is for NURBS interpolation and the other for position servo control, is presented. Performance analysis and experiments on an X-Y table are carried out, hardware cost as well as consuming time for interpolation and motion control is compared with the existing methods. The experimental and comparing results indicate that, compared with the existing methods, the proposed method can reduce the hardware cost by 97.5% using higher-accuracy interpolation algorithm within the period of 0.5 ms. A method which ensures the real-time performance and interpolation accuracy, and reduces the hardware cost significantly is proposed, and it’s practical in the use of industrial application.

  1. Large band high sensitivity motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we describe the characteristics and performances of mono-axial monolithic sensors aimed to low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites. The mechanical part of these sensors is based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum, a mechanical architecture developed for ground-based applications. The unique features of the UNISA class of folded pendulum sensors (compactness, lightness, scalability, low resonance frequency and high quality factor) are based on the action of the gravitational force on the the moving part of the sensor. In this paper we show how to extend the application of ground-based folded pendulum also to space, in absence of gravity, still keeping all their peculiar features and characteristics. Tests on a prototype confirm the feasibility of this application, demonstrating also that interesting performances can be relatively easily obtained.

  2. 75 FR 34725 - Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ..., Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications; Mahoning Hydropower, LLC June 10, 2010. On May 25, 2010, Mahoning Hydropower, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  3. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  4. Applications of structure-from-motion photogrammetry to fluvial geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, James Thomas

    Since 2011, Structure-from-Motion Multi-View Stereo Photogrammetry (SfM or SfM-MVS) has gone from an overlooked computer vision technique to an emerging methodology for collecting low-cost, high spatial resolution three-dimensional data for topographic or surface modeling in many academic fields. This dissertation examines the applications of SfM to the field of fluvial geomorphology. My research objectives for this dissertation were to determine the error and uncertainty that are inherent in SfM datasets, the use of SfM to map and monitor geomorphic change in a small river restoration project, and the use of SfM to map and extract data to examine multi-scale geomorphic patterns for 32 kilometers of the Middle Fork John Day River. SfM provides extremely consistent results, although there are systematic errors that result from certain survey patterns that need to be accounted for in future applications. Monitoring change on small restoration stream channels with SfM gave a more complete spatial perspective than traditional cross sections on small-scale geomorphic change. Helicopter-based SfM was an excellent platform for low-cost, large scale fluvial remote sensing, and the data extracted from the imagery provided multi-scalar perspectives of downstream patterns of channel morphology. This dissertation makes many recommendations for better and more efficient SfM surveys at all of the spatial scales surveyed. By implementing the improvements laid out here and by other authors, SfM will be a powerful tool that will make 3D data collection more accessible to the wider geomorphic community.

  5. Projection of controlled repeatable real-time moving targets to test and evaluate motion imagery quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Stephen D.; Mendez, Michael; Trent, Randall

    2015-05-01

    The projection of controlled moving targets is key to the quantitative testing of video capture and post processing for Motion Imagery. This presentation will discuss several implementations of target projectors with moving targets or apparent moving targets creating motion to be captured by the camera under test. The targets presented are broadband (UV-VIS-IR) and move in a predictable, repeatable and programmable way; several short videos will be included in the presentation. Among the technical approaches will be targets that move independently in the camera's field of view, as well targets that change size and shape. The development of a rotating IR and VIS 4 bar target projector with programmable rotational velocity and acceleration control for testing hyperspectral cameras is discussed. A related issue for motion imagery is evaluated by simulating a blinding flash which is an impulse of broadband photons in fewer than 2 milliseconds to assess the camera's reaction to a large, fast change in signal. A traditional approach of gimbal mounting the camera in combination with the moving target projector is discussed as an alternative to high priced flight simulators. Based on the use of the moving target projector several standard tests are proposed to provide a corresponding test to MTF (resolution), SNR and minimum detectable signal at velocity. Several unique metrics are suggested for Motion Imagery including Maximum Velocity Resolved (the measure of the greatest velocity that is accurately tracked by the camera system) and Missing Object Tolerance (measurement of tracking ability when target is obscured in the images). These metrics are applicable to UV-VIS-IR wavelengths and can be used to assist in camera and algorithm development as well as comparing various systems by presenting the exact scenes to the cameras in a repeatable way.

  6. The Art and Literature of Motion Pictures. A Study in Bibliographic and Filmographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barbara E.

    This survey of efforts in the bibliographic control of film literature includes a review of cataloging practices for motion pictures, an analysis of the handling and control of the major works about motion pictures, a comparison of the major film cataloging codes used in the United States, Great Britain, and Europe, and a survey of the major…

  7. An Open-Access Educational Tool for Teaching Motion Dynamics in Multi-Axis Servomotor Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Guillen, J. R.; de Jesus Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, R.; Osornio-Rios, R. A.; Guevara-Gonzalez, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Servomotors are widely used in computerized numerically controlled (CNC) machines, hence motion control is a major topic covered in undergraduate/graduate engineering courses. Despite the fact that several syllabi include the motion dynamics topic in their courses, there are neither suitable tools available for designing and simulating multi-axis…

  8. Center of gravity motions and ankle joint stiffness control in upright undisturbed stance modeled through a fractional Brownian motion framework.

    PubMed

    Rougier, P; Caron, O

    2000-12-01

    The authors modeled the center of gravity vertical projection (CG(v)) and the difference, CP - CG(v), which, combined, constitute the center of pressure (CP) trajectory, as fractional Brownian motion in order to investigate their relative contributions and their spatiotemporal articulation. The results demonstrated that CG(v) and CP - CG(v) motions are both endowed in complementary fashion with strong stochastic and part-deterministic behaviors. In addition, if the temporal coordinates remain similar for all 3 trajectories by definition, the switch between the successive control mechanisms appears for shorter displacements for CP - CG(v) and CG(v) than for CP trajectories. Results deduced from both input (CG(v)) and muscular stiffness (CP - CG(v)) thus provide insight into the way the central nervous system regulates stance control and in particular how CG and CP - CG are controlled. PMID:11114233

  9. Cooperative motion control for multi-target observation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement--determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the author investigates the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. The focus is primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. This paper first formalizes the problem and discusses related work. The author then presents a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level reasoning control based on the ALLIANCE formalism. The effectiveness of the approach is analyzed by comparing it to three other feasible algorithms for cooperative control, showing the superiority of the approach for a large class of problems.

  10. Multi-robot motion control for cooperative observation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement--determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the authors investigate the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. They focus primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. This paper first formalizes the problem and discusses related work. The authors then present a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level reasoning control based on the ALLIANCE formalism. They analyze the effectiveness of the approach by comparing it to 3 other feasible algorithms for cooperative control, showing the superiority of the approach for a large class of problems.

  11. The application of mean field theory to image motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Hanauer, G G

    1995-01-01

    Previously, Markov random field (MRF) model-based techniques have been proposed for image motion estimation. Since motion estimation is usually an ill-posed problem, various constraints are needed to obtain a unique and stable solution. The main advantage of the MRF approach is its capacity to incorporate such constraints, for instance, motion continuity within an object and motion discontinuity at the boundaries between objects. In the MRF approach, motion estimation is often formulated as an optimization problem, and two frequently used optimization methods are simulated annealing (SA) and iterative-conditional mode (ICM). Although the SA is theoretically optimal in the sense of finding the global optimum, it usually takes many iterations to converge. The ICM, on the other hand, converges quickly, but its results are often unsatisfactory due to its "hard decision" nature. Previously, the authors have applied the mean field theory to image segmentation and image restoration problems. It provides results nearly as good as SA but with much faster convergence. The present paper shows how the mean field theory can be applied to MRF model-based motion estimation. This approach is demonstrated on both synthetic and real-world images, where it produced good motion estimates. PMID:18289956

  12. 76 FR 79673 - PacifiCorp; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    .... n. Comments, Protests, or Motions to Intervene: Anyone may submit comments, a protest, or a motion... other comments filed, but only those who file a motion to intervene in accordance with the Commission's... ``MOTION TO INTERVENE'' as applicable; (2) set forth in the heading the name of the applicant and...

  13. Using a wireless motion controller for 3D medical image catheter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    State-of-the-art morphological imaging techniques usually provide high resolution 3D images with a huge number of slices. In clinical practice, however, 2D slice-based examinations are still the method of choice even for these large amounts of data. Providing intuitive interaction methods for specific 3D medical visualization applications is therefore a critical feature for clinical imaging applications. For the domain of catheter navigation and surgery planning, it is crucial to assist the physician with appropriate visualization techniques, such as 3D segmentation maps, fly-through cameras or virtual interaction approaches. There has been an ongoing development and improvement for controllers that help to interact with 3D environments in the domain of computer games. These controllers are based on both motion and infrared sensors and are typically used to detect 3D position and orientation. We have investigated how a state-of-the-art wireless motion sensor controller (Wiimote), developed by Nintendo, can be used for catheter navigation and planning purposes. By default the Wiimote controller only measure rough acceleration over a range of +/- 3g with 10% sensitivity and orientation. Therefore, a pose estimation algorithm was developed for computing accurate position and orientation in 3D space regarding 4 Infrared LEDs. Current results show that for the translation it is possible to obtain a mean error of (0.38cm, 0.41cm, 4.94cm) and for the rotation (0.16, 0.28) respectively. Within this paper we introduce a clinical prototype that allows steering of a virtual fly-through camera attached to the catheter tip by the Wii controller on basis of a segmented vessel tree.

  14. Control-structure interaction/mirror motion compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Mark; Chu, Peter; Price, Xen

    1992-01-01

    Space Systems/Loral (formerly Ford Aerospace, Space Systems Division) has implemented a rigid-body Mirror Motion Compensation (MMC) scheme for the GOES-I/M spacecraft currently being built for NASA and NOAA. This has resulted in a factor of 15 reduction in pointing error due to rigid-body spacecraft motion induced by the periodic black-body calibration maneuvers required for the instruments. For GOES the spacecraft and the payload mirrors are considered as rigid bodies. The structural flexibility effects are small and are included in the total pointing budget as a separate item. This paper extends the MMC technique to include structural flexibility. For large multi-payload platforms, the structural flexibility effects can be more important in sensor pointing jitter as the result of payload motion. Sensitivity results are included to show the importance of the dynamic model fidelity.

  15. Stirling engine power control and motion conversion mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Marks, David T.

    1983-01-01

    A motion conversion device for converting between the reciprocating motion of the pistons in a Stirling engine and the rotating motion of its output shaft, and for changing the stroke and phase of the pistons, includes a lever pivoted at one end and having a cam follower at the other end. The piston rod engages the lever intermediate its ends and the cam follower engages a cam keyed to the output shaft. The lever pivot can be moved to change the length of the moment arm defined between the cam follower and the piston rod the change the piston stroke and force exerted on the cam, and the levers can be moved in opposite directions to change the phase between pistons.

  16. Stirling engine power control and motion conversion mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, D.T.

    1983-07-12

    A motion conversion device for converting between the reciprocating motion of the pistons in a Stirling engine and the rotating motion of its output shaft, and for changing the stroke and phase of the pistons, includes a lever pivoted at one end and having a cam follower at the other end. The piston rod engages the lever intermediate its ends and the cam follower engages a cam keyed to the output shaft. The lever pivot can be moved to change the length of the moment arm defined between the cam follower and the piston rod the change the piston stroke and force exerted on the cam, and the levers can be moved in opposite directions to change the phase between pistons. 3 figs.

  17. Preliminary study for motion scaling based control in minimally invasive vascular interventional robot.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhen-Qiu; Bian, Gui-Bin; Xie, Xiao-Liang; Hao, Jian-Long; Gao, Zhan-Jie; Hou, Zeng-Guang

    2015-08-01

    Robot-assisted vascular interventions present promising trend for reducing the X-ray radiation to the surgeon during the operation. However, the control methods in the current vascular interventional robots only repeat the manipulation of the surgeon. While under certain circumstances, it is necessary to scale the manipulation of the surgeon to obtain a higher precision or a shorter manipulation time. A novel control method based on motion scaling for vascular interventional robot is proposed in this paper. The main idea of the method is to change the motion speed ratios between the master and the slave side. The motion scaling based control method is implemented in the vascular interventional robot we've developed before, so the operator can deliver the interventional devices under different motion scaling factors. Experiment studies verify the effectiveness of the motion scaling based control. PMID:26737390

  18. Implementation and application of real-time motion analysis based on passive markers.

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Pedotti, A

    1998-11-01

    A method for real-time motion analysis based on passive markers is presented. An opto-electronic automatic motion analyser was used as hardware platform and the real-time operation was based on the interfacing between two levels of the system architecture. True real-time acquisition, processing and representation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional kinematics data were implemented through a newly conceived data acquisition procedure and high speed optimisation of the kinematics data processing. The method allows one to operate the motion analysis system in real-time; even when the data elaboration unit is required to perform other processing functions, the only consequence is a decrease in system sampling rate. The maximum number of processed and plotted markers in three dimensions at the highest system sampling rate (100 Hz) turned out to be suitable for the implementation of analytical and visual kinematics biofeedback. An example of the achievable level of complexity in terms of marker disposition model and graphic representation is reported by describing a demonstration of the real-time representation of human face movements. A clinical application of the method for patient position definition and control at radiotherapy units is presented. PMID:10367459

  19. A Realization of Motion Acquisition System Based on Interaction Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    Recently, skill preservation of an expert has been a serious problem of the medical or production fields. This paper proposes a motion acquisition and reproduction of human motion by bilateral motion control. The proposed skill preservation system is composed of two modes; acquisition mode and reproduction mode. In the acquisition mode, the control system is based on bilateral control. Since a touching motion is subject to the “law of action and reaction”, it is possible to decompose the force information into action force and reaction force by using the bilateral control. Furthermore, human motion is acquired in decoupled modal space by using the quarry matrix. The decoupled modes correspond to “moving”, “yawing”, “grasping” tasks, and so on. Thus the skilled motion by a human is easily obtained and analyzed in the modal space. In the reproduction mode, the acquired human motion is reproduced in the modal space by the interaction mode control. The proposed skill preservation system is applied for grasping motion by three fingers. As a result, both grasping force and moving position are well reproduced automatically. The experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  20. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  1. A visual motion detecting module for dragonfly-controlled robots.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thuy T; Higgins, Charles M

    2014-01-01

    When imitating biological sensors, we have not completely understood the early processing of the input to reproduce artificially. Building hybrid systems with both artificial and real biological components is a promising solution. For example, when a dragonfly is used as a living sensor, the early processing of visual information is performed fully in the brain of the dragonfly. The only significant remaining tasks are recording and processing neural signals in software and/or hardware. Based on existing works which focused on recording neural signals, this paper proposes a software application of neural information processing to design a visual processing module for dragonfly hybrid bio-robots. After a neural signal is recorded in real-time, the action potentials can be detected and matched with predefined templates to detect when and which descending neurons fire. The output of the proposed system will be used to control other parts of the robot platform. PMID:25570294

  2. Control of a virtual vehicle influences postural activity and motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao; Yoshida, Ken; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2011-06-01

    Everyday experience suggests that drivers are less susceptible to motion sickness than passengers. In the context of inertial motion (i.e., physical displacement), this effect has been confirmed in laboratory research using whole body motion devices. We asked whether a similar effect would occur in the context of simulated vehicles in a visual virtual environment. We used a yoked control design in which one member of each pair of participants played a driving video game (i.e., drove a virtual automobile). A recording of that performance was viewed (in a separate session) by the other member of the pair. Thus, the two members of each pair were exposed to identical visual motion stimuli, but the risk of behavioral contagion was minimized. Participants who drove the virtual vehicle (drivers) were less likely to report motion sickness than participants who viewed game recordings (passengers). Data on head and torso movement revealed that drivers tended to move more than passengers, and that the movements of drivers were more predictable than the movements of passengers. Before the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness movement differed between participants who (later) reported motion sickness and those who did not, consistent with a prediction of the postural instability theory of motion sickness. The results confirm that control is an important factor in the etiology of motion sickness and extend this finding to the control of noninertial virtual vehicles. PMID:21604911

  3. Analytic Theory and Control of the Motion of Spinning Rigid Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    1993-01-01

    -fixed torques. Assessment of the analytic solutions reveals that they are very accurate; for symmetric bodies the solutions of Euler's equations of motion are, in fact, exact. Second, the results of this research have a fundamental impact on practical scientific and mechanical applications in terms of the analysis and control of all finite-sized rigid bodies ranging from nanomachines to very large bodies, both man made and natural. After all, Euler's equations of motion apply to all physical bodies, barring only the extreme limits of quantum mechanics and relativity.

  4. Force control techniques for robot manipulators and their military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, P.; Chrystall, K.

    An overview is presented of existing techniques for providing compliant motion control to robot manipulators. Active compliance of robot manipulators can be achieved by using either logic branching feedback or continuous feedback methods, but the latter has a broader range of potential applications. The theoretical background, working principles, and advantages and drawbacks of two continuous feedback approaches are discussed. These approaches are hybrid position/force control, which integrates explicit force control and pure position control concepts, and impedance control, in which a specific mechanical impedance is achieved at the manipulator end-effector. The requirements of compliant motion control (force control) for military robotics are outlined and three scenarios of force control applications are presented: ordnance handling, refuelling of vehicles, and mine field clearing.

  5. Adaptive motion artifact reducing algorithm for wrist photoplethysmography application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo

    2016-04-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) technology is widely used in wearable heart pulse rate monitoring. It might reveal the potential risks of heart condition and cardiopulmonary function by detecting the cardiac rhythms in physical exercise. However the quality of wrist photoelectric signal is very sensitive to motion artifact since the thicker tissues and the fewer amount of capillaries. Therefore, motion artifact is the major factor that impede the heart rate measurement in the high intensity exercising. One accelerometer and three channels of light with different wavelengths are used in this research to analyze the coupled form of motion artifact. A novel approach is proposed to separate the pulse signal from motion artifact by exploiting their mixing ratio in different optical paths. There are four major steps of our method: preprocessing, motion artifact estimation, adaptive filtering and heart rate calculation. Five healthy young men are participated in the experiment. The speeder in the treadmill is configured as 12km/h, and all subjects would run for 3-10 minutes by swinging the arms naturally. The final result is compared with chest strap. The average of mean square error (MSE) is less than 3 beats per minute (BPM/min). Proposed method performed well in intense physical exercise and shows the great robustness to individuals with different running style and posture.

  6. Enhanced Modeling of First-Order Plant Equations of Motion for Aeroelastic and Aeroservoelastic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology is described for generating first-order plant equations of motion for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic applications. The description begins with the process of generating data files representing specialized mode-shapes, such as rigid-body and control surface modes, using both PATRAN and NASTRAN analysis. NASTRAN executes the 146 solution sequence using numerous Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) calls to import the mode-shape files and to perform the aeroelastic response analysis. The aeroelastic response analysis calculates and extracts structural frequencies, generalized masses, frequency-dependent generalized aerodynamic force (GAF) coefficients, sensor deflections and load coefficients data as text-formatted data files. The data files are then re-sequenced and re-formatted using a custom written FORTRAN program. The text-formatted data files are stored and coefficients for s-plane equations are fitted to the frequency-dependent GAF coefficients using two Interactions of Structures, Aerodynamics and Controls (ISAC) programs. With tabular files from stored data created by ISAC, MATLAB generates the first-order aeroservoelastic plant equations of motion. These equations include control-surface actuator, turbulence, sensor and load modeling. Altitude varying root-locus plot and PSD plot results for a model of the F-18 aircraft are presented to demonstrate the capability.

  7. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 25.779 Section 25.779 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and...

  8. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 25.779 Section 25.779 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and...

  9. Regularization and control of irregular vehicular motion through a series of signals at disordered intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    We study the control and regularization of irregular motion of a vehicle moving through the series of traffic signals positioned at disordered intervals. All signals are controlled by both cycle time and phase shift. The nonlinear dynamic model of the vehicular motion controlled by signals is described in terms of the stochastic nonlinear map. The vehicle exhibits a very complex behavior with varying both cycle time and strength of disordered intervals. The delay or advance of tour time is compensated by synchronizing the phase shift with disordered intervals. The irregular motion induced by the disordered configuration of signals is regularized for various values of cycle time.

  10. Handbook on astronaut crew motion disturbances for control system design. [in skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullas, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    The analyses and results pertinent to the characterization of the disturbances imparted to the Skylab vehicle by the T-013 crew motion experiments are summarized. Guidelines to help control system designers assess anticipated crew motion disturbances during the design cycle of a new manned spacecraft control system are provided. These guidelines, in conjunction with the T-013 characterizations outlined, begin with the control system conceptual design and conclude with preliminary expectations for pointing performance as affected by crew motions. Block diagrams to highlight the contents so that the reader can easily identify the information and data flow are used. These diagrams provide a handy cross reference of related topics.

  11. 76 FR 71005 - Brazos River Authority; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ..., Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric... comments, motions to intervene, and protests, is 30 days from the issuance date of this notice. All... protests filed. k. Description of Request: The applicant proposes to surrender the license and...

  12. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  13. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to determine

  14. Brain-machine interfacing control of whole-body humanoid motion.

    PubMed

    Bouyarmane, Karim; Vaillant, Joris; Sugimoto, Norikazu; Keith, François; Furukawa, Jun-Ichiro; Morimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI), motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task. PMID:25140134

  15. Brain-machine interfacing control of whole-body humanoid motion

    PubMed Central

    Bouyarmane, Karim; Vaillant, Joris; Sugimoto, Norikazu; Keith, François; Furukawa, Jun-ichiro; Morimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI), motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task. PMID:25140134

  16. Abstracted Workow Framework with a Structure from Motion Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Adam J.

    In scientific and engineering disciplines, from academia to industry, there is an increasing need for the development of custom software to perform experiments, construct systems, and develop products. The natural mindset initially is to shortcut and bypass all overhead and process rigor in order to obtain an immediate result for the problem at hand, with the misconception that the software will simply be thrown away at the end. In a majority of the cases, it turns out the software persists for many years, and likely ends up in production systems for which it was not initially intended. In the current study, a framework that can be used in both industry and academic applications mitigates underlying problems associated with developing scientific and engineering software. This results in software that is much more maintainable, documented, and usable by others, specifically allowing new users to extend capabilities of components already implemented in the framework. There is a multi-disciplinary need in the fields of imaging science, computer science, and software engineering for a unified implementation model, which motivates the development of an abstracted software framework. Structure from motion (SfM) has been identified as one use case where the abstracted workflow framework can improve research efficiencies and eliminate implementation redundancies in scientific fields. The SfM process begins by obtaining 2D images of a scene from different perspectives. Features from the images are extracted and correspondences are established. This provides a sufficient amount of information to initialize the problem for fully automated processing. Transformations are established between views, and 3D points are established via triangulation algorithms. The parameters for the camera models for all views / images are solved through bundle adjustment, establishing a highly consistent point cloud. The initial sparse point cloud and camera matrices are used to generate a dense

  17. A Geometric Approach to Decouple Robotino Motions and its Functional Controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straßberger, Daniel; Mercorelli, Paolo; Sergiyenko, Oleg

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyses a functional control of the Robotino. The proposed control strategy considers a functional decoupling control strategy realized using a geometric approach and the invertibility property of the DC-drives with which the Robotino is equipped. For a given control structure the functional controllability is proven for motion trajectories of class C3, continuous functions with third derivative also being continuous. Horizontal, Vertical and Angular motions are considered and the decoupling between these motions is obtained. Control simulation results using real data of the Robotino are shown. The used control which enables to produce the presented results is a standard Linear Model Predictive Control (LMPC), even though for sake of brevity the standard algorithm is not shown.

  18. DIESEL NOX CONTROL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a project to design, develop, and demonstrate a diesel engine nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) control package that will meet the U.S. Navy's emission control requirements. (NOTE: In 1994, EPA issued a Notice for Proposed Rule Making (NP...

  19. Optimization of motion control laws for tether crawler or elevator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Frank R.; Von Tiesenhausen, Georg

    1988-01-01

    Based on the proposal of a motion control law by Lorenzini (1987), a method is developed for optimizing motion control laws for tether crawler or elevator systems in terms of the performance measures of travel time, the smoothness of acceleration and deceleration, and the maximum values of velocity and acceleration. The Lorenzini motion control law, based on powers of the hyperbolic tangent function, is modified by the addition of a constant-velocity section, and this modified function is then optimized by parameter selections to minimize the peak acceleration value for a selected travel time or to minimize travel time for the selected peak values of velocity and acceleration. It is shown that the addition of a constant-velocity segment permits further optimization of the motion control law performance.

  20. Controlling aliased dynamics in motion systems? An identification for sampled-data control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Sampled-data control systems occasionally exhibit aliased resonance phenomena within the control bandwidth. The aim of this paper is to investigate the aspect of these aliased dynamics with application to a high performance industrial nano-positioning machine. This necessitates a full sampled-data control design approach, since these aliased dynamics endanger both the at-sample performance and the intersample behaviour. The proposed framework comprises both system identification and sampled-data control. In particular, the sampled-data control objective necessitates models that encompass the intersample behaviour, i.e., ideally continuous time models. Application of the proposed approach on an industrial wafer stage system provides a thorough insight and new control design guidelines for controlling aliased dynamics.

  1. Fractional Brownian Motion:. Theory and Application to DNA Walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. C.; Muniandy, S. V.

    2001-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the theory of fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and its generalization to multifractional Brownian motion (MBM). FBM and MBM are applied to a biological system namely the DNA sequence. By considering a DNA sequence as a fractal random walk, it is possible to model the noncoding sequence of human retinoblastoma DNA as a discrete version of FBM. The average scaling exponent or Hurst exponent of the DNA walk is estimated to be H = 0.60 ± 0.05 using the monofractal R/S analysis. This implies that the mean square fluctuation of DNA walk belongs to anomalous superdiffusion type. We also show that the DNA landscape is not monofractal, instead one has multifractal DNA landscape. The empirical estimates of the Hurst exponent falls approximately within the range H ~ 0.62 - 0.72. We propose two multifractal models, namely the MBM and multiscale FBM to describe the existence of different Hurst exponents in DNA walk.

  2. Coordinating robot motion, sensing, and control in plans. LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; Brown, R.G.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a framework for robotic planning and execution that provides a continuum of adaptability with respect to model incompleteness, model error, and sensing error. For example, dividing robot motion into gross-motion planning, fine-motion planning, and sensor-augmented control had yielded productive research and solutions to individual problems. Unfortunately, these techniques could only be combined by hand with ad hoc methods and were restricted to systems where all kinematics are completely modeled in planning. The original intent was to develop methods for understanding and autonomously synthesizing plans that coordinate motion, sensing, and control. The project considered this problem from several perspectives. Results included (1) theoretical methods to combine and extend gross-motion and fine-motion planning; (2) preliminary work in flexible-object manipulation and an implementable algorithm for planning shortest paths through obstacles for the free-end of an anchored cable; (3) development and implementation of a fast swept-body distance algorithm; and (4) integration of Sandia`s C-Space Toolkit geometry engine and SANDROS motion planer and improvements, which yielded a system practical for everyday motion planning, with path-segment planning at interactive speeds. Results (3) and (4) have either led to follow-on work or are being used in current projects, and they believe that (2) will eventually be also.

  3. Abstracted Workow Framework with a Structure from Motion Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Adam J.

    In scientific and engineering disciplines, from academia to industry, there is an increasing need for the development of custom software to perform experiments, construct systems, and develop products. The natural mindset initially is to shortcut and bypass all overhead and process rigor in order to obtain an immediate result for the problem at hand, with the misconception that the software will simply be thrown away at the end. In a majority of the cases, it turns out the software persists for many years, and likely ends up in production systems for which it was not initially intended. In the current study, a framework that can be used in both industry and academic applications mitigates underlying problems associated with developing scientific and engineering software. This results in software that is much more maintainable, documented, and usable by others, specifically allowing new users to extend capabilities of components already implemented in the framework. There is a multi-disciplinary need in the fields of imaging science, computer science, and software engineering for a unified implementation model, which motivates the development of an abstracted software framework. Structure from motion (SfM) has been identified as one use case where the abstracted workflow framework can improve research efficiencies and eliminate implementation redundancies in scientific fields. The SfM process begins by obtaining 2D images of a scene from different perspectives. Features from the images are extracted and correspondences are established. This provides a sufficient amount of information to initialize the problem for fully automated processing. Transformations are established between views, and 3D points are established via triangulation algorithms. The parameters for the camera models for all views / images are solved through bundle adjustment, establishing a highly consistent point cloud. The initial sparse point cloud and camera matrices are used to generate a dense

  4. Dimensional coordinate measurements: application in characterizing cervical spine motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Nianke; Xue, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Cervical spine as a complicated part in the human body, the form of its movement is diverse. The movements of the segments of vertebrae are three-dimensional, and it is reflected in the changes of the angle between two joint and the displacement in different directions. Under normal conditions, cervical can flex, extend, lateral flex and rotate. For there is no relative motion between measuring marks fixed on one segment of cervical vertebra, the cervical vertebrae with three marked points can be seen as a body. Body's motion in space can be decomposed into translational movement and rotational movement around a base point .This study concerns the calculation of dimensional coordinate of the marked points pasted to the human body's cervical spine by an optical method. Afterward, these measures will allow the calculation of motion parameters for every spine segment. For this study, we choose a three-dimensional measurement method based on binocular stereo vision. The object with marked points is placed in front of the CCD camera. Through each shot, we will get there two parallax images taken from different cameras. According to the principle of binocular vision we can be realized three-dimensional measurements. Cameras are erected parallelly. This paper describes the layout of experimental system and a mathematical model to get the coordinates.

  5. Three-dimensional topographic amplification of seismic motion: Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assimaki, D.; Mohammadi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Topography effects are associated with the presence of strong topographic relief; documented observations during strong seismic events have shown that structures on the tops of hills, ridges, and canyons had suffered greater damage than similar structures at the hill bases or on level ground. While there is qualitative agreement between theory and observations on topography effects, there is clear quantitative discrepancy: numerical predictions of crest-to-base amplification factors rarely exceed the value of 2, while amplification values observed in the field are as high as 10. We here investigate the focusing and scattering of seismic waves in 3D features by means of a systematic parametric study of the seismic response of idealized geometries on the surface of homogeneous elastic half space using finite differences, to quantify the role of geometry, material properties and ground motion characteristics in the predicted ground surface response. We specifically focus on pyramid (convex) geometries and elastic homogeneous material behavior, and use Ricker wavelets as vertical and oblique incident pulses on ground surface. Results are compared to analytical solutions and thereafter extended to account for soil layering, nonlinear response and broadband incident motion characteristics. We then develop geometry, material and ground motion dependent dimensionless amplification factors that can multiply flat ground surface response spectra and account for topography effects as part of engineering design code provisions.omparison of the scattered wavefield complexity emanating at the vertex and toe of a 45deg single slope upon incidence of a vertical, a forward and a backward oblique wave.

  6. On the Motions of an Oscillating System Under the Influence of Flip-Flop Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluegge-Lotz, I.; Klotter, K.

    1949-01-01

    So-called flip-flop controls (also called "on-off-course controls") are frequently preferred to continuous controls because of their simple construction. Thus they are used also for the steering control of airplanes. Such a body possesses-even if one thinks, for instance, only of the symmetric longitudinal motion - three degrees of freedom so that a study of its motions under the influence of an intermittent control is at least lengthy. Thus, it is suggested that an investigation of the basic effect of such a control first be made on a system with one degree of freedom. Furthermore, we limit ourselves in the resent report to the investigation of an "ideal" control where the control surface immediately obeys the command given by the "steering control function". Thus the oscillation properties of the control surface and the defects in linkage, sensing element, and mixing device are, at first, neglected. As long as the deviations from the "ideal" control may be neglected in practice, also the motion of the control surface takes place at the heat of the motion of the principal system. The aim of our investigation is to obtain a survey of the influence of the system and control coefficients on the damping behavior which is to be attained.

  7. The 3D Human Motion Control Through Refined Video Gesture Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yohan; Suk, Myunghoon; Prabhakaran, B.

    In the beginning of computer and video game industry, simple game controllers consisting of buttons and joysticks were employed, but recently game consoles are replacing joystick buttons with novel interfaces such as the remote controllers with motion sensing technology on the Nintendo Wii [1] Especially video-based human computer interaction (HCI) technique has been applied to games, and the representative game is 'Eyetoy' on the Sony PlayStation 2. Video-based HCI technique has great benefit to release players from the intractable game controller. Moreover, in order to communicate between humans and computers, video-based HCI is very crucial since it is intuitive, easy to get, and inexpensive. On the one hand, extracting semantic low-level features from video human motion data is still a major challenge. The level of accuracy is really dependent on each subject's characteristic and environmental noises. Of late, people have been using 3D motion-capture data for visualizing real human motions in 3D space (e.g, 'Tiger Woods' in EA Sports, 'Angelina Jolie' in Bear-Wolf movie) and analyzing motions for specific performance (e.g, 'golf swing' and 'walking'). 3D motion-capture system ('VICON') generates a matrix for each motion clip. Here, a column is corresponding to a human's sub-body part and row represents time frames of data capture. Thus, we can extract sub-body part's motion only by selecting specific columns. Different from low-level feature values of video human motion, 3D human motion-capture data matrix are not pixel values, but is closer to human level of semantics.

  8. Unified Approach To Control Of Motions Of Mobile Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1995-01-01

    Improved computationally efficient scheme developed for on-line coordinated control of both manipulation and mobility of robots that include manipulator arms mounted on mobile bases. Present scheme similar to one described in "Coordinated Control of Mobile Robotic Manipulators" (NPO-19109). Both schemes based on configuration-control formalism. Present one incorporates explicit distinction between holonomic and nonholonomic constraints. Several other prior articles in NASA Tech Briefs discussed aspects of configuration-control formalism. These include "Increasing the Dexterity of Redundant Robots" (NPO-17801), "Redundant Robot Can Avoid Obstacles" (NPO-17852), "Configuration-Control Scheme Copes with Singularities" (NPO-18556), "More Uses for Configuration Control of Robots" (NPO-18607/NPO-18608).

  9. Applications of markerless motion capture in gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Sandau, Martin

    2016-03-01

    This thesis is based on four manuscripts where two of them were accepted and two were submitted to peer-reviewed journals. The experimental work behind the thesis was conducted at the Institute of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen. The purpose of the studies was to explore the variability of human gait and to conduct new methods for precise estimation of the kinematic parameters applied in forensic gait analysis. The gait studies were conducted in a custom built gait laboratory designed to obtain optimal conditions for markerless motion analysis. The set-up consisted of eight synchronised cameras located in the corners of the laboratory, which were connected to a single computer. The captured images were processed with stereovision-based algorithms to provide accurate 3D reconstructions of the participants. The 3D reconstructions of the participants were obtained during normal walking and the kinematics were extracted with manual and automatic methods. The kinematic results from the automatic approach were compared to marker-based motion capture to validate the precision. The results showed that the proposed markerless motion capture method had a precision comparable to marker-based methods in the frontal plane and the sagittal plane. Similar markerless motion capture methods could therefore provide the basis for reliable gait recognition based on kinematic parameters. The manual annotations were compared to the actual anthropometric measurements obtained from MRI scans and the intra- and inter-observer variability was also quantified to observe the associated effect on recognition. The results showed not only that the kinematics in the lower extremities were important but also that the kinematics in the shoulders had a high discriminatory power. Likewise, the shank length was also highly discriminatory, which has not been previously reported. However, it is important that the same expert performs all annotations, as the inter

  10. Robust cascade control for the horizontal motion of a vehicle with single-wheel actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseberg, Jan-Erik; Roppenecker, Günter

    2015-12-01

    The article presents a cascade control for the horizontal motion of a vehicle with single-wheel actuators. The outer control loop for the longitudinal and lateral accelerations and the yaw rate ensures a desired vehicle motion. By a combination of state feedback control and observer-based disturbance feedforward the inner control loop robustly stabilises the rotating and steering motions of the wheels in spite of unknown frictions between tyres and ground. Since the three degrees of freedom of the horizontal motion are affected by eight tyre forces, the vehicle considered is an over-actuated system. Thus additional control objectives can be realised besides the desired motion trajectory as, for example, a maximum in driving safety. The corresponding analytical tyre force allocation also guarantees real-time capability because of its relatively low computational effort. Provided suitable fault detection and isolation are available, the proposed cascade control has the potential of fault-tolerance, because the force allocation is adaptable. Another benefit results from the modular control structure, because it allows a stepwise implementation. Besides, it only requires a small number of measurements for control purposes. These measurements are the rotational speeds and steering angles of the wheels, the longitudinal and lateral acceleration and the yaw rate of the vehicle.

  11. The Development of a Computer Controlled Super 8 Motion Picture Projector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Eldon J.

    Instructors in Child Development at the University of Texas at Austin selected sound motion pictures as the most effective medium to simulate the observation of children in nursery laboratories. A computer controlled projector was designed for this purpose. An interface and control unit controls the Super 8 projector from a time-sharing computer…

  12. Autogenic-feedback training exercise is superior to promethazine for control of motion sickness symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.

    2000-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms affect approximately 50% of the crew during space travel and are commonly treated with intramuscular injections of promethazine. The purpose of this paper is to compare the effectiveness of three treatments for motion sickness: intramuscular injections (i.m.) of promethazine, a physiological training method (autogenic-feedback training exercise [AFTE]), and a no-treatment control. An earlier study tested the effects of promethazine on cognitive and psychomotor performance and motion sickness tolerance in a rotating chair. For the present paper, motion sickness tolerance, symptom reports, and physiological responses of these subjects were compared to matched subjects selected from an existing database who received either AFTE or no treatment. Three groups of 11 men, between the ages of 33 and 40 years, were matched on the number of rotations tolerated during their initial rotating-chair motion sickness test. The motion sickness test procedures and the 7-day interval between tests were the same for all subjects. The drug group was tested under four treatment conditions: baseline (no injections), a 25 mg dose of promethazine, a 50 mg dose of promethazine, and a placebo of sterile saline. AFTE subjects were given four 30-minute AFTE sessions before their second, third, and fourth motion sickness tests (6 hours total). The no-treatment control subjects were only given the four rotating-chair tests. Motion sickness tolerance was significantly increased after 4 hours of AFTE when compared to either 25 mg (p < 0.00003) or 50 mg (p < 0.00001) of promethazine. The control and promethazine groups did not differ. AFTE subjects reported fewer or no symptoms at higher rotational velocities than subjects in the control or promethazine groups. The primary physiological effect of promethazine was an inhibition of skin conductance level. The AFTE group showed significantly less heart rate and skin conductance variability during motion sickness tests

  13. Developments in Human Centered Cueing Algorithms for Control of Flight Simulator Motion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, Jacob A.; Telban, Robert J.; Cardullo, Frank M.

    1997-01-01

    The authors conducted further research with cueing algorithms for control of flight simulator motion systems. A variation of the so-called optimal algorithm was formulated using simulated aircraft angular velocity input as a basis. Models of the human vestibular sensation system, i.e. the semicircular canals and otoliths, are incorporated within the algorithm. Comparisons of angular velocity cueing responses showed a significant improvement over a formulation using angular acceleration input. Results also compared favorably with the coordinated adaptive washout algorithm, yielding similar results for angular velocity cues while eliminating false cues and reducing the tilt rate for longitudinal cues. These results were confirmed in piloted tests on the current motion system at NASA-Langley, the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS). Proposed future developments by the authors in cueing algorithms are revealed. The new motion system, the Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF), where the final evaluation of the cueing algorithms will be conducted, is also described.

  14. Application of Analytic Solution in Relative Motion to Spacecraft Formation Flying in Elliptic Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hancheol; Park, Sang-Young; Choi, Kyu-Hong

    2008-09-01

    The current paper presents application of a new analytic solution in general relative motion to spacecraft formation flying in an elliptic orbit. The calculus of variations is used to analytically find optimal trajectories and controls for the given problem. The inverse of the fundamental matrix associated with the dynamic equations is not required for the solution in the current study. It is verified that the optimal thrust vector is a function of the fundamental matrix of the given state equations. The cost function and the state vector during the reconfiguration can be analytically obtained as well. The results predict the form of optimal solutions in advance without having to solve the problem. Numerical simulation shows the brevity and the accuracy of the general analytic solutions developed in the current paper.

  15. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xuyong

    2014-12-15

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  16. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua; Wang, Xuyong; Wang, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  17. Do Motion Controllers Make Action Video Games Less Sedentary? A Randomized Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Bowling, J. Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Sports- and fitness-themed video games using motion controllers have been found to produce physical activity. It is possible that motion controllers may also enhance energy expenditure when applied to more sedentary games such as action games. Young adults (N = 100) were randomized to play three games using either motion-based or traditional controllers. No main effect was found for controller or game pair (P > .12). An interaction was found such that in one pair, motion control (mean [SD] 0.96 [0.20] kcal · kg−1 · hr−1) produced 0.10 kcal · kg−1 · hr−1 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.17) greater energy expenditure than traditional control (0.86 [0.17] kcal · kg−1 · hr−1, P = .048). All games were sedentary. As currently implemented, motion control is unlikely to produce moderate intensity physical activity in action games. However, some games produce small but significant increases in energy expenditure, which may benefit health by decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:22028959

  18. Do motion controllers make action video games less sedentary? A randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Tate, Deborah F; Ward, Dianne S; Ribisl, Kurt M; Bowling, J Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Sports- and fitness-themed video games using motion controllers have been found to produce physical activity. It is possible that motion controllers may also enhance energy expenditure when applied to more sedentary games such as action games. Young adults (N = 100) were randomized to play three games using either motion-based or traditional controllers. No main effect was found for controller or game pair (P > .12). An interaction was found such that in one pair, motion control (mean [SD] 0.96 [0.20] kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1)) produced 0.10 kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1) (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.17) greater energy expenditure than traditional control (0.86 [0.17] kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1), P = .048). All games were sedentary. As currently implemented, motion control is unlikely to produce moderate intensity physical activity in action games. However, some games produce small but significant increases in energy expenditure, which may benefit health by decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:22028959

  19. Motion and force controlled vibration testing. [of aerospace hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.; Boatman, David J.; Kern, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for controlling both the input acceleration and force in vibration tests is proposed to alleviate the overtesting risks and the problems associated with response limiting in conventional vibration tests of aerospace hardware. Previous research on impedance and force controlled vibration tests is reviewed and a simple equation governing the dual control of acceleration and force is derived. A practical method for implementing the dual control technique in random vibration tests has been demonstrated in JPL's environmental test facility using a conventional digital controller operating in the extremal mode. The dual control technique provides appropriate real-time notching of the input acceleration and a corresponding reduction of the test item response at resonances. Issues concerning the need for force and acceleration phase information, the adequacy of specifying the blocked force, and the derivation of the total force for multipoint supports are discussed.

  20. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George L.

    2016-04-05

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  1. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George

    2011-11-22

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  2. Walking motion generation, synthesis, and control for biped robot by using PGRL, LPI, and fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzuu-Hseng S; Su, Yu-Te; Lai, Shao-Wei; Hu, Jhen-Jia

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes the implementation of fuzzy motion control based on reinforcement learning (RL) and Lagrange polynomial interpolation (LPI) for gait synthesis of biped robots. First, the procedure of a walking gait is redefined into three states, and the parameters of this designed walking gait are determined. Then, the machine learning approach applied to adjusting the walking parameters is policy gradient RL (PGRL), which can execute real-time performance and directly modify the policy without calculating the dynamic function. Given a parameterized walking motion designed for biped robots, the PGRL algorithm automatically searches the set of possible parameters and finds the fastest possible walking motion. The reward function mainly considered is first the walking speed, which can be estimated from the vision system. However, the experiment illustrates that there are some stability problems in this kind of learning process. To solve these problems, the desired zero moment point trajectory is added to the reward function. The results show that the robot not only has more stable walking but also increases its walking speed after learning. This is more effective and attractive than manual trial-and-error tuning. LPI, moreover, is employed to transform the existing motions to the motion which has a revised angle determined by the fuzzy motion controller. Then, the biped robot can continuously walk in any desired direction through this fuzzy motion control. Finally, the fuzzy-based gait synthesis control is demonstrated by tasks and point- and line-target tracking. The experiments show the feasibility and effectiveness of gait learning with PGRL and the practicability of the proposed fuzzy motion control scheme. PMID:21095871

  3. Flight experience with manually controlled unconventional aircraft motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfield, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    A modified YF-16 aircraft was used to flight demonstrate decoupled modes under the USAF Fighter Control Configured Vehicle (CCV) Program. The direct force capabilities were used to implement seven manually controlled unconventional modes on the aircraft, allowing flat turns, decoupled normal acceleration control, independent longitudinal and lateral translations, uncoupled elevation and azimuth aiming, and blended direct lift. This paper describes the design, development, and flight testing of these control modes. The need for task-tailored mode authorities, gain-scheduling and selected closed-loop design is discussed.

  4. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  5. Sparse deformable models with application to cardiac motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Deformable models have been widely used with success in medical image analysis. They combine bottom-up information derived from image appearance cues, with top-down shape-based constraints within a physics-based formulation. However, in many real world problems the observations extracted from the image data often contain gross errors, which adversely affect the deformation accuracy. To alleviate this issue, we introduce a new family of deformable models that are inspired from compressed sensing, a technique for efficiently reconstructing a signal based on its sparseness in some domain. In this problem, we employ sparsity to represent the outliers or gross errors, and combine it seamlessly with deformable models. The proposed new formulation is applied to the analysis of cardiac motion, using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI), where the automated tagging line tracking results are very noisy due to the poor image quality. Our new deformable models track the heart motion robustly, and the resulting strains are consistent with those calculated from manual labels. PMID:24683970

  6. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  7. Human motion planning based on recursive dynamics and optimal control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Janzen; Huang, Gang; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient optimal control and recursive dynamics-based computer animation system for simulating and controlling the motion of articulated figures. A quasi-Newton nonlinear programming technique (super-linear convergence) is implemented to solve minimum torque-based human motion-planning problems. The explicit analytical gradients needed in the dynamics are derived using a matrix exponential formulation and Lie algebra. Cubic spline functions are used to make the search space for an optimal solution finite. Based on our formulations, our method is well conditioned and robust, in addition to being computationally efficient. To better illustrate the efficiency of our method, we present results of natural looking and physically correct human motions for a variety of human motion tasks involving open and closed loop kinematic chains.

  8. Modification of Motion Perception and Manual Control Following Short-Durations Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Rupert, A. H.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive changes during space flight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination and spatial disorientation following G-transitions. This ESA-NASA study was designed to examine both the physiological basis and operational implications for disorientation and tilt-translation disturbances following short-duration spaceflights. The goals of this study were to (1) examine the effects of stimulus frequency on adaptive changes in motion perception during passive tilt and translation motion, (2) quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion, and (3) evaluate vibrotactile feedback as a sensorimotor countermeasure.

  9. Controllers, observers, and applications thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Miklosovic, Robert (Inventor); Radke, Aaron (Inventor); Zhou, Wankun (Inventor); Zheng, Qing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Controller scaling and parameterization are described. Techniques that can be improved by employing the scaling and parameterization include, but are not limited to, controller design, tuning and optimization. The scaling and parameterization methods described here apply to transfer function based controllers, including PID controllers. The parameterization methods also apply to state feedback and state observer based controllers, as well as linear active disturbance rejection (ADRC) controllers. Parameterization simplifies the use of ADRC. A discrete extended state observer (DESO) and a generalized extended state observer (GESO) are described. They improve the performance of the ESO and therefore ADRC. A tracking control algorithm is also described that improves the performance of the ADRC controller. A general algorithm is described for applying ADRC to multi-input multi-output systems. Several specific applications of the control systems and processes are disclosed.

  10. Maximum Principle for General Controlled Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yuecai; Hu Yaozhong; Song Jian

    2013-04-15

    We obtain a maximum principle for stochastic control problem of general controlled stochastic differential systems driven by fractional Brownian motions (of Hurst parameter H>1/2). This maximum principle specifies a system of equations that the optimal control must satisfy (necessary condition for the optimal control). This system of equations consists of a backward stochastic differential equation driven by both fractional Brownian motions and the corresponding underlying standard Brownian motions. In addition to this backward equation, the maximum principle also involves the Malliavin derivatives. Our approach is to use conditioning and Malliavin calculus. To arrive at our maximum principle we need to develop some new results of stochastic analysis of the controlled systems driven by fractional Brownian motions via fractional calculus. Our approach of conditioning and Malliavin calculus is also applied to classical system driven by standard Brownian motions while the controller has only partial information. As a straightforward consequence, the classical maximum principle is also deduced in this more natural and simpler way.

  11. An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D.; McAvoy, Thomas J.

    2006-12-15

    Sophisticated methods for real-time motion compensation include using the linear accelerator, MLC, or treatment couch. To design such a couch, the required couch and control system dynamics need to be investigated. We used an existing treatment couch known as the Hexapod{sup TM} to gain insight into couch dynamics and an internal model controller to simulate feedback control of respiration-induced motion. The couch dynamics, described using time constants and dead times, were investigated using step inputs. The resulting data were modeled as first and second order systems with dead time. The couch was determined to have a linear response for step inputs {<=}1 cm. Motion data from 12 patients were obtained using a skin marker placed on the abdomen of the patient and the marker data were assumed to be an exact surrogate of tumor motion. The feedback system was modeled with the couch as a second-ordersystem and the controller as a first order system. The time constants of the couch and controller and the dead times were varied starting with parameters obtained from the Hexapod{sup TM} couch and the performance of the feedback system was evaluated. The resulting residual motion under feedback control was generally <0.3 cm when a fast enough couch was simulated.

  12. Active control of the attitude motion and structural vibration of a flexible satellite by jet thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mokin

    A Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations of motion of a flexible satellite in a tree-type geometry. The flexible satellite model is the geosynchronous INSAT-II type satellite with a flexible balance beam and a flexible solar panel attached to the rigid main body. In deriving the equations of motion, the orbital motion, the librational motion, and the structural motion of flexible bodies are involved. The assumed-modes method is used to express the deflections of the flexible structures in the form of a finite series of space-dependent admissible functions multiplied by time-dependent amplitudes. The kinetic energy, potential energy, strain energy, and virtual work of the flexible satellite are evaluated as functions of time in terms of the generalized coordinates. Then, by substituting them into Lagrange's equations for discrete systems, the governing equations of motion of the flexible satellite are obtained as a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The attitude motion and the structural motion of the flexible satellite are coupled motions with one another. Uncontrolled dynamics show that the librational and structural motions are oscillatory and undamped motions. The stability and performance of the flexible satellite needs to be improved by designing control systems. A control objective is proposed to improve the stability and performance for pointing accuracy maneuver by controlling the librational motions and flexible modes simultaneously. For the control objective, a control system is synthesized, using feedback linearization control, thrust determination, thrust management, and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation. Feedback linearization for second-order nonlinear systems is used to obtain a stable feedback control system for the pointing-accuracy control. A stable feedback control system is obtained by adjusting the diagonal matrices of the linear second-order system. Jet thrusters are used as the primary

  13. Extended analytical formulas for the perturbed Keplerian motion under a constant control acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiani, Federico; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a set of analytical formulae for the perturbed Keplerian motion of a spacecraft under the effect of a constant control acceleration. The proposed set of formulae can treat control accelerations that are fixed in either a rotating or inertial reference frame. Moreover, the contribution of the zonal harmonic is included in the analytical formulae. It will be shown that the proposed analytical theory allows for the fast computation of long, multi-revolution spirals while maintaining good accuracy. The combined effect of different perturbations and of the shadow regions due to solar eclipse is also included. Furthermore, a simplified control parameterisation is introduced to optimise thrusting patterns with two thrust arcs and two cost arcs per revolution. This simple parameterisation is shown to ensure enough flexibility to describe complex low thrust spirals. The accuracy and speed of the proposed analytical formulae are compared against a full numerical integration with different integration schemes. An averaging technique is then proposed as an application of the analytical formulae. Finally, the paper presents an example of design of an optimal low-thrust spiral to transfer a spacecraft from an elliptical to a circular orbit around the Earth.

  14. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA): Standards-Based Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Lindolfo; Rich, Thomas; Lucord, Steven; Diegelman, Thomas; Mireles, James; Gonzalez, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This technology development originated from the need to assess the debris threat resulting from soil material erosion induced by landing spacecraft rocket plume impingement on extraterrestrial planetary surfaces. The impact of soil debris was observed to be highly detrimental during NASA s Apollo lunar missions and will pose a threat for any future landings on the Moon, Mars, and other exploration targets. The innovation developed under this program provides a simulation tool that combines modeling of the diverse disciplines of rocket plume impingement gas dynamics, granular soil material liberation, and soil debris particle kinetics into one unified simulation system. The Unified Flow Solver (UFS) developed by CFDRC enabled the efficient, seamless simulation of mixed continuum and rarefied rocket plume flow utilizing a novel direct numerical simulation technique of the Boltzmann gas dynamics equation. The characteristics of the soil granular material response and modeling of the erosion and liberation processes were enabled through novel first principle-based granular mechanics models developed by the University of Florida specifically for the highly irregularly shaped and cohesive lunar regolith material. These tools were integrated into a unique simulation system that accounts for all relevant physics aspects: (1) Modeling of spacecraft rocket plume impingement flow under lunar vacuum environment resulting in a mixed continuum and rarefied flow; (2) Modeling of lunar soil characteristics to capture soil-specific effects of particle size and shape composition, soil layer cohesion and granular flow physics; and (3) Accurate tracking of soil-borne debris particles beginning with aerodynamically driven motion inside the plume to purely ballistic motion in lunar far field conditions.

  15. Neural network-based motion control of an underactuated wheeled inverted pendulum model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenguang; Li, Zhijun; Cui, Rongxin; Xu, Bugong

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, automatic motion control is investigated for one of wheeled inverted pendulum (WIP) models, which have been widely applied for modeling of a large range of two wheeled modern vehicles. First, the underactuated WIP model is decomposed into a fully actuated second order subsystem Σa consisting of planar movement of vehicle forward and yaw angular motions, and a nonactuated first order subsystem Σb of pendulum motion. Due to the unknown dynamics of subsystem Σa and the universal approximation ability of neural network (NN), an adaptive NN scheme has been employed for motion control of subsystem Σa . The model reference approach has been used whereas the reference model is optimized by the finite time linear quadratic regulation technique. The pendulum motion in the passive subsystem Σb is indirectly controlled using the dynamic coupling with planar forward motion of subsystem Σa , such that satisfactory tracking of a set pendulum tilt angle can be guaranteed. Rigours theoretic analysis has been established, and simulation studies have been performed to demonstrate the developed method. PMID:25330424

  16. 76 FR 57731 - Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications; McKay Dam Hydropower, LLC On May 31, 2011, McKay Dam Hydropower, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the...: Carl Spetzler, McKay Dam Hydropower, LLC, 745 Emerson Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301, phone (650)...

  17. 76 FR 57731 - Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications; Kachess Dam Hydropower, LLC On May 31, 2011, Kachess Dam Hydropower, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the... Contact: Carl Spetzler, Kachess Dam Hydropower, LLC, 745 Emerson Street, Palto Alto, CA 94301, phone...

  18. 77 FR 29634 - Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications; Corral Creek South Hydro, LLC On April 3, 2012, Corral Creek South Hydro, LLC, filed...

  19. 77 FR 107 - Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications; Earth By Design, Inc. On October 13, 2011, and supplemented on October 30, 2011, Earth By Design, Inc. filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant... structure; (2) a ] 1210-foot-long, 72-inch-diameter penstock consisting of a 365-foot- long,...

  20. 78 FR 75553 - Cedar Rapids Water Board; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cedar Rapids Water Board; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission...

  1. 76 FR 65506 - Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications; Pacific Gas and Electric Company On September 1, 2011, Pacific Gas and...

  2. 75 FR 143 - Lockhart Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... applicant proposes to install a single submersible turbine/generator unit in the hydro canal bank and... COMMISSION Lockhart Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene... Power Company. e. Name of Project: Lockhart Project. f. Location: The project is located on the...

  3. 78 FR 27216 - PPL Holtwood, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Holtwood, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and...

  4. 77 FR 101 - Rumford Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Rumford Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission...

  5. How NASA KSC Controls Interfaces with the use of Motion Skeletons and Product Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will show how NASA KSC controls interfaces for Modular Product Architecture (MPA) using Locator Skeletons, Interface Skeletons, and Product Structure, to be combined together within a Motion Skeleton. The user will learn how to utilize skeleton models to communicate interface data, as successfully done at NASA KSC in their use of Motion Skeletons to control interfaces for multi-launch systems. There will be discussion of the methodology used to control design requirements through WTParts, and how to utilize product structure for non-CAD documents.

  6. Motion of the two-control airplane in rectilinear flight after initial disturbances with introduction of controls following an exponential law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemin, Alexander

    1937-01-01

    An airplane in steady rectilinear flight was assumed to experience an initial disturbance in rolling or yawing velocity. The equations of motion were solved to see if it was possible to hasten recovery of a stable airplane or to secure recovery of an unstable airplane by the application of a single lateral control following an exponential law. The sample computations indicate that, for initial disturbances complex in character, it would be difficult to secure correlation with any type of exponential control. The possibility is visualized that the two-control operation may seriously impair the ability to hasten recovery or counteract instability.

  7. Application and API for Real-time Visualization of Ground-motions and Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, S.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Kubo, T.; Nakamura, H.; Azuma, H.; Fujiwara, H.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the recent progress of seismograph and communication environment, real-time and continuous ground-motion observation becomes technically and economically feasible. K-NET and KiK-net, which are nationwide strong motion networks operated by NIED, cover all Japan by about 1750 stations in total. More than half of the stations transmit the ground-motion indexes and/or waveform data in every second. Traditionally, strong-motion data were recorded by event-triggering based instruments with non-continues telephone line which is connected only after an earthquake. Though the data from such networks mainly contribute to preparations for future earthquakes, huge amount of real-time data from dense network are expected to directly contribute to the mitigation of ongoing earthquake disasters through, e.g., automatic shutdown plants and helping decision-making for initial response. By generating the distribution map of these indexes and uploading them to the website, we implemented the real-time ground motion monitoring system, Kyoshin (strong-motion in Japanese) monitor. This web service (www.kyoshin.bosai.go.jp) started in 2008 and anyone can grasp the current ground motions of Japan. Though this service provides only ground-motion map in GIF format, to take full advantage of real-time strong-motion data to mitigate the ongoing disasters, digital data are important. We have developed a WebAPI to provide real-time data and related information such as ground motions (5 km-mesh) and arrival times estimated from EEW (earthquake early warning). All response data from this WebAPI are in JSON format and are easy to parse. We also developed Kyoshin monitor application for smartphone, 'Kmoni view' using the API. In this application, ground motions estimated from EEW are overlapped on the map with the observed one-second-interval indexes. The application can playback previous earthquakes for demonstration or disaster drill. In mobile environment, data traffic and battery are

  8. Application of vibrotactile feedback of body motion to improve rehabilitation in individuals with imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Conrad

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Balance rehabilitation and vestibular/balance prostheses are both emerging fields that have a potential for synergistic interaction. This paper reviews vibrotactile prosthetic devices that have been developed to date and ongoing work related to the application of vibrotactile feedback for enhanced postural control. A vibrotactile feedback device developed in the author’s laboratory is described. Methods Twelve subjects with vestibular hypofunction were tested on a platform that moved randomly in a plane, while receiving vibrotactile feedback in the anterio-posterior direction. The feedback allowed subjects to significantly decrease their anterio-posterior body tilt, but did not change mediolateral tilt. A tandem walking task using subjects with vestibulopathies demonstrated a reduction in their medio-lateral sway due to vibrotactile feedback of medio-lateral body tilt, after controlling for the effects of task learning. The findings from two additional experiments conducted in the laboratories of collaborating physical therapists are summarized. Results The Dynamic Gait Index scores in community-dwelling elderly individuals who were prone-to-fall were significantly improved with the use of medio-lateral body tilt feedback. Discussion and Conclusions While more work is needed, these results suggest that vibrotactile tilt feedback of subjects’ body motion can be used effectively by physical therapists for balance rehabilitation. A preliminary description of the 3rd generation device that has been reduced from a vest format to a belt format is described to demonstrate the progressive evolution from research to clinical application. PMID:20588096

  9. Dual-Position-Controller Design for the Linear-Motor-Driven Motion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Yong; Horng, Rong-Hwang; Shih, Yi-Ti; Lee, An-Chen

    This work develops a dual-controller composed of a macroscopic controller (MAC) and a microscopic controller (MIC) for improving motion precision of a linear-motor-driven motion system. Based on the macroscopic model in which Coulomb friction model is considered, the MAC is designed. In the presliding region however, the MIC design is based on the lineralized microscopic model. Furthermore, a switching algorithm is developed for bumpless transfer in shifting control action between two controllers. Thus, when the table of motion stage moves to the desired position, the control action can be smoothly switched from the MAC to the MIC. The whole system with the proposed dual-controller has the advantage that it serves as a long stroke (coarse stage) and a short stroke (fine stage) to achieve high precision motion control. The experimental results reveal that it totally takes 2.59 seconds to reach the 1000μm target position with the accuracy of one BLU (basic length unit; sensor resolution), 20nm the result has over 29% improvement when compared with the result using single MAC. In addition, good nanometer-scale tracking performance with the accuracy of one BLU, 20nm, can be obtained by using the MIC.

  10. 1.8-m Spacewatch telescope motion control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Marcus L.; Bressi, Terrence; McMillan, Robert S.; Tubbiolo, Andrew; Barr, Lawrence D.

    1998-05-01

    The 1.8 meter Spacewatch telescope and its building on Kitt Peak were dedicated on June 7, 1997 for the purpose of finding previously unknown asteroids and comets. Drift- scanning large areas of sky with a CCD will be done at rates up to 10 times that of the sidereal rate over angles up to 60 degrees of arc along great circles at various orientations. The primary mirror and cell around which the telescope are from the multi-mirror telescope on Mt. Hopkins in Arizona. The telescope's friction drive system allows backlash-free control of its altitude-over-azimuth mount. The mount features bearings of small radii and plenty of motor torque to compensate for wind buffeting. Both incremental and absolute encoders will be used; the absolute encoders will update the position derived from incremental encoders to compensate for the microslipping that is an unavoidable consequence of a friction drive. The control system features commercially produced servo controller cards that are programmed from a user interface program running in a PC under DOS. Realtime operation of the drive is controlled by the interface cards, leaving the PC free to run the display of the position readout and accept keyboard input for the observer without interfering with the drive. It is believed that this design offers the greatest flexibility and accuracy of our search programs.

  11. Approaches to creating and controlling motion in MRI.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory S; Cole, Gregory; Su, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide three dimensional (3D) imaging with excellent resolution and sensitivity making it ideal for guiding and monitoring interventions. The development of MRI-compatible interventional devices is complicated by factors including: the high magnetic field strength, the requirement that such devices should not degrade image quality, and the confined physical space of the scanner bore. Numerous MRI guided actuated devices have been developed or are currently being developed utilizing piezoelectric actuators as their primary means of mechanical energy generation to enable better interventional procedure performance. While piezoelectric actuators are highly desirable for MRI guided actuation for their precision, high holding force, and non-magnetic operation they are often found to cause image degradation on a large enough to scale to render live imaging unusable. This paper describes a newly developed piezoelectric actuator driver and control system designed to drive a variety of both harmonic and non-harmonic motors that has been demonstrated to be capable of operating both harmonic and non-harmonic piezoelectric actuators with less than 5% SNR loss under closed loop control. The proposed system device allows for a single controller to control any supported actuator and feedback sensor without any physical hardware changes. PMID:22255873

  12. Application of the fractional Levy motion to precipitation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuha, Y.; Tachinami, S.; Gomi, C.

    2012-12-01

    We applied the fractional Lévy motion model to precipitation data, referring to Lavallée (2004) and Lavallée (2008). The data we used were from the Global Preciptiation Climatology Centre (GPCC) monthly precipitation dataset. These data consist of 360 (longitude) × 180 (latitude) × 1336 (monthly, 1901-2012). First, we constructed four datasets: time series of average monthly precipitation of the top (maximum) 1000 precipitation observation stations, top 10, top 100, and top 500. Next, according to Lavallée (2004) and Lavallée (2008), using Fourier transformation, convolution (filtering) and inverse Fourier transformation, we obtained random variables Xt (Lavallée, 2004) from Yt (precipitation). We transformed from Yt to Xt. Finally, we fitted the Lévy law to Xt. As a preliminary result, we present examples of the values of the Lévy law parameters: alpha, beta, gamma, and delta for the "top 100" dataset. Parameters obtained were (1.17, 0.0, 257.6, 0.28; maximum likelihood), (1.10, 0.0, 250.0, -0.99; quantile algorithm), and (1.20, 0.0, 265.1, 0.57; empirical characteristic function algorithm). We used J. P. Nolan's algorithm. The values are quite sensitive to the algorithm that is used. At the Fall meeting, we will present considerations and results obtained using precipitation data other than those of the GPCC. J. P. Nolan, http://academic2.american.edu/~jpnolan/stable/stable.html Lavallée (2004), Stochastic modeling of climatic variability in dendrochronology, GRL, 31, L15202. Lavallée (2008), On the random nature of earthquake sources and ground motions; a unified theory, Advances in Geophysics, 50, chapter 16. Acknowledgement: We thank Dr. D. Lavallee for his comments and suggestions.; An example of results which we obtained. On a log-log plot, PDF of the Lévy law (red line) is more appropriate than the Gaussian law (blue line) in terms of heavy tail or extreme values. This is consistent with Lavallée (2004) and Lavallée (2008) who used slip

  13. DNA motion induced by electrokinetic flow near an Au coated nanopore surface as voltage controlled gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on an Au-coated membrane surface near nanopores, prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules, which are presumably generated by electrokinetic flow, vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations. We carefully investigate these DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of the counterions, which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or repelled—DNA’s anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could qualitatively explain these unusual DNA motions near metal-collated gated nanopores. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of controlling the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, as in the case of recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with alternating current voltages on the Vgate.

  14. DNA motion induced by electrokinetic flow near an Au coated nanopore surface as voltage controlled gate.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-13

    We used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on an Au-coated membrane surface near nanopores, prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules, which are presumably generated by electrokinetic flow, vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations. We carefully investigate these DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of the counterions, which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or repelled-DNA's anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could qualitatively explain these unusual DNA motions near metal-collated gated nanopores. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of controlling the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, as in the case of recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with alternating current voltages on the Vgate. PMID:25611963

  15. DNA Motion Induced by Electrokinetic Flow near an Au Coated Nanopore Surface as Voltage Controlled Gate

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on Au coated membrane surface near nanopores prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores are investigated using fluorescence microscopy. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations, presumably generated by electrokinetic flow. We carefully investigate theses DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of counterions; which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or to be repelled, DNA’s anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could explain these unusual DNA motions near metal collated gated nanopores qualitatively. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility to control the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, for example, recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with AC voltages on the Vgate. PMID:25611963

  16. Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, John M; Bushuyev, Oleksandr S; Weiss, Paul S; Barrett, Christopher J

    2015-08-25

    As our understanding and control of intra- and intermolecular interactions evolve, ever more complex molecular systems are synthesized and assembled that are capable of performing work or completing sophisticated tasks at the molecular scale. Commonly referred to as molecular machines, these dynamic systems comprise an astonishingly diverse class of motifs and are designed to respond to a plethora of actuation stimuli. In this Review, we outline the conditions that distinguish simple switches and rotors from machines and draw from a variety of fields to highlight some of the most exciting recent examples of opportunities for driven molecular mechanics. Emphasis is placed on the need for controllable and hierarchical assembly of these molecular components to display measurable effects at the micro-, meso-, and macroscales. As in Nature, this strategy will lead to dramatic amplification of the work performed via the collective action of many machines organized in linear chains, on functionalized surfaces, or in three-dimensional assemblies. PMID:26172380

  17. Adaptive neural network motion control of manipulators with experimental evaluations.

    PubMed

    Puga-Guzmán, S; Moreno-Valenzuela, J; Santibáñez, V

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller plus adaptive neuronal network compensation is proposed. With the aim of estimating the desired torque, a two-layer neural network is used. Then, adaptation laws for the neural network weights are derived. Asymptotic convergence of the position and velocity tracking errors is proven, while the neural network weights are shown to be uniformly bounded. The proposed scheme has been experimentally validated in real time. These experimental evaluations were carried in two different mechanical systems: a horizontal two degrees-of-freedom robot and a vertical one degree-of-freedom arm which is affected by the gravitational force. In each one of the two experimental set-ups, the proposed scheme was implemented without and with adaptive neural network compensation. Experimental results confirmed the tracking accuracy of the proposed adaptive neural network-based controller. PMID:24574910

  18. Controlling Motion Sickness and Spatial Disorientation and Enhancing Vestibular Rehabilitation with a User-Worn See-Through Display

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Wesley W.O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypotheses An eyewear mounted visual display (“User-worn see-through display”) projecting an artificial horizon aligned with the user's head and body position in space can prevent or lessen motion sickness in susceptible individuals when in a motion provocative environment as well as aid patients undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. In this project, a wearable display device, including software technology and hardware, was developed and a phase I feasibility study and phase II clinical trial for safety and efficacy were performed. Study Design Both phase I and phase II were prospective studies funded by the NIH. The phase II study used repeated measures for motion intolerant subjects and a randomized control group (display device/no display device) pre-post test design for patients in vestibular rehabilitation. Methods Following technology and display device development, 75 patients were evaluated by test and rating scales in the phase II study; 25 subjects with motion intolerance used the technology in the display device in provocative environments and completed subjective rating scales while 50 patients were evaluated before and after vestibular rehabilitation (25 using the display device and 25 in a control group) using established test measures. Results All patients with motion intolerance rated the technology as helpful for nine symptoms assessed, and 96% rated the display device as simple and easy to use. Duration of symptoms significantly decreased with use of the technology displayed. In patients undergoing vestibular rehabilitation, there were no significant differences in amount of change from pre- to post-therapy on objective balance tests between display device users and controls. However, those using the technology required significantly fewer rehabilitation sessions to achieve those outcomes than the control group. Conclusions A user-worn see-through display, utilizing a visual fixation target coupled with a stable artificial horizon

  19. Evaluation of the Leap Motion Controller as a New Contact-Free Pointing Device

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Daniel; Weichert, Frank; Rinkenauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Fitts' law-based analysis of the user's performance in selection tasks with the Leap Motion Controller compared with a standard mouse device. The Leap Motion Controller (LMC) is a new contact-free input system for gesture-based human-computer interaction with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. Up to this point, there has hardly been any systematic evaluation of this new system available. With an error rate of 7.8 % for the LMC and 2.8% for the mouse device, movement times twice as large as for a mouse device and high overall effort ratings, the Leap Motion Controller's performance as an input device for everyday generic computer pointing tasks is rather limited, at least with regard to the selection recognition provided by the LMC. PMID:25609043

  20. Development of Visual Motion Perception for Prospective Control: Brain and Behavioral Studies in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Agyei, Seth B.; van der Weel, F. R. (Ruud); van der Meer, Audrey L. H.

    2016-01-01

    During infancy, smart perceptual mechanisms develop allowing infants to judge time-space motion dynamics more efficiently with age and locomotor experience. This emerging capacity may be vital to enable preparedness for upcoming events and to be able to navigate in a changing environment. Little is known about brain changes that support the development of prospective control and about processes, such as preterm birth, that may compromise it. As a function of perception of visual motion, this paper will describe behavioral and brain studies with young infants investigating the development of visual perception for prospective control. By means of the three visual motion paradigms of occlusion, looming, and optic flow, our research shows the importance of including behavioral data when studying the neural correlates of prospective control. PMID:26903908

  1. Controlling a robot with intention derived from motion.

    PubMed

    Crick, Christopher; Scassellati, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, sophisticated intention-based control system for a mobile robot built from an extremely inexpensive webcam and radio-controlled toy vehicle. The system visually observes humans participating in various playground games and infers their goals and intentions through analyzing their spatiotemporal activity in relation to itself and each other, and then builds a coherent narrative out of the succession of these intentional states. Starting from zero information about the room, the rules of the games, or even which vehicle it controls, it learns rich relationships between players, their goals and intentions, probing uncertain situations with its own behavior. The robot is able to watch people playing various playground games, learn the roles and rules that apply to specific games, and participate in the play. The narratives it constructs capture essential information about the observed social roles and types of activity. After watching play for a short while, the system is able to participate appropriately in the games. We demonstrate how the system acts appropriately in scenarios such as chasing, follow-the-leader, and variants of tag. PMID:25163625

  2. Use of the optimal control model in the design of motion cue experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junker, A. M.; Levison, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment is presented in which the effects of roll motions on human operator performance were investigated. The motion cues considered were the result of commanded vehicle motion and vehicle disturbances. An optimal control pilot-vehicle model was used in the design of the experiment and to predict system performance prior to executing the experiment. The model predictions and experimental results are compared. Seventy-eight per cent of the model predictions are within one standard deviation of the means of the experimental results. The high correlation between model predictions and system performance indicate the usefulness of the predictive model for experimental design and for prediction of pilot performance influenced by motion cues.

  3. Autogenic-Feedback Training for the Control of Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents case-studies of 9 shuttle crewmembers (prime and alternates) and one U.S. Navy F-18 pilot, as they participated in all preflight training and testing activities in support of a life sciences flight experiment aboard Spacelab-J, and Spacelab-3. The primary objective of the flight experiment was to determine if Autogenic-feedback training (AFT), a physiological self-regulation training technique would be an effective treatment for motion sickness and space motion sickness in these crewmembers. Additional objectives of this study involved the examining human physiological responses to motion sickness on Earth and in space, as well as developing predictive criteria for susceptibility to space motion sickness based on ground-based data. Comparisons of these crewmembers are made to a larger set of subjects from previous experiments (treatment and "test-only" controls subjects). This paper describes all preflight methods, results and proposed changes for future tests.

  4. A multiloop approach to modeling motion sensor responses. [pilot sensory feedback control in compensatory tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junker, A. M.; Repperger, D. W.; Neff, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    By using a least squares identification algorithm, a multiloop approach is taken to effectively model the response characteristics of the motion sensors. The inputs to the model include the possible sources of information provided to the human via his motion sensing system. One input models the response of the angular acceleration sensors (second derivative of position) and the second input models the response of the linear sensors (sine of position). The third input is the visual display error provided to the human in the closed loop tracking experiment. Data from a roll axis tracking simulation were analyzed. The major source of pilot lead under the motion mode of operation is discussed for control of plants in which motion information improved performance and in which there was no improvement in performance.

  5. Method for neural network control of motion using real-time environmental feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of motion control for robotics and other automatically controlled machinery using a neural network controller with real-time environmental feedback. The method is illustrated with a two-finger robotic hand having proximity sensors and force sensors that provide environmental feedback signals. The neural network controller is taught to control the robotic hand through training sets using back- propagation methods. The training sets are created by recording the control signals and the feedback signal as the robotic hand or a simulation of the robotic hand is moved through a representative grasping motion. The data recorded is divided into discrete increments of time and the feedback data is shifted out of phase with the control signal data so that the feedback signal data lag one time increment behind the control signal data. The modified data is presented to the neural network controller as a training set. The time lag introduced into the data allows the neural network controller to account for the temporal component of the robotic motion. Thus trained, the neural network controlled robotic hand is able to grasp a wide variety of different objects by generalizing from the training sets.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Control of Hyperthermia Using Real Time Ultrasonic Thermal Strain Imaging with Motion Compensation, Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Foiret, Josquin; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    Mild hyperthermia has been successfully employed to induce reversible physiological changes that can directly treat cancer and enhance local drug delivery. In this approach, temperature monitoring is essential to avoid undesirable biological effects that result from thermal damage. For thermal therapies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been employed to control real-time Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapies. However, combined ultrasound imaging and therapy systems offer the benefits of simple, low-cost devices that can be broadly applied. To facilitate such technology, ultrasound thermometry has potential to reliably monitor temperature. Control of mild hyperthermia was previously achieved using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller based on thermocouple measurements. Despite accurate temporal control of heating, this method is limited by the single position at which the temperature is measured. Ultrasound thermometry techniques based on exploiting the thermal dependence of acoustic parameters (such as longitudinal velocity) can be extended to create thermal maps and allow an accurate monitoring of temperature with good spatial resolution. However, in vivo applications of this technique have not been fully developed due to the high sensitivity to tissue motion. Here, we propose a motion compensation method based on the acquisition of multiple reference frames prior to treatment. The technique was tested in the presence of 2-D and 3-D physiological-scale motion and was found to provide effective real-time temperature monitoring. PID control of mild hyperthermia in presence of motion was then tested with ultrasound thermometry as feedback and temperature was maintained within 0.3°C of the requested value. PMID:26244783

  7. Spatial and Temporal Control of Hyperthermia Using Real Time Ultrasonic Thermal Strain Imaging with Motion Compensation, Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Foiret, Josquin; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2015-01-01

    Mild hyperthermia has been successfully employed to induce reversible physiological changes that can directly treat cancer and enhance local drug delivery. In this approach, temperature monitoring is essential to avoid undesirable biological effects that result from thermal damage. For thermal therapies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been employed to control real-time Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapies. However, combined ultrasound imaging and therapy systems offer the benefits of simple, low-cost devices that can be broadly applied. To facilitate such technology, ultrasound thermometry has potential to reliably monitor temperature. Control of mild hyperthermia was previously achieved using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller based on thermocouple measurements. Despite accurate temporal control of heating, this method is limited by the single position at which the temperature is measured. Ultrasound thermometry techniques based on exploiting the thermal dependence of acoustic parameters (such as longitudinal velocity) can be extended to create thermal maps and allow an accurate monitoring of temperature with good spatial resolution. However, in vivo applications of this technique have not been fully developed due to the high sensitivity to tissue motion. Here, we propose a motion compensation method based on the acquisition of multiple reference frames prior to treatment. The technique was tested in the presence of 2-D and 3-D physiological-scale motion and was found to provide effective real-time temperature monitoring. PID control of mild hyperthermia in presence of motion was then tested with ultrasound thermometry as feedback and temperature was maintained within 0.3°C of the requested value. PMID:26244783

  8. Controlling the Motion of Knotted Polymers through Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narsimhan, Vivek; Renner, C. Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    Nanopore sequencing is a technique where DNA moves through a pore and base-pair information is read along the chain as an electric signal. One hurdle facing this technique is that DNA passes too quickly through the pore, rendering the signal to be too noisy. In this talk, we discuss one strategy to control the speed by which polymers move through pores. By tying a knot on a polymer chain, we find that we can jam the polymer at the pore's entrance and halt translocation completely. This idea by itself may not seem useful, but by cycling the field on and off at the relaxation time scale of the knot, we can control the swelling dynamics of the knot at the pore's entrance, and hence ratchet the polymer through the pore. This talk focuses on two parts. First, we will discuss the dynamics of a knot jamming at the pore entrance and determine what sets the critical tension to halt translocation. We will determine how knot topology affects these results and discuss what regimes lead to large fluctuations in the translocation speed. We will then discuss the dynamics of a knot under a time-dependent, periodic force. Lastly, we develop a model to describe the knot's swelling dynamics during relaxation, and use this to explain some of the trends observed in our simulations. Now at Liquiglide.

  9. Controlled motion in an elastic world. Research project: Manipulation strategies for massive space payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Wayne J.

    1992-01-01

    The flexibility of the drives and structures of controlled motion systems are presented as an obstacle to be overcome in the design of high performance motion systems, particularly manipulator arms. The task and the measure of performance to be applied determine the technology appropriate to overcome this obstacle. Included in the technologies proposed are control algorithms (feedback and feed forward), passive damping enhancement, operational strategies, and structural design. Modeling of the distributed, nonlinear system is difficult, and alternative approaches are discussed. The author presents personal perspectives on the history, status, and future directions in this area.

  10. Electric-field-controlled suppression of Walker breakdown and chirality switching in magnetic domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Li, You-Quan

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall controlled by an electric field in the presence of the spin flexoelectric interaction. We reveal that this interaction generates an effective spin torque and results in significant changes in the current-driven domain wall motion. In particular, the electric field can stabilize the domain wall motion, leading to strong suppression of the current-induced Walker breakdown and thus allowing a higher maximum wall velocity. We can furthermore use this electric-field control to efficiently switch the chirality of a moving domain wall in the steady regime.

  11. 77 FR 58117 - Tacoma Power; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has..., motions to intervene, and protests: October 11, 2012. All documents may be filed electronically via the... the Commission. n. Comments, Protests, or Motions to Intervene: Anyone may submit comments, a...

  12. Focused ultrasound treatment of VX2 tumors controlled by local harmonic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Huang, Yuexi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using localized harmonic motion (LHM) to monitor and control focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) in VX2 tumors in vivo. FUS exposures were performed on 13 VX2 tumors implanted in nine rabbits. The same transducer induced coagulation and generated a localized oscillatory motion by periodically varying the radiation force. A separate diagnostic ultrasound transducer tracked motion by cross-correlating echo signals at different instances. A threshold in motion amplitude was instituted to cease exposure. Coagulation was confirmed by T2-weighted MR images, thermal dose obtained through MR thermometry and histological examinations. For tumor locations achieving coagulation, the LHM amplitude was 9% (p = 0.04) to 57% (p < 0.0001) lower than that before exposure. Control was successful for 74 (69%) out of 108 cases, with 52 (48%) reaching the threshold and achieving coagulation and 22 (21%) never reaching threshold nor coagulating. For the 34 (31%) unsuccessful exposures, 16 (15%) never reached the threshold but coagulation occurred, and 18 (16%) reached threshold without coagulation confirmed. Noise or radio-frequency signal changes explained motion over- or underestimation in 24 (22%) cases; the remaining 10 (9%) had other causes of error. The control was generally successful, but sudden change or noise in the acquired echo signal caused failure. Coagulation after exposure could be validated by comparing amplitudes before and after exposure.

  13. [Motion control of moving mirror based on fixed-mirror adjustment in FTIR spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-bing; Xu, Xian-ze; Le, Yi; Xu, Feng-qiu; Li, Jun-wei

    2012-08-01

    The performance of the uniform motion of the moving mirror, which is the only constant motion part in FTIR spectrometer, and the performance of the alignment of the fixed mirror play a key role in FTIR spectrometer, and affect the interference effect and the quality of the spectrogram and may restrict the precision and resolution of the instrument directly. The present article focuses on the research on the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror. In order to improve the FTIR spectrometer, the maglev support system was designed for the moving mirror and the phase detection technology was adopted to adjust the tilt angle between the moving mirror and the fixed mirror. This paper also introduces an improved fuzzy PID control algorithm to get the accurate speed of the moving mirror and realize the control strategy from both hardware design and algorithm. The results show that the development of the moving mirror motion control system gets sufficient accuracy and real-time, which can ensure the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror. PMID:23156801

  14. Nonresonant Multiple-Pulse Control of Molecular Motions in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    We propose the implementation of the multiple-pulse excitation for manipulation of the molecular contributions to the optically-heterodyne-detected optical-Kerr-effect. The key parameters controlling the specificity of the multiple-pulse excitation scenarios are the pulses durations, the delays between pulses, the relation between the pump pulses amplitudes and the pulses polarizations. We model the high-order optical responses and consider some principles of the scenarios construction. We show that it is possible to adjust the excitation scenario in such a way that the some responses can be removed from detected signal along with the enhancement of the interested response amplitude. The theoretical analysis and first experimental data reveal that the multiple-pulse excitation technique can be useful for the selective spectroscopy of the molecular vibrations and rotations in liquid.

  15. Decision Making and Finite-Time Motion Control for a Group of Robots.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Liu, Shirong; Xie, Xiaogao; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the problem of odor source localization by designing and analyzing a decision-control system (DCS) for a group of robots. In the decision level, concentration magnitude information and wind information detected by robots are used to predict a probable position of the odor source. Specifically, the idea of particle swarm optimization is introduced to give a probable position of the odor source in terms of concentration magnitude information. Moreover, an observation model of the position of the odor source is built according to wind information, and a Kalman filter is used to estimate the position of the odor source, which is combined with the position obtained by using concentration magnitude information in order to make a decision on the position of the odor source. In the control level, two types of the finite-time motion control algorithms are designed; one is a finite-time parallel motion control algorithm, while the other is a finite-time circular motion control algorithm. Precisely, a nonlinear finite-time consensus algorithm is first proposed, and a Lyapunov approach is used to analyze the finite-time convergence of the proposed consensus algorithm. Then, on the basis of the proposed finite-time consensus algorithm, a finite-time parallel motion control algorithm, which can control the group of robots to trace the plume and move toward the probable position of odor source, is derived. Next, a finite-time circular motion control algorithm, which can enable the robot group to circle the probable position of the odor source in order to search for odor clues, is also developed. Finally, the performance capabilities of the proposed DCS are illustrated through the problem of odor source localization. PMID:23033435

  16. Functional nanostructures: Applications in nanobarcoding, autonomous motion, and biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirok, Ugur Korcan

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have resulted in development of a wide array of novel nanomaterials for various applications. Nano-particles, rods, wires, tubes and other geometrical forms have attracted great interest due to their unique shape and size-dependent properties at the nanometer scale. In addition to their applications in electronics and catalysis, such nanomaterials have also been employed as barcodes in various biological and non-biological systems, as engines for autonomous locomotion, and in novel or existing sensing platforms. Despite the encouraging progress during the recent years, there are significant challenges in fabrication and in meeting the demands for higher performance materials. In this dissertation, advances in the fabrication, use and performance of various nanostructures in barcoding, locomotion and biosensing, applications and their implications were discussed. A rapid, single-step alloy electrodeposition scheme was developed to fabricate compositionally encoded nanowire barcodes. It was shown that multiple readout techniques can be used to decode the barcode patterns in an orthogonal manner as most nanobarcodes to present day have relied on segmented growth approaches and a single level of identification. On another front, the speed of autonomous gold/platinum (Au/Pt) catalytic nanomotors was enhanced by an order of magnitude and the power output was increased by two orders of magnitude by using a cathodic silver/gold (Ag/Au) alloy instead of a pure Au segment. Nanomotor speeds were found to correlate with the Ag content in the alloy, and possible mechanisms behind this enhancement were discussed. A novel use of nanoparticles for biosensing applications was also demonstrated. It was shown that electrochemical impedance responses of biomarkers can be tuned by gold nanoparticles (AuNP) for frequency-based detection. The system's impedance behavior was characterized by physical, electrical and mathematical models, and the theory and

  17. The application of biological motion research: biometrics, sport, and the military.

    PubMed

    Steel, Kylie; Ellem, Eathan; Baxter, David

    2015-02-01

    The body of research that examines the perception of biological motion is extensive and explores the factors that are perceived from biological motion and how this information is processed. This research demonstrates that individuals are able to use relative (temporal and spatial) information from a person's movement to recognize factors, including gender, age, deception, emotion, intention, and action. The research also demonstrates that movement presents idiosyncratic properties that allow individual discrimination, thus providing the basis for significant exploration in the domain of biometrics and social signal processing. Medical forensics, safety garments, and victim selection domains also have provided a history of research on the perception of biological motion applications; however, a number of additional domains present opportunities for application that have not been explored in depth. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current applications of biological motion-based research and to propose a number of areas where biological motion research, specific to recognition, could be applied in the future. PMID:24830879

  18. An Interface for Specifying Rigid-Body Motions for CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Chan, William; Aftosmis, Michael; Meakin, Robert L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An interface for specifying rigid-body motions for CFD applications is presented. This interface provides a means of describing a component hierarchy in a geometric configuration, as well as the motion (prescribed or six-degree-of-freedom) associated with any component. The interface consists of a general set of datatypes, along with rules for their interaction, and is designed to be flexible in order to evolve as future needs dictate. The specification is currently implemented with an XML file format which is portable across platforms and applications. The motion specification is capable of describing general rigid body motions, and eliminates the need to write and compile new code within the application software for each dynamic configuration, allowing client software to automate dynamic simulations. The interface is integrated with a GUI tool which allows rigid body motions to be prescribed and verified interactively, promoting access to non-expert users. Illustrative examples, as well as the raw XML source of the file specifications, are included.

  19. Quantum Control of Atomic and Molecular Translational Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Raizen, M.G.; Fink, M.

    2005-08-25

    Our research program focuses on the development of a method to cool atoms and molecules of any choice as long as they have a stable gaseous phase. Our approach starts with a very cold supersonic beam of He seeded with the molecules of choice. The internal temperature can reach 1 milliKelvin or less. The high center of mass velocity of the particles forming the beam will be reduced by elastically scattering the atoms/molecules from a very cold single crystal surface (20-40K), which moves in the beam direction. This will enable the continuous control of the mean velocity over a large range, after scattering, down to a few tens of m/s or even below as the crystal surface's velocity approaches v/2 of the impacting particles. We will use the decelerated particles as a source for a white-fringe matter-wave interferometer, where one reflector is a very cold surface of interest. The interference pattern will reveal the real part (via integral intensities) and the imaginary part (via phase shifts) of the scattering cross sections. This is particularly interesting for H{sub 2} and resonance structures. This interferometer set-up follows closely Prichard's arrangement.

  20. Controlled Laboratory Comparison Study of Motion With Football Equipment in a Destabilized Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Prasarn, Mark L.; Horodyski, MaryBeth; DiPaola, Matthew J.; DiPaola, Christian P.; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Conrad, Bryan P.; Rechtine, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have shown that there are better alternatives to log rolling patients with unstable spinal injuries, although this method is still commonly used for placing patients onto a spine board. No previous studies have examined transfer maneuvers involving an injured football player with equipment in place onto a spine board. Purpose To test 3 different transfer maneuvers of an injured football player onto a spine board to determine which method most effectively minimizes spinal motion in an injured cervical spine model. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Five whole, lightly embalmed cadavers were fitted with shoulder pads and helmets and tested both before and after global instability was surgically created at C5-C6. An electromagnetic motion analysis device was used to assess the amount of angular and linear motion with sensors placed above and below the injured segment during transfer. Spine-boarding techniques evaluated were the log roll, the lift and slide, and the 8-person lift. Results The 8-person lift technique resulted in the least amount of angular and linear motion for all planes tested as compared with the lift-and-slide and log-roll techniques. This reached statistical significance for lateral bending (P = .031) and medial-lateral translation (P = .030) when compared with the log-roll maneuver. The lift-and-slide technique was significantly more effective at reducing motion than the log roll for axial rotation (P = .029) and lateral bending (P = .006). Conclusion The log roll resulted in the most motion at an unstable cervical injury as compared with the other 2 spine-boarding techniques examined. The 8-person lift and lift-and-slide techniques may both be more effective than the log roll at reducing unwanted cervical spine motion when spine boarding an injured football player. Reduction of such motion is critical in the prevention of iatrogenic injury. PMID:26535397

  1. High-precision single-input control of relative motion in spacecraft formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerman, Anna; Ovchinnikov, Michael; Smirnov, Georgi; Trofimov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    A Newton-type method is proposed to improve the accuracy of control for relative motion of two satellites in close formation. We assume that the deputy satellite is equipped with a passive attitude control system that provides one-axis stabilization, and one or two orbit control thrusters are installed along the stabilized axis. Previous studies show that it is possible to construct periodic relative trajectories both in case of passive magnetic and spin stabilization. However, the accuracy of the numerically obtained control is quite low due to modeling errors caused by linearization of the equations of relative motion. Therefore, a correction procedure is required to compensate for nonlinear effects. To this end we suggest a recently developed algorithm based on the Newton method for solving nonlinear systems with geometric constraints. Being implemented, this algorithm allows decreasing the modeling error by up to ten times. The previously found control and trajectory of the linearized system are used as initial approximations.

  2. Instrument Remote Control Application Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Hostetter, Carl F.

    2006-01-01

    The Instrument Remote Control (IRC) architecture is a flexible, platform-independent application framework that is well suited for the control and monitoring of remote devices and sensors. IRC enables significant savings in development costs by utilizing extensible Markup Language (XML) descriptions to configure the framework for a specific application. The Instrument Markup Language (IML) is used to describe the commands used by an instrument, the data streams produced, the rules for formatting commands and parsing the data, and the method of communication. Often no custom code is needed to communicate with a new instrument or device. An IRC instance can advertise and publish a description about a device or subscribe to another device's description on a network. This simple capability of dynamically publishing and subscribing to interfaces enables a very flexible, self-adapting architecture for monitoring and control of complex instruments in diverse environments.

  3. Detection and Control of Mobile Robot Motion by Real-Time Computer Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsche, H. J.

    1987-02-01

    An approach is presented that combines dynamical models of 3D motion with geometric models of the scene and the laws of perspective projection to estimate all motion parameters necessary to control a mobile robot vehicle. The approach is demonstrated by autonomous con-trol of a jet propelled air-cushion vehicle, navigating through a technical environment with three degrees of motion freedom and performing a rendezvous maneuver with a passive partner. Features of the partner and other objects in the scene, the 3D shapes of which are known, are looked for and then tracked by the processors of a multimicroprocessor system. A sequential Kalman filter formulation is used to detect and to cope with variable feature visibility due to occlusion and motion while determining the complete relative motion state without inversion of the projection equations. A scheme is developed for always selecting those features for tracking which yield the best state estimate, the quality of which is demonstrated by physical docking with a static partner. The system operates at 0.13 seconds cycle time, half of which is spent for I/O operations. Experimental results are given.

  4. Applications of a Controller Design Method for Nonholonomic Systems to Auto-Steering Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamatsu, Masanori; Kubota, Tetsuya; Kohno, Yukinobu; Iwata, Shinichi

    In the industrial field of motion control, many systems are nonholonomic, and thefore are difficult to control by static state feedback. As a controller design method for nonholonomic systems, a time-state control form that is applicable to a broad class of nonholonomic systems has been proposed. This paper describes three applications of controllers designed to utilize the time-state control form for the motion control of the following ground vehicles: a large-scale transfer crane, a rotary snow remover, and the mobile field of the Sapporo Dome stadium. In the first two examples, we develop a control function in a time-state control form into an integral type, and a combination of a filter and the Smith compensator. In the third example, we confirm the validity of the motion control by computer simulations and actual experiments.

  5. Vestibular Stimulation for ADHD: Randomized Controlled Trial of Comprehensive Motion Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David L.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Crowl, Lindsay; Bozzolo, Hernan; Peruggia, Mario; Ramadan, Yaser; Bornstein, Robert; Hollway, Jill A.; Thompson, Susan; Malone, Krista; Hall, Kristy L.; Shelton, Sara B.; Bozzolo, Dawn R.; Cook, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This research evaluates effects of vestibular stimulation by Comprehensive Motion Apparatus (CMA) in ADHD. Method: Children ages 6 to 12 (48 boys, 5 girls) with ADHD were randomized to thrice-weekly 30-min treatments for 12 weeks with CMA, stimulating otoliths and semicircular canals, or a single-blind control of equal duration and…

  6. 14 CFR 23.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 23.779 Section 23.779 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design...

  7. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  8. 14 CFR 23.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 23.779 Section 23.779 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and...

  9. Motion Controllers for Learners to Manipulate and Interact with 3D Objects for Mental Rotation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Wang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Lin, Po-Han; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Mental rotation is an important spatial processing ability and an important element in intelligence tests. However, the majority of past attempts at training mental rotation have used paper-and-pencil tests or digital images. This study proposes an innovative mental rotation training approach using magnetic motion controllers to allow learners to…

  10. Design and Evaluation of an Integrated Online Motion Control Training Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buiu, C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an integrated Internet-based package for teaching the fundamentals of motion control by using a wide range of resources: theory, videos, simulators, games, quizzes, and a remote lab. The package is aimed at automation technicians, pupils at vocational schools and students taking an introductory course in…

  11. 14 CFR 23.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motion and effect of cockpit controls. 23.779 Section 23.779 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and...

  12. Injury risk in runners using standard or motion control shoes: a randomised controlled trial with participant and assessor blinding

    PubMed Central

    Malisoux, Laurent; Chambon, Nicolas; Delattre, Nicolas; Gueguen, Nils; Urhausen, Axel; Theisen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim This randomised controlled trial investigated if the usage of running shoes with a motion control system modifies injury risk in regular leisure-time runners compared to standard shoes, and if this influence depends on foot morphology. Methods Recreational runners (n=372) were given either the motion control or the standard version of a regular running shoe model and were followed up for 6 months regarding running activity and injury. Foot morphology was analysed using the Foot Posture Index method. Cox regression analyses were used to compare injury risk between the two groups, based on HRs and their 95% CIs, controlling for potential confounders. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of motion control system in runners with supinated, neutral and pronated feet. Results The overall injury risk was lower among the participants who had received motion control shoes (HR=0.55; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.85) compared to those receiving standard shoes. This positive effect was only observed in the stratum of runners with pronated feet (n=94; HR=0.34; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.84); there was no difference in runners with neutral (n=218; HR=0.78; 95% CI 0.44 to 1.37) or supinated feet (n=60; HR=0.59; 95% CI 0.20 to 1.73). Runners with pronated feet using standard shoes had a higher injury risk compared to those with neutral feet (HR=1.80; 95% CI 1.01 to 3.22). Conclusions The overall injury risk was lower in participants who had received motion control shoes. Based on secondary analysis, those with pronated feet may benefit most from this shoe type. PMID:26746907

  13. 76 FR 11446 - Erie Boulevard Hydropower, LP; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Erie Boulevard Hydropower, LP; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions to Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Terms and...

  14. 77 FR 22312 - Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On March 23, 2012, Cave Run Energy, LLC...' (Corps) Cave Run Dam, located on the Licking River in Rowan and Bath Counties, Kentucky. The sole purpose... generation of 34,164 megawatt-hours (MWh), and operate utilizing surplus water from the Cave Run Dam,...

  15. 78 FR 7768 - Public Service Company of Colorado; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Public Service Company of Colorado; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Preliminary...

  16. Design and Implementation of an Electromagnetic Energy Harvester for Linear and Rotary Motion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekmati, Alireza

    This thesis presents a new design for an electromagnetic energy harvester to be used in both linear and rotary motion applications. This electromagnetic energy harvester consists of a moving coil within a fixed magnetic circuit. This magnetic circuit comprises of a permanent magnet (as a magnetic source), a magnetic conductor (such as iron), and an air gap to create a space for coil movement inside energy harvester setup. In the parameter study of this electromagnetic energy harvester, it has been demonstrated that applying design modifications will improve the amount of induced voltage by %50. For linear motion applications, the energy harvester has been mounted on a linear motor and the experimental results indicated that when the coil movements' speed is 70 [mm/s], the maximum harvested power is 5.320 [mW]. For rotary motion applications, first a voice coil speaker has been used as a single degree of freedom system to produce voltage through a rotating beam and hub. Since in lower resonance frequencies, the maximum induced voltage is quite low, thus in next step, the two degrees of freedom energy harvesting system for rotary motion applications has been introduced. This system has been mounted on a car ring and the result illustrated that at the resonance frequency (15 [Hz]), the induced voltage was 0.175 [V] for each coil.

  17. 75 FR 71103 - Hampshire Paper Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hampshire Paper Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Preliminary Terms and Conditions, and Preliminary...

  18. 77 FR 60415 - Newburgh Hydro, LLC, Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Newburgh Hydro, LLC, Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Preliminary Terms and...

  19. 77 FR 60413 - Uniontown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Uniontown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Preliminary Terms and...

  20. Motion control of the ankle joint with a multiple contact nerve cuff electrode: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Durand, Dominique M

    2014-08-01

    The flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) has demonstrated significant capability for fascicular and subfascicular stimulation selectivity. However, due to the inherent complexity of the neuromuscular skeletal systems and nerve-electrode interface, a trajectory tracking motion control algorithm of musculoskeletal systems for functional electrical stimulation using a multiple contact nerve cuff electrode such as FINE has not yet been developed. In our previous study, a control system was developed for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) musculoskeletal systems with little prior knowledge of the system. In this study, more realistic computational ankle/subtalar joint model including a finite element model of the sciatic nerve was developed. The control system was tested to control the motion of ankle/subtalar joint angles by modulating the pulse amplitude of each contact of a FINE placed on the sciatic nerve. The simulation results showed that the control strategy based on the separation of steady state and dynamic properties of the system resulted in small output tracking errors for different reference trajectories such as sinusoidal and filtered random signals. The proposed control method also demonstrated robustness against external disturbances and system parameter variations such as muscle fatigue. These simulation results under various circumstances indicate that it is possible to take advantage of multiple contact nerve electrodes with spatial selectivity for the control of limb motion by peripheral nerve stimulation even with limited individual muscle selectivity. This technology could be useful to restore neural function in patients with paralysis. PMID:24939581

  1. Motion-Based System Identification and Fault Detection and Isolation Technologies for Thruster Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Sutter, David W.; Berkovitz, Dustin; Betts, Bradley J.; Kong, Edmund; delMundo, Rommel; Lages, Christopher R.; Mah, Robert W.; Papasin, Richard

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the motions of a thruster-controlled spacecraft, it is possible to provide on-line (1) thruster fault detection and isolation (FDI), and (2) vehicle mass- and thruster-property identification (ID). Technologies developed recently at NASA Ames have significantly improved the speed and accuracy of these ID and FDI capabilities, making them feasible for application to a broad class of spacecraft. Since these technologies use existing sensors, the improved system robustness and performance that comes with the thruster fault tolerance and system ID can be achieved through a software-only implementation. This contrasts with the added cost, mass, and hardware complexity commonly required by FDI. Originally developed in partnership with NASA - Johnson Space Center to provide thruster FDI capability for the X-38 during re-entry, these technologies are most recently being applied to the MIT SPHERES experimental spacecraft to fly on the International Space Station in 2004. The model-based FDI uses a maximum-likelihood calculation at its core, while the ID is based upon recursive least squares estimation. Flight test results from the SPHERES implementation, as flown aboard the NASA KC-1 35A 0-g simulator aircraft in November 2003 are presented.

  2. Comparison study on disturbance estimation techniques in precise slow motion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, S.; Nagamune, R.; Altintas, Y.; Fan, D.; Zhang, Z.

    2010-08-01

    Precise low speed motion control is important for the industrial applications of both micro-milling machine tool feed drives and electro-optical tracking servo systems. It calls for precise position and instantaneous velocity measurement and disturbance, which involves direct drive motor force ripple, guide way friction and cutting force etc., estimation. This paper presents a comparison study on dynamic response and noise rejection performance of three existing disturbance estimation techniques, including the time-delayed estimators, the state augmented Kalman Filters and the conventional disturbance observers. The design technique essentials of these three disturbance estimators are introduced. For designing time-delayed estimators, it is proposed to substitute Kalman Filter for Luenberger state observer to improve noise suppression performance. The results show that the noise rejection performances of the state augmented Kalman Filters and the time-delayed estimators are much better than the conventional disturbance observers. These two estimators can give not only the estimation of the disturbance but also the low noise level estimations of position and instantaneous velocity. The bandwidth of the state augmented Kalman Filters is wider than the time-delayed estimators. In addition, the state augmented Kalman Filters can give unbiased estimations of the slow varying disturbance and the instantaneous velocity, while the time-delayed estimators can not. The simulation and experiment conducted on X axis of a 2.5-axis prototype micro milling machine are provided.

  3. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  4. Control over molecular motion using the cis–trans photoisomerization of the azo group

    PubMed Central

    Ribagorda, María

    2012-01-01

    Summary Control over molecular motion represents an important objective in modern chemistry. Aromatic azobenzenes are excellent candidates as molecular switches since they can exist in two forms, namely the cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers, which can interconvert both photochemically and thermally. This transformation induces a molecular movement and a significant geometric change, therefore the azobenzene unit is an excellent candidate to build dynamic molecular devices. We describe selected examples of systems containing an azobenzene moiety and their motions and geometrical changes caused by external stimuli. PMID:23019434

  5. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  6. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock. PMID:21303189

  7. A novel application of motion analysis for detecting stress responses in embryos at different stages of development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    studied in the control treatments. Conclusion This innovative use of motion analysis incorporates data quantifying embryonic movements at a range of frequencies and so provides an holistic analysis of an embryo’s movement patterns. This technique has potential applications for quantifying embryonic responses to environmental stressors such as exposure to pharmaceuticals or pollutants, and also as an automated tool for developmental staging of embryos. PMID:23374982

  8. The application of holography as a real-time three-dimensional motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A historical introduction to holography is presented, as well as a basic description of sideband holography for stationary objects. A brief theoretical development of both time-dependent and time-independent holography is also provided, along with an analytical and intuitive discussion of a unique holographic arrangement which allows the resolution of front surface detail from an object moving at high speeds. As an application of such a system, a real-time three-dimensional motion picture camera system is discussed and the results of a recent demonstration of the world's first true three-dimensional motion picture are given.

  9. Robotically controlled slosh-free motion of an open container of liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.; Dohrmann, C.; Parker, G.; Robinett, R.; Romero, V.; Schmitt, D.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes two methods for controlling the surface of a liquid in an open container as it is being carried by a robot arm. Both methods make use of the fundamental mode of oscillation and damping of the liquid in the container as predicted from a boundary element model of the fluid. The first method uses an infinite impulse response filter to alter an acceleration profile so that the liquid remains level except for a single wave at the beginning and end of the motion. The motion of the liquid is similar to that of a simple pendulum. The second method removes the remaining two surface oscillations by tilting the container parallel to the beginning and ending wave. A double pendulum model is used to determine the trajectory for this motion. Experimental results of a FANUC S-800 robot moving a 230 mm diameter hemispherical container of water are presented.

  10. Vibrating barrier: a novel device for the passive control of structures under ground motion

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, P.; Tombari, A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel device, called vibrating barrier (ViBa), that aims to reduce the vibrations of adjacent structures subjected to ground motion waves is proposed. The ViBa is a structure buried in the soil and detached from surrounding buildings that is able to absorb a significant portion of the dynamic energy arising from the ground motion. The working principle exploits the dynamic interaction among vibrating structures due to the propagation of waves through the soil, namely the structure–soil–structure interaction. The underlying theoretical aspects of the novel control strategy are scrutinized along with its numerical modelling. Closed-form solutions are also derived to design the ViBa in the case of harmonic excitation. Numerical and experimental analyses are performed in order to investigate the efficiency of the device in mitigating the effects of ground motion waves on the structural response. A significant reduction in the maximum structural acceleration of 87% has been achieved experimentally. PMID:26345731

  11. Motion Perception and Manual Control Performance During Passive Tilt and Translation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    This joint ESA-NASA study is examining changes in motion perception following Space Shuttle flights and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data has been collected on 5 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s) combined with body translation (12-22 cm, peak-to-peak) is utilized to elicit roll-tilt perception (equivalent to 20 deg, peak-to-peak). A forward-backward moving sled (24-390 cm, peak-to-peak) with or without chair tilting in pitch is utilized to elicit pitch tilt perception (equivalent to 20 deg, peak-to-peak). These combinations are elicited at 0.15, 0.3, and 0.6 Hz for evaluating the effect of motion frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity. In both devices, a closed-loop nulling task is also performed during pseudorandom motion with and without vibrotactile feedback of tilt. All tests are performed in complete darkness. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for translation motion perception to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. The results of this study indicate that post-flight recovery of motion perception and manual control performance is complete within 8 days following short-duration space missions. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt improves manual control performance both before and after flight.

  12. Imparting Motion to a Test Object Such as a Motor Vehicle in a Controlled Fashion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southward, Stephen C. (Inventor); Reubush, Chandler (Inventor); Pittman, Bryan (Inventor); Roehrig, Kurt (Inventor); Gerard, Doug (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus imparts motion to a test object such as a motor vehicle in a controlled fashion. A base has mounted on it a linear electromagnetic motor having a first end and a second end, the first end being connected to the base. A pneumatic cylinder and piston combination have a first end and a second end, the first end connected to the base so that the pneumatic cylinder and piston combination is generally parallel with the linear electromagnetic motor. The second ends of the linear electromagnetic motor and pneumatic cylinder and piston combination being commonly linked to a mount for the test object. A control system for the linear electromagnetic motor and pneumatic cylinder and piston combination drives the pneumatic cylinder and piston combination to support a substantial static load of the test object and the linear electromagnetic motor to impart controlled motion to the test object.

  13. Pitching motion control of a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Minami, Keisuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2014-11-01

    Free flights and a pitching motion control of a butterfly-like flapping wing-body model are numerically investigated by using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. The model flaps downward for generating the lift force and backward for generating the thrust force. Although the model can go upward against the gravity by the generated lift force, the model generates the nose-up torque, consequently gets off-balance. In this study, we discuss a way to control the pitching motion by flexing the body of the wing-body model like an actual butterfly. The body of the model is composed of two straight rigid rod connected by a rotary actuator. It is found that the pitching angle is suppressed in the range of +/-5° by using the proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) control for the input torque of the rotary actuator.

  14. Altered sensorimotor control of the body as an etiological factor in space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, James R.; Graybiel, Ashton; Dizio, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to nonterrestrial force levels affects the activity of gravitoinertial force sensitive receptors of the body, both of labyrinthine and nonlabyrinthine origin. It also disrupts the normal patterning of motor control of body orientation and movement. The patterns and levels of muscle innervation necessary to achieve particular body configurations and to bring about particular body movements are greatly affected by background force level and body orientation relative to the force vector. The present studies demonstrate that such altered sensorimotor control of head and body posture along with altered vestibulomotor control are evocative of motion sickness. This observation has explanatory significance both for space motion sickness and the re-entry disturbances that occur after prolonged spaceflight.

  15. Control of humanoid robot via motion-onset visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Mengfan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates controlling humanoid robot behavior via motion-onset specific N200 potentials. In this study, N200 potentials are induced by moving a blue bar through robot images intuitively representing robot behaviors to be controlled with mind. We present the individual impact of each subject on N200 potentials and discuss how to deal with individuality to obtain a high accuracy. The study results document the off-line average accuracy of 93% for hitting targets across over five subjects, so we use this major component of the motion-onset visual evoked potential (mVEP) to code people's mental activities and to perform two types of on-line operation tasks: navigating a humanoid robot in an office environment with an obstacle and picking-up an object. We discuss the factors that affect the on-line control success rate and the total time for completing an on-line operation task. PMID:25620918

  16. PSD Camera Based Position and Posture Control of Redundant Robot Considering Contact Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Kotani, Kentaro

    The paper describes a position and posture controller design based on the absolute position by external PSD vision sensor for redundant robot manipulator. The redundancy enables a potential capability to avoid obstacle while continuing given end-effector jobs under contact with middle link of manipulator. Under contact motion, the deformation due to joint torsion obtained by comparing internal and external position sensor, is actively suppressed by internal/external position hybrid controller. The selection matrix of hybrid loop is given by the function of the deformation. And the detected deformation is also utilized in the compliant motion controller for passive obstacle avoidance. The validity of the proposed method is verified by several experimental results of 3link planar redundant manipulator.

  17. Control of humanoid robot via motion-onset visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Mengfan; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates controlling humanoid robot behavior via motion-onset specific N200 potentials. In this study, N200 potentials are induced by moving a blue bar through robot images intuitively representing robot behaviors to be controlled with mind. We present the individual impact of each subject on N200 potentials and discuss how to deal with individuality to obtain a high accuracy. The study results document the off-line average accuracy of 93% for hitting targets across over five subjects, so we use this major component of the motion-onset visual evoked potential (mVEP) to code people's mental activities and to perform two types of on-line operation tasks: navigating a humanoid robot in an office environment with an obstacle and picking-up an object. We discuss the factors that affect the on-line control success rate and the total time for completing an on-line operation task. PMID:25620918

  18. 'Structure-from-Motion': a high resolution, low-cost photogrammetric tool for geoscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westoby, M. J.; Glasser, N. F.; Brasington, J.; Hambrey, M.; Reynolds, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Presently, the majority of methods capable of surveying, at high resolution, often complex landforms and landscapes are accompanied by high costs and difficult portability. Furthermore, the relative remoteness and inaccessibility of many field sites renders these approaches impractical. The 'Structure-from-Motion' (SfM) method operates under the same basic assumption of stereoscopic photogrammetry, namely that 3D structure can be resolved from two or more overlapping, offset images. Using only a consumer-grade digital camera and a network of ground control targets, the user moves through the environment, acquiring photographs of the feature or area of interest from as many locations and perspectives as possible. Freely-available, automated feature extraction and bundle adjustment software is used to reconstruct scene geometry. Results from example applications of the technique to two moraine dam complexes in the Nepal Himalaya will be presented. Both sites have produced catastrophic glacial lake outburst floods, and as a result possess impressive breaches through their moraine dams. DTMs of the moraine complexes were constructed, facilitating the extraction of precise metric data pertaining to breach dimensions, volumes of released water from the lake basin, and amounts of material removed from the moraine complexes during the outburst. Such data are invaluable for detailed hydrodynamic modelling and subsequent hazard assessments. To conclude, SfM output will be directly compared with that obtained from a Terrestrial Laser Scanning system.

  19. Focused Ultrasound Surgery Control Using Local Harmonic Motion: VX2 Tumor Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Goertz, David; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time method for controlling focused ultrasound surgery using ultrasound imaging. The approach uses measurements of localized harmonic motion (LHM) in order to perform controlled FUS exposures by detecting changes in the elastic properties of tissues during coagulation. Methods: Nine New Zealand rabbits with VX2 tumors implanted in the thigh were used for this study. LHM was generated within the tumors by periodic induction of radiation force using a FUS transducer (80-mm focal length, 100-mm diameter, 20-mm central hole, 1.485-MHz). Tissue motion was tracked by collecting and cross-correlating RF signals during the motion using a separate diagnostic transducer (3-kHz PRF, 5-MHz). After locating the tumor in MR images, a series of sonications were performed to treat the tumors using a reduction in LHM amplitude to control the exposure. Results: LHM was successfully used to control the sonications. A LHM amplitude threshold value was determined at which changes were considered significant and then the exposure was started and stopped when the LHM amplitude dropped below the threshold. The appearance of a lesion was then verified by MRI. The feasibility of LHM measurements to control FUS exposure was validated.

  20. Focused Ultrasound Surgery Control Using Local Harmonic Motion: VX2 Tumor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Goertz, David; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time method for controlling focused ultrasound surgery using ultrasound imaging. The approach uses measurements of localized harmonic motion (LHM) in order to perform controlled FUS exposures by detecting changes in the elastic properties of tissues during coagulation. Methods: Nine New Zealand rabbits with VX2 tumors implanted in the thigh were used for this study. LHM was generated within the tumors by periodic induction of radiation force using a FUS transducer (80-mm focal length, 100-mm diameter, 20-mm central hole, 1.485-MHz). Tissue motion was tracked by collecting and cross-correlating RF signals during the motion using a separate diagnostic transducer (3-kHz PRF, 5-MHz). After locating the tumor in MR images, a series of sonications were performed to treat the tumors using a reduction in LHM amplitude to control the exposure. Results: LHM was successfully used to control the sonications. A LHM amplitude threshold value was determined at which changes were considered significant and then the exposure was started and stopped when the LHM amplitude dropped below the threshold. The appearance of a lesion was then verified by MRI. The feasibility of LHM measurements to control FUS exposure was validated.

  1. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  2. Real-time high-speed motion blur compensation system based on back-and-forth motion control of galvanometer mirror.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Takanoshin; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-12-14

    We developed a novel real-time motion blur compensation system for the blur caused by high-speed one-dimensional motion between a camera and a target. The system consists of a galvanometer mirror and a high-speed color camera, without the need for any additional sensors. We controlled the galvanometer mirror with continuous back-and-forth oscillating motion synchronized to a high-speed camera. The angular speed of the mirror is given in real time within 10 ms based on the concept of background tracking and rapid raw Bayer block matching. Experiments demonstrated that our system captures motion-invariant images of objects moving at speeds up to 30 km/h. PMID:26698958

  3. Adaptive Momentum-Based Motion Detection Approach and Its Application on Handoff in Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tein-Yaw; Chen, Yung-Mu; Hsu, Chih-Hung

    2009-01-01

    Positioning and tracking technologies can detect the location and the movement of mobile nodes (MNs), such as cellular phone, vehicular and mobile sensor, to predict potential handoffs. However, most motion detection mechanisms require additional hardware (e.g., GPS and directed antenna), costs (e.g., power consumption and monetary cost) and supply systems (e.g., network fingerprint server). This paper proposes a Momentum of Received Signal Strength (MRSS) based motion detection method and its application on handoff. MRSS uses the exponentially weighted moving average filter with multiple moving average window size to analyze the received radio signal. With MRSS, an MN can predict its motion state and make a handoff trigger at the right time without any assistance from positioning systems. Moreover, a novel motion state dependent MRSS scheme called Dynamic MRSS (DMRSS) algorithm is proposed to adjust the motion detection sensitivity. In our simulation, the MRSS- and DMRSS-based handoff algorithms can reduce the number of unnecessary handoffs up to 44% and save battery power up to 75%. PMID:22346724

  4. Adaptive momentum-based motion detection approach and its application on handoff in wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tein-Yaw; Chen, Yung-Mu; Hsu, Chih-Hung

    2009-01-01

    Positioning and tracking technologies can detect the location and the movement of mobile nodes (MNs), such as cellular phone, vehicular and mobile sensor, to predict potential handoffs. However, most motion detection mechanisms require additional hardware (e.g., GPS and directed antenna), costs (e.g., power consumption and monetary cost) and supply systems (e.g., network fingerprint server). This paper proposes a Momentum of Received Signal Strength (MRSS) based motion detection method and its application on handoff. MRSS uses the exponentially weighted moving average filter with multiple moving average window size to analyze the received radio signal. With MRSS, an MN can predict its motion state and make a handoff trigger at the right time without any assistance from positioning systems. Moreover, a novel motion state dependent MRSS scheme called Dynamic MRSS (DMRSS) algorithm is proposed to adjust the motion detection sensitivity. In our simulation, the MRSS- and DMRSS-based handoff algorithms can reduce the number of unnecessary handoffs up to 44% and save battery power up to 75%. PMID:22346724

  5. Quality control procedures for dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei; Hristov, Dimitre H.

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the authors introduce and demonstrate quality control procedures for evaluating the geometric and dosimetric fidelity of dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving treatment couch motion synchronous with gantry and multileaf collimator (MLC). Tests were designed to evaluate positional accuracy, velocity constancy and accuracy for dynamic couch motion under a realistic weight load. A test evaluating the geometric accuracy of the system in delivering treatments over complex dynamic trajectories was also devised. Custom XML scripts that control the Varian TrueBeam™ STx (Serial #3) axes in Developer Mode were written to implement the delivery sequences for the tests. Delivered dose patterns were captured with radiographic film or the electronic portal imaging device. The couch translational accuracy in dynamic treatment mode was 0.01 cm. Rotational accuracy was within 0.3°, with 0.04 cm displacement of the rotational axis. Dose intensity profiles capturing the velocity constancy and accuracy for translations and rotation exhibited standard deviation and maximum deviations below 3%. For complex delivery involving MLC and couch motions, the overall translational accuracy for reproducing programmed patterns was within 0.06 cm. The authors conclude that in Developer Mode, TrueBeam™ is capable of delivering dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion with good geometric and dosimetric fidelity.

  6. Quaternion regularization in celestial mechanics, astrodynamics, and trajectory motion control. III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    2015-09-01

    The present paper1 analyzes the basic problems arising in the solution of problems of the optimum control of spacecraft (SC) trajectory motion (including the Lyapunov instability of solutions of conjugate equations) using the principle of the maximum. The use of quaternion models of astrodynamics is shown to allow: (1) the elimination of singular points in the differential phase and conjugate equations and in their partial analytical solutions; (2) construction of the first integrals of the new quaternion; (3) a considerable decrease of the dimensions of systems of differential equations of boundary value optimization problems with their simultaneous simplification by using the new quaternion variables related with quaternion constants of motion by rotation transformations; (4) construction of general solutions of differential equations for phase and conjugate variables on the sections of SC passive motion in the simplest and most convenient form, which is important for the solution of optimum pulse SC transfers; (5) the extension of the possibilities of the analytical investigation of differential equations of boundary value problems with the purpose of identifying the basic laws of optimum control and motion of SC; (6) improvement of the computational stability of the solution of boundary value problems; (7) a decrease in the required volume of computation.

  7. Modeling, system identification, and control for slosh-free motion of an open container of liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.; Baty, R.; Dykhuizen, R.; Dohrmann, C.; Parker, G.; Robinett, R.; Romero, V.; Schmitt, D.

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses work performed under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) with Corning, Inc., to analyze and test various techniques for controlling the motion of a high speed robotic arm carrying an open container of viscous liquid, in this case, molten glass. A computer model was generated to estimate the modes of oscillation of the liquid based on the shape of the container and the viscosity of the liquid. This fluid model was experimentally verified and tuned based on experimental data from a capacitive sensor on the side of the container. A model of the robot dynamics was also developed and verified through experimental tests on a Fanuc S-800 robot arm. These two models were used to estimate the overall modes of oscillation of an open container of liquid being carried by a robot arm. Using the estimated modes, inverse dynamic control techniques were used to determine a motion profile which would eliminate waves on the liquid`s surface. Experimental tests showed that residual surface waves in an open container of water at the end of motion were reduced by over 95% and that in-motion surface waves were reduced by over 75%.

  8. Optimization of ferrofluid motion on solid substrate and its application to micro-mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seonuk; Kim, Dongil; Cho, Il-Joo; Yun, Kwang-Seok

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates the optimization of an oil-based ferrofluid droplet on a solid surface and its application to a micro-mirror device with a fast switching time. The motion of the ferrofluid droplet on a hydrophilic surface was examined at various surfactant concentrations for both rotational and linear reciprocating actuations. A maximum moving speed of 0.733 m/s was measured at a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) concentration of 0.1 wt % during the rotational motion of the ferrofluid droplet. In addition, a fast reciprocating motion was successfully demonstrated during the linear operation experiment without droplet separation or surface contamination. A maximum acceleration and deceleration of 28 m/s2 was measured at a PVA concentration of 0.1 wt %. As an application of the fast motion of the ferrofluid, a current-driven micro-mirror was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Switching times of 25 and 18 ms were measured for the closing and opening phases of the mirror, respectively.

  9. Using EMG to anticipate head motion for virtual-environment applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair; Aguilar, Mario; Hasanbelliu, Erion

    2005-01-01

    In virtual environment (VE) applications, where virtual objects are presented in a see-through head-mounted display, virtual images must be continuously stabilized in space in response to user's head motion. Time delays in head-motion compensation cause virtual objects to "swim" around instead of being stable in space which results in misalignment errors when overlaying virtual and real objects. Visual update delays are a critical technical obstacle for implementing head-mounted displays in applications such as battlefield simulation/training, telerobotics, and telemedicine. Head motion is currently measurable by a head-mounted 6-degrees-of-freedom inertial measurement unit. However, even given this information, overall VE-system latencies cannot be reduced under about 25 ms. We present a novel approach to eliminating latencies, which is premised on the fact that myoelectric signals from a muscle precede its exertion of force, thereby limb or head acceleration. We thus suggest utilizing neck-muscles' myoelectric signals to anticipate head motion. We trained a neural network to map such signals onto equivalent time-advanced inertial outputs. The resulting network can achieve time advances of up to 70 ms.

  10. MEMS applications in turbulence and flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfdahl, Lennart; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    1999-02-01

    Manufacturing processes that can create extremely small machines have been developed in recent years. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) refer to devices that have characteristic length of less than 1 mm but more than 1 μm, that combine electrical and mechanical components and that are fabricated using integrated circuit batch-processing techniques. Electrostatic, magnetic, pneumatic and thermal actuators, motors, valves, gears and tweezers of less than 100 μm size have been fabricated. These have been used as sensors for pressure, temperature, mass flow, velocity and sound, as actuators for linear and angular motions, and as simple components for complex systems such as micro-heat-engines and micro-heat-pumps. In this paper, we focus on the use of microelectromechanical systems for the diagnosis and control of turbulent shear flows. We survey the status and outlook of microsensors and microactuators as used for those particular applications, and compare the minute devices to their larger cousins. Microsensors can resolve all relevant scales even in high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows. Arrays of microsensors and microactuators make it feasible, for the first time, to achieve effective reactive control targeted toward specific small-scale coherent structures in turbulent wall-bounded flows.

  11. Non-Linear Fuzzy Logic Control for Forced Large Motions of Spinning Shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEI, SHULIANG; PALAZZOLO, ALAN; NA, UHNJOO; KASCAK, ALBERT

    2000-08-01

    A unique control approach is developed for prescribed large motion control using magnetic bearings in a proposed active stall control test rig. A finite element based, flexible shaft is modeled in a closed loop system with PD controllers that generate the control signals to support and to shake the rotor shaft. A linearized force model of the stall rig with 16 magnetic poles (4 opposing C-cores) yields stability and frequency responses. The non-linear model retains the non-linearities in Ampere's law, Faraday's law and the Maxwell stress tensor. A fuzzy logic control system is then designed to show the advantages over the conventional controllers with the fully non-linear model.

  12. Input-Shaped Link Motion Control of Planar Space Robot Equipped with Flexible Appendage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa

    Control of a space robot without actuators on the main body is an underactuated control problem. Various stabilization methods, such as the time-varying feedback control method, discontinuous feedback control method, center manifold-based method, zero-dynamics method and sliding-mode control method have been proposed. However, past studies have not considered underactuated space robots equipped with a flexible appendage, such as solar panels. If the manipulators are simply controlled to achieve the target state for the robot using the past controllers without taking a flexible appendage into consideration, residual vibration remains even after the link motion has finished. In order to suppress the residual vibration on the flexible appendage, we apply the input-shaping technique to the link motion of an underactuated planar space robot. Numerical and experimental studies are carried out to validate the proposed method for a planar dual-link space robot with a flexible appendage. The results show that the proposed method is capable of not only controlling the link angles and the main body attitude to the goal angles, but also suppressing the residual vibration on the flexible appendage.

  13. Motion-base simulator results of advanced supersonic transport handling qualities with active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, J. B.; Joshi, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Handling qualities of the unaugmented advanced supersonic transport (AST) are deficient in the low-speed, landing approach regime. Consequently, improvement in handling with active control augmentation systems has been achieved using implicit model-following techniques. Extensive fixed-based simulator evaluations were used to validate these systems prior to tests with full motion and visual capabilities on a six-axis motion-base simulator (MBS). These tests compared the handling qualities of the unaugmented AST with several augmented configurations to ascertain the effectiveness of these systems. Cooper-Harper ratings, tracking errors, and control activity data from the MBS tests have been analyzed statistically. The results show the fully augmented AST handling qualities have been improved to an acceptable level.

  14. Insect-inspired high-speed motion vision system for robot control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Zou, Ke; Zhang, Tianguang; Borst, Alexander; Kühnlenz, Kolja

    2012-10-01

    The mechanism for motion detection in a fly's vision system, known as the Reichardt correlator, suffers from a main shortcoming as a velocity estimator: low accuracy. To enable accurate velocity estimation, responses of the Reichardt correlator to image sequences are analyzed in this paper. An elaborated model with additional preprocessing modules is proposed. The relative error of velocity estimation is significantly reduced by establishing a real-time response-velocity lookup table based on the power spectrum analysis of the input signal. By exploiting the improved velocity estimation accuracy and the simple structure of the Reichardt correlator, a high-speed vision system of 1 kHz is designed and applied for robot yaw-angle control in real-time experiments. The experimental results demonstrate the potential and feasibility of applying insect-inspired motion detection to robot control. PMID:22864467

  15. Double aperture focusing transducer for controlling microparticle motions in trapezoidal microchannels with surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Tjeung, Ricky; Ervin, Hannah; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for controlling the motion of microparticles suspended in an aqueous solution, which fills in a microchannel fabricated into a piezoelectric substrate, using propagating surface acoustic waves. The cross-sectional shape of this microchannel is trapezoidal, preventing the formation of acoustic standing waves across the channel width and therefore allowing the steering of microparticles. The induced acoustic streaming transports these particles to eliminate the use of external pumps for fluid actuation.

  16. Expenditure optimization in a problem of controlled motion of mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadzanjanz, Levon K.; Pototskaya, Irina Yu.; Pupysheva, Yulia Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The controlled motion which is represented by the linear ODE system with constant coefficients is considered. The admissible control is a piecewise constant function that blanks selected frequency components of the solution of linear equations at the moment T. As "the expenditure" functional we use the integral of the sum of the modules of coordinates of the control along the interval [0, T]. The problem under consideration is to construct an admissible control which minimizes the Expenditure. To solve this problem the method is proposed which leads to explicit formulas. All results of research are formulated as the theorem. These results can be applied not only in mechanical controlled systems, but also in any problem that can be described by the system of ordinary differential equations with control.

  17. Suboptimal LQR-based spacecraft full motion control: Theory and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnaccia, Leone; Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Pastorelli, Stefano P.

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces a real time suboptimal control algorithm for six-degree-of-freedom spacecraft maneuvering based on a State-Dependent-Algebraic-Riccati-Equation (SDARE) approach and real-time linearization of the equations of motion. The control strategy is sub-optimal since the gains of the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) are re-computed at each sample time. The cost function of the proposed controller has been compared with the one obtained via a general purpose optimal control software, showing, on average, an increase in control effort of approximately 15%, compensated by real-time implementability. Lastly, the paper presents experimental tests on a hardware-in-the-loop six-degree-of-freedom spacecraft simulator, designed for testing new guidance, navigation, and control algorithms for nano-satellites in a one-g laboratory environment. The tests show the real-time feasibility of the proposed approach.

  18. Mechanisms for Rapid Adaptive Control of Motion Processing in Macaque Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Pamela M.; Ahmed, Bashir; Kohn, Adam; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of neural networks is their ability to rapidly adjust their function, including signal gain and temporal dynamics, in response to changes in sensory inputs. These adjustments are thought to be important for optimizing the sensitivity of the system, yet their mechanisms remain poorly understood. We studied adaptive changes in temporal integration in direction-selective cells in macaque primary visual cortex, where specific hypotheses have been proposed to account for rapid adaptation. By independently stimulating direction-specific channels, we found that the control of temporal integration of motion at one direction was independent of motion signals driven at the orthogonal direction. We also found that individual neurons can simultaneously support two different profiles of temporal integration for motion in orthogonal directions. These findings rule out a broad range of adaptive mechanisms as being key to the control of temporal integration, including untuned normalization and nonlinearities of spike generation and somatic adaptation in the recorded direction-selective cells. Such mechanisms are too broadly tuned, or occur too far downstream, to explain the channel-specific and multiplexed temporal integration that we observe in single neurons. Instead, we are compelled to conclude that parallel processing pathways are involved, and we demonstrate one such circuit using a computer model. This solution allows processing in different direction/orientation channels to be separately optimized and is sensible given that, under typical motion conditions (e.g., translation or looming), speed on the retina is a function of the orientation of image components. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many neurons in visual cortex are understood in terms of their spatial and temporal receptive fields. It is now known that the spatiotemporal integration underlying visual responses is not fixed but depends on the visual input. For example, neurons that respond selectively to

  19. Truss Climbing Robot for Space Station: Design, Analysis, and Motion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wing Kwong

    The application of space robots has become more popular in performing tasks such as Intra and Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) in Low Earth Orbit. For EVA, space robots were always designed as a chain-like manipulator with a joint configuration similar to on the earth robotic arm. Based on their joint configuration, they can be classified into two main categories. The first one is the six degrees of freedom (DOF) robotic arm including Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS), Engineering Test Satellite No. 7 (ETS-VII), the Main Arm (MA) and the Small Fine Arm (SFA) of Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). The other group is the seven-DOF space robotic arm which includes European Robotic Arm (ERA) and Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), or Canadarm2. They not only perform manipulation tasks, but also be able to navigate on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). In a free floating environment, motions of a space robotic arm cause the attitude change of a space station because of their dynamic coupling effect. Hence, the stabilization of the space station attitude is important to maintain the electrical energy generated by the solar panels and the signal strength for communication. Most of research in this area focuses on the motion control of a space manipulator through the study of Generalized Jacobian Matrix. Little research has been conducted specifically on the design of locomotion mechanism of a space manipulator. This dissertation proposes a novel methodology for the locomotion on a space station which aims to lower the disturbance on a space station. Without modifying the joint configuration of conventional space manipulators, the use of a new gripping mechanism is proposed which combines the advantages of active wheels and conventional grippers. To realize the proposed gripping mechanism, this dissertation also presents the design of a novel frame climbing robot (Frambot) which is equipped with the new gripping mechanism

  20. Quaternion regularization and trajectory motion control in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    2014-07-01

    Problems of regularization in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered, and basic regular quaternion models for celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are presented. It is shown that the effectiveness of analytical studies and numerical solutions to boundary value problems of controlling the trajectory motion of spacecraft can be improved by using quaternion models of astrodynamics. In this second part of the paper, specific singularity-type features (division by zero) are considered. They result from using classical equations in angular variables (particularly in Euler variables) in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics and can be eliminated by using Euler (Rodrigues-Hamilton) parameters and Hamilton quaternions. Basic regular (in the above sense) quaternion models of celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered; these include equations of trajectory motion written in nonholonomic, orbital, and ideal moving trihedrals whose rotational motions are described by Euler parameters and quaternions of turn; and quaternion equations of instantaneous orbit orientation of a celestial body (spacecraft). New quaternion regular equations are derived for the perturbed three-dimensional two-body problem (spacecraft trajectory motion). These equations are constructed using ideal rectangular Hansen coordinates and quaternion variables, and they have additional advantages over those known for regular Kustaanheimo-Stiefel equations.

  1. Applications of DNA Nanomechanical Devices to Molecular Biology and to Programmed Dynamic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunhua

    Not merely is DNA a favorable genetic material, but an effective supermolecular subunit for nanoconstruction as well. In structural DNA nanotechnology, rigid branched DNA motifs have been combined with sticky-ended cohesion to build DNA objects, arrays and devices for functional purposes. Reciprocating devices are key features in macroscopic machines. In Chapter II, I report the construction of two reciprocal PX-JX2 devices, wherein the control strands leading to the PX state in one device lead to the JX2 state in the other device, and vice versa. The formation, transformation and reciprocal motions of these two devices are confirmed utilizing gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy. This system is likely to be of use for molecular robotic applications where reciprocal motions are of value in addition its inherent contribution to molecular choreography and molecular aesthetics. Recently, several DNA-based nanomechanical devices have been developed as an attractive tool for fine measurements on nanoscale objects. In Chapter III, I have constructed a device wherein two DNA triple crossover (TX) molecules are connected by a shaft, similar to a previous device that measured the amount of work that can be performed by integration host factor [Shen, W., Bruist, M., Goodman, S. & Seeman, N. C., Angew. Chemie Int. Ed. 43, 4750-4752 (2004)]. In the present case, the binding site on the shaft contains the sequence recognized by apo-SoxR, the apo-form of a protein that is a redox-sensing transcriptional activator; previous data suggest that it distorts its binding site by an amount that corresponds to about two base pairs. A pair of dyes reports the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal between the two TX domains, reflecting changes in the shape of the device upon binding the protein. The TX domains are used to amplify the signal expected from a relatively small distortion of the DNA binding site. From FRET analysis of apo-SoxR binding, the effect of

  2. Touch-free, gesture-based control of medical devices and software based on the leap motion controller.

    PubMed

    Mauser, Stanislas; Burgert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    There are several intra-operative use cases which require the surgeon to interact with medical devices. We used the Leap Motion Controller as input device and implemented two use-cases: 2D-Interaction (e.g. advancing EPR data) and selection of a value (e.g. room illumination brightness). The gesture detection was successful and we mapped its output to several devices and systems. PMID:24732520

  3. New Worlds Observer Formation Control Design Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission is designed for the direct detection and characterization of extrasolar planets. The NWO mission concept employs a two spacecraft leader-follower formation on a trajectory around the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) Libration Point. The leader spacecraft is baselined as a 4 meter optical telescope. The follower, Starshade spacecraft, is designed to suppress light from a central body star permitting direct detection of a surrounding exoplanetary system. The current design requires a nominal leader-follower separation range of 72 Megameters. NWO poses many challenges including formation control. NWO cycles between three principal control modes during the nominal mission timeline: science (fine pointing), realignment and transition. This paper examines formation control strategies in the context of dynamics of relative motion for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2)libration point. The paper presents an overview of the equations of relative motion followed by a discussion of each of the control modes. Discussion and analysis characterize control strategies for each of the mission control modes, including requirements, implementation challenges and project fuel budgets.

  4. Highly stretchable and wearable graphene strain sensors with controllable sensitivity for human motion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Jin; Hyun, Woo Jin; Mun, Sung Cik; Park, Yong Tae; Park, O Ok

    2015-03-25

    Because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties, graphene strain sensors have attracted extensive attention for electronic applications in virtual reality, robotics, medical diagnostics, and healthcare. Although several strain sensors based on graphene have been reported, the stretchability and sensitivity of these sensors remain limited, and also there is a pressing need to develop a practical fabrication process. This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of new types of graphene strain sensors based on stretchable yarns. Highly stretchable, sensitive, and wearable sensors are realized by a layer-by-layer assembly method that is simple, low-cost, scalable, and solution-processable. Because of the yarn structures, these sensors exhibit high stretchability (up to 150%) and versatility, and can detect both large- and small-scale human motions. For this study, wearable electronics are fabricated with implanted sensors that can monitor diverse human motions, including joint movement, phonation, swallowing, and breathing. PMID:25735398

  5. Aging and the mechanisms underlying head and postural control during voluntary motion.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, R P; Emasithi, A

    1997-05-01

    The quality of sensory information that is necessary for balance and postural stability will depend to a great extent on head stability as the body moves. How older persons coordinate head and body motion for balance during volitional activities is not known. The purposes of this article are to present a basis for understanding the influence of aging on head control during voluntary motion and to discuss some data that demonstrate how elderly people might control head movement to improve gaze and the quality of vestibular inputs. A "top-down" or "head-first" control scheme is proposed as the mechanism that elderly people without disabilities use to maintain head position during self-initiated motion. This type of control ensures that the angular position of the head in space remains relatively constant--through the use of a head-stabilization-in-space (HSS) strategy--regardless of the magnitude or direction of displacements in the body's center of force. The HSS strategy is thought to reduce potential ambiguities in the interpretation of sensory inputs for balance and is derived primarily from a geocentric (orientation to the vertical) frame of reference. Egocentric (orientation of the head with respect to the body) or exocentric (orientation to objects in the environment) frames of reference, however, refine the control of head stabilization. Preliminary research suggests that elderly people use the HSS strategy to control head pitch during difficult balance tasks. These findings, if supported by more definitive studies, may be useful in the treatment of patients with balance disorders. The treatment of patients with balance dysfunction is discussed within the conceptual framework of a "head-first" organization scheme. PMID:9149758

  6. A Diffusion Approximation Based on Renewal Processes with Applications to Strongly Biased Run-Tumble Motion.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2016-03-01

    We consider organisms which use a renewal strategy such as run-tumble when moving in space, for example to perform chemotaxis in chemical gradients. We derive a diffusion approximation for the motion, applying a central limit theorem due to Anscombe for renewal-reward processes; this theorem has not previously been applied in this context. Our results extend previous work, which has established the mean drift but not the diffusivity. For a classical model of tumble rates applied to chemotaxis, we find that the resulting chemotactic drift saturates to the swimming velocity of the organism when the chemical gradients grow increasingly steep. The dispersal becomes anisotropic in steep gradients, with larger dispersal across the gradient than along the gradient. In contrast to one-dimensional settings, strong bias increases dispersal. We next include Brownian rotation in the model and find that, in limit of high chemotactic sensitivity, the chemotactic drift is 64% of the swimming velocity, independent of the magnitude of the Brownian rotation. We finally derive characteristic timescales of the motion that can be used to assess whether the diffusion limit is justified in a given situation. The proposed technique for obtaining diffusion approximations is conceptually and computationally simple, and applicable also when statistics of the motion is obtained empirically or through Monte Carlo simulation of the motion. PMID:27012850

  7. Layered Multicast Encryption of Motion JPEG2000 Code Streams for Flexible Access Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakachi, Takayuki; Toyoshima, Kan; Tonomura, Yoshihide; Fujii, Tatsuya

    In this paper, we propose a layered multicast encryption scheme that provides flexible access control to motion JPEG2000 code streams. JPEG2000 generates layered code streams and offers flexible scalability in characteristics such as resolution and SNR. The layered multicast encryption proposal allows a sender to multicast the encrypted JPEG2000 code streams such that only designated groups of users can decrypt the layered code streams. While keeping the layering functionality, the proposed method offers useful properties such as 1) video quality control using only one private key, 2) guaranteed security, and 3) low computational complexity comparable to conventional non-layered encryption. Simulation results show the usefulness of the proposed method.

  8. The relationship of motion sickness susceptibility to learned autonomic control for symptom suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four men were randomly assigned to four equal groups matched in terms of their Coriolis Sickness Susceptibility Index (CSSI). Two groups of subjects were highly susceptible to motion sickness, and two groups were moderately susceptible. All subjects were given six C551 tests at 5-d intervals. Treatment Groups I (highly susceptible) and II (moderately susceptible) were taught to control their autonomic responses, using a training method called autogenic-feedback training (AFT) before the third, fourth, and fifth CSSI tests. Control groups III (highly susceptible) and IV (moderately susceptible) received no treatment. Results showed that both treatment groups significantly improved performance on CSSI tests after training; neither of the control groups changed significantly. Highly and moderately susceptible subjects in the two treatment groups improved at comparable rates. Highly susceptible control group subjects did not habituate across tests as readily as the moderately susceptible controls.

  9. Using Unconstrained Tongue Motion as an Alternative Control Mechanism for Wheeled Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, noncontact, and wireless assistive technology that infers users’ intentions by detecting and classifying their voluntary tongue motions, and translating them to user-defined commands. We have developed customized interface circuitry between an external TDS (eTDS) prototype and a commercial powered wheelchair (PWC) as well as three control strategies to evaluate the tongue motion as an alternative control input for wheeled mobility. We tested the eTDS performance in driving PWCs on 12 able-bodied human subjects, of which 11 were novice. The results showed that all subjects could complete navigation tasks by operating the PWC using their tongue motions. Despite little prior experience, the average time using the eTDS and the tongue was only approximately three times longer than using a joystick and the fingers. Navigation time was strongly dependant on the number of issued commands, which reduced by gaining experience. Particularly, the unintended issued commands (the Midas touch problem) were rare, demonstrating the effectiveness of the tongue tracking and external magnetic field cancellation algorithms as well as the safety of the TDS for wheeled mobility. PMID:19362901

  10. Provision of Controlled Motion Accuracy of Industrial Robots and Multiaxis Machines by the Method of Integrated Deviations Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakhmalev, O. N.; Petreshin, D. I.; Fedonin, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    There is a developed method of correction of the integrated motion deviations of industrial robots and multiaxis machines, which are caused by the primary geometrical deviations of their segments. This method can be used to develop a control system providing the motion correction for industrial robots and multiaxis machines.

  11. Control of self-motion in dynamic fluids: fish do it differently from bees.

    PubMed

    Scholtyssek, Christine; Dacke, Marie; Kröger, Ronald; Baird, Emily

    2014-05-01

    To detect and avoid collisions, animals need to perceive and control the distance and the speed with which they are moving relative to obstacles. This is especially challenging for swimming and flying animals that must control movement in a dynamic fluid without reference from physical contact to the ground. Flying animals primarily rely on optic flow to control flight speed and distance to obstacles. Here, we investigate whether swimming animals use similar strategies for self-motion control to flying animals by directly comparing the trajectories of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) moving through the same experimental tunnel. While moving through the tunnel, black and white patterns produced (i) strong horizontal optic flow cues on both walls, (ii) weak horizontal optic flow cues on both walls and (iii) strong optic flow cues on one wall and weak optic flow cues on the other. We find that the mean speed of zebrafish does not depend on the amount of optic flow perceived from the walls. We further show that zebrafish, unlike bumblebees, move closer to the wall that provides the strongest visual feedback. This unexpected preference for strong optic flow cues may reflect an adaptation for self-motion control in water or in environments where visibility is limited. PMID:24872463

  12. Energy Consumption Analysis Procedure for Robotic Applications in different task motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Iman; Aris, Ishak b.; Hamiruce Marhaban, Mohammad; Juraiza Ishak, Asnor

    2015-11-01

    This work proposes energy analysis method for humanoid robot, seen from simple motion task to complex one in energy chain. The research developed a procedure suitable for analysis, saving and modelling of energy consumption not only in this type of robot but also in most robots that based on electrical power as an energy source. This method has validated by an accurate integration using Matlab software for the power consumption curve to calculate the energy of individual and multiple servo motors. Therefore, this study can be considered as a procedure for energy analysis by utilizing the laboratory instruments capabilities to measure the energy parameters. We performed a various task motions with different angular speed to find out the speed limits in terms of robot stability and control strategy. A battery capacity investigation have been searched for several types of batteries to extract the power modelling equation and energy density parameter for each battery type, Matlab software have been built to design the algorithm and to evaluate experimental amount of the energy which is represented by area under the curve of the power curves. This will provide a robust estimation for the required energy in different task motions to be considered in energy saving (i.e., motion planning and real time scheduling).

  13. Controlled surface-induced flows from the motion of self-assembled colloidal walkers

    PubMed Central

    Sing, Charles E.; Schmid, Lothar; Schneider, Matthias F.; Franke, Thomas; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Biological flows at the microscopic scale are important for the transport of nutrients, locomotion, and differentiation. Here, we present a unique approach for creating controlled, surface-induced flows inspired by a ubiquitous biological system, cilia. Our design is based on a collection of self-assembled colloidal rotors that “walk” along surfaces in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. These rotors are held together solely by magnetic forces that allow for reversible assembly and disassembly of the chains. Furthermore, rotation of the magnetic field allows for straightforward manipulation of the shape and motion of these chains. This system offers a simple and versatile approach for designing microfluidic devices as well as for studying fundamental questions in cooperative-driven motion and transport at the microscopic level. PMID:20080716

  14. Stretching and Controlled Motion of Single-Stranded DNA in Locally-Heated Solid-State Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, Maxim; Maffeo, Christopher; Wells, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of solid-state nanopores for DNA detection and sequencing require the electrophoretic motion of DNA through the nanopores to be precisely controlled. Controlling the motion of single-stranded DNA presents a particular challenge, in part because of the multitude of conformations that a DNA strand can adopt in a nanopore. Through continuum, coarse-grained and atomistic modeling, we demonstrate that local heating of the nanopore volume can be used to alter the electrophoretic mobility and conformation of single-stranded DNA. In the nanopore systems considered, the temperature near the nanopore is modulated via a nanometer-size heater element that can be radiatively switched on and off. The local enhancement of temperature produces considerable stretching of the DNA fragment confined within the nanopore. Such stretching is reversible, so that the conformation of DNA can be toggled between compact (local heating is off) and extended (local heating is on) states. The effective thermophoretic force acting on single-stranded DNA in the vicinity of the nanopore is found to be sufficiently large (4–8 pN) to affect such changes in the DNA conformation. The local heating of the nanopore volume is observed to promote single-file translocation of DNA strands at transmembrane biases as low as 10 mV, which opens new avenues for using solid-state nanopores for detection and sequencing of DNA. PMID:23876013

  15. Robotic vision. [process control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. S.; Wilf, J. M.; Cunningham, R. T.; Eskenazi, R.

    1979-01-01

    Robotic vision, involving the use of a vision system to control a process, is discussed. Design and selection of active sensors employing radiation of radio waves, sound waves, and laser light, respectively, to light up unobservable features in the scene are considered, as are design and selection of passive sensors, which rely on external sources of illumination. The segmentation technique by which an image is separated into different collections of contiguous picture elements having such common characteristics as color, brightness, or texture is examined, with emphasis on the edge detection technique. The IMFEX (image feature extractor) system performing edge detection and thresholding at 30 frames/sec television frame rates is described. The template matching and discrimination approach to recognize objects are noted. Applications of robotic vision in industry for tasks too monotonous or too dangerous for the workers are mentioned.

  16. SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hyvarinen, M; Leventouri, T; Pella, S; Dumitru, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dose distribution is highly localized and has a very sharp fall-off. Thus the one of the most important part of the treatment is the localization and immobilization of the applicator from the implantation to the setup verification to the treatment delivery. The smallest motions of the patient can induce a small rotation, tilt, or translational movement of the applicator that can convert into miss of a significant part of the tumor or to over irradiating a nearby critical organ.The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators. Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Many of the present immobilization devices produced for external radiotherapy can be used to improve the localization of HDR applicators during transportation of the patient and during treatment. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended.

  17. Materials and processes control for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and processes control relative to space applications is discussed. The components of a total material and process control system are identified, contamination control issues are listed, and recommendations are made.

  18. Particle motion in unsteady two-dimensional peristaltic flow with application to the ureter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Lozano, Joel; Sen, Mihir; Dunn, Patrick F.

    2009-04-01

    Particle motion in an unsteady peristaltic fluid flow is analyzed. The fluid is incompressible and Newtonian in a two-dimensional planar geometry. A perturbation method based on a small ratio of wave height to wavelength is used to obtain a closed-form solution for the fluid velocity field. This analytical solution is used in conjunction with an equation of motion for a small rigid sphere in nonuniform flow taking Stokes drag, virtual mass, Faxén, Basset, and gravity forces into account. Fluid streamlines and velocity profiles are calculated. Theoretical values for pumping rates are compared with available experimental data. An application to ureteral peristaltic flow is considered since fluid flow in the ureter is sometimes accompanied by particles such as stones or bacteriuria. Particle trajectories for parameters that correspond to calcium oxalates for calculosis and Escherichia coli type for bacteria are analyzed. The findings show that retrograde or reflux motion of the particles is possible and bacterial transport can occur in the upper urinary tract when there is a partial occlusion of the wave. Dilute particle mixing is also investigated, and it is found that some of the particles participate in the formation of a recirculating bolus, and some of them are delayed in transit and eventually reach the walls. This can explain the failure of clearing residuals from the upper urinary tract calculi after successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. The results may also be relevant to the transport of other physiological fluids and industrial applications in which peristaltic pumping is used.

  19. Application of Dense Array Analysis to Strong Motion Data Recorded at The SMART-1 Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, C.

    2003-12-01

    This paper is part of a project to design an optimal strong motion dense array in New Zealand. The overall project looks at developing a dense network of strong motion seismometers in order to measure directly the rupture process of major seismogenic sources such as the Alpine Fault and strands of the Marlborough Fault System defining the South Island sector of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone. This work shows the application of dense array analysis to a set of seismic data recorded at the SMART-1 array in Taiwan (data kindly provided by the Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica Data Management Center for Strong Motion Seismology - Taiwan). The data have been processed and analysed applying modified MUSIC algorithm with higher computing capabilities giving higher resolution results. The SMART-1 array is an ideal dense array of 37 strong motion instruments set up in the following configuration: 3 concentric circles of radii 200m, 1 km and 2km, and one central station. The studied event called Event 5 was recorded on January 29th 1981 and had a magnitude 6. Event 5 is an ideal case study as its epicentral distance (about 30 km) is comparable to epicentral distances for expected events on the Alpine Fault or on the Hope Fault in New Zealand. Event 5 has been previously widely analysed using strong motion array studies and aftershocks studies but with disagreeing results; this new study hopes to bring new insights in the debate. Using simple fault and velocity models, this latest analysis of Event 5 has given the following rupture properties. It has confirmed one of the hypotheses that the fault ruptured from southeast to northwest. The higher resolution of the computation has improved the location of the hypocentre depth and the location of the propagating rupture front. This allowed resolving changes of velocities in the rupture process and locating asperities in the fault plane. Contrary to the previous array studies, the inferred size of the fault

  20. Results and applications of a space suit range-of-motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL

    1989-01-01

    The range of motion of space suits has traditionally been described using limited 2-D mapping of limb, torso, or arm movements performed in front of an orthogonal grid. A new technique for recovering extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit range-of-motion data during underwater testing was described in a paper presented by the author at the 1988 conference. The new technique uses digitized data which is automatically acquired from video images of the subject. Three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using 2-D computer graphics. Results of using this technique for the current shuttle EVA suit during underwater simulated weightlessness testing are discussed. Application of the data for use in animating anthropometric computer models is highlighted.

  1. Motion-Capture-Enabled Software for Gestural Control of 3D Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Luo, Victor; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Valderrama, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art systems use general-purpose input devices such as a keyboard, mouse, or joystick that map to tasks in unintuitive ways. This software enables a person to control intuitively the position, size, and orientation of synthetic objects in a 3D virtual environment. It makes possible the simultaneous control of the 3D position, scale, and orientation of 3D objects using natural gestures. Enabling the control of 3D objects using a commercial motion-capture system allows for natural mapping of the many degrees of freedom of the human body to the manipulation of the 3D objects. It reduces training time for this kind of task, and eliminates the need to create an expensive, special-purpose controller.

  2. Models of Postural Control: Shared Variance in Joint and COM Motions

    PubMed Central

    Kilby, Melissa C.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.; Newell, Karl M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated the organization of the postural control system in human upright stance. To this aim the shared variance between joint and 3D total body center of mass (COM) motions was analyzed using multivariate canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The CCA was performed as a function of established models of postural control that varied in their joint degrees of freedom (DOF), namely, an inverted pendulum ankle model (2DOF), ankle-hip model (4DOF), ankle-knee-hip model (5DOF), and ankle-knee-hip-neck model (7DOF). Healthy young adults performed various postural tasks (two-leg and one-leg quiet stances, voluntary AP and ML sway) on a foam and rigid surface of support. Based on CCA model selection procedures, the amount of shared variance between joint and 3D COM motions and the cross-loading patterns we provide direct evidence of the contribution of multi-DOF postural control mechanisms to human balance. The direct model fitting of CCA showed that incrementing the DOFs in the model through to 7DOF was associated with progressively enhanced shared variance with COM motion. In the 7DOF model, the first canonical function revealed more active involvement of all joints during more challenging one leg stances and dynamic posture tasks. Furthermore, the shared variance was enhanced during the dynamic posture conditions, consistent with a reduction of dimension. This set of outcomes shows directly the degeneracy of multivariate joint regulation in postural control that is influenced by stance and surface of support conditions. PMID:25973896

  3. Models of Postural Control: Shared Variance in Joint and COM Motions.

    PubMed

    Kilby, Melissa C; Molenaar, Peter C M; Newell, Karl M

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated the organization of the postural control system in human upright stance. To this aim the shared variance between joint and 3D total body center of mass (COM) motions was analyzed using multivariate canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The CCA was performed as a function of established models of postural control that varied in their joint degrees of freedom (DOF), namely, an inverted pendulum ankle model (2DOF), ankle-hip model (4DOF), ankle-knee-hip model (5DOF), and ankle-knee-hip-neck model (7DOF). Healthy young adults performed various postural tasks (two-leg and one-leg quiet stances, voluntary AP and ML sway) on a foam and rigid surface of support. Based on CCA model selection procedures, the amount of shared variance between joint and 3D COM motions and the cross-loading patterns we provide direct evidence of the contribution of multi-DOF postural control mechanisms to human balance. The direct model fitting of CCA showed that incrementing the DOFs in the model through to 7DOF was associated with progressively enhanced shared variance with COM motion. In the 7DOF model, the first canonical function revealed more active involvement of all joints during more challenging one leg stances and dynamic posture tasks. Furthermore, the shared variance was enhanced during the dynamic posture conditions, consistent with a reduction of dimension. This set of outcomes shows directly the degeneracy of multivariate joint regulation in postural control that is influenced by stance and surface of support conditions. PMID:25973896

  4. Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceravolo, Rosario; Pecorelli, Marica Leonarda; Zanotti Fragonara, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The seismic behaviour of many art objects and obelisks can be analysed in the context of the seismic response of rigid blocks. Starting from the pioneering works by Housner, a large number of analytical studies of the rigid block dynamics were proposed. In fact, despite its apparent simplicity, the motion of a rigid block involves a number of complex dynamic phenomena such as impacts, sliding, uplift and geometric nonlinearities. While most of the current strategies to avoid toppling consist in preventing rocking motion, in this paper a novel semi-active on-off control strategy for protecting monolithic art objects was investigated. The control procedure under study follows a feedback-feedforward scheme that is realised by switching the stiffness of the anchorages located at the two lower corner of the block between two values. Overturning spectra have been calculated in order to clarify the benefits of applying a semi-active control instead of a passive control strategy. In accordance with similar studies, the numerical investigation took into account the dynamic response of blocks with different slenderness and size subject to one-sine pulse excitation.

  5. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  6. Applications of AVHRR-Derived Ice Motions for the Arctic and Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, James; Emery, William

    1998-01-01

    Characterization and diagnosis of sea ice/atmosphere/ocean interactions require a synthesis of observations and modeling to identify the key mechanisms controlling the ice/climate system. In this project, we combined product generation, observational analyses, and modeling to define and interpret variability in ice motion in conjunction with thermodynamic factors such as surface temperature and albedo. The goals of this work were twofold: (1) to develop and test procedures to produce an integrated set of polar products from remotely-sensed and supporting data; and (2) to apply these data to understand processes at work in controlling sea ice distribution.

  7. Application of model based control to robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1988-01-01

    A robot that can duplicate humam motion capabilities in such activities as balancing, reaching, lifting, and moving has been built and tested. These capabilities are achieved through the use of real time Model-Based Control (MBC) techniques which have recently been demonstrated. MBC accounts for all manipulator inertial forces and provides stable manipulator motion control even at high speeds. To effectively demonstrate the unique capabilities of MBC, an experimental robotic manipulator was constructed, which stands upright, balancing on a two wheel base. The mathematical modeling of dynamics inherent in MBC permit the control system to perform functions that are impossible with conventional non-model based methods. These capabilities include: (1) Stable control at all speeds of operation; (2) Operations requiring dynamic stability such as balancing; (3) Detection and monitoring of applied forces without the use of load sensors; (4) Manipulator safing via detection of abnormal loads. The full potential of MBC has yet to be realized. The experiments performed for this research are only an indication of the potential applications. MBC has no inherent stability limitations and its range of applicability is limited only by the attainable sampling rate, modeling accuracy, and sensor resolution. Manipulators could be designed to operate at the highest speed mechanically attainable without being limited by control inadequacies. Manipulators capable of operating many times faster than current machines would certainly increase productivity for many tasks.

  8. Materials Control for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The distant future of mankind and the ultimate survivability of the human race, as it is known today, will depend on mans' ability to break earthly bonds and establish new territorial positions throughout the universe. Man must therefore be positioned to not only travel to, but also, to readily adapt to numerous and varying environments. For this mass migration across the galaxies nothing is as import to the human race as is NASA's future missions into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), to the moon, and/or Mars. These missions will form the building blocks to eternity for mankind. From these missions, NASA will develop the foundations for these building blocks based on sound engineering and scientific principles, both known and yet to be discovered. The integrity of the program will lead to development, tracking and control of the most basic elements of hardware production: That being development and control of applications of space flight materials. Choosing the right material for design purposes involves many considerations, such as governmental regulations associated with manufacturing operations, both safety of usage and of manufacturing, general material usage requirements, material longevity and performance requirements, material interfacing compatibility and material usage environments. Material performance is subject to environmental considerations in as much as a given material may perform exceptionally well at standard temperatures and pressures while performing poorly under non-standard conditions. These concerns may be found true for materials relative to the extreme temperatures and vacuum gradients of high altitude usage. The only way to assure that flight worthy materials are used in design is through testing. However, as with all testing, it requires both time on schedule and cost to the operation. One alternative to this high cost testing approach is to rely on a materials control system established by NASA. The NASA community relies on the MAPTIS materials

  9. Motion Control of Drives for Prosthetic Hand Using Continuous Myoelectric Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purushothaman, Geethanjali; Ray, Kalyan Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In this paper the authors present motion control of a prosthetic hand, through continuous myoelectric signal acquisition, classification and actuation of the prosthetic drive. A four channel continuous electromyogram (EMG) signal also known as myoelectric signals (MES) are acquired from the abled-body to classify the six unique movements of hand and wrist, viz, hand open (HO), hand close (HC), wrist flexion (WF), wrist extension (WE), ulnar deviation (UD) and radial deviation (RD). The classification technique involves in extracting the features/pattern through statistical time domain (TD) parameter/autoregressive coefficients (AR), which are reduced using principal component analysis (PCA). The reduced statistical TD features and or AR coefficients are used to classify the signal patterns through k nearest neighbour (kNN) as well as neural network (NN) classifier and the performance of the classifiers are compared. Performance comparison of the above two classifiers clearly shows that kNN classifier in identifying the hidden intended motion in the myoelectric signals is better than that of NN classifier. Once the classifier identifies the intended motion, the signal is amplified to actuate the three low power DC motor to perform the above mentioned movements.

  10. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  11. Applications of computer-graphics animation for motion-perception research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, D. R.; Kaiser, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using computer animated stimuli in studying motion perception are presented and discussed. Most current programs of motion perception research could not be pursued without the use of computer graphics animation. Computer generated displays afford latitudes of freedom and control that are almost impossible to attain through conventional methods. There are, however, limitations to this presentational medium. At present, computer generated displays present simplified approximations of the dynamics in natural events. Very little is known about how the differences between natural events and computer simulations influence perceptual processing. In practice, the differences are assumed to be irrelevant to the questions under study, and that findings with computer generated stimuli will generalize to natural events.

  12. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  13. Upper plate absolute motion and slab-anchor force control on back-arc deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, A.; Lallemand, S.

    2003-04-01

    In order to test how the combined effects of overriding plate motion and trench migration can account for the variability of back-arc tectonic regimes, their "normal to the trench" absolute motion components and the strain regime of all oceanic subduction zones were compiled. Strain regime was estimated following Jarrard (1986), in a semiquantitative way. The upper plate absolute motion (Vup) is calculated in the hotspot HS3-NUVEL1A (Gripp and Gordon, 2002) reference frame and trench migration (Vt) from Vup, corrected from deformation rate of back-arc region, mainly given by GPS data. As slabs tend to sink because of their age-related-mass-excess relative to the surrounding mantle, it is generally assumed that most of the trenches have a spontaneous seaward motion (trench rollback). Ages at trench have thus also been compiled ( from Muller et al, 1997) to test a possible control of trench migration with slab age. Our values underline a high control of strain regime by Vup, but inconsistencies still remain with this single parameter. To account for all the observed deformations, trench migration is needed. There are more or less as much subduction zones with seaward Vt as landward ones, and, for 90% of subduction zones, Vt never reach 50 mm/y in the two directions. The expected relation between trench migration and slab age is far to be verified: landward trench migrations exist in many subduction zones, and, among them, many have old slabs. Several examples indicate that the slab tend to follow the trench migration and, so, to move transversely in the surrounding mantle. As a consequence, Vt is close to the "normal to the trench" slab migration and gives informations about the slab anchor force : slabs are not perfectly anchored but their possible motions appear to be limited. This 50 mm/y limitation of slab migration may provide new constraints on the poorly known slab-anchor force. No evidence of age related trench rollback have beeen found. It does not

  14. Design and Control of a Ship Motion Simulation Platform from an Energy Efficiency Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J; Lloyd, Peter D; Rowe, John C; Pin, Francois G

    2009-01-01

    Most hydraulic servo systems are designed with little consideration for energy efficiency. Pumps are selected based upon required peak power demands, valves are chosen primarily for their rated flow, actuators for the maximum force. However, the design of a hydraulic servo system has great potential in terms of energy efficiency that has, for the most part, been ignored. This paper describes the design and control of a large-scale ship motion simulation platform that was designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Office of Naval Research. The primary reasons to incorporate energy-efficiency features into the design are cost and size reduction. A preliminary survey of proposed designs based on traditional motion simulation platform configurations (Stuart Platforms) required hydraulic power supplies approaching 1.22 MW. This manuscript describes the combined design and control effort that led to a system with the same performance requirements, however requiring a primary power supply that was less than 112 kW. The objective of this paper is to illustrate alternative design and control approaches that can significantly reduce the power requirements of hydraulic systems and improve the overall energy-efficiency of large-scale hydraulically actuated systems.

  15. Efficiency improvement of a new vertical axis wind turbine by individual active control of blade motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Seong; Min, Seung Yong; Jeong, In Oh; Lee, Yun Han; Kim, Seung Jo

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a research for the performance improvement of the straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine is described. To improve the performance of the power generation system, which consists of several blades rotating about axis in parallel direction, the cycloidal blade system and the individual active blade control system are adopted, respectively. Both methods are variable pitch system. For cycloidal wind turbine, aerodynamic analysis is carried out by changing pitch angle and phase angle based on the cycloidal motion according to the change of wind speed and wind direction, and control mechanism using the cycloidal blade system is realized for 1kw class wind turbine. By this method, electrical power is generated about 30% higher than wind turbine using fixed pitch angle method. And for more efficient wind turbine, individual pitch angle control of each blade is studied. By maximizing the tangential force in each rotating blade at the specific rotating position, optimal pitch angle variation is obtained. And several airfoil shapes of NACA 4-digit and NACA 6-series are studied. Aerodynamic analysis shows performance improvement of 60%. To realize this motion, sensing and actuating system is designed.

  16. Real-time feedback control for high-intensity focused ultrasound system using localized motion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Azuma, Takashi; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is one of the noninvasive treatment for tumors. Visualizing the treated area inside the human body is necessary to control the HIFU exposure. Localized motion imaging (LMI) using ultrasound to induce and detect tissue deformation is one technique to detect a change in tissue stiffness caused by thermal coagulation. In experiments with porcine liver, LMI has shown to detect deformation with less than 20% accuracy. We have developed a prototype feedback control system using real-time LMI. In this system, coagulation size was measured every 1 s and controlled to correspond to a targeted size. The typical size error was reduced to 14% from 35%. LMI displacements in normal and coagulated tissues were sufficiently different to discriminate between coagulated areas and noncoagulated ones after HIFU sonication and to visualize treated areas after HIFU treatment.

  17. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  18. Principles and applications of quantum control engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gough, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This is a brief survey of quantum feedback control and specifically follows on from the two-day conference Principles and applications of quantum control engineering, which took place in the Kavli Royal Society International Centre at Chicheley Hall, on 12–13 December 2011. This was the eighth in a series of principles and applications of control to quantum systems workshops. PMID:23091206

  19. A new DPIV proceeding algorithm and its application in particle motion study in a rotary drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhixiao; Chi, Yong; Li, Shuiqing; Shen, Xiaojiang; Cen, Kefa

    2002-05-01

    A new digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) proceeding method, namely, consecutive motion vector estimation algorithm, which fully employs the global information of sequential gray images and the physics property of flow field to get the precise velocity vector at each pixel, is proposed. Therefore it enlarges the application range of DPIV, especially for high-speed flow, large velocity gradient flow and rotational flow. The new method is applied to study the particle motion qualitatively in a partially filled rotary drum in this work. The results indicate that the newly developed algorithm describes the real flow field of granular motion in the transverse plane of rotary drum more accurately than the conventional cross-correlation method, which is adopted here as the comparative one. It can be concluded from DPIV analysis that the burden bed in rotary drum consists of two distinct regions, the active layer and the plug flow region. Moreover, the boundary of these two regions is an arc and the rotational speed plays an important role in the particles flow field.

  20. Leap Motion Gesture Control With Carestream Software in the Operating Room to Control Imaging: Installation Guide and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Pauchot, Julien; Di Tommaso, Laetitia; Lounis, Ahmed; Benassarou, Mourad; Mathieu, Pierre; Bernot, Dominique; Aubry, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, routine cross-sectional imaging viewing during a surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). Such contact risks exposure to aseptic conditions and causes loss of time. Devices such as the recently introduced Leap Motion (Leap Motion Society, San Francisco, CA), which enables interaction with the computer without any physical contact, are of wide interest in the field of surgery, but configuration and ergonomics are key challenges for the practitioner, imaging software, and surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of Leap Motion on a PC for optimized use with Carestream Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc, Rochester, NY) using a plug-in (to download at https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_F4eBeBQc3yNENvTXlnY09qS00&authuser=0) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk). Videos of surgical procedure and discussion about innovative gesture control technology and its various configurations are provided in this article. PMID:26002115

  1. In vivo quantification of motion in liver parenchyma and its application in shistosomiasis tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Ahmed M.; Hashem, Ahmed M.; Youssef, Abou-Bakr M.; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed F.

    1995-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major problem in Egypt, despite an active control program it is estimated to exist in about 1/3 of the population. Deposition of less functioning fibrous tissues in the liver is the major contributory factor to the hepatic pathology. Fibrous tissues consist of a complex array of connective matrix material and a variety of collagen isotopes. As a result of an increased stromal density (collagen content), the parenchyma became more ectogenic and less elastic (hard). In this study we investigated the effect of cardiac mechanical impulses from the heart and aorta on the kinetics of the liver parenchyma. Under conditions of controlled patient movements and suspended respiration, a 30 frame per second of 588 X 512 ultrasound images (cineloop, 32 pels per cm) are captured from an aTL ultrasound machine then digitized. The image acquisition is triggered by the R wave of the ECG of the patient. The motion that has a forced oscillation form in the liver parenchyma is quantified by tracking of small box (20 - 30 pels) in 16 directions for all the successive 30 frames. The tracking was done using block matching techniques (the max correlation between boxes in time, frequency domains, and the minimum SAD (sum absolute difference) between boxes). The motion is quantified for many regions at different positions within the liver parenchyma for 80 cases of variable degrees of schisto., cirrhotic livers, and for normal livers. The velocity of the tissue is calculated from the displacement (quantified motion), time between frames, and the scan time for the ultrasound scanner. We found that the motion in liver parenchyma is small in the order of very few millimeters, and the attenuation of the mechanical wave for one ECG cycle is higher in the schisto. and cirrhotic livers than in the normal ones. Finally quantification of motion in liver parenchyma due to cardiac impulses under controlled limb movement and respiration may be of value in the characterization of

  2. Artificial cilia as autonomous nanoactuators: Design of a gradient self-oscillating polymer brush with controlled unidirectional motion.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tsukuru; Akimoto, Aya Mizutani; Nagase, Kenichi; Okano, Teruo; Yoshida, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    A gradient self-oscillating polymer brush surface with ordered, autonomous, and unidirectional ciliary motion has been designed. The self-oscillating polymer is a random copolymer composed of N-isopropylacrylamide and ruthenium tris(2,2'-bipyridine) [Ru(bpy)3], which acts as a catalyst for an oscillating chemical reaction, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. The target polymer brush surface was designed to have a thickness gradient by using sacrificial-anode atom transfer radical polymerization. The gradient structure of the polymer brush was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. These analyses revealed that the thickness of the polymer brush was in the range of several tens of nanometers, and the amount of Ru(bpy)3 increased as the thickness increased. The gradient polymer brush induced a unidirectional propagation of the chemical wave from the region with small Ru(bpy)3 amounts to the region with large Ru(bpy)3 amounts. This spatiotemporal control of the ciliary motion would be useful in potential applications to functional surface such as autonomous mass transport systems. PMID:27602405

  3. Artificial cilia as autonomous nanoactuators: Design of a gradient self-oscillating polymer brush with controlled unidirectional motion

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tsukuru; Akimoto, Aya Mizutani; Nagase, Kenichi; Okano, Teruo; Yoshida, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    A gradient self-oscillating polymer brush surface with ordered, autonomous, and unidirectional ciliary motion has been designed. The self-oscillating polymer is a random copolymer composed of N-isopropylacrylamide and ruthenium tris(2,2′-bipyridine) [Ru(bpy)3], which acts as a catalyst for an oscillating chemical reaction, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. The target polymer brush surface was designed to have a thickness gradient by using sacrificial-anode atom transfer radical polymerization. The gradient structure of the polymer brush was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. These analyses revealed that the thickness of the polymer brush was in the range of several tens of nanometers, and the amount of Ru(bpy)3 increased as the thickness increased. The gradient polymer brush induced a unidirectional propagation of the chemical wave from the region with small Ru(bpy)3 amounts to the region with large Ru(bpy)3 amounts. This spatiotemporal control of the ciliary motion would be useful in potential applications to functional surface such as autonomous mass transport systems. PMID:27602405

  4. Preparation of surface coatings on a conductive substrate by controlled motion of graphene nanoflakes in a liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. F.; Qin, R. S.

    2015-02-01

    Controlled motion of graphene and graphene oxide nanoflakes in a thin liquid film on metal surfaces was studied to unravel the significant variations of the electric field effects on the nanoparticles. It was found that graphene oxide flakes were negatively charged and migrated toward anode while the electrically neutral graphene flakes moved toward cathode. Therefore, thin layers of graphene as a protective coating were produced to inhibit corrosion of underlying metals and reduce friction and wear-related mechanical failures in moving mechanical systems. The method does not require an insulated substrate to confine the high electric field to the fluidic layer. The motion of the nano-particles under pulsed electric current was very efficient. The observed effects were interpreted in a possible mechanism associated to the effect of electric field on the mobility of different particles in different conductive media. This significant phenomenon, combined with unique properties of graphene and graphene oxides, represents an exciting platform for enabling diverse applications on the preparation of protective coatings on an arbitrary conductive substrate over large areas.

  5. Optimization of inertial sensor-based motion capturing for magnetically distorted field applications.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, Christoph; Ellegast, Rolf P; Hermanns, Ingo; Kraus, Thomas; Ochsmann, Elke; Larue, Christian; Plamondon, André

    2014-12-01

    Inertial measurement units (IMU) are gaining increasing importance for human motion tracking in a large variety of applications. IMUs consist of gyroscopes, accelerometers, and magnetometers which provide angular rate, acceleration, and magnetic field information, respectively. In scenarios with a permanently distorted magnetic field, orientation estimation algorithms revert to using only angular rate and acceleration information. The result is an increasing drift error of the heading information. This article describes a method to compensate the orientation drift of IMUs using angular rate and acceleration readings in a quaternion-based algorithm. Zero points (ZP) were introduced, which provide additional heading and gyroscope bias information and were combined with bidirectional orientation computation. The necessary frequency of ZPs to achieve an acceptable error level is derived in this article. In a laboratory environment the method and the effect of varying interval length between ZPs was evaluated. Eight subjects were equipped with seven IMUs at trunk, head and upper extremities. They performed a predefined course of box handling for 40 min at different motion speeds and ranges of motion. The orientation estimation was compared to an optical motion tracking system. The resulting mean root mean squared error (RMSE) of all measurements ranged from 1.7 deg to 7.6 deg (roll and pitch) and from 3.5 deg to 15.0 deg (heading) depending on the measured segment, at a mean interval-length of 1.1 min between two ZPs without magnetometer usage. The 95% limits of agreement (LOA) ranged in best case from -2.9 deg to 3.6 deg at the hip roll angle and in worst case from -19.3 deg to 18.9 deg at the forearm heading angle. This study demonstrates that combining ZPs and bidirectional computation can reduce orientation error of IMUs in environments with magnetic field distortion. PMID:25321344

  6. Controlling Molecular Motion, Assembly and Coupling as a Step towards Molecular Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Colin James

    changes in the supramolecular self-assembly of thioethers. Chapter 9 details how the ordering and length of surface-bound hydrogen-bonded chains of methanol are dictated by the underlying surface and examines an unreported chiral meta-stable methanol hexamer. Single-molecule measurements can answer many of the current questions in the field of molecular machines and lead to control of molecular motion. Development of mechanisms to direct molecular motion and to couple this motion to external systems is crucial for the rational design of new molecular machinery with functionalities such as mass transport, propulsion, separations, sensing, signaling and chemical reactions.

  7. Motion and Form Coherence Detection in Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Relationship to Motor Control and 2:4 Digit Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Elizabeth; White, Sarah; Campbell, Ruth; Swettenham, John; Hansen, Peter; Ramus, Franck

    2006-01-01

    Children with autistic spectrum disorder and controls performed tasks of coherent motion and form detection, and motor control. Additionally, the ratio of the 2nd and 4th digits of these children, which is thought to be an indicator of foetal testosterone, was measured. Children in the experimental group were impaired at tasks of motor control,…

  8. Organ motion due to respiration: the state of the art and applications in interventional radiology and radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Mulcahy, Maureen; Piyasena, Rohan; Zhou, Tong; Dieterich, Sonja; Xu, Sheng; Banovac, Filip; Wong, Kenneth H.

    2005-04-01

    Tracking organ motion due to respiration is important for precision treatments in interventional radiology and radiation oncology, among other areas. In interventional radiology, the ability to track and compensate for organ motion could lead to more precise biopsies for applications such as lung cancer screening. In radiation oncology, image-guided treatment of tumors is becoming technically possible, and the management of organ motion then becomes a major issue. This paper will review the state-of-the-art in respiratory motion and present two related clinical applications. Respiratory motion is an important topic for future work in image-guided surgery and medical robotics. Issues include how organs move due to respiration, how much they move, how the motion can be compensated for, and what clinical applications can benefit from respiratory motion compensation. Technology that can be applied for this purpose is now becoming available, and as that technology evolves, the subject will become an increasingly interesting and clinically valuable topic of research.

  9. Manual control of yaw motion with combined visual and vestibular cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, G. L.; Young, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are made of manual control performance in the closed-loop task of nulling perceived self-rotation velocity about an earth-vertical axis. Self-velocity estimation was modelled as a function of the simultaneous presentation of vestibular and peripheral visual field motion cues. Based on measured low-frequency operator behavior in three visual field environments, a parallel channel linear model is proposed which has separate visual and vestibular pathways summing in a complementary manner. A correction to the frequency responses is provided by a separate measurement of manual control performance in an analogous visual pursuit nulling task. The resulting dual-input describing function for motion perception dependence on combined cue presentation supports the complementary model, in which vestibular cues dominate sensation at frequencies above 0.05 Hz. The describing function model is extended by the proposal of a non-linear cue conflict model, in which cue weighting depends on the level of agreement between visual and vestibular cues.

  10. ADAPTIVE CONTROL OF CENTER OF MASS (GLOBAL) MOTION AND ITS JOINT (LOCAL) ORIGIN IN GAIT

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Pai, Yi-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic gait stability can be quantified by the relationship of the motion state (i.e. the position and velocity) between the body center of mass (COM) and its base of support (BOS). Humans learn how to adaptively control stability by regulating the absolute COM motion state (i.e., its position and velocity) or by controlling the BOS (through stepping) in a predictable manner, or by doing both simultaneously following an external perturbation that disrupts their regular relationship. Post repeated-slip perturbation training, for instance, older adults learned to forward shift their COM position while walking with a reduced step length, hence reduced their likelihood of falls. How and to what extent each individual joint influences such adaptive alterations is mostly unknown. A three-dimensional individualized human kinematic model was established. Based on the human model, sensitivity analysis was used to systematically quantify the influence of each lower limb joint on the COM position relative to the BOS and the step length during gait. It was found that the leading foot had the greatest effect on regulating the COM position relative to the BOS; and both hips bear the most influence on the step length. These findings could guide cost-effective but efficient fall-reduction training paradigm among older population. PMID:24998991

  11. The Motion Control System For The Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Howard K.

    1983-12-01

    LODTM, built by LLNL for DOD, is a precision vertical lathe used to diamond turn large optical parts (to 64" diameter) to 1 μinch rms figure error. The LODTM motion controls require precision sensors, precision servos, and a wideband (330 Hz) real time computer. Position is sensed to 1/40 μinch resolution by laser interferometers and differential capacitance gauges. Precision servos operating at 1/10 μinch resolution and at low velocities with zero backlash are required. A unique Fast Tool Servo (FTS), located close to the diamond tool, adjusts the final tool position. The LODTM controls coordinate the X, Z, and FTS servos to cause the tool to move on a specified contour and at a specified feedrate in the X-Z plane. The part floppy diskette commands this motion with a linear CNC and real time (32-bit) computer. During each 1.5 ms sample time, the computer must DMA 14 sensor readings into memory, calculate the X and Z Tool Coordinates, calculate the FTS input, output the following errors, output the FTS input, store "flight recorder" information, and check for anomalies.

  12. Motion control system for the Large Optic Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM)

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, H.K.

    1983-01-01

    LODTM, built by LLNL for DOD, is a precision vertical lathe used to diamond turn large optical parts (to 64'' diameter) to 1 ..mu..inch rms figure error. The LODTM motion controls require precision sensors, precision servos, and a wideband (330 Hz) real time computer. Position is sensed to 1/40 ..mu..inch resolution by laser interferometers and differential capacitance gauges. Presision servos operating at 1/10 ..mu..inch resolution and at low velocities with zero backlash are required. A unique Fast Tool Servo (FTS), located close to the diamond tool, adjusts the final tool position. The LODTM controls coordinate the X, Z and FTS servos to cause the tool to move on a specified contour and at a specified feedrate in the X-Z plane. The part floppy diskette commands this motion with a linear CNC and real time (32-bit) computer. During each 1.5 ms sample time, the computer must DMA 14 sensor readings into memory, calculate the X and Z Tool Coordinates, calculate the FTS input, output the following errors, output the FTS input, store ''flight recorder'' information, and check for anomalies.

  13. Motion control system for the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM)

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, H.K.

    1981-07-08

    LODTM, built by LLNL for DOD, is a precision vertical lathe used to diamond turn large optical parts (to 64'' diameter) to 1 ..mu.. inch tolerance. The LODTM motion controls require precision sensors, precision servos, and a wideband (100 Hz) real time computer. Position is sensed to 1/40 ..mu.. inch resolution by laser interferometers and differential capacitance gauges. Precision servos operating at 1/10 ..mu.. inch resolution and at low velocities with zero backlash are required. A unique fast tool servo (FTS), located close to the diamond tool, adjusts the final tool position. The LODTM controls coordinate the X, Z, and FTS servos to cause the tool to move on a specified contour and at a specified feedrate in the X-Z plane. The part tape commands this motion with a linear CNC and real time (32-bit) computer. During each 1 ms sample time, the computer must DMA 13 sensor readings into memory, calculate the X and Z Tool Coordinates, calculate the FTS input, output the following errors, output the FTS input, and check for anomalies.

  14. Research on the modeling of the missile's disturbance motion and the initial control point optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhu, Dalin; Tang, Shengjing

    2012-11-01

    The initial trajectory design of the missile is an important part of the overall design, but often a tedious calculation and analysis process due to the large dimension nonlinear differential equations and the traditional statistical analysis methods. To improve the traditional design methods, a robust optimization concept and method are introduced in this paper to deal with the determination of the initial control point. First, the Gaussian Radial Basis Network is adopted to establish the approximate model of the missile's disturbance motion based on the disturbance motion and disturbance factors analysis. Then, a direct analytical relationship between the disturbance input and statistical results is deduced on the basis of Gaussian Radial Basis Network model. Subsequently, a robust optimization model is established aiming at the initial control point design problem and the niche Pareto genetic algorithm for multi-objective optimization is adopted to solve this optimization model. An integral design example is give at last and the simulation results have verified the validity of this method.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V.; Sykes, Jenna; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony; Dawson, Laura A.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ≤5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ≤5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ≤10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ≥60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  16. Space Weather Influence on Relative Motion Control using the Touchless Electrostatic Tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Erik A.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-07-01

    With recent interest in the use of electrostatic forces for contactless tugging and attitude control of noncooperative objects for orbital servicing and active debris mitigation, the need for a method of remote charge control arises. In this paper, the use of a directed electron beam for remote charge control is considered in conjunction with the relative motion control. A tug vehicle emits an electron beam onto a deputy object, charging it negatively. At the same time, the tug is charged positively due to beam emission, resulting in an attractive electrostatic force. The relative position feedback control between the tug and the passive debris object is studied subject to the charging being created through an electron beam. Employing the nominal variations of the GEO space weather conditions across longitude slots, two electrostatic tugging strategies are considered. First, the electron beam current is adjusted throughout the orbit in order to maximize this resulting electrostatic force. This open-loop control strategy compensates for changes in the nominally expected local space weather environment in the GEO region to adjust for fluctuations in the local plasma return currents. Second, the performance impact of using a fixed electron beam current on the electrostatic tractor is studied if the same natural space weather variations are assumed. The fixed electron beam current shows a minor performance penalty (<5 %) while providing a much simpler implementation that does not require any knowledge of local space weather conditions.

  17. Space Weather Influence on Relative Motion Control using the Touchless Electrostatic Tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Erik A.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-09-01

    With recent interest in the use of electrostatic forces for contactless tugging and attitude control of noncooperative objects for orbital servicing and active debris mitigation, the need for a method of remote charge control arises. In this paper, the use of a directed electron beam for remote charge control is considered in conjunction with the relative motion control. A tug vehicle emits an electron beam onto a deputy object, charging it negatively. At the same time, the tug is charged positively due to beam emission, resulting in an attractive electrostatic force. The relative position feedback control between the tug and the passive debris object is studied subject to the charging being created through an electron beam. Employing the nominal variations of the GEO space weather conditions across longitude slots, two electrostatic tugging strategies are considered. First, the electron beam current is adjusted throughout the orbit in order to maximize this resulting electrostatic force. This open-loop control strategy compensates for changes in the nominally expected local space weather environment in the GEO region to adjust for fluctuations in the local plasma return currents. Second, the performance impact of using a fixed electron beam current on the electrostatic tractor is studied if the same natural space weather variations are assumed. The fixed electron beam current shows a minor performance penalty (<5 %) while providing a much simpler implementation that does not require any knowledge of local space weather conditions.

  18. Emulating a robotic manipulator arm with an hybrid motion-control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-González, G.; León-Galicia, A.; Noriega-Hernández, M.; Salazar-Hueta, A.

    2015-01-01

    A motion control system with four and 1/2 degrees of freedom, designed to move small objects within a 0.25 m3 space, parallel to a horizontal table, with high speed and performance similar to a robotic manipulator arm was built. The machine employs several actuators and control devices. Its main characteristic is to incorporate a servomotor, steeper motors, electromechanical and fluid power actuators and diverse control resources. A group of actuators arranged on a spherical coordinates system is attached to the servomotor platform. A linear pneumatic actuator with an angular grip provides the radial extension and load clamping capacity. Seven inductive proximity sensors and one encoder provide feedback, for operating the actuators under closed loop conditions. Communication between the sensors and control devices is organized by a PLC. A touch screen allows governing the system remotely, easily and interactively, without knowing the specific programming language of each control component. The graphic environment on the touch screen guides the user to design and store control programs, establishing coordinated automatic routines for moving objects in space, simulation and implementation of industrial positioning or machining processes.

  19. Active Flow Control of the Near Wake of an Axisymmetric Body in Prescribed Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Controlled interactions between fluidic actuators and the cross flow over the aft end of a wire-mounted axisymmetric moving wind tunnel bluff body model are exploited for modification of its near wake and thereby its global unsteady aerodynamic loads. The model is supported by eight servo-controlled wires, each including a miniature inline force transducer for measurements of the time-resolved tension. The body moves along a prescribed trajectory controllable in six degrees of freedom using closed loop feedback from an external camera system. Actuation is effected by an integrated azimuthally-segmented array of four aft-facing synthetic jet modules around the perimeter of the tail end. In the present investigations, the aerodynamic loads are controlled during time-periodic axial and rotational motions with varying reduced frequencies of up to 0.259. It is shown that this flow control approach modifies the near wake and induces aerodynamic loads that are comparable to the baseline model dynamic loads. Control of the model's unsteady aerodynamic characteristics may be adopted for in flight stabilization.

  20. Translating electromagnetic torque into controlled motion for use in medical implants.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Daniel; Meng, Teresa; Poon, Ada

    2010-01-01

    A new propulsion method for sub-millimeter implants is presented that achieves high power to thrust conversion efficiency with a simple implementation. Previous research has shown that electromagnetic forces are a promising micro-scale propulsion mechanism; however the actual implementation is challenging due to the inherent symmetry of these forces. The presented technique translates torque into controlled motion via asymmetries in resistance forces, such as fluid drag. For a 1-mm sized object using this technique, the initial analysis predicts that speeds of 1 cm/sec can be achieved with approximately 100 µW of power, which is about 10 times more efficient than existing methods. In addition to better performance, this method is easily controllable and has favorable scalability. PMID:21096711

  1. Application of universal kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion: Statistical significance of results

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.R.; Roberts, K.P.

    1989-02-01

    Universal kriging is compared with ordinary kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Ordinary kriging is based on a stationary random function model; universal kriging is based on a nonstationary random function model representing first-order drift. Accuracy of universal kriging is compared with that for ordinary kriging; cross-validation is used as the basis for comparison. Hypothesis testing on these results shows that accuracy obtained using universal kriging is not significantly different from accuracy obtained using ordinary kriging. Test based on normal distribution assumptions are applied to errors measured in the cross-validation procedure; t and F tests reveal no evidence to suggest universal and ordinary kriging are different for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Nonparametric hypothesis tests applied to these errors and jackknife statistics yield the same conclusion: universal and ordinary kriging are not significantly different for this application as determined by a cross-validation procedure. These results are based on application to four independent data sets (four different seismic events).

  2. Applications of robust control theory - Educational implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorato, P.; Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is made of applications of robust control theory to problems of flight control, control of flexible space structures, and engine control which have appeared in recent conferences and journals. An analysis is made of which theoretical techniques are most commonly used and what implications this has for graduate and undergraduate education in aerospace engineering.

  3. Application of a spring-dashpot system to clinical lung tumor motion data

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerley, E. J.; Wilson, P. L.; Cavan, A. E.; Berbeco, R. I.; Meyer, J.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The treatment efficacy of radiation therapy for lung tumors can be increased by compensating for breath-induced tumor motion. In this study, we quantitatively examine a mathematical model of pseudomechanical linkages between an external surrogate signal and lung tumor motion. Methods: A spring-dashpot system based on the Voigt model was developed to model the correlation between abdominal respiratory motion and tumor motion during lung radiotherapy. The model was applied to clinical data obtained from 52 treatments ('beams') from 10 patients, treated on the Mitsubishi Real-Time Radiation Therapy system, Sapporo, Japan. In Stage 1, model parameters were optimized for individual patients and beams to determine reference values and to investigate how well the model can describe the data. In Stage 2, for each patient the optimal parameters determined for a single beam were applied to data from other beams to investigate whether a beam-specific set of model parameters is sufficient to model tumor motion over a course of treatment. Results: In Stage 1, the baseline root mean square (RMS) residual error for all individually optimized beam data was 0.90 {+-} 0.40 mm (mean {+-} 1 standard deviation). In Stage 2, patient-specific model parameters based on a single beam were found to model the tumor position closely, even for irregular beam data, with a mean increase with respect to Stage 1 values in RMS error of 0.37 mm. On average, the obtained model output for the tumor position was 95% of the time within an absolute bound of 2.0 and 2.6 mm in Stages 1 and 2, respectively. The model was capable of dealing with baseline, amplitude and frequency variations of the input data, as well as phase shifts between the input abdominal and output tumor signals. Conclusions: These results indicate that it may be feasible to collect patient-specific model parameters during or prior to the first treatment, and then retain these for the rest of the treatment period. The model has

  4. Controlled Release Applications of Organometals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, John S.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews two classes of controlled release organometals: (1) distributional, to distribute bioactive materials to control a certain target organism; and (2) protective, to protect surface or interior of some structure from attach by organisms. Specific examples are given including a discussion of controlled release for schistosomiasis. (SK)

  5. Applications of fuzzy logic to control and decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Jani, Yashvant

    1991-01-01

    Long range space missions will require high operational efficiency as well as autonomy to enhance the effectivity of performance. Fuzzy logic technology has been shown to be powerful and robust in interpreting imprecise measurements and generating appropriate control decisions for many space operations. Several applications are underway, studying the fuzzy logic approach to solving control and decision making problems. Fuzzy logic algorithms for relative motion and attitude control have been developed and demonstrated for proximity operations. Based on this experience, motion control algorithms that include obstacle avoidance were developed for a Mars Rover prototype for maneuvering during the sample collection process. A concept of an intelligent sensor system that can identify objects and track them continuously and learn from its environment is under development to support traffic management and proximity operations around the Space Station Freedom. For safe and reliable operation of Lunar/Mars based crew quarters, high speed controllers with ability to combine imprecise measurements from several sensors is required. A fuzzy logic approach that uses high speed fuzzy hardware chips is being studied.

  6. A Study of Longitudinal Control Problems at Low and Negative Damping and Stability with Emphasis on Effects of Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoff, Melvin; McFadden, Norman M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    As part of a general investigation to determine the effects of simulator motions on pilot opinion and task performance over a wide range of vehicle longitudinal dynamics, a cooperative NASA-AMAL program was conducted on the centrifuge at Johnsville, Pennsylvania. The test parameters and measurements for this program duplicated those of earlier studies made at Ames Research Center with a variable-stability airplane and with a pitch-roll chair flight simulator. Particular emphasis was placed on the minimum basic damping and stability the pilots would accept and on the minimum dynamics they considered controllable in the event of stability-augmentation system failure. Results of the centrifuge-simulator program indicated that small positive damping was required by the pilots over most of the frequency range covered for configurations rated acceptable for emergency conditions only (e.g., failure of a pitch damper). It was shown that the pilot's tolerance for unstable dynamics was dependent primarily on the value of damping. For configurations rated acceptable for emergency operation only, the allowable instability and damping corresponded to a divergence time to double amplitude of about 1 second. Comparisons were made of centrifuge, pitch-chair and fixed-cockpit simulator tests with flight tests. Pilot ratings indicated that the effects of incomplete or spurious motion cues provided by these three modes of simulation were important only for high-frequency, lightly damped dynamics or unstable, moderately damped dynamics. The pitch- chair simulation, which provided accurate angular-acceleration cues to the pilot, compared most favorably with flight. For the centrifuge simulation, which furnished accurate normal accelerations but spurious pitching and longitudinal accelerations, there was a deterioration of pilots' opinion relative to flight results. Results of simulator studies with an analog pilot replacing the human pilot illustrated the adaptive capability of human

  7. Dynamic recurrent neural networks for stable adaptive control of wing rock motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Steven Boon-Lam

    Wing rock is a self-sustaining limit cycle oscillation (LCO) which occurs as the result of nonlinear coupling between the dynamic response of the aircraft and the unsteady aerodynamic forces. In this thesis, dynamic recurrent RBF (Radial Basis Function) network control methodology is proposed to control the wing rock motion. The concept based on the properties of the Presiach hysteresis model is used in the design of dynamic neural networks. The structure and memory mechanism in the Preisach model is analogous to the parallel connectivity and memory formation in the RBF neural networks. The proposed dynamic recurrent neural network has a feature for adding or pruning the neurons in the hidden layer according to the growth criteria based on the properties of ensemble average memory formation of the Preisach model. The recurrent feature of the RBF network deals with the dynamic nonlinearities and endowed temporal memories of the hysteresis model. The control of wing rock is a tracking problem, the trajectory starts from non-zero initial conditions and it tends to zero as time goes to infinity. In the proposed neural control structure, the recurrent dynamic RBF network performs identification process in order to approximate the unknown non-linearities of the physical system based on the input-output data obtained from the wing rock phenomenon. The design of the RBF networks together with the network controllers are carried out in discrete time domain. The recurrent RBF networks employ two separate adaptation schemes where the RBF's centre and width are adjusted by the Extended Kalman Filter in order to give a minimum networks size, while the outer networks layer weights are updated using the algorithm derived from Lyapunov stability analysis for the stable closed loop control. The issue of the robustness of the recurrent RBF networks is also addressed. The effectiveness of the proposed dynamic recurrent neural control methodology is demonstrated through simulations to

  8. Applications of intelligent telerobotic control

    SciTech Connect

    Herget, C.J.; Grasz, E.L.; Merrill, R.D.

    1991-10-01

    The telerobotics laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a facility for developing and testing new concepts in robotics controls. Research and development is being conducted in computer vision; adaptive control; software architectures for real-time, intelligent control; artificial neural networks; fuzzy logic controllers; telepresence; and path planning and collision avoidance. The equipment in the telerobotics laboratory includes a six degree of freedom articulating robot arm with controller, gripper, and force and torque sensor; a 3D CAD workstation with software to model the work cell environment and simulate the robot dynamics; a six degree of freedom forceball for operator input to the telerobotics controller and the robot simulation; and a computer with a real-time operating system. Soon to be added are a 3D viewing system and a force reflecting hand controller. This paper describes one of the research and development efforts currently in progress on this program. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Altered sensory-motor control of the head as an etiological factor in space-motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical unloading during head movements in weightlessness may be an etiological factor in space-motion sickness. We simulated altered head loading on Earth without affecting vestibular stimulation by having subjects wear a weighted helmet. Eight subjects were exposed to constant velocity rotation about a vertical axis with direction reversals every 60 sec. for eight reversals with the head loaded and eight with the head unloaded. The severity of motion sickness elicited was significantly higher when the head was loaded. This suggests that altered sensory-motor control of the head is also an etiological factor in space-motion sickness.

  10. Intelligent complementary sliding-mode control for LUSMS-based X-Y-theta motion control stage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Chen, Syuan-Yi; Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Liu, Yen-Hung

    2010-07-01

    An intelligent complementary sliding-mode control (ICSMC) system using a recurrent wavelet-based Elman neural network (RWENN) estimator is proposed in this study to control the mover position of a linear ultrasonic motors (LUSMs)-based X-Y-theta motion control stage for the tracking of various contours. By the addition of a complementary generalized error transformation, the complementary sliding-mode control (CSMC) can efficiently reduce the guaranteed ultimate bound of the tracking error by half compared with the slidingmode control (SMC) while using the saturation function. To estimate a lumped uncertainty on-line and replace the hitting control of the CSMC directly, the RWENN estimator is adopted in the proposed ICSMC system. In the RWENN, each hidden neuron employs a different wavelet function as an activation function to improve both the convergent precision and the convergent time compared with the conventional Elman neural network (ENN). The estimation laws of the RWENN are derived using the Lyapunov stability theorem to train the network parameters on-line. A robust compensator is also proposed to confront the uncertainties including approximation error, optimal parameter vectors, and higher-order terms in Taylor series. Finally, some experimental results of various contours tracking show that the tracking performance of the ICSMC system is significantly improved compared with the SMC and CSMC systems. PMID:20639156

  11. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Active Control Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for active control design and analysis applications. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this report is the development of the equations of motion from first principles by using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated by making use of parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. Comparisons between experimental and analytical data obtained from the numerical model show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to aid in the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  12. Application of data assimilation methods for analysis and integration of observed and modeled Arctic Sea ice motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Walter Neil

    This thesis demonstrates the applicability of data assimilation methods to improve observed and modeled ice motion fields and to demonstrate the effects of assimilated motion on Arctic processes important to the global climate and of practical concern to human activities. Ice motions derived from 85 GHz and 37 GHz SSM/I imagery and estimated from two-dimensional dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice models are compared to buoy observations. Mean error, error standard deviation, and correlation with buoys are computed for the model domain. SSM/I motions generally have a lower bias, but higher error standard deviations and lower correlation with buoys than model motions. There are notable variations in the statistics depending on the region of the Arctic, season, and ice characteristics. Assimilation methods are investigated and blending and optimal interpolation strategies are implemented. Blending assimilation improves error statistics slightly, but the effect of the assimilation is reduced due to noise in the SSM/I motions and is thus not an effective method to improve ice motion estimates. However, optimal interpolation assimilation reduces motion errors by 25--30% over modeled motions and 40--45% over SSM/I motions. Optimal interpolation assimilation is beneficial in all regions, seasons and ice conditions, and is particularly effective in regimes where modeled and SSM/I errors are high. Assimilation alters annual average motion fields. Modeled ice products of ice thickness, ice divergence, Fram Strait ice volume export, transport across the Arctic and interannual basin averages are also influenced by assimilated motions. Assimilation improves estimates of pollutant transport and corrects synoptic-scale errors in the motion fields caused by incorrect forcings or errors in model physics. The portability of the optimal interpolation assimilation method is demonstrated by implementing the strategy in an ice thickness distribution (ITD) model. This research presents an

  13. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to determine the feasibility of utilizing controllable mechanical seals for aerospace applications. A potential application was selected as a demonstration case: the buffer gas seal in a LOX (liquid oxygen) turbopump. Currently, floating ring seals are used in this application. Their replacement with controllable mechanical seals would result in substantially reduced leakage rates. This would reduce the required amount of stored buffer gas, and therefore increase the vehicle payload. For such an application, a suitable controllable mechanical seal was designed and analyzed.

  14. Aerodynamic force variation in an inclined hovering motion by kinematic and geometric controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Due to the excellent flight capability with a high maneuverability, dragonfly flight has been a great interest in various fields. In the present study, we construct a one-paired dynamically scaled dragonfly wing model, perform an inclined hovering motion by wing flapping in a white-oil tank, and measure the normal and tangential forces on the wing. First, we investigate the effect of kinematic parameters of wing motion such as the attack angle (α), pitching duration, pitching timing, etc. The Reynolds number is 1,900 or 2,430 depending on the wing shape. We find that the aerodynamic forces vary greatly with these kinematic parameters. On the other hand, the corrugation on the wing surface has been found to increase the lift force in gliding flight. In this study, we investigate the effect of surface corrugation on the force of the flapping wing. With the corrugation, the drag force slightly increases during a downstroke (high α) and the lift force increases during an upstroke (small α), respectively, resulting in the increase of the mean vertical force by 10 ˜30% depending on the wing trajectory. We further investigate the force variation by kinematic and geometric controls using flow visualization and the result will be shown in the presentation.

  15. Investigation and Development of Control Laws for the NASA Langley Research Center Cockpit Motion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Craig R.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Zaychik, Kirill B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop highly advanced simulators is a critical need that has the ability to significantly impact the aerospace industry. The aerospace industry is advancing at an ever increasing pace and flight simulators must match this development with ever increasing urgency. In order to address both current problems and potential advancements with flight simulator techniques, several aspects of current control law technology of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base simulator were examined. Preliminary investigation of linear models based upon hardware data were examined to ensure that the most accurate models are used. This research identified both system improvements in the bandwidth and more reliable linear models. Advancements in the compensator design were developed and verified through multiple techniques. The position error rate feedback, the acceleration feedback and the force feedback were all analyzed in the heave direction using the nonlinear model of the hardware. Improvements were made using the position error rate feedback technique. The acceleration feedback compensator also provided noteworthy improvement, while attempts at implementing a force feedback compensator proved unsuccessful.

  16. Estimating first-order geometric parameters and monitoring contact transitions during force-controlled compliant motion

    SciTech Connect

    Schutter, J. de; Bruyninckx, H.; Dutre, S.; Geeter, J. de; Katupitiya, J.; Demey, S.; Lefebvre, T.

    1999-12-01

    This paper uses (linearized) Kalman filters to estimate first-order geometric parameters (i.e., orientation of contact normals and location of contact points) that occur in force-controlled compliant motions. The time variance of these parameters is also estimated. In addition, transitions between contact situations can be monitored. The contact between the manipulated object and its environment is general, i.e., multiple contacts can occur at the same time, and both the topology and the geometry of each single contact are arbitrary. The two major theoretical contributions are (1) the integration of the general contact model, developed previously by the authors, into a state-space form suitable for recursive processing; and (2) the use of the reciprocity constraint between ideal contact forces and motion freedoms as the measurement equation of the Kalman filter. The theory is illustrated by full 3-D experiments. The approach of this paper allows a breakthrough in the state of the art dominated by the classical, orthogonal contact models of Mason that can only cope with a limited (albeit important) subset of all possible contact situations.

  17. The motion of bubbles and particles in oscillating liquids with applications to multiphase flow in Coriolis meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Joel Aaron

    Coriolis flow meters measure mass flow and density of liquids and gases to very high accuracies. However, when two or more phases are present simultaneously in a pipeline, measurement accuracy can be severely reduced. Coriolis meters have an inherent advantage over volumetric meters in measuring pure liquid quantities in applications involving liquids with entrained gas because the mass flow rate of an aerated mixture is close to that of the liquid flow rate. However, Coriolis meters use two oscillating flow tubes to make measurements, with the assumption that the fluid moves directly with the tubes in the oscillatory direction. When multiple phases or components of different density are present, this assumption is not valid and errors result. The current research involves analytic and experimental efforts to understand, model, and reduce errors due to multiphase flow in a Coriolis meter. The main error mechanism studied is phase decoupling, or the relative motion of the dispersed phase with respect to the continuous phase. Dilute mixtures involving solid particles in liquids are considered in addition to bubbly fluids. Equations of motion for spherical particles and bubbles in non-inertial oscillating reference frames are non-dimensionalized and solved with a variety of boundary conditions. Theoretical results for amplitude ratio and phase angle between sphere and fluid are verified with high speed video camera experiments. Phase decoupling is found to depend on meter and fluid parameters such as frequency, oscillation amplitude, and viscosity. Practical recommendations based on experimental and model results are made to improve measurement accuracy. Reducing bubble size by turbulent mixing and using a Coriolis meter with a minimum tube oscillation frequency and maximum amplitude are found to be the most practical ways to reduce errors due to relative phase motion. Power dissipation, density error, and other parameters of interest in the design and operation of a

  18. 77 FR 69616 - EWP LLC; Notice of Application for Amendment of Exemption and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission EWP LLC; Notice of Application for Amendment of Exemption and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and...

  19. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions - Effect of Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Inertial measurement of motion with Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) is emerging as an alternative to 3D motion capture systems in biomechanics. The objectives of this study are: 1) to describe the absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of commercially available AHRS under various types of motion; and 2) to evaluate the effect of motion velocity on the accuracy of these measurements. Methods The criterion validity of accuracy was established under controlled conditions using an instrumented Gimbal table. AHRS modules were carefully attached to the center plate of the Gimbal table and put through experimental static and dynamic conditions. Static and absolute accuracy was assessed by comparing the AHRS orientation measurement to those obtained using an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was assessed by measuring the variation in relative orientation between modules during trials. Findings Evaluated AHRS systems demonstrated good absolute static accuracy (mean error < 0.5o) and clinically acceptable absolute accuracy under condition of slow motions (mean error between 0.5o and 3.1o). In slow motions, relative accuracy varied from 2o to 7o depending on the type of AHRS and the type of rotation. Absolute and relative accuracy were significantly affected (p<0.05) by velocity during sustained motions. The extent of that effect varied across AHRS. Interpretation Absolute and relative accuracy of AHRS are affected by environmental magnetic perturbations and conditions of motions. Relative accuracy of AHRS is mostly affected by the ability of all modules to locate the same global reference coordinate system at all time. Conclusions Existing AHRS systems can be considered for use in clinical biomechanics under constrained conditions of use. While their individual capacity to track absolute motion is relatively consistent, the use of multiple AHRS modules to compute relative motion between rigid bodies needs to be optimized according to

  20. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  1. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance. PMID:26133875

  2. SAR imagery of moving targets: application of time-frequency distributions for estimating motion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, Alexander M.; Peckham, C. D.; Teti, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    It is well known that targets moving along track within a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) field of view are imaged as defocused objects. The SAR stripmap mode is tuned to stationary ground targets and the mismatch between the SAR processing parameters and the target motion parameters causes the energy to spill over to adjacent image pixels, thus not only hindering target feature extraction, but also reducing the probability of detection. The problem can be remedied by generating the image using a filter matched to the actual target motion parameters, effectively focusing the SAR image on the target. For a fixed rate of motion the target velocity can be estimated from the slope of the Doppler frequency characteristic. The processing is carried out on the range compressed data but before azimuth compression. The problem is similar to the classical problem of estimating the instantaneous frequency of a linear FM signal (chirp). This paper investigates the application of three different time-frequency analysis techniques to estimate the instantaneous Doppler frequency of range compressed SAR data. In particular, we compare the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Gabor expansion and the Short-Time Fourier transform with respect to their performance in noisy SAR data. Criteria are suggested to quantify the performance of each method in the joint time- frequency domain. It is shown that these methods exhibit sharp signal-to-noise threshold effects, i.e., a certain SNR below which the accuracy of the velocity estimation deteriorates rapidly. It is also shown that the methods differ with respect to their representation of the SAR data.

  3. Telepresence system development for application to the control of remote robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Carl D., III; Duffy, Joseph; Vora, Rajul; Chiang, Shih-Chien

    1989-01-01

    The recent developments of techniques which assist an operator in the control of remote robotic systems are described. In particular, applications are aimed at two specific scenarios: The control of remote robot manipulators; and motion planning for remote transporter vehicles. Common to both applications is the use of realistic computer graphics images which provide the operator with pertinent information. The specific system developments for several recently completed and ongoing telepresence research projects are described.

  4. A biological micro actuator: graded and closed-loop control of insect leg motion by electrical stimulation of muscles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Bin Aziz, Mohamed Fareez; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect-machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  5. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect–machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  6. Chaos control of Hastings-Powell model by combining chaotic motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danca, Marius-F.; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a Parameter Switching (PS) algorithm as a new chaos control method for the Hastings-Powell (HP) system. The PS algorithm is a convergent scheme that switches the control parameter within a set of values while the controlled system is numerically integrated. The attractor obtained with the PS algorithm matches the attractor obtained by integrating the system with the parameter replaced by the averaged value of the switched parameter values. The switching rule can be applied periodically or randomly over a set of given values. In this way, every stable cycle of the HP system can be approximated if its underlying parameter value equalizes the average value of the switching values. Moreover, the PS algorithm can be viewed as a generalization of Parrondo's game, which is applied for the first time to the HP system, by showing that losing strategy can win: "losing + losing = winning." If "loosing" is replaced with "chaos" and, "winning" with "order" (as the opposite to "chaos"), then by switching the parameter value in the HP system within two values, which generate chaotic motions, the PS algorithm can approximate a stable cycle so that symbolically one can write "chaos + chaos = regular." Also, by considering a different parameter control, new complex dynamics of the HP model are revealed.

  7. Chaos control of Hastings-Powell model by combining chaotic motions.

    PubMed

    Danca, Marius-F; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a Parameter Switching (PS) algorithm as a new chaos control method for the Hastings-Powell (HP) system. The PS algorithm is a convergent scheme that switches the control parameter within a set of values while the controlled system is numerically integrated. The attractor obtained with the PS algorithm matches the attractor obtained by integrating the system with the parameter replaced by the averaged value of the switched parameter values. The switching rule can be applied periodically or randomly over a set of given values. In this way, every stable cycle of the HP system can be approximated if its underlying parameter value equalizes the average value of the switching values. Moreover, the PS algorithm can be viewed as a generalization of Parrondo's game, which is applied for the first time to the HP system, by showing that losing strategy can win: "losing + losing = winning." If "loosing" is replaced with "chaos" and, "winning" with "order" (as the opposite to "chaos"), then by switching the parameter value in the HP system within two values, which generate chaotic motions, the PS algorithm can approximate a stable cycle so that symbolically one can write "chaos + chaos = regular." Also, by considering a different parameter control, new complex dynamics of the HP model are revealed. PMID:27131485

  8. Effectiveness enhancement of a cycloidal wind turbine by individual active control of blade motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Seong; Lee, Yun Han; Kim, Seung Jo

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, a research for the effectiveness enhancement of a Cycloidal Wind Turbine by individual active control of blade motion is described. To improve the performance of the power generation system, which consists of several straight blades rotating about axis in parallel direction, the cycloidal blade system and the individual active blade control method are adopted. It has advantages comparing with horizontal axis wind turbine or conventional vertical axis wind turbine because it maintains optimal blade pitch angles according to wind speed, wind direction and rotor rotating speed to produce high electric power at any conditions. It can do self-starting and shows good efficiency at low wind speed and complex wind condition. Optimal blade pitch angle paths are obtained through CFD analysis according to rotor rotating speed and wind speed. The individual rotor blade control system consists of sensors, actuators and microcontroller. To realize the actuating device, servo motors are installed to each rotor blade. Actuating speed and actuating force are calculated to compare with the capacities of servo motor, and some delays of blade pitch angles are corrected experimentally. Performance experiment is carried out by the wind blowing equipment and Labview system, and the rotor rotates from 50 to 100 rpm according to the electric load. From this research, it is concluded that developing new vertical axis wind turbine, Cycloidal Wind Turbine which is adopting individual active blade pitch control method can be a good model for small wind turbine in urban environment.

  9. Control of a Virtual Vehicle Influences Postural Activity and Motion Sickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xiao; Yoshida, Ken; Stoffregen, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Everyday experience suggests that drivers are less susceptible to motion sickness than passengers. In the context of inertial motion (i.e., physical displacement), this effect has been confirmed in laboratory research using whole body motion devices. We asked whether a similar effect would occur in the context of simulated vehicles in a visual…

  10. Future applications of simulators in process control

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.; Wysor, W.

    1997-03-21

    Future applications of simulators in process control will see activities with high return on investment in areas such as concurrent engineering, hardware-in-the-loop controller testing, process fault detection, and Internet-retrievable simulation models and tools. These applications are based on advancing technology in the field of simulation technology. In this paper, the advancing technology will be reviewed, and projections to future uses of simulators in process control will be made.

  11. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  12. Extension assist control for individuals with cervical cord injury using motion assist robot for upper limb.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsuya; Yano, Ken'ichi

    2010-01-01

    Many people of all ages have sustained cervical cord injury in traffic accidents or sport accidents, and consequently suffered physical impairment. Among these individuals dysfunction of the upper limbs is a concern, although recovery from dysfunction is possible through rehabilitation. In this study, we developed an assistive robot for upper limb movement which has high effectiveness in rehabilitation. To achieve this, we devised an algorithm of a dynamic filter that decreases the noise and delay of the device for controlling the motion assist robot stably. This filter changes the cutoff frequency depending on the amount of input change. The robot assists movement only during elbow extension. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through experiments. PMID:21095926

  13. Application of side-oblique image-motion blur correction to Kuaizhou-1 agile optical images.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Long, Hui; Liu, Bao-Cheng; Li, Ying

    2016-03-21

    Given the recent development of agile optical satellites for rapid-response land observation, side-oblique image-motion (SOIM) detection and blur correction have become increasingly essential for improving the radiometric quality of side-oblique images. The Chinese small-scale agile mapping satellite Kuaizhou-1 (KZ-1) was developed by the Harbin Institute of Technology and launched for multiple emergency applications. Like other agile satellites, KZ-1 suffers from SOIM blur, particularly in captured images with large side-oblique angles. SOIM detection and blur correction are critical for improving the image radiometric accuracy. This study proposes a SOIM restoration method based on segmental point spread function detection. The segment region width is determined by satellite parameters such as speed, height, integration time, and side-oblique angle. The corresponding algorithms and a matrix form are proposed for SOIM blur correction. Radiometric objective evaluation indices are used to assess the restoration quality. Beijing regional images from KZ-1 are used as experimental data. The radiometric quality is found to increase greatly after SOIM correction. Thus, the proposed method effectively corrects image motion for KZ-1 agile optical satellites. PMID:27136855

  14. Integration, control, and applications of multifunctional linear actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2008-03-01

    The integration, analysis, control, and application of a linear actuator are investigated. The linear actuator has super-precision, large stroke, and simultaneous precision positioning and vibration suppression capabilities. It is an integration of advanced electro-mechanical technology, smart materials technology, sensing technology, and control technology. Based on the electromechanical technology, a DC-motor driven leading screw ensures the large stroke of motion and coarse positioning. The smart piezoelectric technology makes the fine positioning and vibration suppression over a wide frequency range possible. The advanced control strategy greatly compensates the hysteresis characteristics such as backlash and/or dead zone, and enables the excellent performance of the actuator. Several sensors such as load cells, displacement sensors, and encoders are also integrated for various applications. Controller design and testing of this linear actuator are also conducted. The applications of the linear actuator are also explored in precision positioning and vibration suppression of a flexible manipulator and smart composite platform for thrust vector control of satellites.

  15. Through-wafer interrogation of microstructure motion for MEMS feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jeremy M.; Chen, Jingdong; Brown, Kolin S.; Famouri, Parviz F.; Hornak, Lawrence A.

    1999-09-01

    Closed-loop MEMS control enables mechanical microsystems to adapt to the demands of the environment which they are actuating opening a new window of opportunity for future MEMS applications. Planar diffractive optical microsystems have the potential to enable the integrated optical interrogation of MEMS microstructure position fully decoupled from the means of mechanical actuation which is central to realization of feedback control. This paper presents the results of initial research evaluating through-wafer optical microsystems for MEMS integrated optical monitoring. Positional monitoring results obtained from a 1.3 micrometer wavelength through- wafer free-space optical probe of a lateral comb resonator fabricated using the Multi-User MEMS Process Service (MUMPS) are presented. Given the availability of positional information via probe signal feedback, a simulation of the application of nonlinear sliding control is presented illustrating position control of the lateral comb resonator structure.

  16. pH-induced motion control of self-propelled oil droplets using a hydrolyzable gemini cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shingo; Banno, Taisuke; Tonooka, Taishi; Osaki, Toshihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji; Toyota, Taro

    2014-07-15

    Self-propelled motion of micrometer-sized substances has drawn much attention as an autonomous transportation system. One candidate vehicle is a chemically driven micrometer-sized oil droplet. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of a chemical reaction system controlling the three-dimensional motion of oil droplets underwater. In this study, we developed a molecular system that controlled the self-propelled motion of 4-heptyloxybenzaldehyde oil droplets by using novel gemini cationic surfactants containing carbonate linkages (2G12C). We found that, in emulsions containing sodium hydroxide, the motion time of the self-propelled oil droplets was longer in the presence of 2G12C than in the presence of gemini cationic surfactants without carbonate linkages. Moreover, in 2G12C solution, oil droplets at rest underwent unidirectional, self-propelled motion in a gradient field toward a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide. Even though they stopped within several seconds, they restarted in the same direction. 2G12C was gradually hydrolyzed under basic conditions to produce a pair of the corresponding monomeric surfactants, which exhibit different interfacial properties from 2G12C. The prolonged and restart motion of the oil droplets were explained by the increase in the heterogeneity of the interfacial tension of the oil droplets. PMID:24934718

  17. Reversible control of F(1)-ATPase rotational motion using a photochromic ATP analog at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Ei-Ichiro; Kamei, Takashi; Konno, Hiroki; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2014-03-28

    Motor enzymes such as F1-ATPase and kinesin utilize energy from ATP for their motion. Molecular motions of these enzymes are critical to their catalytic mechanisms and were analyzed thoroughly using a single molecule observation technique. As a tool to analyze and control the ATP-driven motor enzyme motion, we recently synthesized a photoresponsive ATP analog with a p-tert-butylazobenzene tethered to the 2' position of the ribose ring. Using cis/trans isomerization of the azobenzene moiety, we achieved a successful reversible photochromic control over a kinesin-microtubule system in an in vitro motility assay. Here we succeeded to control the hydrolytic activity and rotation of the rotary motor enzyme, F1-ATPase, using this photosensitive ATP analog. Subsequent single molecule observations indicated a unique pause occurring at the ATP binding angle position in the presence of cis form of the analog. PMID:24607907

  18. A piloted evaluation of an oblique-wing research aircraft motion simulation with decoupling control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Mcneill, Walter E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Maine, Trindel A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed an oblique-wing research plane from NASA's digital fly-by-wire airplane. Oblique-wing airplanes show large cross-coupling in control and dynamic behavior which is not present on conventional symmetric airplanes and must be compensated for to obtain acceptable handling qualities. The large vertical motion simulator at NASA Ames-Moffett was used in the piloted evaluation of a proposed flight control system designed to provide decoupled handling qualities. Five discrete flight conditions were evaluated ranging from low altitude subsonic Mach numbers to moderate altitude supersonic Mach numbers. The flight control system was effective in generally decoupling the airplane. However, all participating pilots objected to the high levels of lateral acceleration encountered in pitch maneuvers. In addition, the pilots were more critical of left turns (in the direction of the trailing wingtip when skewed) than they were of right turns due to the tendency to be rolled into the left turns and out of the right turns. Asymmetric side force as a function of angle of attack was the primary cause of lateral acceleration in pitch. Along with the lateral acceleration in pitch, variation of rolling and yawing moments as functions of angle of attack caused the tendency to roll into left turns and out of right turns.

  19. Magnetic fish-robot based on multi-motion control of a flexible magnetic actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Shin, Kyoosik; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a biologically inspired fish-robot driven by a single flexible magnetic actuator with a rotating magnetic field in a three-axis Helmholtz coil. Generally, magnetic fish-robots are powered by alternating and gradient magnetic fields, which provide a single motion such as bending the fish-robot's fins. On the other hand, a flexible magnetic actuator driven by an external rotating magnetic field can create several gaits such as the bending vibration, the twisting vibration, and their combination. Most magnetic fish-like micro-robots do not have pectoral fins on the side and are simply propelled by the tail fin. The proposed robot can swim and perform a variety of maneuvers with the addition of pectoral fins and control of the magnetic torque direction. In this paper, we find that the robot's dynamic actuation correlates with the magnetic actuator and the rotating magnetic field. The proposed robot is also equipped with new features, such as a total of six degrees of freedom, a new control method that stabilizes posture, three-dimensional swimming, a new velocity control, and new turning abilities. PMID:22550128

  20. 78 FR 30297 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric.... Deadline for filing comments, motions to intervene, and protests: June 14, 2013. All documents may be filed.... n. Comments, Protests, or Motions to Intervene: Anyone may submit comments, a protest, or a...

  1. Transitioning Active Flow Control to Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Chen, Fang-Jenq

    1999-01-01

    Active Flow Control Programs at NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and DARPA have been initiated with the goals of obtaining revolutionary advances in aerodynamic performance and maneuvering compared to conventional approaches. These programs envision the use of actuators, sensors, and controllers on applications such as aircraft wings/tails, engine nacelles, internal ducts, nozzles, projectiles, weapons bays, and hydrodynamic vehicles. Anticipated benefits of flow control include reduced weight, part count, and operating cost and reduced fuel burn (and emissions), noise and enhanced safety if the sensors serve a dual role of flow control and health monitoring. To get from the bench-top or laboratory test to adaptive distributed control systems on realistic applications, reliable validated design tools are needed in addition to sub- and large-scale wind-tunnel and flight experiments. This paper will focus on the development of tools for active flow control applications.

  2. Coherent Control of Population Transfer via Linear Chirp in Liquid Solution: The Role of Motional Narrowing.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, Porscha L; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    The conditions under which linear chirp can be used to control population transfer between the electronic states of a chromophore dissolved in liquid solution are investigated. To this end, we model the chromophore as a two-state system with shifted electronic potential energy surfaces and a fluctuating electronic transition frequency. The fluctuations are described as an exponentially correlated Gaussian stochastic process, which can be characterized by the average fluctuation amplitude, σ, and correlation time, τc. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for an ensemble of stochastic histories, at different values of σ and τc, and under a wide range of pulse intensities and linear chirp coefficients. In the limit τc → ∞, we find that control diminishes rapidly as soon as σ exceeds the bandwidth of the pulse. However, we also find that control can be regained by reducing τc. We attribute this trend to motional narrowing, whereby decreasing τc narrows down the effective bandwidth of the solvent-induced fluctuations. The results suggest that the choice of methanol as a solvent in the actual experimental demonstration of chirp control by Cerullo et al. [ Chem. Phys. Lett. 1996 , 262 , 362 - 368 ] may have contributed to its success, due to the particularly short τc (∼20 fs) that the rapid librations of this hydrogen bonded liquid give rise to. The results also give rise to the rather surprising prediction that coherent control in liquid solution can be strongly dependent on the choice of solvent and be improved upon by choosing solvents that correspond to lower values of στc. PMID:26595412

  3. Inferential modeling and predictive feedback control in real-time motion compensation using the treatment couch during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng; D'Souza, Warren D; McAvoy, Thomas J; Ray Liu, K J

    2007-10-01

    Tumor motion induced by respiration presents a challenge to the reliable delivery of conformal radiation treatments. Real-time motion compensation represents the technologically most challenging clinical solution but has the potential to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The performance of a real-time couch-based motion compensation system is mainly dependent on two aspects: the ability to infer the internal anatomical position and the performance of the feedback control system. In this paper, we propose two novel methods for the two aspects respectively, and then combine the proposed methods into one system. To accurately estimate the internal tumor position, we present partial-least squares (PLS) regression to predict the position of the diaphragm using skin-based motion surrogates. Four radio-opaque markers were placed on the abdomen of patients who underwent fluoroscopic imaging of the diaphragm. The coordinates of the markers served as input variables and the position of the diaphragm served as the output variable. PLS resulted in lower prediction errors compared with standard multiple linear regression (MLR). The performance of the feedback control system depends on the system dynamics and dead time (delay between the initiation and execution of the control action). While the dynamics of the system can be inverted in a feedback control system, the dead time cannot be inverted. To overcome the dead time of the system, we propose a predictive feedback control system by incorporating forward prediction using least-mean-square (LMS) and recursive least square (RLS) filtering into the couch-based control system. Motion data were obtained using a skin-based marker. The proposed predictive feedback control system was benchmarked against pure feedback control (no forward prediction) and resulted in a significant performance gain. Finally, we combined the PLS inference model and the predictive feedback control to evaluate the overall performance of the

  4. Characterizing and controlling the motion of ssDNA in a solid-state nanopore.

    PubMed

    Luan, Binquan; Martyna, Glenn; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2011-11-01

    Sequencing DNA in a synthetic solid-state nanopore is potentially a low-cost and high-throughput method. Essential to the nanopore-based DNA sequencing method is the ability to control the motion of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule at single-base resolution. Experimental studies showed that the average translocation speed of DNA driven by a biasing electric field can be affected by ionic concentration, solvent viscosity, or temperature. Even though it is possible to slow down the average translocation speed, instantaneous motion of DNA is too diffusive to allow each DNA base to stay in front of a sensor site for its measurement. Using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we study the diffusion constant, friction coefficient, electrophoretic mobility, and effective charge of ssDNA in a solid-state nanopore. Simulation results show that the spatial fluctuation of ssDNA in 1 ns is comparable to the spacing between neighboring nucleotides in ssDNA, which makes the sensing of a DNA base very difficult. We demonstrate that the recently proposed DNA transistor could potentially solve this problem by electrically trapping ssDNA inside the DNA transistor and ratcheting ssDNA base-by-base in a biasing electric field. When increasing the biasing electric field, we observed that the translocation of ssDNA changes from ratcheting to steady-sliding. The simulated translocation of ssDNA in the DNA transistor was theoretically characterized using Fokker-Planck analysis. PMID:22067161

  5. Quantification of vocal fold motion using echography: application to recurrent nerve paralysis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Mike-Ely; Lefort, Muriel; Bergeret-Cassagne, Héloïse; Hachi, Siham; Li, Ang; Russ, Gilles; Lazard, Diane; Menegaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence; Trésallet, Christophe; Frouin, Frédérique

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent nerve paralysis (RP) is one of the most frequent complications of thyroid surgery. It reduces vocal fold mobility. Nasal endoscopy, a mini-invasive procedure, is the conventional way to detect RP. We suggest a new approach based on laryngeal ultrasound and a specific data analysis was designed to help with the automated detection of RP. Ten subjects were enrolled for this feasibility study: four controls, three patients with RP and three patients without RP according to nasal endoscopy. The ultrasound protocol was based on a ten seconds B-mode acquisition in a coronal plane during normal breathing. Image processing included three steps: 1) automated detection of two consecutive closing and opening images, corresponding to extreme positions of vocal folds in the sequence of B-mode images, using principal component analysis of the image sequence; 2) positioning of three landmarks and robust tracking of these points using a multi-pyramidal refined optical flow approach; 3) estimation of quantitative parameters indicating left and right fractions of mobility, and motion symmetry. Results provided by automated image processing were compared to those obtained by an expert. Detection of extreme images was accurate; tracking of landmarks was reliable in 80% of cases. Motion symmetry indices showed similar values for controls and patients without RP. Fraction of mobility was reduced in cases of RP. Thus, our CAD system helped in the detection of RP. Laryngeal ultrasound combined with appropriate image processing helped in the diagnosis of recurrent nerve paralysis and could be proposed as a first-line method.

  6. Dynamic analysis of astronaut motions in microgravity: Applications for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava J.

    1995-01-01

    Simulations of astronaut motions during extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks were performed using computational multibody dynamics methods. The application of computational dynamic simulation to EVA was prompted by the realization that physical microgravity simulators have inherent limitations: viscosity in neutral buoyancy tanks; friction in air bearing floors; short duration for parabolic aircraft; and inertia and friction in suspension mechanisms. These limitations can mask critical dynamic effects that later cause problems during actual EVA's performed in space. Methods of formulating dynamic equations of motion for multibody systems are discussed with emphasis on Kane's method, which forms the basis of the simulations presented herein. Formulation of the equations of motion for a two degree of freedom arm is presented as an explicit example. The four basic steps in creating the computational simulations were: system description, in which the geometry, mass properties, and interconnection of system bodies are input to the computer; equation formulation based on the system description; inverse kinematics, in which the angles, velocities, and accelerations of joints are calculated for prescribed motion of the endpoint (hand) of the arm; and inverse dynamics, in which joint torques are calculated for a prescribed motion. A graphical animation and data plotting program, EVADS (EVA Dynamics Simulation), was developed and used to analyze the results of the simulations that were performed on a Silicon Graphics Indigo2 computer. EVA tasks involving manipulation of the Spartan 204 free flying astronomy payload, as performed during Space Shuttle mission STS-63 (February 1995), served as the subject for two dynamic simulations. An EVA crewmember was modeled as a seven segment system with an eighth segment representing the massive payload attached to the hand. For both simulations, the initial configuration of the lower body (trunk, upper leg, and lower leg) was a neutral

  7. Gain-compensated sinusoidal scanning of a galvanometer mirror in proportional-integral-differential control using the pre-emphasis technique for motion-blur compensation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Takanoshin; Senoo, Taku; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2016-07-20

    We propose a method to achieve precise sine-wave path tracking for real-time motion-blur compensation to extend the corresponding frequency spectrum in proportional-integral-differential (PID) control by using a pre-emphasis technique. We calculate pre-emphasis coefficients in advance to follow a sine wave with a gain of 0 dB and multiply the input signal by these pre-emphasis coefficients. In experiments, we were thus able to extend the greatest frequency from 100 to 500 Hz and achieve gain improvement of approximately 3 dB at 400 and 500 Hz. For the application of inspection, we confirmed that motion blur is significantly reduced when the system operates at high frequency, and we achieved a responsiveness 3.3 times higher than that of our previous system. PMID:27463919

  8. A recursive approach to the equations of motion for the maneuvering and control of flexible multi-body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Meirovitch, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    Interest lies in a mathematical formulation capable of accommodating the problem of maneuvering a space structure consisting of a chain of articulated flexible substructures. Simultaneously, any perturbations from the 'rigid body' maneuvering and any elastic vibration must be suppressed. The equations of motion for flexible bodies undergoing rigid body motions and elastic vibrations can be obtained conveniently by means of Lagrange's equations in terms of quasi-coordinates. The advantage of this approach is that it yields equations in terms of body axes, which are the same axes that are used to express the control forces and torques. The equations of motion are nonlinear hybrid differential quations. The partial differential equations can be discretized (in space) by means of the finite element method or the classical Rayleigh-Ritz method. The result is a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations of high order. The nonlinearity can be traced to the rigid body motions and the high order to the elastic vibration. Elastic motions tend to be small when compared with rigid body motions.

  9. Electric-Field Control over Spin-Wave and Current Induced Domain Wall Motion and Magnonic Torques in Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagina, Iryna; Linder, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    We discover that the way spin-waves exert magnetic torques in multiferroic materials can cause not only domain wall motion, but also magnetization dynamics for homogeneous magnetization textures. Interestingly, the domain wall motion can be controlled via purely electrical means with the spin-waves being generated by an ac electric field E while the direction of the wall motion also is sensitive to an applied dc E field. Moreover, we determine the interaction between spin-transfer torque from an electric current and a magnetic domain wall in multiferroics and show that the Walker breakdown threshold scales with the magnitude of a perpendicular electric field, offering a way to control the properties of domain wall propagation via electric gating.

  10. Introduction to structure from motion and its applications in remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, Matt B

    2011-01-11

    This talk discusses my experience at Los Alamos National Laboratories developing the Wide Area Persistent Surveillance (WAPS) system AngelFire and the problems with working with low resolution surface models. This experience provided a motivation to seek solutions to utilize the redundant WAPS imagery to build surface models of the urban environment. Structure from Motion (SfM) is a process that takes multiple view imagery and compute the 3D structure of a scene. We will walk through the basic algorithm and discuss areas for optimization. Military services and intelligence agencies face long-standing challenges with processing, exploiting, and disseminating ISR data. The problem is that too much data is being produced and not enough people to look at it and the problem is not going away. As a result of this data overload, we need to shift the way we think about data and find creative ways to use and present it so it can be easily digested by decision makers. SfM also provides a means for developing a data processing and organization architecture. Applications for various remote sensing applications will be discussed for motivation for why SfM and Multi-View Stereo rendering is an important area that needs to be continued to be developed.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics and chaotic motions in feedback-controlled two- and three-degree-of-freedom robots

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, A.S. Ghosal, A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a feedback-controlled rigid robot is most commonly described by a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. In this paper, the authors analyze these equations, representing the feedback-controlled motion of two- and three-degrees-of-freedom rigid robots with revolute (R) and prismatic (P) joints in the absence of compliance, friction, and potential energy, for the possibility of chaotic motions. The authors first study the unforced or inertial motions of the robots, and show that when the Gaussian or Riemannian curvature of the configuration space of a robot is negative, the robot equations can exhibit chaos. If the curvature is zero or positive, then the robot equations cannot exhibit chaos. The authors show that among the two-degrees-of-freedom robots, the PP and the PR robot have zero Gaussian curvature while the RP and RR robots have negative Gaussian curvatures. For the three-degrees-of-freedom robots, they analyze the two well-known RRP and RRR configurations of the Stanford arm and the PUMA manipulator, respectively, and derive the conditions for negative curvature and possible chaotic motions. The criteria of negative curvature cannot be used for the forced or feedback-controlled motions. For the forced motion, the authors resort to the well-known numerical techniques and compute chaos maps, Poincare maps, and bifurcation diagrams. Numerical results are presented for the two-degrees-of-freedom RP and RR robots, and the authors show that these robot equations can exhibit chaos for low controller gains and for large underestimated models. From the bifurcation diagrams, the route to chaos appears to be through period doubling.

  12. Multi-step motion planning: Application to free-climbing robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretl, Timothy Wolfe

    This dissertation addresses the problem of planning the motion of a multi-limbed robot to "free-climb" vertical rock surfaces. Free-climbing relies on natural features and friction (such as holes or protrusions) rather than special fixtures or tools. It requires strength, but more importantly it requires deliberate reasoning: not only must the robot decide how to adjust its posture to reach the next feature without falling, it must plan an entire sequence of steps, where each one might have future consequences. This process of reasoning is called multi-step planning. A multi-step planning framework is presented for computing non-gaited, free-climbing motions. This framework derives from an analysis of a free-climbing robot's configuration space, which can be decomposed into constraint manifolds associated with each state of contact between the robot and its environment. An understanding of the adjacency between manifolds motivates a two-stage strategy that uses a candidate sequence of steps to direct the subsequent search for motions. Three algorithms are developed to support the framework. The first algorithm reduces the amount of time required to plan each potential step, a large number of which must be considered over an entire multi-step search. It extends the probabilistic roadmap (PRM) approach based on an analysis of the interaction between balance and the topology of closed kinematic chains. The second algorithm addresses a problem with the PRM approach, that it is unable to distinguish challenging steps (which may be critical) from impossible ones. This algorithm detects impossible steps explicitly, using automated algebraic inference and machine learning. The third algorithm provides a fast constraint checker (on which the PRM approach depends), in particular a test of balance at the initially unknown number of sampled configurations associated with each step. It is a method of incremental precomputation, fast because it takes advantage of the sample

  13. 18 CFR 4.34 - Hearings on applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative procedures. 4.34 Section 4.34 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION...

  14. 18 CFR 4.34 - Hearings on applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative procedures. 4.34 Section 4.34 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION...

  15. 18 CFR 4.34 - Hearings on applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative procedures. 4.34 Section 4.34 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION...

  16. 18 CFR 4.34 - Hearings on applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative procedures. 4.34 Section 4.34 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION...

  17. 18 CFR 4.34 - Hearings on applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... applications; consultation on terms and conditions; motions to intervene; alternative procedures. 4.34 Section 4.34 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION...

  18. 78 FR 66913 - Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ..., Motions To Intervene, and Protests; Eagle Creek RE, LLC Take notice that the following hydroelectric...: 10482-111. c. Date Filed: June 24, 2013. d. Applicant: Eagle Creek RE, LLC. e. Name of Project: Swinging... President Operations, Eagle Creek RE, LLC, 65 Madison Avenue, Suite 500, Morristown, NJ 07960, (973)...

  19. 78 FR 70546 - Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Preliminary Terms...

  20. 77 FR 18801 - Notice of Application for Non-Capacity Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests: Power Authority of the State of New York Take notice that the..., 2011 and supplemented on February 15, 2012. d. Applicant: Power Authority of the State of New York. e. Name of Project: Niagara Power Project. f. Location: On the Niagara River, in the City of Niagara...

  1. Transdermal scopolamine for prevention of motion sickness : clinical pharmacokinetics and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Nachum, Zohar; Shupak, Avi; Gordon, Carlos R

    2006-01-01

    A transdermal therapeutic system for scopolamine (TTS-S) was developed to counter the adverse effects and short duration of action that has restricted the usefulness of scopolamine when administered orally or parenterally. The plaster contains a reservoir of 1.5 mg of scopolamine programmed to deliver 0.5 mg over a 3-day period. A priming dose (140 microg) is incorporated into the adhesive layer to saturate certain binding sites within the skin and to accelerate the achievement of steady-state blood levels. The remainder is released at a constant rate of approximately 5 microg/hour. The protective plasma concentration of scopolamine is estimated to be 50 pg/mL. TTS-S attains that concentration after 6 hours; a steady state of about 100 pg/mL is achieved 8-12 hours after application. Yet 20-30% of subjects failed to attain the estimated protective concentration, and plasma concentrations measured in subjects who failed to respond to TTS-S were lower than in responders. These findings may explain some of the treatment failures. Overall, the product appears to be the approximate functional equivalent of a 72-hour slow intravenous infusion. A combination of transdermal and oral scopolamine (0.3 or 0.6 mg) was effective and well tolerated in producing desired plasma concentrations 1-hour post-treatment. TTS-S has proved to be significantly superior to placebo in reducing the incidence and severity of motion sickness by 60-80%. It was more effective than oral meclizine or cinnarizine, similar to oral scopolamine 0.6 mg or promethazine plus ephedrine, and the same as or superior to dimenhydrinate. The addition of ephedrine or the use of two patches did not improve its efficacy, but rather increased the rate of adverse effects. TTS-S was most effective against motion sickness 8-12 hours after application. Despite previous evidence to the contrary, a recent bioavailability study demonstrated similar intraindividual absorption and sustained clinical efficacy with long

  2. Tools for monitoring and controlling distributed applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith; Wood, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    The Meta system is a UNIX-based toolkit that assists in the construction of reliable reactive systems, such as distributed monitoring and debugging systems, tool integration systems and reliable distributed applications. Meta provides mechanisms for instrumenting a distributed application and the environment in which it executes, and Meta supplies a service that can be used to monitor and control such an instrumented application. The Meta toolkit is built on top of the ISIS toolkit; they can be used together in order to build fault-tolerant and adaptive, distributed applications.

  3. Dielectric elastomers for active vibration control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, S.; Kaal, W.; Melz, T.

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) have proved to have high potential for smart actuator applications in many laboratory setups and also in first commercially available components. Because of their large deformation capability and the inherent fast response to external stimulation they proffer themselves to applications in the field of active vibration control, especially for lightweight structures. These structures typically tend to vibrate with large amplitudes even at low excitation forces. Here, DE actuators seem to be ideal components for setting up control loops to suppress unwanted vibrations. Due to the underlying physical effect DE actuators are generally non-linear elements with an approximately quadratic relationship between in- and output. Consequently, they automatically produce higher-order frequencies. This can cause harmful effects for vibration control on structures with high modal density. Therefore, a linearization technique is required to minimize parasitic effects. This paper shows and quantifies the nonlinearity of a commercial DE actuator and demonstrates the negative effects it can have in technical applications. For this purpose, two linearization methods are developed. Subsequently, the actuator is used to implement active vibration control for two different mechanical systems. In the first case a concentrated mass is driven with the controlled actuator resulting in a tunable oscillator. In the second case a more complex mechanical structure with multiple resonances is used. Different control approaches are applied likewise and their impact on the whole system is demonstrated. Thus, the potential of DE actuators for vibration control applications is highlighted.

  4. Vehicular motion in counter traffic flow through a series of signals controlled by a phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Tobita, Kazuhiro

    2012-10-01

    We study the dynamical behavior of counter traffic flow through a sequence of signals (traffic lights) controlled by a phase shift. There are two lanes for the counter traffic flow: the first lane is for east-bound vehicles and the second lane is for west-bound vehicles. The green-wave strategy is studied in the counter traffic flow where the phase shift of signals in the second lane has opposite sign to that in the first lane. A nonlinear dynamic model of the vehicular motion is presented by nonlinear maps at a low density. There is a distinct difference between the traffic flow in the first lane and that in the second lane. The counter traffic flow exhibits very complex behavior on varying the cycle time, the phase difference, and the split. Also, the fundamental diagram is derived by the use of the cellular automaton (CA) model. The dependence of east-bound and west-bound vehicles on cycle time, phase difference, and density is clarified.

  5. Adaptive sliding mode control on inner axis for high precision flight motion simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongling; Niu, Jianjun; Wang, Yan

    2008-10-01

    Discrete adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) with exponential reaching law is proposed to alleviate the influence of the factors such as the periodical fluctuation torque of motor, nonlinear friction, and other disturbance which will deteriorate the tracking performance of a DC torque motor driven inner axis for a high precision flight motion simulator, considering the limited compensating ability of the ASMC for these uncertainty, an equivalent friction advance compensator based on Stribeck model is also presented for extra-low speed servo of the system. Firstly, the way direct using the available parts of the inner axis itself to ascertain the parameters for Stribeck model is listed. Secondly, adaptive approach is used to overcome the difficulty of choice the key parameter for exponential reaching law, and the stability of the algorithm is analyzed. Lastly, comparable experiments are carried out to verify the valid of the combined approach. The experiments results show with a stable 0.00006°/s speed response, 95% of time the tracking error is within 0.0002°, other servos such as sine wave tracking are also with high precision.

  6. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  7. Investigation and control of dynamic stall of an aerofoil ramp up motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosti, Marco Edoardo; Omidyeganeh, Mohammad; Pinelli, Alfredo

    2015-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations of the flow around a NACA0020 aerofoil at Rec = 20 ×103 undergoing a ramp up motion has been undertaken (α ∈ [0° ,20° ] ,α˙rad c /U∞ = 0 . 12). New insights on the vorticity dynamics in the baseline case are discussed using a number of post-processing techniques. We will also present and discuss the effects of a passive control technique based on the use of a thin flap hinged via a torsional spring to the suction side of the aerofoil. The interaction between the flap dynamics (modelled as an infinitely thin plate) and the fluid have been carried out using an original Immersed Boundary Method applied to a finite volume solver. When the spring constant is chosen to lock the flap oscillations into the main shedding frequency, the back flow induced by the primary vortex is strongly reduced by the presence of the flap inhibiting the generation of massive separation. Moreover, the flap is capable to enhance and protract the lift overshoot typical of the dynamic stall also alleviating the subsequent lift-breakdown. These beneficial behaviour is mainly due to the establishment of a fluid structure interaction cycle that continuously regenerate the primary vortex which is ultimately responsible for the enhanced lift.

  8. Input relegation control for gross motion of a kinematically redundant manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    This report proposes a method for resolving the kinematic redundancy of a serial link manipulator moving in a three-dimensional workspace. The underspecified problem of solving for the joint velocities based on the classical kinematic velocity model is transformed into a well-specified problem. This is accomplished by augmenting the original model with additional equations which relate a new vector variable quantifying the redundant degrees of freedom (DOF) to the joint velocities. The resulting augmented system yields a well specified solution for the joint velocities. Methods for selecting the redundant DOF quantifying variable and the transformation matrix relating it to the joint velocities are presented so as to obtain a minimum Euclidean norm solution for the joint velocities. The approach is also applied to the problem of resolving the kinematic redundancy at the acceleration level. Upon resolving the kinematic redundancy, a rigid body dynamical model governing the gross motion of the manipulator is derived. A control architecture is suggested which according to the model, decouples the Cartesian space DOF and the redundant DOF.

  9. MRI-Compatible Manipulator With Remote-Center-of-Motion Control

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Nobuhiko; Tokuda, Junichi; Hurwitz, Shelley; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess a needle-guiding manipulator for MRI-guided therapy that allows a physician to freely select the needle insertion path while maintaining remote center of motion (RCM) at the tumor site. Materials and Methods The manipulator consists of a three-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) base stage and passive needle holder with unconstrained two-DOF rotation. The synergistic control keeps the Virtual RCM at the preplanned target using encoder outputs from the needle holder as input to motorize the base stage. Results The manipulator assists in searching for an optimal needle insertion path which is a complex and time-consuming task in MRI-guided ablation therapy for liver tumors. The assessment study showed that accuracy of keeping the virtual RCM to predefined position is 3.0 mm. In a phantom test, the physicians found the needle insertion path faster with than without the manipulator (number of physicians = 3, P = 0.001). However, the alignment time with the virtual RCM was not shorter when imaging time for planning were considered. Conclusion The study indicated that the robot holds promise as a tool for accurately and interactively selecting the optimal needle insertion path in liver ablation therapy guided by open-configuration MRI. PMID:18407542

  10. Exploring direct 3D interaction for full horizontal parallax light field displays using leap motion controller.

    PubMed

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  11. Electromechanical actuator with controllable motion, fast response rate, and high-frequency resonance based on graphene and polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Huang, Lu; Li, Na; Huang, Yi; Wu, Yingpeng; Fang, Shaoli; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Baughman, Ray; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-05-22

    Although widely investigated, novel electromechanical actuators with high overall actuation performance are still in urgent need for various practical and scientific applications, such as robots, prosthetic devices, sensor switches, and sonar projectors. In this work, combining the properties of unique environmental perturbations-actuated deformational isomerization of polydiacetylene (PDA) and the outstanding intrinsic features of graphene together for the first time, we design and fabricate an electromechanical bimorph actuator composed of a layer of PDA crystal and a layer of flexible graphene paper through a simple yet versatile solution approach. Under low applied direct current (dc), the graphene-PDA bimorph actuator with strong mechanical strength can generate large actuation motion (curvature is about 0.37 cm(-1) under a current density of 0.74 A/mm(2)) and produce high actuation stress (more than 160 MPa/g under an applied dc of only 0.29 A/mm(2)). When applying alternating current (ac), this actuator can display reversible swing behavior with long cycle life under high frequencies even up to 200 Hz; significantly, while the frequency and the value of applied ac and the state of the actuators reach an appropriate value, the graphene-PDA actuator can produce a strong resonance and the swing amplitude will jump to a peak value. Moreover, this stable graphene-PDA actuator also demonstrates rapidly and partially reversible electrochromatic phenomenon when applying an ac. Two mechanisms-the dominant one, electric-induced deformation, and a secondary one, thermal-induced expansion of PDA-are proposed to contribute to these interesting actuation performances of the graphene-PDA actuators. On the basis of these results, a mini-robot with controllable direction of motion based on the graphene-PDA actuator is designed to illustrate the great potential of our discoveries for practical use. Combining the unique actuation mechanism and many outstanding properties of

  12. The effect of lateral controls in producing motion of an airplane as computed from wind-tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, F. E.; Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study of the lateral controllability of an airplane has been made in which both the static rolling and yawing moments supplied by the controls and the reactions due to the inherent stability of the airplane have been taken into account. A hypothetical average airplane, embodying the essential characteristics of both the wind tunnel models and the full size test airplanes, was assumed for the study. Computations made of forced rolling and yawing motions of an F-22 airplane caused by a sudden deflection of the ailerons were found to agree well with actual measurements of these motions. The conditions following instantaneous full deflections of the lateral control have been studied, and some attention has been devoted to the controlling of complete turn maneuvers.

  13. A simple motion differential game with different constraints on controls and under phase constraint on the state of the evader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmanov, Askar; Ibragimov, Gafurjan

    2016-06-01

    We consider a simple motion pursuit differential game of one pursuer and one evader. Control of the pursuer is subjected to integral constraint, and that of the evader is subjected to geometric constraint. More precisely, value of control parameter of the evader belongs to a given convex subset of ℝn. Pursuit is completed if the evader becomes in l vicinity of the pursuer. Sufficient conditions of completion of pursuit are obtained.

  14. Application-Defined Decentralized Access Control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Dunn, Alan M; Hofmann, Owen S; Lee, Michael Z; Mehdi, Syed Akbar; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    DCAC is a practical OS-level access control system that supports application-defined principals. It allows normal users to perform administrative operations within their privilege, enabling isolation and privilege separation for applications. It does not require centralized policy specification or management, giving applications freedom to manage their principals while the policies are still enforced by the OS. DCAC uses hierarchically-named attributes as a generic framework for user-defined policies such as groups defined by normal users. For both local and networked file systems, its execution time overhead is between 0%-9% on file system microbenchmarks, and under 1% on applications. This paper shows the design and implementation of DCAC, as well as several real-world use cases, including sandboxing applications, enforcing server applications' security policies, supporting NFS, and authenticating user-defined sub-principals in SSH, all with minimal code changes. PMID:25426493

  15. Excitation of Intra-bunch Vertical Motion in the SPS - Implications for Feedback Control of Ecloud and TMCI Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cesaratto, J.M.; Fox, J.D.; Pivi, M.T.; Rivetta, C.H.; Turgut, O.; Uemura, S.; Hofle, W.; Wehrle, U.; /CERN

    2012-06-01

    Electron cloud (ecloud) and transverse mode coupled-bunch instabilities (TMCI) limit the bunch intensity in the CERN SPS. This paper presents experimental measurements in the SPS of single-bunch motion driven by a GHz bandwidth vertical excitation system. The final goal is to quantify the change in internal bunch dynamics as instability thresholds are approached, and quantify the frequencies of internal modes as ecloud effects become significant. Initially, we have been able to drive the beam and view its motion. We show the excitation of barycentric, head-tail and higher vertical modes at different bunch intensities. The beam motion is analyzed in the time domain, via animated presentations of the sampled vertical signals, and in the frequency domain, via spectrograms showing the modal frequencies vs. time. The demonstration of the excitation of selected internal modes is a significant step in the development of the feedback control techniques.

  16. Space and motion discomfort and abnormal balance control in patients with anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, R G; Redfern, M S; Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous research suggested that panic disorder with agoraphobia is associated with abnormalities on vestibular and balance function tests. The purpose of this study was to further examine psychiatric correlates of vestibular/balance dysfunction in patients with anxiety disorders and the specific nature of the correlated vestibular abnormalities. The psychiatric variables considered included anxiety disorder versus normal control status, panic disorder versus non-panic anxiety disorder diagnosis, presence or absence of comorbid fear of heights, and degree of space and motion discomfort (SMD). The role of anxiety responses to vestibular testing was also re-examined. Methods 104 subjects were recruited: 29 psychiatrically normal individuals and 75 psychiatric patients with anxiety disorders. Anxiety patients were assigned to four subgroups depending on whether or not they had panic disorder and comorbid fear of heights. SMD and anxiety responses were measured by questionnaires. Subjects were examined for abnormal unilateral vestibular hypofunction on caloric testing indicative of peripheral vestibular dysfunction, asymmetric responses on rotational testing as an indicator of an ongoing vestibular imbalance and balance function using Equitest dynamic posturography as an indicator of balance control. Logistic regression was used to establish the association between the psychiatric variables and vestibular or balance test abnormalities. Results Rotational test results were not significantly related to any of the psychiatric variables. The presence of either panic attacks or fear of heights increased the probability of having caloric hypofunction in a non-additive fashion. SMD and anxiety responses were independently associated with abnormal balance. Among specific posturography conditions, the association with SMD was significant for a condition that involved the balance platform tilting codirectionally with body sway, suggesting an abnormal dependence on

  17. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore–Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  18. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  19. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  20. 78 FR 30298 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric... filing comments, motions to intervene, and protests: June 14, 2013. All documents may be filed... mailing list should so indicate by writing to the Secretary of the Commission. n. Comments, Protests,...

  1. On the Kinematic Motion Primitives (kMPs) - Theory and Application.

    PubMed

    Moro, Federico L; Tsagarakis, Nikos G; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2012-01-01

    Human neuromotor capabilities guarantee a wide variety of motions. A full understanding of human motion can be beneficial for rehabilitation or performance enhancement purposes, or for its reproduction on artificial systems like robots. This work aims at describing the complexity of human motion in a reduced dimensionality, by means of kinematic Motion Primitives (kMPs). A set of five invariant kMPs are identified for periodic motions, and a set of two kMPs for discrete motions. It is shown how these two sets of kMPs can be combined to synthesize more complex motion as the simultaneous execution of the periodic and the discrete motions. The results reported are an evidence of the theory of Central Pattern Generators (CPG), showing its effects on the kinematics, and are related to what presented in the literature on the Motor Primitives extracted from EMG signals. Experimental tests with the COmpliant huMANoid (COMAN) were performed to show that the kMPs extracted from human subjects can be used to transfer the features of human locomotion to the gait of a robot. PMID:23091459

  2. 78 FR 38702 - Brenda Wirkkala See; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... inoperable due to a hurricane force windstorm in December of 2007 which damaged the power line. The cost of... protest, or a motion to intervene in accordance with the requirements of Rules of Practice and Procedure... consider all protests or other comments filed, but only those who file a motion to intervene in...

  3. 75 FR 70730 - EBD Hydro; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ...: The proposed 45-Mile Hydroelectric Project would be located on the concrete drop structure of the...-Mile Hydroelectric Project would consist of: (1) A proposed intake structure; (2) a proposed 2,700-foot... public notice. p. Protests or Motions to Intervene--Anyone may submit a protest or a motion to...

  4. On some properties of reflected skew Brownian motions and applications to dispersion in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shiyu; Wang, Suxin; Wang, Yongjin

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the close connection between the skew Brownian motion and the random particle motion in heterogeneous media, we investigate the reflected skew Brownian motion and try to find out its relationship with the corresponding dispersion problem when there exists a reflecting boundary. Through the use of the knowledge of stochastic analysis, we provide some basic properties of reflected skew Brownian motions, including the transition density, the Laplace transform of the first passage time, and some related results. A simple method to generate the sample path is also proposed. At the end of this paper, we reveal the strong relationship between the reflected skew Brownian motion and the solute dispersion in the presence of a sharp interface and a reflecting boundary.

  5. Effect of vision and stance width on human body motion when standing: implications for afferent control of lateral sway.

    PubMed Central

    Day, B L; Steiger, M J; Thompson, P D; Marsden, C D

    1993-01-01

    1. Measurements of human upright body movements in three dimensions have been made on thirty-five male subjects attempting to stand still with various stance widths and with eyes closed or open. Body motion was inferred from movements of eight markers fixed to specific sites on the body from the shoulders to the ankles. Motion of these markers was recorded together with motion of the point of application of the resultant of the ground reaction forces (centre of pressure). 2. The speed of the body (average from eight sites) was increased by closing the eyes or narrowing the stance width and there was an interaction between these two factors such that vision reduced body speed more effectively when the feet were closer together. Similar relationships were found for components of velocity both in the frontal and sagittal planes although stance width exerted a much greater influence on the lateral velocity component. 3. Fluctuations in position of the body were also increased by eye closure or narrowing of stance width. Again, the effect of stance width was more potent for lateral than for anteroposterior movements. In contrast to the velocity measurements, there was no interaction between vision and stance width. 4. There was a progressive increase in the amplitude of position and velocity fluctuations from markers placed higher on the body. The fluctuations in the position of the centre of pressure were similar in magnitude to those of the markers placed near the hip. The fluctuations in velocity of centre of pressure, however, were greater than of any site on the body. 5. Analysis of the amplitude of angular motion between adjacent straight line segments joining the markers suggests that the inverted pendulum model of body sway is incomplete. Motion about the ankle joint was dominant only for lateral movement in the frontal plane with narrow stance widths (< 8 cm). For all other conditions most angular motion occurred between the trunk and leg. 6. The large

  6. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.; Krafft, G.A.

    1999-06-22

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser is disclosed. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control. 1 fig.

  7. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Dunxiong; Krafft, Geoffrey Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control.

  8. Motion-Based Piloted Simulation Evaluation of a Control Allocation Technique to Recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craun, Robert W.; Acosta, Diana M.; Beard, Steven D.; Leonard, Michael W.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Weinstein, Michael; Yildiz, Yildiray

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the maturation of a control allocation technique designed to assist pilots in the recovery from pilot induced oscillations (PIOs). The Control Allocation technique to recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations (CAPIO) is designed to enable next generation high efficiency aircraft designs. Energy efficient next generation aircraft require feedback control strategies that will enable lowering the actuator rate limit requirements for optimal airframe design. One of the common issues flying with actuator rate limits is PIOs caused by the phase lag between the pilot inputs and control surface response. CAPIO utilizes real-time optimization for control allocation to eliminate phase lag in the system caused by control surface rate limiting. System impacts of the control allocator were assessed through a piloted simulation evaluation of a non-linear aircraft simulation in the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. Results indicate that CAPIO helps reduce oscillatory behavior, including the severity and duration of PIOs, introduced by control surface rate limiting.

  9. Circular motion control of an optically trapped microprobe for nano-position sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaka, Yuto; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Terutake

    2007-09-01

    As a position sensing probe for Nano-CMM which measures three-dimensional shapes of microparts, we propose a novel probing technique using circular motion of an optically trapped microsphere. In this report, a fundamental principle is described for sensing a coordinate on a work surface using a circular motion probe. The circular motion of the trapped sphere near a work surface becomes an ellipse compressed perpendicularly to the surface due to the change of viscous drag of the sphere. The elliptical orbit of the trapped sphere depends on a distance from the surface and a normal vector direction of the surface. By processing the elliptical orbit, the circular motion probe can detect a position and a plane normal vector of the work surface simultaneously. In order to verify feasibility of this method, fundamental experiments are carried out. The circular motion probe is approached to a vertical silicon cleavage surface. The behavior of the trapped sphere near the surface agrees well with the theory. Based on the elliptical orbit of the trapped sphere near the surface, a position and a plane normal vector of the surface are estimated. It is verified that the circular motion probe can detect a position of a work surface with resolution of better than 50nm and detect a plane normal vector of the surface.

  10. Application-Defined Decentralized Access Control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Dunn, Alan M.; Hofmann, Owen S.; Lee, Michael Z.; Mehdi, Syed Akbar; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    DCAC is a practical OS-level access control system that supports application-defined principals. It allows normal users to perform administrative operations within their privilege, enabling isolation and privilege separation for applications. It does not require centralized policy specification or management, giving applications freedom to manage their principals while the policies are still enforced by the OS. DCAC uses hierarchically-named attributes as a generic framework for user-defined policies such as groups defined by normal users. For both local and networked file systems, its execution time overhead is between 0%–9% on file system microbenchmarks, and under 1% on applications. This paper shows the design and implementation of DCAC, as well as several real-world use cases, including sandboxing applications, enforcing server applications’ security policies, supporting NFS, and authenticating user-defined sub-principals in SSH, all with minimal code changes. PMID:25426493

  11. Energy intake and expenditure during sedentary screen time and motion-controlled video gaming123

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Deborah F; Ward, Dianne S; Wang, Xiaoshan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Television watching and playing of video games (VGs) are associated with higher energy intakes. Motion-controlled video games (MC) may be a healthier alternative to sedentary screen-based activities because of higher energy expenditures, but little is known about the effects of these games on energy intakes. Objective: Energy intake, expenditure, and surplus (intake − expenditure) were compared during sedentary (television and VG) and active (MC) screen-time use. Design: Young adults (n = 120; 60 women) were randomly assigned to the following 3 groups: television watching, playing traditional VGs, or playing MCs for 1 h while snacks and beverages were provided. Energy intakes, energy expenditures, and appetites were measured. Results: Intakes across these 3 groups showed a trend toward a significant difference (P = 0.065). The energy expenditure (P < 0.001) was higher, and the energy surplus (P = 0.038) was lower, in MC than in television or VG groups. All conditions produced a mean (±SD) energy surplus as follows: 638 ± 408 kcal in television, 655 ± 533 kcal in VG, and 376 ± 487 kcal in MC groups. The OR for consuming ≥500 kcal in the television compared with the MC group was 3.2 (95% CI: 1.2, 8.4). Secondary analyses, in which the 2 sedentary conditions were collapsed, showed an intake that was 178 kcal (95% CI: 8, 349 kcal) lower in the MC condition than in the sedentary groups (television and VG). Conclusion: MCs may be a healthier alternative to sedentary screen time because of a lower energy surplus, but the playing of these games still resulted in a positive energy balance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01523795. PMID:22760571

  12. Challenges in DNA motion control and sequence readout using nanopore devices

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Spencer; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    Nanopores are being hailed as a potential next-generation DNA sequencer that could provide cheap, high-throughput DNA analysis. In this review we present a detailed summary of the various sensing techniques being investigated for use in DNA sequencing and mapping applications. A crucial impasse to the success of nanopores as a reliable DNA analysis tool is the fast and stochastic nature of DNA translocation. We discuss the incorporation of biological motors to step DNA through a pore base-by-base, as well as the many experimental modifications attempted for the purpose of slowing and controlling DNA transport. PMID:25642629

  13. Quadratic optimal cooperative control synthesis with flight control application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1984-01-01

    An optimal control-law synthesis approach is presented that involves simultaneous solution for two cooperating controllers operating in parallel. One controller's structure includes stochastic state estimation and linear feedback of the state estimates, while the other controller involves direct linear feedback of selected system output measurements. This structure is shown to be optimal under the constraint of linear feedback of system outputs in one controller. Furthermore, it is appropriate for flight control synthesis where the full-state optimal stochastic controller can be adjusted to be representative of an optimal control model of the human pilot in a stochastic regulation task. The method is experimentally verified in the case of the selection of pitch-damper gain for optimum pitch tracking, where optimum implies the best subjective pilot rating in the task. Finally, results from application of the method to synthesize a controller for a multivariable fighter aircraft are presented, and implications of the results of this method regarding the optimal plant dynamics for tracking are discussed.

  14. Piloted Evaluation of the H-Mode, a Variable Autonomy Control System, in Motion-Based Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    As aircraft become able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help understand their use and guide the design of new, more effective forms of automation and interaction. The "H-mode" is one such method and is based on the metaphor of a well-trained horse. The concept allows the pilot to manage a broad range of control automation functionality, from augmented manual control to FMS-like coupling and automation initiated actions, using a common interface system and easily learned set of interaction skills. The interface leverages familiar manual control interfaces (e.g., the control stick) and flight displays through the addition of contextually dependent haptic-multimodal elements. The concept is relevant to manned and remotely piloted vehicles. This paper provides an overview of the H-mode concept followed by a presentation of the results from a recent evaluation conducted in a motion-based simulator. The evaluation focused on assessing the overall usability and flying qualities of the concept with an emphasis on the effects of turbulence and cockpit motion. Because the H-mode results in interactions between traditional flying qualities and management of higher-level flight path automation, these effects are of particular interest. The results indicate that the concept may provide a useful complement or replacement to conventional interfaces, and retains the usefulness in the presence of turbulence and motion.

  15. Comparison of visual biofeedback system with a guiding waveform and abdomen-chest motion self-control system for respiratory motion management

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yujiro; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Kanai, Takayuki; Ito, Kengo; Sato, Kiyokazu; Dobashi, Suguru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Matsushita, Haruo; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Irregular breathing can influence the outcome of 4D computed tomography imaging and cause artifacts. Visual biofeedback systems associated with a patient-specific guiding waveform are known to reduce respiratory irregularities. In Japan, abdomen and chest motion self-control devices (Abches) (representing simpler visual coaching techniques without a guiding waveform) are used instead; however, no studies have compared these two systems to date. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of respiratory coaching in reducing respiratory irregularities by comparing two respiratory management systems. We collected data from 11 healthy volunteers. Bar and wave models were used as visual biofeedback systems. Abches consisted of a respiratory indicator indicating the end of each expiration and inspiration motion. Respiratory variations were quantified as root mean squared error (RMSE) of displacement and period of breathing cycles. All coaching techniques improved respiratory variation, compared with free-breathing. Displacement RMSEs were 1.43 ± 0.84, 1.22 ± 1.13, 1.21 ± 0.86 and 0.98 ± 0.47 mm for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. Period RMSEs were 0.48 ± 0.42, 0.33 ± 0.31, 0.23 ± 0.18 and 0.17 ± 0.05 s for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. The average reduction in displacement and period RMSE compared with the wave model were 27% and 47%, respectively. For variation in both displacement and period, wave model was superior to the other techniques. Our results showed that visual biofeedback combined with a wave model could potentially provide clinical benefits in respiratory management, although all techniques were able to reduce respiratory irregularities. PMID:26922090

  16. The Relationship Between Engagement and Neurophysiological Measures of Attention in Motion-Controlled Video Games: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Lauren; Nelson, Monica; Siow, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Video games and virtual environments continue to be the subject of research in health sciences for their capacity to augment practice through user engagement. Creating game mechanics that increase user engagement may have indirect benefits on learning (ie, engaged learners are likely to practice more) and may also have direct benefits on learning (ie, for a fixed amount of practice, engaged learners show superior retention of information or skills). Objective To manipulate engagement through the aesthetic features of a motion-controlled video game and measure engagement’s influence on learning. Methods A group of 40 right-handed participants played the game under two different conditions (game condition or sterile condition). The mechanics of the game and the amount of practice were constant. During practice, event-related potentials (ERPs) to task-irrelevant probe tones were recorded during practice as an index of participants’ attentional reserve. Participants returned for retention and transfer testing one week later. Results Although both groups improved in the task, there was no difference in the amount of learning between the game and sterile groups, countering previous research. A new finding was a statistically significant relationship between self-reported engagement and the amplitude of the early-P3a (eP3a) component of the ERP waveform, such that participants who reported higher levels of engagement showed a smaller eP3a (beta=−.08, P=.02). Conclusions This finding provides physiological data showing that engagement elicits increased information processing (reducing attentional reserve), which yields new insight into engagement and its underlying neurophysiological properties. Future studies may objectively index engagement by quantifying ERPs (specifically the eP3a) to task-irrelevant probes. PMID:27103052

  17. Modular control of fusion power heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.

    2012-08-24

    This work is motivated by the growing demand for auxiliary heating on small and large machines worldwide. Numerous present and planned RF experiments (EBW, Lower Hybrid, ICRF, and ECH) are increasingly complex systems. The operational challenges are indicative of a need for components of real-time control that can be implemented with a moderate amount of effort in a time- and cost-effective fashion. Such a system will improve experimental efficiency, enhance experimental quality, and expedite technological advancements. The modular architecture of this control-suite serves multiple purposes. It facilitates construction on various scales from single to multiple controller systems. It enables expandability of control from basic to complex via the addition of modules with varying functionalities. It simplifies the control implementation process by reducing layers of software and electronic development. While conceived with fusion applications in mind, this suite has the potential to serve a broad range of scientific and industrial applications. During the Phase-I research effort we established the overall feasibility of this modular control-suite concept. We developed the fundamental modules needed to implement open-loop active-control and demonstrated their use on a microwave power deposition experiment.

  18. A rheology model of soft elastomeric capacitor for Weigh-In-Motion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollipara, Venkata Dharmateja

    As a result of fast growing industry, there is an increase in traffic congestion and deterioration of transportation inventory. Real-time traffic characterisation could be used to amoliorate the efficiency of our transportation system. Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) systems offer the advantages of vehicle classification, speed measurement, in addition to weight measurement while vehicles are moving. In this thesis, state-of-the-art WIM systems are discussed and limitations of current technologies are identified. A Soft Elastomeric Capacitor (SEC) that works as a large scale surface strain gauge is introduced to address the limitations in existing techniques and investigated for its applicability as a WIM sensor. Though the novel SEC has potential advantages, the relationship axial strain-to-stress needs to be modeled to enable its utilization as a WIM sensor. A Zener model is selected and modified by the addition of a slider to characterize the polymer behavior. An overstress approach is used to study the resultant stress-strain response owing to its simplicity and computational benefits. Since the overstress approach is data-driven, an experimental testing scheme is used to identify the model parameters. The tests comprise three types of applied strain loading: multi step relaxation, simple relaxation and cyclic compression. Specimens with varying stiffness are employed for these tests. Numerical simulations for the cyclic compression loading are presented to assess the model performance. The model is found to be capable of reproducing the experimental data with an absolute maximum error value of 0.085 MPa for slow loading rate tests and 0.175 MPa for high loading rate tests. Comparative studies are completed to investigate the impact of patch stiffness on the mechanical behavior of the soft elastomeric capacitor patches. It is observed that as stiffness decreases, the nonlinearity in stress-strain response increases

  19. 78 FR 79427 - Greenwood County; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Monument Street Suite 19, Greenwood, SC 29646, (864) 943-2648. i. FERC Contact: Mark Carter at (678) 245-3083, or email: mark.carter@ferc.gov . j. Deadline for filing comments, motions to intervene,...

  20. Ensemble framework based real-time respiratory motion prediction for adaptive radiotherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Tatinati, Sivanagaraja; Nazarpour, Kianoush; Tech Ang, Wei; Veluvolu, Kalyana C

    2016-08-01

    Successful treatment of tumors with motion-adaptive radiotherapy requires accurate prediction of respiratory motion, ideally with a prediction horizon larger than the latency in radiotherapy system. Accurate prediction of respiratory motion is however a non-trivial task due to the presence of irregularities and intra-trace variabilities, such as baseline drift and temporal changes in fundamental frequency pattern. In this paper, to enhance the accuracy of the respiratory motion prediction, we propose a stacked regression ensemble framework that integrates heterogeneous respiratory motion prediction algorithms. We further address two crucial issues for developing a successful ensemble framework: (1) selection of appropriate prediction methods to ensemble (level-0 methods) among the best existing prediction methods; and (2) finding a suitable generalization approach that can successfully exploit the relative advantages of the chosen level-0 methods. The efficacy of the developed ensemble framework is assessed with real respiratory motion traces acquired from 31 patients undergoing treatment. Results show that the developed ensemble framework improves the prediction performance significantly compared to the best existing methods. PMID:27238760

  1. Processing of translational and rotational motions of surface waves: performance analysis and applications to single sensor and to array measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranò, Stefano; Fäh, Donat

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of rotational seismic motions has received considerable attention in the last years. Recent advances in sensor technologies allow us to measure directly the rotational components of the seismic wavefield. Today this is achieved with improved accuracy and at an affordable cost. The analysis and the study of rotational motions are, to a certain extent, less developed than other aspects of seismology due to the historical lack of instrumental observations. This is due to both the technical challenges involved in measuring rotational motions and to the widespread belief that rotational motions are insignificant. This paper addresses the joint processing of translational and rotational motions from both the theoretical and the practical perspectives. Our attention focuses on the analysis of motions of both Rayleigh waves and Love waves from recordings of single sensors and from an array of sensors. From the theoretical standpoint, analysis of Fisher information (FI) allows us to understand how the different measurement types contribute to the estimation of quantities of geophysical interest. In addition, we show how rotational measurements resolve ambiguity on parameter estimation in the single sensor setting. We quantify the achievable estimation accuracy by means of Cramér-Rao bound (CRB). From the practical standpoint, a method for the joint processing of rotational and translational recordings to perform maximum likelihood (ML) estimation is presented. The proposed technique estimates parameters of Love waves and Rayleigh waves from single sensor or array recordings. We support and illustrate our findings with a comprehensive collection of numerical examples. Applications to real recordings are also shown.

  2. Extension of the stability of motions in a combustion chamber by non- linear active control based on hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, P.; Culick, F.E.C.; Zukoski, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the first quantitative data establishing the details of hysteresis whose existence in dynamical behavior was reported by Sterling and Zukoski. The new idea was demonstrated that the presence of dynamical hysteresis provides opportunity for a novel strategy of active nonlinear control of unsteady motions in combustors. A figure shows the hysteresis exhibited for the amplitude of pressure oscillations as a function of equivalence ratio in a combustor having a recirculation zone, in this case a dump combustor.

  3. Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-08-20

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. PMID:25935686

  4. Semi-decentralized adaptive fuzzy control for cooperative multirobot systems with H(infinity) motion/internal force tracking performance.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kuang-Yow; Chiu, Chian-Song; Liu, P

    2002-01-01

    We present a semi-decentralized adaptive fuzzy control scheme for cooperative multirobot systems to achieve H(infinity) performance in motion and internal force tracking. First, we reformulate the overall system dynamics into a fully actuated system with constraints. To cope with both parametric and nonparametric uncertainties, the controller for each robot consists of two parts: 1) model-based adaptive controller; and 2) adaptive fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The model-based adaptive controller handles the nominal dynamics which results in both zero motion and internal force errors for a pure parametric uncertain system. The FLC part handles the unstructured dynamics and external disturbances. An H(infinity) tracking problem defined by a novel performance criterion is given and solved in the sequel. Hence, a robust controller satisfying the disturbance attenuation is derived being simple and singularity-free. Asymptotic convergence is obtained when the fuzzy approximation error is bounded with finite energy. Maintaining the same results, the proposed controller is further simplified for easier implementation. Finally, the numerical simulation results for two cooperative planar robots transporting an object illustrate the expected performance. PMID:18238126

  5. Compound Velocity Synchronizing Control Strategy for Electro-Hydraulic Load Simulator and Its Engineering Application.

    PubMed

    Han, Songshan; Jiao, Zongxia; Yao, Jianyong; Shang, Yaoxing

    2014-09-01

    An electro-hydraulic load simulator (EHLS) is a typical case of torque systems with strong external disturbances from hydraulic motion systems. A new velocity synchronizing compensation strategy is proposed in this paper to eliminate motion disturbances, based on theoretical and experimental analysis of a structure invariance method and traditional velocity synchronizing compensation controller (TVSM). This strategy only uses the servo-valve's control signal of motion system and torque feedback of torque system, which could avoid the requirement on the velocity and acceleration signal in the structure invariance method, and effectively achieve a more accurate velocity synchronizing compensation in large loading conditions than a TVSM. In order to facilitate the implementation of this strategy in engineering cases, the selection rules for compensation parameters are proposed. It does not rely on any accurate information of structure parameters. This paper presents the comparison data of an EHLS with various typical operating conditions using three controllers, i.e., closed loop proportional integral derivative (PID) controller, TVSM, and the proposed improved velocity synchronizing controller. Experiments are conducted to confirm that the new strategy performs well against motion disturbances. It is more effective to improve the tracking accuracy and is a more appropriate choice for engineering applications. PMID:24895465

  6. Use of a Computer-Controlled Motion Phantom to Investigate the Temporal and Spatial Fidelity of HYPR Processing

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Lauren; Rahimi, Mahdi; Holmes, James; Brittain, Jean; Korosec, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this work, we investigate the spatial and temporal fidelity of highly constrained backPRojection (HYPR) processing using a computer-controlled motion phantom. The goal of this experimental set-up was to provide not only well-defined temporal dynamics and spatial characteristics of the motion phantom, but also circumstances that imitate in vivo scenarios. Methods The phantom was designed to represent an artery flanked on both sides by vein. Both arterial and venous components have different temporal dynamics but are confluent, which corresponds to a difficult scenario for HYPR. Spatial and temporal fidelity was investigated by measuring signal intensity profiles through the phantom both orthogonal to as well as along the direction of motion. Results Spatial fidelity profiles measured from the HYPR processed images yielded full-width-at-half-maximum values very similar to those measured in non-HYPR-processed images. Furthermore, there was no significant spreading of the motion phantom leading edge in HYPR processed images. Conclusion Although HYPR processing has certain characteristic artifacts that are discussed, the technique can be used to improve image quality of highly undersampled time frame images with minimal loss of spatial or temporal fidelity. PMID:23475821

  7. Reinventing User Applications for Mission Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay Phillip; Crocker, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, NASA Ames Research Center's (ARC) Intelligent Systems Division, and NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) began a collaboration to move user applications for JSC's mission control center to a new software architecture, intended to replace the existing user applications being used for the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. It must also carry NASA/JSC mission operations forward to the future, meeting the needs for NASA's exploration programs beyond low Earth orbit. Key requirements for the new architecture, called Mission Control Technologies (MCT) are that end users must be able to compose and build their own software displays without the need for programming, or direct support and approval from a platform services organization. Developers must be able to build MCT components using industry standard languages and tools. Each component of MCT must be interoperable with other components, regardless of what organization develops them. For platform service providers and MOD management, MCT must be cost effective, maintainable and evolvable. MCT software is built from components that are presented to users as composable user objects. A user object is an entity that represents a domain object such as a telemetry point, a command, a timeline, an activity, or a step in a procedure. User objects may be composed and reused, for example a telemetry point may be used in a traditional monitoring display, and that same telemetry user object may be composed into a procedure step. In either display, that same telemetry point may be shown in different views, such as a plot, an alpha numeric, or a meta-data view and those views may be changed live and in place. MCT presents users with a single unified user environment that contains all the objects required to perform applicable flight controller tasks, thus users do not have to use multiple applications, the traditional boundaries that exist between multiple heterogeneous

  8. Development of CCD controller for scientific application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Pathan, F. M.; Shah, U. V., Prof; Makwana, D. H., Prof; Anandarao, B. G., Prof

    2010-02-01

    Photoelectric equipment has wide applications such as spectroscopy, temperature measurement in infrared region and in astronomical research etc. A photoelectric transducer converts radiant energy into electrical energy. There are two types of photoelectric transducers namely photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and charged couple device (CCD) are used to convert radiant energy into electrical signal. Now the entire modern instruments use CCD technology. We have designed and developed a CCD camera controller using camera chip CD47-10 of Marconi which has 1K × 1K pixel for space application only.

  9. Continuous Passive Motion Provides Good Pain Control in Patients with Adhesive Capsulitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dundar, Umit; Toktas, Hasan; Cakir, Tuncay; Evcik, Deniz; Kavuncu, Vural

    2009-01-01

    Painful stiffening of the shoulder, "frozen shoulder" is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. Continuous passive motion (CPM) is an established method of preventing joint stiffness and of overcoming it. A randomized, comparative prospective clinical trial was planned to compare the early response with different rehabilitation methods…

  10. Strain-mediated deterministic control of 360° domain wall motion in magnetoelastic nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cheng-Yen; Sepulveda, Abdon E.; Hoff, Daniel; Keller, Scott M.; Carman, Gregory. P.

    2015-11-01

    This study provides numerical simulations for deterministic 360° magnetization rotation of the transverse domain walls in a nickel nano-ring (outer diameter: 500 nm, inner diameter: 300 nm, and thickness: 10 nm) on a lead zirconate titanate (Pb[ZrxTi1-x]O3 0 < x < 1) (PZT) thin film (500 nm) deposited onto a Si substrate with surface patterned electrodes. Two alternative electrode architectures are studied, namely, a 4-electrode and a 6-electrode configuration. The 4-electrode configuration relies on magnetization dynamics to produce an overshoot coupled with proper timing control of the voltage applied to achieve 360° magnetization rotation. In contrast, the 6-electrode configuration only requires sequential voltage application to successive pairs of electrodes and thus can be operated at quasi-static speeds and does not rely on magnetization dynamics to achieve 360° magnetization rotation. These analytical models provide support for developing new devices such as nanoscale multiferroic driven electromagnetic motors.

  11. The application of the sinusoidal model to lung cancer patient respiratory motion

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.; Vedam, S.S.; Chung, T.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Keall, P.J.

    2005-09-15

    Accurate modeling of the respiratory cycle is important to account for the effect of organ motion on dose calculation for lung cancer patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a respiratory model for lung cancer patients. Lujan et al. [Med. Phys. 26(5), 715-720 (1999)] proposed a model, which became widely used, to describe organ motion due to respiration. This model assumes that the parameters do not vary between and within breathing cycles. In this study, first, the correlation of respiratory motion traces with the model f(t) as a function of the parameter n(n=1,2,3) was undertaken for each breathing cycle from 331 four-minute respiratory traces acquired from 24 lung cancer patients using three breathing types: free breathing, audio instruction, and audio-visual biofeedback. Because cos{sup 2} and cos{sup 4} had similar correlation coefficients, and cos{sup 2} and cos{sup 1} have a trigonometric relationship, for simplicity, the cos{sup 1} value was consequently used for further analysis in which the variations in mean position (z{sub 0}), amplitude of motion (b) and period ({tau}) with and without biofeedback or instructions were investigated. For all breathing types, the parameter values, mean position (z{sub 0}), amplitude of motion (b), and period ({tau}) exhibited significant cycle-to-cycle variations. Audio-visual biofeedback showed the least variations for all three parameters (z{sub 0}, b, and {tau}). It was found that mean position (z{sub 0}) could be approximated with a normal distribution, and the amplitude of motion (b) and period ({tau}) could be approximated with log normal distributions. The overall probability density function (pdf) of f(t) for each of the three breathing types was fitted with three models: normal, bimodal, and the pdf of a simple harmonic oscillator. It was found that the normal and the bimodal models represented the overall respiratory motion pdfs with correlation values from 0.95 to 0.99, whereas the range

  12. Validation of attenuation models for ground motion applications in central and eastern North America

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2015-11-01

    Recently developed attenuation models are incorporated into standard one-dimensional (1-D) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), effectively making them two-dimensional (2-D) and eliminating the need to create different GMPEs for an increasing number of sub-regions. The model is tested against a data set of over 10,000 recordings from 81 earthquakes in North America. The use of attenuation models in GMPEs improves our ability to fit observed ground motions and should be incorporated into future national hazard maps. The improvement is most significant at higher frequencies and longer distances which have a greater number of wave cycles. This has implications for themore » rare high-magnitude earthquakes, which produce potentially damaging ground motions over wide areas, and drive the seismic hazards. Furthermore, the attenuation models can be created using weak ground motions, they could be developed for regions of low seismicity where empirical recordings of ground motions are uncommon and do not span the full range of magnitudes and distances.« less

  13. Building motion models of lung tumours from cone-beam CT for radiotherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Martin, James; McClelland, Jamie; Yip, Connie; Thomas, Christopher; Hartill, Clare; Ahmad, Shahreen; O'Brien, Richard; Meir, Ivan; Landau, David; Hawkes, David

    2013-03-21

    A method is presented to build a surrogate-driven motion model of a lung tumour from a cone-beam CT scan, which does not require markers. By monitoring an external surrogate in real time, it is envisaged that the motion model be used to drive gated or tracked treatments. The motion model would be built immediately before each fraction of treatment and can account for inter-fraction variation. The method could also provide a better assessment of tumour shape and motion prior to delivery of each fraction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. The two-step method involves enhancing the tumour region in the projections, and then fitting the surrogate-driven motion model. On simulated data, the mean absolute error was reduced to 1 mm. For patient data, errors were determined by comparing estimated and clinically identified tumour positions in the projections, scaled to mm at the isocentre. Averaged over all used scans, the mean absolute error was under 2.5 mm in superior-inferior and transverse directions. PMID:23442367

  14. CdC-SF Catalogue.II: Application of its Proper Motions to Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, B.; Garzón, F.

    We present an astrometric catalogue of positions and proper motions derived from the Carte du Ciel plates of the San Fernando zone, photographic material with a mean epoch 1901.4 with a limiting magnitude V˜15.Digitization has been made using a conventional flatbed scanner. Special techniques have been developed to handle the combination of plate material and the large distortion introduced by the scanner. A variety of post-scan corrections are shown to be necessary. The equatorial coordinates are on the ICRS system defined by Tycho-2. Comparison with the reference catalog indicates external errors of 0.;​​''2. The UCAC2 Catalogue was used as second-epoch positions to derive proper motions with a mean accuracy of 1.2 mas/year for the proper motions for well-measure stars. The usefulness of the resulting catalogue of proper motions is demonstrated by means of a proper-motion analysis of seven open clusters ASCC 30, BOCHUM 3, NGC 2215, NGC 2302, NGC 2311, NGC 2323 and NGC 2548, determining individual membership probabilities and characterizing the gross properties of each cluster.

  15. Validation of attenuation models for ground motion applications in central and eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2015-11-01

    Recently developed attenuation models are incorporated into standard one-dimensional (1-D) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), effectively making them two-dimensional (2-D) and eliminating the need to create different GMPEs for an increasing number of sub-regions. The model is tested against a data set of over 10,000 recordings from 81 earthquakes in North America. The use of attenuation models in GMPEs improves our ability to fit observed ground motions and should be incorporated into future national hazard maps. The improvement is most significant at higher frequencies and longer distances which have a greater number of wave cycles. This has implications for the rare high-magnitude earthquakes, which produce potentially damaging ground motions over wide areas, and drive the seismic hazards. Furthermore, the attenuation models can be created using weak ground motions, they could be developed for regions of low seismicity where empirical recordings of ground motions are uncommon and do not span the full range of magnitudes and distances.

  16. Space infrared telescope pointing control system. Infrared telescope tracking in the presence of target motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schneider, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The use of charge-coupled-devices, or CCD's, has been documented by a number of sources as an effective means of providing a measurement of spacecraft attitude with respect to the stars. A method exists of defocussing and interpolation of the resulting shape of a star image over a small subsection of a large CCD array. This yields an increase in the accuracy of the device by better than an order of magnitude over the case when the star image is focussed upon a single CCD pixel. This research examines the effect that image motion has upon the overall precision of this star sensor when applied to an orbiting infrared observatory. While CCD's collect energy within the visible spectrum of light, the targets of scientific interest may well have no appreciable visible emissions. Image motion has the effect of smearing the image of the star in the direction of motion during a particular sampling interval. The presence of image motion is incorporated into a Kalman filter for the system, and it is shown that the addition of a gyro command term is adequate to compensate for the effect of image motion in the measurement. The updated gyro model is included in this analysis, but has natural frequencies faster than the projected star tracker sample rate for dim stars. The system state equations are reduced by modelling gyro drift as a white noise process. There exists a tradeoff in selected star tracker sample time between the CCD, which has improved noise characteristics as sample time increases, and the gyro, which will potentially drift further between long attitude updates. A sample time which minimizes pointing estimation error exists for the random drift gyro model as well as for a random walk gyro model.

  17. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motions: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrarca, J. R.; Harrison, B. A.; Redman, M. C.; Rowe, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to calculate unsteady loadings caused by motions of lifting surfaces with leading edge and trailing edge controls based on the subsonic kernel function approach. The pressure singularities at hinge line and side edges were extracted analytically as a preliminary step to solving the integral equation of collocation. The program calculates generalized aerodynamic forces for user supplied deflection modes. Optional intermediate output includes pressure at an array of points, and sectional generalized forces. From one to six controls on the half span can be accomodated.

  18. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions – Changes in Accuracy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS) has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven’t been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1) to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2) to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time. Methods This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT) and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP). Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials. Findings Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase. Interpretation The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame. Conclusions Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their

  19. Fully-deformable patient motion models from cone-beam CT for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; McClelland, J.; Yip, C.; Thomas, C.; Hartill, C.; Ahmad, S.; Meir, I.; Landau, D.; Hawkes, D.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method to build a fully deformable motion model directly from cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections. This allows inter-fraction variations in the respiratory motion to be accounted for. It is envisaged that the model be used to track the tumour, and monitor organs at risk (OAR), during gated or tracked radiotherapy (RT) treatment of lung cancer. The method is tested on CBCT projections from a simulated phantom in two cases. The simulations are generated from a patient respiratory trace and associated CBCT scanner geometry. Without and with motion correction, l2 norm maximum errors were reduced from 24.5 to 0.698 mm in case 1, and 20.0 to 0.101 mm in case 2, respectively.

  20. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles & practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Khaled

    With the increasing use of nanoparticles in both science and industry, their chemical modification became a significant part of nanotechnology. Unfortunately, most commonly used procedures provide just randomly functionalized materials. The long-term objective of our work is site- and stoichiometrically-controlled functionalization of nanoparticles with the utilization of solid supports and other nanostructures. On the examples of silica nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanorods, we have obtained results on the solid-phase chemistry, method development, and modeling, which advanced us toward this goal. At the same time, we explored several applications of nanoparticles that will benefit from the controlled functionalization: imaging of titanium-dioxide-based photocatalysts, bioimaging by fluorescent nanoparticles, drug delivery, assembling of bone implants, and dental compositions. Titanium dioxide-based catalysts are known for their catalytic activity and their application in solar energy utilization such as photosplitting of water. Functionalization of titanium dioxide is essential for enhancing bone-titanium dioxide nanotube adhesion, and, therefore, for its application as an interface between titanium implants and bones. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles should enhance sensitivity and selectivity of nanoassemblies for imaging and drug delivery applications. Along those lines, we studied the relationship between morphology and surface chemistry of nanoparticles, and their affinity to organic molecules (salicylic and caffeic acid) using Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and toward material surfaces using SEM- and TEM-imaging. We focused on commercial samples of titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide nanorods with and without oleic acid ligands, and differently functionalized silica nanoparticles. My work included synthesis, functionalization, and characterization of several types of nanoparticles, exploring their application in imaging, dentistry, and bone