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Sample records for mouse atrophic thymus

  1. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  2. Hedgehog Signalling in the Embryonic Mouse Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus, which provides an essential environment for T cell fate specification, and for the differentiation of multipotent progenitor cells into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, non-autoreactive T cells. Here we review the role of the Hedgehog signalling pathway in T cell development, thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development, and thymocyte–TEC cross-talk in the embryonic mouse thymus during the last week of gestation. PMID:27504268

  3. Thymus and pulmonary lymph node response to acute and subchronic ozone inhalation in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Dziedzic, D.; White, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas which primarily injures the centroacinar portion of the lung. While the classical lesion of oxidant-mediated lung damage is relatively well described, the effect of this form of injury on the lymphocytic arm of the pulmonary defense system is less clear. In the present experiments Cd-1 female mice were exposed to ozone at a level of 0.7 ppm for 20 hr per day for 1-28 days and the lymphocyte response was observed in the pulmonary lymph nodes and the thymus. In the mediastinal lymph nodes a marked hyperplastic response was observed that was prominent in the paracortex and was characterized by the presence of blastic forms. In contrast, the thymus underwent an atrophic response characterized by cellular loss in the cortical region. Prior surgical adrenalectomy of ozone-exposed animals eliminated part, but not all of the thymic atrophy response, indicating that adrenal-mediated stress alone did not account for all the observed effect. Thymectomy of animals prior to ozone exposure produced a 40% reduction in the mediastinal lymph node response, suggesting that a part of the node hyperplasia is thymus dependent. The results of these experiments indicate that lymphoid organs are altered following oxidant-mediated lung damage in the mouse. The changes are observed in the absence of exogenous antigenic stimulation and suggest that lymphoid cells are in integral aspect of the host response to high-level ozone inhalation.

  4. Thymus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... older adults it is quite small. The primary function of the thymus is ... called T-lymphocytes or T-cells. While in the thymus, the lymphocytes do not ...

  5. Alteration of T cell maturation and proliferation in the mouse thymus induced by serum factors from patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Aiso, S; Hibi, T; Watanabe, N; Iwao, Y; Yoshida, T; Asakura, H; Tsuru, S; Tsuchiya, M

    1987-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) often have thymus abnormalities, although the precise mechanisms which induce those abnormalities remain unclear. We have examined the effect of serum fractions from patients with UC and other colonic diseases on mouse thymus to clarify the possible existence of factors which have thymus growth activity. These fractions were separated from sera of patients with UC by gel filtration and anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography. In mice given UC serum fractions; (i) remarkable increases in weight and total cell number of the thymus were observed from day 4 to day 9; (ii) a significant increase in the number of peanut agglutinin (PNA)+ thymus cells was demonstrated using flow cytometry on day 9; (iii) on quantitative analysis of surface antigens the percentage of Lyt-2+ thymus cells decreased and that of L3T4+ thymus cells increased remarkably on day 13; the number of bright Thy-1.2+ cells and of dull Lyt-1+ cells increased. In contrast, the serum fractions from patients with other colonic diseases and from normal persons caused little change in mouse thymus throughout the study. The results suggest that factors fractionated from the serum of patients with UC disturb intra-thymic T cell maturation and enhance the proliferation of thymus cells. PMID:3498579

  6. Effects of several salt marsh plants on mouse spleen and thymus cell proliferation using mtt assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwan; Lee, Hee-Jung; Kim, You Ah; Youn, Hyun Joo; Lee, Burm-Jong

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, we have tested the effects of 21 salt marsh plants on cell proliferation of mouse immune cells (spleen and thymus) using MTT assay in culture. The methanolic extracts of six salt marsh plants ( Rosa rugosa, Ixeris tamagawaensis, Artemisia capillaris, Tetragonia tetragonoides, Erigeron annus, and Glehnia littoralis) showed very powerful suppressive effects of mouse immune cell death and significant activities of cell proliferation in vitro. Especially, the methanolic extract of Rosa rugosa was found to have fifteen times compared to the control treatment, demonstrating that Rosa rugosa may have a potent stimulation effect on immune cell proliferation. These results suggest that several salt marsh plants including Rosa rugosa could be useful for further study as an immunomodulating agent.

  7. Antagonist effect of Interleukin 1 receptor on normal thymopoiesis and thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongjing; Wu, Mingyuan; Wen, Bin; Sun, Ningyun; Xiang, Di; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Weng, Shunyan; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Thymopoiesis is essential and significant for development and maintenance of the robust and healthy immune system. The acute suppression of thymopoiesis induced by 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) is an intractable clinical problem complicating chemotherapy. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a cytokine that competitively blocks binding of interleukin 1 (IL-1) to its receptor. This study aims to investigate the effects of the IL-1Ra on the thymus toxicity of 5-Aza in mouse. In this study, we treated the mice with the 5-Aza (100 mg/kg per mouse). The GeneChip methodology developed by Affymetrix was used to monitor global gene expression during mouse thymus regeneration induced by a single injection of 5-Aza. The total thymocytes were counted using a hemocytometer. Cell cycle of samples were analyzed on a Becton Dickinson FACScan. Cells surfaces were labeled with anti-CD4, anti-CD8 and anti-CD45RA antibodies, and detected by flow cytometry. BrdU incorporation was detected by flow cytometry. The results indicated that administering exogenous IL-1Ra to normal mice inhibited cell cycle progress of thymocytes in a dosage-dependent manner. Proliferation of immature CD4(-)CD8(-) double negative (DN) and CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive (DP) thymocytes were both inhibited. The pretreatment of normal mice with exogenous IL-1Ra reduced acute toxicity on thymus and immune suppression induced by 5-Aza. Furthermore, thymus reconstitution after 5-Aza treatment was accelerated by IL-1Ra. In conclusion, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist could inhibit normal thymopoiesis and reduce thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse. Pretreatment with IL-1Ra would offer a new and promising strategy to alleviate immunotoxicity of chemotherapy in clinical. PMID:27158410

  8. Antagonist effect of Interleukin 1 receptor on normal thymopoiesis and thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjing; Wu, Mingyuan; Wen, Bin; Sun, Ningyun; Xiang, Di; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Weng, Shunyan; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Thymopoiesis is essential and significant for development and maintenance of the robust and healthy immune system. The acute suppression of thymopoiesis induced by 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) is an intractable clinical problem complicating chemotherapy. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a cytokine that competitively blocks binding of interleukin 1 (IL-1) to its receptor. This study aims to investigate the effects of the IL-1Ra on the thymus toxicity of 5-Aza in mouse. In this study, we treated the mice with the 5-Aza (100 mg/kg per mouse). The GeneChip methodology developed by Affymetrix was used to monitor global gene expression during mouse thymus regeneration induced by a single injection of 5-Aza. The total thymocytes were counted using a hemocytometer. Cell cycle of samples were analyzed on a Becton Dickinson FACScan. Cells surfaces were labeled with anti-CD4, anti-CD8 and anti-CD45RA antibodies, and detected by flow cytometry. BrdU incorporation was detected by flow cytometry. The results indicated that administering exogenous IL-1Ra to normal mice inhibited cell cycle progress of thymocytes in a dosage-dependent manner. Proliferation of immature CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) and CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes were both inhibited. The pretreatment of normal mice with exogenous IL-1Ra reduced acute toxicity on thymus and immune suppression induced by 5-Aza. Furthermore, thymus reconstitution after 5-Aza treatment was accelerated by IL-1Ra. In conclusion, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist could inhibit normal thymopoiesis and reduce thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse. Pretreatment with IL-1Ra would offer a new and promising strategy to alleviate immunotoxicity of chemotherapy in clinical. PMID:27158410

  9. Identification of radiation-sensitive expressed genes in the ICR and AKR/J mouse thymus.

    PubMed

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chul; Choi, Seung Jin; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hee Sun

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated radiation-sensitive expressed genes (EGs), their signal pathways, and the effects of ionizing radiation in the thymus of ICR and AKR/J mice. Whole-body and relative thymus weights were taken and microarray analyses were done on the thymuses of high-dose-rate (HDR, (137) Cs, 0.8 Gy/min, a single dose of 4.5 Gy) and low-dose-rate (LDR, (137) Cs, 0.7 mGy/h, a cumulative dose of 1.7 Gy) irradiated ICR and AKR/J mice. Gene expression patterns were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The effect of ionizing radiation on thymus cell apoptosis was measured terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP-end labeling (TUNEL). LDR-irradiation increased the mean whole-body weight, but decreased the relative thymus weight of AKR/J mice. Radiation-sensitive EGs were found by comparing HDR- and LDR-irradiated ICR and AKR/J mice. qPCR analysis showed that 12 EGs had dose and dose-rate dependent expression patterns. Gene-network analysis indicated that Ighg, Igh-VJ558, Defb6, Reg3g, and Saa2 may be involved in the immune response, leukocyte migration, and apoptosis. Our data suggest that expression of the HDR (Glut1, Glut4, and PKLR) and LDR radiation-response genes (Ighg and Igh-VJ558) can be dose or dose-rate dependent. There was an increased number of apoptotic cells in HDR-irradiated ICR mice and LDR-irradiated AKR/J mice. Thus, changes of the mean whole-body weight and relative thymus weight, EGs, signal pathways, and the effects of ionizing radiation on the thymus of ICR and AKR/J mice are described. PMID:23444016

  10. Mouse and human CD8(+) CD28(low) regulatory T lymphocytes differentiate in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Vuddamalay, Yirajen; Attia, Mehdi; Vicente, Rita; Pomié, Céline; Enault, Geneviève; Leobon, Bertrand; Joffre, Olivier; Romagnoli, Paola; van Meerwijk, Joost P M

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes play a central role in the control of immune responses and so maintain immune tolerance and homeostasis. In mice, expression of the CD8 co-receptor and low levels of the co-stimulatory molecule CD28 characterizes a Treg cell population that exerts potent suppressive function in vitro and efficiently controls experimental immunopathology in vivo. It has remained unclear if CD8(+) CD28(low) Treg cells develop in the thymus or represent a population of chronically activated conventional T cells differentiating into Treg cells in the periphery, as suggested by their CD28(low) phenotype. We demonstrate that functional CD8(+) CD28(low) Treg cells are present in the thymus and that these cells develop locally and are not recirculating from the periphery. Differentiation of CD8(+) CD28(low) Treg cells requires MHC class I expression on radioresistant but not on haematopoietic thymic stromal cells. In contrast to other Treg cells, CD8(+) CD28(low) Treg cells develop simultaneously with CD8(+) CD28(high) conventional T cells. We also identified a novel homologous naive CD8(+) CD28(low) T-cell population with immunosuppressive properties in human blood and thymus. Combined, our data demonstrate that CD8(+) CD28(low) cells can develop in the thymus of mice and suggest that the same is true in humans. PMID:26924728

  11. Influence of MHC on thymus repopulation following intrathymic transfer of mouse T-cell precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Chervenak, R.; Altazan, J.D.

    1987-04-01

    T-cell precursors (pre-T cells) traditionally have been detected by their ability to repopulate the thymus of heavily irradiated mice following intravenous injection. Recently, an assay system involving the direct injection of pre-T cells into the thymus of sublethally irradiated animals has been described. Here we report the results of experiments designed to evaluate the ability of bone marrow cells to produce thymic repopulation following intrathymic injection in a wide range of donor-host strain combinations. Irradiated (600 R) mice were injected intrathymically with 2 X 10(6) bone marrow cells which differed from the recipient with respect to their Thy-1 allotype and the percentage of thymus cells expressing either donor- or recipient-type Thy-1 was determined 9 to 23 days after injection. The results of these experiments showed that thymocytes expressing the Thy-1 allotype derived from the donor marrow were only detected when the donor and host were matched at MHC. By contrast, thymic repopulation by MHC-mismatched donor marrow cells could readily be observed when these cells were given intravenously.

  12. Changes in Mouse Thymus and Spleen after Return from the STS-135 Mission in Space

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Daila S.; Mao, Xiao Wen; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E.; Jones, Tamako A.; Slater, Jerry M.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous results with flight (FLT) mice showed abnormalities in thymuses and spleens that have potential to compromise immune defense mechanisms. In this study, the organs were further evaluated in C57BL/6 mice after Space Shuttle Atlantis returned from a 13-day mission. Thymuses and spleens were harvested from FLT mice and ground controls housed in similar animal enclosure modules (AEM). Organ and body mass, DNA fragmentation and expression of genes related to T cells and cancer were determined. Although significance was not obtained for thymus mass, DNA fragmentation was greater in the FLT group (P<0.01). Spleen mass alone and relative to body mass was significantly decreased in FLT mice (P<0.05). In FLT thymuses, 6/84 T cell-related genes were affected versus the AEM control group (P<0.05; up: IL10, Il18bp, Il18r1, Spp1; down: Ccl7, IL6); 15/84 cancer-related genes had altered expression (P<0.05; up: Casp8, FGFR2, Figf, Hgf, IGF1, Itga4, Ncam1, Pdgfa, Pik3r1, Serpinb2, Sykb; down: Cdc25a, E2F1, Mmp9, Myc). In the spleen, 8/84 cancer-related genes were affected in FLT mice compared to AEM controls (P<0.05; up: Cdkn2a; down: Birc5, Casp8, Ctnnb1, Map2k1, Mdm2, NFkB1, Pdgfa). Pathway analysis (apoptosis signaling and checkpoint regulation) was used to map relationships among the cancer–related genes. The results showed that a relatively short mission in space had a significant impact on both organs. The findings also indicate that immune system aberrations due to stressors associated with space travel should be included when estimating risk for pathologies such as cancer and infection and in designing appropriate countermeasures. Although this was the historic last flight of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program, exploration of space will undoubtedly continue. PMID:24069384

  13. Changes in mouse thymus and spleen after return from the STS-135 mission in space.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Mao, Xiao Wen; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Jones, Tamako A; Slater, Jerry M; Pecaut, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Our previous results with flight (FLT) mice showed abnormalities in thymuses and spleens that have potential to compromise immune defense mechanisms. In this study, the organs were further evaluated in C57BL/6 mice after Space Shuttle Atlantis returned from a 13-day mission. Thymuses and spleens were harvested from FLT mice and ground controls housed in similar animal enclosure modules (AEM). Organ and body mass, DNA fragmentation and expression of genes related to T cells and cancer were determined. Although significance was not obtained for thymus mass, DNA fragmentation was greater in the FLT group (P<0.01). Spleen mass alone and relative to body mass was significantly decreased in FLT mice (P<0.05). In FLT thymuses, 6/84 T cell-related genes were affected versus the AEM control group (P<0.05; up: IL10, Il18bp, Il18r1, Spp1; down: Ccl7, IL6); 15/84 cancer-related genes had altered expression (P<0.05; up: Casp8, FGFR2, Figf, Hgf, IGF1, Itga4, Ncam1, Pdgfa, Pik3r1, Serpinb2, Sykb; down: Cdc25a, E2F1, Mmp9, Myc). In the spleen, 8/84 cancer-related genes were affected in FLT mice compared to AEM controls (P<0.05; up: Cdkn2a; down: Birc5, Casp8, Ctnnb1, Map2k1, Mdm2, NFkB1, Pdgfa). Pathway analysis (apoptosis signaling and checkpoint regulation) was used to map relationships among the cancer-related genes. The results showed that a relatively short mission in space had a significant impact on both organs. The findings also indicate that immune system aberrations due to stressors associated with space travel should be included when estimating risk for pathologies such as cancer and infection and in designing appropriate countermeasures. Although this was the historic last flight of NASA's Space Shuttle Program, exploration of space will undoubtedly continue. PMID:24069384

  14. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  15. Effects of Thymus vulgaris ethanolic extract on chronic toxoplasmosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Eraky, Maysa Ahmad; El-Fakahany, Amany Farouk; El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Abou-Ouf, Eman Abdel-Rahman; Yaseen, Doaa Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    The current work was undertaken to investigate the potential effectiveness of Thymus vulgaris ethanolic extract (TVE) against Toxoplasma gondii infection in chronic experimental toxoplasmosis. To evaluate prophylactic effects, mice received 500 mg/kg TVE for 5 days before they were infected by an avirulent Me49 T. gondii strain. To investigate the therapeutic effects of the extract postinfection, daily treatment with TVE was initiated at 6 weeks postinfection and continued for 10 days. The following groups of animals were used as controls: uninfected/non-treated, infected/non-treated, and infected/treated with a combination of pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine. Brain cyst count and histopathological changes using H&E and Feulgen stains were used to evaluate the efficacy of TVE. The mean number of brain cysts was significantly decreased by 24 % in mice treated prophylactically with TVE. TVE also significantly reduced the mean number of brain cysts when administered to animals already chronically infected with T. gondii. The effect of TVE was comparable to that of treatment with a mixture of sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine (46 and 51 % reduction, respectively). Moreover, considerable amelioration of the pathological lesions in the brain and retina was observed. The results demonstrate the potential efficacy of T. vulgaris as a new natural therapeutic and prophylactic agent for use in the treatment of chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:27098159

  16. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development. PMID:26918321

  17. Environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid inhibit IL-7/STAT5 cytokine signaling pathways in mouse CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative thymus cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-04-15

    Environmental arsenic exposure is a public health issue. Immunotoxicity induced by arsenic has been reported in humans and animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanisms of As(+3) and MMA(+3) toxicity in mouse thymus cells. Because we know that MMA(+3) inhibits IL-7 signaling in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells, we studied the influence of As(+3) and MMA(+3) on T cell development in the thymus at the earliest stage of T cell development (CD4-CD8-, double negative, DN) which requires IL-7 dependent signaling. We found in a DN thymus cell line (D1) that a low concentration of MMA(+3) (50 nM) suppressed IL-7 dependent JAK1, 3 and STAT5 signaling. As(+3) suppressed STAT5 and JAK3 at higher concentrations (500 nM). Cell surface expression of the IL-7 receptor (CD127) was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+)3, but was increased by 500 NM As(+3), indicating possible differences in the mechanisms of action of these agents. A decrease in cyclin D1 protein expression was observed in D1 cells exposed to As(+3) at 500 nM and MMA(+3) starting at 50 nM, suggesting that arsenic at these environmentally-relevant doses suppresses early T cell development through the inhibition of IL-7 signaling pathway. PMID:26921788

  18. A crucial role of the thymus in induction by the lprcg gene of lymphadenopathy with autoimmunity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, A; Moriyama, T; Ogata, Y; Katagiri, T; Kimura, M

    1992-04-01

    The new mutation at the lpr locus, lprcg, induces massive lymphoproliferation characterized by the selective expansion of CD4-, CD8-, B220+, Thy-1+ cells or double-negative T lymphocytes and production of autoantibodies as does lpr. The thymus is necessary for the induction of anomalous double-negative T lymphocytes and autoimmune symptoms by lpr. To determine whether or not the thymus is also indispensable to expression of the function of lrpcg, lprcg homozygous athymic nude mice (lprcg/lprcg nu/nu; lprcg nudes) were constructed by crossing CBA/KlJms-lprcg/lprcg (CBA-lprcg) and DDD/l-nu/nu mice and observed for lymphoid organ hyperplasia and autoantibody production with or without thymus grafts from various strains of mice including CBA-lprcg. Neither lymphoproliferation nor significantly increased production of autoantibodies was observed in unmanipulated lprcg nudes. In contrast, thymus grafts of both +/+ and lprcg/lprcg genotypes caused lymphoid organ hyperplasia composed of anomalous double-negative T lymphocytes and significantly augmented the production of antibodies against single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Interestingly, serum Ig and anti-ssDNA antibody levels rose in response to thymus grafts only in IgG but not in IgM classes. These results indicate that the thymus plays a crucial role in the induction of abnormal T-cell differentiation by lprcg and that thymic genotype is irrelevant. PMID:1592441

  19. Sequential appearance of thymocyte subpopulations and T cell antigen receptor gene messages in the mouse thymus after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tomooka, S.; Matsuzaki, G.; Kishihara, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yoshikai, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Himeno, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1987-12-15

    The sequential differentiation patterns of thymocyte were observed with cell surface phenotypes and the expression of T cell antigen receptor in 800 rad irradiated adult mice. Thymus was severely reduced in size and cell number by day 5 after whole body irradiation and rapidly recovered from day 7 to day 14. Surface marker analysis on day 5 after irradiation showed thymocytes with Thy-1low L3T4+/Lyt-2- dominantly existed and suggested that these cells were radioresistant-survived cells. On the other hand, thymocytes on day 7 were composed of a large number of Thy-1high L3T4+/Lyt-2+ blast-like cells and a relatively high proportion of Thy-1high L3T4-/Lyt-2- cells which expressed a large amount of gamma-chain gene messages but scarcely any alpha- and beta-chain gene messages similar to the fetal thymocytes. On day 14, thymocytes were composed mostly of Thy-1high H-2low L3T4+/Lyt-2+ subpopulation which expressed a remarkably low level of gamma-chain gene messages, and high levels of alpha- and beta-chain transcripts analogous to those of normal adult thymus. Taken together, intrathymic radioresistent stem cells for T thymocytes seem to proliferate and differentiate after irradiation with the same pattern as was seen in a fetal thymus development.

  20. Molecular characterization of the mouse involuted thymus: aberrations in expression of transcription regulators in thymocyte and epithelial compartments.

    PubMed

    Ortman, Crystal L; Dittmar, Kimberly A; Witte, Pamela L; Le, Phong T

    2002-07-01

    Despite playing a critical role in the development of naive T cells, the thymus is involuted with age. Whether a single age-associated defect or multiple aberrations contribute to thymic involution remains controversial. Here, we determined molecular aberrations in the thymocyte and epithelium compartments of the aging thymus. We demonstrated that total thymocyte numbers declined with a stepwise kinetics; clear demarcations occurred at 1.5, 3, 12 and 22 months of age. By quantitative PCR, a 2.4-fold reduction in the copies of signal joint TCR-excised circle (sjTREC)/10(5) thymocytes was first detected at 3 months; no further reduction observed thereafter. Nevertheless, the combined reductions in thymocyte numbers and sjTREC/10(5) cells caused a 7-fold decrease in sjTREC/thymus by 3 months, 21-fold by 18 months and 72-fold by 22 months as compared to 1 month. We showed aberration in expression of E2A, a transcription regulator critical for TCR beta rearrangement. While E2A expression declined 3-fold by 3 months and 18-fold by 7 months, expression of LMO2, a negative regulator of E2A activities, increased 5-fold by 18 months. Interestingly, expression of pre-T alpha and its transcriptional regulator HEB were not reduced with age. Furthermore, keratin-8 expression, specific for cortical thymic epithelium, declined 3-fold by 7 months and remained stable thereafter. In contrast, Foxn1 expression was reduced 3-fold by 3 months, 16-fold by 12 months and 37-fold by 18 months. IL-7 expression was not reduced until 7 months and reached 15-fold reduction by 22 months. Thus, the data demonstrate that thymic involution results not from a single defect, but culminates from an array of molecular aberrations in both the developing thymocytes and thymic epithelials. PMID:12096041

  1. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus gland; drawing shows ...

  2. The SCID-hu mouse as a tool in immunotoxicological risk assessment: effects of 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutyl-imidazole (THI) and di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) on the human thymus in SCID-hu mice.

    PubMed

    de Heer, C; Schuurman, H J; Houben, G F; Pieters, R H; Penninks, A H; van Loveren, H

    1995-06-26

    SCID mice engrafted with human fetal thymus and liver tissue fragments (SCID-hu mice) are currently considered as a new tool in human immunotoxicological risk assessment. Testing of various immunotoxicants exerting thymotoxicity via different intrathymic target cell types is necessary for validation of this model. Therefore, SCID-hu mice were exposed to 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)-imidazole (THI), the immunotoxic component in the food additive, Caramel Colour III, or the organotin compound, di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC). Histopathological examination of the human thymus grafts of SCID-hu mice either exposed to THI or to DBTC showed a reduction in the relative size of the thymus cortex, an effect also described in rodents. These results indicate that the human thymus is a target for the immunotoxic action of both THI and DBTC. In addition, they indicate the promising potential of the SCID-hu mouse model as a tool for human immunotoxicological risk assessment. PMID:7624878

  3. L-selectin and alpha 4 beta 7 integrin homing receptor pathways mediate peripheral lymphocyte traffic to AKR mouse hyperplastic thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Michie, S. A.; Streeter, P. R.; Butcher, E. C.; Rouse, R. V.

    1995-01-01

    Before the development of thymic lymphoma, AKR mice undergo a striking lymphoid hyperplasia of the thymic medulla. We have previously shown that there is a marked increase in traffic of B and T lymphocytes from the periphery into the preneoplastic, hyperplastic thymuses of these mice, in contrast to the scant traffic of such cells to normal thymuses. The traffic of lymphocytes to lymph nodes and Peyer's patches is controlled in part by the interaction of lymphocyte adhesion molecules called homing receptors with their tissue-selective endothelial ligands known as vascular addressins. We have investigated the roles of homing receptors and vascular addressins in the traffic of lymphocytes to the AKR hyperplastic thymus. We demonstrate that development of hyperplasia is accompanied by an increase in the number of thymic medullary blood vessels with high endothelial venule morphology and expression of the peripheral node addressin (PNAd) and the mucosal addressin (MAdCAM-1). In vitro and in vivo functional assays show that the addressin/homing receptor pairs PNAd/L-selectin and MAdCAM-1/alpha 4 beta 7 are involved in lymphocyte traffic to the hyperplastic thymus. These results indicate that molecular adhesion mechanisms involved in tissue-selective migration of lymphocytes to peripheral lymph node and to mucosal lymphoid tissues play a role in the recruitment of B and T lymphocytes to the AKR thymus and thus in the pathogenesis of thymic hyperplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7543735

  4. Reconstituted Thymus Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zimu; Liu, Haifeng; Rui, Jinxiu; Liu, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Reconstituted thymus organ culture is based on fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC). Purified thymocyte populations, from genetically modified mice or even from other species, are cultured in vitro with thymic lobes depleted of their endogenous thymocytes (by 2'-deoxyguanosine treatment) to form a new thymus. This potent and timesaving method is distinct from FTOC, which assesses development of unmodified thymic lobes, and reaggregate thymic organ culture, in which epithelial cells are separately purified before being aggregated with thymocytes. PMID:26294406

  5. Hemopoiesis in the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Marion D.

    1995-01-01

    The presence in the thymus of hemopoietic cells other than thymocytes has been known for many years, but the extent of the hemopoietic activity of the thymus and the possible functional implications have only recently begun to receive much attention. This review summarizes the literature in this field, especially in the light of current cytokine and thymic-factor knowledge, and includes clinical relevance where possible. PMID:8770555

  6. Management of atrophic mandible fractures.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Matthew J; Haug, Richard H; Christensen, Bryan S; Aldridge, Eron

    2009-05-01

    Traumatic facial fractures that were once rarely encountered now present with increasing frequency in the elderly population. Included in this group of fractures are those of the atrophic edentulous mandible. As patients age and become edentulous, atrophy of the mandibular alveolar ridges and adjacent basal bone reduces bony surface area, bone density, and blood supply, making the mandible more brittle and increasing the likelihood of mandibular fracture during a traumatic event. Surgical treatment of these fractures has become more predictable and less morbid. However, because these fractures present so infrequently, many surgeons lack the relevant experience in handling them, and thus find the reduction and fixation of such injuries difficult. A number of techniques have been employed to treat this injury. This article reviews the more common modalities and presents updates on accepted surgical treatments. PMID:19348982

  7. Dermatoscopic findings of atrophic dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Bengu Nisa; Unlu, Ezgi; Erdem, Cengizhan; Heper, Aylin Okcu

    2015-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an uncommon locally aggressive mesenchymal tumor with a high local recurrence rate. Atrophic DFSP is a rare variant of DFSP characterized by a non-protuberant lesion. We report on a 23-year-old female, who presented with an atrophic, asymptomatic macule on the right side of her back 2 cm in diameter. Dermatoscopic examination revealed homogenous pigment network on a purplish erythematous background. The histopathological finding of the incisional biopsy material was consistent with DFSP. To our knowledge, this is the second case of atrophic DFSP discussing the dermatoscopic features of this relatively rare condition. PMID:25692086

  8. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... staged? Next Topic How is thymus cancer treated? Survival rates for thymus cancer Survival rates are often ... into account. Stage of thymoma 5-year observed survival rate I 74% II 73% III 64% IV ...

  9. Evaluating evidence for atrophic scarring treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    McGrouther, Duncan; Chakrabarty, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Atrophic scars cause significant patient morbidity. Whilst there is evidence to guide treatment, there does not appear to be a systematic review to analyse the efficacy of treatment options. Objectives To retrieve all evidence relating to atrophic scar treatment and evaluate using the Clinical Evidence GRADE score in order to allow clinicians to make evidence-based treatment choices. Method Searches were performed in Medline, EMBASE, CINHL and Cochrane to identify all English studies published evaluating treatment of atrophic scars on adults excluding journal letters. Each study was allocated a GRADE score based on type of study, quality, dose response, consistency of results and significance of results. The end score allowed categorisation of evidence into high, moderate, low or very low quality. Results A total of 41 studies were retrieved from searches including randomised controlled trials, observational studies, retrospective analyses and case reports of which 7% were allocated a high-quality score, 10% a moderate score, 7% a low score and 75% a very low score. Treatment modalities included ablative laser therapy, non-ablative laser therapy, autologous fat transfer, dermabrasion, chemical peels, injectables, subcision, tretinoin iontophoresis and combination therapy. Conclusion There is a paucity of good-quality clinical evidence evaluating treatment modalities for atrophic scarring. Evidence supports efficacy of laser, surgery and peel therapy. Further biomolecular research is required to identify targeted treatment options and more randomised controlled trials would make the evidence base for atrophic scar treatment more robust. PMID:25352991

  10. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  11. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  12. Possible association of thymus dysfunction with fading syndromes in puppies and kittens.

    PubMed

    Roth, J A

    1987-05-01

    "Wasting" or "fading" syndromes are common causes of puppy and kitten mortality. Numerous infectious and toxic, metabolic, or nutritional factors could potentially be responsible for wasting and death in young animals. Evidence has been presented that infectious canine hepatitis virus infection, beta-hemolytic streptococcus infection, and feline infectious peritonitis virus infection are responsible for a significant number of deaths due to wasting syndrome. However, many cases of wasting syndrome cannot be attributed to infectious agents or other specific etiologies. The thymus gland warrants special attention when one is evaluating an animal with a wasting syndrome because it is known that, in some species, neonatal thymectomy results in wasting and death. Unfortunately, most reports describing fading syndromes in puppies and kittens do not mention the gross or histologic appearance of the thymus gland at postmortem examination. When examining the thymus gland, one must keep in mind that the thymus may be hypoplastic owing to a congenital or genetic defect in its structure and function or it may be atrophic secondary to whatever is causing the fading syndrome. If a thorough history, clinical examination, and/or postmortem examination do not reveal a cause for the fading syndrome, then defective thymus function should be considered as a possible causative or contributing factor to the fading syndrome. In these cases, therapy designed to replace or improve the defective thymus function should be considered. At least one form of wasting syndrome in puppies (immunodeficient dwarfism) has been found to respond to short-term therapy with a thymus hormone (thymosin fraction 5) or with bovine growth hormone (which is thymotropic) in limited clinical trials. It is possible that other forms of wasting or fading syndromes would also respond to therapy with thymus hormone or growth hormone. Certain thymus hormones (thymopoietin pentapeptide, thymosin alpha 1, facteur

  13. ATROPHIC CARDIOMYOCYTE SIGNALING IN HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A.; Marion, Tony N.; Darazi, Fahed Al; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Cardinal pathologic features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle (LV) and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 wks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO4, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared to untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by: a) LV hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; b) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm2) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were re-expressing β-myosin heavy chain; and c) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with mRNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO4 cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function, but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO4 cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  14. Atrophic cardiomyocyte signaling in hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A; Marion, Tony N; Al Darazi, Fahed; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2013-12-01

    Cardinal pathological features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 weeks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO₄, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared with untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by (1) left ventricle hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; (2) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm²) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were reexpressing β-myosin heavy chain; and (3) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING-finger protein-1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with messenger RNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO₄ cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis, and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO₄ cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  15. Immune regulation by mesenchymal stem cells derived from adult spleen and thymus.

    PubMed

    Krampera, Mauro; Sartoris, Silvia; Liotta, Francesco; Pasini, Annalisa; Angeli, Roberta; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Andreini, Angelo; Mosna, Federico; Bonetti, Bruno; Rebellato, Elisabetta; Testi, Maria Grazia; Frosali, Francesca; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Tridente, Giuseppe; Maggi, Enrico; Romagnani, Sergio; Annunziato, Francesco

    2007-10-01

    We show here that human and mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be obtained not only from bone marrow (BM), but also from adult spleen and thymus. In vitro, both human and mouse spleen- and thymus-derived MSCs exhibit immunophenotypic characteristics and differentiation potential completely comparable to BM-MSCs. In addition, they can inhibit immune responses mediated by activated T lymphocytes with efficiency comparable to BM-MSCs. In vivo, mouse MSCs from BM, spleen, and thymus, if injected together with a genetically modified tumor cell vaccine, can equally prevent the onset of an anti-tumor memory immune response, thus leading to tumor growth in normally resistant mice. Our data suggest that not only do spleen and thymus have a stem cell reservoir to build up their stromal architecture, but also contain microenviromental immunoregulatory cells with the same properties of BM-MSCs. PMID:17999601

  16. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY OF THE HUMAN THYMUS CORRELATE WITH INFANT CAUSE OF DEATH

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Mark C.; Burke, Nancy; Kalantarpour, Fatemeh; Niesen, Melissa I.; Hall, Aaron; Pennypacker, Keith; Citron, Bruce; Pick, Chaim G.; Adams, Vernard; Das, Mahasweta; Mohapatra, Shyam; Cualing, Hernani; Blanck, George

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the morphological and molecular changes in the thymus for common causes of human infant death. Thymic architecture and molecular changes apparent in human infant head trauma victims were assessed by microscopy and quantified by image analysis of digital whole slide images. Thymuses from victims of SIDS and suffocated infants displaying normal thymus architecture were used for comparison. Molecular expression of proliferation and serotonin receptor and transporter protein markers was evaluated. Duplicate morphological and molecular studies of rodent thymuses were completed with both mouse and rat models. Quantification of novel parameters of digital images of thymuses from human infants suffering mortal head trauma revealed a disruption of the corticomedullary organization of the thymus, particularly involving dissolution of the corticomedullary border. A similar result was obtained for related mouse and rat models. The human thymuses from head trauma cases also displayed a higher percentage of Ki-67-positive thymocytes. Finally, we determined that thymus expression of the human serotonin receptor, and the serotonin transporter, occur almost exclusively in the thymic medulla. Head trauma leads to a disruption of the thymic, corticomedullary border, and molecular expression patterns in a robust and quantifiable manner. PMID:25309682

  17. Ectopic TBX1 suppresses thymic epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation during thymus organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reeh, Kaitlin A G; Cardenas, Kim T; Bain, Virginia E; Liu, Zhijie; Laurent, Micheline; Manley, Nancy R; Richie, Ellen R

    2014-08-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands arise from a shared endodermal primordium in the third pharyngeal pouch (3rd pp). Thymus fate is specified in the ventral 3rd pp between E9.5 and E11, whereas parathyroid fate is specified in the dorsal domain. The molecular mechanisms that specify fate and regulate thymus and parathyroid development are not fully delineated. Previous reports suggested that Tbx1 is required for thymus organogenesis because loss of Tbx1 in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome and in experimental Tbx1 deletion mutants is associated with thymus aplasia or hypoplasia. However, the thymus phenotype is likely to be secondary to defects in pharyngeal pouch formation. Furthermore, the absence of Tbx1 expression in the thymus-fated domain of the wild-type 3rd pp suggested that Tbx1 is instead a negative regulator of thymus organogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated a novel mouse strain in which expression of a conditional Tbx1 allele was ectopically activated in the thymus-fated domain of the 3rd pp. Ectopic Tbx1 expression severely repressed expression of Foxn1, a transcription factor that marks the thymus-fated domain and is required for differentiation and proliferation of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitors. By contrast, ectopic Tbx1 did not alter the expression pattern of Gcm2, a transcription factor restricted to the parathyroid-fated domain and required for parathyroid development. Ectopic Tbx1 expression impaired TEC proliferation and arrested TEC differentiation at an early progenitor stage. The results support the hypothesis that Tbx1 negatively regulates TEC growth and differentiation, and that extinction of Tbx1 expression in 3rd pp endoderm is a prerequisite for thymus organogenesis. PMID:25053428

  18. The thymus-pituitary axis and its changes during aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Brown, O A; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The pituitary-thymic axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is to review the evidence demonstrating that aging brings about a progressive disruption in the integration of this network. In doing so, we briefly review the experimental evidence supporting the view that immune and neuroendocrine aging are interdependent processes. The advantages and limits of the nude mouse as a model of thymus-dependent accelerated aging is also discussed. Next, we review a number of studies which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction 5 (TF5), thymosin alpha-1 and thymosin beta-4 on beta-endorphin, ACTH, glucocorticoids, LHRH and LH secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone (HTH) and thymus factor are summarized. Aging has a significant impact on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones. Thus, it has been reported that TF5 and HTH have thyrotropin-inhibiting activity in young but not in old rats. Furthermore, intravenous administration of HTH was also able to reduce plasma GH and increase corticosterone levels in both young and old rats, although these responses were much weaker in the old animals. Further evidence on this topic is discussed. It is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might therefore act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes

  19. Implant placement in atrophic alveolar ridges: a simplified technique.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1998-01-01

    A technique is presented that allows for the predictable and simple placement of implants into ideal restorable positions in severely atrophic, knife-edged ridges. Technical considerations and advantages of this treatment approach are discussed. PMID:9823107

  20. Thymic hormones in thymus recovery from radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Neta; Schwartz, G.N.; MacVittie, T.J.; Douches, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a thymic hormone, thymosin fraction 5 (TF5), in restoring immunocompetence in the thymus of gamma-irradiated mice was examined. Three different mouse strains were used in this study, since previous work has established that the response to TF5 varies in different strains. To measure the rate of recovery of immunocompetent cells in the thymus, the responsiveness to comitogenic effect of interleukn-1 (IL-1) was used. This assay was chosen since it has been established that only more mature PNA, Lytl(+2-) medullary cells respond to this monokine. Contrary to several earlier reports that radio-resistant cells repopulating the thymus within the first 10 days after irradiation are mature, corticosteriod-resistant, immunocompetent cells, the thymic cells from irradiated mice in all strains used had greatly reduced responses to IL-1. Daily intraperitoneal injections of TF5 increased significantly the responses of thymic cells to IL-1 in 10-13 weeks old C57B1/KsJ, C3H/HeJ, and DBA/1 mice. Older mice, 5 months or more in age, of DBA/1 strain did not respond to treatment with TF5. However, C3H/HeJ mice of the same age were highly responsive. In conclusion, (a) cells repopulating the thymus within 12 days after irradiation contain lower than normal fraction of mature IL-1 responsive cells, (b) thymic hormones increase the rate of recovery of immunocompetent cells in the thymus, and (c) the effect of thymic hormones is strain and age dependent.

  1. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Joanne; Pahouja, Gaurav; Andersen, Barbara; Lustberg, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors. PMID:25815692

  2. Atrophic vaginitis in breast cancer survivors: a difficult survivorship issue.

    PubMed

    Lester, Joanne; Pahouja, Gaurav; Andersen, Barbara; Lustberg, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors. PMID:25815692

  3. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  4. Failed Fixation in Atrophic Mandibular Fractures: The Case against Miniplates.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Matthew J; Kushner, George M; Alpert, Brian

    2011-09-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of the fractured atrophic edentulous mandible, treatment continues to be difficult. Patient management is more complicated due to patients often being elderly with more complex medical problems. Rigid internal fixation has greatly improved outcomes with shorter treatment times, yet a consensus has yet to be reached regarding which method yields the most predictable results. Options include using small miniplates to larger reconstruction plates. Although each method has advantages, we present our experience with retreatment of failed miniplate fixation using load-bearing reconstruction plates of fractured atrophic edentulous mandibles. PMID:22942943

  5. Computed tomography of the normal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Peterson, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Recognition of variations in size, shape, and density of the normal thymus on computed tomographic (CT) scans is of paramount importance, less it be misinterpreted as an abnormal mediastinal mass. Studying patients subsequently proved free of active chest disease, we analyzed 154 CT scans of the mediastinum, performed on a fourth-generation scanner, to determine the incidence of visualization and appearance of the normal thymus. The thymus was seen in 100% of patients under age 30, 73% of patients between 30 and 49 years, and in 17% of patients over 49 years of age. The thickness of the thymus showed a definite decrease in size with increasing age; although the width showed a similar general tendency, a wide variation was noted within each age group. In younger patients, the density of the thymus was similar to that of muscle; the attenuation values progressively decreased in older patients, finally approaching that of fat.

  6. Pediatric non-Helicobacter pylori atrophic gastritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Pogoriler, Jennifer; Kamin, Daniel; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Although autoimmune atrophic gastritis is classically a disease of elderly adults, recent studies have described the disease in younger adults, particularly in those with other autoimmune diseases and iron-deficiency anemia. Atrophic gastritis in pediatrics is a rare and possibly underdiagnosed entity that has been primarily reported as single-case reports. This retrospective study of atrophic gastritis not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection was performed to further expand the knowledge of clinical presentation, pathologic findings, and natural history of this disease in the pediatric population. Twelve patients with a histologic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis were identified, with an age range of 8 months to 18 years. Seven had other autoimmune diseases and/or immunodeficiency. Atrophy was confined to the oxyntic mucosa in 10 patients, with intramucosal inflammation in a diffuse or basal-predominant pattern. Active inflammation was present in 7 patients. Pseudopyloric, intestinal, or squamous/mucinous metaplasia was seen at initial biopsy or on follow-up in 8 patients, and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia was seen in 5. One patient developed an adenocarcinoma during the follow-up period of 10 years. Two false-negative diagnoses were retrospectively identified. In the majority of cases, the possibility of atrophic gastritis was not raised by the submitting physician, and the endoscopic findings were not specific. Therefore, accurate diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion on the part of the pathologist, and the diagnosis should be considered particularly in patients with a clinical history of other autoimmune diseases or iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:25602795

  7. Thymus: the next (re)generation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Velardi, Enrico; Dudakov, Jarrod A; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2016-05-01

    As the primary site of T-cell development, the thymus plays a key role in the generation of a strong yet self-tolerant adaptive immune response, essential in the face of the potential threat from pathogens or neoplasia. As the importance of the role of the thymus has grown, so too has the understanding that it is extremely sensitive to both acute and chronic injury. The thymus undergoes rapid degeneration following a range of toxic insults, and also involutes as part of the aging process, albeit at a faster rate than many other tissues. The thymus is, however, capable of regenerating, restoring its function to a degree. Potential mechanisms for this endogenous thymic regeneration include keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) signaling, and a more recently described pathway in which innate lymphoid cells produce interleukin-22 (IL-22) in response to loss of double positive thymocytes and upregulation of IL-23 by dendritic cells. Endogenous repair is unable to fully restore the thymus, particularly in the aged population, and this paves the way toward the need for exogenous strategies to help regenerate or even replace thymic function. Therapies currently in clinical trials include KGF, use of the cytokines IL-7 and IL-22, and hormonal modulation including growth hormone administration and sex steroid inhibition. Further novel strategies are emerging in the preclinical setting, including the use of precursor T cells and thymus bioengineering. The use of such strategies offers hope that for many patients, the next regeneration of their thymus is a step closer. PMID:27088907

  8. Microneedling Therapy in Atrophic Facial Scars: An Objective Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller) treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars. PMID:20300368

  9. Combination Therapy in the Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5%) patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5%) patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7%) patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1%) patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2%) patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100%) patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars. PMID:24761094

  10. T-Cell Reconstitution after Thymus Xenotransplantation Induces Hair Depigmentation and Loss

    PubMed Central

    Furmanski, Anna L; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Blundell, Michael P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Sebire, Neil J; Davies, E Graham; Crompton, Tessa

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a mouse model for T-cell targeting of hair follicles, linking the pathogenesis of alopecia to that of depigmentation disorders. Clinically, thymus transplantation has been successfully used to treat T-cell immunodeficiency in congenital athymia, but is associated with autoimmunity. We established a mouse model of thymus transplantation by subcutaneously implanting human thymus tissue into athymic C57BL/6 nude mice. These xenografts supported mouse T-cell development. Surprisingly, we did not detect multiorgan autoimmune disease. However, in all transplanted mice, we noted a striking depigmentation and loss of hair follicles. Transfer of T cells from transplanted nudes to syngeneic black-coated RAG−/− recipients caused progressive, persistent coat-hair whitening, which preceded patchy hair loss in depigmented areas. Further transfer experiments revealed that these phenomena could be induced by CD4+ T cells alone. Immunofluorescent analysis suggested that Trp2+ melanocyte-lineage cells were decreased in depigmented hair follicles, and pathogenic T cells upregulated activation markers when exposed to C57BL/6 melanocytes in vitro, suggesting that these T cells are not tolerant to self-melanocyte antigens. Our data raise interesting questions about the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific tolerance to skin antigens. PMID:23303453

  11. T-cell reconstitution after thymus xenotransplantation induces hair depigmentation and loss.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Anna L; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Blundell, Michael P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Sebire, Neil J; Davies, E Graham; Crompton, Tessa

    2013-05-01

    Here we present a mouse model for T-cell targeting of hair follicles, linking the pathogenesis of alopecia to that of depigmentation disorders. Clinically, thymus transplantation has been successfully used to treat T-cell immunodeficiency in congenital athymia, but is associated with autoimmunity. We established a mouse model of thymus transplantation by subcutaneously implanting human thymus tissue into athymic C57BL/6 nude mice. These xenografts supported mouse T-cell development. Surprisingly, we did not detect multiorgan autoimmune disease. However, in all transplanted mice, we noted a striking depigmentation and loss of hair follicles. Transfer of T cells from transplanted nudes to syngeneic black-coated RAG(-/-) recipients caused progressive, persistent coat-hair whitening, which preceded patchy hair loss in depigmented areas. Further transfer experiments revealed that these phenomena could be induced by CD4+ T cells alone. Immunofluorescent analysis suggested that Trp2+ melanocyte-lineage cells were decreased in depigmented hair follicles, and pathogenic T cells upregulated activation markers when exposed to C57BL/6 melanocytes in vitro, suggesting that these T cells are not tolerant to self-melanocyte antigens. Our data raise interesting questions about the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific tolerance to skin antigens. PMID:23303453

  12. Chronic atrophic gastritis in association with hair mercury level.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zeyun; Xue, Huiping; Jiang, Jianlan; Lin, Bing; Zeng, Si; Huang, Xiaoyun; An, Jianfu

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore hair mercury level in association with chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous stage of gastric cancer (GC), and thus provide a brand new angle of view on the timely intervention of precancerous stage of GC. We recruited 149 healthy volunteers as controls and 152 patients suffering from chronic gastritis as cases. The controls denied upper gastrointestinal discomforts, and the cases were diagnosed as chronic superficial gastritis (n=68) or chronic atrophic gastritis (n=84). We utilized Mercury Automated Analyzer (NIC MA-3000) to detect hair mercury level of both healthy controls and cases of chronic gastritis. The statistic of measurement data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation, which was analyzed using Levene variance equality test and t test. Pearson correlation analysis was employed to determine associated factors affecting hair mercury levels, and multiple stepwise regression analysis was performed to deduce regression equations. Statistical significance is considered if p value is less than 0.05. The overall hair mercury level was 0.908949 ± 0.8844490 ng/g [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] in gastritis cases and 0.460198 ± 0.2712187 ng/g (mean±SD) in healthy controls; the former level was significantly higher than the latter one (p=0.000<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis subgroup was 1.155220 ± 0.9470246 ng/g (mean ± SD) and that in chronic superficial gastritis subgroup was 0.604732 ± 0.6942509 ng/g (mean ± SD); the former level was significantly higher than the latter level (p<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic superficial gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.05). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.01). Stratified analysis indicated that the hair mercury level in healthy controls with eating seafood was significantly higher than that in healthy

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... after treatment for thymus cancer? What should you ask your doctor about thymus cancer? It’s important to ... your work schedule. Or you may want to ask about clinical trials for which you may qualify. ...

  14. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of thymus and fat tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gui C.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Reid, V.; Steinglass, K.; Ginsberg, Mark D.; Jacobowitz, Larry; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-08-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of the human thymus gland and surrounding mediastinal fat were measured to evaluate this approach in distinguishing between thymus and fat tissues during therapeutic surgery for myasthenia gravis disease.

  15. What's New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for thymus cancer What’s new in research and treatment for thymus cancer? There ... treating thymomas is still being explored. In addition, new treatments are being developed and tested. Researchers are ...

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Thymus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for thymus cancer? What are the key statistics about thymus cancers? Although thymic tumors are the ... number diagnosed each year is not known). Survival statistics for thymomas are discussed in the section “ Survival ...

  17. FOXN1 in thymus organogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Harsh Jayesh; Briones Leon, Alberto; Blackburn, C Clare

    2016-08-01

    Development of the primary T-cell repertoire takes place in the thymus. The linked processes of T-cell differentiation and T-cell repertoire selection each depend on interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells; in particular, with the epithelial cells of the cortical and medullary thymic compartments (cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells; cTECs and mTECs, respectively). The importance of the thymic epithelial cell lineage in these processes was revealed in part through analysis of nude (nu/nu) mice, which are congenitally hairless and athymic. The nude phenotype results from null mutation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXN1, which has emerged as a pivotal regulator both of thymus development and homeostasis. FOXN1 has been shown to play critical roles in thymus development, function, maintenance, and even regeneration, which positions it as a master regulator of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) differentiation. In this review, we discuss current understanding of the regulation and functions of FOXN1 throughout thymus ontogeny, from the earliest stages of organogenesis through homeostasis to age-related involution, contextualising its significance through reference to other members of the wider Forkhead family. PMID:27378598

  18. FOXN1 in thymus organogenesis and development

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Harsh Jayesh; Briones Leon, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Development of the primary T‐cell repertoire takes place in the thymus. The linked processes of T‐cell differentiation and T‐cell repertoire selection each depend on interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells; in particular, with the epithelial cells of the cortical and medullary thymic compartments (cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells; cTECs and mTECs, respectively). The importance of the thymic epithelial cell lineage in these processes was revealed in part through analysis of nude (nu/nu) mice, which are congenitally hairless and athymic. The nude phenotype results from null mutation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXN1, which has emerged as a pivotal regulator both of thymus development and homeostasis. FOXN1 has been shown to play critical roles in thymus development, function, maintenance, and even regeneration, which positions it as a master regulator of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) differentiation. In this review, we discuss current understanding of the regulation and functions of FOXN1 throughout thymus ontogeny, from the earliest stages of organogenesis through homeostasis to age‐related involution, contextualising its significance through reference to other members of the wider Forkhead family. PMID:27378598

  19. Multimodal management of atrophic acne scarring in the aging face.

    PubMed

    O'Daniel, T Gerald

    2011-12-01

    Atrophic facial acne scarring is a widely prevalent condition that can have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life. The appearance of these scars is often worsened by the normal effects of aging. A number of options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, ablative or nonablative laser resurfacing, dermal fillers, and surgical techniques such as subcision or punch excision. Depending on the type and extent of scarring, a multimodal approach is generally necessary to provide satisfactory results. Resurfacing techniques correct surface irregularities, long-lasting dermal fillers address the volume loss resulting from acne, and sub-superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) face-lift procedures counter the soft tissue laxity and ptosis associated with aging. This article briefly reviews the evolution of individual approaches to treating atrophic acne scarring, followed by case examples illustrating results that can be achieved using a multimodal approach. Representative cases from patients in their 30s, 40s, and 50s are presented. In the author's clinical practice, multimodal approaches incorporating fractionated laser, injectable poly-L: -lactic acid, and sub-SMAS face-lift procedures have achieved optimal aesthetic outcomes, high patient satisfaction, and durability of aesthetic effect over time. PMID:21491169

  20. Evolutionary conservation of neuropeptide expression in the thymus of different species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Alberto B; Aw, Danielle; Palmer, Donald B

    2006-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the immune and neuroendocrine systems cross talk by sharing ligands and receptors. Hormones and neuropeptides produced by the neuroendocrine system often modulate the function of lymphoid organs and immune cells. We have previously reported the intrathymic expression of somatostatin (SOM) in the mouse and that several neuropeptides, most notably calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), SOM and substance P (SP), can modulate thymocyte development. However, little is known about the intrathymic expression of these neuropeptides either in the mouse or in other species. Moreover, a comparative analysis of the expression of these molecules would highlight the evolutionary importance of intrathymic neuroendocrine interactions in T-cell development. We have studied the expression of different neuropeptides in the thymus of zebrafish, Xenopus, avians, rodent, porcine, equine and human by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. We found that CGRP, NPY, SOM, SP and vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) are expressed in the thymus of all species investigated. The thymic location of many of these neuropeptides was conserved and appears to be within the stromal compartments. Interestingly, in the avian thymus the expression of CGRP, SOM and SP appears to change depending on the age of the tissue. These findings suggest that neuropeptides may play an important role in T-cell development and provide further evidence of cross talk between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. PMID:16630030

  1. [Bodily movement of teeth in atrophic jaw segments].

    PubMed

    Wehrbein, H; Riess, H; Meyer, R; Schneider, B; Diedrich, P

    1990-03-01

    This experimental animal study was conducted to evaluate the extent of bone restructuring after bodily movement of teeth into an area of atrophied alveolar bone. The measured values as well as the radiographic and histologic data indicate that partial or total bone restructuring occurs depending on the rate of tooth movement. In our experiment we observed marked bone formation at an average tooth movement rate of 15 microns/day, whereas no noteworthy bone formation occurred at higher rates of tooth movement (26-40 microns/day). Basically, an improvement in attachment is possible with bodily movement in atrophic alveolar bone. However, it is important to remember the delayed periosteal reaction when planning the mechanics to be applied. PMID:2257823

  2. The mystery of the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daniel; Ellis, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The thymus is the last organ in the human body to have its mechanisms fully understood, having had its function fully delineated more than 50 years ago (Miller , Tissue Antigens 63:509-517). Prior to this, the thymus gland has had an interesting history with theories having included a role in fetal growth and development before becoming more sinisterly, a cause of sudden infant death in the late 19th century known as status lymphaticus (Paltauf , Wien Klin Wochenschr 2:877-881). Until Miller (, Lancet 278:748-749) eventually proved its primarily immunological role, the history of this mysterious gland has closely mirrored the history of medicine itself, troubling the minds of pathologists such as Virchow (, Ueber die Chlorose und die damit zusammenhängenden Anomalien im Gefässapparate, insbesondere über "Endocarditis puerperalis," vorgetragen in der Sitzung der Berliner Geburtshülflichen Gesellschaft vom 12) and Grawitz (, Deut Med Wochenschr 22:429-431), surgeons such as Astley Cooper (, The Anatomy of the Thymus Gland) and Keynes (1953, Ann R Coll Surg 12:88), and eminent medical epidemiologists such as Greenwood and Woods [, J Hyg (Lond) 26:305-326]. This article will hopefully be of interest therefore to both clinician and historian alike. Clin. Anat. 29:679-684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037529

  3. Histological Features and Biocompatibility of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitutes in the Atrophic Alveolar Ridge Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Maiorana, Carlo; Beretta, Mario; Rancitelli, Davide; Grossi, Giovanni Battista; Cicciù, Marco; Herford, Alan Scott

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atrophic alveolar ridges for implant placement is today a common procedure in dentistry daily practice. The surgical reconstruction provides for the optimization of the supporting bone for the implants and a restoration of the amount of keratinized gingiva for esthetic and functional reasons. In the past, tissue regeneration has been performed with autogenous bone and free gingival or connective tissue grafts. Nowadays, bone substitutes and specific collagen matrix allow for a complete restoration of the atrophic ridge without invasive harvesting procedures. A maxillary reconstruction of an atrophic ridge by means of tissue substitutes and its histological features are then presented. PMID:27022489

  4. Histological Features and Biocompatibility of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitutes in the Atrophic Alveolar Ridge Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rancitelli, Davide; Grossi, Giovanni Battista; Herford, Alan Scott

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atrophic alveolar ridges for implant placement is today a common procedure in dentistry daily practice. The surgical reconstruction provides for the optimization of the supporting bone for the implants and a restoration of the amount of keratinized gingiva for esthetic and functional reasons. In the past, tissue regeneration has been performed with autogenous bone and free gingival or connective tissue grafts. Nowadays, bone substitutes and specific collagen matrix allow for a complete restoration of the atrophic ridge without invasive harvesting procedures. A maxillary reconstruction of an atrophic ridge by means of tissue substitutes and its histological features are then presented. PMID:27022489

  5. The diagnostic dilemma of the posterior mediastinal thymus: CT manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Weber, T.R.; Sequeira, F.W.; Vane, D.W.; King, H.

    1983-03-01

    Extension of the normal thymus into the posterior mediastinum is rare. The CT appearance of this anomaly in an infant is presented. A mass of soft-tissue density extended from the anterior mediastinum to the posterior chest wall. The absence of any tissue-cleavage plane in the lesion and a smooth continuous lateral margin are signs of posterior extension of the thymus, and they help to distinguish this from a normal anterior thymus being present with a posterior tumor.

  6. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  7. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization

    PubMed Central

    Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7−/−CCR9−/− (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160–200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  8. Treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures with the pencilboneplate: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Henrique do Couto; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of fractures of the atrophic edentulous mandible is still low, even with the increasing life expectancy. The reduced blood supply of the sclerotic bone, the diminished contact area between bone fragments and the patient's systemic condition makes the treatment of those fractures a challenge for any professional. Treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures by means of miniplate osteosynthesis has not been the preferred method of fixation by many authors. Yet, many surgeons have applied this type of fixation for the atrophied jaw sections. This paper reports 2 cases of fractured atrophic mandibles treated with the pencilboneplate, a monocortical 2.0 mm titanium, 8 or 10-hole hardware with reinforcement on its middle portion, highlighting important considerations of its use. The pencilboneplate appears to be a valuable option for the treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures, especially by an intra-oral approach, and warrants further biomechanical and clinical studies. PMID:25838701

  9. Thoughts on Positive Selection in Thymus.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M

    2016-05-01

    Any analysis of the mechanism of signalling during positive selection in the thymus is dependent on one's model of the TCR-ligand interaction. To date, thinking about mechanism has been dominated by what might be termed the Standard (or Centric) model, which is based on analogy between the BCR and the TCR. As the present analysis is an independent rationalized view of the TCR-ligand interactions, it permits a more balanced view of positive selection. The goal here was to explore this alternative to the Standard model. PMID:26834041

  10. Comparison of transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy outcomes in atrophic and hydronephrotic kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Gülpınar, Murat Tolga; Akçay, Muzaffer; Sancak, Eyüp Burak; Akbaş, Alpaslan; Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Reşorlu, Berkan; Armağan, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy in patients with atrophic and hydronephrotic kidneys. Material and methods Clinical data were collected from 35 patients who had undergone laparoscopic nephrectomies for atrophic or hydronephrotic non-functioning kidneys between January 2010 and March 2014. Comparative analysis was carried out between the two groups examining demographic characteristics, imaging modalities, etiology, operative times, port numbers, conversion to open surgery, complications, pre-and post-operative hemoglobin and creatinine values, transfusion rates and length of hospital stays. Results Laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed for atrophic kidneys in 20 (57%) patients and for hydronephrotic kidneys in 15 (42%) patients. In the atrophic group, 3 patients (15%) required transfusion because of bleeding but none of the patients required conversion to open surgery. In the hydronephrotic group one patient (6.6%) required transfusion and conversion to open surgery because of bleeding. Both of the groups were similar in terms of postoperative hospital stay but compared to the atrophic kidneys, hydronephrotic ones were associated with a longer total operative times (90.1 min vs. 73.6 min, p=0.03). Any serious complication (except for bleeding) and mortality were not encountered in both groups. Conclusion Laparoscopic nephrectomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive technique that can be used in atrophic and hydronephrotic non-functioning kidneys. PMID:26623146

  11. Current Therapeutic Development for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarizes recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem-cell based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  12. Surfactant Protein A Expression in Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Atrophic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Hamed, Atef A.; Mohamed, Abd ElRaof Said; Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Maha A.; Abdel-Aziz, Hesham R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surfactant protein A (SP-A) exhibits antimicrobial properties and interacts with a variety of respiratory tract pathogens. Objective The objective of this study was to detect the presence of SP-A and measure its alterations in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and primary atrophic rhinitis (PAR) versus healthy controls. Methods Inferior turbinate and sinus mucosal biopsies were taken from 30 patients with CRS, 30 patients with PAR, and 20 healthy controls. Immunohistochemical staining for SP-A and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of SP-A messenger RNA were performed on nasal tissue samples. Results Immunostaining localized SP-A to the mucosa and submucosal glands in CRS specimens but failed to localize it in PAR specimens. Quantitative PCR showed a high, statistically significant increase in the SP-A levels of patients with CRS when compared with controls (p < 0.0001) and also demonstrated a significant reduction of SP-A in patients with PAR compared with controls (p < 0.005). Conclusion SP-A is significantly increased in CRS and decreased significantly in PAR and appears to be expressed by respiratory epithelial cells and submucosal glandular elements of the sinonasal mucosa. The potential therapeutic applications of surfactant in the enhancement of mucociliary clearance need to be studied. PMID:25992168

  13. Current therapeutic developments in atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarises recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem cell-based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  14. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45–0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93–11.99), and the AUC was 0.82. G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:27149493

  15. The complete genome sequence of a chronic atrophic gastritis Helicobacter pylori strain: Evolution during disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung D.; Kling-Bäckhed, Helene; Giannakis, Marios; Xu, Jian; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Cordum, Holland S.; Wang, Chunyan; Elliott, Glendoria; Edwards, Jennifer; Mardis, Elaine R.; Engstrand, Lars G.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces acute superficial gastritis in nearly all of its human hosts. However, a subset of individuals develops chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG), a condition characterized in part by diminished numbers of acid-producing parietal cells and increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Previously, we used a gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model with an engineered ablation of parietal cells to show that loss of parietal cells provides an opportunity for a H. pylori isolate from a patient with ChAG (HPAG1) to bind to, enter, and persist within gastric stem cells. This finding raises the question of how ChAG influences H. pylori genome evolution, physiology, and tumorigenesis. Here we describe the 1,596,366-bp HPAG1 genome. Custom HPAG1 Affymetrix GeneChips, representing 99.6% of its predicted ORFs, were used for whole-genome genotyping of additional H. pylori ChAG isolates obtained from Swedish patients enrolled in a case-control study of gastric cancer, as well as ChAG- and cancer-associated isolates from an individual who progressed from ChAG to gastric adenocarcinoma. The results reveal a shared gene signature among ChAG strains, as well as genes that may have been lost or gained during progression to adenocarcinoma. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling of HPAG1’s response to acid during in vitro growth indicates that genes encoding components of metal uptake and utilization pathways, outer membrane proteins, and virulence factors are among those associated with H. pylori’s adaptation to ChAG. PMID:16788065

  16. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? What are the risk factors for thymus cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting ... Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Thymus Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating ...

  17. Thymus in experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Yu I; Lomshakov, A A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Mayorov, A P; Larionov, P M

    2014-10-01

    We studied structural changes in the prostate gland, thymus, and lymph nodes in CBA mice after transplantation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the prostate gland. On experimental day 5, the number of blood and lymph vessels decreased in the gland; the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the number of immunoblasts in the thymus increased. On day 18, the number of blood vessels in the tumor decreased; the width of the cortex and glandular tissue increased in the thymus, while the number of immunoblasts was reduced. On day 28, tumor infiltration and increased number of lymphatic vessels in its stroma were observed; parenchyma was reduced, and the area of the connective tissue increased in the thymus. These structural changes indicated the development of accidental involution of the thymus during carcinogenesis of the prostate. PMID:25339587

  18. Antigen-binding thymus-derived lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Nancy M.; Greaves, M. F.

    1972-01-01

    Thymus-derived `rosette'-forming lymphocytes which have been separated from other SRBC-sensitive cells by means of cotton wool columns were examined for the presence of immunoglobulin. This was carried out by inhibition of rosette formation by anti-immunoglobulin sera. Inhibition was effected by a number of anti-IgM sera shown to contain antibodies with specificities directed towards the `hinge' region of the μ chain. No other heavy chain specific antisera were inhibitory. The ratio of rosette inhibition by anti-κ and anti-λ light chain sera varied during the course of the response to SRBC, the latter inhibiting by 89 per cent 3 days post-immunization. PMID:4113387

  19. Decision-making algorithm in treatment of the atrophic mandible fractures*

    PubMed Central

    DE FEUDIS, F.; DE BENEDITTIS, M.; ANTONICELLI, V.; VITTORE, P.; CORTELAZZI, R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Closed treatment of atrophic mandible fractures often results in malunion, pseudoarthrosis and pain. Open reduction and rigid internal fixation (ORIF) is still indicated for displaced atrophic mandible fractures. The Authors report a treatment protocol that allows to gain the best results using reconstruction plates, autologous bone grafting and free fibula flap reconstruction when necessary. Methods Retrospective analysis of 15 patients with atrophic mandible fractures who underwent treatment between 2007 and 2011. 7 cases did not receive any treatment because of their general condition, while the others 8 were surgically managed by external approach. In all cases load-bearing osteosynthesis plates with locking screws were used; in 2 of them contextual bone grafts were performed; in 1 case mandible reconstruction needed harvesting a free fibula flap. Results In 6 out of 8 cases complete functional and morphological restoration were obtained without any major complication. In 1 case suppurative infection and necrosis of the bone graft occurred, which made necessary its removing, leaving in situ only the reconstruction plate. In another case, during the first year after surgical treatment, atrophic mandible resorption occurred from one angle to the other, resulting in loss of the anchoring reconstruction plate. Conclusions ORIF is the gold standard procedure for the of atrophic mandible fractures, because it guarantees best morpho-functional outcomes and predictability. Nevertheless the Authors suggest contextual bone grafting in case of substance loss, or a poor quality bone or for dental implant surgery and free fibula flap in selected cases. PMID:24841687

  20. Thymus-derived rather than tumor-induced regulatory T cells predominate in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Sengupta, Sadhak; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant brain tumor with an average survival time of 15 months. Previously, we and others demonstrated that CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrate human GBM as well as mouse models that recapitulate malignant brain tumors. However, whether brain tumor-resident Tregs are thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) or induced Tregs (iTregs), by the conversion of conventional CD4+ T cells, has not been established. To investigate this question, we utilized the i.c. implanted GL261 cell-based orthotopic mouse model, the RasB8 transgenic astrocytoma mouse model, and a human GBM tissue microarray. We demonstrate that Tregs in brain tumors are predominantly thymus derived, since thymectomy, prior to i.c. GL261 cell implantation, significantly decreased the level of Tregs in mice with brain tumors. Accordingly, most Tregs in human GBM and mouse brain tumors expressed the nTreg transcription factor, Helios. Interestingly, a significant effect of the brain tumor microenvironment on Treg lineage programming was observed, based on higher levels of brain tumor-resident Tregs expressing glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD103 and lower levels of Tregs expressing CD62L and CD45RB compared with peripheral Tregs. Furthermore, there was a higher level of nTregs in brain tumors that expressed the proliferative marker Ki67 compared with iTregs and conventional CD4+ T cells. Our study demonstrates that future Treg-depleting therapies should aim to selectively target systemic rather than intratumoral nTregs in brain tumor-specific immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:21908444

  1. Thymus-derived rather than tumor-induced regulatory T cells predominate in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Sengupta, Sadhak; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant brain tumor with an average survival time of 15 months. Previously, we and others demonstrated that CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrate human GBM as well as mouse models that recapitulate malignant brain tumors. However, whether brain tumor-resident Tregs are thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) or induced Tregs (iTregs), by the conversion of conventional CD4(+) T cells, has not been established. To investigate this question, we utilized the i.c. implanted GL261 cell-based orthotopic mouse model, the RasB8 transgenic astrocytoma mouse model, and a human GBM tissue microarray. We demonstrate that Tregs in brain tumors are predominantly thymus derived, since thymectomy, prior to i.c. GL261 cell implantation, significantly decreased the level of Tregs in mice with brain tumors. Accordingly, most Tregs in human GBM and mouse brain tumors expressed the nTreg transcription factor, Helios. Interestingly, a significant effect of the brain tumor microenvironment on Treg lineage programming was observed, based on higher levels of brain tumor-resident Tregs expressing glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD103 and lower levels of Tregs expressing CD62L and CD45RB compared with peripheral Tregs. Furthermore, there was a higher level of nTregs in brain tumors that expressed the proliferative marker Ki67 compared with iTregs and conventional CD4(+) T cells. Our study demonstrates that future Treg-depleting therapies should aim to selectively target systemic rather than intratumoral nTregs in brain tumor-specific immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:21908444

  2. Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Tolosa, Eva; Li, Weijie; Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Wienhold, Wolfgang; Denzin, Lisa K.; Lautwein, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph; Schnorrer, Petra; Weber, Ekkehard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Kurek, Raffael; Melms, Arthur; Brömme, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II–associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of αβ-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology. PMID:12925692

  3. Unsuccessful Treatment of Atrophic Mandible Fracture by Use of Improper Materials.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Ferreira, Ana Carulina Rezende; Garcia Junior, Idelmo Rangel; Silva, Adalberto Novaes; de Carvalho Reis, Erik Neiva Ribeiro; Pires, Willian Ricardo; Bonardi, João Paulo; Borba, Alexandre Meireles

    2016-06-01

    Fractures of atrophic mandibles are present on the day by day of buccomaxillofacial surgeons. Mandible atrophy occurs due to tooth loss, which over time induces bone resorption leading to a fragile and susceptible to fracture structure. This paper reports the case of a patient victim of face trauma resulting in atrophic mandible fracture with treatment failure through the use of shared load miniplate. Therefore, a new treatment was performed with miniplate of system 2.4 along with bone graft. After 6 months, the patient was rehabilitated with implant-supported prosthesis installation. It is concluded that for successful treatment of atrophic mandible fractures, the use of rigid plates is necessary, allowing an excellent rehabilitation of the stomatognathic system. PMID:27244201

  4. Failure of miniplate osteosynthesis for the management of atrophic mandibular fracture.

    PubMed

    Santos, George Soares; de Assis Costa, Marcelo Dias Moreira; de Oliveira Costa, Cecília; Souza, Francisley Avila; Júnior, Idelmo Rangel Garcia; de Melo, Willian Morais

    2013-07-01

    Fractures of the severely atrophic (<10 mm) edentulous mandible are not common, and these fractures with a vertical height of 10 mm or less have long been recognized as being particularly problematic. Although there are advances in the treatment of the atrophic mandibular fracture, the treatment remains controversial. There are some options for treatment planning because of using small miniplates to large reconstruction plates. However, when the fixation method fails, it causes malunion, nonunion, and/or infection, and sometimes it has been associated with large bone defects. The authors describe a clinical report of a failed miniplate fixation for atrophic mandibular fracture management. The authors used a load-bearing reconstruction plate combined with autogenous bone graft from iliac crest for this retreatment. The authors show a follow-up of 6 months, with union of the fracture line and no complication postoperatively. PMID:23851887

  5. Helicobacter pylori evolution during progression from chronic atrophic gastritis to gastric cancer and its impact on gastric stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Chen, Swaine L.; Karam, Sherif M.; Engstrand, Lars; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the adaptations of Helicobacter pylori to a rarely captured event in the evolution of its impact on host biology—the transition from chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG) to gastric adenocarcinoma—and defined the impact of these adaptations on an intriguing but poorly characterized interaction between this bacterium and gastric epithelial stem cells. Bacterial isolates were obtained from a single human host colonized with a single dominant strain before and after his progression from ChAG to gastric adenocarcinoma during a 4-year interval. Draft genome assemblies were generated from two isolates, one ChAG-associated, the other cancer-associated. The cancer-associated strain was less fit in a gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model of human ChAG and better able to establish itself within a mouse gastric epithelial progenitor-derived cell line (mGEP) that supports bacterial attachment. GeneChip-based comparisons of the transcriptomes of mGEPs and a control mouse gastric epithelial cell line revealed that, upon infection, the cancer-associated strain regulates expression of GEP-associated signaling and metabolic pathways, and tumor suppressor genes associated with development of gastric cancer in humans, in a manner distinct from the ChAG-associated isolate. The effects on GEP metabolic pathways, some of which were confirmed in gnotobiotic mice, together with observed changes in the bacterial transcriptome are predicted to support aspects of an endosymbiosis between this microbe and gastric stem cells. These results provide insights about how H. pylori may adapt to and influence stem cell biology and how its intracellular residency could contribute to gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:18332421

  6. Transcriptional activator TAp63 is upregulated in muscular atrophy during ALS and induces the pro-atrophic ubiquitin ligase Trim63

    PubMed Central

    von Grabowiecki, Yannick; Abreu, Paula; Blanchard, Orphee; Palamiuc, Lavinia; Benosman, Samir; Mériaux, Sophie; Devignot, Véronique; Gross, Isabelle; Mellitzer, Georg; Gonzalez de Aguilar, José L; Gaiddon, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and their understanding might help finding therapeutic solutions for pathologies such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We meta-analyzed transcriptomic experiments of muscles of ALS patients and mouse models, uncovering a p53 deregulation as common denominator. We then characterized the induction of several p53 family members (p53, p63, p73) and a correlation between the levels of p53 family target genes and the severity of muscle atrophy in ALS patients and mice. In particular, we observed increased p63 protein levels in the fibers of atrophic muscles via denervation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. At a functional level, we demonstrated that TAp63 and p53 transactivate the promoter and increased the expression of Trim63 (MuRF1), an effector of muscle atrophy. Altogether, these results suggest a novel function for p63 as a contributor to muscular atrophic processes via the regulation of multiple genes, including the muscle atrophy gene Trim63. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10528.001 PMID:26919175

  7. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  8. Neuro-immune modulation of the thymus microenvironment (review).

    PubMed

    Mignini, Fiorenzo; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Mattioli, Laura; Cosenza, Monica; Artico, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    The thymus is the primary site for T-cell lympho-poiesis. Its function includes the maturation and selection of antigen specific T cells and selective release of these cells to the periphery. These highly complex processes require precise parenchymal organization and compartmentation where a plethora of signalling pathways occur, performing strict control on the maturation and selection processes of T lymphocytes. In this review, the main morphological characteristics of the thymus microenvironment, with particular emphasis on nerve fibers and neuropeptides were assessed, as both are responsible for neuro-immune‑modulation functions. Among several neurotransmitters that affect thymus function, we highlight the dopaminergic system as only recently has its importance on thymus function and lymphocyte physiology come to light. PMID:24676230

  9. The effects of deoxynivalenol on gene expression in the murine thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Kol, Sandra W.M. van; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2011-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and is often detected in grains. Because of its high abundance, there has been a large interest in the effects of DON in animals and humans. DON is known to be immunosuppressive at high concentrations and immunostimulatory at low concentrations. The present study aimed to acquire insight into the modes of action of DON. For this, C57Bl6 mice were orally exposed to 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg bw DON for 3, 6, or 24 h and thymuses were subjected to genome-wide expression microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that DON downregulated genes involved in proliferation, mitochondria, protein synthesis, and ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, GSEA showed a selective downregulation of genes highly expressed at the early precursor thymocytes stage. This indicates that early precursor thymocytes, particularly at the double-positive CD4+CD8+ stage, are more vulnerable to DON than very early or late precursor thymocytes. There was a large overlap of genes upregulated by DON with genes previously reported to be either upregulated during T cell activation or upregulated during negative selection of thymocytes that recognize 'self-antigens'. This indicates that DON induces cellular events that also occur after activation of the T cell receptor, for example, release of calcium from the endoplasmatic reticulum. This T cell activation in the thymus then evokes negative selection and depletion of thymocytes, which provides a plausible explanation for the high sensitivity of the thymus for DON exposure. The expression patterns of four genes indicative for some of the processes that were affected after DON treatment were confirmed using real-time PCR. Immunocytological experiments with primary mouse thymocytes demonstrated the translocation of NFAT from the cytoplasm into the nucleus upon exposure top DON, thus providing further evidence for the involvement of T cell activation.

  10. Impairment of an atrophic mandible by preparation of the implant cavity: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Timm; Torsiglieri, Tobias; Rau, Andrea; Möhlhenrich, Stephan C; Eichhorn, Stefan; Grohmann, Isabella; Deppe, Herbert; Hölzle, Frank; Raith, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    An important complication during insertion of implants in atrophic mandibles is the fracture that can be induced by preparation of the cavity. We designed this study to identify which configuration of cavities in the interforaminal region was the least likely to fracture. An electromechanical testing machine was used to measure breaking loads of specifically-designed synthetic models of atrophic mandibles. The implant cavities correlated with the common clinical patterns. Intact atrophied synthetic mandibles broke at a mean (SD) load of 729.48 (59.94) N (control group). Models with four different configurations of cavities fractured as follows: two short, wide cavities (8 x 4.2mm) at a mean (SD) load of 569.17 (67.7) N; two long, thin cavities (15 x2.8mm) at a load of 563.40 (62.0) N; four short, wide cavities (8 x 4.2mm) at a load of 667.01 (71.89) N; and four long, thin cavities (15 x 2.8mm) at a load of 409.50 (43.61) N. Biomechanical findings showed that there was a greater risk of fracture of atrophic mandibular models in long, thin implant cavities with more preparation sites. Each cavity prepared for an implant increased the risk of fracture in an atrophic mandible. The risk of fracture is greatest with long, thin cavities. PMID:27068851

  11. Accuracy of pepsinogens for early diagnosis of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer in Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Zoalfaghari, Abbas; Aletaha, Najmeh; Roushan, Nader; Taslimi, Reza; Foroutan, Hossein; Faridnia, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, non-invasive methods for screening atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of serological parameters including serum pepsinogen I (PGI), pepsinogen II (PGII) and pepsinogen I: II ratio for the screening atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. Methods: The study population consisted of 132 dyspeptic patients who had undergone upper endoscopy with biopsy. Blood samples for ELISA assays of serum PGI, PGII and IgG antibodies against Helicobacter pylori were drawn. Comparison between the two groups was done by Student’s t- test, and Mann Whitney test. Cut-off points were calculated using receiver operating curves (ROC). Results: Mean (±SD) age of the study population was 51.4 (±15.5) years. Values of PGI and PG ratio decreased significantly in the atrophic gastritis as compared with the control group (p<0.05). Values of PG and PG ratio didn’t show any significant difference between the gastric cancer and control group (p>0.05). For patients with atrophic gastritis, the area under the ROC for PGI was 0.639 (95% CI:0.538-0.741, p=0.008) in which the best cut-off value was 40μg/L (sensitivity 90%, specificity 67%, accuracy 69%, negative predictive value 92%, YI : 0.429). The area under the ROC for PG ratio was 0.711 (95% CI: 0.617–0.806, p=0.0001) and the best cut-off value was 8 (sensitivity 71%, specificity 71%, accuracy 71%, negative predictive value 86%,YI : 0.431). Conclusion: It seems that PGI, PGI: PGII ratio is potential biomarkers for screening atrophic gastritis with high sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and negative predictive value. Serology could be used as a screening method for the detection of precancerous states due to its convenience, relative low cost and safety. PMID:25695008

  12. Increased Expression of Intranuclear Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Atrophic Renal Tubules Is Associated with Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jen-Pi; Liou, Jia-Hung; Kao, Wei-Tse; Wang, Shao-Chung; Lian, Jong-Da; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Background Reduced turnover of extracellular matrix has a role in renal fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is associated with many glomerular diseases, but the histological association of MMPs and human renal fibrosis is unclear. Methods This is a retrospective study. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the review of patients’ medical records, data analysis and pathological specimens staining with waiver of informed consents. Specimens of forty-six patients were examined by immunohistochemical stain of MMP-9 in nephrectomized kidneys, and the association of renal expression of MMP-9 and renal fibrosis was determined. MMP-9 expression in individual renal components and fibrosis was graded as high or low based on MMP-9 staining and fibrotic scores. Results Patients with high interstitial fibrosis scores (IFS) and glomerular fibrosis scores (GFS) had significantly higher serum creatinine, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and were more likely to have chronic kidney disease (CKD) and urothelial cell carcinoma. Univariate analysis showed that IFS and GFS were negatively associated with normal and atrophic tubular cytoplasmic MMP-9 expression and IFS was positively correlated with atrophic tubular nuclear MMP-9 expression. Multivariate stepwise regression indicated that MMP-9 expression in atrophic tubular nuclei (r = 0.4, p = 0.002) was an independent predictor of IFS, and that MMP-9 expression in normal tubular cytoplasm (r = −0.465, p<0.001) was an independent predictor of GFS. Conclusions Interstitial fibrosis correlated with MMP-9 expression in the atrophic tubular nuclei. Our results indicate that renal fibrosis is associated with a decline of MMP-9 expression in the cytoplasm of normal tubular cells and increased expression of MMP-9 in the nuclei of tubular atrophic renal tubules. PMID:23110201

  13. Association of the Extent of Atrophic Gastritis With Specific Dyspeptic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook Hee; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Ja Yeon; Im, Seon Gyo; Kim, Eunkyung; Yang, Min Jae; Ryu, Seo Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims It remains unclear whether atrophic gastritis can affect dyspeptic symptoms. We aimed to investigate whether the extent of atrophic gastritis is associated with specific dyspeptic symptoms. Methods Consecutive adults in a routine health-checkup program were enrolled in the study. The extent of atrophic gastritis was classified into 3 groups based on the Kimura-Takemoto criteria; the gastritis with no or little atrophy (group A: C0), the gastritis with atrophy mainly in the antrum (group B: C1 and C2), and the gastritis with atrophy in the large area of the corpus (group C: C3 and O). Upper gastrointestinal symptoms were categorized into “typical reflux symptoms,” “epigastric pain syndrome (EPS)-related symptoms,” and “postprandial distress syndrome (PDS)-related symptoms.” Results A total of 1827 patients (1009 males, mean age 45.1 years) were included in the analysis. The subgroups of atrophic gastritis were as follows: group A (n = 1218, 66.7%), group B (n = 392, 21.4%), and group C (n = 217, 11.9%). Typical reflux, EPS-related, and PDS-related symptoms were present in 10.5%, 19.8%, and 16.2% of the subjects, respectively. PDS-related and EPS-related symptoms were significantly more prevalent in the group C of male patients and the group B of female patients, respectively, compared with other groups. PDS-related and EPS-related symptoms were independently associated with the group C in males (OR, 2.123; 95% CI, 1.090–4.136) and the group B in females (OR, 2.571; 95% CI, 1.319–5.025), respectively. Conclusions The extent of atrophic gastritis appears to affect the generation of specific dyspeptic symptoms in a gender-dependent manner. PMID:26424039

  14. The Thymus Is a Common Target Organ in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    Infectious disease immunology has largely focused on the effector immune response, changes in the blood and peripheral lymphoid organs of infected individuals, and vaccine development. Studies of the thymus in infected individuals have been neglected, although this is progressively changing. The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, able to generate mature T cells that eventually colonize secondary lymphoid organs, and is therefore essential for peripheral T cell renewal. Recent data show that normal thymocyte development and export can be altered as a result of an infectious disease. One common feature is the severe atrophy of the infected organ, mainly due to the apoptosis-related depletion of immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. Additionally, thymocyte proliferation is frequently diminished. The microenvironmental compartment of the thymus is also affected, particularly in acute infectious diseases, with a densification of the epithelial network and an increase in the deposition of extracellular matrix. In the murine model of Chagas disease, intrathymic chemokine production is also enhanced, and thymocytes from Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice exhibit greater numbers of cell migration-related receptors for chemokines and extracellular matrix, as well as increased migratory responses to the corresponding ligands. This profile is correlated with the appearance of potentially autoreactive thymus-derived immature CD4+CD8+ T cells in peripheral organs of infected animals. A variety of infectious agents—including viruses, protozoa, and fungi—invade the thymus, raising the hypothesis of the generation of central immunological tolerance for at least some of the infectious agent-derived antigens. It seems clear that the thymus is targeted in a variety of infections, and that such targeting may have consequences on the behavior of peripheral T lymphocytes. In this context, thymus-centered immunotherapeutic approaches potentially represent a new tool for the treatment of severe

  15. The Thymus: A Forgotten, But Very Important Organ.

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Pachura, Ewelina; Pachura, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Medical science seems to be on the threshold of a revolution: It seems possible that in twenty years, doctors will be able to replace organs in the human body like parts in a car. This is thanks to the recent achievement of a team from the Medical Research Council Center for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland - the group of researchers tried to regenerate the thymus gland in mice. The thymus gland is an essential organ for the development of the immune system, but very few people have any idea that it exists. In the literature and also in people's awareness, the fact is often that the thymus controls and harmonizes the entire immune system and the immune functioning of the organism. It is the primary donor of cells for the lymphatic system, much as bone marrow is the cell donor for the cardiovascular system. It is within the thymus that progenitor cells are created and then undergo maturation and differentiation into mature T cells. The thymus gland is located in the mediastinum, behind the sternum. It is composed of two identical lobes. Each lobe is divided into a central medulla and a peripheral cortex. The thymus is at its largest and most active during the neonatal and pre-adolescent periods. After this period the organ gradually disappears and is replaced by fat. In elderly individuals the thymus weighs 5 g. The aim of this work is to shed new light on this important immune defense organ, whose function is not confined to the destruction of nonfunctional T cells. PMID:27627572

  16. Effects of proteolysis on the adenosinetriphosphatase activities of thymus myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, N.D.; Wagner, P.D.

    1987-07-28

    Limited proteolysis was used to identify regions on the heavy chains of calf thymus myosin which may be involved in ATP and actin binding. Assignments of the various proteolytic fragments to different parts of the myosin heavy chain were based on solubility, gel filtration, electron microscopy, and binding of /sup 32/P-labeled regulatory light chains. Chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved within the head of thymus myosin to give a 70,000-dalton N-terminal fragment and a 140,000-dalton C-terminal fragment. These two fragments did not dissociate under nondenaturing conditions. Cleavage within the myosin tail to give heavy meromyosin occurred more slowly. Cleavage at the site 70,000 daltons from the N-terminus of the heavy chain caused about a 30-fold decrease in the actin concentration required to achieve half-maximal stimulation of the magnesium-adenosinetriphosphatase (Mg-ATPase) activity of unphosphorylated thymus myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of this digested myosin was only slightly affected by light chain phosphorylation. Actin inhibited the cleavage at this site by chymotrypsin. In the presence of ATP, chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain at an additional site about 4000 daltons from the N-terminus. Cleavage at this site caused a 2-fold increase in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-ATPase activity and 3-fold decreases in the Ca/sup 2 +/- and Mg-ATPase activities of thymus myosin. Thus, cleavage at the N-terminus of thymus myosin was affected by ATP, and this cleavage altered ATPase activity. Papain cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain about 94,000 daltons from the N-terminus to give subfragment 1. Although this subfragment 1 contained intact light chains, its actin-activated ATPase activity was not affected by light chain phosphorylation.

  17. The Immunoendocrine Thymus as a Pacemaker of Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-06-01

    The thymus develops from an endocrine area of the foregut, and retains the ancient potencies of this region. However, later it is populated by bone marrow originated lymphatic elements and forms a combined organ, which is a central part of the immune system as well as an influential element of the endocrine orchestra. Thymus produces self-hormones (thymulin, thymosin, thymopentin, and thymus humoral factor), which are participating in the regulation of immune cell transformation and selection, and also synthesizes hormones similar to that of the other endocrine glands such as melatonin, neuropeptides, and insulin, which are transported by the immune cells to the sites of requests (packed transport). Thymic (epithelial and immune) cells also have receptors for hormones which regulate them. This combined organ, which is continuously changing from birth to senescence seems to be a pacemaker of life. This function is basically regulated by the selection of self-responsive thymocytes as their complete destruction helps the development (up to puberty) and their gradual release in case of weakened control (after puberty) causes the erosion of cells and intercellular material, named aging. This means that during aging, self-destructive and non-protective immune activities are manifested under the guidance of the involuting thymus, causing the continuous irritation of cells and organs. Possibly the pineal body is the main regulator of the pacemaker, the neonatal removal of which results in atrophy of thymus and wasting disease and its later corrosion causes the insufficiency of thymus. The co-involution of pineal and thymus could determine the aging and the time of death without external intervention; however, external factors can negatively influence both of them. PMID:27352969

  18. Effect of graded doses of fission neutrons or X rays on the stromal compartment of the thymus in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J.A.; van Ewijk, W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the supportive role of the thymic stroma in T cell differentiation was investigated in a transplantation model using athymic nude mice and transplanted irradiated thymuses. In this model, neonatal CBA/H mice were exposed to graded doses of whole-body irradiation with fast fission neutrons of 1 MeV mean energy or 300 kVp X rays. The doses used varied from 2.75 up to 6.88 Gy fission neutrons and from 6.00 up to 15.00 Gy X rays at center-line dose rates of 0.10 and 0.30 Gy/min, respectively. Subsequently, the thymus was excised and a thymus lobe was transplanted under the kidney capsule of H-2 compatible nude mice. One and two months after transplantation, the T cell composition of the thymic transplant was investigated using immunohistology with monoclonal antibodies directed to the cell surface differentiation antigens Thy-1, Lyt-1, Lyt-2, MT-4, and T-200. Furthermore, the stromal cell composition of the thymic transplant was investigated with monoclonal antibodies directed to MHC antigens and with monoclonal antibodies defining different subsets of thymic stromal cells. To investigate the reconstitution capacity of the thymic transplant, the peripheral T cell number was measured using flow cytofluorometric analysis of nude spleen cells with the monoclonal antibodies anti-Thy-1, anti-Lyt-2, and anti-MT-4. The results of this investigation show that a neonatal thymus grafted in a nude mouse has a similar stromal and T cell composition as that of a normal thymus in situ. In addition, grafting of such a thymus results in a significant increase of the peripheral T cell number. Irradiation of the graft prior to transplantation has no effects on the stromal and T cell composition but the graft size decreases. This reduction of size shows a linear dose-response curve after neutron irradiation. The X-ray curve is linear for doses in excess of 6.00 Gy.

  19. Phosphopeptides in highly purified calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Welsh, R S; Vyska, K

    1987-01-01

    Highly purified DNA obtained from calf thymus nuclei was found to cleave after reaction with a chelating agent and subsequent dialysis against 0.01 M phosphate. During the cleavage release of proteineous material into the dialysate was observed. By means of anion exchange resin column chromatography, this material was separated into 9 main fractions. Two of these fractions P1 and P5) were found to contain the amino acids phosphoserine, asp, thr, ser, glu, gly, ala, val, ile, leu, and arg, as well as metal ion complexes of phosphoserine. The complexes were dissociated by Chelex 100 treatment. The proportion of phosphoserine was much greater in P5 than in P1. P1 and P5 contained essentially no nucleotide material. All other fractions (P2, P3, P3a, P4, P5a, P6, P7, P8, P6a, P9) were found to contain ribonucleotides and deoxynucleotides. The deoxynucleotide content was about 10% of total nucleotide content. After a deionizing treatment with Chelex, the amounts of nucleotides were extensively reduced to a level corresponding to about 1 nucleotide of 10 amino acids. In separate experiments, commercial DNA (S-DNA) was ultrasonicated, and digested with pancreatic DNAase, exonuclease III, and S1 nuclease. From DEAE Sephacel chromatography of this material the fraction obtained having the highest proportion of protein aceous material was hydrolyzed with Pronase and again chromatographed on DEAE Sephacel. From this fractionation a single fraction containing deoxynucleotides and amino acids was found. The mixture obtained by hydrolysis of this fraction with snake venom diesterase and was again rechromatographed, which revealed two peaks, one corresponding to deoxynucleotide material and a second one to a mixture of 4 amino acids, phosphoserine, asp, glu, and gly. From this it was concluded that the fraction used for diesterase digestion consisted of deoxynucleotide-amino acids, with covalent diester bonds between their deoxynucleotide and amino acid portions. The results

  20. Microenvironments in the normal thymus and the thymus in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Bofill, M.; Janossy, G.; Willcox, N.; Chilosi, M.; Trejdosiewicz, L. K.; Newsom-Davis, J.

    1985-01-01

    The disposition of epithelial cells and extracellular matrix, in the thymus of 8 cases of myasthenia gravis (MG) and in controls (over a wide age range) was studied. In the controls, the subcapsular epithelium was strongly Leu-7-positive in the fetus, negative in childhood, and positive again in adults. Another antibody, RFD4, also labeled the subcapsular epithelium in childhood and adults, but not fetal samples. The samples from MG cases showed the same staining pattern as adult control samples. The medullary epithelium was also RFD4+, and at all ages. The most striking changes in the advanced cases of MG were the unusual arrangement and hypertrophic appearance of medullary epithelial cell areas, separated by laminin-positive basement membranes from the alternating multiple bands of peripheral lymph-node-like areas. The latter had regions resembling the paracortex of lymph nodes as well as germinal centers (GCs). The T-cell zones contained heavy deposits of fibronectin. These T-cell zones were unique to the thymus in MG and were absent in the two normal thymic samples with isolated GCs. In MG the laminin-containing basement membrane, which separated the medullary epithelial and peripheral lymph-node-like areas, was fenestrated at circumscribed points closest to the GCs, thus apparently permitting communication among the medullary epithelium, the T-cell zones, the GCs and the associated antigen-presenting cells. Large numbers of interdigitating cells and some lymphocytes of cortical thymocyte phenotype were also found at these special sites, where opportunities for autosensitization may persist in MG. Images Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3874554

  1. Carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation of the thyroid (CASTLE).

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuying; Wang, Li; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xibiao; Li, Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE) is a rare intrathyroidal neoplasm, probably arising from ectopic thymus or branchial pouch remnants. The tumor was first reported by Miyauchi et al. [1].The clinical and pathological features of this tumor were classified by Chan et al. [2] into 4 groups: ectopic hamartomatous thymoma, ectopic cervical thymoma, spindle ephithelial tumor with thymic-like differentiation (SETTLE), and carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE). Recently, CASTLE has been designated as an independent clinicopathologic entity of thyroid tumors in the most recent edition of the World Health Organization classification of tumors of endocrine organs[3].To our knowledge, less than 100 cases of CASTLE have been reported in the literature, 45 cases of which (including one of the authors' patient) have been identified in China. We report a new case of this entity and suggest recommendations for diagnosis. PMID:23920320

  2. Radiation-induced formation of apoptotic bodies in rat thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Ohyama, H.; Yamada, T.; Ohkawa, A.; Watanabe, I.

    1985-01-01

    The process of interphase death of thymocytes in whole-body X-irradiated rats were studied. Cell size distribution analysis indicates that cell fragments (=apoptotic bodies) appeared in the thymus and increased in number depending on dose (200-1000 R) and time (2-6 hr) after irradiation with corresponding decrease in normal-size thymocytes. Occurrence of nuclear fragmentation in association with the cellular fragmentation was proved with cytofluorometric determination of DNA content in individual cells. Scanning electron microscopic observations also revealed extensive fragmentation of cells in the irradiated rat thymus. The results show clearly that cells as well as nuclei fragments rapidly into smaller pieces of various sizes in the irradiated rat thymus as commonly observed with apoptosis.

  3. Characterization and Angiogenic Potential of Human Neonatal and Infant Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuyun; Mundada, Lakshmi; Johnson, Sean; Wong, Joshua; Witt, Russell; Ohye, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in angiogenesis during thymus regeneration. We have previously shown that MSCs can be isolated from enzymatically digested human neonatal and infant thymus tissue that is normally discarded during pediatric cardiac surgical procedures. In this paper, we demonstrate that thymus MSCs can also be isolated by explant culture of discarded thymus tissue and that these cells share many of the characteristics of bone marrow MSCs. Human neonatal thymus MSCs are clonogenic, demonstrate exponential growth in nearly 30 population doublings, have a characteristic surface marker profile, and express pluripotency genes. Furthermore, thymus MSCs have potent proangiogenic behavior in vitro with sprout formation and angiogenic growth factor production. Thymus MSCs promote neoangiogenesis and cooperate with endothelial cells to form functional human blood vessels in vivo. These characteristics make thymus MSCs a potential candidate for use as an angiogenic cell therapeutic agent and for vascularizing engineered tissues in vitro. PMID:25713463

  4. ALTERED HISTOLOGY OF THE THYMUS AND SPLEEN IN CONTAMINANT-EXPOSED JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphological difference in spleen and thymus are closely related to functional immune differences. Hormonal regulation of the immune system has been demonstrated in reptilian splenic and thymic tissue. Spleens and thymus were obtained from juvenile alligators at two reference si...

  5. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  6. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-06-13

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  7. Major motor atrophic patterns in the face and neck: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Harnsberger, H.R.; Dillon, W.P.

    1985-06-01

    Cranial nerve deficits from various pathologic processes of the head and neck may result in characteristic patterns of denervation muscular atrophy. Such atrophic patterns may be clues to the location and extent of the lesion, particularly when cranial nerves are involved early in the course of the disease process. Thirty-six patients with computed tomographic (CT) evidence of muscular atrophy secondary to pathologic conditions involving the motor division of cranial nerves were examined. Five characteristic denervation muscular atrophy patterns seen on CT scans were identified. Recognition of these atrophic patterns can prevent misinterpretation of their CT appearance and direct the CT examination to the course of the compromised cranial nerve from the brainstem to its peripheral innervation.

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist prevents l-arginine induced immune dysfunction independent of gonadal steroids: Relates with a decline in elevated thymus and brain nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Ullewar, Meenal P; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2016-07-01

    The present study was carried out to find out the effect of leuprolide, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor agonist, on l-arginine induced immunosuppression, and relates with brain and thymus levels of nitric oxide (NO). Further, the effect of leuprolide was studied in sham operated, ovariectomized and castrated mice to understand the role of sex steroids in l-arginine induced immunosuppression. Treatment with l-arginine (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg/i.p. for 7 days) increased brain and thymus levels of NO; measured by using 'NO Measuring Instrument' (Innovative Instruments Inc., USA) in dose dependent manner. It also decreased cellularity, relative weight of thymus, DNA fragmentation, humoral, and cell mediated immunity response to sheep RBC. Prior treatment of leuprolide (100μg/mouse, s.c. for 7 days) prevented l-arginine induced rise in brain and thymus tissue levels of NO as well as the changes in immunological parameters. The protective effect of leuprolide against l-arginine induced immunosuppression and rise in brain and tissue nitric oxide levels was even evident in ovariectomized and castrated mice, suggesting that the observed effect of leuprolide is independent of sex steroids, and correlated with its ability to prevent l-arginine induced rise in CNS and peripheral immune tissue levels of NO. PMID:27130798

  9. An Unusual Presentation of Pseudothrombotic Microangiopathy in a Patient with Autoimmune Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Nasnas, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We hereby describe the case of a young female patient who presented with pseudothrombotic microangiopathy, as well as pancytopenia accompanied by autoimmune atrophic gastritis. Case Presentation. A 36-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the emergency department with fatigue and dyspnea on minimal exertion. Physical examination was unremarkable except for pallor and noninjected conjunctiva. Laboratory tests revealed high LDH and low hemoglobin, white blood cells, platelets, and haptoglobin. The peripheral blood smear showed schistocytes suggestive of pseudothrombotic microangiopathy. Low cobalamin level and hyperhomocysteinemia were also detected. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis was confirmed by gastric biopsy and positive anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Vitamin B12 supplements were given which led to rapid recovery and normalization of blood parameters. Conclusion. This case highlights the importance and serves as a reminder to clinicians to rule out cobalamin deficiency and autoimmune atrophic gastritis in patients presenting with a picture suggestive of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pancytopenia, which was completely reversible after appropriate replacement therapy without recurring to unnecessary and invasive procedures such as plasma exchange. PMID:27018160

  10. Effects of Thyme Extract Oils (from Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis) on Cytokine Production and Gene Expression of oxLDL-Stimulated THP-1-Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, A.; Reglero, G.

    2012-01-01

    Properties of thyme extracts from three different species (Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis) were examined. Two oil fractions from each species were obtained by CO2 supercritical fluid extraction. Main compounds presented in the supercritical extracts of the three thyme varieties were 1,8 cineole, thymol, camphor, borneol, and carvacrol. As a cellular model of inflammation/atherogenesis, we use human macrophages derived from THP-1 monocytes and activated by oxidized LDLs. These cells were incubated with the thyme fraction oils, and the productions and gene expressions of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, IL-6, and IL-10 were determined. Thyme extracts significantly reduced production and gene expression of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, and IL-6 and highly increased these parameters on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine. Changes on production and gene expressions were dose dependent and according to the thyme content of each species. Taken together, these results may suggest that thyme extracts could have anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22577523

  11. Cavernous hemangioma in the thymus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ose, Naoko; Kobori, Yuko; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Susaki, Yoshiyuki; Taniguchi, Seiji; Maeda, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is not a neoplasm, but rather a congenital venous malformation with the potential to develop in all parts of the body, though it is very rarely seen in the thymus. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma in the thymus partially resected. A 71-year-old woman presented with pericardial discomfort, and chest computed tomography (CT) showed a left lateral mediastinal mass which was 2.0 × 1.2 × 1.8 cm in size, with border regularity and without calcification. Its interior was partially enhanced. Three-dimensional chest computed tomography image showed a tortuous vessel connecting to the tumor. Surgical resection was performed for the purpose of providing a definitive diagnosis and treatment because a mediastinal tumor such as thymoma or teratoma was suspected. Partial resection of the thymus including the mass was done by utilizing a three-port, left-sided video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach with hoisting of the third rib with the patient in a spinal position. A wine-colored mass bulging from the surface of the left lobe of the thymus was identified along with the communicating vessel which could only be cut with an energy device. It is considered that thymic partial resection using VATS is a better option for small and non-infiltrative lesions. PMID:26943686

  12. Isolation and characterization of Thy 1 homologue from human thymus.

    PubMed

    Bonewald, L F; Goust, J M; Sade, R M; Wang, A C

    1985-01-01

    A 40 000 M.W. glycoprotein was isolated from human thymus. This molecule binds lentil lectin, reacts with an antiserum made against the p25 antigen (the human Thy 1 homologue) and possesses almost identical amino acid composition as the p25 antigen and its 40 000 M.W. dimer. PMID:2864756

  13. The primordial thymus: everything you need under one roof.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Graham; Baik, Song

    2014-08-21

    Lymphocytes normally develop within anatomically distinct tissues. In Cell Reports, Swann et al. (2014) reconstruct the primordial thymus and suggest that it was a site of combined T and B lymphopoiesis before evolving into an organ specialized for T cell production. PMID:25148021

  14. Response of gastric epithelial progenitors to Helicobacter pylori Isolates obtained from Swedish patients with chronic atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Marios; Bäckhed, Helene Kling; Chen, Swaine L; Faith, Jeremiah J; Wu, Meng; Guruge, Janaki L; Engstrand, Lars; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-10-30

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma in some humans, especially those that develop an antecedent condition, chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG). Gastric epithelial progenitors (GEPs) in transgenic gnotobiotic mice with a ChAG-like phenotype harbor intracellular collections of H. pylori. To characterize H. pylori adaptations to ChAG, we sequenced the genomes of 24 isolates obtained from 6 individuals, each sampled over a 4-year interval, as they did or did not progress from normal gastric histology to ChAG and/or adenocarcinoma. H. pylori populations within study participants were largely clonal and remarkably stable regardless of disease state. GeneChip studies of the responses of a cultured mouse gastric stem cell-like line (mGEPs) to infection with sequenced strains yielded a 695-member dataset of transcripts that are (i) differentially expressed after infection with ChAG-associated isolates, but not with a "normal" or a heat-killed ChAG isolate, and (ii) enriched in genes and gene functions associated with tumorigenesis in general and gastric carcinogenesis in specific cases. Transcriptional profiling of a ChAG strain during mGEP infection disclosed a set of responses, including up-regulation of hopZ, an adhesin belonging to a family of outer membrane proteins. Expression profiles of wild-type and DeltahopZ strains revealed a number of pH-regulated genes modulated by HopZ, including hopP, which binds sialylated glycans produced by GEPs in vivo. Genetic inactivation of hopZ produced a fitness defect in the stomachs of gnotobiotic transgenic mice but not in wild-type littermates. This study illustrates an approach for identifying GEP responses specific to ChAG-associated H. Pylori strains and bacterial genes important for survival in a model of the ChAG gastric ecosystem. PMID:19723631

  15. Transcriptomic analysis supports similar functional roles for the two thymuses of the tammar wallaby

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The thymus plays a critical role in the development and maturation of T-cells. Humans have a single thoracic thymus and presence of a second thymus is considered an anomaly. However, many vertebrates have multiple thymuses. The tammar wallaby has two thymuses: a thoracic thymus (typically found in all mammals) and a dominant cervical thymus. Researchers have known about the presence of the two wallaby thymuses since the 1800s, but no genome-wide research has been carried out into possible functional differences between the two thymic tissues. Here, we used pyrosequencing to compare the transcriptomes of a cervical and thoracic thymus from a single 178 day old tammar wallaby. Results We show that both the tammar thoracic and the cervical thymuses displayed gene expression profiles consistent with roles in T-cell development. Both thymuses expressed genes that mediate distinct phases of T-cells differentiation, including the initial commitment of blood stem cells to the T-lineage, the generation of T-cell receptor diversity and development of thymic epithelial cells. Crucial immune genes, such as chemokines were also present. Comparable patterns of expression of non-coding RNAs were seen. 67 genes differentially expressed between the two thymuses were detected, and the possible significance of these results are discussed. Conclusion This is the first study comparing the transcriptomes of two thymuses from a single individual. Our finding supports that both thymuses are functionally equivalent and drive T-cell development. These results are an important first step in the understanding of the genetic processes that govern marsupial immunity, and also allow us to begin to trace the evolution of the mammalian immune system. PMID:21854594

  16. Effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on chronic atrophic gastritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xue-Hui; Yang, Yue-Ping; Dai, Jie; Wu, Jing-Fang; Bo, Ai-Hua

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on experimental chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) in rats. METHODS: Sixty-three male adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups including normal control group, model control group and three different dosages He-Ne laser groups. The chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) model in rats was made by pouring medicine which was a kind of mixed liquor including 2% sodium salicylate and 30% alcohol down the throat for 8 wk to stimulate rat gastric mucosa, combining with irregular fasting and compulsive sporting as pathogenic factors; 3.36, 4.80, and 6.24 J/cm2 doses of He-Ne laser were used, respectively for three different treatment groups, once a day for 20 d. The pH value of diluted gastric acid was determined by acidimeter, the histopathological changes such as the inflammatory degrees in gastric mucosa, the morphology and structure of parietal cells were observed, and the thickness of mucosa was measured by micrometer under optical microscope. RESULTS: In model control group, the secretion of gastric acid was little, pathologic morphological changes in gastric mucosa such as thinner mucous, atrophic glands, notable inflammatory infiltration were found. After 3.36 J/cm2 dose of He-Ne laser treatment for 20 d, the secretion of gastric acid was increased (P < 0.05), the thickness of gastric mucosa was significantly thicker than that in model control group (P < 0.01), the gastric mucosal inflammation cells were decreased (P < 0.05). Morphology, structure and volume of the parietal cells all recuperated or were closed to normal. CONCLUSION: 3.36 J/cm2 dose of He-Ne laser has a significant effect on CAG in rats. PMID:15991302

  17. Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing as Monotherapy in the Treatment of Atrophic Facial Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2014-01-01

    Background: While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as ‘excellent’ if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and <25% improvement were labelled as ‘good’ and ‘poor’ response, respectively. The overall satisfaction of the patients and any adverse reactions to the treatment were also noted. Results: Most of the patients showed a combination of different morphological types of acne scars. At the time of final assessment 6 months after the last laser session, an excellent response was observed in 26 patients (43.3%) while 15 (25%) and 19 patients (31.7%) demonstrated a good and poor response respectively. Rolling and superficial boxcar scars responded the best while pitted scars responded the least to fractional laser monotherapy. The commonest reported adverse effect was transient erythema and crusting lasting for an average of 3-4 and 4-6 days, respectively while three patients developed post-inflammatory pigmentation lasting for 8-12 weeks. Conclusions: Fractional laser resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar scars with minimal

  18. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  19. Effects of radiation on the developing canine thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Milisen, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of in vivo and in vitro gamma irradiation of the non-lymphoid components of the thymus were studied in fetal, newborn and juvenile dogs. Thymic fragments were irradiated in vitro (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Gy) prior to explant culture. Explant outgrowths were classified as epithelial, spindle or mixed cell type and the colony diameters measured. Radiation caused a dose related decrease in both the number an diameter of spindle cell colonies at all ages, and a corresponding increase in the number of epithelial-colonies. Diameter of epithelial colonies showed a dose related decrease in fetuses but an increase in neonates and juveniles. Although the epithlium in the fetus was significantly more radiosensitive than in the neonate, the spindle cell, or mesenchymal, components of the thymus were much more radiosensitive than the epithelium at all ages. Furthermore, in the absence of radiation, non-lymphoid cells of the thymus showed an age related decrease in proliferative capacity in vitro.

  20. The inflatable thymus herniation of the normal mediastinal thymus: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stuut, Marijn; van Zwieten, Gusta; Straetmans, Jos M; Lacko, Martin; Stumpel, Constance T R M

    2016-04-01

    Anterior neck masses in young children can be a diagnostic challenge for otolaryngologists and radiologists. We present a rare case of herniation of normal mediastinal thymus in a four-year-old girl. Additional medical features as an inguinal hernia and trochlear nerve paresis raised the question whether there is a causal relationship or an association. A connective tissue disorder could not be diagnosed as possible causal factor to the abnormal movement of the mediastinal thymus. Awareness and recognition of this benign phenomenon is important in order to avoid unnecessary biopsy or surgery. Diagnosis can be confirmed by ultrasonography. Magnetic Resonance Imaging might be valuable in order to obtain more information about the extension of the mass. PMID:26968057

  1. Antibacterial activity and chemical constitutions of essential oils of Thymus persicus and Thymus eriocalyx from west of Iran.

    PubMed

    Talei, Gholam Reza; Meshkatalsadat, Mohammad Hadi

    2007-11-01

    The essential oils of Thymus persicus and Thymus eriocalyx were collected in Lorestan province, west of Iran and were examined by GC/MS and bacteriological tests. Twenty seven compounds representing 92.095% of T. persicus and 99.77% of Thymus eriocalyx essential oils were identified. The major constituents of T. persicus were thymol (10.71%), carvacrol (25.71%), gamma-terpinene (5.63%), alpha-pinene (1.14%), beta-pinene (1.02%), limonene (11.65%) trans-sabinene hydrate (7.78%) and 1-borneol (4.07%) and the major compounds of T. eriocalyx. were 1, 8-cinole (3.07%), L-linalool (1.01%), thymol (66.34%), caryophyllene oxide (2.96%) and carvacrol (7.5%). The oils also were examined for antibacterial activities against 6 standard bacteria by the broth microdilution and disc diffusion methods. They exhibited significant antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC =1 : 235, MBC =1:20), Escherichia coli (MIC = 1:320, MBC =1:80) and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (MIC = MBC = 1:1280). The results were compared with control antibiotics. PMID:19090255

  2. Detection and characterization of stomach cancer and atrophic gastritis with fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu; Jia, Chunde; Wang, Rong

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to find a valid method to distinguish gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of laser induced (514.5 nm and 488.0 nm) was measured. The serum spectrum is different between normal and cancer. Average value of diagnosis parameter for normal serum, red shift is less than 12 nm and Raman relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 nm excited is stronger than that of 488.0 nm. To gastric cancer, its red shift of average is bigger than 12 nm and relative intensity of Raman peak C by 514.5 nm excited is weaker than that by 488.0 nm. To atrophic gastritis, the distribution state of Raman peaks is similar with normal serum and auto-fluorescence spectrum's shape is similar to that of gastric cancer. Its average Raman peak red shift is bigger than 12 nm and the relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 excited is stronger than that of by 488.0. We considered it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 85.6% for diagnosis of gastric cancer compared with the result of clinical diagnosis.

  3. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G. J. M.; Mitchell, G.; Bailie, N.; Thornhill, D.; Watterson, J.; Kimbell, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  4. A two-short-implant-supported molar restoration in atrophic posterior maxilla: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the stress distribution of 2-short implants (2SIs) installed in a severely atrophic maxillary molar site. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different diameters of internal connection implants were modeled: narrow platform (NP), regular platform (RP), and wide platform (WP). The maxillary first molars were restored with one implant or two short implants. Three 2SI models (NP-oblique, NP-vertical, and NP-horizontal) and four single implant models (RP and WP in a centered or cantilevered position) were used. Axial and oblique loadings were applied on the occlusal surface of the crown. The von Mises stress values were measured at the bone-implant, peri-implant bone, and implant/abutment complex. RESULTS The highest stress distribution at the bone-implant interface and the peri-implant bone was noticed in the RP group, and the lowest stress distribution was observed in the 2SI groups. Cantilevered position showed unfavorable stress distribution with axial loading. 2SI types did not affect the stress distribution in oblique loading. The number and installation positions of the implant, rather than the bone level, influenced the stress distribution of 2SIs. The implant/abutment complex of WP presented the highest stress concentration while that of 2SIs showed the lowest stress concentration. CONCLUSION 2SIs may be useful for achieving stable stress distribution on the surrounding bone and implant-abutment complex in the atrophic posterior maxilla. PMID:27555900

  5. Radiation effects on regeneration and T-cell-inducing function of the thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Hirokawa, K.; Sado, T.

    1984-04-01

    Radiation effects on regeneration and T-cell-inducing function of the thymus were studied in three sets of experiments. When TXB mice were grafted with 1-week-old thymus which had been previously irradiated at various doses, an exponential decrease was observed in the morphological regeneration of the thymus grafts and in their T-cell-inducing function at doses of 600 R and over, showing about 10% that of the control at 1500 R. When in situ thymus of adult mice was locally irradiated, the radiation effect on T-cell-inducing function was less pronounced as compared with the first experiment; i.e., about 40% of the control at 1797 R. When in situ thymus of 1-day-old newborn mice was locally irradiated, regeneration potential of 1-day-old newborn thymus was highly resistant to radiation exposure and no effect on immunological functions was observed even by local irradiation of 2000 R.

  6. Marrow-thymus interactions during radiation leukemogenesis in C57BL/Ka mice

    SciTech Connect

    Boniver, J.; Decl'eve, A.; Lieberman, M.; Honsik, C.; Travis, M.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-02-01

    Transplantation of thymus and bone marrow cells from irradiated C57BL/Ka mice demonstrated the presence of potentially neoplastic cells in the thymus at 30 to 60 days postirradiation. During the same interval, no such cells could be detected in the bone marow; moreover, the capacity of bone marrow cells to repopulate the thymus was impaired severely. These observations suggest that the primary site of neoplastic transformation in irradiated C57BL/Ka mice is the thymus rather than the bone marrow and that impaired thymic regeneration is a critical step in radiation leukemogenesis in mice.

  7. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone - a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Valášek, Jiří; Kaiser, Jozef; Florian, Zdeněk; Wolff, Jan

    2014-12-18

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant geometries and the levels of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) on the surrounding bone. Six mandibular bone segments demonstrating different grades of mandibular bone atrophy and various bone volume fractions (from 0.149 to 0.471) were imaged using a micro-CT device. The acquired bone STL models and implant (Brånemark, Straumann, Ankylos) were merged into a three-dimensional finite elements structure. The mean displacement value for all implants was 3.1 ±1.2 µm. Displacements were lower in the group with a strong BIC. The results indicated that the maximum strain values of cortical and cancellous bone increased with lower bone density. Strain distribution is the first and foremost dependent on the shape of bone and architecture of cancellous bone. The geometry of the implant, thread patterns, grade of bone atrophy and BIC all affect the displacement and micro-strain on the mandible bone. Preoperative finite element analysis could offer improved predictability in the long-term outlook of dental implant restorations. PMID:25468296

  8. Antioxidant and Anticholinesterase Potential of Six Thymus Species.

    PubMed

    Kindl, Marija; Blažeković, Biljana; Bucar, Franz; Vladimir-Knežević, Sanda

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities of the ethanolic extracts of six selected Thymus species growing in Croatia (T. longicaulis, T. praecox subsp. polytrichus, T. pulegioides, T. serpyllum subsp. serpyllum, T. striatus, and T. vulgaris). Antioxidant effectiveness was assessed using six different assays, in comparison with rosmarinic acid, luteolin, and reference antioxidants. All tested Thymus extracts possessed DPPH (IC50 = 3-6 μg/mL) and nitric oxide (IC50 = 70-177 μg/mL) free radical scavenging activities, strong reducing properties (IC50 = 11-15 μg/mL), ferrous ion chelating activity (IC50 = 126-389 μg/mL), ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 34-80 μg/mL), and high total antioxidant capacities (238-294 mg AAE/g). AChE inhibitory activity was examined using Ellman's colorimetric method and all tested extracts showed anti-AChE activity in a dose dependent manner. The values of 10-28%, 23-39%, and 64-86% were obtained for tested concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL, respectively. Additionally, the contents of total hydroxycinnamic derivatives, flavonoids, and tannins in dried plant samples were determined spectrophotometrically. Our results highlighted Thymus species as a rich source of natural antioxidants and AChE inhibitors that could be useful in preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26351513

  9. Antioxidant and Anticholinesterase Potential of Six Thymus Species

    PubMed Central

    Kindl, Marija; Blažeković, Biljana; Bucar, Franz; Vladimir-Knežević, Sanda

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities of the ethanolic extracts of six selected Thymus species growing in Croatia (T. longicaulis, T. praecox subsp. polytrichus, T. pulegioides, T. serpyllum subsp. serpyllum, T. striatus, and T. vulgaris). Antioxidant effectiveness was assessed using six different assays, in comparison with rosmarinic acid, luteolin, and reference antioxidants. All tested Thymus extracts possessed DPPH (IC50 = 3–6 μg/mL) and nitric oxide (IC50 = 70–177 μg/mL) free radical scavenging activities, strong reducing properties (IC50 = 11–15 μg/mL), ferrous ion chelating activity (IC50 = 126–389 μg/mL), ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 34–80 μg/mL), and high total antioxidant capacities (238–294 mg AAE/g). AChE inhibitory activity was examined using Ellman's colorimetric method and all tested extracts showed anti-AChE activity in a dose dependent manner. The values of 10–28%, 23–39%, and 64–86% were obtained for tested concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL, respectively. Additionally, the contents of total hydroxycinnamic derivatives, flavonoids, and tannins in dried plant samples were determined spectrophotometrically. Our results highlighted Thymus species as a rich source of natural antioxidants and AChE inhibitors that could be useful in preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26351513

  10. Synergistic role of gaseous ammonia in etiology of Pasteurella multocida-induced atrophic rhinitis in swine.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T D; Roe, J M; Webster, A J

    1996-01-01

    One-week-old Large White piglets were weaned and allocated to 14 experimental groups, each composed of five animals. Each group was housed in a separate Rochester exposure chamber and exposed continuously to gaseous ammonia at either 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35, or 50 ppm (two groups per exposure level). One week after ammonia exposure commenced, the pigs from one group at each exposure level were inoculated intranasally with 9 x 10(7) CFU of Pasteurella multocida type D. After a further 4 weeks of exposure, all the pigs were euthanized and the extent of turbinate degeneration was assessed by using a morphometric index (J.T. Done, D. H. Upcott, D. C. Frewin, and C. N. Hebert, Vet. Rec. 114:33-35, 1984) and a subjective scoring system (Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Atrophic Rhinitis: a System of Snout Grading, 1978). Exposure to ammonia at a concentration of 5 ppm or greater resulted in a significant increase in the severity of turbinate atrophy induced by P. multocida compared with that occurring in pigs kept in 0 ppm of ammonia. This effect was maximal at 10 ppm but decreased progressively at concentrations above 25 ppm. Regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the severity of turbinate degeneration and the number of P. multocida organisms isolated from the nasal epithelium at the end of the experiment (R2 = 0.86). These findings suggest that exposure to ammonia facilitates the growth and/or survival of P. multocida within the upper respiratory tract of the pig, thereby contributing to the severity of the clinical disease atrophic rhinitis. Furthermore, exposure of pigs to ammonia at 10 ppm or greater, in the absence of either P. multocida or Bordetella bronchiseptica, induced a mild but statistically significant degree of turbinate atrophy. The findings of this study demonstrate that exposure to ammonia, at concentrations within the range encountered commonly in commercial piggeries, contributes to the severity of clinical lesions

  11. Guided Bone Regeneration of an Atrophic Mandible with a Heterologous Bone Block.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Danilo Alessio; Greco, Gian Battista; Riboli, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to test the effectiveness of using enzymatically deantigenated equine bone block as a scaffold for guided bone regeneration (GBR) during a horizontal augmentation of the lower jaw. A partially edentulous atrophic mandible was augmented using an equine-derived block with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane. After 8.5 months, two bone core samples were collected at the augmentation site, and implants were placed. A definitive prosthesis delivered 6 months after implant placement provided excellent functional and aesthetic rehabilitation throughout the follow-up period. Histological and histomorphometrical analysis of the biopsies showed newly formed bone to be present and the residual biomaterial was still undergoing remodeling. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography scans taken before augmentation and 26 months later showed maintenance of ridge width and possible corticalization of the vestibular augmented ridge side. The equine-derived bone block placed in accordance with GBR principles provided a successful clinical, radiographic, and histological outcome. PMID:26889354

  12. Atrophic nerve fibers in regions of reduced MIBG uptake in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Hajime; Ozawa Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Isao

    1995-11-01

    A myocardial MIBG-SPECT examination was conducted 2 wk after doxorubicin chemotherapy on a 52-yr-old woman without cardiac symptoms. Despite normal {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy, reduced MIBG uptake was detected in the apical anterior, inferior and lateral segments of the left ventricle. The patient died of congestive heart failure due to doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy 10 mo later. At necropsy, the left ventricle was markedly dilated and the apical anterior, inferior and lateral walls were thin, stiff and whitish. Nerve fibers in the apical inferior wall were atrophic and markedly fibrotic where MIBG uptake was most reduced. Nerve fibers in the septum were normal where MIBG uptake had remained normal. The histologic findings correspond with the findings on the MIBG image. MIBG imaging may detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy before cardiac symptoms are manifest and cardiac function deteriorates. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  13. The Opa1-Dependent Mitochondrial Cristae Remodeling Pathway Controls Atrophic, Apoptotic, and Ischemic Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Varanita, Tatiana; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Romanello, Vanina; Zaglia, Tania; Quintana-Cabrera, Rubén; Semenzato, Martina; Menabò, Roberta; Costa, Veronica; Civiletto, Gabriele; Pesce, Paola; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Di Lisa, Fabio; Mongillo, Marco; Sandri, Marco; Scorrano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial morphological and ultrastructural changes occur during apoptosis and autophagy, but whether they are relevant in vivo for tissue response to damage is unclear. Here we investigate the role of the optic atrophy 1 (OPA1)-dependent cristae remodeling pathway in vivo and provide evidence that it regulates the response of multiple tissues to apoptotic, necrotic, and atrophic stimuli. Genetic inhibition of the cristae remodeling pathway in vivo does not affect development, but protects mice from denervation-induced muscular atrophy, ischemic heart and brain damage, as well as hepatocellular apoptosis. Mechanistically, OPA1-dependent mitochondrial cristae stabilization increases mitochondrial respiratory efficiency and blunts mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, and reactive oxygen species production. Our results indicate that the OPA1-dependent cristae remodeling pathway is a fundamental, targetable determinant of tissue damage in vivo. PMID:26039448

  14. Loss of interleukin-21 leads to atrophic germinal centers in multicentric Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Shimizu, Yui; Sakurai, Nodoka; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Both multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) and immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) are systemic diseases, presenting with hypergammaglobulinemia and elevated serum levels of IgG4. However, with regard to histopathological findings, MCD shows atrophic germinal centers. On the other hand, expanded germinal centers are detected in IgG4-RD. We extracted germinal centers from specimens of each disorder by microdissection and analyzed the expression of mRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction to clarify the mechanisms underlying atrophied germinal centers in MCD. This analysis disclosed loss of interleukin (IL)-21 and B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-6 in the germinal centers of MCD. Loss of IL-21 is considered to be involved in the disappearance of Bcl-6 and leads to atrophied germinal centers in MCD. PMID:26377996

  15. Factors Modulating Recovery Rate after Intermittent Tetanic Fatigue in Atrophic Soleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhibin

    2008-06-01

    To specify the factors modulating the recovery rate after intermittent tetanic fatigue in soleus, and to seek the reasons for the decrease of recovery rate in atrophic soleus, we observed the recovery time course of different types of fatigue in isolated muscle strips. A 10 % or 50 % decrease in maximal contraction tension of tetani was defined respectively as slight or moderate fatigue. Tetanic tension recovery rates after short-term and long-term of slight or moderate fatigue were observed, some pharmacological intervention were also used. The results showed that slight fatigue only induced an inhibition to myofibril, while moderate fatigue induced an inhibition in myofibril and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channels. There were significant decreases in all of the fatigue groups in one-week tail-suspended rats. These suggest that both slight and moderate fatigue inhibit the myofibrils and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channels in one-week unloaded soleus.

  16. Comparison of different laser systems in the treatment of hypertrophic and atrophic scars and keloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharschmidt, D.; Algermissen, Bernd; Willms-Jones, J.-C.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1997-12-01

    Different laser systems and techniques are used for the treatment of hypertrophic scars, keloids and acne scars. Significant criteria in selecting a suitable laser system are the scar's vascularization, age and diameter. Flashlamp- pumped dye-lasers, CO2-lasers with scanner, Argon and Nd:YAG-lasers are used. Telangiectatic scars respond well to argon lasers, erythematous scars and keloids to dye-laser treatment. Using interstitial Nd:YAG-laser vaporization, scars with a cross-section over 1 cm can generally be reduced. For the treatment of atrophic and acne scars good cosmetic results are achieved with a CO2-laser/scanner system, which allows a precise ablation of the upper dermis with low risk of side-effects.

  17. Diethylstilbestrol alters positive and negative selection of T cells in the thymus and modulates T-cell repertoire in the periphery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicole; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S. . E-mail: pnagark@hsc.vcu.edu

    2006-04-15

    Prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) is known to cause altered immune functions and increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease in humans. In the current study, we investigated the effects of DES on T-cell differentiation in the thymus using the HY-TCR transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the female mice exhibit positive selection of T cells bearing the Tg TCR, while the male mice show negative selection of such T cells. In female HY-TCR-Tg mice, exposure to DES showed more pronounced decrease in thymic cellularity when compared to male mice. Additionally, female mice also showed a significant decrease in the proportion of double-positive (DP) T cells in the thymus and HY-TCR-specific CD8{sup +} T cells in the periphery. Male mice exhibiting negative selection also showed decreased thymic cellularity following DES exposure. Moreover, the male mice showed increased proportion of double-negative (DN) T cells in the thymus and decreased proportion of CD8{sup +} T cells. The density of expression of HY-TCR on CD8{sup +} cells was increased following DES exposure in both females and males. Finally, the proliferative response of thymocytes to mitogens and peripheral lymph node T cells to male H-Y antigen was significantly altered in female and male mice following DES treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that DES alters T-cell differentiation in the thymus by interfering with positive and negative selection processes, which in turn modulates the T-cell repertoire in the periphery.

  18. HIV-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Immunity in Humanized Bone Marrow–Liver–Thymus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Timothy E.; Allen, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T-cell responses play a critical role in the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and recent vaccine studies in nonhuman primates now demonstrate the ability of T cells to prevent the early dissemination of simian immunodeficiency virus and perhaps clear residual infection. Recent advances in humanized mouse models, in particular the humanized bone marrow–liver–thymus (BLT) mouse model, show promise in their ability not only to support sustained infection with HIV, but also to recapitulate human HIV-specific immunity. The availability of a small-animal model with which to study human-specific immune responses to HIV would greatly facilitate the elucidation of mechanisms of immune control, as well as accelerate the iterative testing of promising vaccine candidates. Here we discuss data from our recent study detailing the composition and efficacy of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in humanized BLT mice that was recently presented at a Harvard Center for AIDS Research symposium on humanized mouse models for HIV vaccine design. PMID:24151322

  19. Time Course of Atrophic Remodeling: Effects of Exercise on Cardiac Morpology and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. M.; Martin, D.; Caine, T.; Matz, T.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Early and consistent evaluation of cardiac morphology and function throughout an atrophic stimulus is critically important for the design and optimization of interventions. Exercise training is one intervention that has been shown to confer favorable improvements in LV mass and function during unloading. However, the format and intensity of exercise required to induce optimal cardiac improvements has not been investigated. PURPOSE: This randomized, controlled trial was designed to 1) comprehensively characterize the time course of unloading-induced morpho-functional remodeling, and 2) examine the effects of high intensity exercise training on cardiac structural and functional parameters during unloading. METHODS: Twenty six subjects completed 70 days of head down tilt bed rest (HDBR): 17 were randomized to exercise training (ExBR) and 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of integrated high intensity, continuous, and resistance exercise. We assessed cardiac morphology (left ventricular mass; LVM) and function (speckle-tracking assessment of longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and twist) before (BR-2), during (BR7,21,31,70), and following (BR+0, +3) HDBR. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) was evaluated before (BR- 3), during (BR4,25,46,68) and following (BR+0) HDBR. RESULTS: Sedentary HDBR resulted in a progressive decline in LVM, longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain, and an increase in twist. ExBR mitigated decreases in LVM and function. Change in twist was significantly related to change in VO2max (R=0.68, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in cardiac morphology and function begin early during unloading. High-intensity exercise attenuates atrophic morphological and functional remodeling.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell implantation in atrophic nonunion of the long bones

    PubMed Central

    Phedy, P.; Kholinne, E.; Djaja, Y. P.; Kusnadi, Y.; Merlina, M.; Yulisa, N. D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the therapeutic potential of combining bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) granules to treat nonunion of the long bone. Methods Ten patients with an atrophic nonunion of a long bone fracture were selectively divided into two groups. Five subjects in the treatment group were treated with the combination of 15 million autologous BM-MSCs, 5g/cm3 (HA) granules and internal fixation. Control subjects were treated with iliac crest autograft, 5g/cm3 HA granules and internal fixation. The outcomes measured were post-operative pain (visual analogue scale), level of functionality (LEFS and DASH), and radiograph assessment. Results Post-operative pain evaluation showed no significant differences between the two groups. The treatment group demonstrated faster initial radiographic and functional improvements. Statistically significant differences in functional scores were present during the first (p = 0.002), second (p = 0.005) and third (p = 0.01) month. Both groups achieved similar outcomes by the end of one-year follow-up. No immunologic or neoplastic side effects were reported. Conclusions All cases of nonunion of a long bone presented in this study were successfully treated using autologous BM-MSCs. The combination of autologous BM-MSCs and HA granules is a safe method for treating nonunion. Patients treated with BM-MSCs had faster initial radiographic and functional improvements. By the end of 12 months, both groups had similar outcomes. Cite this article: H.D. Ismail, P. Phedy, E. Kholinne, Y. P. Djaja, Y. Kusnadi, M. Merlina, N. D. Yulisa. Mesenchymal stem cell implantation in atrophic nonunion of the long bones: A translational study. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:287–293. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.2000587. PMID:27412657

  1. T cell receptor diversity in the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Vanhanen, Reetta; Heikkilä, Nelli; Aggarwal, Kunal; Hamm, David; Tarkkila, Heikki; Pätilä, Tommi; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Saramäki, Jari; Arstila, T Petteri

    2016-08-01

    A diverse T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is essential for adaptive immune responses and is generated by somatic recombination of TCRα and TCRβ gene segments in the thymus. Previous estimates of the total TCR diversity have studied the circulating mature repertoire, identifying 1 to 3×10(6) unique TCRβ and 0.5×10(6) TCRα sequences. Here we provide the first estimate of the total TCR diversity generated in the human thymus, an organ which in principle can be sampled in its entirety. High-throughput sequencing of samples from four pediatric donors detected up to 10.3×10(6) unique TCRβ sequences and 3.7×10(6) TCRα sequences, the highest directly observed diversity so far for either chain. To obtain an estimate of the total diversity we then used three different estimators, preseq and DivE, which measure the saturation of rarefaction curves, and Chao2, which measures the size of the overlap between samples. Our results provide an estimate of a thymic repertoire consisting of 40 to 70×10(6) unique TCRβ sequences and 60 to 100×10(6) TCRα sequences. The thymic repertoire is thus extremely diverse. Moreover, extrapolation of the data and comparison with earlier estimates of peripheral diversity also suggest that the thymic repertoire is transient, with different clones produced at different times. PMID:27442982

  2. Thymus medulla under construction: Time and space oddities.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nuno L; Ribeiro, Ana R

    2016-04-01

    The development of effective T-cell-based immunotherapies to treat infection, cancer, and autoimmunity should incorporate the ground rules that control differentiation of T cells in the thymus. Within the thymus, thymic epithelial cells (TECs) provide microenvironments supportive of the generation and selection of T cells that are responsive to pathogen-derived antigens, and yet tolerant to self-determinants. Defects in TEC differentiation cause syndromes that range from immunodeficiency to autoimmunity, which makes the study of TECs of fundamental and clinical importance to comprehend how immunity and tolerance are balanced. Critical to tolerance induction are medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), which purge autoreactive T cells, or redirect them to a regulatory T-cell lineage. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, studies by Baik et al. and Mayer et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: XXXX-XXXX and 46: XXXX-XXXX]) document novel spatial-temporal singularities in the lineage specification and maintenance of mTECs. While Baik et al. define a developmental checkpoint during mTEC specification in the embryo, Mayer et al. reveal that the generation and maintenance of the adult mTEC compartment is temporally controlled in vivo. The two reports described new developmentally related, but temporally distinct principles that underlie the homeostasis of the thymic medulla across life. PMID:26947141

  3. Constitutive synthesis of tumor necrosis factor in the thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Giroir, B P; Brown, T; Beutler, B

    1992-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a major mediator of endotoxic shock, the normal function of TNF that has preserved this protein throughout mammalian evolution remains unknown. If the protein serves a role in normal development or homeostasis, it must be produced under physiologic conditions. To determine whether TNF secretion occurs in normal animals, and to define the tissue sources of the protein, we prepared a reporter construct in which the TNF coding sequence and introns are replaced by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) coding sequence. This construct was inserted into the murine genome, yielding 13 transgenic founders. Macrophages harvested from 4 of the transgenic lines expressed CAT activity after stimulation with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Each of these 4 transgenic lines also constitutively expressed CAT activity in the thymus but in no other tissue examined. Cultured thymocytes secrete TNF, as demonstrated both by cytotoxicity assays and by immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled thymic culture medium. CAT activity was associated with the thymic lymphocyte population and not with thymic macrophages or dendritic cells. CAT activity was present in thymic lymphocytes irrespective of CD4 or CD8 expression; T cells from the spleen, however, had no detectable CAT activity. The biosynthesis of TNF in the thymus of normal animals implies a role for this protein in the development or regulation of the immune response. Images PMID:1594585

  4. Kinetics of mature T-cell development in the thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Egerton, M.; Scollay, R.; Shortman, K. )

    1990-04-01

    We have reexamined the balance between cell birth, cell maturation, and cell death in the thymus by labeling dividing thymocytes and their progeny in vivo with (3H)-thymidine, isolating clearly defined subpopulations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and determining the distribution of label by autoradiography. When mature thymocytes were precisely defined (as CD4+CD8- CD3+ or CD4-CD8+ CD3+) and separated from immature single positives (CD4+CD8- CD3- and CD4-CD8+ CD3-), a lag was observed in the rate of entry of (3H)thymidine into mature cells. Thus, many of the mature thymocytes appear to derive from a small nondividing cortical thymocyte pool, rather than originating directly from the earliest dividing CD4+CD8+ blasts. There was little evidence for cell division during or after mature thymocyte formation, suggesting a one-for-one differentiation from cortical cells rather than selective clonal expansion. The rate of production of mature single positive thymocytes agreed closely with estimates of the rate of export of mature T cells from the thymus and was only 3% of the rate of production of double-positive cortical thymocytes. This was compatible with a stringent selection process and extensive intrathymic cell death and suggested that no extensive negative selection occurred after the mature cells were formed.

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum group A correcting protein from calf thymus.

    PubMed

    Eker, A P; Vermeulen, W; Miura, N; Tanaka, K; Jaspers, N G; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D

    1992-09-01

    A proteinous factor was purified from calf thymus and HeLa cells, which specifically corrects the excision repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A) cells. Recovery of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis after microinjection of XP-A cells was used as a quantitative assay for the correcting activity of protein preparations. XP-A correcting protein appears to be very stable as it withstands heating to 100 degrees C and treatment with SDS or 6 M urea. A molecular weight of 40-45 kD was found both under native (gel filtration) and denaturing (SDS-PAGE) conditions. Calf XP-A protein binds to single-stranded DNA more strongly than to double-stranded DNA, but shows no clear preference for UV-irradiated DNA. Polyclonal antibodies raised against human recombinant XP-A protein, which strongly inhibit UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis of normal human cells, completely abolished XP-A correcting activity when mixed with calf thymus preparations. This indicates a close relationship between human gene product and the calf protein. In the final preparation two main protein bands were present. Only one band at approx. 41 kD showed both DNA binding activity in Southwestern blots and immune reaction with human XP-A antibody, suggesting that this is the active calf XP-A correcting factor. PMID:1380654

  6. Genetic diversity and chemical polymorphism of some Thymus species.

    PubMed

    Rustaiee, Ali Reza; Yavari, Alireza; Nazeri, Vahideh; Shokrpour, Majid; Sefidkon, Fatemeh; Rasouli, Musa

    2013-06-01

    To ascertain whether there are chemical and genetic relationships among some Thymus species and also to determine correlation between these two sets of data, the essential-oil composition and genetic variability of six populations of Thymus including: T. daenensis ČELAK. (two populations), T. fallax FISCH. & C.A.MEY., T. fedtschenkoi RONNIGER, T. migricus KLOKOV & DES.-SHOST., and T. vulgaris L. were analyzed by GC and GC/MS, and also by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Thus, 27 individuals were analyzed using 16 RAPD primers, which generated 264 polymorphic scorable bands and volatiles isolated by distillation extraction were subjected to GC and GC/MS analyses. The yields of oils ranged from 2.1 to 3.8% (v/w), and 34 components were identified, amounting to a total percentage of 97.8-99.9%. RAPD Markers allowed a perfect distinction between the different species based on their distinctive genetic background. However, they did not show identical clustering with the volatile-oil profiles. PMID:23776024

  7. Parvalbumin in cortical epithelial cells of the pigeon thymus

    PubMed Central

    ATOJI, YASURO; YAMAMOTO, YOSHIO; SUZUKI, YOSHITAKA

    2000-01-01

    We examined the distribution of parvalbumin in the pigeon thymus by light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry. Tissues were also examined by conventional electron microscopy to determine the ultrastructure of immunoreactive cells. Parvalbumin immunoreaction was located in epithelial cells of the cortex, which formed dense mesh-like structures. Parvalbumin-positive epithelial cells were classified into 2 types. The first comprised elongated cells. In these, the nucleus was spindle-shaped, oval, or triangular, with a slightly irregular contour and contained rich heterochromatin peripherally. The cytoplasm was pale and processes extended laterally or ramified among the surrounding thymocytes. This type of cell formed the majority of immunoreactive cells. The other cell type consisted of polygonal epithelial cells. The nucleus was oval with deep indentations. Euchromatin occupied a large part of the nucleus. The cytoplasm contained numerous cell organelles compared with the elongated type, in particular, electron-dense vacuoles of various sizes and often bundles of tonofilaments. Both types of epithelial cell were interconnected by desmosomes. No secretory granules were found in the cytoplasm of elongated or polygonal cells. These results indicate the presence of heterogeneous group of parvalbumin-immunoreactive epithelial cells and suggest the likelihood of different functional roles for parvalbumin in the pigeon thymus. PMID:10853953

  8. Thymus recovery after intensive physical exercise under conditions of immunocorrection and without it.

    PubMed

    Sapin, M R; Tkachuk, M G

    2005-11-01

    Exogenous antioxidants, e.g. tocopherol, prevent undesirable changes in the thymus and accelerate its recovery after intensive physical exercise. Four weeks after the end of training (swimming) the general structure of the thymus and content of LPO products in rats treated with tocopherol corresponded to the control values, in contrast to animals receiving no correction. PMID:16758627

  9. VEGF-mediated cross-talk within the neonatal murine thymus

    PubMed Central

    Cuddihy, Andrew R.; Ge, Shundi; Zhu, Judy; Jang, Julie; Chidgey, Ann; Thurston, Gavin; Boyd, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of cross-talk that regulate the hematopoietic and epithelial compartments of the thymus are well established, the interactions of these compartments with the thymic endothelium have been largely ignored. Current understanding of the thymic vasculature is based on studies of adult thymus. We show that the neonatal period represents a unique phase of thymic growth and differentiation, marked by endothelium that is organized as primitive, dense networks of capillaries dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF dependence in neonates is mediated by significantly higher levels of both VEGF production and endothelial VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) expression than in the adult thymus. VEGF is expressed locally in the neonatal thymus by immature, CD4−CD8− “double negative” (DN) thymocytes and thymic epithelium. Relative to adult thymus, the neonatal thymus has greater thymocyte proliferation, and a predominance of immature thymocytes and cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs). Inhibition of VEGF signaling during the neonatal period results in rapid loss of the dense capillaries in the thymus and a marked reduction in the number of thymocytes. These data demonstrate that, during the early postnatal period, VEGF mediates cross-talk between the thymocyte and endothelial compartments of the thymus. PMID:19088378

  10. The human thymus. A chimeric organ comprised of central and peripheral lymphoid components.

    PubMed

    Haynes, B F; Hale, L P

    1998-01-01

    The human thymus is a lymphoepithelial organ in which T cells develop during fetal life. After maturation and selection in the fetal thymic microenvironment, T cells emigrate to peripheral lymphoid tissues such as the spleen, gut, and lymph nodes, and establish the peripheral T cell repertoire. Although the thymus has enormous regenerative capacity during fetal development, the regenerative capacity of the human postnatal thymus decreases over time. With the advent of intensive chemotherapy regimens for a variety of cancer syndromes, and the discovery that infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) leads to severe loss of CD4+ T cells, has come the need to understand the role of the human thymus in reconstitution of the immune system in adults. During a recent study of the thymus in HIV infection, we observed many CD8+ T cells in AIDS thymuses that had markers consistent with those of mature effector cytotoxic T cells usually found in peripheral immune tissues, and noted these CD8+ effector T cells were predominantly located in a thymic zone termed the thymic perivascular space. This article reviews our own work on the thymus in HIV-1 infection, and discusses the work of others that, taken together, suggest that the thymus contains peripheral immune cell components not only in the setting of HIV infection, but also in myasthenia gravis, as well as throughout normal life during the process of thymus involution. Thus, the human thymus can be thought of as a chimeric organ comprised of both central and peripheral lymphoid tissues. These observations have led us to postulate that the thymic epithelial atrophy and decrease in thymopoiesis that occurs in myasthenia gravis, HIV-1 infection, and thymic involution may in part derive from cytokines or other factors produced by peripheral immune cells within the thymic perivascular space. PMID:9951649

  11. Thymus Transplantation in Complete DiGeorge Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Markert, M. Louise; Devlin, Blythe H.; Chinn, Ivan; McCarthy, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Complete DiGeorge anomaly is characterized by athymia, congenital heart disease and hypoparathyroidism. This congenital disease is fatal by age 2 years unless immune reconstitution is successful. There are multiple underlying syndromes associated with complete DiGeorge anomaly including 22q11 hemizygosity in approximately 50%, CHARGE association in approximately 25%, and diabetic embryopathy in approximately 15%. Approximately one third of patients present with rash and lymphadenopathy associated with oligoclonal “host” T cells. This condition resembles Omenn syndrome. Immunosuppression is necessary to control the oligoclonal T cells. The results of thymus transplantation are reported for a series of 50 patients, 36 of whom survive. The survivors develop naïve T cells and a diverse T cell repertoire. PMID:19066739

  12. RAPD and phytochemical analysis of Thymus moroderi plantlets after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Marco-Medina, Ana; Casas, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cryopreservation is at present the most reliable strategy to preserve plant germplasm. When aromatic plants are the object of conservation it is necessary to assess not only the genetic but also the phytochemical stability to ensure that plant material maintains its qualities after storage. In this work we present molecular and phytochemical stability data related to a previously described vitrification-based cryopreservation protocol for Thymus moroderi Pau ex Martínez. RAPD markers have been used to assess the genetic stability of T. moroderi explants and revealed 0.34 percent of variation in the cryopreserved material studied. Phytochemical data collected from GC-MS analysis of dichloromethane extracts from cryopreserved plantlets rendered a profile in which 1,8-cineole (14.5 percent), camphor (5.9 percent) and borneol (5.2 percent) were the major components. Both data confirmed the suitability of the cryopreservation protocol applied. PMID:23625080

  13. The reactivity of the thiol groups of calf thymus deoxyribonucleohistone

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, J.E.; Walker, I.O.

    1974-01-01

    The reactivities of the two cysteine thiol groups of calf thymus F3 histone were investigated using 5,5′-dithiobis-[2- nitrobenzoic acid], (DTNB). In isolated histone, both thiol groups were available for reaction. However, analysis of reaction profiles of native deoxyribonucleohistone, (DNH), in various solvent conditions, together with gel electrophoresis studies of DNH modified with DTNB, showed that only one of the thiol groups is normally modified by the reagent. If NaCl is present (above 1.OM) the other thiol group can also be modified. The reactivities of both groups were largely independent of the degree of DNH supercoiling and of the binding of F3 to the DNA. PMID:4472380

  14. [A surgical case of Hodgkin's lymphoma originated from thymus].

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Y; Kobayashi, T; Nawata, S; Hirayama, T; Mori, F; Esato, K

    1990-01-01

    We experienced a surgical case of large Hodgkin's lymphoma of the thymus. An 18 year-old male who had been complaining of a persistent cough was admitted to our hospital. Chest X-ray film showed an anterosuperior mediastinal tumor. But there was no superficial lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. He received a surgical extirpation of the tumor approached by median sternotomy. The tumor expanded to the whole antero superior mediastinal region, which was 18.5 X 15 X 5.5 cm in size, surrounding the trachea and main branch of aortic arch and veins. The tumor directly invaded the bilateral pleura and left innominate vein, so these regions were resected with the tumor. The left innominate vein was reconstructed with a PTFE graft. The pathological diagnosis was Hodgkin's lymphoma nodular sclerosis type by LSG classification. A post operative course was uneventful. PMID:2329291

  15. Contributory and Exacerbating Roles of Gaseous Ammonia and Organic Dust in the Etiology of Atrophic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T. D. C.; Roe, J. M.; Hayes, C. M.; Jones, P.; Pearson, G. R.; Webster, A. J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Pigs reared commercially indoors are exposed to air heavily contaminated with particulate and gaseous pollutants. Epidemiological surveys have shown an association between the levels of these pollutants and the severity of lesions associated with the upper respiratory tract disease of swine atrophic rhinitis. This study investigated the role of aerial pollutants in the etiology of atrophic rhinitis induced by Pasteurella multocida. Forty, 1-week-old Large White piglets were weaned and divided into eight groups designated A to H. The groups were housed in Rochester exposure chambers and continuously exposed to the following pollutants: ovalbumin (groups A and B), ammonia (groups C and D), ovalbumin plus ammonia (groups E and F), and unpolluted air (groups G and H). The concentrations of pollutants used were 20 mg m−3 total mass and 5 mg m−3 respirable mass for ovalbumin dust and 50 ppm for ammonia. One week after exposure commenced, the pigs in groups A, C, E, and G were infected with P. multocida type D by intranasal inoculation. After 4 weeks of exposure to pollutants, the pigs were killed and the extent of turbinate atrophy was assessed with a morphometric index (MI). Control pigs kept in clean air and not inoculated with P. multocida (group H) had normal turbinate morphology with a mean MI of 41.12% (standard deviation [SD], ± 1.59%). In contrast, exposure to pollutants in the absence of P. multocida (groups B, D, and F) induced mild turbinate atrophy with mean MIs of 49.65% (SD, ±1.96%), 51.04% (SD, ±2.06%), and 49.88% (SD, ±3.51%), respectively. A similar level of atrophy was also evoked by inoculation with P. multocida in the absence of pollutants (group G), giving a mean MI of 50.77% (SD, ±2.07%). However, when P. multocida inoculation was combined with pollutant exposure (groups A, C, and E) moderate to severe turbinate atrophy occurred with mean MIs of 64.93% (SD, ±4.64%), 59.18% (SD, ±2.79%), and 73.30% (SD, ±3.19%), respectively. The severity

  16. Subpopulations of T lymphocytes emigrating in venous blood draining pig thymus labelled in vivo with fluorochrome.

    PubMed Central

    Binns, R M; Pabst, R; Licence, S T

    1988-01-01

    The emigration of labelled thymus cells in the pig was studied directly in blood draining the large right distal cervical lobe of the thymus after controlled labelling with FITC delivered through cannulated branches of a main thymic artery and vein by temporary ex vivo perfusion at body temperature. Roughly 1% of thymic cells emigrated per day. Unlike most thymocytes, which are small, the size spectrum of thymic emigrants is slightly larger than that of typical blood lymphocytes. Surface-marker studies show that the surface phenotypes of the emigrants differ from both typical thymus and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Although the emigrants resemble thymocytes in the high proportion of strong rosettes formed with sheep red blood cells (RBC), they rosette poorly with pig red cells, particularly in the unenhanced saline test, in this respect behaving like blood lymphocytes. The peripheral T-cell subset bearing a Fc receptor is almost absent in thymus, but is well represented among the emigrants which thus resemble corticosteroid-resistant thymocytes in the pig. The large population of thymus-dependent Null lymphocytes in young pig blood apparently arise in thymus since they constitute 1/3 of emigrants, although only forming less than 10% of thymus cells. This emigration of thymic cells is discussed in relation to its implications for the turnover of known functional peripheral T-cell populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3258276

  17. Efficacy of fractional CO2 laser in treatment of atrophic scar of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Nahidi, Yalda; Maleki, Masoud; Esmaily, Habibollah; Moghimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Unfortunately, it can lead to unsightly atrophic scars with limited treatment options. Fractional CO2 laser is accepted for treatment of atrophic acne scars and recently has been used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis, so we planned to use fractional CO2 laser on leishmaniasis scar. We conducted this study on 60 leishmaniasis scars on the face of 40 patients. The lesions were treated by a fractional CO2 laser with beam size of 120 μm, with energy of 50-90 mJ, and 50-100 spots/cm(2) density with two passes in three monthly sessions. Evaluation was done in the first and second months after the first treatment and 3 and 6 months after the last treatment. Digital photography was performed at each visit. Assessment of improvement rate by patient and physician was rated separately as follows: no improvement (0 %), mild (<25 %), moderate (25-50 %), good (51-75 %), and excellent (76-100 %). Based on patients' opinion, in the first and second follow-up, 48.3 and 90 % of them reported moderate to excellent healing, respectively (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up after the end of the experiment, most of the patients (88.3 and 95 %, respectively) reported moderate to excellent healing of scars. Based on two observers' opinion, healing in the first follow-up in most of the patients (65 %) was mild to moderate and 33 % were reported as having no healing. In the second follow-up, only 5 % of the patients were reported with no healing and 60 % were reported as having moderate healing (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up, most of the patients (95 and 96.6 %) were reported as having moderate to excellent healing (p = <0.001). Our results underlined the high efficacy of fractional CO2 laser for leishmaniasis scar. No significant adverse effects were noted. PMID:26984344

  18. [The application of helium-neon laser radiation for the combined treatment of the patients with atrophic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Sharipov, R A; Sharipova, E R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the efficacy of the treatment of the patients presenting with atrophic rhinitis (ozena) of the upper respiratory tract by the application of helium-neon laser radiation. A total of 120 patients aged from 15 to 53 years were treated based at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, G.G. Kuvatov Republican Clinical Hospital, Ufa. All these patients underwent routine clinical, roentgenological, microbiological, and rheographic examination. The method for the treatment of atrophic rhinitis is described; it includes the application of helium-neon laser radiation in combination with the administration of the purified preparation of liquid polyvalent Klebsiella bacteriophage. The positive results of the treatment by the proposed method were documented in 90% of the patients. PMID:23268248

  19. Effect of boric acid supplementation of ostrich water on the expression of Foxn1 in thymus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Rehman, Zia Ur; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Tang, Juan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sun, Peng-Peng; Zhong, Juming; Peng, Ke-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Foxn1 is essential for thymus development. The relationship between boric acid and thymus development, optimal dose of boric acid in ostrich diets, and the effects of boric acid on the expression of Foxn1 were investigated in the present study. Thirty healthy ostriches were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and supplemented with boric acid at the concentration of 0 mg/L, 40 mg/L, 80 mg/L, 160 mg/L, 320 mg/L, 640 mg/L, respectively. The histological changes in thymus were observed by HE staining, and the expression of Foxn1 analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. TUNEL method was used to label the apoptotic cells. Ostrich Foxn1 was sequenced by Race method. The results were as following: Apoptosis in ostrich thymus was closely related with boric acid concentrations. Low boric acid concentration inhibited apoptosis in thymus, but high boric acid concentration promoted apoptosis. Foxn1-positive cells were mainly distributed in thymic medulla and rarely in cortex. Foxn1 is closely related to thymus growth and development. The nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of Foxn1 were 2736 bases and 654 amino acids in length. It is highly conserved as compared with other species. These results demonstrated that the appropriate boric acid supplementation in water would produce positive effects on the growth development of ostrich thymus by promoting Foxn1 expression, especially at 80 mg/L, and the microstructure of the thymus of ostrich fed 80 mg/L boric acid was well developed. The supplementation of high dose boron (>320 mg/L) damaged the microstructure of thymus and inhibited the immune function by inhibiting Foxn1 expression, particularly at 640 mg/L. The optimal dose of boric acid supplementation in ostrich diets is 80 mg/L boric acid. The genomic full-length of African ostrich Foxn1 was cloned for the first time in the study. PMID:25665795

  20. Clinical studies of the treatment of facial atrophic acne scars and acne with a bipolar fractional radiofrequency system.

    PubMed

    Kaminaka, Chikako; Uede, Mikiko; Matsunaka, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2015-06-01

    Few clinical studies have examined the utility of bipolar fractional radiofrequency (FRF) therapy as a treatment for atrophic acne scars and active acne in people with darker skin. This study was designed to compare the safety and efficacy of bipolar FRF therapy as a treatment for atrophic acne scars and acne vulgaris. Twenty-three Japanese patients with atrophic acne scars and mild to severe acne on both cheeks were treated with a bipolar FRF system (eMatrix; Syneron, Yokneam Illit, Israel). Five treatment sessions were carried out at 1-month intervals, and the patients were followed up for 3 months after the final treatment. Assessments of scar severity and the number of acne lesions and 3-D in vivo imaging analysis were performed. Evaluations of the treatment outcomes and their effects on the patients' quality of life (QOL) were also carried out. We demonstrated that the improvement in scar volume was marked in the patients with mild scars and was at least moderate in 23 (57.5%) of the treated areas. With regard to the number of acne lesions, the treated areas exhibited significantly fewer lesions compared with the baseline at each time point (P < 0.05). The patients' assessments of the treatment outcomes and their QOL indicated that both had improved significantly by the end of the study. Furthermore, significant reductions in the patients' sebum levels, skin roughness and scar depth were observed. Bipolar FRF treatment significantly improved the atrophic acne scars and acne of Japanese patients and had minimal side-effects. PMID:25855397

  1. Hexamita and Giardia as a cause of mortality in congenitally thymus-less (nude) mice

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, G. A.; Lina, P. H. C.; Zurcher, C.; Nieuwerkerk, H. T. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two intestinal flagellates, Hexamita muris and Giardia muris, were found in high concentrations in most of the congenitally thymus-less (nude) mice in a conventional colony being maintained at the Radiobiological Institute TNO. Antiflagellate therapy markedly reduced mortality, with >50% of the mice living to 110 days. In mice receiving thymus transplants but no antiflagellate treatment the mortality rate was less than in either control or treated mice. In addition, histopathological examination of mice with thymus transplants revealed fewer intestinal flagellates than in control mice. It is suggested that the wasting syndrome seen in nude and neonatally thymectomized mice may be aggravated by infestation with Hexamita and Giardia. PMID:4778720

  2. Immunological relationship between acetylcholine receptor and thymus: a possible significance in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Aharonov, A; Tarrab-Hazdai, R; Abramsky, O; Fuchs, S

    1975-01-01

    A defined immunological cross-reaction was observed between acetylcholine receptor fraction from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, and two calf thymus fractions. The cross-reaction was demonstrated on the cellular level by means of the lymphocyte transformation technique, and on the humoral level, by means of the microcomplement fixation assay. In the human disease myasthenia gravis both acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction and the thymus are affected, probably by an autoimmune mechanism. The immunological cross-reaction between acetylcholine receptor and thymic components may explain the association between endplate and thymus disorders in myasthenia gravis. PMID:1055418

  3. Artificial neural networks in the recognition of the presence of thyroid disease in patients with atrophic body gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo; Centanni, Marco; Vannella, Lucy; Grossi, Enzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of artificial neural networks in predicting the presence of thyroid disease in atrophic body gastritis patients. METHODS: A dataset of 29 input variables of 253 atrophic body gastritis patients was applied to artificial neural networks (ANNs) using a data optimisation procedure (standard ANNs, T&T-IS protocol, TWIST protocol). The target variable was the presence of thyroid disease. RESULTS: Standard ANNs obtained a mean accuracy of 64.4% with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 59.8% in recognizing atrophic body gastritis patients with thyroid disease. The optimization procedures (T&T-IS and TWIST protocol) improved the performance of the recognition task yielding a mean accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 74.7% and 75.8%, 78.8% and 81.8%, and 70.5% and 69.9%, respectively. The increase of sensitivity of the TWIST protocol was statistically significant compared to T&T-IS. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that artificial neural networks may be taken into consideration as a potential clinical decision-support tool for identifying ABG patients at risk for harbouring an unknown thyroid disease and thus requiring diagnostic work-up of their thyroid status. PMID:18203288

  4. Molecular Genotyping of Anisakis Larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and Endoscopic Evidence for Preferential Penetration of Normal over Atrophic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Toshio; Akao, Nobuaki; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Hirata, Nobuto; Nakaji, So; Yamauchi, Kenji; Hirai, Mitsuru; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Eiji; Naito, Mikio; Saitoh, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shibata, Nobumitsu; Shimo, Masamune; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. Methods In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis) were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Results Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s.) (99%), and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005). Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–31.8). Conclusions In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae. PMID:24586583

  5. The Attenuated Live Yellow Fever Virus 17D Infects the Thymus and Induces Thymic Transcriptional Modifications of Immunomodulatory Genes in C57BL/6 and BALB/C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Lima, Breno Luiz; Espósito, Danillo Lucas Alves; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Thymus is involved in induction of self-tolerance in T lymphocytes, particularly due to Aire activity. In peripheral tissues, Treg cells and immunomodulatory molecules, like the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib molecules, are essential for maintenance of autotolerance during immune responses. Viral infections can trigger autoimmunity and modify thymic function, and YFV17D immunization has been associated with the onset of autoimmunity, being contraindicated in patients with thymic disorders. Aiming to study the influence of YFV17D immunization on the transcriptional profiles of immunomodulatory genes in thymus, we evaluated the gene expression of AIRE, FOXP3, H2-Q7 (Qa-2/HLA-G), H2-T23 (Qa-1/HLA-E), H2-Q10, and H2-K1 following immunization with 10,000 LD50 of YFV17D in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. The YFV17D virus replicated in thymus and induced the expression of H2-Q7 (Qa-2/HLA-G) and H2-T23 (Qa-1/HLA-E) transcripts and repressed the expression of AIRE and FOXP3. Transcriptional expression varied according to tissue and mouse strain analyzed. Expression of H2-T23 (Qa-1/HLA-E) and FOXP3 was induced in thymus and liver of C57BL/6 mice, which exhibited defective control of viral load, suggesting a higher susceptibility to YFV17D infection. Since the immunization with YFV17D modulated thymus gene expression in genetically predisposed individuals, the vaccine may be related to the onset of autoimmunity disorders. PMID:26457200

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG).An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45-0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77-0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93-11.99), and the AUC was 0.82.G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:27149493

  7. Prosthetic management of the atrophic mandible using endosseous implants and overdentures: a six year review.

    PubMed

    Chan, M F; Johnston, C; Howell, R A; Cawood, J I

    1995-11-11

    This paper presents the treatment results and experiences gained from a retrospective study of patients treated with the IMZ osseo-integrated implant system and mandibular overdentures. Patients experiencing problems wearing conventional dentures were assessed by the implant team and 65 cases were treated with 154 endosseous implants placed in the edentulous mandible. Two to four implants were placed in each case and in addition some patients have had augmentation of the mandible with hydroxyapatite. The definitive mandibular prostheses were supported by both implants and the residual ridges. A variety of retention systems were utilised, which included different types of bar and clip, stud attachments, and magnets. The patients have been followed up regularly and evaluated after periods of between one and six years. Six implants have failed over this time resulting in a success rate of over 96%. Most patients expressed a high degree of satisfaction with their new overdentures. There was, however, a considerable burden of maintenance care required for the patient group examined. The findings demonstrate that implant retained overdentures offer a highly effective means of oral rehabilitation for the atrophic mandible, restoring both oral function and facial form. PMID:7495628

  8. Are atrophic long-bone nonunions associated with low-grade infections?

    PubMed Central

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Spranger, Ole; Gantz, Simone; Burckhardt, Irene; Zimmermann, Stefan; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing, especially when associated with bacterial infection, is a severe complication following long-bone fractures and requires special treatment. Because standard diagnostic techniques might provide falsely negative results, we evaluated the sonication method for detection of bacteria on implants of patients with fracture nonunions. A total of 49 patients with a nonunion (group NU) and, for comparison, 45 patients who had undergone routine removal of osteosynthetic material (group OM), were included in the study. Five different diagnostic methods (culture of tissue samples, culture of intraoperative swabs, histopathology of tissue samples, culture of sonication fluid, and 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction of sonication fluid) were compared and related to clinical data. Among the diagnostic tests, culture of sonication fluid demonstrated by far the highest detection rate of bacteria (57%) in group NU, and rather unexpectedly 40% in group OM. Culture of sonication samples also revealed a broad spectrum of bacteria, in particular Propionibacterium spp. In conclusion, our results indicate that more bacteria can be detected on implants of patients with atrophic nonunions of long-bone fractures by means of the sonication procedure, which provides a valuable additional diagnostic tool to decide on a surgical procedure (eg, two-step procedure) and to further specify antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26719698

  9. Impaired Translocation of GLUT4 Results in Insulin Resistance of Atrophic Soleus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats. PMID:25713812

  10. Impaired translocation of GLUT4 results in insulin resistance of atrophic soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats. PMID:25713812

  11. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J.; Brown, Celeste J.; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV. PMID:27103314

  12. Microscopic and ultrastructural modifications of postmenopausal atrophic vaginal mucosa after fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Zerbinati, Nicola; Serati, Maurizio; Origoni, Massimo; Candiani, Massimo; Iannitti, Tommaso; Salvatore, Stefano; Marotta, Francesco; Calligaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal atrophy occurring during menopause is closely related to the dramatic decrease in ovarian estrogens due to the loss of follicular activity. Particularly, significant changes occur in the structure of the vaginal mucosa, with consequent impairment of many physiological functions. In this study, carried out on bioptic vaginal mucosa samples from postmenopausal, nonestrogenized women, we present microscopic and ultrastructural modifications of vaginal mucosa following fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser treatment. We observed the restoration of the vaginal thick squamous stratified epithelium with a significant storage of glycogen in the epithelial cells and a high degree of glycogen-rich shedding cells at the epithelial surface. Moreover, in the connective tissue constituting the lamina propria, active fibroblasts synthesized new components of the extracellular matrix including collagen and ground substance (extrafibrillar matrix) molecules. Differently from atrophic mucosa, newly-formed papillae of connective tissue indented in the epithelium and typical blood capillaries penetrating inside the papillae, were also observed. Our morphological findings support the effectiveness of fractional CO2 laser application for the restoration of vaginal mucosa structure and related physiological trophism. These findings clearly coupled with striking clinical relief from symptoms suffered by the patients before treatment. PMID:25410301

  13. Rationale in diagnosis and screening of atrophic gastritis with stomach-specific plasma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Agréus, Lars; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Di Mario, Francesco; Leja, Marcis; Mahachai, Varocha; Yaron, Niv; Van Oijen, Martijn; Perez, Guillermo Perez; Rugge, Massimo; Ronkainen, Jukka; Salaspuro, Mikko; Sipponen, Pentti; Sugano, Kentaro; Sung, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Atrophic gastritis (AG) results most often from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. AG is the most important single risk condition for gastric cancer that often leads to an acid-free or hypochlorhydric stomach. In the present paper, we suggest a rationale for noninvasive screening of AG with stomach-specific biomarkers. Methods The paper summarizes a set of data on application of the biomarkers and describes how the test results could be interpreted in practice. Results In AG of the gastric corpus and fundus, the plasma levels of pepsinogen I and/or the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio are always low. The fasting level of gastrin-17 is high in AG limited to the corpus and fundus, but low or non-elevated if the AG occurs in both antrum and corpus. A low fasting level of G-17 is a sign of antral AG or indicates high intragastric acidity. Differentiation between antral AG and high intragastric acidity can be done by assaying the plasma G-17 before and after protein stimulation, or before and after administration of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Amidated G-17 will rise if the antral mucosa is normal in structure. H. pylori antibodies are a reliable indicator of helicobacter infection, even in patients with AG and hypochlorhydria. Conclusions Stomach-specific biomarkers provide information about the stomach health and about the function of stomach mucosa and are a noninvasive tool for diagnosis and screening of AG and acid-free stomach. PMID:22242613

  14. The FSHD Atrophic Myotube Phenotype Is Caused by DUX4 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vanderplanck, Céline; Ansseau, Eugénie; Charron, Sébastien; Stricwant, Nadia; Tassin, Alexandra; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wilton, Steve D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to deletions in 4q35 within the D4Z4 repeat array in which we identified the double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene. We found stable DUX4 mRNAs only derived from the most distal D4Z4 unit and unexpectedly extended to the flanking pLAM region that provided an intron and a polyadenylation signal. DUX4 encodes a transcription factor expressed in FSHD but not control primary myoblasts or muscle biopsies. The DUX4 protein initiates a large transcription deregulation cascade leading to muscle atrophy and oxidative stress, which are FSHD key features. Methodology/Principal Findings We now show that transfection of myoblasts with a DUX4 expression vector leads to atrophic myotube formation associated with the induction of E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and Atrogin1/MAFbx) typical of muscle atrophy. DUX4 induces expression of downstream targets deregulated in FSHD such as mu-crystallin and TP53. We developed specific siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA. Addition of these antisense agents to primary FSHD myoblast cultures suppressed DUX4 protein expression and affected expression of the above-mentioned markers. Conclusions/Significance These results constitute a proof of concept for the development of therapeutic approaches for FSHD targeting DUX4 expression. PMID:22053214

  15. A polysaccharide from cultured mycelium of Hericium erinaceus and its anti-chronic atrophic gastritis activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxing; Gao, Yang; Xu, Duoduo; Gao, Qipin

    2015-11-01

    A polysaccharide named EP-1 was found by screening cultured mycelium of Hericium erinaceus, which was extracted and subjected to precipitation with ethanol, hollow-fiber ultrafiltration and ion-exchange chromatography. The polysaccharide has a molecular weight of approximately 3100Da and is composed of glucose, mannose and galactose, thus being a heteroglycan. EP-1 has a backbone of α-d-Glc(1→3) and β-d-Glc(1→3). The β-d-Glc(1→3) and α-d-Gal-(1→3) were regarded as branches attached to the C-4 position. The α-d-Man was regarded as a terminal residue. The anti-CAG activity was evaluated in experimental systems using a cell model for identification. The polysaccharide significantly inhibited the growth of MC cells obtained from human gastric mucosa epithelium (GES-1) cells transformed by MNNG, which were used as a chronic atrophic gastritis cell model. It also interfered with the MC cells by inducing cell cycle arrest. Thus, EP-1 shows potential for the development of new functional foods and drugs. PMID:26314904

  16. What Happens in the Thymus Does Not Stay in the Thymus: How T Cells Recycle the CD4+-CD8+ Lineage Commitment Transcriptional Circuitry To Control Their Function.

    PubMed

    Vacchio, Melanie S; Bosselut, Rémy

    2016-06-15

    MHC-restricted CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are at the core of most adaptive immune responses. Although these cells carry distinct functions, they arise from a common precursor during thymic differentiation, in a developmental sequence that matches CD4 and CD8 expression and functional potential with MHC restriction. Although the transcriptional control of CD4(+)-CD8(+) lineage choice in the thymus is now better understood, less was known about what maintains the CD4(+) and CD8(+) lineage integrity of mature T cells. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that establish in the thymus, and maintain in postthymic cells, the separation of these lineages. We focus on recent studies that address the mechanisms of epigenetic control of Cd4 expression and emphasize how maintaining a transcriptional circuitry nucleated around Thpok and Runx proteins, the key architects of CD4(+)-CD8(+) lineage commitment in the thymus, is critical for CD4(+) T cell helper functions. PMID:27260768

  17. Quest for the binding mode of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-10-15

    The binding interaction of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA was studied by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The UV-vis study revealed that an obvious interaction between tetrabromobisphenol A and Calf thymus DNA happened. The π-π(∗) transitions and the electron cloud of tetrabromobisphenol A might be changed by entering the groove of Calf thymus DNA. From the fluorescence spectral and thermodynamics studies, it was concluded that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force played a major role in the binding of tetrabromobisphenol A to Calf thymus DNA. The molecular modeling study showed that the possible sites of tetrabromobisphenol A in the groove of DNA. Circular dichroism study also depicted that tetrabromobisphenol A bond to DNA. These above results would further advance our knowledge on the molecular mechanism of the binding interactions of brominated flame-retardants with nucleic acid. PMID:24830628

  18. Quest for the binding mode of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-10-01

    The binding interaction of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA was studied by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The UV-vis study revealed that an obvious interaction between tetrabromobisphenol A and Calf thymus DNA happened. The π-π∗ transitions and the electron cloud of tetrabromobisphenol A might be changed by entering the groove of Calf thymus DNA. From the fluorescence spectral and thermodynamics studies, it was concluded that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force played a major role in the binding of tetrabromobisphenol A to Calf thymus DNA. The molecular modeling study showed that the possible sites of tetrabromobisphenol A in the groove of DNA. Circular dichroism study also depicted that tetrabromobisphenol A bond to DNA. These above results would further advance our knowledge on the molecular mechanism of the binding interactions of brominated flame-retardants with nucleic acid.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of early events of thymus repopulation in radiation bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A.; Hammerling, U.; Mathieson, B.J.

    1983-04-01

    The phenotype of murine thymocytes repopulating the thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras shortly after irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution was analyzed by immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry. Thymuses in these chimeras, while essentially devoid of lymphoid cells at day 7, were repopulated by days 10 to 12 after irradiation. It was found that this initial repopulation arose from a radioresistant intrathymic precursor that expanded to an almost complete complement of host-type thymocytes. However, these host-derived thymocytes were unusual in that they were relatively deficient in Lyt 1+2- and peanut agglutinin ''dull'' cells as compared with normal thymocytes. Donor bone-marrow-derived cells first appeared in the irradiated chimeric thymuses between days 12 and 15 after irradiation and bone marrow transfer. By day 19, chimeric thymuses contained more than 98% donor cells. This course was identical for three chimeric combinations, each made across different genetic barriers. In contrast to the cells that populate the fetal thymus during normal ontogeny, the first donor bone-marrow-derived cells that can be detected within the irradiated chimeric thymuses already expressed phenotypically normal adult T cell subpopulations in that they contained significant numbers both of Lyt 1+2- and of Lyt 1+2+ thymocytes. Thus, the Lyt phenotype of donor cells that initially repopulate an adult thymus after irradiation is markedly different from the Lyt phenotype of cells that initially populate the fetal thymus. The differences between adult and fetal thymic development that are observed in radiation bone marrow chimeras may be important in our understanding of T cell differentiation in these animals.

  20. [The role of the pineal-thymus system in the regulation of autoimmunity, aging and lifespan].

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-07-01

    Thymus is an immunoendocrine organ, the hormones of which mainly influence its own lymphatic elements. It has a central role in the immune system, the neonatal removal causes the collapse of immune system and the whole organism. The thymic nurse cells select the bone marrow originated lymphocytes and destroy the autoreactive ones, while thymus originated Treg cells suppress the autoreactive cells in the periphery. The involution of the organ starts after birth, however, this truly happens in the end of puberty only, as before this it is overcompensated by developmental processes. From the end of adolescence the involution allows the life, proliferation and enhanced functioning of some autoreactive cells, which gradually wear down the cells and intercellular materials, causing the aging. The enhanced and mass function of autoreactive cells lead to the autoimmune diseases and natural death. This means that the involution of thymus is not a part of the organismic involution, but an originator of it, which is manifested in the lifespan-pacemaker function. Thus, aging can be conceptualized as a thymus-commanded slow autoimmune process. The neonatal removal of pineal gland leads to the complete destruction of the thymus and the crashing down of the immune system, as well as to wasting disease. The involution of the pineal and thymus runs parallel, because the two organs form a functional unit. It is probable that the pineal gland is responsible for the involution of thymus and also regulates its lifespan determining role. However, the data reviewed here do not prove the exclusive role of the pineal-thymus system in the regulation of aging and lifespan, but only call attention to such possibility. PMID:27346473

  1. Dysfunction of irradiated thymus for the development of helper T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amagai, T.; Kina, T.; Hirokawa, K.; Nishikawa, S.; Imanishi, J.; Katsura, Y.

    1987-07-15

    The development of cytotoxic T cells and helper T cells in an intact or irradiated thymus was investigated. C57BL/6 (H-2b, Thy-1.2) mice were whole body-irradiated, or were irradiated with shielding over either the thymus or right leg and tail, and were transferred with 1.5 X 10(7) bone marrow cells from B10.Thy-1.1 mice (H-2b, Thy-1.1). At various days after reconstitution, thymus cells from the recipient mice were harvested and a peanut agglutinin low-binding population was isolated. This population was further treated with anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement to remove host-derived cells and was assayed for the frequency of cytotoxic T cell precursors (CTLp) and for the activity of helper T cells (Th). In the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated mice, Th activity reached normal control level by day 25, whereas CTLp frequency remained at a very low level during these days. In the thymus of whole body-irradiated mice, generation of CTLp was highly accelerated while that of Th was retarded, the period required for reconstitution being 25 days and more than 42 days for CTLp and Th, respectively. Preferential development of CTLp was also seen in right leg- and tail-shielded (L-T-shielded) and irradiated recipients. Histological observation indicated that Ia+ nonlymphoid cells were well preserved in the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated recipients, whereas in L-T-shielded and irradiated recipients, such cells in the medulla were markedly reduced in number. These results suggest strongly that the generation of Th but not CTLp is dependent on radiosensitive thymic component(s), and that such components may represent Ia+ cells themselves in the medulla or some microenvironment related to Ia+ cells.

  2. Rhodiola rosea suppresses thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis by downregulating tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like-2 in septic rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING-WEI; SU, MEI-XIAN; ZHANG, WEI; ZHANG, LIN-MING; WANG, YUN-HUI; QIAN, CHUAN-YUN

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that Rhodiola rosea can enhance cellular immunity and humoral immune function in mice, and thus, it has become a research hotspot. However, its underlying mechanism of action has remained elusive. The present study investigated whether Rhodiola rosea was able to downregulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2), thereby inhibiting the expression of apoptotic genes, attenuating T-lymphocyte apoptosis and improving immunity in septic mice. A mouse model of caecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established, and animals in the treatment group were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of Rhodiola rosea extract, while animals in the control group and sham-operated group were injected with an equivalent amount of normal saline. TIPE2, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA and protein levels in thymic T cells were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, the thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis rate, thymus T-lymphocyte count and thymus T-lymphocyte sub-sets were assessed using flow cytometry. Levels of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ] and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were determined using ELISA. The results showed that, compared to that in the CLP group, the expression of TIPE2, Fas and FasL in the treatment group was significantly decreased, while the expression of Bcl-2 was increased (P<0.05). The thymus lymphocyte count in the CLP group was significantly higher compared with that in the treatment group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the apoptotic rate of thymus T-lymphocytes in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the CLP group (P<0.05). In addition, treatment with Rhodiola rosea rescued decreased in the counts of the CD3+ T and CD4+ T sub-sets of thymus T lymphocytes in the CLP group (P<0

  3. Dose-dependent Medicinal Effects of Thymus haussknechtii Velen Grown Wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kılıçgün, Hasan; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine dose-dependent interactions between phenolic contents and antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal effect mechanisms of the infusions of Thymus haussknechtii Velen, naturally grown in the Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. Therefore, the infusions of Thymus haussknechtii were tested and the interactions between phenolic contents and antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal effect mechanisms were determined by way of different antioxidant, antibacterial and antioxidant test systems. The concentrations of Thymus haussknechtii showed strong hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity and free radical scavenging activity [1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) % inhibition]. Also, it was seen that Thymus haussknechtii infusions possessed strong antibacterial and antifungal activity against different gram negative and positive bacteria and fungi. In this study, positive correlations between antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal potency and the total phenolic content of Thymus haussknechtii were found. When the concentration differences were examined, it was seen that concentrations of 4% had the most strong antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal activity. As a result, Thymus haussknechtii can be reliable antioxidant, antibacterial antifungal substance at concentrations of 4% when it is used as a supplement to therapeutic regimens and for medicinal purposes. PMID:26826832

  4. Protection against apoptosis in chicken bursa and thymus cells by phorbol ester in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, J.; Thorbecke, G.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Programmed suicide or apoptosis, due to activation of endogenous nucleases, occurs in immature CD4{sup {minus}}85{sup {minus}} mammalian thymus cells. Like the thymus, the bursa of Fabricius is a site of massive lymphopoiesis accompanied by cell death in vivo. In the present study the authors have, therefore, examined whether chicken bursa and thymus cells exhibit apoptosis. Bursa and thymus cells from SC chickens, 4-10 weeks of age, were incubated for 8-24 hrs with various reagents. Genomic DNA was isolated, electrophoresed in 3% Nusieve agarose gels, and examined for patterns of DNA fragmentation. A laddering of DNA in multiples of 200 base pairs, indicative of apoptosis, was observed with both bursa and thymus cells. These patterns of DNA fragmentation from bursa cells could be prevented by adding phorbol myristic acetate during culture and, more effectively, by PMA plus ionomycin, but not by ionomycin alone or by anti-{mu}. PMA did not affect the patterns of DNA fragmentation seen with spleen cells. Addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin inhibited the preventive effect of PMA on apoptosis. PMA also greatly promoted the survival of bursa cells in culture, as assayed by percentage cell death and by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation. It is concluded that bursa and thymus cells from the chicken exhibit apoptosis. The data further suggest that protein kinase C activation protects apoptosis in cultured bursa cells.

  5. Thymus hyperplasia, differential diagnosis in the wheezing infant.

    PubMed

    Pedroza Meléndez, A; Larenas-Linnemann, D

    1997-01-01

    Thymus hyperplasia is not a rare condition in infancy, but it is generally considered not to cause any symptoms. We present here a series of 11 children seen at the National Institute of Pediatrics (NIP), Mexico-city, that do have respiratory symptoms secondary to the enlarged gland. Age of onset of the symptoms was median at birth, with age of first visit to the NIP of 6 months. Symptoms were respiratory crisis and various respiratory complaints. Five underwent thoracotomy and resection of the right pulmonary lobe was necessary in one, because of irreversible changes in the lung tissue due to chronic compression. In another patient thymic lobectomy was executed because extrinsic compression of the right upper bronchus resulted in recurrent atelectasia. The five biopsies taken during the intervention showed normal or hyperplastic or involutive thymic tissue without signs of malignancy. The evolution was positive in all the patients. In conclusion thymic hyperplasia must be taken into account in the evaluation of an infant with respiratory symptoms. PMID:9150833

  6. Chitosan microbeads for encapsulation of thyme (Thymus serpyllum L.) polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Trifković, Kata T; Milašinović, Nikola Z; Djordjević, Verica B; Krušić, Melina T Kalagasidis; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D; Nedović, Viktor A; Bugarski, Branko M

    2014-10-13

    In this work chitosan microbeads were prepared by emulsion technique and loaded with thyme polyphenols by diffusion from an external aqueous solution of Thymus serpyllum L. The effects of concentrations of chitosan (1.5-3% (w/v)) and GA (glutaraldehyde) (0.1-0.4% (v/v)), as a crosslinking agent on the main properties of microbeads were assessed. The obtained microgel beads from ∼ 220 to ∼ 790 μm in diameter were exposed to controlled drying process at air (at 37 °C) after which they contracted to irregular shapes (∼ 70-230 μm). The loading of dried microbeads with polyphenols was achieved by swelling in the acidic medium. The swelling rate of microbeads decreased with the increase in GA concentration. Upon this rehydration, thyme polyphenols were effectively encapsulated (active load of 66-114 mg GAE g(beads)(-1)) and the microbeads recovered a spherical shape. Both, the increase in the amount of the crosslinking agent and the presence of polyphenols, contributed to a more pronounced surface roughness of microbeads. The release of encapsulated polyphenols in simulated gastrointestinal fluids was prolonged to 3h. PMID:25037430

  7. Assessment of genetic and chemical variability in Thymus caramanicus.

    PubMed

    Hadian, Javad; Bigdeloo, Mahdi; Nazeri, Vahideh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-05-01

    Thymus caramanicus is an endemic species grown in Iran with interesting pharmacological and biological properties. In the present work, essential oil compositions and inter-simple sequences repeat (ISSR) markers were used to estimate the relationships among and within seven populations of T. caramanicus, belonging to three provinces in Iran. The studied individuals were distinguished on the basis of ISSR markers and constituents of essential oil. A total of 127 band positions were produced by 12 ISSR primers, of which 105 were found polymorphic with 82.68% polymorphism. Genetic similarity values among individuals ranged between 0.15 and 0.82 which was indicative of a high level of genetic variation. On the basis of their genetic similarities, ISSR analysis allowed to group the samples into two main clusters. One of these included populations originated from Kerman and Isfahan provinces, and the other cluster consists of populations from Semnan province. Chemical compounds of essential oils were found variable in the various individuals and all samples were principally composed of phenolic constituents (carvacrol and/or thymol). As a consequence, the plants were classified into two major chemotypes including carvacrol and thymol/carvacrol. A relationship between genetic and chemical variability and geographic distribution has been observed in studied populations of T. caramanicus. PMID:24469732

  8. Thymus, kidney and craniofacial abnormalities in Six 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Souil, Evelyne; Demignon, Josiane; Maire, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    Six genes are widely expressed during vertebrate embryogenesis, suggesting that they are implicated in diverse differentiation processes. To determine the functions of the Six1 gene, we constructed Six1-deficient mice by replacing its first exon by the beta-galactosidase gene. We have previously shown that mice lacking Six1 die at birth due to thoracic skeletal defects and severe muscle hypoplasia affecting most of the body muscles. Here, we report that Six1(-/-) neonates also lack a kidney and thymus, as well as displaying a strong disorganisation of craniofacial structures, namely the inner ear, the nasal cavity, the craniofacial skeleton, and the lacrimal and parotid glands. These organ defects can be correlated with Six1 expression in the embryonic primordium structures as revealed by X-Gal staining at different stages of embryogenesis. Thus, the fetal abnormalities of Six1(-/-) mice appear to result from the absence of the Six 1 homeoprotein during early stages of organogenesis. Interestingly, these Six1 defects are very similar to phenotypes caused by mutations of Eya 1, which are responsible for the BOR syndrome in humans. Close comparison of Six1 and Eya 1 deficient mice strongly suggests a functional link between these two factors. Pax gene mutations also lead to comparable phenotypes, suggesting that a regulatory network including the Pax, Six and Eya genes is required for several types of organogenesis in mammals. PMID:12834866

  9. Glandular Trichomes and Essential Oil of Thymus quinquecostatus

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ping; Liu, Hanzhu; Gao, Ting; Xin, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The distribution and types of glandular trichomes and essential oil chemistry of Thymus quinquecostatus were studied. The glandular trichomes are distributed on the surface of stem, leaf, rachis, calyx and corolla, except petiole, pistil and stamen. Three morphologically distinct types of glandular trichomes are described. Peltate trichomes, consisting of a basal cell, a stalk cell and a 12-celled head, are distributed on the stem, leaf, corolla and outer side of calyx. Capitate trichomes, consisting of a unicellular base, a 1–2-celled stalk and a unicellular head, are distributed more diffusely than peltate ones, existing on stem, leaf, rachis and calyx. Digitiform trichomes are just distributed on the outer side of corolla, consisting of 1 basal cell, 3 stalk cells and 1 head cell. All three types of glandular trichomes can secrete essential oil, and in small capitate trichomes of rachis, all peltate trichomes and digitiform trichomes, essential oil is stored in a large subcuticular space, released by cuticle rupture, whereas, in other capitate trichomes, essential oil crosses the thin cuticle. The essential oil of T. quinquecostatus is yellow, and its content is highest in the growth period. 68 constituents were identified in the essential oils. The main constituent is linalool. PMID:24250266

  10. Activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil against Anisakis larvae.

    PubMed

    Giarratana, F; Muscolino, D; Beninati, C; Giuffrida, A; Panebianco, A

    2014-07-01

    Anisakiasis is an important food-borne disease especially in countries with high fish consumption. The increase of cases of human disease and the virtual absence of effective treatments have prompted the research on new active compounds against Anisakis larvae. As well known, the disease is related to the consumption of raw or almost raw seafood products, but also marinated and/or salted fishery products, if the processing is insufficient to destroy nematode larvae can represent a risks for the consumers. In the light of the biocidal efficacy against different pathogens demonstrated for various essential oils, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) against anisakidae larvae. The TEO at 10% and 5% concentration in oil sunflower seeds, caused in vitro the death of all larvae within 14 h, with cuticle and intestinal wall damages. The results obtained showing a significant activity against Anisakis larvae, suggest further investigation on TEO as a larvicidal agent and on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. PMID:24721259

  11. Exosomes in the Thymus: Antigen Transfer and Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Thymocytes go through several steps of maturation and selection in the thymus in order to form a functional pool of effector T-cells and regulatory T-cells in the periphery. Close interactions between thymocytes, thymic epithelial cells, and dendritic cells are of vital importance for the maturation, selection, and lineage decision of the thymocytes. One important question that is still unanswered is how a relatively small epithelial cell population can present a vast array of self-antigens to the manifold larger population of developing thymocytes in this selection process. Here, we review and discuss the literature concerning antigen transfer from epithelial cells with a focus on exosomes. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released from a cell into the extracellular space. These vesicles can carry proteins, microRNAs, and mRNAs between cells and are thus able to participate in intercellular communication. Exosomes have been shown to be produced by thymic epithelial cells and to carry tissue-restricted antigens and MHC molecules, which may enable them to participate in the thymocyte selection process. PMID:26257734

  12. Adult Perithyroid and Cervical Thymus-Parathyroid Unit

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The thymus-parathyroid unit (TPU) occurring in adults is rare. The main symptoms and important clinical findings are as follows: 2 patients presented with neomercazole-resistant Basedow–Graves disease. A third patient presented with thyroid nodules and a fourth patient with a neck mass after thyroid resection for medullary thyroid carcinoma. The main diagnoses were those of thyroid nodules (either in the context of goiter, or not). In the fourth case the diagnosis was of thyroid medullary carcinoma recurrence in the neck. Thyroidectomy was performed in the 2 cases of Basedow–Graves disease and in the third case (wherein selective neck dissection was also performed). In the fourth case, a neck dissection was performed for a possible medullary carcinoma recurrence. A TPU was microscopically detected in 2 cases with perithyroid location, on thyroidectomies for Basedow–Graves disease and in the 2 other cases with neck soft tissue location (associated with thyroid papillary carcinoma and thyroid medullary carcinoma extension). Postsurgical hypocalcemia requiring treatment occurred in both patients with Basedow–Graves disease and in the fourth patient. The presence of TPU should be acknowledged because such lesions can be misdiagnosed as suspect lymph nodes during thyroid surgery for malignant tumors. PMID:25501075

  13. A strong association between thyrotropin receptor-blocking antibody-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and HLA-DR8 and HLA-DQB1 0302 in Koreans

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Bo Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang-Soon; Lee, Jung-Bin ); Shong, Young Kee ); Han, Hoon ); Chang, Youn Bok )

    1993-09-01

    The authors investigated whether the associations between HLA alleles of patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism varied according to the presence or absence of TSH receptor-blocking antibody (TRBab). They analyzed the HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DR antigens by serotyping and the DQA1 and DQB1 genes using both enzymatic DNA amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridizations. The patient population consisted of 47 Korean patients with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and 62 patients with goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. The antigen frequency of HLA-DR8 was significantly increased in 23 atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis patients that were positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) compared to 136 controls [52% vs. 16%; x[sup 2] = 13.1; Pc (corrected P value) = 0.003]. This relative risk was 5.7; the etiological fraction was 0.43. HLA-DQB1*0302 was also increased in patients with TBII-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (24% vs. 7%; x[sup 2] = 11.2; Pc = 0.012; relative risk = 4.4; etiological fraction = 0.19). No specific DR antigens or DQB1 alleles were increased in either TBII-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroidities or goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. A significant decrease in the frequency of HLA-DR6 antigen was observed in both TBII-positive atrophic antoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 8.4; Pc = 0.03) and goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 23.2; Pc < 0.001) patients. The frequency of the HLC-Cwl antigen was significantly increased in all patient groups. The authors conclude that TRBab-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis is immunogenetically different from both goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis and TRBab-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis. It is possible that HLA-DR8 and/or DQB1*0302 may be related to the susceptibility genes involved in the production of TRBab in Koreans. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Risk factors for atrophic chronic gastritis in a European population: results of the Eurohepygast study

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The development of atrophic chronic gastritis (ACG) is multifactorial, involving environment as well as host responses to Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to determine factors involved in ACG in a European dyspeptic population. Methods: Data concerning sociodemographics, social behaviour, biological aspects, diet, and virulence factors of H pylori strains were collected in a cross sectional study from 19 European centres in 14 countries. Dyspeptic H pylori positive patients with ACG or non-ACG (NACG) at histology were included. Anti-CagA antibodies were evaluated by two immunoblot tests and anti-VacA antibodies by one. Logistic regression models were constructed, and estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from the coefficients. Results: Of the 451 patients included in the study, 267 were analysed: 202 had NACG and 65 ACG. Mean age was 44.4 years and 63% were women. Risk factors for atrophy identified by multivariate analysis were: age over 60 years (OR 4.14, 95% CI 1.79–9.58), coffee consumption (OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.07–5.16), sedative consumption (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.04–4.52), and harbouring anti-CagA and anti-VacA antibodies simultaneously (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.26–7.56), while the odds were significantly reduced for those with an anxiety score of 6 or more (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21–0.99). Conclusion: The simultaneous presence of anti-CagA and anti-VacA antibodies enhanced the risk of ACG in European dyspeptic patients. Failure to discern diet and family history as risk factors for ACG may suggest that diet is homogeneous in Europe and that most of the risk factors for ACG identified so far are identical to risk factors for H pylori infection. PMID:12010878

  15. Accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Forné, Montserrat; Barrio, Jesus; De la Coba, Cristobal; González, Begoña; Rivera, Robin; Esteve, Maria; Fernandez-Bañares, Fernando; Madrigal, Beatriz; Gras-Miralles, Beatriz; Perez-Aisa, Angeles; Viver-Pi-Sunyer, Jose M.; Bory, Felipe; Rosinach, Merce; Loras, Carmen; Esteban, Carlos; Santolaria, Santos; Gomollon, Fernando; Valle, Julio; Gisbert, Javier P.

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that GastroPanel might be a useful tool for the diagnosis of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) measuring four biomarkers in blood: basal gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen I and II (PGI and PGII), and Helicobacter pylori antibodies. Aim To determine the accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of CAG. Methods This was a prospective, blinded, multicenter study that included dyspeptic patients. G17, PGI, and PGII were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Three antrum and two corpus biopsies were obtained for standard histological analysis and rapid urease test. Biopsies were analyzed by a single blinded expert pathologist. Results Ninety-one patients were included (77% women, mean age 44 years, 51% H. pylori positive, 17% with CAG). G17 was reduced in patients with antrum CAG (5.4 vs. 13.4 pmol/l; P<0.01) and increased in patients with corpus CAG (11 vs. 24 pmol/l; P<0.05), but its accuracy was only acceptable in the case of corpus localization [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), 74%]; PGII difference was almost statistically significant only when testing for corpus atrophy (33 vs. 21 μg/l; P=0.05; AUC=72%). The PGI and PGI/PGII ratio showed no significant differences (AUCs were all unacceptably low). Helicobacter pylori antibody levels were higher in H. pylori-infected patients (251 vs. 109 EIU, P=0.01; AUC=70). The accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of CAG was as follows: sensitivity 50%; specificity 80%; positive 25% and negative 92% predictive values; and positive 2.4 and negative 0.6 likelihood ratios. Conclusion GastroPanel is not accurate enough for the diagnosis of CAG; thus, its systematic use in clinical practice cannot be recommended. PMID:25014624

  16. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from two species of Thymus growing wild in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Laura; Bruno, Maurizio; Formisano, Carmen; De Feo, Vincenzo; Napolitano, Francesco; Rosselli, Sergio; Senatore, Felice

    2009-01-01

    The volatile constituents of the aerial parts of two samples of Thymus longicaulis C. Presl, collected in Campania and in Sicily, and two samples of Thymus pulegioides L. from the same regions, were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed. Considering the four oils together, seventy-eight different compounds were identified: 57 for Thymus longicaulis from Sicily (91.1% of the total oil), 40 for Thymus longicaulis from Campania (91.5% of the oil), 39 for Thymus pulegioides from Sicily (92.5% of the oil) and 29 for Thymus pulegioides from Campania (90.1% of the oil). The composition of the oils is different, although the most abundant components are identical in T. pulegioides. The essential oils showed antibacterial activity against eight selected microorganisms. PMID:19924089

  17. Computer-aided diagnostic method for classification of Alzheimer's disease with atrophic image features on MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Yoshiura, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Koga, Hiroshi; Mihara, Futoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Shuji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2008-03-01

    Our goal for this study was to attempt to develop a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) method for classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with atrophic image features derived from specific anatomical regions in three-dimensional (3-D) T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. Specific regions related to the cerebral atrophy of AD were white matter and gray matter regions, and CSF regions in this study. Cerebral cortical gray matter regions were determined by extracting a brain and white matter regions based on a level set based method, whose speed function depended on gradient vectors in an original image and pixel values in grown regions. The CSF regions in cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles were extracted by wrapping the brain tightly with a zero level set determined from a level set function. Volumes of the specific regions and the cortical thickness were determined as atrophic image features. Average cortical thickness was calculated in 32 subregions, which were obtained by dividing each brain region. Finally, AD patients were classified by using a support vector machine, which was trained by the image features of AD and non-AD cases. We applied our CAD method to MR images of whole brains obtained from 29 clinically diagnosed AD cases and 25 non-AD cases. As a result, the area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve obtained by our computerized method was 0.901 based on a leave-one-out test in identification of AD cases among 54 cases including 8 AD patients at early stages. The accuracy for discrimination between 29 AD patients and 25 non-AD subjects was 0.840, which was determined at the point where the sensitivity was the same as the specificity on the ROC curve. This result showed that our CAD method based on atrophic image features may be promising for detecting AD patients by using 3-D MR images.

  18. Thymus-associated parathyroid hormone has two cellular origins with distinct endocrine and immunological functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijie; Farley, Alison; Chen, Lizhen; Kirby, Beth J; Kovacs, Christopher S; Blackburn, C Clare; Manley, Nancy R

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of extracellular calcium and inorganic phosphorus homeostasis. Although the parathyroid glands were thought to be the only source of PTH, extra-parathyroid PTH production in the thymus, which shares a common origin with parathyroids during organogenesis, has been proposed to provide an auxiliary source of PTH, resulting in a higher than expected survival rate for aparathyroid Gcm2⁻/⁻ mutants. However, the developmental ontogeny and cellular identity of these "thymic" PTH-expressing cells is unknown. We found that the lethality of aparathyroid Gcm2⁻/⁻ mutants was affected by genetic background without relation to serum PTH levels, suggesting a need to reconsider the physiological function of thymic PTH. We identified two sources of extra-parathyroid PTH in wild-type mice. Incomplete separation of the parathyroid and thymus organs during organogenesis resulted in misplaced, isolated parathyroid cells that were often attached to the thymus; this was the major source of thymic PTH in normal mice. Analysis of thymus and parathyroid organogenesis in human embryos showed a broadly similar result, indicating that these results may provide insight into human parathyroid development. In addition, medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) express PTH in a Gcm2-independent manner that requires TEC differentiation and is consistent with expression as a self-antigen for negative selection. Genetic or surgical removal of the thymus indicated that thymus-derived PTH in Gcm2⁻/⁻ mutants did not provide auxiliary endocrine function. Our data show conclusively that the thymus does not serve as an auxiliary source of either serum PTH or parathyroid function. We further show that the normal process of parathyroid organogenesis in both mice and humans leads to the generation of multiple small parathyroid clusters in addition to the main parathyroid glands, that are the likely source of physiologically relevant "thymic

  19. Narrow-implant-retained overdenture in an atrophic mandibular ridge: a case report with 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Carlos Roberto Garcia; Martins-Junior, Paulo Antonio; Araujo, Roberto Carlos de; Sa, Marcos Augusto de; Wassall, Thomaz; Ferreira, Anderson Jose

    2015-01-01

    When atrophic jaws compromise oral rehabilitation with conventional implants, narrow-diameter implants can be used. This case report describes treatment of an edentulous 75-year-old diabetic woman with a severely resorbed mandibular ridge. Her mandibular dentition was restored with an overdenture supported by 3 narrow implants and 1 mini implant. Her maxillary dentition was restored with a conventional complete denture. A 6-year clinical and radiographic follow-up confirmed that the narrow implants had provided effective stability for the overdenture, providing improvements in phonetics and masticatory ability at a low cost. PMID:26545281

  20. Axon and muscle spindle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse

    PubMed Central

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Otto, Anthony; Matsakas, Antonios; El-Morsy, Salah E; Jones, Lisa; Anderson, Bethan; Patel, Ketan

    2011-01-01

    Germline deletion of the myostatin gene results in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the tension-generating (extrafusal) fibres in skeletal muscle. As this gene is expressed predominantly in myogenic tissues it offers an excellent model with which to investigate the quantitative relationship between muscle and axonal development. Here we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in nerve fibres in major nerves of both the fore- and hindlimbs. We show that axons within these nerves undergo hypertrophy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the age-related neural atrophic process is delayed in the absence of myostatin. Finally, we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in the number of muscle spindles (also called stretch receptors or proprioceptors). However, our work demonstrates that the mechanisms regulating intrafusal fibre hyperplasia and hypertrophy differ from those that control the aetiology of extrafusal fibres. PMID:21208206

  1. Association of nucleotide excision repair pathway gene polymorphisms with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingwei; Sun, Liping; Xu, Qian; Tu, Huakang; He, Caiyun; Xing, Chengzhong; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms of NER genes could change NER ability, thereby altering individual susceptibility to GC. We systematically analyzed 39 SNPs of 8 key genes of NER pathway in 2686 subjects including 898 gastric cancer (GC), 851 atrophic gastritis (AG) and 937 controls (CON) in northern Chinese. SNP genotyping were performed using Sequenom MassARRAY platform. The results demonstrated that DDB2 rs830083 GG genotype was significantly associated with increased GC risk compared with wildtype CC (OR=2.32, P = 6.62 × 10−9); XPC rs2607775 CG genotype conferred a 1.73 increased odds of GC risk than non-cancer subjects compared with wild-type CC (OR=1.73, P= 3.04 × 10−4). The combined detection of these two polymorphisms demonstrated even higher GC risk (OR=3.05). Haplotype analysis suggested that DDB2 rs2029298-rs326222-rs3781619-rs830083 GTAG haplotype was significantly associated with disease risk in each step of CON→AG→GC development (AG vs. CON: OR=2.88, P= 7.51 × 10−7; GC vs. AG: OR=2.90, P=5.68 × 10−15; GC vs. CON: OR=8.42, P=2.22 × 10−15); DDB2 GTAC haplotype was associated with reduced risk of GC compared with CON (OR=0.63, P= 8.31 × 10−12). XPC rs1870134-rs2228000- rs2228001-rs2470352-rs2607775 GCAAG haplotype conferred increased risk of GC compared with AG (OR=1.88, P= 6.98 × 10−4). XPA rs2808668 and drinking, DDB2 rs326222, rs3781619, rs830083 and smoking demonstrated significant interactions in AG; XPC rs2607775 had significant interaction with smoking in GC. In conclusion, NER pathway polymorphisms especially in “damage incision” step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors. The detection of NER pathway polymorphisms such as DDB2 and XPC might be applied in the prediction of GC risk and personalized prevention in the future. NOVELTY & IMPACT STATEMENTS NER pathway polymorphisms especially in “damage incision” step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with

  2. Association of nucleotide excision repair pathway gene polymorphisms with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingwei; Sun, Liping; Xu, Qian; Tu, Huakang; He, Caiyun; Xing, Chengzhong; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphisms of NER genes could change NER ability, thereby altering individual susceptibility to GC. We systematically analyzed 39 SNPs of 8 key genes of NER pathway in 2686 subjects including 898 gastric cancer (GC), 851 atrophic gastritis (AG) and 937 controls (CON) in northern Chinese. SNP genotyping were performed using Sequenom MassARRAY platform. The results demonstrated that DDB2 rs830083 GG genotype was significantly associated with increased GC risk compared with wild-type CC (OR=2.32, P= 6.62 × 10-9); XPC rs2607775 CG genotype conferred a 1.73 increased odds of GC risk than non-cancer subjects compared with wild-type CC (OR=1.73, P= 3.04 × 10-4). The combined detection of these two polymorphisms demonstrated even higher GC risk (OR=3.05). Haplotype analysis suggested that DDB2 rs2029298-rs326222-rs3781619-rs830083 GTAG haplotype was significantly associated with disease risk in each step of CON→AG→GC development (AG vs. CON: OR=2.88, P= 7.51 × 10-7; GC vs. AG: OR=2.90, P=5.68 × 10-15; GC vs. CON: OR=8.42, P=2.22 × 10-15); DDB2 GTAC haplotype was associated with reduced risk of GC compared with CON (OR=0.63, P= 8.31 × 10-12). XPC rs1870134-rs2228000-rs2228001-rs2470352-rs2607775 GCAAG haplotype conferred increased risk of GC compared with AG (OR=1.88, P= 6.98 × 10-4). XPA rs2808668 and drinking, DDB2 rs326222, rs3781619, rs830083 and smoking demonstrated significant interactions in AG; XPC rs2607775 had significant interaction with smoking in GC. In conclusion, NER pathway polymorphisms especially in "damage incision" step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors. The detection of NER pathway polymorphisms such as DDB2 and XPC might be applied in the prediction of GC risk and personalized prevention in the future. NER pathway polymorphisms especially in "damage incision" step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors, which might be applied in the

  3. Patterning of the third pharyngeal pouch into thymus/parathyroid by Six and Eya1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Silvius, Derek; Davenport, Julie; Grifone, Raphaelle; Maire, Pascal; Xu, Pin-Xian

    2006-05-15

    Previous studies have suggested a role of the homeodomain Six family proteins in patterning the developing vertebrate head that involves appropriate segmentation of three tissue layers, the endoderm, the paraxial mesoderm and the neural crest cells; however, the developmental programs and mechanisms by which the Six genes act in the pharyngeal endoderm remain largely unknown. Here, we examined their roles in pharyngeal pouch development. Six1-/- mice lack thymus and parathyroid and analysis of Six1-/- third pouch endoderm demonstrated that the patterning of the third pouch into thymus/parathyroid primordia is initiated. However, the endodermal cells of the thymus/parathyroid rudiments fail to maintain the expression of the parathyroid-specific gene Gcm2 and the thymus-specific gene Foxn1 and subsequently undergo abnormal apoptosis, leading to a complete disappearance of organ primordia by E12.5. This thus defines the thymus/parathyroid defects present in the Six1 mutant. Analyses of the thymus/parathyroid development in Six1-/-;Six4-/- double mutant show that both Six1 and Six4 act synergistically to control morphogenetic movements of early thymus/parathyroid tissues, and the threshold of Six1/Six4 appears to be crucial for the regulation of the organ primordia-specific gene expression. Previous studies in flies and mice suggested that Eya and Six genes may function downstream of Pax genes. Our data clearly show that Eya1 and Six1 expression in the pouches does not require Pax1/Pax9 function, suggesting that they may function independently from Pax1/Pax9. In contrast, Pax1 expression in all pharyngeal pouches requires both Eya1 and Six1 function. Moreover, we show that the expression of Tbx1, Fgf8 and Wnt5b in the pouch endoderm was normal in Six1-/- embryos and slightly reduced in Six1-/-;Six4-/- double mutant, but was largely reduced in Eya1-/- embryos. These results indicate that Eya1 appears to be upstream of very early events in the initiation of thymus

  4. Young, proliferative thymic epithelial cells engraft and function in aging thymuses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Miller, Christine M.; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Wagers, Amy J.; Serwold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The thymus reaches its maximum size early in life and then begins to shrink, producing fewer T cells with increasing age. This thymic decline is thought to contribute to age-related T cell lymphopenias and hinder T cell recovery following bone marrow transplantation. While several cellular and molecular processes have been implicated in age-related thymic involution, their relative contributions are not known. Using heterochronic parabiosis, we observe that young circulating factors are not sufficient to drive regeneration of the aged thymus. In contrast, we find that resupplying young, engraftable thymic epithelial cells to a middle-aged or defective thymus leads to thymic growth and increased T cell production. Intrathymic transplantation and in vitro colony forming assays reveal that the engraftment and proliferative capacities of thymic epithelial cells diminish early in life, whereas the receptivity of the thymus to thymic epithelial cell engraftment remains relatively constant with age. These results support a model in which thymic growth and subsequent involution are driven by cell intrinsic changes in the proliferative capacity of thymic epithelial cells, and further show that young thymic epithelial cells can engraft and directly drive the growth of involuted thymuses. PMID:25870244

  5. Relationship between age of allogeneic thymus donor and immunological restoration of athymic ('nude") mice.

    PubMed

    Radov, L A; Sussdorf, D H; McCann, R L

    1975-12-01

    In nude mice back-crossed a minimum of five times to BALB/c, solid thymus grafts from C57Bl donors 3 days of age or younger restored both the humoral immune response against sheep erythrocytes and cellular immunity as tested by rejection of CBA skin grafts. Donor thymus placed under the renal capsule at a dose of 0-5 mg/g of recipient resulted in normal humoral immunity, while a minimum dose of 1-5 mg/g was required to reconstitute cellular competence. None of the various amounts of allogeneic thymus tissue transplanted affected the immunological status of nude recipients when grafts were obtained from donors 4 days of age or older. Histological findings correlated with the humoral and cellular responses observed. In nudes grafted with neonatal tissue, the thymus implant proliferated and developed normal architecture. The density of lymphocytes in thymus-dependent regions of peripheral lymphoid organs was near normal. On the other hand, most grafts from older (3-week-old) donors were resorbed by 90 days after implantation. In a number of cases, however, Russell bodies and numerous blast and plasma cells were seen in the graft site. Our observations suggest a possible cytotoxic rejection of implants from older allogeneic donors, while the survival and restorative capacity of transplants from 3-day-old or younger donors may have been due to a tolerogenic effect of the graft on the nude recipient. PMID:1193689

  6. Expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 2 in human thymus.

    PubMed

    Almanzar, Giovanni; Mayerl, Christina; Seitz, Jan-Christoph; Höfner, Kerstin; Brunner, Andrea; Wild, Vanessa; Jahn, Daniel; Geier, Andreas; Fassnacht, Martin; Prelog, Martina

    2016-06-01

    11beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) is a high affinity dehydrogenase which rapidly inactivates physiologically-active glucocorticoids to protect key tissues. 11β-HSD2 expression has been described in peripheral cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system as well as in murine thymus. In absence of knowledge of 11β-HSD2 expression in human thymus, the study aimed to localize 11β-HSD2 in human thymic tissue. Thymic tissue was taken of six healthy, non-immunologically impaired male infants below 12months of age with congenital heart defects who had to undergo correction surgery. 11β-HSD2 protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Kidney tissue, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were taken as positive controls. Significant expression of 11β-HSD2 protein was found at single cell level in thymus parenchyma, at perivascular sites of capillaries and small vessels penetrating the thymus lobuli and within Hassall's bodies. The present study demonstrates that 11β-HSD2 is expressed in human thymus with predominant perivascular expression and also within Hassall's bodies. To our knowledge, this is the first report confirming 11β-HSD2 expression at the protein level in human thymic tissue underlining a potential role of this enzyme in regulating glucocorticoid function at the thymic level. PMID:27025972

  7. Acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNAs in thymus and thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, M. J.; Asher, O.; Fuchs, S.

    1995-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder characterized in most cases by serological antibody against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Evidence for intrathymic localization of AChR suggests that the thymus has an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction, we have demonstrated AChR alpha-subunit mRNA in thymuses and thymomas from patients with and without myasthenia gravis. We have also studied the expression of myogenin which is known to be involved in the regulation of AChR expression. By using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found myogenin mRNAs in all of the thymuses and thymomas. Thus, both AChR alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNA are present in all of these specimens. By immunohistochemistry myoid cells (desmin and myoglobin positive) were present in all (four of four) thymuses studied and in two of five thymomas. Thus, in thymomas, nonmyoid cells might express both AChR and myogenin. These results indicate that cells within the thymus and thymoma express AChR and its regulatory protein myogenin and that such cells, under certain conditions, might play a role in the triggering of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7778671

  8. Inlay osteotome sinus floor elevation with concentrated growth factor application and simultaneous short implant placement in severely atrophic maxilla.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghui; Cai, Zhiyu; Zheng, Dingguo; Lin, Pei; Cai, Yahua; Hong, Shuxin; Lai, Yiwei; Wu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Sinus floor elevation with simultaneous implant placement in severely atrophic maxilla is challenging. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the short-term performance of modified osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) with concentrated growth factor (CGF) application and concurrent placement of a short implant in cases with residual bone height (RBH) of 2-4 mm. Twenty-five short implants were installed in 16 patients with mean RBH of 3.23 mm using modified OSFE with CGFs from January 2012 to April 2014. Postoperatively, the implants were clinically evaluated, and vertical bone gain (VBG) was measured using cone beam computed tomography. The mean duration of follow-up was 19.88 months (12-32 months). All the implants were stable with an overall survival rate of 100%. The mean VBG immediately after surgery was 9.21 mm. Six months later, significant reduction of alveolar bone height (2.90 ± 0.22 mm) was found (P < 0.05). During the second 6-month period, further alveolar bone resorption (0.14 ± 0.11 mm) was noted but without significance (P > 0.05). Within the limits of this study, modified OSFE with CGF application and simultaneous short implant placement could yield predictable clinical results for severely atrophic maxilla with RBH of 2-4 mm. PMID:27250556

  9. An atrophic, telangiectatic patch at the distal border of the tongue: a mucous membrane manifestation of xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Sheyla Batista; Harumi Nakajima Teshima, Tathyane; Lourenço, Silvia Vanessa; Nico, Marcello Menta Simonsen

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by clinical and cellular sensitivity, pigmentary changes, and early development of malignancies in sun-exposed mucocutaneous and ocular structures due to a defective ability to repair intracellular DNA damage. Individuals with XP also have a greater frequency of oral cancer, particularly squamous cell carcinoma of the anterior third of the tongue. The current study reports four cases of XP that exhibited a characteristic crescent-shaped, atrophic, telangiectatic area on the distal border of the tongue and correlates this lesion with the development of tumors at this site during follow-up. The tongue lesion was photographed and biopsied in the four patients. During routine follow-up visits, new biopsies were performed if additional tongue lesions were observed. The studied lesions were similar in the four patients. During follow-up, squamous cell carcinoma developed in one patient and pyogenic granuloma developed in three patients and was relapsing in one. The lesion remained stable in one patient during the study. The atrophic and telangiectatic patches probably occur because of chronic sun damage to the exposed portion of the tongue, and this area has a high predisposition for the development of benign and malignant tumors. PMID:24456184

  10. An unusual case of atrophic mandible fracture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and on oral bisphosphonate therapy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Osaimi, Abdulrahman; Samman, Mahmood; Al-Shakhs, Mohammad; Al-Suhaim, Faisal; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of severely atrophic (height < 10 mm) edentulous mandibles are infrequent and challenging to manage. Factors such as sclerotic bone and decreased vascularity combined with systemic diseases complicate the management of such fractures. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of type I collagen metabolism. Patients with OI characteristically present with histories of long bone fractures, deformities, blue sclerae, and opalescent dentin. However, fractures of the facial skeleton are rare. Bisphosphonate therapy has been proven to effectively reduce the fracture risk in patients with OI. The purpose of this clinical report is to present an unusual case of spontaneous fracture of the atrophic mandible in a patient with OI. Despite open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with miniplate osteosynthesis, the patient developed a second fracture at a screw placement site distal to the first fracture. The patient was successfully treated with ORIF using locking reconstruction plates fixed in the symphyseal and angle regions. Bone healing following ORIF was normal, and no clinical sign of osteonecrosis as a result of bisphosphonate therapy was observed. Patients with OI can present with spontaneous fractures of already weakened mandibles. Although such fractures can be managed with care using established protocols, further research is required to examine the effects of concomitant medication, such as bisphosphonates. PMID:25408599

  11. Effects of epidermal growth factor on atrophic enteritis in piglets induced by experimental porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jeom-Yong; Shin, Kyoung-Sun; Lee, Chul-Seung; Song, Dae-Sub

    2008-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) promotes gastrointestinal mucosal recovery by stimulating the mitogenic activity of intestinal crypt epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of EGF on atrophic enteritis induced in piglets by experimental infection with porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) strain Dr13. Two groups of 12 conventional, colostrum-deprived, 1-day-old, large White-Duroc cross breed piglets were inoculated orally with PEDV (3 x 10(5) 50% tissue culture infective doses), with or without EGF (10 microg/kg/day, intraperitoneally once daily for 4 days after infection) and compared to 12 uninfected, untreated control piglets. PEDV+EGF piglets had less severe clinical signs than PEDV only piglets at 48 and 60 h post-infection (hpi). Histologically, the ratio of villous height:crypt depth of PEDV+EGF piglets was significantly higher than PEDV only piglets at 36 and 48 hpi. Immunohistochemistry for Ki67 demonstrated increased proliferation in intestinal crypt epithelial cells of PEDV+EGF piglets compared to PEDV only piglets at 36, 48 and 60 hpi. EGF stimulates proliferation of intestinal crypt epithelial cells and promotes recovery from atrophic enteritis in PEDV-infected piglets. PMID:17574457

  12. An unusual case of atrophic mandible fracture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and on oral bisphosphonate therapy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Osaimi, Abdulrahman; Samman, Mahmood; Al-Shakhs, Mohammad; Al-Suhaim, Faisal; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-04-01

    Fractures of severely atrophic (height < 10 mm) edentulous mandibles are infrequent and challenging to manage. Factors such as sclerotic bone and decreased vascularity combined with systemic diseases complicate the management of such fractures. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of type I collagen metabolism. Patients with OI characteristically present with histories of long bone fractures, deformities, blue sclerae, and opalescent dentin. However, fractures of the facial skeleton are rare. Bisphosphonate therapy has been proven to effectively reduce the fracture risk in patients with OI. The purpose of this clinical report is to present an unusual case of spontaneous fracture of the atrophic mandible in a patient with OI. Despite open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with miniplate osteosynthesis, the patient developed a second fracture at a screw placement site distal to the first fracture. The patient was successfully treated with ORIF using locking reconstruction plates fixed in the symphyseal and angle regions. Bone healing following ORIF was normal, and no clinical sign of osteonecrosis as a result of bisphosphonate therapy was observed. Patients with OI can present with spontaneous fractures of already weakened mandibles. Although such fractures can be managed with care using established protocols, further research is required to examine the effects of concomitant medication, such as bisphosphonates. PMID:25408599

  13. The use of a new locking 90° blade plate in the treatment of atrophic proximal humerus nonunions

    PubMed Central

    Allende, Bartolome T.

    2008-01-01

    This level IV case series study prospectively evaluated patients with atrophic proximal humerus nonunions stabilised with a locking 90° blade plate. All patients were women with an average age of 69 years (range 56–78). Time from trauma to nonunion treatment averaged 23 months. Five patients had had previous surgical treatments. Two patients had a history of infection and one patient with active infection was reconstructed in two stages. Follow-up averaged 22 months (range 18–36); union was achieved in all seven cases after an average of 5.85 months. The DASH score at the last follow-up averaged 25 points and Constant score averaged 72.7 points. No patient required additional procedures. At the last follow-up all patients were free of infection, and there were no cases of avascular necrosis. The results with locked 90° blade plates in atrophic nonunions of the proximal humerus in adults were favourable in this series. PMID:18974986

  14. Inlay osteotome sinus floor elevation with concentrated growth factor application and simultaneous short implant placement in severely atrophic maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonghui; Cai, Zhiyu; Zheng, Dingguo; Lin, Pei; Cai, Yahua; Hong, Shuxin; Lai, Yiwei; Wu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Sinus floor elevation with simultaneous implant placement in severely atrophic maxilla is challenging. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the short-term performance of modified osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) with concentrated growth factor (CGF) application and concurrent placement of a short implant in cases with residual bone height (RBH) of 2–4 mm. Twenty-five short implants were installed in 16 patients with mean RBH of 3.23 mm using modified OSFE with CGFs from January 2012 to April 2014. Postoperatively, the implants were clinically evaluated, and vertical bone gain (VBG) was measured using cone beam computed tomography. The mean duration of follow-up was 19.88 months (12–32 months). All the implants were stable with an overall survival rate of 100%. The mean VBG immediately after surgery was 9.21 mm. Six months later, significant reduction of alveolar bone height (2.90 ± 0.22 mm) was found (P < 0.05). During the second 6-month period, further alveolar bone resorption (0.14 ± 0.11 mm) was noted but without significance (P > 0.05). Within the limits of this study, modified OSFE with CGF application and simultaneous short implant placement could yield predictable clinical results for severely atrophic maxilla with RBH of 2–4 mm. PMID:27250556

  15. Tetanic contraction induces enhancement of fatigability and sarcomeric damage in atrophic skeletal muscle and its underlying molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Muscle unloading due to long-term exposure of weightlessness or simulated weightlessness causes atrophy, loss of functional capacity, impaired locomotor coordination, and decreased resistance to fatigue in the antigravity muscles of the lower limbs. Besides reducing astronauts' mobility in space and on returning to a gravity environment, the molecular mechanisms for the adaptation of skeletal muscle to unloading also play an important medical role in conditions such as disuse and paralysis. The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness on skeletal muscles and to induce muscle unloading in the rat hindlimb. Our series studies have shown that the maximum of twitch tension and the twitch duration decreased significantly in the atrophic soleus muscles, the maximal tension of high-frequency tetanic contraction was significantly reduced in 2-week unloaded soleus muscles, however, the fatigability of high-frequency tetanic contraction increased after one week of unloading. The maximal isometric tension of intermittent tetanic contraction at optimal stimulating frequency did not alter in 1- and 2-week unloaded soleus, but significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus. The 1-week unloaded soleus, but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL), was more susceptible to fatigue during intermittent tetanic contraction than the synchronous controls. The changes in K+ channel characteristics may increase the fatigability during high-frequency tetanic contraction in atrophic soleus muscles. High fatigability of intermittent tetanic contraction may be involved in enhanced activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) and switching from slow to fast isoform of myosin heavy chain, tropomyosin, troponin I and T subunit in atrophic soleus muscles. Unloaded soleus muscle also showed a decreased protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and the reduction in nNOS-derived NO increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated

  16. Age-related changes in the thymus gland: CT-pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A.V.; Korobkin, M.; Olanow, W.; Heaston, D.K.; Ram, P.C.; Dunnick, N.R.; Silverman, P.M.

    1983-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that computed tomography (CT) is useful for thymoma detection in patients with myasthenia gravis. However, that usefulness may be conditioned by the state of the normal thymus. To examine this concept, the CT findings in 64 consecutive patients with histologic confirmation of thymic status after thymectomy or thymic biopsy during mediastinal exploration were reviewed. The normal thymus has a bilobed, arrowhead-shaped cross section at all ages, with gradual focal or diffuse fatty infiltration of the parenchyma usually occurring between 20 and 40 years of age. A thymoma is usually a spherical or oval mass, often producing a focal, distinct bulge in the adjacent pleural reflection. The differentiation of thymoma from normal thymus should be possible in most patients if age-related changes in the normal gland are appreciated.

  17. Thymus transplantation and disease prevention in the diabetes-prone Bio-Breeding rat

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiou, H.M.; Bellgrau, D.

    1989-05-15

    Bio-Breeding rat T lymphocytes proliferate poorly in response to alloantigen. Transplantation of Bio-Breeding rats with fetal thymus tissue from diabetes resistant rats leads to an improvement in the T cell proliferative response, but only if the thymus contains bone marrow-derived, radiation-resistant thymic antigen presenting cells of the diabetes-resistant phenotype. The current study provides evidence that thymus transplantation leading to the restoration of Bio-Breeding T cell proliferative function can also significantly reduce the incidence of insulitis and prevent the development of diabetes. It appears that a defect in the bone marrow-derived thymic APC population contributes to an abnormal maturation of Bio-Breeding T lymphocytes which in turn predisposes animals to insulitis and diabetic disease.

  18. The presence of erythroid cells in the thymus gland of man.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, M D; Singh, J

    1980-01-01

    Biopsies of the right lobe of normal thymus glands without signs of neoplasia or germinal centre formation from 35 patients ranging in age from 20 to 60 years of age, and from 3 children aged 6, 7 and 12, showed on electron microscopic examination of the material from 14 patients that in 12 cases erythroid cells of all stages of development past the beginning of haemoglobinisation were present in some degree. Earlier erythroid cells could not be identified on morphological grounds with certainty, but cells which could have been lymphoblasts, proerythroblasts and stem cell were all observed. A section of a megakaryocyte was seen in one thymus. The importance of erythropoiesis within the thymus gland is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7364659

  19. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  20. The appearance of the thymus and the integrated evolution of adaptive immune and neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Geenen, V

    2012-01-01

    The immune system may be considered as a sensory organ able to respond to different kinds of danger signals that are not detected by nervous cells. The immune response is not autonomous but also regulated by the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as by neuropeptides, vitamin D and neuroendocrine axes such as the corticotrope, somatotrope, thyrotrope and gonadotrope axes. During evolution, the thymus emerged concomitantly with recombinase-dependent adaptive immunity as an'immune brain' or a'master class' highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was an absolute requirement for survival of species because of the high risk of autotoxicity inherent to the stochastic generation of extreme diversity characterizing this novel adaptive type of immune defenses against non-self. The thymus now appears to be an obligatory intersection for the integrated evolution of the major systems of cell-to-cell signalling, the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. The presentation of many self-peptides by thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is controlled by the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein and is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells. In the same time, by still unexplained mechanisms, MHC presentation of the same self-peptides in the thymus promotes the generation of self-specific FOXP3+ CD4+CD25+ natural regulatory T cells (nTreg) that are able to inhibit in periphery self-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells having escaped the thymus censorship. Moreover, a thymus dysfunction is more and more established as the primary event driving the development of organ-specific autoimmunity, which is the tribute paid, mainly by mankind, for the preservation of self against non-self. Our novel knowledge about thymus physiology and physiopathology already serves as the basis for the development of various innovative and efficient immunomodulating strategies in pharmacology. PMID:22897070

  1. Response of thymus lymphocytes to streptozotocin-induced diabetes and exogenous vitamin C administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozerkan, Dilşad; Ozsoy, Nesrin; Cebesoy, Suna

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes causes oxidative stress, which in turn generates excessive free radicals resulting in cellular damage. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that protects tissues and organs from oxidative stress. The thymus is one of the most important lymphoid organs, which regulates T-lymphocyte proliferation and maturation. The aim of this study is to investigate the protective effects of vitamin C on the thymus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The mitotic activity and cell integrity of thymic lymphocytes were explored. Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: control (Group 1), STZ-diabetes (Group 2) and vitamin C-treated STZ-diabetics (Group 3). Rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg STZ to induce diabetes. Vitamin C (20 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically. Semithin and ultrathin sections were examined under a light or an electron microscope, respectively. Considerable numbers of mitotic lymphocytes were observed in the thymus of control rats. In the diabetic rats, however, numbers of mitotic lymphocytes decreased to ∼57% of controls, and cell division abnormalities were observed. Additionally, diabetic rats showed degeneration in the structure of the thymus including trabecular thickening, accumulation of lipid vacuoles, heterochromatic nuclei and loss of mitochondrial cristae. Degradation of medullar and cortical integrity was also detected. In the vitamin C-treated STZ-diabetic group, the structure of the thymus and mitotic activity of the lymphocytes were similar to the control group. These results suggest that vitamin C protects the thymus against injury caused by diabetes and restores thymocyte mitotic activity. PMID:25145646

  2. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  3. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  4. Trb2, a mouse homolog of tribbles, is dispensable for kidney and mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Takasato, Minoru; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Okabayashi, Koji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Asashima, Makoto; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2008-09-05

    Glomeruli comprise an important filtering apparatus in the kidney and are derived from the metanephric mesenchyme. A nuclear protein, Sall1, is expressed in this mesenchyme, and we previously reported that Trb2, a mouse homolog of Drosophila tribbles, is expressed in the mesenchyme-derived tissues of the kidney by microarray analyses using Sall1-GFP knock-in mice. In the present report, we detected Trb2 expression in a variety of organs during gestation, including the kidneys, mesonephros, testes, heart, eyes, thymus, blood vessels, muscle, bones, tongue, spinal cord, and ganglions. In the developing kidney, Trb2 signals were detected in podocytes and the prospective mesangium of the glomeruli, as well as in ureteric bud tips. However, Trb2 mutant mice did not display any apparent phenotypes and no proteinuria was observed, indicating normal glomerular functions. These results suggest that Trb2 plays minimal roles during kidney and mouse development.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective. PMID:26763078

  6. Appearance of cell fragments in thymus after a whole-body X-irradiation of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ohyama, H.; Yamada, T.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in surface architecture and three dimensional structure of rat thymus cortex were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after a whole-body X-irradiation. The samples of thymus prepared from rats 4 to 8 hr after a 400 R irradiation were observed by SEM. Normal thymocytes, having tiny microvilli and shallow ridges, decreased in number after irradiation, with a corresponding increase in radiation damaged round shaped cells with occasional protrusions and pores. With time after irradiation, smaller spherical fragments of cells having smooth or porous surfaces increased in number.

  7. Ultrastructural studies on erythropoiesis in the avian thymus. I. Description of cell types.

    PubMed

    Kendall, M D; Frazier, J A

    1979-06-01

    Thymus lobes from three species of birds, Quelea quelea, Passer domesticus and Sturnus vulgaris, have been examined ultrastructurally. The component cell types are compared with their counterparts in mammalian thymus glands, and found to be similar. Greater differences between small, intermediate and enlarged lobes of one species than exist between species. Developing erythroid cells are present in most enlarging and some enlarged glands. They appear to be developing at the expense of lymphoid cells in some birds. The origin of these cells is discussed. Cells that are possible candidates for the production of some thymic hormones are also described. PMID:466697

  8. Fascial relationship of the thymus: radiologic-pathologic correlation in neonatal pneumomediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Quattromani, F.L.; Foley, L.C.; Bowen, A.D.; Weisman, L.; Hernandez, J.

    1981-12-01

    The radiographic appearance of retrothymic pneumomediastinum is quite specific. The findings include elevation of the thymus away from other mediastinal structures with increased lucency beneath it, visualization of a radiodense line extending from the inferior pole of the thymus to the midportion of the heart, and tenting of the pericardium at the point of attachment of this line. This constellation of findings will aid in the differential diagnosis of medial anterior pneumothorax, pneumopericardium, and intrapulmonary cyst in the infant with air block. The paper details the mediastinal anatomy with special emphasis on a previously undescribed layer of connective tissue that accounts for this specific radiographic appearance.

  9. Activity of host-derived T cells which differentiate in nude mice grafted with co-isogenic or allogeneic thymuses.

    PubMed

    Kindred, B; Loor, F

    1974-05-01

    If nude mice are grafted with a neonatal thymus, host type precursor cells develop within the graft thymus and after about 6 wk the T-cell population of the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes is of host type. However, immunological responsiveness produced in nude mice in this manner is incomplete: (a) the ability to react to T-cell mitogens in vitro is greater than in untreated nudes but lower than in normal mice; (b) the response to T-cell dependent antigens is less than normal; and (c) the rejection of skin grafts is slower than in normal animals. Whether host precursor cells which differentiate in an allogeneic thymus are able to reject skin grafts from thymus donor strain appears to depend on the strain combination used. PMID:4596513

  10. Effect of chitosan edible films added with Thymus moroderi and Thymus piperella essential oil on shelf-life of cooked cured ham.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Navajas, Y; Viuda-Martos, M; Barber, X; Sendra, E; Perez-Alvarez, J A; Fernández-López, J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to develop chitosan edible films added with essential oils obtained from two Thymus species, Thymus moroderi (TMEO) and Thymus piperella (TPEO) to determine their application for enhancing safety (antioxidant and antibacterial properties) and shelf-life of cooked cured ham (CCH) stored at 4 °C during 21 days. Addition of TMEO and TPEO into chitosan films decreased the aerobic mesophilic bacteria (AMB) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) counts in coated cooked cured ham samples as compared with uncoated samples. Both AMB and LAB showed the lowest counts in CCH samples coated with chitosan films added with TPEO at 2 %. In regard to lipid oxidation, the CCH samples coated with chitosan films added with TMEO or TPEO had lower degrees of lipid oxidation than uncoated control samples. Chitosan films added with TPEO at 2 % showed the lowest values. The addition of TPEO or TMEO in chitosan films used as coated in CCH improved their shelf life. PMID:26396394

  11. mRNA expression characteristics are different in irreversibly atrophic intrinsic muscles of the forepaw compared with reversibly atrophic biceps in a rat model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Xin; Chen, Liang; Ding, Fei; Chen, Le-Zi; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    In obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), irreversible muscle atrophy occurs much faster in intrinsic muscles of the hand than in the biceps. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, mRNA expression profiles of denervated intrinsic muscles of the forepaw (IMF) and denervated biceps were determined by microarray using the rat model of OBPP where atrophy of IMF is irreversible while atrophy of biceps is reversible. Relative to contralateral control, 446 dysregulated mRNAs were detected in denervated IMF and mapped to 51 KEGG pathways, and 830 dysregulated mRNAs were detected in denervated biceps and mapped to 52 KEGG pathways. In denervated IMF, 10 of the pathways were related to muscle regulation; six with down-regulated and one with up-regulated mRNAs. The remaining three pathways had both up- and down-regulated mRNAs. In denervated biceps, 13 of the pathways were related to muscle regulation, six with up-regulated and seven with down-regulated mRNAs. Five of the pathways with up-regulated mRNAs were related to regrowth and differentiation of muscle cells. Among the 23 pathways with dysregulated mRNAs, 13 were involved in regulation of neuromuscular junctions. Our results demonstrated that mRNAs expression characteristics in irreversibly atrophic denervated IMF were different from those in reversibly atrophic denervated biceps; dysregulated mRNAs in IMF were associated with inactive pathways of muscle regulation, and in biceps they were associated with active pathways of regrowth and differentiation. Lack of self-repair potential in IMF may be a major reason why atrophy of IMF becomes irreversible much faster than atrophy of biceps after denervation. PMID:26902607

  12. Progesterone receptor in chicken bursa of Fabricius and thymus: evidence for expression in B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, S; Ylikomi, T; Palojoki, E; Syvälä, H; Pelto-Huikko, M; Tuohimaa, P

    1998-06-25

    In the present work constitutive progesterone receptor (PR) expression in the chicken bursa of Fabricius was detected in the stromal, smooth muscle and follicular medullary cells and smooth muscle cells of blood vessels. PR expression was increased during sexual maturation and after estrogen treatment. Bursal medullary PR-positive cells were further characterized to be B-lymphocytes by flow cytometric analysis. In addition, estrogen induced expression of PR in the bursal FAE-cells (follicle-associated epithelial cells). In the thymus PR was expressed constitutively in the connective tissue cells of the capsule and interfollicular septa, in a few medullary cells and in vascular smooth muscle. The PR-positive medullary cells consisted of epithelial cells, large polygonal cells resembling macrophages and plasma cells. T-lymphocytes were PR-negative. Estrogen up-regulated PR expression in the thymus. Immunoblotting studies revealed that both isoforms of PR, i.e. PR-A and PR-B, were expressed in the bursa of Fabricius and thymus with PR-B dominance. These results suggest that the chicken primary lymphoid organs bursa and thymus are under regulation of estrogen and progesterone. Expression of PR in B-lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells in the chicken is documented for the first time and suggests evidence for direct action of progesterone on immune responses. PMID:9723893

  13. Work flow for the prosthetic rehabilitation of atrophic patients with a minimal-intervention CAD/CAM approach.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Ragazzini, Sara; Fantini, Massimiliano; Corinaldesi, Giuseppe; Scotti, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    The implant-supported fixed rehabilitation of patients with an atrophic edentulous crest remains a challenge if bone augmentation is not planned. A minimal intervention approach for bone regeneration is necessary to minimize the flap overextension needed to close the defect over the augmented bone. Prosthetically guided bone regeneration can determine the amount of bone augmentation necessary for definitive prosthetic fixed rehabilitation. The positions of the implants and prosthetic restoration were planned; a 0.3 mm thick titanium mesh was customized for bone augmentation by using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing and rapid prototyped by laser sintering, and the definitive prosthetic rehabilitation was carried out according to the initial treatment plan. This resulted in minimal bone augmentation relative to the functional needs of the definitive prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:25862269

  14. Programming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in the development of neuroendocrine autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Geenen, Vincent; Bodart, Gwennaëlle; Henry, Séverine; Michaux, Hélène; Dardenne, Olivier; Charlet-Renard, Chantal; Martens, Henri; Hober, Didier

    2013-01-01

    For centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus was considered as only a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus first appeared in cartilaginous fishes some 500 million years ago, at the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was a necessity for the survival of species, given the potent evolutionary pressure imposed by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent in the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. A new paradigm of “neuroendocrine self-peptides” has been proposed, together with the definition of “neuroendocrine self.” Neuroendocrine self-peptides are secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) not according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but are processed for presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells, which emerge during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). At the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that can inhibit, in the periphery, those self-reactive T cells that escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments indicate that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands results primarily from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic

  15. Treatment of the edentulous atrophic maxilla using zygomatic implants: evaluation of survival rates over 5-10 years.

    PubMed

    Yates, J M; Brook, I M; Patel, R R; Wragg, P F; Atkins, S A; El-Awa, A; Bakri, I; Bolt, R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective observational cohort study was to analyse and report the 5-10-year survival rates of endosseous zygomatic implants used in the rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. Forty-three consecutive zygomatic implant placements in 25 patients were evaluated over a 5-10-year period. All zygomatic implant surgery was carried out under general anaesthesia. Nobel Biocare zygomatic machined-surface implants were used, and placement was undertaken using the modified sinus slot method. The main outcome measures and determinants for success were survival of the restored implants and the proportion of originally planned prostheses delivered to patients. Of the 25 patients treated, 12 were male and 13 were female; 19 were non-smokers, and the mean age at time of surgery was 64 years. Patients were treatment-planned for implant-retained bridgework, a removable prosthesis retained by fixed cast gold or milled titanium beams, or magnet-retained removable prostheses. A combination of zygomatic and conventional implants was used in all but one patient. In this study it was shown that the overall success rate for zygomatic implants was 86%, with six of the implants either failing to integrate or requiring removal due to persistent infection associated with the maxillary sinus. All patients received their planned prosthesis, although in six cases the method of retention required modification. This study illustrates that zygomatic implants are a successful and important treatment option when trying to restore the atrophic maxilla, with the potential to avoid additional augmentation/grafting procedures and resulting in a high long-term success rate. PMID:24120903

  16. Human immune system development and survival of non-obese diabetic (NOD)-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human thymus and autologous haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Covassin, L; Jangalwe, S; Jouvet, N; Laning, J; Burzenski, L; Shultz, L D; Brehm, M A

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice bearing targeted mutations in the IL2rg gene and engrafted with human immune systems are effective tools for the study of human haematopoiesis, immunity, infectious disease and transplantation biology. The most robust human immune model is generated by implantation of human fetal thymic and liver tissues in irradiated recipients followed by intravenous injection of autologous fetal liver haematopoietic stem cells [often referred to as the BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) model]. To evaluate the non-obese diabetic (NOD)-scid IL2rγnull (NSG)–BLT model, we have assessed various engraftment parameters and how these parameters influence the longevity of NSG–BLT mice. We observed that irradiation and subrenal capsule implantation of thymus/liver fragments was optimal for generating human immune systems. However, after 4 months, a high number of NSG–BLT mice develop a fatal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-like syndrome, which correlates with the activation of human T cells and increased levels of human immunoglobulin (Ig). Onset of GVHD was not delayed in NSG mice lacking murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I or II and was not associated with a loss of human regulatory T cells or absence of intrathymic cells of mouse origin (mouse CD45+). Our findings demonstrate that NSG–BLT mice develop robust human immune systems, but that the experimental window for these mice may be limited by the development of GVHD-like pathological changes. PMID:23869841

  17. Identification of the minimum peptide from mouse myostatin prodomain for human myostatin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yuri; Aoki, Shin; Takayama, Shota; Yoshida, Momoko; Asari, Tomo; Yakushiji, Fumika; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Itoh, Fumiko; Negishi, Yoichi; Sunada, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2015-02-12

    Myostatin, an endogenous negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, is a therapeutic target for muscle atrophic disorders. Here, we identified minimum peptides 2 and 7 to effectively inhibit myostatin activity, which consist of 24 and 23 amino acids, respectively, derived from mouse myostatin prodomain. These peptides, which had the propensity to form α-helix structure, interacted to myostatin with KD values of 30-36 nM. Moreover, peptide 2 significantly increased muscle mass in Duchenne muscular dystrophy model mice. PMID:25569186

  18. Influence of the thymus on the capacity of female mice to reject male skin grafts

    SciTech Connect

    De Pirro, E.S.; Goldberg, E.H.

    1989-05-01

    The ability of female mice to reject H-Y-incompatible, but otherwise histocompatible, male skin grafts differs greatly from strain to strain, as is illustrated particularly by the C57BL strain (B6 and other sublines), termed ''H-Y rejector,'' because females invariably and promptly reject C57BL male skin, in comparison with the C3H strain, termed ''H-Y nonrejector,'' because females characteristically accept male C3H skin. To assess the extent to which the thymus governs this rejector vs. nonrejector status, two studies were made. In the first, lethally irradiated B6 (C57BL) and C3H females were restored with (B6 X C3H)F1 female cells, providing a graft-vs.-host-free milieu for differentiation of the same immunopoietic cell population in B6 vs. C3H hosts. With respect to (B6 X C3H)F1 male skin grafts, B6 hosts responded as rejectors and C3H hosts as nonrejectors, signifying that rejector vs. nonrejector status was determined by the host during immunopoiesis. That the main organ responsible for rejector vs. nonrejector determination is the thymus was shown in a second study. Previously thymectomized (B6 X C3H)F1 females received a histocompatible graft of thymus from either B6 or C3H neonatal females and were restored with donor-marked (B6-Ly-5a X C3H)F1 female cells after lethal irradiation. With respect to (B6 X C3H)F1 male skin grafts, the recipients of B6 thymus grafts responded generally as rejectors and the recipients of C3H thymus grafts responded uniformly as nonrejectors.

  19. Effect of Different Selenium Supplementation Levels on Oxidative Stress, Cytokines, and Immunotoxicity in Chicken Thymus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yachao; Jiang, Li; Li, Yuanfeng; Luo, Xuegang; He, Jian

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of different selenium (Se) supplementation levels on oxidative stress, cytokines, and immunotoxicity in chicken thymus. A total of 180 laying hens (1 day old; Mianyang, China) were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 45). The chickens were maintained either on a basic diet (control group) containing 0.2 mg/kg Se, a low-supplemented diet containing 5 mg/kg Se, a medium-supplemented diet containing 10 mg/kg Se, or a high-supplemented diet containing 15 mg/kg Se for 15, 30, and 45 days, respectively. Over the entire experimental period, serum and thymus samples were collected and used for the detection of the experimental index. The results indicated that the antioxidative enzyme activities and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of antioxidative enzymes, IFN-γ and IL-2 in the thymus, and the content of IFN-γ and IL-2 in the serum of excessive-Se-treated chickens at all time points (except for the 5 mg/kg Se supplement group at 15 days) were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared to the corresponding control groups. Interestingly, a significantly increase (P < 0.05) in the content of IFN-γ was observed in the serum and thymus in the 5 mg/kg Se supplement group at 15 and 30 days compared to the corresponding control groups. In histopathological examination, the thymus tissue from excessive-Se-treated chickens revealed different degrees of cortex drop, incrassation of the medulla, and degeneration of the reticular cells. These results suggested that the excessive Se could result in a decrease in immunity, an increase in oxidative damage, and a series of clinical pathology changes, such as cortex drop, incrassation of the medulla, and degeneration of the reticular cells. PMID:26740218

  20. Intrinsic innervation and dopaminergic markers after experimental denervation in rat thymus

    PubMed Central

    Mignini, F.; Sabbatini, M.; D'Andrea, V.; Cavallotti, C.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine rat thymus innervation using denervation techniques and to explore the related microanatomical localization of dopamine, D1, D2 receptors and dopamine membrane transporter (DAT). In the thymus subcapsular region, the parenchymal cholinergic fibers belong exclusively to phrenic nerve branching. No somatic phrenic nerve branching was detected in any other analysed thymus lobule regions. In rats subjected to sympathetic or parasympathetic ablation, it was observed that catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers respectively contributed to forming plexuses along vessel walls. In the subcapsular and septal region, no parenchymal nerve branching, belonging to sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system was noted. Instead, in the deep cortical region, cortico-medullary junction (CM-j) and medulla, catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers were detected along the vessels and parenchyma. Dopamine and dopamine receptors were widely diffused in the lobular cortico-medullary junction region and in the medulla, where the final steps of thymocyte maturation and their trafficking take place. No variation in dopamine and DAT immune reaction was observed following total or partial parasympathectomy or phrenic nerve cutting. After chemical or surgical sympathectomy however, neither dopamine nor DAT immune reaction was noted again. Instead, D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression was not affected by thymus denervation. In rats subjected to specific denervation, it was observed the direct intraparenchymal branching of the phrenic nerve and sympathetic and parasympathetic fibers into thymus parenchyma along vessels. These findings on the dopaminergic system highlight the importance of neurotransmitter receptor expression in the homeostasis of neuroimmune modulation. PMID:20558339

  1. Comparative effect of thymus vulgaris and ibuprofen on primary dysmenorrhea: A triple-blind clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Salmalian, Hajar; Saghebi, Roshanak; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Bijani, Ali; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Nasiri Amiri, Fatemeh; Bakouei, Fatemeh; Behmanesh, Fereshte; Bekhradi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysmenorrhea is one of the most common medical problems in gynecology causing several problems in the personal and social life of women. This study was conducted to compare the effect of thymus vulgaris and ibuprofen on the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea Methods: This clinical study was conducted on 84 students of Babol University of Medical Sciences with primary dysmenorrhea. The students were randomly assigned to three groups receiving thymus vulgaris, ibuprofen and placebo. In all three groups, with the beginning of pain, 200 mg capsules and 25 drops of essential oil were given every 6 hours for two consecutive cycles. Pain intensity used the visual scale before and one hour after each dose for 48 hour after starting medication. The data were collected and analyzed. This study was registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trial (www.irct.ir) with registration number ID: IRCT201101245683N1 Results: The mean age of participants was 20.5±1.8 years. Both thymus vulgaris and ibuprofen were effective to reduce the pain severity of dysmenorrhea. Before treatment, the mean pain intensity in thymus vulgaris, ibuprofen and placebo groups were 6.57±2.02, 5.30±2.23 and 6.18±1.78, respectively and after treatment decreased to 1.21±1.06, 1.48±1.62 and 3.54±2.26, respectively. Reduction of pain severity was not statistically significant between the two medications, however it was significant for each drug compared with placebo (p<0.001). Conclusion: The results suggest that thymus vulgaris as well as ibuprofen can be effective in reducing the severity of pain and spasm in primary dysmenorrhea. PMID:24778782

  2. The Effect of Root, Shoot and Seed Extracts of The Iranian Thymus L. (Family: Lamiaceae) Species on HIV-1 Replication and CD4 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani Farsani, Maryam; Behbahani, Mandana; Isfahani, Hamid Zarkesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective The genus Thymus L. is a cushion plant that was previously used for the treatment of bronchitis and rheumatism. The present investigation was carried out to study the effects of root, shoot, leaf and seed extracts of five Thymus species and subspecies on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, the activity of the Thymus extracts on HIV-1 replication and lymphocytes population were examined respectively using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit and flow-cytometer. The Thymus species effect was investigated, including Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus carmanicus, Thymus daenensis subspecies lancifolius and Thymus daenensis subspecies daenensis. Results The effect of root methanol extracts of all species on PBMCs proliferation was significantly higher than the other extracts. The intensity of CD4, CD3 and CD45 were decreased in the presence of all root extracts. Although the average median fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of CD19 were increased in the cells treated with these extracts. All methanol extracts showed anti-HIV-1 activity at high concentrations (200 and 500 µg/ml). Anti-HIV-1 activity of Thymus daenensis subspecies daenensis was significantly more than the other species. Conclusion These results demonstrated that root extracts of Thymus species might be a good candidate to investigate anti-HIV infection in vivo. PMID:27540531

  3. Gene expression of ornithine decarboxylase, cyclooxygenase-2, and gastrin in atrophic gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori before and after eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Konturek, Peter C; Rembiasz, Kazimierz; Konturek, Stanislaw J; Stachura, Jerzy; Bielanski, Wladyslaw; Galuschka, K; Karcz, Danuta; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2003-01-01

    H. pylori (Hp) -induced atrophic gastritis is a well-known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Whether Hp eradication can prevent or retard the progress of atrophy and metaplasia has been the topic of numerous studies but the subject remains controversial. Recently, the increased expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), gastrin and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 has been shown to be increased in premalignant lesions in gastric mucosa and to play an essential role in the malignant transformation. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of eradication therapy on atrophic gastritis and analyze the gene expression for ODC, COX-2 and gastrin in gastric mucosa after succesful eradication in patients with atrophic gastritis. Twenty patients with chronic atrophic gastritis including both corpus and antrum of the stomach were included in this study. Four antral mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from antrum and four from corpus. The histopathologic evaluation of gastritis was based on Sydney classification of gastritis. All patients were Hp positive based on the [13C] urea breath test (UBT) and the presence of anti-Hp IgG and anti-CagA-antibodies detected by ELISA. The patients were then eradicated with triple therapy consiting of omeprazol (2 x 20 mg), amoxycillin (2 x 1 g) and clarithromycin (2 x 500 mg) for seven days and vitamin C 1 g/day for three months. In gastric mucosal samples obtained from the antrum and corpus before and after eradication, the mRNA expression for ODC, COX-2, and gastrin was assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In all patients the gastric secretory analysis was performed by measuring gastric acid output and serum gastrin levels. After triple therapy the successful eradication assessed by UBT was observed in 95% of patients. In 45% of patients the infection with CagA-positive Hp strain was observed. Three months after eradication a significant reduction in the gastric activity (neutrophilic

  4. Insights on Foxn1 Biological Significance and Usages of the “Nude” Mouse in Studies of T-Lymphopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijie; Burnley, Preston; Coder, Brandon; Su, Dong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in the “nude” gene, i.e. the FoxN1 gene, induces a hairless phenotype and a rudimentary thymus gland in mice (nude mouse) and humans (T-cell related primary immunodeficiency). Conventional FoxN1 gene knockout and transgenic mouse models have been generated for studies of FoxN1 gene function related to skin and immune diseases, and for cancer models. It appeared that FoxN1's role was fully understood and the nude mouse model was fully utilized. However, in recent years, with the development of inducible gene knockout/knockin mouse models with the loxP-Cre(ERT) and diphtheria toxin receptor-induced cell abolished systems, it appears that the complete repertoire of FoxN1's roles and deep-going usage of nude mouse model in immune function studies have just begun. Here we summarize the research progress made by several recent works studying the role of FoxN1 in the thymus and utilizing nude and “second (conditional) nude” mouse models for studies of T-cell development and function. We also raise questions and propose further consideration of FoxN1 functions and utilizing this mouse model for immune function studies. PMID:23091413

  5. Antifungal activity of chemically different essential oils from wild Tunisian Thymus spp.

    PubMed

    Maissa, Ben Jabeur; Walid, Hamada

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils isolated by using hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Thymus algeriensis and Thymus capitatus Hoff. et Link. from different locations of Tunisia (Kef, Takelsa, Zaghouan, Fahs and Toukeber) were characterised. The chemical composition was analysed by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the major component of T. capitatus from Kef and T. algeriensis was thymol while carvacrol was the main component of T. capitatus from Zaghouan, Fahs and Toukeber. The antifungal activity of the oils and some pure components was assessed by the in vitro assay against several fungi and oomycetes. T. capitatus (chemotype carvacrol) exhibited the strongest antifungal activity followed by T. capitatus (chemotype thymol) and T. algeriensis, indicating that carvacrol might have a stronger antifungal activity than thymol. PMID:25484099

  6. Expression, crystallization and structure elucidation of γ-terpinene synthase from Thymus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Kristin; Parthier, Christoph; Egerer-Sieber, Claudia; Geiger, Daniel; Muller, Yves A; Kreis, Wolfgang; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of γ-terpinene, a precursor of the phenolic isomers thymol and carvacrol found in the essential oil from Thymus sp., is attributed to the activitiy of γ-terpinene synthase (TPS). Purified γ-terpinene synthase from T. vulgaris (TvTPS), the Thymus species that is the most widely spread and of the greatest economical importance, is able to catalyze the enzymatic conversion of geranyl diphosphate (GPP) to γ-terpinene. The crystal structure of recombinantly expressed and purified TvTPS is reported at 1.65 Å resolution, confirming the dimeric structure of the enzyme. The putative active site of TvTPS is deduced from its pronounced structural similarity to enzymes from other species of the Lamiaceae family involved in terpenoid biosynthesis: to (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase and 1,8-cineole synthase from Salvia sp. and to (4S)-limonene synthase from Mentha spicata. PMID:26750479

  7. Expression of cell cycle and apoptosis regulators in thymus and thymic epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Papoudou-Bai, Alexandra; Barbouti, Alexandra; Galani, Vassiliki; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Rontogianni, Dimitra; Kanavaros, Panagiotis

    2016-05-01

    The human thymus supports the production of self-tolerant T cells with competent and regulatory functions. Various cellular components of the thymic microenvironment such as thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and dendritic cells play essential roles in thymic T cell differentiation. The multiple cellular events occurring during thymic T cell and TEC differentiation involve proteins regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Dysregulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis networks is involved in the pathogenesis of thymic epithelial tumors (TET) which are divided into two broad categories, thymomas and thymic carcinomas. The present review focuses on the usefulness of the analysis of the expression patterns of major cell cycle and apoptosis regulators in order to gain insight in the histophysiology of thymus and the histopathology, the clinical behavior and the biology of TET. PMID:25794494

  8. Thymus: reexamination of age-related changes in size and shape

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, I.R.; Glazer, G.M.; Bookstein, F.L.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-08-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the normal and abnormal thymus and its age-related changes have been described. However, there is little quantitative data regarding thymic morphology at the extremes of age and the value of thymic measurements in particular thickness, to recognize thymic abnormality. Using computed tomography the thymic morphology in 309 normal patients was analyzed retrospectively, examining its appearance at the extremes of age and measuring its dimensions for comparison with similar data in 23 patients with clinically or surgically proven thymic abnormality. The study confirmed the previously reported age-related growth and subsequent involution of the normal thymus. Comparison of normal and abnormal glands suggests that thymic shape reliably separates normal from abnormal glands. While thymic thickness and the logarithm of the product of transverse dimension and thickness were sensitive indicators of thymic abnormality, these were not necessary for accurate recognition of abnormality.

  9. Clonal deletion and clonal anergy in the thymus induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.L.; Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A. )

    1990-03-01

    The present study demonstrates that immune tolerance can be achieved in the thymus both by clonal deletion and by clonal inactivation, but that the two tolerant states are induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities. TCR engagement of self antigens on bone marrow-derived, radiation-sensitive (presumably dendritic) cells induces clonal deletion of developing thymocytes, whereas TCR engagement of self antigens on radiation-resistant cellular elements, such as thymic epithelium, induces clonal anergy. The nondeleted, anergic thymocytes can express IL-2-Rs but are unable to proliferate in response to either specific antigen or anti-TCR antibodies, and do develop into phenotypically mature cells that emigrate out of the thymus and into the periphery.

  10. Influence of nandrolone decanoate on the repopulation of the thymus after total body irradiation of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, J.; Huys, J.; De Scheerder, Y.; Dhont, E.; De Smedt, M.

    1982-10-01

    It has been reported that nandrolone decanoate is helpful in overcoming the neutropenic phase following irradiation. In the present study the influence of nandrolone decanoate on the thymus' cellularity after total body irradiation was investigated. In comparison with a placebo-treated group, mice receiving nandrolone decanoate showed a similar pattern of thymus repopulation, but a significantly lower number of thymocytes over the whole period of treatment was found. Nonirradiated mice also had a significantly lower number of thymocytes when treated with nandrolone decanoate. In addition, the number of circulating leukocytes was also evaluated over a period of 1 month after total body irradiation. On 11 of the 21 days investigated, a significantly higher number of leukocytes was found in the nandrolone decanoate-treated group. We conclude that the action of nandrolone decanoate was not clearly distinct from that of testosterone regarding either granulopoiesis or thymic involution.