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Sample records for mouse cardiomyocyte injury

  1. Ginsenoside Rb3 protects cardiomyocytes against ischemia-reperfusion injury via the inhibition of JNK-mediated NF-κB pathway: a mouse cardiomyocyte model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijia; Liu, Huimin; Xie, Zulong; Yang, Shuang; Xu, Wei; Hou, Jingbo; Yu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb3 is extracted from the plant Panax ginseng and plays important roles in cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in I/R injury. However, the underlying mechanism of ginsenoside Rb3 in myocardial I/R injury remains poorly understood. In the current study, a model of myocardial I/R injury was induced via oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reperfusion (OGD-Rep) in mouse cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells. Our data demonstrate that ginsenoside Rb3 suppresses OGD-Rep-induced cell apoptosis by the suppression of ROS generation. By detecting the NF-κB signaling pathway, we discover that the protective effect of ginsenoside Rb3 on the OGD-Rep injury is closely related to the inhibition of NF-κB activity. Ginsenoside Rb3 inhibits the upregulation of phospho-IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunit p65 which are induced by ORD-Rep injury. In addition, the extract also inhibits the OGD-Rep-induced increase in the expression of inflammation-related factors, such as IL-6, TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, LPS treatment alleviates the protective roles of ginsenoside Rb3 and activates the NF-κB pathway. Finally, the upstream factors of NF-κB were analyzed, including the Akt/Foxo3a and MAPK signaling pathways. We find that ginsenoside Rb3 pretreatment only decreases the phosphorylation of JNK induced by OGD-Rep injury, an indicator of the MAPK pathway. Importantly, an inhibitor of phospho-JNK, SP600125, protects against OGD-Rep induced apoptosis and inhibited NF-κB signaling pathway, similar to the roles of ginsenoside Rb3. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the protective effect of ginsenoside Rb3 on the OGD-Rep injury is attributed to the inhibition of JNK-mediated NF-κB activation, suggesting that ginsenoside Rb3 has the potential to serve as a novel therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID

  2. Ginsenoside Rb3 Protects Cardiomyocytes against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury via the Inhibition of JNK-Mediated NF-κB Pathway: A Mouse Cardiomyocyte Model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zulong; Yang, Shuang; Xu, Wei; Hou, Jingbo; Yu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb3 is extracted from the plant Panax ginseng and plays important roles in cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in I/R injury. However, the underlying mechanism of ginsenoside Rb3 in myocardial I/R injury remains poorly understood. In the current study, a model of myocardial I/R injury was induced via oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reperfusion (OGD-Rep) in mouse cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells. Our data demonstrate that ginsenoside Rb3 suppresses OGD-Rep-induced cell apoptosis by the suppression of ROS generation. By detecting the NF-κB signaling pathway, we discover that the protective effect of ginsenoside Rb3 on the OGD-Rep injury is closely related to the inhibition of NF-κB activity. Ginsenoside Rb3 inhibits the upregulation of phospho-IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunit p65 which are induced by ORD-Rep injury. In addition, the extract also inhibits the OGD-Rep-induced increase in the expression of inflammation-related factors, such as IL-6, TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, LPS treatment alleviates the protective roles of ginsenoside Rb3 and activates the NF-κB pathway. Finally, the upstream factors of NF-κB were analyzed, including the Akt/Foxo3a and MAPK signaling pathways. We find that ginsenoside Rb3 pretreatment only decreases the phosphorylation of JNK induced by OGD-Rep injury, an indicator of the MAPK pathway. Importantly, an inhibitor of phospho-JNK, SP600125, protects against OGD-Rep induced apoptosis and inhibited NF-κB signaling pathway, similar to the roles of ginsenoside Rb3. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the protective effect of ginsenoside Rb3 on the OGD-Rep injury is attributed to the inhibition of JNK-mediated NF-κB activation, suggesting that ginsenoside Rb3 has the potential to serve as a novel therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID

  3. Isolation and Physiological Analysis of Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Gretchen M.; Bader, David M.; Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes, the workhorse cell of the heart, contain exquisitely organized cytoskeletal and contractile elements that generate the contractile force used to pump blood. Individual cardiomyocytes were first isolated over 40 years ago in order to better study the physiology and structure of heart muscle. Techniques have rapidly improved to include enzymatic digestion via coronary perfusion. More recently, analyzing the contractility and calcium flux of isolated myocytes has provided a vital tool in the cellular and sub-cellular analysis of heart failure. Echocardiography and EKGs provide information about the heart at an organ level only. Cardiomyocyte cell culture systems exist, but cells lack physiologically essential structures such as organized sarcomeres and t-tubules required for myocyte function within the heart. In the protocol presented here, cardiomyocytes are isolated via Langendorff perfusion. The heart is removed from the mouse, mounted via the aorta to a cannula, perfused with digestion enzymes, and cells are introduced to increasing calcium concentrations. Edge and sarcomere detection software is used to analyze contractility, and a calcium binding fluorescent dye is used to visualize calcium transients of electrically paced cardiomyocytes; increasing understanding of the role cellular changes play in heart dysfunction. Traditionally used to test drug effects on cardiomyocytes, we employ this system to compare myocytes from WT mice and mice with a mutation that causes dilated cardiomyopathy. This protocol is unique in its comparison of live cells from mice with known heart function and known genetics. Many experimental conditions are reliably compared, including genetic or environmental manipulation, infection, drug treatment, and more. Beyond physiologic data, isolated cardiomyocytes are easily fixed and stained for cytoskeletal elements. Isolating cardiomyocytes via perfusion is an extremely versatile method, useful in studying cellular changes

  4. Cardiomyocyte marker expression in a human lymphocyte cell line using mouse cardiomyocyte extract.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Zahra; Tavakolinejad, Sima; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Rasooli, Manuchehr

    2011-03-01

    Cell transplantation shows potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases. Embryonic stem cells, cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have been suggested as sources for transplantation therapy. Because of some technical limitations with the use of stem cells, transdifferentiation of fully differentiated cells is a potentially useful alternative. We investigated whether human peripheral blood cells could transdifferentiate into cardiomyocyte. Transdifferentiation was induced in a human B lymphocyte cell line (Raji). Cardiomyocyte extract was prepared from adult mouse cardiomyocytes. The cells were treated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, permeabilized with streptolysin O, and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract. They were cultured for 10 days, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected with immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed that some cells expressed myosin heavy chain, α-actinin and cardiac troponin T after 3 and 4 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed these data. In cells exposed to trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract, troponin T expression was seen in 3.53% of the cells and 3.11% of them expressed α-actinin. After exposure to the cardiomyocyte extract, some permeabilized cells adhered to the plate loosely; however, the morphology did not change significantly, and they continued to show a rounded shape after 4 weeks. Our treated lymphocytes expressed cardiomyocyte markers. Our results suggest that lymphocytes may be useful in future research as a source of cells for reprogramming procedures. PMID:21547694

  5. Cardiomyocyte Marker Expression in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts by Cell-Free Cardiomyocyte Extract and Epigenetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Heidari, Fatemeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Vojdani, Zahra; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohrah; Rohani, Leili

    2014-01-01

    Background: The regenerative capacity of the mammalian heart is quite limited. Recent reports have focused on reprogramming mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether fibroblasts could transdifferentiate into myocardium. Methods: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with Trichostatin A (TSA) and 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC). The treated cells were permeabilized with streptolysin O and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract and cultured for 1, 10, and 21 days. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected by immunohistochemistry. Alkaline phosphatase activity and OCT4 were also detected in cells treated by chromatin-modifying agents. Results: The cells exposed to a combination of 5-aza-dC and TSA and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract showed morphological changes. The cells were unable to express cardiomyocyte markers after 24 h. Immunocytochemical assays showed a notable degree of myosin heavy chain and α-actinin expressions after 10 days. The expression of the natriuretic factor and troponin T occurred after 21 days in these cells. The cells exposed to chromatin-modifying agents also expressed cardiomyocyte markers; however, the proportion of reprogrammed cells was clearly smaller than that in the cultures exposed to 5-aza-dC , TSA, and extract. Conclusion: It seems that the fibroblasts were able to eliminate the previous epigenetic markers and form new ones according to the factors existing in the extract. Since no beating was observed, at least up to 21 days, the cells may need an appropriate extracellular matrix for their function. PMID:24753644

  6. Cardiomyocyte Regeneration in the mdx Mouse Model of Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Laval, Steven; Owens, William Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous regeneration has been demonstrated in the mammalian heart after ischemic injury. However, approximately one-third of cases of heart failure are secondary to nonischemic heart disease and cardiac regeneration in these cases remains relatively unexplored. We, therefore, aimed at quantifying the rate of new cardiomyocyte formation at different stages of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Six-, 12-, 29-, and 44-week-old mdx mice received a 7 day pulse of BrdU. Quantification of isolated cardiomyocyte nuclei was undertaken using cytometric analysis to exclude nondiploid nuclei. Between 6–7 and 12–13 weeks, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled nuclei in the mdx hearts compared with wild-type controls. This difference was lost by the 29–30 week time point, and a significant decrease in cardiomyocyte generation was observed in both the control and mdx hearts by 44–45 weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated BrdU-labeled nuclei exclusively in mononucleated cardiomyocytes. This study demonstrates cardiomyocyte regeneration in a nonischemic model of mammalian cardiomyopathy, controlling for changes in nuclear ploidy, which is lost with age, and confirms a decrease in baseline rates of cardiomyocyte regeneration with aging. While not attempting to address the cellular source of regeneration, it confirms the potential utility of innate regeneration as a therapeutic target. PMID:25749191

  7. Chrysin attenuates cardiomyocyte apoptosis and loss of intermediate filaments in a mouse model of mitoxantrone cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Anghel, N; Cotoraci, C; Ivan, A; Suciu, M; Herman, H; Balta, C; Nicolescu, L; Olariu, T; Galajda, Z; Ardelean, A; Hermenean, A

    2015-12-01

    Chrysin (CHR) is a natural flavonoid and is present in high concentration in honey, propolis and many plant extracts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of CHR to reduce cardiomyocyte apoptosis and loss of intermediate filaments in a mouse model of mitoxantrone cardiotoxicity. Morphology of the cardiomyocytes was determined by optic and transmission electron microscopy and biochemistry methods. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were assessed by immunofluorecence. Tunel assay was used to assess apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. In addition, the distribution of desmin protein was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Our results show that MTX treatment significantly increased serum levels of creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), indicator of cardiac injury and withdrawn under CHR protection. Expression levels of Bcl-2 decreased, while those of Bax and caspase-3 increased following MTX treatment. 50 mg/kg of daily CHR intake reduced Bax and caspase-3 immunopositivity and restored Bcl-2 levels to a value comparable to the control. TUNEL (+) cardiomyocyte nuclei of MTX group showed typical signs of apoptosis which almost completely disappeared in response to 50 mg/kg CHR treatment. In parallel, an irregular distribution and a weak expression of desmin is associated with MTX induced cardiotoxic effects which was also restored by CHR treatment. In conclusion chrysin inhibits MTX-triggered cardiomyocyte apoptosis via multiple pathways, including decrease of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 expression along with preservation of the desmin disarray. PMID:26112963

  8. Analysis of Cardiomyocyte Development using Immunofluorescence in Embryonic Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wilsbacher, Lisa D.; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2015-01-01

    During heart development, the generation of myocardial-specific structural and functional units including sarcomeres, contractile myofibrils, intercalated discs, and costameres requires the coordinated assembly of multiple components in time and space. Disruption in assembly of these components leads to developmental heart defects. Immunofluorescent staining techniques are used commonly in cultured cardiomyocytes to probe myofibril maturation, but this ex vivo approach is limited by the extent to which myocytes will fully differentiate in culture, lack of normal in vivo mechanical inputs, and absence of endocardial cues. Application of immunofluorescence techniques to the study of developing mouse heart is desirable but more technically challenging, and methods often lack sufficient sensitivity and resolution to visualize sarcomeres in the early stages of heart development. Here, we describe a robust and reproducible method to co-immunostain multiple proteins or to co-visualize a fluorescent protein with immunofluorescent staining in the embryonic mouse heart and use this method to analyze developing myofibrils, intercalated discs, and costameres. This method can be further applied to assess cardiomyocyte structural changes caused by mutations that lead to developmental heart defects. PMID:25866997

  9. An improved isolation procedure for adult mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pinz, Ilka; Zhu, Ming; Mende, Ulrike; Ingwall, Joanne S

    2011-09-01

    Isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes are an important tool in cardiovascular research, but are challenging to prepare. Because the energy supply determines cell function and viability, we compared total creatine ([Cr]) and [ATP] in isolated cardiomyocytes with the intact mouse heart. Isolated myocytes suffered severe losses of Cr (-70%) and ATP (-53%). Myocytes were not able to replete [Cr] during a 5 h incubation period in medium supplemented with 1 mM Cr. In contrast, adding 20 mM Cr to the digestion buffers was sufficient to maintain normal [Cr]. Supplementing buffers with 5 mM of inosine (Ino) and adenosine (Ado) to prevent loss of cellular nucleosides partially protected against loss of ATP. To test whether maintaining [ATP] and [Cr] improves contractile function, myocytes were challenged by varying pacing rate from 0.5 to 10 Hz and by adding isoproterenol (Iso) at 5 and 10 Hz. All groups performed well up to 5 Hz, showing a positive cell shortening-frequency relationship; however, only 16% of myocytes isolated under standard conditions were able to sustain pacing with Iso challenge at 10 Hz. In contrast, 30-50% of the myocytes with normal Cr levels were able to contract and maintain low diastolic [Ca(2+)]. Cell yield also improved in Cr and the Cr/Ino/Ado-treated groups (85-90% vs. 70-75% rod shaped in untreated myocytes). These data suggest that viability and performance of isolated myocytes are improved when they are protected from the severe loss of Cr and ATP during the isolation, making them an even better research tool. PMID:21327944

  10. [Ophiopogonin D protects cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin-induced injury through suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress].

    PubMed

    Meng, Chen; Yuan, Cai-Hua; Zhang, Chen-Chen; Wen, Ming-Da; Gao, Yan-Hong; Ding, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Yu; Zhang, Zhao

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to examine whether ophiopogonin D (OP-D) is capable of protecting cardiomyocytes against DOX-induced injury and the mechanisms involved. H9c2 cells were cultured. MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability and toxicity. Mito-tracker as fluorescence probe was used to measure ROS content raised from mitochondria. The mRNA and protein expression of ATF6alpha, GRP78 and CHOP were analyzed using real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The results showed that a significant endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) was induced upon exposure of H9c2 cells to DOX as indicated by the increase in the expression of ERS related proteins, which was paralleled with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in the viability of H9c2 cells. Whereas, DOX-induced ROS accumulation and up-regulation of ERS related proteins were partially abolished by pretreatment with OP-D. Consequently, a DOX-induced ERS was mitigated by application of OP-D. Similarly, DOX-induced decrease in cell viability was partially attenuated by either inhibiting CHOP or pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant. Moreover, cardiac ultrastructural abnormalities seen in mouse receiving DOX injections were obviously ameliorated by pretreatment of OP-D. Taken together, the present study proved that OP-D protects cardiomyocytes against DOX-induced injury, at least in part, through reducing ROS accumulation and alleviating ERS. PMID:25322552

  11. Physiological contractility of cardiomyocytes in the wall of mouse and rat azygos vein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Feng, Han-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated the abundant presence of cardiomyocytes in the wall of thoracic veins of adult mouse and rat. The highly differentiated morphology and myofilament protein contents of the venous cardiomyocytes suggested contractile functions. Here we further investigated the contractility of mouse and rat azygos venous rings compared with that of atrial strips and ventricular papillary muscle. 5-Bromo-4-chloro-indolyl-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining of transgenic mouse vessels expressing lacZ under a cloned cardiac troponin T promoter demonstrated that the venous cardiomyocytes are discontinuous from atrial myocardium and aligned in the wall of thoracic veins perpendicular to the vessel axis. Histological sections displayed sarcomeric striations in the venous cardiomyocytes, which indicate an encirclement orientation of myofibrils in the vessel wall. Mechanical studies found that the rings of mouse and rat azygos vein produce strong cardiac type twitch contractions when stimulated with electrical pacing in contrast to the weak and slow smooth muscle contractions induced using 90 mM KCl. The twitch contraction and relaxation of mouse azygos veins further exhibited a cardiac type of β-adrenergic responses. Quantitative comparison showed that the contractions of venous cardiomyocytes are slightly slower than those of atrium muscle but significantly faster than those of ventricular papillary muscle. These novel findings indicate that the cardiomyocytes abundant in the wall of rodent thoracic veins possess fully differentiated cardiac muscle phenotype despite their anatomical and functional segregations from the heart. PMID:24477237

  12. Lipid emulsion rapidly restores contractility in stunned mouse cardiomyocytes: A comparison with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Fettiplace, Michael; Sy-Jou, Chen; Steinhorn, Benjamin; Shao, Zuohui; Zhu, Xiangdong; Li, Changqing; Harty, Shaun; Weinberg, Guy; Vanden Hoek, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cooling following cardiac arrest can improve survival significantly. However, delays in achieving target temperature may decrease the overall benefits of cooling. Here we test whether lipid emulsion, a clinically approved drug reported to exert cardioprotection, can rescue heart contractility in the setting of delayed cooling in stunned mouse cardiomyocytes. Design Cell culture study Setting Academic research laboratory Subjects Cardiomyocytes isolated from 1–2-day old C57BL6 mice Interventions Cardiomyocytes were exposed to 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 90 minutes reperfusion and 10 minutes isoproterenol with nine interventions: 1) no additional treatment; 2) intra-ischemic cooling at 32°C initiated 10 min prior to reperfusion; 3) delayed cooling started 20 minutes after reperfusion; 4) lipid emulsion + delayed cooling; 5) lipid emulsion (0.25%) administered at reperfusion; 6) lipid emulsion + intra-ischemic cooling; 7) delayed lipid emulsion; 8) lipid emulsion + delayed cooling + Akt inhibitor (API-2, 10 μM) and 9) lipid emulsion + delayed cooling + Erk inhibitor (U0126, 10 μM). Inhibitors were given to cells 1 h prior to ischemia. Measurements and Main Results Contractility was recorded by real-time phase-contrast imaging and analyzed with pulse image velocimetry in MATLAB. Ischemia diminished cell contraction. The cardioprotective effect of cooling was diminished when delayed but was rescued by lipid emulsion. Further, lipid emulsion on its own improved recovery of the contractility to an equal extent as intra-ischemic cooling. However, co-treatment of lipid emulsion and intra-ischemic cooling did not further improve the recovery compared to either treatment alone. Moreover, Akt and Erk inhibitors blocked lipid emulsion-induced protection. Conclusion Lipid emulsion improved contractility and rescued contractility in the context of delayed cooling. This protective effect required Akt and Erk signaling. Lipid emulsion might serve as a

  13. Oxidative Stress and Ca2+ Release Events in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Natalia; Kang, Chifei; Fernandez-Tenorio, Miguel; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qiongling; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Niggli, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Cellular oxidative stress, associated with a variety of common cardiac diseases, is well recognized to affect the function of several key proteins involved in Ca2+ signaling and excitation-contraction coupling, which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to reactive oxygen species. These include the Ca2+ release channels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptors or RyR2s) and the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Oxidation of RyR2s was found to increase the open probability of the channel, whereas CaMKII can be activated independent of Ca2+ through oxidation. Here, we investigated how oxidative stress affects RyR2 function and SR Ca2+ signaling in situ, by analyzing Ca2+ sparks in permeabilized mouse cardiomyocytes under a broad range of oxidative conditions. The results show that with increasing oxidative stress Ca2+ spark duration is prolonged. In addition, long and very long-lasting (up to hundreds of milliseconds) localized Ca2+ release events started to appear, eventually leading to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ depletion. These changes of release duration could be prevented by the CaMKII inhibitor KN93 and did not occur in mice lacking the CaMKII-specific S2814 phosphorylation site on RyR2. The appearance of long-lasting Ca2+ release events was paralleled by an increase of RyR2 oxidation, but also by RyR-S2814 phosphorylation, and by CaMKII oxidation. Our results suggest that in a strongly oxidative environment oxidation-dependent activation of CaMKII leads to RyR2 phosphorylation and thereby contributes to the massive prolongation of SR Ca2+ release events. PMID:25517148

  14. Female Adult Mouse Cardiomyocytes Are Protected Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangfei; He, Quan; Sun, Ying; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Premenopausal women have less cardiovascular disease and lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than men the same age. Our previous studies showed that female mice have lower mortality and better preserved cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for such a sex difference are not well established. Using cultured adult mouse cardiomyocytes (ACMs), we tested the hypothesis that the survival advantage of females stems from activated estrogen receptors (ER) and Akt survival signaling pathways. ACMs were isolated from male and female C57BL/6J mice and treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 μM) for 30 min. Cell survival was indicated by rod ratio (rod shaped cells/total cells) and cell death by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and positive staining of Annexin-V (AV+, a marker for apoptosis) and propidium iodide (PI+, a marker for necrosis). In response to H2O2, female ACMs exhibited a higher rod ratio, lower LDH release and fewer AV+ and PI+ cells compared to males. Phospho-Akt was greater in females both at baseline and after H2O2 stimulation. The downstream molecule of Akt, phosphor-GSK-3β (inactivation), was also higher while caspase-3 activity was lower in females in response to H2O2. Bcl-2 did not differ between genders. ERα was the dominant isoform in females, whereas ERβ was low but similar in both genders. Our findings demonstrate that female ACMs have a greater survival advantage when challenged with oxidative stress-induced cell death. This may be attributable to activation of Akt and inhibition of GSK-3β and caspase-3 through an ERα-mediated mechanism. PMID:20212261

  15. Targeting Pin1 Protects Mouse Cardiomyocytes from High-Dose Alcohol-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuehong; Li, Zizhuo; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Sun, Jiantao; Shan, Lina; Li, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term heavy alcohol consumption is considered to be one of the main causes of left ventricular dysfunction in alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM). As previously suggested, high-dose alcohol induces oxidation stress and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that high-dose alcohol treatment stimulated expression and activity of Pin1 in mouse primary cardiomyocytes. While siRNA-mediated knockdown of Pin1 suppressed alcohol-induced mouse cardiomyocyte apoptosis, overexpression of Pin1 further upregulated the numbers of apoptotic mouse cardiomyocytes. We further demonstrated that Pin1 promotes mitochondria oxidative stress and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential but suppresses endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in the presence of alcohol. Taken together, our results revealed a pivotal role of Pin1 in regulation of alcohol-induced mouse cardiomyocytes apoptosis by promoting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and repressing eNOS expression, which could be potential therapeutic targets for ACM. PMID:26697133

  16. Autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from the myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury through the clearance of CLP36

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chao; Gu, Lei; Wang, Lina; Shang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiong; Wan, Junyi; Shi, Jian; Wang, Fang; Xu, Zhiliang; Ji, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of the death worldwide. An increasing number of studies have found that autophagy is involved in the progression or prevention of CVD. However, the precise mechanism of autophagy in CVD, especially the myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury (MI/R injury), is unclear and controversial. Here, we show that the cardiomyocyte-specific disruption of autophagy by conditional knockout of Atg7 leads to severe contractile dysfunction, myofibrillar disarray and vacuolar cardiomyocytes. A negative cytoskeleton organization regulator, CLP36, was found to be accumulated in Atg7-deficient cardiomyocytes. The cardiomyocyte-specific knockout of Atg7 aggravates the MI/R injury with cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, myofibrillar disarray and severe cardiac fibrosis, most probably due to CLP36 accumulation in cardiomyocytes. Altogether, this work reveals autophagy may protect cardiomyocytes from the MI/R injury through the clearance of CLP36, and these findings define a novel relationship between autophagy and the regulation of stress fibre in heart. PMID:27512143

  17. Trimetazidine protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia-induced injury through ameliorates calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinhong; Xu, Hao; Shi, Liang; Tong, Jie; Zhang, Jianbao

    2015-07-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) overload induced by chronic hypoxia alters Ca(2+)i homeostasis, which plays an important role on mediating myocardial injury. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with trimetazidine (TMZ) would improve Ca(2+)i handling in hypoxic myocardial injury. Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic hypoxia (1% O2, 5% CO2, 37 °C). Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured with Fura-2/AM. Perfusion of cardiomyocytes with a high concentration of caffeine (10 mM) was carried out to verify the function of the cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and the activity of sarco(endo)-plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a). For TMZ-treated cardiomyocytes exposured in hypoxia, we observed a decrease in mRNA expression of proapoptotic Bax, caspase-3 activation and enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. The cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were also alleviated in hypoxic cardiomyocyte treated with TMZ. Moreover, we found that TMZ treatment cardiomyocytes enhanced "metabolic shift" from lipid oxidation to glucose oxidation. Compared with hypoxic cardiomyocyte, the diastolic [Ca(2+)]i was decreased, the amplitude of Ca(2+)i oscillations and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load were recovered, the activities of ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), NCX and SERCA2a were increased in cardiomyocytes treated with TMZ. TMZ attenuated abnormal changes of RyR2 and SERCA2a genes in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. In addition, cholinergic signaling are involved in hypoxic stress and the cardioprotective effects of TMZ. These results suggest that TMZ ameliorates Ca(2+)i homeostasis through switch of lipid to glucose metabolism, thereby producing the cardioprotective effect and reduction in hypoxic cardiomyocytes damage. PMID:25937560

  18. Stable, Covalent Attachment of Laminin to Microposts Improves the Contractility of Mouse Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical output of contracting cardiomyocytes, the muscle cells of the heart, relates to healthy and disease states of the heart. Culturing cardiomyocytes on arrays of elastomeric microposts can enable inexpensive and high-throughput studies of heart disease at the single-cell level. However, cardiomyocytes weakly adhere to these microposts, which limits the possibility of using biomechanical assays of single cardiomyocytes to study heart disease. We hypothesized that a stable covalent attachment of laminin to the surface of microposts improves cardiomyocyte contractility. We cultured cells on polydimethylsiloxane microposts with laminin covalently bonded with the organosilanes 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. We measured displacement of microposts induced by the contractility of mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, which attach better than mature cardiomyocytes to substrates. We observed time-dependent changes in contractile parameters such as micropost deformation, contractility rates, contraction and relaxation speeds, and the times of contractions. These parameters were affected by the density of laminin on microposts and by the stability of laminin binding to micropost surfaces. Organosilane-mediated binding resulted in higher laminin surface density and laminin binding stability. 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane provided the highest laminin density but did not provide stable protein binding with time. Higher surface protein binding stability and strength were observed with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. In cultured cardiomyocytes, contractility rate, contraction speeds, and contraction time increased with higher laminin stability. Given these variations in contractile function, we conclude that binding of laminin to microposts via 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde improves contractility observed by an increase in beating rate and contraction speed as it occurs during the

  19. Isolation and Culture of Adult Mouse Cardiomyocytes for Cell Signaling and in vitro Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daxiang; Wu, Jian; Bai, Yan; Zhao, Xiaochen; Liu, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have made genetically modified mice, including transgenic and gene knockout mice, an essential tool in many research fields. Adult cardiomyocytes are widely accepted as a good model for cardiac cellular physiology and pathophysiology, as well as for pharmaceutical intervention. Genetically modified mice preclude the need for complicated cardiomyocyte infection processes to generate the desired genotype, which are inefficient due to cardiomyocytes’ terminal differentiation. Isolation and culture of high quantity and quality functional cardiomyocytes will dramatically benefit cardiovascular research and provide an important tool for cell signaling transduction research and drug development. Here, we describe a well-established method for isolation of adult mouse cardiomyocytes that can be implemented with little training. The mouse heart is excised and cannulated to an isolated heart system, then perfused with a calcium-free and high potassium buffer followed by type II collagenase digestion in Langendorff retrograde perfusion mode. This protocol yields a consistent result for the collection of functional adult mouse cardiomyocytes from a variety of genetically modified mice. PMID:24894542

  20. Functional brown adipose tissue limits cardiomyocyte injury and adverse remodeling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Ernande, Laura; Cheng, Juan; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Yao, Vincent; Miranda-Bezerra, Alexandre; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Panagia, Marcello; Sosnovik, David E; Puppala, Dheeraj; Armoundas, Antonis A; Hindle, Allyson; Bloch, Kenneth D; Buys, Emmanuel S; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-07-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has well recognized thermogenic properties mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1); more recently, BAT has been demonstrated to modulate cardiovascular risk factors. To investigate whether BAT also affects myocardial injury and remodeling, UCP1-deficient (UCP1(-/-)) mice, which have dysfunctional BAT, were subjected to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. At baseline, there were no differences in echocardiographic parameters, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or myocardial fibrosis between wild-type (WT) and UCP1(-/-) mice. Isoproterenol infusion increased cTnI and myocardial fibrosis and induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in both WT and UCP1(-/-) mice. UCP1(-/-) mice also demonstrated exaggerated myocardial injury, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling, as well as decreased survival. Transplantation of WT BAT to UCP1(-/-) mice prevented the isoproterenol-induced cTnI increase and improved survival, whereas UCP1(-/-) BAT transplanted to either UCP1(-/-) or WT mice had no effect on cTnI release. After 3 days of isoproterenol treatment, phosphorylated AKT and ERK were lower in the LV's of UCP1(-/-) mice than in those of WT mice. Activation of BAT was also noted in a model of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, and was correlated to LV dysfunction. Deficiency in UCP1, and accompanying BAT dysfunction, increases cardiomyocyte injury and adverse LV remodeling, and decreases survival in a mouse model of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. Myocardial injury and decreased survival are rescued by transplantation of functional BAT to UCP1(-/-) mice, suggesting a systemic cardioprotective role of functional BAT. BAT is also activated in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25968336

  1. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  2. Kaempferol protects cardiomyocytes against anoxia/reoxygenation injury via mitochondrial pathway mediated by SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Liao, Zhangping; Huang, Liqing; Liu, Dan; Yin, Dong; He, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis is a critical mechanism of anoxia/ reoxygenation (A/R)-induced injury in cardiomyocytes. Kaempferol (Kae) is a natural polyphenol and a type of flavonoid, which has been demonstrated to protect myocardium against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanism is still not fully elucidated. We hypothesize that Kae may improve the mitochondrial function during I/R injury via a potential signal pathway. In this study, an in vitro I/R model was replicated on neonatal rat primary cardiomyocytes by A/R treatment. Cell viability was monitored by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-5-(3- carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2 H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Protein expression was detected by Western Blotting. mPTP opening and the activity of caspase-3 were measured by colorimetric method. The results showed that Kae effectively enhanced the cell viability and decreased the LDH release in cardiomyocytes subjected to A/R injury. Kae reduced the A/R-induced reactive oxygen species generation, the loss of Δψm, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol. Kae inhibited the A/R-stimulated mPTP opening and activation of caspase-3, and ultimate decrease in cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Furthermore, we found Kae up-regulated Human Silent Information Regulator Type 1 (SIRT1) expression, indicating SIRT1 signal pathway likely involved the cardioprotection of Kae. Sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished the protective effect of Kae in cardiomyocytes subjected to A/R. Additionally, Kae significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2. Thus, we firstly demonstrate that Kae protects cardiomyocytes against A/R injury through mitochondrial pathway mediated by SIRT1. PMID:26086862

  3. Bone marrow stromal cells as an inducer for cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengming; Johkura, Kohei; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Nagai, Mika; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2010-09-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) secrete soluble factors and display varied cell-biological functions. To confirm the ability and efficiency of BMSCs to induce embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiomyocytes, mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were co-cultured with rat BMSCs. After about 10 days, areas of rhythmically contracting cells in more solid aggregates became evident with bundle-like structures formed along borders between EB outgrowth and BMSC layer. ESC-derived cardiomyocytes exhibited sarcomeric striations when stained with troponin I (Trop I), organized in separated bundles. Besides, the staining for connexin 43 was detected in cell-cell junctions, which demonstrated that ESC-derived cardiomyocytes were coupled by gap junction in culture. The related genes of cardiomyocytes were found in these beating and no-beating EBs co-cultured with BMSCs. In addition, an improved efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESC-BMSC co-culture was found in the serum-free medium: 5-fold up-regulation in the number of beating area compared with the serum medium. Effective cardiac differentiation was also recognized in transfer filter assay and in condition medium obtained from BMSC culture. A clear increase in the expression of cardiac genes and TropI protein confirmed further cardiac differentiation by BMP4 and Retinoic Acid (RA) treatment. These results demonstrate that BMSCs can induce cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESCs through soluble factors and enhance it with BMP4 or RA treatment. Serum-free ESC-BMSC co-culture represents a defined in vitro model for identifying the cardiomyocyte-inducing activity from BMSCs and, in addition, a straightforward experimental system for assessing clinical applications. PMID:20801009

  4. Effects of oxytocin on cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hatami, Leili; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2007-04-12

    This study sought to investigate the presence of oxytocin receptors and the possible biological role of oxytocin as an effective factor in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiomyocytes. Mouse ESCs were cultivated in hanging drops to form embryoid bodies (EBs). The EBs were then treated with and without oxytocin (experimental and control groups). Up to 30 days after plating, contraction and beating frequency were monitored and evaluated daily. The growth characteristics of the ESC-derived cardiomyocytes were assessed by cardioactive drugs, immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the experimental group, the percentage of the EBs with spontaneous contraction was significantly increased from 17th day onward. The spontaneous beating frequency of each EB in both groups was also changed with cardioactive drugs such as Bay K, carbachol, isopernaline and phenylephrine. However, in the experimental group, changes with isopernaline were more pronounced at the early and intermediate stages of cardiomyocyte development. The beating cells of both groups, stained positive with anti alpha-actinin, desmin, cardiac troponin I and connexin antibodies, and revealed similar ultrastructural features. Oxytocin receptors were detected on the ESCs and derived-differentiated cells. In addition, cardiac-specific genes such as cardiac alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain, myosin light chain-2v, and atrial natriuretic factor were also detected in the ESC-derived differentiated cells of both groups. In the experimental group, all the specific genes, with the exception of alpha-myosin heavy chain, were more pronounced at the early stage of cardiomyocyte development. In conclusion, oxytocin has receptors on undifferentiated ESCs and derived differentiated cells, and in spite of better improvement of the EBs with spontaneous contraction, it can only promote the early maturation of ESC

  5. Effects of Pogostemon cablin Blanco extract on hypoxia induced rabbit cardiomyocyte injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Bu-Yeo; Lim, Se-Hyun; Cho, Su-In

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pogostemonis Herba, the dried aerial part of Pogostemon cablin Blanco, is a well-known materia medica in Asia that is widely used for syndrome of gastrointestinal dysfunctions. Objective: This study was undertaken to examine whether Pogostemon cablin extract (PCe) might have any beneficial effect on hypoxia induced rabbit cardiomyocyte injury. Materials and Methods: Isolated cardiomyocytes were divided into three groups and the changes of cell viability in cardiomyocytes of hypoxic and hypoxia/reoxygenation group were determined. The effect of PCe on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, intracellular formation of ROS was also measured by monitoring the 2’,7’-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. Results: PCe effectively protected the cells against both the hypoxia and reoxygenation induced injury, and the protective effect of PCe is not mediated by interaction with adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K+ channels. In the presence of PCe, production of ROS under chemical hypoxia was remarkably reduced which suggests that PCe might exert its effect as a ROS scavenger. Conclusion: The present study provides clear evidence for the beneficial effect of PCe on cardiomyocyte injury during hypoxia or reoxygenation following prolonged hypoxia. PMID:25829770

  6. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  7. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  8. Alpha-lipoic acid protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xueming; Chen, Aihua Yang, Pingzhen; Song, Xudong; Liu, Yingfeng; Li, Zhiliang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Li, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •We observed the cell viability and death subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •We observed the degree of autophagy subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival. •LA inhibited the autophagy in parallel to the decreased total cell death. •We concluded that LA protected cardiomyocytes against H/R by inhibiting autophagy. -- Abstract: Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is an important in vitro model for exploring the molecular mechanisms and functions of autophagy during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) plays an important role in the etiology of cardiovascular disease. Autophagy is widely implicated in myocardial I/R injury. We assessed the degree of autophagy by pretreatment with LA exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell based on the expression levels of Beclin-1, LC3II/LC3I, and green fluorescent protein-labeled LC3 fusion proteins. Autophagic vacuoles were confirmed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R using transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that pretreatment with LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival and decreased total cell death in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. We conclude that LA protects cardiomyocytes against H/R injury by inhibiting autophagy.

  9. CDK9 and its repressor LARP7 modulate cardiomyocyte proliferation and response to injury in the zebrafish heart

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Wilson, Kathryn S.; Maqsood, Sana; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.; Denvir, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk)9 acts through the positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) complex to activate and expand transcription through RNA polymerase II. It has also been shown to regulate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, with recent evidence linking it to cardiomyocyte proliferation. We hypothesised that modification of CDK9 activity could both impair and enhance the cardiac response to injury by modifying cardiomyocyte proliferation. Cdk9 expression and activity were inhibited in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. We show that dephosphorylation of residue Ser2 on the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II is associated with impaired cardiac structure and function, and cardiomyocyte proliferation and also results in impaired functional recovery following cardiac laser injury. In contrast, de-repression of Cdk9 activity, through knockdown of La-related protein (Larp7) increases phosphorylation of Ser2 in RNA polymerase II and increases cardiomyocyte proliferation. Larp7 knockdown rescued the structural and functional phenotype associated with knockdown of Cdk9. The balance of Cdk9 and Larp7 plays a key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and response to injury. Larp7 represents a potentially novel therapeutic target to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation and recovery from injury. PMID:26542022

  10. Hydrogen sulfide improves cardiomyocytes electrical remodeling post ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Gang; Wang, Xin-Yan; Chen, Xiu; Shen, Cheng-Xing; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced by cystanthionine-γ-lysase (CSE) in the cardiovascular system, is an endogenous gaseous mediator exerting pronounced physiological effects as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Accumulating evidence indicated that H2S could mediate the cardioprotective effects in myocardial ischemia model. Ventricular arrhythmia is the most important risk factor for cardiac mortality and sudden death after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The potential impact of H2S on cardiomyocytes electrical remodeling post ischemic insult is not fully explored now. Present study investigated the role of H2S on cardiomyocytes electrical remodeling in rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. H2S concentration was reduced and arrhythmia score was increased in this model. CSE mRNA level was also upregulated in the ischemic myocardium. Exposure to exogenous NaHS reduced the action potential duration (APD), inhibited L-type Ca(2+) channels and activated K(ATP) channels in cardiomyocytes isolated from ischemic myocardium Exogenous H2S application improves electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes isolated from ischemic myocardium. These results indicated that reduced H2S level might be linked to ischemia/reperfusion induced arrhythmias. PMID:25755736

  11. Cancer induces cardiomyocyte remodeling and hypoinnervation in the left ventricle of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Das, Suman Kumar; Heinzel, Frank R; Schmidt, Albrecht; Post, Heiner; Schauer, Silvia; Papadakis, Tamara; Kummer, Wolfgang; Hoefler, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is often associated with cachexia, cardiovascular symptoms and autonomic dysregulation. We tested whether extracardiac cancer directly affects the innervation of left ventricular myocardium. Mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (tumor group, TG) or PBS (control group, CG) were analyzed after 21 days. Cardiac function (echocardiography), serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 (ELISA), structural alterations of cardiomyocytes and their innervation (design-based stereology) and levels of innervation-related mRNA (quantitative RT-PCR) were analysed. The groups did not differ in various functional parameters. Serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 were elevated in TG. The total length of axons in the left ventricle was reduced. The number of dense core vesicles per axon profile was reduced. Decreased myofibrillar volume, increased sarcoplasmic volume and increased volume of lipid droplets were indicative of metabolic alterations of TG cardiomyocytes. In the heart, the mRNA level of nerve growth factor was reduced whereas that of β1-adrenergic receptor was unchanged in TG. In the stellate ganglion of TG, mRNA levels of nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y were decreased and that of tyrosine hydroxylase was increased. In summary, cancer induces a systemic pro-inflammatory state, a significant reduction in myocardial innervation and a catabolic phenotype of cardiomyocytes in the mouse. Reduced expression of nerve growth factor may account for the reduced myocardial innervation. PMID:21637823

  12. EGFR Inhibition Blocks Palmitic Acid-induced inflammation in cardiomyocytes and Prevents Hyperlipidemia-induced Cardiac Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixin; Fang, Qilu; Zhong, Peng; Chen, Lingfeng; Wang, Lintao; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies suggest that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonism may be effective for the treatment of angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study was performed to demonstrate if EGFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemia/obesity-related cardiac injuries. The in vivo studies using both wild type (WT) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high fat diet (HFD) showed the beneficial effects of small-molecule EGFR inhibitors, AG1478 and 542, against obesity-induced myocardial injury. Administration of AG1478 and 542 significantly reduced myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, and dysfunction in both two obese mouse models. In vitro, EGFR signaling was blocked by either siRNA silencing or small-molecule EGFR inhibitors in palmitic acid (PA)-stimulated cardiomyocytes. EGFR inhibition attenuated PA-induced inflammatory response and apoptosis in H9C2 cells. Furthermore, we found that PA-induced EGFR activation was mediated by the upstream TLR4 and c-Src. This study has confirmed the detrimental effect of EGFR activation in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced cardiac inflammatory injuries in experimental mice, and has demonstrated the TLR4/c-Src-mediated mechanisms for PA-induced EGFR activation. Our data suggest that EGFR may be a therapeutic target for obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27087279

  13. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Protects Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pálóczi, János; Varga, Zoltán V.; Szebényi, Kornélia; Sarkadi, Balázs; Madonna, Rosalinda; De Caterina, Raffaele; Csont, Tamás; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ferdinandy, Péter; Görbe, Anikó

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Human embryonic stem cell- (hESC-) derived cardiomyocytes are one of the useful screening platforms of potential cardiocytoprotective molecules. However, little is known about the behavior of these cardiomyocytes in simulated ischemia/reperfusion conditions. In this study, we have tested the cytoprotective effect of an NO donor and the brain type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in a screening platform based first on differentiated embryonic bodies (EBs, 6 + 4 days) and then on more differentiated cardiomyocytes (6 + 24 days), both derived from hESCs. Methods. Both types of hESC-derived cells were exposed to 150 min simulated ischemia, followed by 120 min reperfusion. Cell viability was assessed by propidium iodide staining. The following treatments were applied during simulated ischemia in differentiated EBs: the NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) (10−7, 10−6, and 10−5 M), BNP (10−9, 10−8, and 10−7 M), and the nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 10−5 M). Results. SNAP (10−6, 10−5 M) significantly attenuated cell death in differentiated EBs. However, simulated ischemia/reperfusion-induced cell death was not affected by BNP or by L-NNA. In separate experiments, SNAP (10−6 M) also protected hESC-derived cardiomyocytes. Conclusions. We conclude that SNAP, but not BNP, protects differentiated EBs or cardiomyocytes derived from hESCs against simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present screening platform is a useful tool for discovery of cardiocytoprotective molecules and their cellular mechanisms. PMID:27403231

  14. Mitochondrial DNA oxidative damage contributes to cardiomyocyte ischemia/reperfusion-injury in rats: cardioprotective role of lycopene.

    PubMed

    Yue, Rongchuan; Xia, Xuewei; Jiang, Jiahui; Yang, Dezhong; Han, Yu; Chen, Xiongwen; Cai, Yue; Li, Liangpeng; Wang, Wei Eric; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-injury. Lycopene, a lipophilic antioxidant found mainly in tomatoes and in other vegetables and fruits, can protect mtDNA against oxidative damage. However, the role of mtDNA in myocardial I/R-injury is unclear. In the present study, we aimed to determine if and how lycopene protects cardiomyocytes from I/R-injury. In both in vitro and in vivo studies, I/R-injury increased mt 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG) content, decreased mtDNA content and mtDNA transcription levels, and caused mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiomyocytes. These effects of I/R injury on cardiomycoytes were blocked by pre-treatment with lycopene. MtDNA depletion alone was sufficient to induce cardiomyocyte death. I/R-injury decreased the protein level of a key activator of mt transcription, mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), which was blocked by lycopene. The protective effect of lycopene on mtDNA was associated with a reduction in mitochondrial ROS production and stabilization of Tfam. In conclusion, lycopene protects cardiomyocytes from the oxidative damage of mtDNA induced by I/R-injury. PMID:25656550

  15. Zinc pyrithione salvages reperfusion injury by inhibiting NADPH oxidase activation in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kasi, Viswanath; Bodiga, Sreedhar; Kommuguri, Upendra Nadh; Sankuru, Suneetha; Bodiga, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2011-07-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT), has a strong anti-apoptotic effect when administered just before reperfusion. Because oxidative stress has been proposed to contribute to myocardial reperfusion injury, we tested whether ZPT can reduce the production of reactive oxygen species during reoxygenation in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and evaluated the role of NADPH oxidase in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury. The cells were subjected to 8h of simulated ischemia, followed by either 30 min or 16 h of reoxygenation. ZPT when started just before reoxygenation significantly reduced superoxide generation, LDH release and improved cell survival compared to H/R. Attenuation of the ROS production by ZPT paralleled its capacity to prevent pyknotic nuclei formation. In addition, ZPT reversed the H/R-induced expression of NOX2 and p47(phox) phosphorylation indicating that ZPT directly protects cardiomyocytes from reperfusion injury by a mechanism that attenuates NADPH oxidase mediated intracellular oxidative stress. PMID:21651898

  16. Methylglyoxal increases cardiomyocyte ischemia-reperfusion injury via glycative inhibition of thioredoxin activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Liang; Lau, Wayne B.; Yuan, Yue-Xing; Wang, Ya-Jing; Yi, Wei; Christopher, Theodore A.; Lopez, Bernard L.; Liu, Hui-Rong

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is closely related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the specific molecular basis linking DM with increased vulnerability to cardiovascular injury remains incompletely understood. Methylglyoxal (MG), a precursor to advanced glycation end products (AGEs), is increased in diabetic patient plasma, but its role in diabetic cardiovascular complications is unclear. Thioredoxin (Trx), a cytoprotective molecule with antiapoptotic function, has been demonstrated to be vulnerable to glycative inhibition, but whether Trx is glycatively inhibited by MG, thus contributing to increased cardiac injury, has never been investigated. Cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes were treated with MG (200 μM) for 6 days. The following were determined pre- and post-simulated ischemia-reperfusion (SI-R; 8 h of hypoxia followed by 3 h of reoxygenation): cardiomyocyte death/apoptosis, Trx expression and activity, AGE formation, Trx-apoptosis-regulating kinase-1 (Trx-ASK1) complex formation, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and activity. Compared with vehicle, MG significantly increased SI-R-induced cardiomyocyte LDH release and apoptosis (P < 0.01). Prior to SI-R, Trx activity was reduced in MG-treated cells, but Trx expression was increased moderately. Moreover, Trx-ASK1 complex formation was reduced, and both p38 MAPK activity and phosphorylation were increased. To investigate the effects of MG on Trx directly, recombinant human Trx (hTrx) was incubated with MG in vitro. Compared with vehicle, MG incubation markedly increased CML formation (a glycation footprint) and inhibited Trx activity. Finally, glycation inhibitor aminoguanidine administration during MG treatment of cultured cells reduced AGE formation, increased Trx activity, restored Trx-ASK1 interaction, and reduced p38 MAPK phosphorylation and activity, caspase-3 activation, and LDH release (P < 0.01). We demonstrated for the first time that methylglyoxal sensitized cultured

  17. Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT

    SciTech Connect

    Pavone, Luigi Michele Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Avallone, Luigi

    2008-12-12

    Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

  18. Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 regulates the early differentiation of cardiomyocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Youm, Jae Boum; Cho, Sung Woo; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial for maintaining the properties of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and for regulating their subsequent differentiation into diverse cell lineages, including cardiomyocytes. However, mitochondrial regulators that manage the rate of differentiation or cell fate have been rarely identified. This study aimed to determine the potential mitochondrial factor that controls the differentiation of ESCs into cardiac myocytes. We induced cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse ESCs (mESCs) and performed microarray assays to assess messenger RNA (mRNA) expression changes at differentiation day 8 (D8) compared with undifferentiated mESCs (D0). Among the differentially expressed genes, Pdp1 expression was significantly decreased (27-fold) on D8 compared to D0, which was accompanied by suppressed mitochondrial indices, including ATP levels, membrane potential, ROS and mitochondrial Ca(2+). Notably, Pdp1 overexpression significantly enhanced the mitochondrial indices and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and reduced the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate compared to a mock control. In confirmation of this, a knockdown of the Pdp1 gene promoted the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial PDP1 is a potential regulator that controls cardiac differentiation at an early differentiation stage in ESCs. PMID:27538372

  19. Krp1 (Sarcosin) promotes lateral fusion of myofibril assembly intermediates in cultured mouse cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Cynthia C.; Connelly, Patricia S.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Horowits, Robert

    2008-03-10

    Krp1, also called sarcosin, is a cardiac and skeletal muscle kelch repeat protein hypothesized to promote the assembly of myofibrils, the contractile organelles of striated muscles, through interaction with N-RAP and actin. To elucidate its role, endogenous Krp1 was studied in primary embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes. While immunofluorescence showed punctate Krp1 distribution throughout the cell, detergent extraction revealed a significant pool of Krp1 associated with cytoskeletal elements. Reduction of Krp1 expression with siRNA resulted in specific inhibition of myofibril accumulation with no effect on cell spreading. Immunostaining analysis and electron microscopy revealed that cardiomyocytes lacking Krp1 contained sarcomeric proteins with longitudinal periodicities similar to mature myofibrils, but fibrils remained thin and separated. These thin myofibrils were degraded by a scission mechanism distinct from the myofibril disassembly pathway observed during cell division in the developing heart. The data are consistent with a model in which Krp1 promotes lateral fusion of adjacent thin fibrils into mature, wide myofibrils and contribute insight into mechanisms of myofibrillogenesis and disassembly.

  20. Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 regulates the early differentiation of cardiomyocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Youm, Jae Boum; Cho, Sung Woo; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial for maintaining the properties of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and for regulating their subsequent differentiation into diverse cell lineages, including cardiomyocytes. However, mitochondrial regulators that manage the rate of differentiation or cell fate have been rarely identified. This study aimed to determine the potential mitochondrial factor that controls the differentiation of ESCs into cardiac myocytes. We induced cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse ESCs (mESCs) and performed microarray assays to assess messenger RNA (mRNA) expression changes at differentiation day 8 (D8) compared with undifferentiated mESCs (D0). Among the differentially expressed genes, Pdp1 expression was significantly decreased (27-fold) on D8 compared to D0, which was accompanied by suppressed mitochondrial indices, including ATP levels, membrane potential, ROS and mitochondrial Ca2+. Notably, Pdp1 overexpression significantly enhanced the mitochondrial indices and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and reduced the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate compared to a mock control. In confirmation of this, a knockdown of the Pdp1 gene promoted the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial PDP1 is a potential regulator that controls cardiac differentiation at an early differentiation stage in ESCs. PMID:27538372

  1. Peptide-enhanced mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts and direct reprogramming towards cardiomyocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kunwoo; Yu, Pengzhi; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Tang, Richard; Murthy, Niren

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of myocardial infarction is a major challenge in medicine due to the inability of heart tissue to regenerate. Direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes via the delivery of transcription factor mRNAs has the potential to regenerate cardiac tissue and to treat heart failure. Even though mRNA delivery to cardiac fibroblasts has the therapeutic potential, mRNA transfection in cardiac fibroblasts has been challenging. Herein, we develop an efficient mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via a polyarginine-fused heart-targeting peptide and lipofectamine complex, termed C-Lipo and demonstrate the partial direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts towards cardiomyocyte cells. C-Lipo enabled the mRNA-induced direct cardiac reprogramming due to its efficient transfection with low toxicity, which allowed for multiple transfections of Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) mRNAs for a period of 2 weeks. The induced cardiomyocyte-like cells had α-MHC promoter-driven GFP expression and striated cardiac muscle structure from α-actinin immunohistochemistry. GMT mRNA transfection of cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via C-Lipo significantly increased expression of the cardiomyocyte marker genes, Actc1, Actn2, Gja1, Hand2, and Tnnt2, after 2 weeks of transfection. Moreover, this study provides the first direct evidence that the stoichiometry of the GMT reprogramming factors influence the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes. Our results demonstrate that mRNA delivery is a potential approach for cardiomyocyte generation. PMID:25834424

  2. The Influence of Copper (Cu) Deficiency in a Cardiomyocyte Cell Model (HL-1 Cell) of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondria are important mediators of cell death and this study examines whether mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Cu deprivation promotes cell death in a cell culture model for ischemia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocytes. HL-1 cells (kindly donated by Dr. William C. Claycomb, LSU Health Scien...

  3. Frequency Dependence of Petechial Hemorrhage and Cardiomyocyte Injury Induced during Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Fields, Kristina; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) for perfusion imaging can induce microscale bio-effects during intermittent high-Mechanical Index scans. The dependence of MCE-induced bio-effects on the ultrasonic frequency was examined in rats at 1.6, 2.5 and 3.5 MHz. Premature complexes were counted in the electrocardiogram, petechial hemorrhages with microvascular leakage on the heart surface were observed at the time of exposure, plasma troponin elevation was measured after 4 h and cardiomyocyte injury was detected at 24 h. Increasing response to exposure above an apparent threshold was observed for all endpoints at each frequency. The effects decreased with increasing ultrasonic frequency, and the thresholds increased. Linear regressions for frequency-dependent thresholds indicated coefficients and exponents of 0.6 and 1.07 for petechial hemorrhages, respectively, and 1.02 and 0.8 for cardiomyocyte death, compared with 1.9 and 0.5 (square root) for the guideline limit of the mechanical index. The results clarify the dependence of cardiac bio-effects on frequency, and should allow development of theoretical descriptions of the phenomena and improved safety guidance for MCE. PMID:27126240

  4. Doxycycline Attenuates Protein Aggregation in Cardiomyocytes and Improves Survival of a Mouse Model of Cardiac Proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hanqiao; Tang, Mingxin; Zheng, Qingwen; Kumarapeli, Asangi R. K.; Horak, Kathleen M.; Tian, Zongwen; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this preclinical study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline (Doxy) for desmin-related cardiomyopathy (DRC) and to elucidate the potential mechanisms involved. Background DRC, exemplifying cardiac proteinopathy, is characterized by intrasarcoplasmic protein aggregation and cardiac insufficiency. No effective treatment for DRC is presently available. Doxy was shown to attenuate aberrant intranuclear aggregation and toxicity of misfolded proteins in non-cardiac cells and animal models of other proteinopathies. Methods Mice and cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with transgenic (TG) expression of a human DRC-linked missense mutant αB-crystallin (CryABR120G) were used for testing the effect of Doxy. Doxy was administered via drinking water (6 mg/ml) initiated at 8 or 16 weeks of age. Results Doxy treatment initiated at 16 weeks of age significantly delayed the premature death of CryABR120G TG mice, with a median lifespan of 30.4 weeks (placebo group 25 weeks, p<0.01). In another cohort of CryABR120G TG mice, Doxy treatment initiated at 8 weeks of age significantly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in one month. Further investigation revealed that Doxy significantly reduced the abundance of CryAB-positive microscopic aggregates, detergent-resistant CryAB oligomers, and total ubiquitinated proteins in CryABR120G TG hearts. In cell culture, Doxy treatment dose-dependently suppressed the formation of both microscopic protein aggregates and detergent-resistant soluble CryABR120G oligomers, and reversed the upregulation of p62 protein induced by adenovirus-mediated CryABR120G expression. Conclusions Doxy suppresses CryABR120G induced aberrant protein aggregation in cardiomyocytes and prolongs CryABR120G based DRC mouse survival. PMID:20947000

  5. Cardiac Stem Cell Secretome Protects Cardiomyocytes from Hypoxic Injury Partly via Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chi-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soon Jun; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) were known to secrete diverse paracrine factors leading to functional improvement and beneficial left ventricular remodeling via activation of the endogenous pro-survival signaling pathway. However, little is known about the paracrine factors secreted by CSCs and their roles in cardiomyocyte survival during hypoxic condition mimicking the post-myocardial infarction environment. We established Sca-1+/CD31− human telomerase reverse transcriptase-immortalized CSCs (Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT), evaluated their stem cell properties, and paracrine potential in cardiomyocyte survival during hypoxia-induced injury. Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT sustained proliferation ability even after long-term culture exceeding 100 population doublings, and represented multi-differentiation potential into cardiomyogenic, endothelial, adipogenic, and osteogenic lineages. Dominant factors secreted from Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT were EGF, TGF-β1, IGF-1, IGF-2, MCP-1, HGF R, and IL-6. Among these, MCP-1 was the most predominant factor in Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT conditioned medium (CM). Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT CM increased survival and reduced apoptosis of HL-1 cardiomyocytes during hypoxic injury. MCP-1 silencing in Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT CM resulted in a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. We demonstrated that Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT exhibited long-term proliferation capacity and multi-differentiation potential. Sca-1+/CD31− CSCshTERT CM protected cardiomyocytes from hypoxic injury partly via MCP-1-dependent mechanism. Thus, they are valuable sources for in vitro and in vivo studies in the cardiovascular field. PMID:27231894

  6. Cardiac Stem Cell Secretome Protects Cardiomyocytes from Hypoxic Injury Partly via Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soon Jun; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) were known to secrete diverse paracrine factors leading to functional improvement and beneficial left ventricular remodeling via activation of the endogenous pro-survival signaling pathway. However, little is known about the paracrine factors secreted by CSCs and their roles in cardiomyocyte survival during hypoxic condition mimicking the post-myocardial infarction environment. We established Sca-1+/CD31- human telomerase reverse transcriptase-immortalized CSCs (Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT)), evaluated their stem cell properties, and paracrine potential in cardiomyocyte survival during hypoxia-induced injury. Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) sustained proliferation ability even after long-term culture exceeding 100 population doublings, and represented multi-differentiation potential into cardiomyogenic, endothelial, adipogenic, and osteogenic lineages. Dominant factors secreted from Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) were EGF, TGF-β1, IGF-1, IGF-2, MCP-1, HGF R, and IL-6. Among these, MCP-1 was the most predominant factor in Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) conditioned medium (CM). Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) CM increased survival and reduced apoptosis of HL-1 cardiomyocytes during hypoxic injury. MCP-1 silencing in Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) CM resulted in a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. We demonstrated that Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) exhibited long-term proliferation capacity and multi-differentiation potential. Sca-1+/CD31- CSCs(hTERT) CM protected cardiomyocytes from hypoxic injury partly via MCP-1-dependent mechanism. Thus, they are valuable sources for in vitro and in vivo studies in the cardiovascular field. PMID:27231894

  7. Effect of azelnidipine and amlodipine on single cell mechanics in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Iribe, Gentaro; Kaihara, Keiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Naruse, Keiji

    2013-09-01

    Azelnidipine and amlodipine are dihydropyridine-type Ca(2+) channel blockers for the treatment of hypertension. Although these drugs have high vasoselectivity and small negative inotropic effects in vivo, little is known regarding their direct effects on cellular contractility without humoral regulation or the additive effects of these drugs with other antihypertensive drugs on myocardial contractility. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+) channel blockers on single cell mechanics, mouse cardiomyocytes were enzymatically isolated, and a pair of carbon fibers was attached to opposite cell-ends to stretch the cells. Cells were paced at 4 Hz superfused in normal Tyrode solution at 37°C. Cell length and active/passive force calculated from carbon fiber bending were recorded in 6 different preload conditions. Slopes of end-systolic force-length relation curves (maximum elastance) were measured as an index of contractility before and after drugs were administered. Azelnidipine at 10nM and 100 nM did not change maximum elastance, while amlodipine at 100 nM did decrease maximum elastance. The combination of RNH-6270 (active form of angiotensin II receptor blocker, olmesartan, 10nM) and either amlodipine (10nM) or azelnidipine (10nM) did not affect maximum elastance. Although both amlodipine and azelnidipine can be used safely at therapeutically relevant concentrations even in combination with olmesartan, the present results suggest that azelnidipine has a less negative inotropic action compared to amlodipine. PMID:23747592

  8. Dioxin Exposure Disrupts the Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Fan, Yunxia; Puga, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Experimental exposure of fish, birds, and rodents to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; dioxin) causes multiple Ah receptor–mediated developmental abnormalities, an observation consistent with compelling evidence in human populations that TCDD exposure is responsible for a significant incidence of birth defects. To characterize molecular mechanisms that might explain the developmental effects of dioxin, we have studied the consequences of TCDD exposure on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in culture and on the expression of genes, including those coding for homeodomain containing transcription factors, with a role in progression of tissue differentiation and embryonic identity during development. We find that TCDD treatment causes expression changes in a number of homeobox genes concomitant with Ah receptor recruitment to the promoters of many of these genes, whether under naïve or dioxin-activated conditions. TCDD exposure also derails temporal expression trajectories of developmentally regulated genes in a wide diversity of differentiation pathways, including genes with functions in neural and cardiovascular development, self-renewal, hematopoiesis and mesenchymal lineage specification, and Notch and Wnt pathways. Among these, we find that TCDD represses the expression of the cardiac development–specific Nkx2.5 homeobox transcription factor, of cardiac troponin-T and of α- and β-myosin heavy chains, inhibiting the formation of beating cardiomyocytes, a characteristic phenotype of differentiating mouse ES cells in culture. These data identify potential pathways for dioxin to act as a developmental teratogen, possibly critical to cardiovascular development and disease, and provide molecular targets that may help us understand the molecular basis of Ah receptor–mediated developmental toxicity. PMID:20130022

  9. Saffron extracts alleviate cardiomyocytes injury induced by doxorubicin and ischemia-reperfusion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Nathalie; Nader, Moni; Duca, Laurent; Martiny, Laurent; Chahine, Ramez

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), a highly active chemotherapeutic drug, faces limitations in clinical application due to severe cardiotoxic effects (mainly through increased oxidative stress). Therefore, its effect is exacerbated in subjects with ischemic heart disease. We have recently reported that saffron extract (SAF), a natural compound mainly consisting of safranal and corcins, exerts a protective effect against DOX oxidative cytotoxicity in isolated rabbit hearts. Here, we aimed to investigate whether SAF exerts cardioprotection against combined ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and DOX toxicity in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. H9c2 were subjected to simulated I/R, with or without DOX treatment at reperfusion, in the presence or absence of SAF prior to ischemia or at reperfusion. We evaluated the effects of these treatments by MTT, LDH and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by Hoechst 33258 staining, tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester fluorescence and caspase activity. The results showed that I/R and DOX significantly decreased cardiomyocytes viability, inhibited reperfusion injury salvage kinase cardioprotective pathway, reduced contractile proteins (α-Actinine, Troponine C and MLC), increased caspase-3 expression and induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. These effects were remarkably inhibited by treatment with SAF (10 μg/mL) at reperfusion. SAF activated AKT/P70S6K and ERK1/2, restored contractile proteins expression, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pore and decreased caspase-3 activity. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SAF treatment exerted cardioprotection against I/R and DOX toxicity by reducing oxidative stress (LDH assay). Thereby, SAF offers a potential novel antioxidant therapeutic strategy to counteract I/R and DOX cardiotoxicity, paving the way for future clinical trials. PMID:25885550

  10. Subthreshold nitric oxide synthase inhibition improves synergistic effects of subthreshold MMP-2/MLCK-mediated cardiomyocyte protection from hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Bil-Lula, Iwona; Lin, Han-Bin; Biały, Dariusz; Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Diebel, Lucas; Sawicka, Jolanta; Woźniak, Mieczyslaw; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Injury of myocardium during ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a complex and multifactorial process involving uncontrolled protein phosphorylation, nitration/nitrosylation by increased production of nitric oxide and accelerated contractile protein degradation by matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). It has been shown that simultaneous inhibition of MMP-2 with doxycycline (Doxy) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) with ML-7 at subthreshold concentrations protects the heart from contractile dysfunction triggered by I/R in a synergistic manner. In this study, we showed that additional co-administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (1400W or L-NAME) in subthreshold concentrations improves this synergistic protection in the model of hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R)-induced contractile dysfunction of cardiomyocytes. Isolated cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 min. of hypoxia and 20 min. of reoxygenation in the presence or absence of the inhibitor cocktails. Contractility of cardiomyocytes was expressed as myocyte peak shortening. Inhibition of MMP-2 by Doxy (25-100 μM), MLCK by ML-7 (0.5-5 μM) and NOS by L-NAME (25-100 μM) or 1400W (25-100 μM) protected myocyte contractility after H-R in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of these activities resulted in full recovery of cardiomyocyte contractility after H-R at the level of highest single-drug concentration. The combination of subthreshold concentrations of NOS, MMP-2 and MLCK inhibitors fully protected cardiomyocyte contractility and MLC1 from degradation by MMP-2. The observed protection with addition of L-NAME or 1400W was better than previously reported combination of ML-7 and Doxy. The results of this study suggest that addition of NOS inhibitor to the mixture of inhibitors is better strategy for protecting cardiomyocyte contractility. PMID:26992120

  11. HDAC Inhibition Blunts Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Inducing Cardiomyocyte Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Min; Kong, Yongli; Tan, Wei; May, Herman; Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Pedrozo, Zully; Wang, Zhao; Morales, Cyndi; Luo, Xiang; Cho, Geoffrey; Jiang, Nan; Jessen, Michael E.; Warner, John J.; Lavandero, Sergio; Gillette, Thomas G.; Turer, Aslan T.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reperfusion accounts for a substantial fraction of the myocardial injury occurring with ischemic heart disease. Yet, no standard therapies are available targeting reperfusion injury. Here, we tested the hypothesis that SAHA, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor FDA-approved for cancer treatment, will blunt reperfusion injury. Methods and Results Twenty-one rabbits were randomized into 3 groups: a) vehicle control, b) SAHA pretreatment (one day prior and at surgery), and c) SAHA treatment at the time of reperfusion only. Each arm was subjected to ischemia/reperfusion surgery (I/R, 30min coronary ligation, 24h reperfusion). Additionally cultured neonatal and adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulated I/R (sI/R) to probe mechanism. SAHA reduced infarct (those reduction inhibitor, SAHA, infarct size in a large animal model, even when delivered in the clinically relevant context of reperfusion. The cardioprotective effects of SAHA during I/R occur, at least in part, through induction of autophagic flux. assayed in both rabbit myocardium and in mice harboring an RFP-GFP-LC3 transgene. In cultured myocytes subjected to sI/R, SAHA pretreatment reduced cell death by 40%. This eduction in cell death correlated with increased autophagic activity in SAHA-treated cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATG7 and ATG5, essential autophagy proteins, abolished SAHA's cardioprotective effects. Conclusions The FDS-approved anti-cancer HDAC inhibitor, SAHA, reduces myocardial infarct size in a large animal model, even when delivered in the clinically relevant context of reperfusion. The cardioprotective effects of SAHA during I/R occur, at least in part, through induction of autophagic flux. PMID:24396039

  12. Conditional deletion of cardiomyocyte peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ enhances myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Michael J; Hake, Paul W; O'Connor, Michael; Schulte, Christine; Moore, Victoria; James, Jeanne M; Piraino, Giovanna; Zingarelli, Basilia

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a key regulator of the inflammatory response to an array of biologic insults. We have previously demonstrated that PPARγ ligands reduce myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in rodents. In the current study, we directly determined the role of cardiomyocyte PPARγ in ischemia-reperfusion injury, using a model of conditional cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of PPARγ in vivo. In mice, α-myosin heavy chain-restricted Cre-mediated PPARγ deficiency was induced by tamoxifen treatment (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 4 days (PPARγ mice), whereas controls included mice treated with the oil diluent vehicle (PPARγ mice). Western blot and histochemical analyses confirmed that expression of PPARγ protein was abolished in cardiomyocytes of mice treated with tamoxifen, but not with vehicle. After tamoxifen or vehicle treatment, animals were subjected to 30-min ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by 2-h reperfusion. In PPARγ mice, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion induced extensive myocardial damage, which was associated with elevated tissue activity of myeloperoxidase, indicating infiltration of neutrophils, and elevated plasma levels of troponin I when compared with PPARγ mice. Upon echocardiographic analysis, PPARγ mice also demonstrated ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 were higher in PPARγ mice when compared with PPARγ mice. These pathological events in PPARγ mice were associated with enhanced nuclear factor κB DNA binding in the infarcted hearts. Thus, our data suggest that cardiomyocyte PPARγ is a crucial protective receptor and may prevent reperfusion injury by modulating mechanisms of inflammation. PMID:24089001

  13. Conditional deletion of cardiomyocyte peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ enhances myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Michael J.; Hake, Paul W.; O’Connor, Michael; Schulte, Christine; Moore, Victoria; James, Jeanne M.; Piraino, Giovanna; Zingarelli, Basilia

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a key regulator of the inflammatory response to an array of biologic insults. We have previously demonstrated that PPARγ ligands reduce myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in rodents. In the current study, we directly determined the role of cardiomyocyte PPARγ in ischemia-reperfusion injury, employing a model of conditional cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of PPARγ in vivo. In mice, α-myosin heavy chain-restricted Cre-mediated PPARγ deficiency was induced by tamoxifen treatment (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 4 days (PPARγ−/− mice); whereas controls included mice treated with the oil diluent vehicle (PPARγ+/+ mice). Western blot and histochemical analyses confirmed that expression of PPARγ protein was abolished in cardiomyocytes of mice treated with tamoxifen, but not with vehicle. After tamoxifen or vehicle treatment, animals were subjected to 30 min ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by 2 hrs reperfusion. In PPARγ−/− mice, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion induced extensive myocardial damage, which was associated with elevated tissue activity of myeloperoxidase, indicating infiltration of neutrophils, and elevated plasma levels of troponin-I when compared to PPARγ+/+ mice. PPARγ−/− mice also demonstrated ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction upon echocardiographic analysis. Plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 were higher in PPARγ−/− mice when compared to PPARγ+/+ mice. These pathological events in PPARγ−/− mice were associated with enhanced nuclear factor-κB DNA binding in the infarcted hearts. Thus, our data suggests that cardiomyocyte PPARγ is a crucial protective receptor and may prevent reperfusion injury by modulating mechanisms of inflammation. PMID:24089001

  14. Comparison of various iron chelators and prochelators as protective agents against cardiomyocyte oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Jansová, Hana; Macháček, Miloslav; Wang, Qin; Hašková, Pavlína; Jirkovská, Anna; Potůčková, Eliška; Kielar, Filip; Franz, Katherine J; Simůnek, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress is a common denominator of numerous cardiovascular disorders. Free cellular iron catalyzes the formation of highly toxic hydroxyl radicals, and iron chelation may thus be an effective therapeutic approach. However, using classical iron chelators in diseases without iron overload poses risks that necessitate more advanced approaches, such as prochelators that are activated to chelate iron only under disease-specific oxidative stress conditions. In this study, three cell-membrane-permeable iron chelators (clinically used deferasirox and experimental SIH and HAPI) and five boronate-masked prochelator analogs were evaluated for their ability to protect cardiac cells against oxidative injury induced by hydrogen peroxide. Whereas the deferasirox-derived agents TIP and TRA-IMM displayed negligible protection and even considerable toxicity, the aroylhydrazone prochelators BHAPI and BSIH-PD provided significant cytoprotection and displayed lower toxicity after prolonged cellular exposure compared to their parent chelators HAPI and SIH, respectively. Overall, the most favorable properties in terms of protective efficiency and low inherent cytotoxicity were observed with the aroylhydrazone prochelator BSIH. BSIH efficiently protected both H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast-derived cells and isolated primary rat cardiomyocytes against hydrogen peroxide-induced mitochondrial and lysosomal dysregulation and cell death. At the same time, BSIH was nontoxic at concentrations up to its solubility limit (600 μM) and in 72-h incubation. Hence, BSIH merits further investigation for prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular disorders associated with a known (or presumed) component of oxidative stress. PMID:24992833

  15. Comparison of various iron chelators and prochelators as protective agents against cardiomyocyte oxidative injury

    PubMed Central

    Jansová, Hana; Macháček, Miloslav; Wang, Qin; Hašková, Pavlína; Jirkovská, Anna; Potůčková, Eliška; Kielar, Filip; Franz, Katherine J.; Šimůnek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common denominator of numerous cardiovascular disorders. Free cellular iron catalyzes formation of highly toxic hydroxyl radicals and iron chelation may thus be an effective therapeutic approach. However, using classical iron chelators in diseases without iron overload poses risks that necessitate more advanced approaches, such as prochelators that are activated to chelate iron only under disease-specific oxidative stress conditions. In this study, three cell membrane-permeable iron chelators (clinically-used deferasirox and experimental SIH and HAPI) and five boronate-masked prochelator analogs were evaluated for their ability to protect cardiac cells against oxidative injury induced by hydrogen peroxide. Whereas the deferasirox-derived agents TIP and TRA-IMM displayed negligible protection and even considerable toxicity, aroylhydrazone prochelators BHAPI and BSIH-PD provided significant cytoprotection and displayed lower toxicity following prolonged cellular exposure compared to their parent chelators HAPI and SIH, respectively. Overall, the most favorable properties in terms of protective efficiency and low inherent cytotoxicity were observed with aroylhydrazone prochelator BSIH. BSIH efficiently protected both H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast-derived cells as well as isolated primary rat cardiomyocytes against hydrogen peroxide-induced mitochondrial and lysosomal dysregulation and cell death. At the same time, BSIH was non-toxic at concentrations up to its solubility limit (600 µM) and 72-hour incubation. Hence, BSIH merits further investigation for prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular disorders associated with a known (or presumed) component of oxidative stress. PMID:24992833

  16. Mouse embryonic stem cells irradiated with γ-rays differentiate into cardiomyocytes but with altered contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mulas, Francesca; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Di Liberto, Riccardo; Magenes, Giovanni; Adjaye, James; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2013-08-30

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for their derivation from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst represent a valuable in vitro model to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on early embryonic cellular response. Following irradiation, both human and mouse ESCs (mESCs) maintain their pluripotent status and the capacity to differentiate into embryoid bodies and to form teratomas. Although informative of the maintenance of a pluripotent status, these studies never investigated the capability of irradiated ESCs to form specific differentiated phenotypes. Here, for the first time, 5Gy-irradiated mESCs were differentiated into cardiomyocytes, thus allowing the analysis of the long-term effects of ionizing radiations on the differentiation potential of a pluripotent stem cell population. On treated mESCs, 96h after irradiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was first performed in order to determine whether the treatment influenced gene expression of the surviving mESCs. Microarrays analysis showed that only 186 genes were differentially expressed in treated mESCs compared to control cells; a quarter of these genes were involved in cellular differentiation, with three main gene networks emerging, including cardiogenesis. Based on these results, we differentiated irradiated mESCs into cardiomyocytes. On day 5, 8 and 12 of differentiation, treated cells showed a significant alteration (qRT-PCR) of the expression of marker genes (Gata-4, Nkx-2.5, Tnnc1 and Alpk3) when compared to control cells. At day 15 of differentiation, although the organization of sarcomeric α-actinin and troponin T proteins appeared similar in cardiomyocytes differentiated from either mock or treated cells, the video evaluation of the kinematics and dynamics of the beating cardiac syncytium evidenced altered contractile properties of cardiomyocytes derived from irradiated mESCs. This alteration correlated with significant reduction of Connexin 43 foci. Our results indicate that mESCs populations

  17. Andrographolide up-regulates cellular-reduced glutathione level and protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    PubMed

    Woo, Anthony Y H; Waye, Mary M Y; Tsui, Stephen K W; Yeung, Sandy T W; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-04-01

    Recent studies revealed that the herb Andrographis paniculata possesses cardioprotective activities. Using neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, the cardioprotective actions of several diterpene lactones derived from A. paniculata including andrographolide, 14-deoxyandrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, and sodium 14-deoxyandrographolide-12-sulfonate were investigated. Pretreatment with andrographolide but not with the other compounds protected the cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury and up-regulated the cellular-reduced glutathione (GSH) level and antioxidant enzyme activities. The cardioprotective action of andrographolide was found to coincide in a time-dependent manner with the up-regulation of GSH, indicating the important role of GSH. The cardioprotective action of andrographolide was also completely abolished by buthionine sulfoximine, which acts as a specific gamma-glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) inhibitor to deplete cellular GSH level. It was subsequently found that the mRNA and protein levels of the GCL catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) were up-regulated by andrographolide. Luciferase reporter assay also demonstrated that andrographolide activated both the GCLC and the GCLM promoters in the transfected rat H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell line. The 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbo-13-acetate response element or the antioxidant response element may be involved in the transactivating actions of andrographolide on the GCLC and GCLM promoters. The present study pinpoints andrographolide as a cardioprotective principle in A. paniculata and reveals its cytoprotective mechanism. PMID:18174384

  18. Monoamine oxidase-induced hydroxyl radical production and cardiomyocyte injury during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Du, Cheng-Kun; Zhan, Dong-Yun; Yoshimoto, Misa; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate the involvement of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in hydroxyl radical production and cardiomyocyte injury during ischemia as well as after reperfusion, we applied microdialysis technique to the heart of anesthetized rats. Dialysate samples were collected during 30 min of induced ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. We monitored dialysate 3,4-dihydrobenzoic acid (3,4-DHBA) concentration as an index of hydroxyl radical production using a trapping agent (4-hydroxybenzoic acid), and dialysate myoglobin concentration as an index of cardiomyocyte injury in the ischemic region. The effect of local administration of a MAO inhibitor, pargyline, was investigated. Dialysate 3,4-DHBA concentration increased from 1.9 ± 0.5 nM at baseline to 3.5 ± 0.7 nM at 20-30 min of occlusion. After reperfusion, dialysate 3,4-DHBA concentration further increased reaching a maximum (4.5 ± 0.3 nM) at 20-30 min after reperfusion, and stabilized thereafter. Pargyline suppressed the averaged increase in dialysate 3,4-DHBA concentration by ∼72% during occlusion and by ∼67% during reperfusion. Dialysate myoglobin concentration increased from 235 ± 60 ng/ml at baseline to 1309 ± 298 ng/ml at 20-30 min after occlusion. After reperfusion, dialysate myoglobin concentration further increased reaching a peak (5833 ± 1017 ng/ml) at 10-20 min after reperfusion, and then declined. Pargyline reduced the averaged dialysate myoglobin concentration by ∼56% during occlusion and by ∼41% during reperfusion. MAO plays a significant role in hydroxyl radical production and cardiomyocyte injury during ischemia as well as after reperfusion. PMID:26953687

  19. Drp1 loss-of-function reduces cardiomyocyte oxygen dependence protecting the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Ramiro; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Riquelme, Jaime A; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Sánchez, Gina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles for ATP production in cardiomyocytes, which is regulated by processes of fission and fusion. We hypothesized that the mitochondria fusion protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibition, attenuates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through modifications in mitochondrial metabolism. Rats were subjected to I/R through coronary artery ligation, and isolated cardiomyocytes were treated with an ischemia-mimicking solution. In vivo, cardiac function, myocardial infarction area, and mitochondrial morphology were determined, whereas in vitro, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) were assessed. In both models, an adenovirus expressing Drp1 dominant-negative K38A (Drp1K38A) was used to induce Drp1 loss-of-function. Our results showed that I/R stimulated mitochondrial fission. Myocardial infarction size and cell death induced by I/R were significantly reduced, whereas cardiac function after I/R was improved in Drp1K38A-treated rats compared with controls. Drp1K38A-transduced cardiomyocytes showed lower OCR with no decrease in intracellular ATP levels, and on I/R, a larger decrease in OCR with a smaller reduction in intracellular ATP level was observed. However, proton leak-associated oxygen consumption was comparatively higher in Drp1K38A-treated cardiomyocytes, suggesting a protective mitochondrial uncoupling effect against I/R. Collectively, our results show that Drp1 inhibition triggers cardioprotection by reducing mitochondrial metabolism during I/R. PMID:24477044

  20. Calnexin silencing in mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes induces Ca2+ cycling defects, ER stress, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bousette, Nicolas; Abbasi, Cynthia; Chis, Roxana; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2014-03-01

    Calnexin (CNX) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control chaperone that has been implicated in ER stress. ER stress is a prominent pathological feature of various pathologic conditions, including cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of CNX and ER stress has not been studied in the heart. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the role of CNX in cardiomyocyte physiology with respect to ER stress, apoptosis, and cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) cycling. We demonstrated significantly decreased CNX mRNA and protein levels by LentiVector mediated transduction of targeting shRNAs. CNX silenced cardiomyocytes exhibited ER stress as evidenced by increased GRP78 and ATF6 protein levels, increased levels of spliced XBP1 mRNA, ASK-1, ERO1a, and CHOP mRNA levels. CNX silencing also led to significant activation of caspases-3 and -9. This activation of caspases was associated with hallmark morphological features of apoptosis including loss of sarcomeric organization and nuclear integrity. Ca(2+) imaging in live cells showed that CNX silencing resulted in Ca(2+) transients with significantly larger amplitudes but decreased frequency and Ca(2+) uptake rates in the basal state. Interestingly, 5 mM caffeine stimulated Ca(2+) transients were similar between control and CNX silenced cardiomyocytes. Finally, we demonstrated that CNX silencing induced the expression of the L-type voltage dependent calcium channel (CAV1.2) but reduced the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate CNX has a specific role in cardiomyocyte viability and Ca(2+) cycling through its effects on ER stress, apoptosis and Ca(2+) channel expression. PMID:24037923

  1. Cardioprotective effect of miRNA-22 on hypoxia/reoxygenation induced cardiomyocyte injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Chen, Lihua; Ding, Jiawang; Zhang, Jing; Fan, Zhixing; Yang, Chaojun; Yu, Qinqin; Yang, Jun

    2016-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in the regulation of pathological and physiological processes in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R). Recent studies have revealed that miR-22 might provide a potential cardioprotective effect on ischemic heart disease. However, the mechanism by which miR-22 prevents MI/R is still not fully clear. Here, we investigated the role of miR-22 in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced cardiomyocyte injury. MI/R was simulated in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with 2h hypoxia followed by 4h reoxygenation. Prior to H/R, cells were transfected by Ad-miR-22 or Ad-scramble. It was revealed that H/R dramatically increased the release of CK and LDH, accompanied by a downregulation of miR-22 expression. Overexpression of miR-22 attenuated cardiomyocyte apoptosis and miR-22 target gene CREB binding protein (CBP) protein level, as determined by flow cytometry analysis and Western blot respectively. We further identified that miR-22 significantly inhibited CBP-related transcriptional factor AP-1 DNA binding activity under H/R. In addition, miR-22 could efficiently change Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) induced by H/R. In conclusion, these results suggest that miR-22 plays an important cardioprotective role partly via regulating CBP/AP-1 pathway to reduce cell apoptosis and inflammatory damage during MI/R injury. PMID:26707060

  2. The miR-17-92 cluster regulates FOG-2 expression and inhibits proliferation of mouse embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Rui; Lei, Han; Chen, Mianzhi; Li, Qinwei; Sun, Huan; Ai, Jianzhong; Chen, Tielin; Wang, Honglian; Fang, Yin; Zhou, Qin

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have gradually been recognized as regulators of embryonic development; however, relatively few miRNAs have been identified that regulate cardiac development. A series of recent papers have established an essential role for the miRNA-17-92 (miR-17-92) cluster of miRNAs in the development of the heart. Previous research has shown that the Friend of Gata-2 (FOG-2) is critical for cardiac development. To investigate the possibility that the miR-17-92 cluster regulates FOG-2 expression and inhibits proliferation in mouse embryonic cardiomyocytes we initially used bioinformatics to analyze 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR) of FOG-2 to predict the potential of miR-17-92 to target it. We used luciferase assays to demonstrate that miR-17-5p and miR-20a of miR-17-92 interact with the predicted target sites in the 3′UTR of FOG-2. Furthermore, RT-PCR and Western blot were used to demonstrate the post-transcriptional regulation of FOG-2 by miR-17-92 in embryonic cardiomyocytes from E12.5-day pregnant C57BL/6J mice. Finally, EdU cell assays together with the FOG-2 rescue strategy were employed to evaluate the effect of proliferation on embryonic cardiomyocytes. We first found that the miR-17-5p and miR-20a of miR-17-92 directly target the 3′UTR of FOG-2 and post-transcriptionally repress the expression of FOG-2. Moreover, our findings demonstrated that over-expression of miR-17-92 may inhibit cell proliferation via post-transcriptional repression of FOG-2 in embryonic cardiomyocytes. These results indicate that the miR-17-92 cluster regulates the expression of FOG-2 protein and suggest that the miR-17-92 cluster might play an important role in heart development. PMID:22267003

  3. The cardioprotective effect of danshen and gegen decoction on rat hearts and cardiomyocytes with post-ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Danshen (Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix) and Gegen (Puerariae Lobatae Radix) have been used for treating heart disease for several thousand years in China. It has been found that a Danshen and Gegen decoction (DG) exhibiting an anti-atherosclerosis effect, which improves the patients’ heart function recovery. Pre-treatment with DG was reported to have protective effects on myocardium against ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the present study, we aim to investigate the post-treatment effect of DG on ischemic-reperfusion injuries ex vivo or in vitro and the underlying mechanisms involved. Methods The rat heart function in an ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) model was explored by examining three parameters including contractile force, coronary flow rate and the release of heart specific enzymes within the heart perfusate. In vitro model of hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R), the protective effect of DG on damaged cardiomyocytes was investigated by examining the cell structure integrity, the apoptosis and the functionality of mitochondria. Results Our results showed that DG significantly improved rat heart function after I/R challenge and suppressed the release of enzymes by damaged heart muscles in a dose-dependent manner. DG also significantly inhibited the death of cardiomyocytes, H9c2 cells, with a H/R challenge. It obviously decreased cell apoptosis, protected the mitochondrial function and cell membrane skeleton integrity on H9c2 cells. The cardio-protection was also found to be related to a decrease in intracellular calcium accumulation within H9c2 cells after I/R challenge. Conclusion The potential application of DG in treating rat hearts with an I/R injury has been implied in this study. Our results suggested that DG decoction could act as an anti-apoptotic and anti-ion stunning agent to protect hearts against an I/R injury. PMID:23228089

  4. Proteomics Unveils Fibroblast-Cardiomyocyte Lactate Shuttle and Hexokinase Paradox in Mouse Muscles.

    PubMed

    Rakus, Dariusz; Gizak, Agnieszka; Wiśniewski, Jacek R

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative mapping, given in biochemically interpretable units such as mol per mg of total protein, of tissue-specific proteomes is prerequisite for the analysis of any process in cells. We applied label- and standard-free proteomics to characterize three types of striated muscles: white, red, and cardiac muscle. The analysis presented here uncovers several unexpected and novel features of striated muscles. In addition to differences in protein expression levels, the three muscle types substantially differ in their patterns of basic metabolic pathways and isoforms of regulatory proteins. Importantly, some of the conclusions drawn on the basis of our results, such as the potential existence of a "fibroblast-cardiomyocyte lactate shuttle" and the "hexokinase paradox" point to the necessity of reinterpretation of some basic aspects of striated muscle metabolism. The data presented here constitute a powerful database and a resource for future studies of muscle physiology and for the design of pharmaceutics for the treatment of muscular disorders. PMID:27302655

  5. 1,5-Disubstituted benzimidazoles that direct cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Okolotowicz, Karl J.; Bushway, Paul; Lanier, Marion; Gilley, Cynthia; Cynthia, Mark; Cashman, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite progress in medical treatments, heart transplantation is one of the only current options for those with infarcted heart muscle. Stem cell differentiation technology may afford cell-based therapeutics that may lead to the generation of new, healthy heart muscle cells from undifferentiated stem cells. Our approach is to use small molecules to stimulate stem cell differentiation. Herein, we describe a novel class of 1,5-disubstituted benzimidazoles that induce differentiation of stem cells into cardiac cells. We report on the evaluation in vitro for cardiomyocyte differentiation and describe structure–activity relationship results that led to molecules with drug-like properties. The results of this study show the promise of small molecules to direct stem cell lineage commitment, to probe signaling pathways and to develop compounds for the stimulation of stem cells to repair damaged heart tissue. PMID:26278027

  6. Eupatilin inhibits the apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes via the Akt/GSK-3β pathway following hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zengyong; Xu, Ya-Wei; Yang, Jingyu

    2016-08-01

    Eupatilin, a pharmacologically active flavone derived from the Artemisia plant species, has been reported to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, and neuroprotective activities against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). However, the role of eupatilin in myocardial I/R injury remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis in vitro. Our results showed that eupatilin markedly improved the cell viability and decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Eupatilin also suppressed oxidative stress and apoptosis in H9c2 cells after myocardial I/R injury. Furthermore, eupatilin obviously increased the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β in H9c2 cells. Our results suggested that eupatilin could provide significant cardioprotection against myocardial I/R injury, and the potential mechanisms might involve inhibition of cardiomyocyte apoptosis through activating the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway. PMID:27470375

  7. Lipoxin A4-Induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Cardiomyocytes against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury via p38 MAPK Activation and Nrf2/ARE Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Zhou, Yu; Tang, Yan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether lipoxin A4 (LXA4) increases expression of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) in cardiomyocytes, whether LXA4-induced HO-1 protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury, and what are the mechanisms involved in the LXA4-induced HO-1 induction. Methods Rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to H/R injury with or without preincubation with LXA4 or HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP-IX or various signal molecule inhibitors. Expressions of HO-1 protein and mRNA were analyzed by using Western blot and RT-PCR respectively. Activity of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) binding to the HO-1 E1 enhancer was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 antioxidant responsive element (ARE) were measured by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Results Pretreatment of the cells undergoing H/R lesion with LXA4 significantly reduced the lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase productions, increased the cell viability, and increased the expressions of HO-1 protein and mRNA and HO-1 promoter activity. HO-1 inhibition abolished the protective role of LXA4 on the cells undergoing H/R lesion. LXA4 increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation, nuclear translocation of Nrf2, Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 ARE and E1 enhancer in cardiomyocytes with or without H/R exposure. Conclusion The protection role of LXA4 against H/R injury of cardiomyocytes is related to upregulation of HO-1, via activation of p38 MAPK pathway and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 ARE and E1 enhancer, but not via activation of phosphatidyinositol-3-kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. PMID:23826208

  8. Inhibition of microRNA-497 ameliorates anoxia/reoxygenation injury in cardiomyocytes by suppressing cell apoptosis and enhancing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xixian; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Qingman; Xu, Qiulin; Xie, Jiahe; Hao, Huixin; Luo, Guangjin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping; Huang, Xiaobo; Liao, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    MiR-497 is predicted to target anti-apoptosis gene Bcl2 and autophagy gene microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 B (LC3B), but the functional consequence of miR-497 in response to anoxia/reoxygenation (AR) or ischemia/reperfusion (IR) remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the influences of miR-497 on myocardial AR or IR injury. We noted that miR-497 was enriched in cardiac tissues, while its expression was dynamically changed in murine hearts subjected to myocardial infarction and in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) subjected to AR. Forced expression of miR-497 (miR-497 mimic) induced apoptosis in NRCs as determined by Hoechst staining and TUNEL assay. In response to AR, silencing of miR-497 using a miR-497 sponge significantly reduced cell apoptosis and enhanced autophagic flux. Furthermore, the infarct size induced by IR in adenovirus (Ad)-miR-497 sponge infected mice was significantly smaller than in mice receiving Ad-vector or vehicle treatment, while Ad-miR-497 increased infarct size. The expression of Bcl-2 and LC3B-II in NRCs or in murine heart was significantly decreased by miR-497 mimic and enhanced by miR-497 sponge. These findings demonstrate that inhibition of miR-497 holds promise for limiting myocardial IR injury. PMID:26299920

  9. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation.

    PubMed

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania; Flores, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc(-/-)) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc(-/-) newborns but rescued in G3 Terc(-/-)/p21(-/-) mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  10. Beta-adrenoceptor subtype dependence of chronotropy in mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, N N; Xu, X; Brito-Martins, M; Poole-Wilson, P A; Harding, S E; Fuller, S J

    2004-11-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCM) have potential both as an experimental model for investigating cardiac physiology and as a source for tissue repair. For both reasons it is important to characterise the responses of these cells, and one of the key modulators of contraction is the beta-adrenergic system. We therefore undertook a detailed study of the response of the spontaneous beating rate of ESCM to beta-adrenoceptor (betaAR) stimulation. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from murine ES line E14Tg2a by the hanging drop method, followed by plating. Spontaneously beating areas were seen starting from 9-14 days after differentiation: the experiments described here were performed on EBs between developmental day 19 and 48. Beating cell layers were seeded with charcoal to allow tracking of movement by a video-edge detection system. Experiments were performed in physiological medium containing 1 mM Ca2+ at 37 degrees C. Isoprenaline (Iso) increased beating rate with an EC50 value of 52 nM. Iso (0.3 microM) increased basal rate from 67 +/- 7 beats per minute (bpm) to 138 +/- 18 bpm, P < 0.001, n = 22. At earlier developmental time points the response to Iso was not maintained through 5 min exposure; this spontaneous desensitisation only being observed before day 36. A repeat application of Iso after a wash period of 20 min produced reproducible effects on beating rate. Subtype dependence of the betaAR response was determined by comparing an initial response with a second in the presence of selective beta1- or beta2AR antagonists. In the presence of the specific beta1AR-blocker CGP 20712A (300 nM) the increase in rate with Iso was reduced from 207 +/- 42% of basal to 128 +/- 13%, P < 0.01. With the beta2AR-blocker ICI 118,551 (50 nM) there was no significant change in Iso response. Exposure to the muscarinic agonist, carbachol (10 microM), inhibited the increase in frequency mediated by isoprenaline, but had mixed stimulatory and inhibitory

  11. Carvedilol-responsive microRNAs, miR-199a-3p and -214 protect cardiomyocytes from simulated ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Mi; Teoh, Jian-Peng; Wang, Yongchao; Broskova, Zuzana; Bayoumi, Ahmed S; Tang, Yaoliang; Su, Huabo; Weintraub, Neal L; Kim, Il-Man

    2016-08-01

    The nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist (β-blocker) carvedilol has been shown to protect against myocardial injury, but the detailed underlying mechanisms are unclear. We recently reported that carvedilol stimulates the processing of microRNA (miR)-199a-3p and miR-214 in the heart via β-arrestin1-biased β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) cardioprotective signaling. Here, we investigate whether these β-arrestin1/β1AR-responsive miRs mediate the beneficial effects of carvedilol against simulated ischemia/reperfusion (sI/R). Using cultured cardiomyocyte cell lines and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrate that carvedilol upregulates miR-199a-3p and miR-214 in both ventricular and atrial cardiomyocytes subjected to sI/R. Overexpression of the two miRs in cardiomyocytes mimics the effects of carvedilol to activate p-AKT survival signaling and the expression of a downstream pluripotency marker Sox2 in response to sI/R. Moreover, carvedilol-mediated p-AKT activation is abolished by knockdown of either miR-199a-3p or miR-214. Along with previous studies to directly link the cardioprotective actions of carvedilol to upregulation of p-AKT/stem cell markers, our findings suggest that the protective roles of carvedilol during ischemic injury are in part attributed to activation of these two protective miRs. Loss of function of miR-199a-3p and miR-214 also increases cardiomyocyte apoptosis after sI/R. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that miR-199a-3p and miR-214 repress the predictive or known apoptotic target genes ddit4 and ing4, respectively, in cardiomyocytes. These findings suggest pivotal roles for miR-199a-3p and miR-214 as regulators of cardiomyocyte survival and contributors to the functional benefits of carvedilol therapy. PMID:27288437

  12. Evaluation of Autophagy Using Mouse Models of Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alicia K.; Bayir, Hülya; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S. B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Autophagy is a homeostatic, carefully regulated, and dynamic process for intracellular recycling of bulk proteins, aging organelles, and lipids. Autophagy occurs in all tissues and cell types, including the brain and neurons. Alteration in the dynamics of autophagy has been observed in many diseases of the central nervous system. Disruption of autophagy for an extended period of time results in accumulation of unwanted proteins and neurodegeneration. However, the role of enhanced autophagy after acute brain injury remains undefined. Established mouse models of brain injury will be valuable in clarifying the role of autophagy after brain injury, and are the topic of discussion in this review. PMID:19879944

  13. Effects of high-mobility group box 1 on the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 proteins following hypoxia and reoxygenation injury in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weipan; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Xiaorong; Fu, Wenwen

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying autophagy during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion remain unclear. The present study investigated the relationship between high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and autophagy in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with recombinant HMGB1 (200 ng/L) or ammonium glycyrrhizinate (100 μM) at appropriate concentrations. Cell viabilities and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activity levels were measured. HMGB1, LC3 and Beclin-1 expression were assessed by Western blot. The results demonstrated that HMGB1-induced myocardial cells have increased levels of Beclin-1 protein and even higher levels of LC3 protein, while HMGB1-inhibited myocardial cells have decreased levels of Beclin-1 and LC3 proteins. In addition, HMGB1 induction significantly increased LDH and CK levels in the cell culture medium; the inhibition of HMGB1 significantly reduced LDH and CK expression in cardiomyocyte culture medium. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that HMGB1 is able to regulate Beclin-1 and LC3 levels following hypoxia and reoxygenation injury in rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:25664043

  14. Modulation of intracellular calcium waves and triggered activities by mitochondrial ca flux in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenghang; Gordan, Richard; Wen, Hairuo; Fefelova, Nadezhda; Zang, Wei-Jin; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mitochondria may play important roles in the Ca(2+) homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. However, it is still unclear if mitochondrial Ca(2+) flux can regulate the generation of Ca(2+) waves (CaWs) and triggered activities in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, intracellular/cytosolic Ca(2+) (Cai (2+)) was imaged in Fluo-4-AM loaded mouse ventricular myocytes. Spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release and CaWs were induced in the presence of high (4 mM) external Ca(2+) (Cao (2+)). The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) reversibly raised basal Cai (2+) levels even after depletion of SR Ca(2+) in the absence of Cao (2+) , suggesting Ca(2+) release from mitochondria. FCCP at 0.01 - 0.1 µM partially depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m ) and increased the frequency and amplitude of CaWs in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous recording of cell membrane potentials showed the augmentation of delayed afterdepolarization amplitudes and frequencies, and induction of triggered action potentials. The effect of FCCP on CaWs was mimicked by antimycin A (an electron transport chain inhibitor disrupting Δψ m ) or Ru360 (a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor), but not by oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor) or iodoacetic acid (a glycolytic inhibitor), excluding the contribution of intracellular ATP levels. The effects of FCCP on CaWs were counteracted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporine A, or the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activator kaempferol. Our results suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+) release and uptake exquisitely control the local Ca(2+) level in the micro-domain near SR ryanodine receptors and play an important role in regulation of intracellular CaWs and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:24348912

  15. Gypenoside Protects Cardiomyocytes against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury via the Inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Mediated Nuclear Factor Kappa B Pathway In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Shi, Liye; Qi, Guoxian; Zhao, Shijie; Gao, Yuan; Li, Yuzhe

    2016-01-01

    Gypenoside (GP) is the major effective component of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and has been shown to encompass a variety of pharmacological activities. In this study, we investigated whether GP is able to protect cardiomyocytes against injury myocardial ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury by using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation–reoxygenation (OGD/R) H9c2 cell model and in vivo myocardial I/R rat model. We found that GP pre-treatment alleviated the impairments on the cardiac structure and function in I/R injured rats. Moreover, pre-treatment with GP significantly inhibited IκB-α phosphorylation and nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit translocation into nuclei. GP and the MAPK pathway inhibitors also reduced the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 in vitro. Specific inhibition of ERK, JNK, and p38 increased the cell viability of OGD/R injured cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GP protects cardiomyocytes against I/R injury by inhibiting NF-κB p65 activation via the MAPK signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that GP may be a promising agent for the prevention or treatment of myocardial I/R injury. PMID:27313532

  16. MicroRNA-128 inhibition attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by the targeted activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, XIAO CONG; LI, LANG; WEN, HONG; BI, QI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of microRNA (miR)-128 inhibition on the targeted activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and on cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In vitro, the expression of PPARG was detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) and HEK293 cells transfected with the mimics or inhibitors of miR-128 or control RNA. Luciferase reporter assays were used to identify whether PPARG is a direct target of miR-128. In vivo, miR-128 was knocked down via ear vein injection of antagomir-128 in a rabbit myocardial I/R injury model. Western blotting investigated the activation of Akt [phosphorylated (p)-Akt] and the expression of total-Akt, PPARG and myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein-1 (Mcl-1) in the myocardium. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was examined with transmission electron microscropy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. PPARG mRNA and protein were downregulated in NRVMs transfected with miR-128 mimics, but upregulated by antagomir-128 compared with control. This indicates that PPARG is a direct miR-128 target. Activation of Akt (p-Akt), Mcl-1 and PPARG expression in the myocardium were increased by miR-128 inhibition. Furthermore, miR-128 antagomirs significantly reduced apoptosis in hearts subjected to I/R injury, which was blocked by the PPARG inhibitor GW9662. In conclusion, miR-128 inhibition attenuated I/R injury-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by the targeted activation of PPARG signaling. PMID:27150726

  17. Cardioprotective effect of carvedilol: inhibition of apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes via the TLR4/NF-κB pathway following ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YONG; XU, YAN; ZHANG, JIANHUA; JI, TINGTING

    2014-01-01

    Carvedilol is a non-selective β-blocker used in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial ischemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of carvedilol on simulated ischemia/reperfusion (SI/R)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vitro. H9c2 cardiomyocytes were incubated with either a vehicle or an ischemic buffer during hypoxia followed by reoxygenation with or without carvedilol. In two additional groups, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) were inhibited by a TLR4 antibody and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, respectively. The results revealed that carvedilol markedly decreased SI/R-induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner, as demonstrated by flow-cytometric analysis. This effect was shown to be associated with an increase in the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein ratio and concurrent reductions in the expression levels of TLR4 and NF-κB. These results suggest that carvedilol provides significant cardioprotection against SI/R-induced injury in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, an effect likely to be mediated through the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25187802

  18. Sulfiredoxin-1 protects against simulated ischaemia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocyte by inhibiting PI3K/AKT-regulated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; He, Zhangyou; Guo, Jinhua; Li, Zhe; Wang, Xiaohong; Yang, Chun; Cui, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered cardiac cell injury is recognized as the major contributor for the pathogenesis progression of ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. Sulfiredoxin-1 (Srx-1) is an endogenous antioxidant and exerts the crucial neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischaemia. However, its function and the underlying mechanism in ischaemic heart diseases remain poorly defined. Here, a dramatical decrease in Srx-1 was validated in H9c2 cardiomyocytes upon simulated ischaemia–reperfusion (SI/R) injury. Moreover, Srx-1 protected H9c2 cells from SI/R-injured injury as the evidences that Srx-1 up-regulation attenuated the inhibitory effects on cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cell apoptosis upon SI/R treatment. Knockdown of Srx-1 accelerated cell injury upon SI/R. Mechanism assay corroborated that SI/R treatment noticeably aggravated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), which was remarkably abated in Ad-Srx-1 groups. Importantly, Srx-1 elevation substantially reduced cytochrome c release, the activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3, accompany with the subsequent decrease in the cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP). Concomitantly, overexpression of Srx-1 also decreased the expression of pro-apoptosis protein Bax and increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression. Further analysis substantiated that Srx-1 treatment remarkably induced the activation of PI3K/AKT signalling. Preconditioning with LY294002 dramatically decreased Srx-1-enhanced cell resistance to SI/R injury. Importantly, LY294002 mitigated the inhibitory effects of Srx-1 on Δψm loss, cytochrome c release, caspase-9/3 activity, and the expression of Bcl-2 family. Together, these results suggested that Srx-1 might protect cardiomyocyte injury upon SI/R by suppressing PI3K/AKT-mediated mitochondria dependent apoptosis, revealing a promising therapeutic agent against ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26992405

  19. ZLN005 protects cardiomyocytes against high glucose-induced cytotoxicity by promoting SIRT1 expression and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenju; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Bin; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Aiping; Zeng, Di; Ou, Dongbo; Yan, Song; Li, Wei; Zheng, Qiangsun

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy increases the risk for the development of heart failure independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by varying degrees of hyperglycemia, which has been proven to induce myocardial apoptosis in animal models. Recently, a novel small molecule, ZLN005, has been reported to show antidiabetic efficacy in a mouse model, possibly by induction of PGC-1α expression. In this study, we investigated whether ZLN005 protects cardiomyocytes against high glucose-induced cytotoxicity and the mechanisms involved. Neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes were incubated with media containing 5.5 or 33mM glucose for 24h in the presence or absence of ZLN005. ZLN005 treatment led to ameliorated cardiomyocyte oxidative injury, enhanced cell viability, and reduced apoptosis in the high glucose environment. Western blot analysis revealed that high glucose suppressed cardiomyocyte autophagy, whereas ZLN005 increased the expression of autophagy marker proteins ATG5, beclin1, and LC3 II/LC3 I; this increase was accompanied by increased expression of SIRT1. Furthermore, EX527, a SIRT1-specific inhibitor, weakened the protective effects of ZLN005 on cardiomyocytes subjected to high glucose. Taken together, these results suggest that ZLN005 suppresses high glucose-induced cardiomyocyte injury by promoting SIRT1 expression and autophagy. PMID:27208585

  20. Defined MicroRNAs Induce Aspects of Maturation in Mouse and Human Embryonic-Stem-Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Desy S; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Lundy, David J; Liu, Chung-Hung; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Pabon, Lil; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Chen, Chien-Chang; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Yan, Yu-Ting; Lee, Sho-Tone; Chiang, Po-Min; Chien, Shu; Murry, Charles E; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2015-09-29

    Pluripotent-cell-derived cardiomyocytes have great potential for use in research and medicine, but limitations in their maturity currently constrain their usefulness. Here, we report a method for improving features of maturation in murine and human embryonic-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes (m/hESC-CMs). We found that coculturing m/hESC-CMs with endothelial cells improves their maturity and upregulates several microRNAs. Delivering four of these microRNAs, miR-125b-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-221, and miR-222 (miR-combo), to m/hESC-CMs resulted in improved sarcomere alignment and calcium handling, a more negative resting membrane potential, and increased expression of cardiomyocyte maturation markers. Although this could not fully phenocopy all adult cardiomyocyte characteristics, these effects persisted for two months following delivery of miR-combo. A luciferase assay demonstrated that all four miRNAs target ErbB4, and siRNA knockdown of ErbB4 partially recapitulated the effects of miR-combo. In summary, a combination of miRNAs induced via endothelial coculture improved ESC-CM maturity, in part through suppression of ErbB4 signaling. PMID:26365191

  1. Extracellular mtDNA activates NF-κB via toll-like receptor 9 and induces cell death in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bliksøen, Marte; Mariero, Lars Henrik; Torp, May Kristin; Baysa, Anton; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Haugen, Fred; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Vaage, Jarle; Valen, Guro; Stensløkken, Kåre-Olav

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) causes sterile inflammation, which exacerbates tissue injury. Elevated levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been associated with AMI. We hypothesized that mtDNA triggers an innate immune response via TLR9 and NF-κB activation, causing cardiomyocyte injury. Murine cardiomyocytes express TLR9 mRNA and protein and were able to internalize fluorescently labeled mouse mtDNA. Incubation of human embryonic kidney cells with serum from AMI patients containing naturally elevated levels of mtDNA induced TLR9-dependent NF-κB activity. This effect was mimicked by isolated mtDNA. mtDNA activated NF-κB in reporter mice both in vivo and in isolated cardiomyocytes. Moreover, incubation of isolated cardiomyocytes with mtDNA induced cell death after 4 and 24 h. Laser confocal microscopy showed that incubation of cardiomyocytes with mtDNA accelerated mitochondrial depolarization induced by reactive oxygen species. In contrast to mtDNA, isolated total DNA did not activate NF-κB nor induce cell death. In conclusion, mtDNA can induce TLR9-dependent NF-κB activation in reporter cells and activate NF-κB in cardiomyocytes. In cardiomyocytes, mtDNA causes mitochondrial dysfunction and death. Endogenous mtDNA in the extracellular space is a danger signal with direct detrimental effects on cardiomyocytes. PMID:27164906

  2. [Desmin content and transversal stiffness of the left ventricle mouse cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after a 30-day space flight on board "BION-M1" biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and the cytoskeletal protein desmin content in the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, fibers of the mouse soleus and tibialis anterior muscle after a 30-day space flight on board the "BION-M1" biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 h after landing. The transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by, atomic force microscopy. The desmin content was estimated by western blotting, and the expression level of desmin-coding gene was detected using real-time PCR. The results indicate that, the transversal stiffness of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes and fibers of the soleus muscle in relaxed and activated states did not differ from the control. The transversal stiffness of the tibialis muscle fibers in relaxed and activated state was increased in the mice group after space flight. At the same time, in all types of studied tissues the desmin content and the expression level of desmin-coding gene did not differ from the control level. PMID:25730983

  3. Overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of SIRT1 in mouse heart causes cardiomyocyte apoptosis and early-onset heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mu, WenLi; Zhang, QingJun; Tang, XiaoQiang; Fu, WenYan; Zheng, Wei; Lu, YunBiao; Li, HongLiang; Wei, YuSheng; Li, Li; She, ZhiGang; Chen, HouZao; Liu, DePei

    2014-09-01

    SIRT1, a mammalian ortholog of yeast silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), is an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase that plays a critical role in the regulation of vascular function. The current study aims to investigate the functional significance of deacetylase activity of SIRT1 in heart. Here we show that the early postnatal hearts expressed the highest level of SIRT1 deacetylase activity compared to adult and aged hearts. We generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific expression of a dominant-negative form of the human SIRT1 (SIRT1H363Y), which represses endogenous SIRT1 activity. The transgenic mice displayed dilated atrial and ventricular chambers, and died early in the postnatal period. Pathological, echocardiographic and molecular phenotype confirmed the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling analysis revealed a greater abundance of apoptotic nuclei in the hearts of transgenic mice. Furthermore, we show that cardiomyocyte apoptosis caused by suppression of SIRT1 activity is, at least in part, due to increased p53 acetylation and upregulated Bax expression. These results indicate that dominant negative form of SIRT1 (SIRT1H363Y) overexpression in mouse hearts causes cardiomyocyte apoptosis and early-onset heart failure, suggesting a critical role of SIRT1 in preserving normal cardiac development during the early postnatal period. PMID:25104317

  4. Endothelium-derived intermedin/adrenomedullin-2 protects human ventricular cardiomyocytes from ischaemia-reoxygenation injury predominantly via the AM₁ receptor.

    PubMed

    Bell, David; Campbell, Malcolm; McAleer, Stephen F; Ferguson, Matthew; Donaghy, Liz; Harbinson, Mark T

    2016-02-01

    Application of intermedin/adrenomedullin-2 (IMD/AM-2) protects cultured human cardiac vascular cells and fibroblasts from oxidative stress and simulated ischaemia-reoxygenation injury (I-R), predominantly via adrenomedullin AM1 receptor involvement; similar protection had not been investigated previously in human cardiomyocytes (HCM). Expression of IMD, AM and their receptor components was studied in HCM. Receptor subtype involvement in protection by exogenous IMD against injury by simulated I-R was investigated using receptor component-specific siRNAs. Direct protection by endogenous IMD against HCM injury, both as an autocrine factor produced in HCM themselves and as a paracrine factor released from HCMEC co-cultured with HCM, was investigated using peptide-specific siRNA for IMD. IMD, AM and their receptor components (CLR, RAMPs1-3) were expressed in HCM. IMD 1nmol L(-1), applied either throughout ischaemia (3h) and re-oxygenation (1h) or during re-oxygenation (1h) alone, attenuated HCM injury (P<0.05); cell viabilities were 59% and 61% respectively vs. 39% in absence of IMD. Cytoskeletal disruption, protein carbonyl formation and caspase activity followed similar patterns. Pre-treatment (4 days) of HCM with CLR and RAMP2 siRNAs attenuated (P<0.05) protection by exogenous IMD. Pre-treatment of HCMEC with IMD (and AM) siRNA augmented (P<0.05) I-R injury: cell viabilities were 22% (and 32%) vs. 39% untreated HCMEC. Pre-treatment of HCM with IMD (and AM) siRNA did not augment HCM injury: cell viabilities were 37% (and 39%) vs. 39% untreated HCM. Co-culture with HCMEC conferred protection from injury on HCM; such protection was attenuated when HCMEC were pre-treated with IMD (but not AM) siRNA before co-culture. Although IMD is present in HCM, IMD derived from HCMEC and acting in a paracrine manner, predominantly via AM1 receptors, makes a marked contribution to cardiomyocyte protection by the endogenous peptide against acute I-R injury. PMID:26743504

  5. Downregulation of RACK1 is associated with cardiomyocyte apoptosis after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Qian, Long; Shi, Jiahai; Zhang, Chi; Lu, Jiawei; Lu, Xiaoning; Wu, Kunpeng; Yang, Chen; Yan, Daliang; Zhang, Chao; You, Qingsheng; Liu, Xiaojuan

    2016-03-01

    The receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) is a multifaceted scaffolding protein that mediates the shuttling of activated protein kinase C (PKC) to cellular membranes. In addition, RACK1 could decrease cell apoptosis in a variety of disease models. However, the function of RACK1 in cardiomyocyte apoptosis after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is unknown. In this study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and subjected to myocardial I/R insult consisting of 30 min left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h. The expression of RACK1 was decreased after myocardial I/R and was associated with cardiomyocyte apoptosis. To further verify the relationship between RACK1 and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, H9c2 cardiomyocytes were cultured under hypoxia for 6 h, then maintained in the regular incubator to reoxygenation. After H9c2 cells were transfected with Flag-RACK1 to overexpress RACK1, RACK1 expression was upregulated in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) 4 h group accompanied with the decrease of cleaved caspase-3 and the increase of Bcl-2 expression. Terminal transferase-mediated biotin dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed that RACK1 overexpression inhibited H9c2 cell apoptosis induced by H/R treatment. Our data suggested that RACK1 might suppress cardiomyocyte apoptosis after I/R, providing a novel molecular target for the therapy of ischemia heart disease. PMID:26659395

  6. The type and extent of injuries in vitrified mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yang; Ning, Fang-Yong; Du, Wen-Jing; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Piao, Shan-Hua; An, Tie-Zhu

    2012-04-01

    To improve the vitrification of mouse oocytes using straws, we attempted to estimate the type and extent of injuries during vitrification with a vitrification solution EAFS10/10. Injuries in oocytes were assessed based on cellular viability, the integrity of the plasma membrane, the status of the meiotic spindle/chromosomes, and morphological appearance. For morphologically normal oocytes, the ability to be fertilized and to develop into blastocysts was examined. Morphological assessment revealed 15% of oocytes to be injured by intracellular ice formed during vitrification, and 10% by osmotic swelling during removal of the cryoprotectant. When assessed by the status of spindles/chromosomes, the most sensitive criterion, damage was found in 16% of oocytes without any treatment. This value was similar to the proportion of fresh oocytes that did not cleave after insemination (13%). On exposure to EAFS10/10, the spindles/chromosomes were affected in 33% of oocytes. The exposure reduced the rate of cleavage by 18% points and the rate of development into blastocysts by 19 points. Vitrification reduced these rates by 15% and 36% points, respectively. Although the mechanism responsible for this moderate toxic effect on developmental ability is not known, information obtained in the present study will be useful to develop a practical method for the vitrification of mouse oocytes using straws. PMID:22202671

  7. The Protective Role of the TOPK/PBK Pathway in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion and H2O2-Induced Injury in H9C2 Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guozhe; Ye, Ning; Dai, Dongxue; Chen, Yintao; Li, Chao; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    T-LAK-cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is a PDZ-binding kinase (PBK) that was recently identified as a novel member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. It has been shown to play an important role in many cellular functions. However, its role in cardiac function remains unclear. Thus, we have herein explored the biological function of TOPK in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and oxidative stress injury in H9C2 cardiomyocytes. I/R and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) were induced in rats by 3-hour reperfusion after 30-min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and by 3 cycles of 5-min I/R. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used to induce oxidative stress in H9C2 cardiomyocytes. TOPK expression was analyzed by western blotting, RT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence imaging studies. The effects of TOPK gene overexpression and its inhibition via its inhibitor HI-TOPK-032 on cell viability and Bcl-2, Bax, ERK1/2, and p-ERK1/2 protein expression were analyzed by MTS assay and western blotting, respectively. The results showed that IPC alleviated myocardial I/R injury and induced TOPK activation. Furthermore, H2O2 induced TOPK phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Interestingly, TOPK inhibition aggravated the H2O2-induced oxidative stress injury in myocardiocytes, whereas overexpression relieved it. In addition, the ERK pathway was positively regulated by TOPK signaling. In conclusion, our results indicate that TOPK might mediate a novel survival signal in myocardial I/R, and that its effect on anti-oxidative stress involves the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26907268

  8. SIRT6 protects cardiomyocytes against ischemia/reperfusion injury by augmenting FoxO3α-dependent antioxidant defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Xu-Lei; Tong, Ming-ming; Gan, Lu; Chen, Huali; Wu, Si-si; Chen, Jia-Xiang; Li, Ru-Li; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Heng-yu; Zhu, Ye; Li, Yan-xin; He, Jin-han; Wang, Meijing; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    SIRT6, a member of the NAD(+)-dependent class III deacetylase sirtuin family, has been revealed to play important roles in promoting cellular resistance against oxidative stress. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are the crucial mechanisms underlying cellular damage and dysfunction in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the role of SIRT6 in I/R-induced ROS and oxidative stress is poorly understood. In this study, by using heterozygous SIRT6 knockout (SIRT6(+/-)) mice and cultured neonatal cardiomyocyte models, we investigated how SIRT6 mediates oxidative stress and myocardial injury during I/R. Partial knockout (KO) of SIRT6 aggravated myocardial damage, ventricular remodeling, and oxidative stress in mice subjected to myocardial I/R, whereas restoration of SIRT6 expression by direct cardiac injection of adenoviral constructs encoding SIRT6 reversed these deleterious effects of SIRT6 KO in the ischemic heart. In addition, partial deletion of the SIRT6 gene decreased myocardial functional recovery following I/R in a Langendorff perfusion model. Similarly, the protective effects of SIRT6 were also observed in cultured cardiomyocytes following hypoxia/reoxygenation. Intriguingly, SIRT6 was noticed to up-regulate AMP/ATP and then activate the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-forkhead box O3α (FoxO3α) axis and further initiated the downstream antioxidant-encoding gene expression (manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase), thereby decreasing cellular levels of oxidative stress and mediating cardioprotection in the ischemic heart. These results suggest that SIRT6 protects the heart from I/R injury through FoxO3α activation in the ischemic heart in an AMP/ATP-induced AMPK-dependent way, thus upregulating antioxidants and suppressing oxidative stress. PMID:26786260

  9. Requirement of IP3 receptor 3 (IP3R3) in nitric oxide induced cardiomyocyte differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjie; Huang, Wei; Yue, Jianbo

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) markedly induces cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we examined the role of the Ca(2+) signaling in the NO-induced CM differentiation of mouse ES cells. We found that NO induced intracellular Ca(2+) increases in ES cells in a dose-dependent manner, and application of IP3 pathway antagonists not only significantly inhibited this induced Ca(2+) increase but also abolished NO-induced CM differentiation of ES cells. Subsequently, all 3 types of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3Rs) in mouse ES cells were individually or triply knocked down. Interestingly, only knockdown of type 3 IP3R (IP3R3) or triple-knockdown of three types of IP3Rs significantly inhibited the NO-induced Ca(2+) increases. Consistently, IP3R3 knockdown blocked the NO-induced CM differentiation of ES cells. CMs derived from IP3R3 knockdown ES cells also showed both structural and functional defects. In summary, our results indicate that the IP3R3-Ca(2+) pathway is required for NO-induced CM differentiation of ES cells. PMID:27349290

  10. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life1, this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques1. Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections1. PMID:27078037

  11. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life(1), this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques(1). Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections(1). PMID:27078037

  12. Renal Ischaemia Reperfusion Injury: A Mouse Model of Injury and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Emily E.; Czopek, Alicja; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Ferenbach, David; Kluth, David; Hughes, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Renal ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients and occlusion of renal blood flow is unavoidable during renal transplantation. Experimental models that accurately and reproducibly recapitulate renal IRI are crucial in dissecting the pathophysiology of AKI and the development of novel therapeutic agents. Presented here is a mouse model of renal IRI that results in reproducible AKI. This is achieved by a midline laparotomy approach for the surgery with one incision allowing both a right nephrectomy that provides control tissue and clamping of the left renal pedicle to induce ischaemia of the left kidney. By careful monitoring of the clamp position and body temperature during the period of ischaemia this model achieves reproducible functional and structural injury. Mice sacrificed 24 hr following surgery demonstrate loss of renal function with elevation of the serum or plasma creatinine level as well as structural kidney damage with acute tubular necrosis evident. Renal function improves and the acute tissue injury resolves during the course of 7 days following renal IRI such that this model may be used to study renal regeneration. This model of renal IRI has been utilized to study the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of AKI as well as analysis of the subsequent renal regeneration. PMID:24961244

  13. Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated spontaneous activity in mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Nidhi; Banach, Kathrin

    2007-06-15

    Embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESdCs) have been proposed as a source for cardiac cell-replacement therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the Ca2+-handling mechanisms that determine the frequency and duration of spontaneous Ca2+ transients in single ESdCs. With laser scanning confocal microscopy using the Ca2+-sensitive dye Fluo-4/AM, we determined that spontaneous Ca2+ transients in ESdCs at the onset of beating (day 9) depend on Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane (50%) whereas Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release is the major contributor to Ca2+ transients in ESdCs after 16 days (72%). Likewise, Ca2+ extrusion in 9-day-old ESdCs depends on Na+-Ca2+ exchange (50.0+/-8%) whereas Ca2+ reuptake by the sarco(endo)plasmic Ca2+ ATPase (72+/-5%) dominates in further differentiated cells. Spontaneous Ca2+ transients were suppressed by the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and the phospholipase C blocker U73122 but continued in the presence of caffeine. Stimulation of IP3 production by phenylephrine or endothelin-1 had a positive chronotropic effect that could be reversed by U73122 and 2-APB. The presence of Ca2+-free solution and block of L-type Ca2+ channels by nifedipine also resulted in a cessation of spontaneous activity. Overall, IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in ESdCs is translated into a depolarization of the plasma membrane and a whole-cell Ca2+ transient is subsequently induced by voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. Although ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca2+ release amplifies the IP3R-induced trigger for the Ca2+ transients and modulates its frequencies, it is not a prerequisite for spontaneous activity. The results of this study offer important insight into the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release for pacemaker activity in differentiating cardiomyocytes. PMID:17379641

  14. Sauchinone augments cardiomyocyte viability by enhancing autophagy proteins -PI3K, ERK(1/2), AMPK and Beclin-1 during early ischemia-reperfusion injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Thapalia, Bisharad Anil; Zhou, Zhen; Lin, Xianhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sauchinone has proved its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in various animal tissues. This study sought to illustrate its regulatory nature on autophagy associated proteins (PI3K, ERK1/2, AMPK, and Beclin-1) during early cardiomyocyte ischemia and subsequent reperfusion. Methods. Cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulated Ischemia/reperfusion with and without Sauchinone pretreatment and also in the presence of autophagy inhibitor (3-MA). Colorimetric analysis of CCK-8, LDH antibody assay as well as Western blot analysis were performed to observe the expressions of LC3B (II) and Beclin-1 protein (markers of autophagy), autophagy proteins (PI3K, ERK1/2 and AMPK) and apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bcl-2) and the results were quantified into their grey values and subjected to statistical analysis. Results. Sauchinone demonstrated cell survival enhancing properties with increase in CCK-8 (SD = 0.553±0.012) and decrease in LDH (SD = 0.183±0.054) expressions, both of which were best observed at test dose of 20 µmol/L. At this dose, there was increment in cellular autophagy as demonstrated by peaking of autophagy markers LC3B-II (p<0.05) and Beclin-1 (p<0.05) with strong correlations (r = 0.99). Similarly, the autophagy proteins, compared to control and I/R model, also showed a significant increased level with PI3K (p<0.0001), total p-ERK1/2 (p<0.0001) and p-AMPKα (p<0.0001). Simultaneously, a decrease in expressions of pro-apoptotic molecules Bax (r = 0.989, p<0.0001) with increment of in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 (r = 0.996, p<0.0001) was observed. The observed effects on cell density, viability and autophagy was abrogated in presence of 3-MA. Conclusions. Sauchinone enhances cell survival by promoting autophagy and inhibiting apoptosis in cardiomyocytes during early stages of Ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27508047

  15. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Pretreatment Protects Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes From Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury In Vitro and Increases Graft Size and Vascularization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Weaver, Matthew S.; Cao, Baohong; Dennis, James E.; Van Biber, Benjamin; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can regenerate infarcted myocardium. However, when implanted into acutely infarcted hearts, few cells survive the first week postimplant. To improve early graft survival, hESC-CMs were pretreated with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a transcriptional activator of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). When hESC-CMs were challenged with an in vitro hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site, survival was significantly greater among cells pretreated with CoPP versus phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-pretreated controls. Compared with PBS-pretreated cells, CoPP-pretreated hESC-CM preparations exhibited higher levels of HO-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor production, with reduced apoptosis, and a 30% decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species. For in vivo translation, 1 × 107 hESC-CMs were pretreated ex vivo with CoPP or PBS and then injected intramyocardially into rat hearts immediately following acute infarction (permanent coronary ligation). At 1 week, hESC-CM content, assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for human Alu sequences, was 17-fold higher in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. On histomorphometry, cardiomyocyte graft size was 2.6-fold larger in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells, occupying up to 12% of the ventricular area. Vascular density of host-perfused human-derived capillaries was significantly greater in grafts composed of CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that ex vivo pretreatment of hESC-CMs with a single dose of CoPP before intramyocardial implantation more than doubled resulting graft size and improved early graft vascularization in acutely infarcted hearts. These findings open the door for delivery of these, or other, stem cells during acute interventional therapy following myocardial infarction or ischemia. PMID

  16. Optical microscopy imaging for the diagnosis of the pharmacological reaction of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs).

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Tomohiko; Espulgar, Wilfred; Shimizu, Eiichi; Saito, Masato; Lee, Jong-Kook; Dou, Xiaoming; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative diagnosis of pharmacological chronotropic reactions on mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs) was successfully performed by utilizing derivative imaging analysis of videos recorded with a microscope camera at 30 Hz frame rate and 680 × 510 pixel resolution. The imaging analysis algorithm, developed in our lab, generated the contractile profile of the cells which was exploited for drug effect profiling. Six drugs such as isoproterenol (0.01-1 μM), quinidine (2-200 μM), propranolol (0.03-30 μM), verapamil (0.01-1 μM), sotalol (1-100 μM), and acetylsalicylic acid (0.1-10 μM) were administered and the quantitative medication effect was determined. Among the negative chronotropic agents administered, verapamil was found to be the most potent while sotalol was found to be the least potent at the micromolar level. Simultaneous measurement of the field potential and contractile motion in the verapamil effect test showed a coherent result. Moreover, this approach can provide insights into the contraction-relaxation conditions which are not available in the common electrophysiological approach. With these findings, it is expected that this study can aid in providing a simple and reliable in vitro mESC-CM-based screening platform for cardiovascular effect profiling of candidate drugs. PMID:26309911

  17. Assessment of developmental cardiotoxic effects of some commonly used phytochemicals in mouse embryonic D3 stem cell differentiation and chick embryonic cardiomyocyte micromass culture models.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Omar J; McAlpine, Roseanna; Chiewhatpong, Phasawee; Latif, Muhammad Liaque; Pratten, Margaret K

    2016-09-01

    Pregnant women often use herbal medicines to alleviate symptoms of pregnancy. The active phytochemicals eugenol (from holy basil) and α-bisabolol (from chamomile) are recommended to promote calmness and reduce stress. There is evidence that both eugenol and α-bisabolol possess pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects and induce reactive oxygen species. The potential effect was examined by monitoring cardiomyocyte contractile activity (differentiation), cell activity, protein content and ROS production for mouse D3 embryonic stem cell and ‎chick embryonic micromass culture. The results showed that eugenol (0.01-80μM) demonstrated effects on cell activity (both systems) and ROS production (stem cell system only), as well as decreasing the contractile activity and protein content at high concentrations in both systems. Additionally, α-bisabolol (0.01-80μM) at high concentrations decreased the contractile activity and cell activity and in the stem cell system induced ROS production and decreased protein content. The results suggest only low concentrations should be ingested in pregnancy.‎. PMID:27105832

  18. Intravenous Sphingosylphosphorylcholine Protects Ischemic and Postischemic Myocardial Tissue in a Mouse Model of Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Christine; Schmitz, Martina; Levkau, Bodo; Herrgott, Ilka; Mersmann, Jan; Larmann, Jan; Johanning, Kai; Winterhalter, Michael; Chun, Jerold; Müller, Frank Ulrich; Echtermeyer, Frank; Hildebrand, Reinhard; Theilmeier, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    HDL, through sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), exerts direct cardioprotective effects on ischemic myocardium. It remains unclear whether other HDL-associated sphingophospholipids have similar effects. We therefore examined if HDL-associated sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) reduces infarct size in a mouse model of transient myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Intravenously administered SPC dose-dependently reduced infarct size after 30 minutes of myocardial ischemia and 24 hours reperfusion compared to controls. Infarct size was also reduced by postischemic, therapeutical administration of SPC. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment to the infarcted area after SPC treatment, and apoptosis was attenuated as measured by TUNEL. In vitro, SPC inhibited leukocyte adhesion to TNFα-activated endothelial cells and protected rat neonatal cardiomyocytes from apoptosis. S1P3 was identified as the lysophospholipid receptor mediating the cardioprotection by SPC, since its effect was completely absent in S1P3-deficient mice. We conclude that HDL-associated SPC directly protects against myocardial reperfusion injury in vivo via the S1P3 receptor. PMID:21274265

  19. Simultaneous Assessment of Cardiomyocyte DNA Synthesis and Ploidy: A Method to Assist Quantification of Cardiomyocyte Regeneration and Turnover.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Although it is accepted that the heart has a limited potential to regenerate cardiomyocytes following injury and that low levels of cardiomyocyte turnover occur during normal ageing, quantification of these events remains challenging. This is in part due to the rarity of the process and the fact that multiple cellular sources contribute to myocardial maintenance. Furthermore, DNA duplication within cardiomyocytes often leads to a polyploid cardiomyocyte and only rarely leads to new cardiomyocytes by cellular division. In order to accurately quantify cardiomyocyte turnover discrimination between these processes is essential. The protocol described here employs long term nucleoside labeling in order to label all nuclei which have arisen as a result of DNA replication and cardiomyocyte nuclei identified by utilizing nuclei isolation and subsequent PCM1 immunolabeling. Together this allows the accurate and sensitive identification of the nucleoside labeling of the cardiomyocyte nuclei population. Furthermore, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole labeling and analysis of nuclei ploidy, enables the discrimination of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei from nuclei which have incorporated nucleoside during polyploidization. Although this method cannot control for cardiomyocyte binucleation, it allows a rapid and robust quantification of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei while accounting for polyploidization. This method has a number of downstream applications including assessing the potential therapeutics to enhance cardiomyocyte regeneration or investigating the effects of cardiac disease on cardiomyocyte turnover and ploidy. This technique is also compatible with additional downstream immunohistological techniques, allowing quantification of nucleoside incorporation in all cardiac cell types. PMID:27285379

  20. Simultaneous Assessment of Cardiomyocyte DNA Synthesis and Ploidy: A Method to Assist Quantification of Cardiomyocyte Regeneration and Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gavin D.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is accepted that the heart has a limited potential to regenerate cardiomyocytes following injury and that low levels of cardiomyocyte turnover occur during normal ageing, quantification of these events remains challenging. This is in part due to the rarity of the process and the fact that multiple cellular sources contribute to myocardial maintenance. Furthermore, DNA duplication within cardiomyocytes often leads to a polyploid cardiomyocyte and only rarely leads to new cardiomyocytes by cellular division. In order to accurately quantify cardiomyocyte turnover discrimination between these processes is essential. The protocol described here employs long term nucleoside labeling in order to label all nuclei which have arisen as a result of DNA replication and cardiomyocyte nuclei identified by utilizing nuclei isolation and subsequent PCM1 immunolabeling. Together this allows the accurate and sensitive identification of the nucleoside labeling of the cardiomyocyte nuclei population. Furthermore, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole labeling and analysis of nuclei ploidy, enables the discrimination of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei from nuclei which have incorporated nucleoside during polyploidization. Although this method cannot control for cardiomyocyte binucleation, it allows a rapid and robust quantification of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei while accounting for polyploidization. This method has a number of downstream applications including assessing the potential therapeutics to enhance cardiomyocyte regeneration or investigating the effects of cardiac disease on cardiomyocyte turnover and ploidy. This technique is also compatible with additional downstream immunohistological techniques, allowing quantification of nucleoside incorporation in all cardiac cell types. PMID:27285379

  1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors Differentiate to Cardiomyocytes and Form Biosynthetic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Chellapan, Malathi; Bursac, Nenad; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart has little capacity to regenerate, and following injury the myocardium is replaced by non-contractile scar tissue. Consequently, increased wall stress and workload on the remaining myocardium leads to chamber dilation, dysfunction, and heart failure. Cell-based therapy with an autologous, epigenetically reprogrammed, and cardiac-committed progenitor cell source could potentially reverse this process by replacing the damaged myocardium with functional tissue. However, it is unclear whether cardiac progenitor cell-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of attaining levels of structural and functional maturity comparable to that of terminally-fated cardiomyocytes. Here, we first describe the derivation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which once differentiated allow for the enrichment of Nkx2-5(+) cardiac progenitors, and the cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the red fluorescent protein. We show that the cardiac progenitors are multipotent and capable of differentiating into endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Moreover, cardiac progenitor selection corresponds to cKit(+) cell enrichment, while cardiomyocyte cell-lineage commitment is concomitant with dual expression of either cKit/Flk1 or cKit/Sca-1. We proceed to show that the cardiac progenitor-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of forming electrically and mechanically coupled large-scale 2D cell cultures with mature electrophysiological properties. Finally, we examine the cell progenitors’ ability to form electromechanically coherent macroscopic tissues, using a physiologically relevant 3D culture model and demonstrate that following long-term culture the cardiomyocytes align, and form robust electromechanical connections throughout the volume of the biosynthetic tissue construct. We conclude that the iPS cell-derived cardiac progenitors are a robust cell source for tissue engineering applications and a 3D culture platform for pharmacological screening and

  2. How to make a cardiomyocyte.

    PubMed

    Später, Daniela; Hansson, Emil M; Zangi, Lior; Chien, Kenneth R

    2014-12-01

    During development, cardiogenesis is orchestrated by a family of heart progenitors that build distinct regions of the heart. Each region contains diverse cell types that assemble to form the complex structures of the individual cardiac compartments. Cardiomyocytes are the main cell type found in the heart and ensure contraction of the chambers and efficient blood flow throughout the body. Injury to the cardiac muscle often leads to heart failure due to the loss of a large number of cardiomyocytes and its limited intrinsic capacity to regenerate the damaged tissue, making it one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this Primer we discuss how insights into the molecular and cellular framework underlying cardiac development can be used to guide the in vitro specification of cardiomyocytes, whether by directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells or via direct lineage conversion. Additional strategies to generate cardiomyocytes in situ, such as reactivation of endogenous cardiac progenitors and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation, will also be discussed. PMID:25406392

  3. Oncostatin M-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation regulates the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy through B-Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Ma, Sai; Zhang, Ran; Li, Shuang; Zhu, Di; Han, Dong; Li, Xiujuan; Li, Congye; Yan, Wei; Sun, Dongdong; Xu, Bin; Wang, Yabin; Cao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that oncostatin M (OSM) could initiate cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation both in vivo and in vitro. OSM-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation might be a new target for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study was designed to determine the role of OSM in cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and the progression of DCM. A mouse DCM model was established to evaluate the effects of OSM in vivo. Echocardiography was applied to determine cardiac function. Sirius red staining was used to detect fibrosis area. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate mitochondria impairment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were performed to detect relative mRNA expressions and cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation-related protein expressions, respectively. OSM treatment induced similar impaired cardiac function and cardiac ultrastructure impairment to those detected in DCM mice. The expressions of dedifferentiation markers of cardiomyocyte (Runx1, and α-SM-actin) were up-regulated in the OSM-treated mice compared with those in the control group. To further demonstrate the important role of OSM, OSM receptor knockout (Oβ(ko)) mice were used. In Oβ(ko) mice, cardiomyocytes dedifferentiation markers of c-kit, Runx1, and atrial natriuretic peptide were down-regulated, with attenuated DCM injury and abrogated OSM/B-Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway. In conclusion, OSM-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation plays a crucial role in the progression of DCM. The mechanism of OSM-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation is associated with B-Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway through the OSM receptor Oβ. PMID:26837420

  4. Five new triterpenoidal saponins from the roots of Ilex cornuta and their protective effects against H₂O₂-induced cardiomyocytes injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlian; Zhao, Jianping; Li, Shanshan; Lu, Yuchen; Liu, Yanli; Xu, Qiongming; Li, Xiaoran; Khan, Ikhlas A; Yang, Shilin

    2014-12-01

    Five new ursane-type triterpenoidal saponins (1-5), together with five known ones (6-10), were isolated from the EtOH extract of the roots of Ilex cornuta. The structures of saponins 1-5 were elucidated as 19α-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid 3β-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (1), 19α-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid 3β-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside-6-O-ethyl ester (2), 19α-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid 3β-O-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (3), 3β-O-[α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl]-19α-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (4) and 3β-O-[α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucuronopyranoside-6-O-methyl ester]-19α-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (5), on the basis of spectroscopic analyses (IR, ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, 1D and 2D NMR) and chemical reactions. Protective effects of compounds 1-10 against H₂O₂-induced H9c2 cardiomyocyte injury were tested. Compounds 1-5, 7, and 10 showed cell-protective effects. Among them compound 5 exhibited the highest activity. No significant DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed for compounds 1-10. PMID:25172104

  5. Connexin 43 acts as a cytoprotective mediator of signal transduction by stimulating mitochondrial KATP channels in mouse cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rottlaender, Dennis; Boengler, Kerstin; Wolny, Martin; Michels, Guido; Endres-Becker, Jeannette; Motloch, Lukas J.; Schwaiger, Astrid; Buechert, Astrid; Schulz, Rainer; Heusch, Gerd; Hoppe, Uta C.

    2010-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane influence cell function and survival. Increasing evidence indicates that multiple signaling pathways and pharmacological actions converge on mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ (mitoKATP) channels and PKC to confer cytoprotection against necrotic and apoptotic cell injury. However, the molecular structure of mitoKATP channels remains unresolved, and the mitochondrial phosphoprotein(s) that mediate cytoprotection by PKC remain to be determined. As mice deficient in the main sarcolemmal gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) lack this cytoprotection, we set out to investigate a possible link among mitochondrial Cx43, mitoKATP channel function, and PKC activation. By patch-clamping the inner membrane of subsarcolemmal murine cardiac mitochondria, we found that genetic Cx43 deficiency, pharmacological connexin inhibition by carbenoxolone, and Cx43 blockade by the mimetic peptide 43GAP27 each substantially reduced diazoxide-mediated stimulation of mitoKATP channels. Suppression of mitochondrial Cx43 inhibited mitoKATP channel activation by PKC. MitoKATP channels of interfibrillar mitochondria, which do not contain any detectable Cx43, were insensitive to both PKC activation and diazoxide, further demonstrating the role of Cx43 in mitoKATP channel stimulation and the compartmentation of mitochondria in cell signaling. Our results define a role for mitochondrial Cx43 in protecting cardiac cells from death and provide a link between cytoprotective stimuli and mitoKATP channel opening, making Cx43 an attractive therapeutic target for protection against cell injury. PMID:20364086

  6. HMGB1 induces apoptosis and EMT in association with increased autophagy following H/R injury in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    OUYANG, FAN; HUANG, HE; ZHANG, MINGYU; CHEN, MINGXIAN; HUANG, HAOBO; HUANG, FANG; ZHOU, SHENGHUA

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of tissue injury following myocardial infarction (MI) which can lead to tissue damage and pathological remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to try and prevent myocardial H/R injury in order to optimize the treatment of MI. This study aimed to explore the functions and molecular mechanisms of action of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and its role in H/R injury to H9c2 cells. The mRNA expression of levels genes were detected by RT-qPCR. The protein levels were examined by western blot analysis. The Beclin 1 expression level was further determined by immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition, an HMGB1 overexpression vector and a shRNA lentiviral vector were constructed in order to induce the overexpression and silencing of HMGB1, respectively. The apoptotic rate of the H9c2 cells was determined by flow cytometry. The expression of miR-210 was markedly increased following the exposure of the cells to H/R, thus indicating that the cell model of H/R injury was successfully established. In addition, an in vivo model of MI was also created using rats. The mRNA and protein level of HMGB1 was found to be upregulated in the myocardial tissue of the rats with MI and in the H9c2 cells subjected to H/R injury. HMGB1 promoted apoptosis by increasing the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and the apoptotic rate of the cells, while decreasing the expression of Bcl-2 during H/R in the H9c2 cells. HMGB1 promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by reducing the protein level of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, while increasing the expression of the mesenchymal markers, vimentin and fibroblast-specific protein (FSP), during H/R in the H9c2 cells. HMGB1 induced the apoptosis of the H9c2 cells and EMT following H/R in association with the induction of autophagy. HMGB1 induced autophagy by upregulating the expression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) and downregulating the phosphorylation levels of

  7. GATA4 regulates Fgf16 to promote heart repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Huang, Xiuzhen; Tian, Xueying; Zhang, Hui; He, Lingjuan; Wang, Yue; Nie, Yu; Hu, Shengshou; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William; Lui, Kathy O; Zhou, Bin

    2016-03-15

    Although the mammalian heart can regenerate during the neonatal stage, this endogenous regenerative capacity is lost with age. Importantly, replication of cardiomyocytes has been found to be the key mechanism responsible for neonatal cardiac regeneration. Unraveling the transcriptional regulatory network for inducing cardiomyocyte replication will, therefore, be crucial for the development of novel therapies to drive cardiac repair after injury. Here, we investigated whether the key cardiac transcription factor GATA4 is required for neonatal mouse heart regeneration. Using the neonatal mouse heart cryoinjury and apical resection models with an inducible loss of GATA4 specifically in cardiomyocytes, we found severely depressed ventricular function in the Gata4-ablated mice (mutant) after injury. This was accompanied by reduced cardiomyocyte replication. In addition, the mutant hearts displayed impaired coronary angiogenesis and increased hypertrophy and fibrosis after injury. Mechanistically, we found that the paracrine factor FGF16 was significantly reduced in the mutant hearts after injury compared with littermate controls and was directly regulated by GATA4. Cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF16 via adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) in the mutant hearts partially rescued the cryoinjury-induced cardiac hypertrophy, promoted cardiomyocyte replication and improved heart function after injury. Altogether, our data demonstrate that GATA4 is required for neonatal heart regeneration through regulation of Fgf16, suggesting that paracrine factors could be of potential use in promoting myocardial repair. PMID:26893347

  8. MiR-21 Protected Cardiomyocytes against Doxorubicin-Induced Apoptosis by Targeting BTG2

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhongyi; Jiang, Bimei; Wu, Yanyang; Liu, Yanjuan; Li, Yuanbin; Gao, Min; Jiang, Yu; Lv, Qinglan; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an anthracycline drug with a wide spectrum of antineoplastic activities. However, it causes cardiac cytotoxicity, and this limits its clinical applications. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) plays a vital role in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. While miR-21 is preferentially expressed in adult cardiomyocytes and involved in cardiac development and heart disease, little is known regarding its biological functions in responding to DOX-induced cardiac cytotoxicity. In this study, the effects of DOX on mouse cardiac function and the expression of miR-21 were examined in both mouse heart tissues and rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes. The results showed that the cardiac functions were more aggravated in chronic DOX injury mice compared with acute DOX-injury mice; DOX treatment significantly increased miR-21 expression in both mouse heart tissue and H9C2 cells. Over-expression of miR-21 attenuated DOX-induced apoptosis in cardiamyocytes whereas knocking down its expression increased DOX-induced apoptosis. These gain- and loss- of function experiments showed that B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) was a target of miR-21. The expression of BTG2 was significantly decreased both in myocardium and H9C2 cells treated with DOX. The present study has revealed that miR-21 protects mouse myocardium and H9C2 cells against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity probably by targeting BTG2. PMID:26132560

  9. Acute inflammation stimulates a regenerative response in the neonatal mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunyong; Nie, Yu; Lian, Hong; Liu, Rui; He, Feng; Huang, Huihui; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac injury in neonatal 1-day-old mice stimulates a regenerative response characterized by reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation, which is distinguished from the fibrotic repair process in adults. Acute inflammation occurs immediately after heart injury and has generally been believed to exert a negative effect on heart regeneration by promoting scar formation in adults; however, little is known about the role of acute inflammation in the cardiac regenerative response in neonatal mice. Here, we show that acute inflammation induced cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical intramyocardial microinjection of immunogenic zymosan A particles into the neonatal mouse heart. We also found that cardiac injury-induced regenerative response was suspended after immunosuppression in neonatal mice, and that cardiomyocytes could not be reactivated to proliferate after neonatal heart injury in the absence of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the major downstream effector of IL-6 signaling, decreased reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical resection. Our results indicate that acute inflammation stimulates the regenerative response in neonatal mouse heart, and suggest that modulation of inflammatory signals might have important implications in cardiac regenerative medicine. PMID:26358185

  10. Impact of neural cell adhesion molecule deletion on regeneration after mouse spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vedangana; Loers, Gabriele; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important functional roles in development of the nervous system. We investigated the influence of a constitutive ablation of NCAM on the outcome of spinal cord injury. Transgenic mice lacking NCAM (NCAM-/-) were subjected to severe compression injury of the lower thoracic spinal cord using wild-type (NCAM+/+) littermates as controls. According to the single-frame motion analysis, the NCAM-/- mice showed reduced locomotor recovery in comparison to control mice at 3 and 6 weeks after injury, indicating an overall positive impact of NCAM on recovery after injury. Also the Basso Mouse Scale score was lower in NCAM-/- mice at 3 weeks after injury, whereas at 6 weeks after injury the difference between genotypes was not statistically significant. Worse locomotor function was associated with decreased monoaminergic and cholinergic innervation of the spinal cord caudal to the injury site and decreased axonal regrowth/sprouting at the site of injury. Astrocytic scar formation at the injury site, as assessed by immunohistology for glial fibrillary acidic protein at and around the lesion site was increased in NCAM-/- compared with NCAM+/+ mice. Migration of cultured monolayer astrocytes from NCAM-/- mice was reduced as assayed by scratch wounding. Numbers of Iba-1 immunopositive microglia were not different between genotypes. We conclude that constitutive NCAM deletion in young adult mice reduces recovery after spinal cord injury, validating the hypothesized beneficial role of this molecule in recovery after injury. PMID:27178448

  11. Role of JAK-STAT pathway in reducing cardiomyocytes hypoxia/reoxygenation injury induced by S1P postconditioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Dongfei; Zhang, Lizhi; Ye, Fangyu; Li, Mengmeng; Wen, Ke

    2016-08-01

    This experiment was designed to explore the protection of sphingosine1-phosphate (S1P) postconditioning on rat myocardial cells injured by hypoxia/reoxygenation acting via the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signal pathway. The data showed that S1P could significantly increase cell viability, lower the rate of apoptosis, decrease the content of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and caspase3 activity in the culture medium, increase the activity of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), reduce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the fluorescence intensity of intracellular calcium, as well as increase the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in comparison with the H/R group. When the JAK inhibitor AG490 or the STAT inhibitor stattic were added, the effects of S1P were inhibited. Our date shows that S1P protects H9c2 cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury and that the protection by S1P was inhibited by AG490 and stattic. Therefore S1P protects H9c2 cells against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury via the JAK-STAT pathway. PMID:27215146

  12. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  13. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Michael J.; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an impact to the cranium of an unrestrained subject allowing rapid acceleration of the free-moving head and torso, an essential characteristic known to be important for concussive injury in humans, and a factor that is missing from existing animal models of TBI. Our method does not require scalp incision, emplacement of protective skull helmets or surgery and the procedure can be completed in 1-2 minutes. Mice spontaneously recover the righting reflex and show no evidence of seizures, paralysis or impaired behavior. Skull fractures and intracranial bleeding are very rare. Minor deficits in motor coordination and locomotor hyperactivity recover over time. Histological analyses reveal mild astrocytic reactivity (increased expression of GFAP) and increased phospho-tau but a lack of blood-brain-barrier disruption, edema and microglial activation. This new animal model is simple and cost-effective and will facilitate characterization of the neurobiological and behavioral consequences of rmTBI. It is also ideal for high throughput screening of potential new therapies for mild concussive injuries as experienced by athletes and military personnel. PMID:21930157

  14. A Novel Mouse Model of Penetrating Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja; Wing, Ian D.; Davidsson, Johan; Plantman, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI) has been difficult to model in small laboratory animals, such as rats or mice. Previously, we have established a non-fatal, rat model for pTBI using a modified air-rifle that accelerates a pellet, which hits a small probe that then penetrates the experimental animal’s brain. Knockout and transgenic strains of mice offer attractive tools to study biological reactions induced by TBI. Hence, in the present study, we adapted and modified our model to be used with mice. The technical characterization of the impact device included depth and speed of impact, as well as dimensions of the temporary cavity formed in a brain surrogate material after impact. Biologically, we have focused on three distinct levels of severity (mild, moderate, and severe), and characterized the acute phase response to injury in terms of tissue destruction, neural degeneration, and gliosis. Functional outcome was assessed by measuring bodyweight and motor performance on rotarod. The results showed that this model is capable of reproducing major morphological and neurological changes of pTBI; as such, we recommend its utilization in research studies aiming to unravel the biological events underlying injury and regeneration after pTBI. PMID:25374559

  15. Mouse models and methods for studying human disease, acute kidney injury (AKI).

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Ganesan; Ranganathan, Punithavathi

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is serious complication in hospitalized patients with high level of mortality. There is not much progress made for the past 50 years in reducing the mortality rate despite advances in understanding disease pathology. Using variety of animal models of acute kidney injury, scientist studies the pathogenic mechanism of AKI and to test therapeutic drugs, which may reduce renal injury. Among them, renal pedicle clamping and cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in mice are most prominently used, mainly due to the availability of gene knockouts to study specific gene functions, inexpensive and availability of the inbred strain with less genetic variability. However, ischemic mouse model is highly variable and require excellent surgical skills to reduce variation in the observation. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol of the mouse model of bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion and cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity. We also discuss the protocol for the isolation and analysis of infiltrated inflammatory cell into the kidney by flow cytometry. Information provided in this chapter will help scientist who wants to start research on AKI and want to establish the mouse model for ischemic and toxic kidney injury. PMID:25064118

  16. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  17. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  18. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khalin, Igor; Jamari, Nor Laili Azua; Razak, Nadiawati Bt Abdul; Hasain, Zubaidah Bt; Nor, Mohd Asri Bin Mohd; Zainudin, Mohd Hakimi Bin Ahmad; Omar, Ainsah Bt; Alyautdin, Renad

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI. PMID:27212925

  19. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Jamari, Nor Laili Azua; Razak, Nadiawati Bt Abdul; Hasain, Zubaidah Bt; Nor, Mohd Asri bin Mohd; Zainudin, Mohd Hakimi bin Ahmad; Omar, Ainsah Bt; Alyautdin, Renad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI. PMID:27212925

  20. A combined scoring method to assess behavioral recovery after mouse spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Fatemi, Gita; Faden, Alan I.

    2010-01-01

    Although the rat has been the predominant rodent used to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), the increasing availability of transgenic animals has led to greater use of mouse models. However, behavioral assessment after SCI in mice has been less extensively investigated than in rats and few studies have critically examined the correlation between behavioral tests and injury severity or tissue damage. The present study characterized hind-limb functional performance in C57Bl/6 mice after contusion SCI at T9 using the weight drop method. A number of behavioral tests were examined with regard to variability, inter-rater reliability, and correlation to injury severity and white matter sparing. Mice were subjected to sham, mild-moderate or moderate-severe SCI and evaluated at day 1 and weekly up to 42 days using the Basso mouse scale (BMS), ladder climb, grid walk, inclined plane, plantar test and tail flick tests. The ladder climb and grid walk tests proved sub-optimal for use in mice, but modifications enhanced their predictive value with regard to injury severity. The inclined plane, plantar test and tail flick test showed far too much variability to have meaningful predictive value. The BMS score proved reliable, as previously reported, but a combined score (BLG) using BMS, Ladder climb (modified), and Grip walk (modified grid walk) provided better separation across injury levels and less variability than the individual tests. These data provide support for use of a combined scoring method to follow motor recovery in mice after SCI contusion injury. PMID:20188770

  1. No Evidence for Cardiomyocyte Number Expansion in Preadolescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Panula, Joni; Westman, Mattias; Wu, Ting-Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Bergmann, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    The magnitude of cardiomyocyte generation in the adult heart has been heavily debated. A recent report suggests that during mouse preadolescence, cardiomyocyte proliferation leads to a 40% increase in the number of cardiomyocytes. Such an expansion would change our understanding of heart growth and have far-reaching implications for cardiac regeneration. Here, using design-based stereology, we found that cardiomyocyte proliferation accounted for 30% of postnatal DNA synthesis; however, we were unable to detect any changes in cardiomyocyte number after postnatal day 11. (15)N-thymidine and BrdU analyses provided no evidence for a proliferative peak in preadolescent mice. By contrast, cardiomyocyte multinucleation comprises 57% of postnatal DNA synthesis, followed by cardiomyocyte nuclear polyploidisation, contributing with 13% to DNA synthesis within the second and third postnatal weeks. We conclude that the majority of cardiomyocytes is set within the first postnatal week and that this event is followed by two waves of non-replicative DNA synthesis. This Matters Arising paper is in response to Naqvi et al. (2014), published in Cell. See also the associated Correspondence by Soonpaa et al. (2015), and the response by Naqvi et al. (2015), published in this issue. PMID:26544945

  2. Cardiac RNA induces inflammatory responses in cardiomyocytes and immune cells via Toll-like receptor 7 signaling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Hongliang; Cai, Jiayan; Zou, Lin; Yan, Dan; Xu, Ganqiong; Li, Dan; Chao, Wei

    2015-10-30

    We have recently reported that extracellular RNA (exRNA) released from necrotic cells induces cytokine production in cardiomyocytes and immune cells and contributes to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the signaling mechanism by which exRNA exhibits its pro-inflammatory effect is unknown. Here we hypothesize that exRNA directly induces inflammation through specific Toll-like receptors (TLRs). To test the hypothesis, we treated rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), or mouse neutrophils with RNA (2.5-10 μg/ml) isolated from rat cardiomyocytes or the hearts from mouse, rat, and human. We found that cellular RNA induced production of several cytokines such as macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), ILs, TNFα, and the effect was completely diminished by RNase, but not DNase. The RNA-induced cytokine production was partially inhibited in cells treated with TLR7 antagonist or genetically deficient in TLR7. Deletion of myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88), a downstream adapter of TLRs including TLR7, abolished the RNA-induced MIP-2 production. Surprisingly, genetic deletion of TLR3 had no impact on the RNA-induced MIP-2 response. Importantly, extracellular RNA released from damaged cardiomyocytes also induced cytokine production. Finally, mice treated with 50 μg of RNA intraperitoneal injection exhibited acute peritonitis as evidenced by marked neutrophil and monocyte migration into the peritoneal space. Together, these data demonstrate that exRNA of cardiac origin exhibits a potent pro-inflammatory property in vitro and in vivo and that exRNA induces cytokine production through TLR7-MyD88 signaling. PMID:26363072

  3. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; MacLellan, W Robb; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  4. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  5. Building and re-building the heart by cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Matthew J; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The adult human heart does not regenerate significant amounts of lost tissue after injury. Rather than making new, functional muscle, human hearts are prone to scarring and hypertrophy, which can often lead to fatal arrhythmias and heart failure. The most-cited basis of this ineffective cardiac regeneration in mammals is the low proliferative capacity of adult cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian cardiomyocytes can avidly proliferate during fetal and neonatal development, and both adult zebrafish and neonatal mice can regenerate cardiac muscle after injury, suggesting that latent regenerative potential exists. Dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cardiomyocyte proliferation throughout life, deciphering why proliferative capacity normally dissipates in adult mammals, and deriving means to boost this capacity are primary goals in cardiovascular research. Here, we review our current understanding of how cardiomyocyte proliferation is regulated during heart development and regeneration. PMID:26932668

  6. Metformin Protects H9C2 Cardiomyocytes from High-Glucose and Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury via Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Inflammatory Responses: Role of AMPK and JNK

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mingyan; Ye, Ping; Liao, Hua; Chen, Manhua

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a first-line drug for the management of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies suggested cardioprotective effects of metformin against ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, it remains elusive whether metformin provides direct protection against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in cardiomyocytes under normal or hyperglycemic conditions. This study in H9C2 rat cardiomyoblasts was designed to determine cell viability under H/R and high-glucose (HG, 33 mM) conditions and the effects of cotreatment with various concentrations of metformin (0, 1, 5, and 10 mM). We further elucidated molecular mechanisms underlying metformin-induced cytoprotection, especially the possible involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). Results indicated that 5 mM metformin improved cell viability, mitochondrial integrity, and respiratory chain activity under HG and/or H/R (P < 0.05). The beneficial effects were associated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species generation and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-6) (P < 0.05). Metformin enhanced phosphorylation level of AMPK and suppressed HG + H/R induced JNK activation. Inhibitor of AMPK (compound C) or activator of JNK (anisomycin) abolished the cytoprotective effects of metformin. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that metformin possessed direct cytoprotective effects against HG and H/R injury in cardiac cells via signaling mechanisms involving activation of AMPK and concomitant inhibition of JNK. PMID:27294149

  7. Aza-induced cardiomyocyte differentiation of P19 EC-cells by epigenetic co-regulation and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Deepti; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2013-09-10

    Stem cells in cell based therapy for cardiac injury is being potentially considered. However, genetic regulatory networks involved in cardiac differentiation are not clearly understood. Among stem cell differentiation models, mouse P19 embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells, are employed for studying (epi)genetic regulation of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Here, we comprehensively assessed cardiogenic differentiation potential of 5-azacytidine (Aza) on P19 EC-cells, associated gene expression profiles and the changes in DNA methylation, histone acetylation and activated-ERK signaling status during differentiation. Initial exposure of Aza to cultured EC-cells leads to an efficient (55%) differentiation to cardiomyocyte-rich embryoid bodies with a threefold (16.8%) increase in the cTnI+ cardiomyocytes. Expression levels of cardiac-specific gene markers i.e., Isl-1, BMP-2, GATA-4, and α-MHC were up-regulated following Aza induction, accompanied by differential changes in their methylation status particularly that of BMP-2 and α-MHC. Additionally, increases in the levels of acetylated-H3 and pERK were observed during Aza-induced cardiac differentiation. These studies demonstrate that Aza is a potent cardiac inducer when treated during the initial phase of differentiation of mouse P19 EC-cells and its effect is brought about epigenetically and co-ordinatedly by hypo-methylation and histone acetylation-mediated hyper-expression of cardiogenesis-associated genes and involving activation of ERK signaling. PMID:23747406

  8. No evidence for chronic demyelination in spared axons following spinal cord injury in a mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lasiene, Jurate; Shupe, Larry; Perlmutter, Steve; Horner, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of remyelination after traumatic spinal cord injury remains elusive, with animal and human studies reporting partial to complete demyelination followed by incomplete remyelination. In the present study, we found that spared rubrospinal tract (RST) axons of passage traced with actively transported dextrans and examined caudally to the lesion twelve weeks after mouse spinal cord contusion injury were fully remyelinated. Spared axons exhibited a marginally reduced myelin thickness and significantly shorter internodes. Contactin-associated protein (CASPR) and Kv1.2 channels were used to identify internodes and paranodal protein distribution properties were used as an index of myelin integrity. This is the first time the CNS myelin internode length was measured in a mouse. To better understand the significance of shortened internodes and thinner myelin in spared axons, we modeled conduction properties using McIntyre’s et al. model of myelinated axons. Mathematical modeling predicted a 21% decrease in the conduction velocity of remyelinated RST axons due to shortened internodes. To determine whether demyelination could be present on axons exhibiting a pathological transport system we utilized the retroviral reporter system. Virally delivered GFP unveiled a small population of dystrophic RST axons that persist chronically with evident demyelination or abnormal remyelination. Collectively these data show that lasting demyelination in spared axons is rare and that remyelination of axons of passage occurs in the chronically injured mouse spinal cord. PMID:18400887

  9. BrdU-positive cells in the neonatal mouse hippocampus following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, John; Soltau, Thomas; Wimborne, Hereward; Kim, Sunjun; Martin-Studdard, Angeline; Hess, David; Hill, William; Waller, Jennifer; Carroll, James

    2005-01-01

    Background Mechanisms that affect recovery from fetal and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) brain injury have not been fully elucidated. The incidence of intrapartum asphyxia is approximately 2.5%, but the occurrence of adverse clinical outcome is much lower. One of the factors which may account for this relatively good outcome is the process of neurogenesis, which has been described in adult animals. We used a neonatal mouse model to assess new cells in the hippocampus after H-I injury. Results Neonatal mice underwent permanent unilateral carotid ligation on the seventh postnatal day followed by exposure to 8% hypoxia for 75 minutes. The presence of new cells was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into cells with sacrifice of the animals at intervals. Brain sections were stained for BrdU in combination with neuronal, glial, endothelial and microglial stains. We found a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells in the neonatal mouse hippocampus in the injured area compared to the non-injured area, most prominent in the dentate gyrus (DG) (154.5 ± 59.6 v. 92.9 ± 32.7 at 3 days after injury; 68.9 ± 23.4 v. 52.4 ± 17.1 at 35 days after injury, p < 0.0011). Among the cells which showed differentiation, those which were stained as either microglial or endothelial cells showed a peak increase at three days after the injury in the DG, injured versus non-injured side (30.5 ± 17.8 v. 2.7 ± 2.6, p < 0.0002). As in the adult animal, neurogenesis was significantly increased in the DG with injury (15.0 ± 4.6 v. 5.2 ± 1.6 at 35 days after injury, p < 0.0002), and this increase was subsequent to the appearance of the other dividing cells. Numbers of new oligodendrocytes were significantly higher in the DG on the non-injured side (7.0 ± 24.2 v. 0.1 ± 0.3, p < 0.0002), suggesting that oligodendrocyte synthesis was reduced in the injured hippocampus. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the neonatal animal responds to brain injury with neurogenesis

  10. The protein PprI provides protection against radiation injury in human and mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Huiping; Yue, Ling; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute radiation injuries are both very lethal and exceptionally difficult to treat. Though the radioresistant bacterium D. radiodurans was first characterized in 1956, genes and proteins key to its radioprotection have not yet to be applied in radiation injury therapy for humans. In this work, we express the D. radiodurans protein PprI in Pichia pastoris yeast cells transfected with the designed vector plasmid pHBM905A-pprI. We then treat human umbilical endothelial vein cells and BALB/c mouse cells with the yeast-derived PprI and elucidate the radioprotective effects the protein provides upon gamma irradiation. We see that PprI significantly increases the survival rate, antioxidant viability, and DNA-repair capacity in irradiated cells and decreases concomitant apoptosis rates and counts of damage-indicative γH2AX foci. Furthermore, we find that PprI reduces mortality and enhances bone marrow cell clone formation and white blood cell and platelet counts in irradiated mice. PprI also seems to alleviate pathological injuries to multiple organs and improve antioxidant viability in some tissues. Our results thus suggest that PprI has crucial radioprotective effects on irradiated human and mouse cells. PMID:27222438

  11. The protein PprI provides protection against radiation injury in human and mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Huiping; Yue, Ling; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute radiation injuries are both very lethal and exceptionally difficult to treat. Though the radioresistant bacterium D. radiodurans was first characterized in 1956, genes and proteins key to its radioprotection have not yet to be applied in radiation injury therapy for humans. In this work, we express the D. radiodurans protein PprI in Pichia pastoris yeast cells transfected with the designed vector plasmid pHBM905A-pprI. We then treat human umbilical endothelial vein cells and BALB/c mouse cells with the yeast-derived PprI and elucidate the radioprotective effects the protein provides upon gamma irradiation. We see that PprI significantly increases the survival rate, antioxidant viability, and DNA-repair capacity in irradiated cells and decreases concomitant apoptosis rates and counts of damage-indicative γH2AX foci. Furthermore, we find that PprI reduces mortality and enhances bone marrow cell clone formation and white blood cell and platelet counts in irradiated mice. PprI also seems to alleviate pathological injuries to multiple organs and improve antioxidant viability in some tissues. Our results thus suggest that PprI has crucial radioprotective effects on irradiated human and mouse cells. PMID:27222438

  12. Early biomarkers of doxorubicin-induced heart injury in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Varsha G.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L.; Herman, Eugene H.; Lee, Taewon; Han, Tao; Lewis, Sherry M.; Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Kerr, Susan; Fuscoe, James C.

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac troponins, which are used as myocardial injury markers, are released in plasma only after tissue damage has occurred. Therefore, there is a need for identification of biomarkers of earlier events in cardiac injury to limit the extent of damage. To accomplish this, expression profiling of 1179 unique microRNAs (miRNAs) was performed in a chronic cardiotoxicity mouse model developed in our laboratory. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were injected intravenously with 3 mg/kg doxorubicin (DOX; an anti-cancer drug), or saline once a week for 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were euthanized a week after the last dose. Cardiac injury was evidenced in mice exposed to 18 mg/kg and higher cumulative DOX dose whereas examination of hearts by light microscopy revealed cardiac lesions at 24 mg/kg DOX. Also, 24 miRNAs were differentially expressed in mouse hearts, with the expression of 1, 1, 2, 8, and 21 miRNAs altered at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg DOX, respectively. A pro-apoptotic miR-34a was the only miRNA that was up-regulated at all cumulative DOX doses and showed a significant dose-related response. Up-regulation of miR-34a at 6 mg/kg DOX may suggest apoptosis as an early molecular change in the hearts of DOX-treated mice. At 12 mg/kg DOX, up-regulation of miR-34a was associated with down-regulation of hypertrophy-related miR-150; changes observed before cardiac injury. These findings may lead to the development of biomarkers of earlier events in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity that occur before the release of cardiac troponins. - Highlights: • Upregulation of miR-34a before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury • Apoptosis might be an early event in mouse heart during doxorubicin treatment. • Expression of miR-150 declined before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury.

  13. A Cytochrome P450-Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G; Lehner, Andreas F; Scott, Michael A; Buchweitz, John P; James, Laura P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0-14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  14. Effects of traumatic brain injury on reactive astrogliosis and seizures in mouse models of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Chen, Michael; Han, Xiaoning; Iliff, Jeffrey; Ren, Zeguang; Sun, Wei; Hagemann, Tracy; Goldman, James; Messing, Albee; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is the only known human pathology caused by mutations in an astrocyte-specific gene, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These mutations result in abnormal GFAP accumulations that promote seizures, motor delays and, ultimately, death. The exact contribution of increased, abnormal levels of astrocytic mutant GFAP in the development and progression of the epileptic phenotype is not clear, and we addressed this question using two mouse models of AxD. Comparison of brain seizure activity spontaneously and after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an effective way to trigger seizures, revealed that abnormal GFAP accumulation contributes to abnormal brain activity (increased interictal discharges) but is not a risk factor for the development of epilepsy after TBI. These data highlight the need to further explore the complex and heterogeneous response of astrocytes towards injury and the involvement of GFAP in the progression of AxD. PMID:25069089

  15. Regrowth of Serotonin Axons in the Adult Mouse Brain Following Injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunju; Dougherty, Sarah E; Wood, Kevin; Sun, Landy; Cudmore, Robert H; Abdalla, Aya; Kannan, Geetha; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Hashemi, Parastoo; Linden, David J

    2016-08-17

    It is widely believed that damaged axons in the adult mammalian brain have little capacity to regrow, thereby impeding functional recovery after injury. Studies using fixed tissue have suggested that serotonin neurons might be a notable exception, but remain inconclusive. We have employed in vivo two-photon microscopy to produce time-lapse images of serotonin axons in the neocortex of the adult mouse. Serotonin axons undergo massive retrograde degeneration following amphetamine treatment and subsequent slow recovery of axonal density, which is dominated by new growth with little contribution from local sprouting. A stab injury that transects serotonin axons running in the neocortex is followed by local regression of cut serotonin axons and followed by regrowth from cut ends into and across the stab rift zone. Regrowing serotonin axons do not follow the pathways left by degenerated axons. The regrown axons release serotonin and their regrowth is correlated with recovery in behavioral tests. PMID:27499084

  16. The mouse brain metabolome: region-specific signatures and response to excitotoxic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Christian; Glaab, Enrico; Michelucci, Alessandro; Binz, Tina M; Koeglsberger, Sandra; Garcia, Pierre; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Ghelfi, Jenny; Balling, Rudi; Buttini, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration is a multistep process characterized by a multitude of molecular entities and their interactions. Systems analyses, or omics approaches, have become an important tool in characterizing this process. Although RNA and protein profiling made their entry into this field a couple of decades ago, metabolite profiling is a more recent addition. The metabolome represents a large part or all metabolites in a tissue, and gives a snapshot of its physiology. By using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, we analyzed the metabolic profile of brain regions of the mouse, and found that each region is characterized by its own metabolic signature. We then analyzed the metabolic profile of the mouse brain after excitotoxic injury, a mechanism of neurodegeneration implicated in numerous neurological diseases. More important, we validated our findings by measuring, histologically and molecularly, actual neurodegeneration and glial response. We found that a specific global metabolic signature, best revealed by machine learning algorithms, rather than individual metabolites, was the most robust correlate of neuronal injury and the accompanying gliosis, and this signature could serve as a global biomarker for neurodegeneration. We also observed that brain lesioning induced several metabolites with neuroprotective properties. Our results deepen the understanding of metabolic changes accompanying neurodegeneration in disease models, and could help rapidly evaluate these changes in preclinical drug studies. PMID:25934215

  17. Akt1/protein kinase B enhances transcriptional reprogramming of fibroblasts to functional cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huanyu; Dickson, Matthew E.; Kim, Min Soo; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of fibroblasts to functional cardiomyocytes represents a potential approach for restoring cardiac function after myocardial injury, but the technique thus far has been slow and inefficient. To improve the efficiency of reprogramming fibroblasts to cardiac-like myocytes (iCMs) by cardiac transcription factors [Gata4, Hand2, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GHMT)], we screened 192 protein kinases and discovered that Akt/protein kinase B dramatically accelerates and amplifies this process in three different types of fibroblasts (mouse embryo, adult cardiac, and tail tip). Approximately 50% of reprogrammed mouse embryo fibroblasts displayed spontaneous beating after 3 wk of induction by Akt plus GHMT. Furthermore, addition of Akt1 to GHMT evoked a more mature cardiac phenotype for iCMs, as seen by enhanced polynucleation, cellular hypertrophy, gene expression, and metabolic reprogramming. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) acted upstream of Akt whereas the mitochondrial target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and forkhead box o3 (Foxo3a) acted downstream of Akt to influence fibroblast-to-cardiomyocyte reprogramming. These findings provide insights into the molecular basis of cardiac reprogramming and represent an important step toward further application of this technique. PMID:26354121

  18. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator. PMID:26414955

  19. Microwave & Magnetic (M2) Proteomics of a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa M.; Van Remmen, Holly; Purkar, Anjali; Mahesula, Swetha; Gelfond, J AL; Sabia, Marian; Qi, Wenbo; Lin, Ai-Ling; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Haskins, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Short-term increases in oxidative stress and decreases in motor function, including debilitating effects on balance and motor control, can occur following primary mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI). However, the long-term effects on motor unit impairment and integrity as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying secondary injuries are poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in central nervous system-specific protein (CSP) expression might correlate to these long-term effects. To test our hypothesis, we longitudinally assessed a closed-skull mTBI mouse model, vs. sham control, at 1, 7, 30, and 120 days post-injury. Motor impairment was determined by rotarod and grip strength performance measures, while motor unit integrity was determined using electromyography. Relative protein expression was determined by microwave & magnetic (M2) proteomics of ipsilateral brain tissue, as previously described. Isoprostane measurements were performed to confirm a primary oxidative stress response. Decoding the relative expression of 476 ± 56 top-ranked proteins for each specimen revealed statistically significant changes in the expression of two well-known CSPs at 1, 7 and 30 days post-injury: P < 0.001 for myelin basic protein (MBP) and P < 0.05 for myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG). This was confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, MAG, αII-spectrin (SPNA2) and neurofilament light (NEFL) expression at 30 days post-injury were directly related to grip strength (P < 0.05). While higher-powered studies of larger cohorts merit further investigation, this study supports the proof-of-concept that M2 proteomics is a rapid method to quantify putative protein biomarkers and therapeutic targets of mTBI and suggests the feasibility of CSP expression correlations to long-term effects on motor impairment. PMID:26157646

  20. Conversion of human fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Huang, Yu; Zheng, Jiashun; Spencer, C Ian; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Ji-Dong; Nie, Baoming; Xie, Min; Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Ma, Tianhua; Xu, Tao; Shi, Guilai; Srivastava, Deepak; Ding, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Reprogramming somatic fibroblasts into alternative lineages would provide a promising source of cells for regenerative therapy. However, transdifferentiating human cells into specific homogeneous, functional cell types is challenging. Here we show that cardiomyocyte-like cells can be generated by treating human fibroblasts with a combination of nine compounds that we term 9C. The chemically induced cardiomyocyte-like cells uniformly contracted and resembled human cardiomyocytes in their transcriptome, epigenetic, and electrophysiological properties. 9C treatment of human fibroblasts resulted in a more open-chromatin conformation at key heart developmental genes, enabling their promoters and enhancers to bind effectors of major cardiogenic signals. When transplanted into infarcted mouse hearts, 9C-treated fibroblasts were efficiently converted to chemically induced cardiomyocyte-like cells. This pharmacological approach to lineage-specific reprogramming may have many important therapeutic implications after further optimization to generate mature cardiac cells. PMID:27127239

  1. Innate immunity and cardiomyocytes in ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Knowlton, Anne A.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is the most common cause of myocardial inflammation, which is primarily a manifestation of the innate immune responses. Innate immunity is activated when pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) responds to molecular patterns common to microbes and to danger signals expressed by injured or infected cells, so called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). The expression of various PRRs in cardiomyocytes and the release of DAMPs from cardiomyocytes subjected to I/R injury, through active mechanisms as well as passive processes, enable cardiomyocytes to generate innate immune responses. Studies in isolated heart and cardiomyocytes have confirmed the inflammatory and functional effects of cardiac PRRs especially toll-like receptors in response to I/R-derived DAMPs, such as heat shock proteins. This review addresses the active role of cardiomyocytes in mediating innate inflammatory responses to myocardial I/R. We propose that cardiomyocytes act as innate immune cells in myocardial I/R injury. PMID:24486305

  2. Effects of Shenqi Fuzheng injection on Fas/FasL protein expression levels in the cardiomyocytes of a mouse model of viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    WU, TIANMIN; CHEN, JINSHUI; FAN, LIUFANG; XIE, WENYAN; XU, CHANGSHENG; WANG, HUAJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of Shenqi Fuzheng injection (SFI) on Fas and FasL protein expression levels in the cardiomyocytes of mice with viral myocarditis (VMC) and to explore the underlying anti-apoptotic mechanisms. A total of 120 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups as follows: Blank control group, model group, ribavirin group, low-dose SFI group and high-dose SFI group. The VMC model was established by the injection of coxsackievirus group B type 3 and saline, ribavirin or SFI was administered 30 min later. Cardiac samples were harvested from mice in each group on days 3, 10 and 30. Apoptosis of cardiac cells was examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling, and Fas and FasL protein expression levels were detected using immunohistochemistry. Myocardial apoptosis and Fas/FasL protein expression levels were significantly increased in the model group, as compared with the blank group (P<0.01), whereas the apoptotic index (AI) and Fas/FasL protein expression levels of cardiac cells in the high-dose SFI group were significantly decreased compared with those in the model group on day 10 (acute phase; P<0.01). The AI and Fas/FasL protein expression levels of cardiac cells in the low- and high-dose SFI groups were also significantly decreased on day 30 (chronic phase; P<0.01); however, no differences between the high- and low-dose groups were detected. In conclusion, SFI relieves VMC via the downregulation of Fas and FasL protein expression and the inhibition of cell apoptosis. PMID:27168814

  3. Members Only: Hypoxia-Induced Cell-Cycle Activation in Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun; Wu, Sean M

    2015-09-01

    A low level of cardiomyocyte turnover occurs in the adult mammalian heart, but the source of these new cells remains unknown. Kimura et al., 2015 utilized a novel hypoxia-induced fate mapping system to identify a rare population of adult cardiomyocytes undergoing cell-cycle entry and expansion in healthy adult hearts and following ischemic injury. PMID:26331604

  4. Challenges measuring cardiomyocyte renewal

    PubMed Central

    Soonpaa, Mark H.; Rubart, Michael; Field, Loren J.

    2012-01-01

    Interventions to effect therapeutic cardiomyocyte renewal have received considerable interest of late. Such interventions, if successful, could give rise to myocardial regeneration in diseased hearts. Regenerative interventions fall into two broad categories, namely approaches based on promoting renewal of pre-existing cardiomyocytes and approaches based on cardiomyogenic stem cell activity. The latter category can be further subdivided into approaches promoting differentiation of endogenous cardiomyogenic stem cells, approaches wherein cardiomyogenic stem cells are harvested, amplified or enriched ex vivo, and subsequently engrafted into the heart, and approaches wherein an exogenous stem cell is induced to differentiate in vitro, and the resulting cardiomyocytes are engrafted into the heart. There is disagreement in the literature regarding the degree to which cardiomyocyte renewal occurs in the normal and injured heart, the mechanism(s) by which this occurs, and the degree to which therapeutic interventions can enhance regenerative growth. This review discusses several caveats which are encountered when attempting to measure cardiomyocyte renewal in vivo which likely contribute, at least in part, to the disagreement regarding the levels at which this occurs in normal, injured and treated hearts. PMID:23142641

  5. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  6. Discontinuous thoracic venous cardiomyocytes and heart exhibit synchronized developmental switch of troponin isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Kracklauer, Martin P.; Feng, Han-Zhong; Jiang, Wenrui; Lin, Jenny L.-C.; Lin, Jim J.-C.; Jin, J.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte-like cells have been reported in thoracic veins of rodents and other mammals, but their differentiation state and relationship to the muscle mass in the heart remain to be characterized. Here we investigated the distribution, ultrastructure, and the expression and developmental regulation of myofilament proteins in mouse and rat pulmonary and azygos venous cardiomyocytes. Tracing cardiomyocytes in transgenic mouse tissues with a lacZ reporter gene driven by cloned rat cardiac troponin T promoter demonstrated scattered distribution of cardiomyocytes discontinuous from the atrial sleeves. The longitudinal axis of venous cardiomyocytes is perpendicular to that of the vessel. These cells contain typical sarcomere structures and intercalated discs as shown in electron microscopic images and express cardiac isoforms of troponin T, troponin I and myosin. The expression of troponin I isoform genes and the alternative splicing of cardiac troponin T in thoracic venous cardiomyocytes are regulated during postnatal development in a precise synchrony with that in the heart. Nonetheless, the patterns of cardiac troponin T splicing in adult rat thoracic venous cardiomyocytes are slightly but clearly distinct from those in the atrial and ventricular muscles. The data indicate that mouse and rat thoracic venous cardiomyocytes residing in extra-cardiac tissue possess a physiologically differentiated state and an intrinsically preset developmental clock, which are apparently independent of the very different hemodynamic environments and functional features of the vessels and heart. PMID:23176202

  7. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  8. Anti-CD31 delays platelet adhesion/aggregation at sites of endothelial injury in mouse cerebral arterioles.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, W. I.; Murata, S.; Nelson, G. H.; Werner, P. K.; Ranken, R.; Harmon, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The arterioles on the surface of the mouse brain (pial arterioles) were observed by in vivo microscopy. A focus of minor endothelial damage was produced in a single pial arteriole in each mouse by briefly exposing the site to a helium neon laser after an intravenous injection of Evans blue. Mice were injected 10 minutes before injury with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to mouse CD31, also known as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. This treatment doubled (P < .01) the time required for the laser to produce a recognizable platelet aggregate. In additional experiments, an MAb to mouse CD61 and an MAb to mouse intercellular adhesion molecule 1 had no effect. The data support previous observations indicating that platelet adhesion/aggregation in this model is induced by endothelial injury without exposure of basal lamina. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the endothelial injury exposes or activates a platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule on the endothelium which is blocked by the MAb directed against CD31. This may be the first demonstration of an effect of an anti-platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule on platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule on platelet adhesion/aggregation in vivo. PMID:8030753

  9. Anti-CD31 delays platelet adhesion/aggregation at sites of endothelial injury in mouse cerebral arterioles.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, W I; Murata, S; Nelson, G H; Werner, P K; Ranken, R; Harmon, R C

    1994-07-01

    The arterioles on the surface of the mouse brain (pial arterioles) were observed by in vivo microscopy. A focus of minor endothelial damage was produced in a single pial arteriole in each mouse by briefly exposing the site to a helium neon laser after an intravenous injection of Evans blue. Mice were injected 10 minutes before injury with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to mouse CD31, also known as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. This treatment doubled (P < .01) the time required for the laser to produce a recognizable platelet aggregate. In additional experiments, an MAb to mouse CD61 and an MAb to mouse intercellular adhesion molecule 1 had no effect. The data support previous observations indicating that platelet adhesion/aggregation in this model is induced by endothelial injury without exposure of basal lamina. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the endothelial injury exposes or activates a platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule on the endothelium which is blocked by the MAb directed against CD31. This may be the first demonstration of an effect of an anti-platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule on platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule on platelet adhesion/aggregation in vivo. PMID:8030753

  10. Coupling primary and stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes in an in vitro model of cardiac cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Yuan, Hongyan; McCain, Megan L.; Ye, George J.C.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Campbell, Patrick H.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of cardiac cell therapy depends on the integration of existing and newly formed cardiomyocytes. Here, we developed a minimal in vitro model of this interface by engineering two cell microtissues (μtissues) containing mouse cardiomyocytes, representing spared myocardium after injury, and cardiomyocytes generated from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, to model newly formed cells. We demonstrated that weaker stem cell–derived myocytes coupled with stronger myocytes to support synchronous contraction, but this arrangement required focal adhesion-like structures near the cell–cell junction that degrade force transmission between cells. Moreover, we developed a computational model of μtissue mechanics to demonstrate that a reduction in isometric tension is sufficient to impair force transmission across the cell–cell boundary. Together, our in vitro and in silico results suggest that mechanotransductive mechanisms may contribute to the modest functional benefits observed in cell-therapy studies by regulating the amount of contractile force effectively transmitted at the junction between newly formed and spared myocytes. PMID:26858266

  11. MMI-0100 inhibits cardiac fibrosis in myocardial infarction by direct actions on cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts via MK2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Yates, Cecelia C.; Lockyer, Pamela; Xie, Liang; Bevilacqua, Ariana; He, Jun; Lander, Cynthia; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte

    2014-01-01

    The cell-permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), MMI-0100, inhibits MK2 and downstream fibrosis and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that MMI-0100 reduces intimal hyperplasia in a mouse vein graft model, pulmonary fibrosis in a murine bleomycin-induced model and development of adhesions in conjunction with abdominal surgery. MK2 is critical to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart injury as MK2 −/− mice are resistant to ischemic remodeling. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting MK2 with MMI-0100 would protect the heart after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in vivo. AMI was induced by placing a permanent LAD coronary ligation. When MMI-0100 peptide was given 30 minutes after permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, the resulting fibrosis was reduced/prevented ~50% at a 2 week time point, with a corresponding improvement in cardiac function and decrease in left ventricular dilation. In cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, MMI-0100 inhibited MK2 to reduce cardiomyocyte caspase 3/7 activity, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast caspase 3/7 activity, which may explain MMI-0100’s salvage of cardiac function and anti-fibrotic effects in vivo. These findings suggest that therapeutic inhibition of MK2 after acute MI, using rationally-designed cell-permeant peptides, inhibits cardiac fibrosis and maintains cardiac function by mechanisms that involve inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast cell death. PMID:25257914

  12. Coupling primary and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in an in vitro model of cardiac cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Yuan, Hongyan; McCain, Megan L; Ye, George J C; Sheehy, Sean P; Campbell, Patrick H; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-02-15

    The efficacy of cardiac cell therapy depends on the integration of existing and newly formed cardiomyocytes. Here, we developed a minimal in vitro model of this interface by engineering two cell microtissues (μtissues) containing mouse cardiomyocytes, representing spared myocardium after injury, and cardiomyocytes generated from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, to model newly formed cells. We demonstrated that weaker stem cell-derived myocytes coupled with stronger myocytes to support synchronous contraction, but this arrangement required focal adhesion-like structures near the cell-cell junction that degrade force transmission between cells. Moreover, we developed a computational model of μtissue mechanics to demonstrate that a reduction in isometric tension is sufficient to impair force transmission across the cell-cell boundary. Together, our in vitro and in silico results suggest that mechanotransductive mechanisms may contribute to the modest functional benefits observed in cell-therapy studies by regulating the amount of contractile force effectively transmitted at the junction between newly formed and spared myocytes. PMID:26858266

  13. Ca2+ paradox injury mediated through TRPC channels in mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Akiko; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The Ca2+ paradox is an important phenomenon associated with Ca2+ overload-mediated cellular injury in myocardium. The present study was undertaken to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms for the development of the Ca2+ paradox. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Fluorescence imaging was performed on fluo-3 loaded quiescent mouse ventricular myocytes using confocal laser scanning microscope. KEY RESULTS The Ca2+ paradox was readily evoked by restoration of the extracellular Ca2+ following 10–20 min of nominally Ca2+-free superfusion. The Ca2+ paradox was significantly reduced by blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, Gd3+, La3+) and anti-TRPC1 antibody. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content, assessed by caffeine application, gradually declined during Ca2+-free superfusion, which was further accelerated by metabolic inhibition. Block of SR Ca2+ leak by tetracaine prevented Ca2+ paradox. The Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX) blocker KB-R7943 significantly inhibited Ca2+ paradox when applied throughout superfusion period, but had little effect when added for a period of 3 min before and during Ca2+ restoration. The SR Ca2+ content was better preserved during Ca2+ depletion by KB-R7943. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the expression of TRPC1, in addition to TRPC3 and TRPC4, in mouse ventricular myocytes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results provide evidence that (i) the Ca2+ paradox is primarily mediated by Ca2+ entry through TRPC (probably TRPC1) channels that are presumably activated by SR Ca2+ depletion; and (ii) reverse mode NCX contributes little to the Ca2+ paradox, whereas inhibition of NCX during Ca2+ depletion improves SR Ca2+ loading, and is associated with reduced incidence of Ca2+ paradox in mouse ventricular myocytes. PMID:20718730

  14. Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Guillory, Ashley N.; Clayton, Robert P.; Herndon, David N.; Finnerty, Celeste C.

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn profoundly affects organs both proximal and distal to the actual burn site. Cardiovascular dysfunction is a well-documented phenomenon that increases morbidity and mortality following a massive thermal trauma. Beginning immediately post-burn, during the ebb phase, cardiac function is severely depressed. By 48 h post-injury, cardiac function rebounds and the post-burn myocardium becomes tachycardic and hyperinflammatory. While current clinical trials are investigating a variety of drugs targeted at reducing aspects of the post-burn hypermetabolic response such as heart rate and cardiac work, there is still a paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce cardiac dysfunction in the severely burned. There are many animal models of burn injury, from rodents, to sheep or swine, but the majority of burn related cardiovascular investigations have occurred in rat and mouse models. This literature review consolidates the data supporting the prevalent role that β-adrenergic receptors play in mediating post-burn cardiac dysfunction and the idea that pharmacological modulation of this receptor family is a viable therapeutic target for resolving burn-induced cardiac deficits. PMID:26729111

  15. Brain injury-induced proteolysis is reduced in a novel calpastatin overexpressing transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Kathleen M.; von Reyn, Catherine R.; Bian, Jifeng; Telling, Glenn C.; Meaney, David F.; Saatman, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    The calpain family of calcium-dependent proteases has been implicated in a variety of diseases and neurodegenerative pathologies. Prolonged activation of calpains results in proteolysis of numerous cellular substrates including cytoskeletal components and membrane receptors, contributing to cell demise despite coincident expression of calpastatin, the specific inhibitor of calpains. Pharmacological and gene knockout strategies have targeted calpains to determine their contribution to neurodegenerative pathology; however, limitations associated with treatment paradigms, drug specificity, and genetic disruptions have produced inconsistent results and complicated interpretation. Specific, targeted calpain inhibition achieved by enhancing endogenous calpastatin levels offers unique advantages in studying pathological calpain activation. We have characterized a novel calpastatin overexpressing transgenic mouse model, demonstrating a substantial increase in calpastatin expression within nervous system and peripheral tissues and associated reduction in protease activity. Experimental activation of calpains via traumatic brain injury resulted in cleavage of α-spectrin, collapsin response mediator protein-2, and voltage-gated sodium channel, critical proteins for the maintenance of neuronal structure and function. Calpastatin overexpression significantly attenuated calpain-mediated proteolysis of these selected substrates acutely following severe controlled cortical impact injury, but with no effect on acute hippocampal neurodegeneration. Augmenting calpastatin levels may be an effective method for calpain inhibition in TBI and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23305291

  16. Gangliosides and ceramides change in a mouse model of blast induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Woods, Amina S; Colsch, Benoit; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Baldwin, Kathrine; Roux, Aurelie; Hoffer, Barry; Cox, Brian M; Hoffer, Michael; Rubovitch, Vardit; Pick, Chaim G; Schultz, J Albert; Balaban, Carey

    2013-04-17

    Explosive detonations generate atmospheric pressure changes that produce nonpenetrating blast induced "mild" traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The structural basis for mild bTBI has been extremely controversial. The present study applies matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging to track the distribution of gangliosides in mouse brain tissue that were exposed to very low level of explosive detonations (2.5-5.5 psi peak overpressure). We observed major increases of the ganglioside GM2 in the hippocampus, thalamus, and hypothalamus after a single blast exposure. Moreover, these changes were accompanied by depletion of ceramides. No neurological or brain structural signs of injury could be inferred using standard light microscopic techniques. The first source of variability is generated by the Latency between blast and tissue sampling (peak intensity of the blast wave). These findings suggest that subtle molecular changes in intracellular membranes and plasmalemma compartments may be biomarkers for biological responses to mild bTBI. This is also the first report of a GM2 increase in the brains of mature mice from a nongenetic etiology. PMID:23590251

  17. Glial cells in the mouse enteric nervous system can undergo neurogenesis in response to injury

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Catia; Sandgren, Katarina; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Richardson, William; Potocnik, Alexandre; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2011-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) in mammals forms from neural crest cells during embryogenesis and early postnatal life. Nevertheless, multipotent progenitors of the ENS can be identified in the adult intestine using clonal cultures and in vivo transplantation assays. The identity of these neurogenic precursors in the adult gut and their relationship to the embryonic progenitors of the ENS are currently unknown. Using genetic fate mapping, we here demonstrate that mouse neural crest cells marked by SRY box–containing gene 10 (Sox10) generate the neuronal and glial lineages of enteric ganglia. Most neurons originated from progenitors residing in the gut during mid-gestation. Afterward, enteric neurogenesis was reduced, and it ceased between 1 and 3 months of postnatal life. Sox10-expressing cells present in the myenteric plexus of adult mice expressed glial markers, and we found no evidence that these cells participated in neurogenesis under steady-state conditions. However, they retained neurogenic potential, as they were capable of generating neurons with characteristics of enteric neurons in culture. Furthermore, enteric glia gave rise to neurons in vivo in response to chemical injury to the enteric ganglia. Our results indicate that despite the absence of constitutive neurogenesis in the adult gut, enteric glia maintain limited neurogenic potential, which can be activated by tissue dissociation or injury. PMID:21865647

  18. Neutrophils and their Fcγ receptors are essential in a mouse model of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Su, Xiao; Van Ziffle, Jessica A.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most common cause of transfusion-related mortality. To explore the pathogenesis of TRALI, we developed an in vivo mouse model based on the passive transfusion of an MHC class I (MHC I) mAb (H2Kd) to mice with the cognate antigen. Transfusion of the MHC I mAb to BALB/c mice produced acute lung injury with increased excess lung water, increased lung vascular and lung epithelial permeability to protein, and decreased alveolar fluid clearance. There was 50% mortality at a 2-hour time point after Ab administration. Pulmonary histology and immunohistochemistry revealed prominent neutrophil sequestration in the lung microvasculature that occurred concomitantly with acute peripheral blood neutropenia, all within 2 hours of administration of the mAb. Depletion of neutrophils by injection of anti-granulocyte mAb Gr-1 protected mice from lung injury following MHC I mAb challenge. FcRγ–/– mice were resistant to MHC I mAb–induced lung injury, while adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into the FcRγ–/– animals restored lung injury following MHC I mAb challenge. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant in vivo mouse model of TRALI using an MHC I mAb, the mechanism of lung injury was dependent on neutrophils and their Fcγ receptors. PMID:16710475

  19. In vivo characterization of early-stage radiation skin injury in a mouse model by two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Hyuk; Shim, Sehwan; Wang, Taejun; Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won-Suk; Myung, Jae Kyung; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) injury is tissue damage caused by high energy electromagnetic waves such as X-ray and gamma ray. Diagnosis and treatment of IR injury are difficult due to its characteristics of clinically latent post-irradiation periods and the following successive and unpredictable inflammatory bursts. Skin is one of the many sensitive organs to IR and bears local injury upon exposure. Early-stage diagnosis of IR skin injury is essential in order to maximize treatment efficiency and to prevent the aggravation of IR injury. In this study, early-stage changes of the IR injured skin at the cellular level were characterized in an in vivo mouse model by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Various IR doses were applied to the mouse hind limbs and the injured skin regions were imaged daily for 6 days after IR irradiation. Changes in the morphology and distribution of the epidermal cells and damage of the sebaceous glands were observed before clinical symptoms. These results showed that TPM is sensitive to early-stage changes of IR skin injury and may be useful for its diagnosis. PMID:26755422

  20. In vivo characterization of early-stage radiation skin injury in a mouse model by two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Won Hyuk; Shim, Sehwan; Wang, Taejun; Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won-Suk; Myung, Jae Kyung; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) injury is tissue damage caused by high energy electromagnetic waves such as X-ray and gamma ray. Diagnosis and treatment of IR injury are difficult due to its characteristics of clinically latent post-irradiation periods and the following successive and unpredictable inflammatory bursts. Skin is one of the many sensitive organs to IR and bears local injury upon exposure. Early-stage diagnosis of IR skin injury is essential in order to maximize treatment efficiency and to prevent the aggravation of IR injury. In this study, early-stage changes of the IR injured skin at the cellular level were characterized in an in vivo mouse model by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Various IR doses were applied to the mouse hind limbs and the injured skin regions were imaged daily for 6 days after IR irradiation. Changes in the morphology and distribution of the epidermal cells and damage of the sebaceous glands were observed before clinical symptoms. These results showed that TPM is sensitive to early-stage changes of IR skin injury and may be useful for its diagnosis. PMID:26755422

  1. Drinking Citrus Fruit Juice Inhibits Vascular Remodeling in Cuff-Induced Vascular Injury Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-no, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  2. Ginsenoside Rd alleviates mouse acute renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by modulating macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Kaixi; Jin, Chao; Ma, Pengfei; Ren, Qinyou; Jia, Zhansheng; Zhu, Daocheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Ginsenoside Rd (GSRd), a main component of the root of Panax ginseng, exhibits anti-inflammation functions and decreases infarct size in many injuries and ischemia diseases such as focal cerebral ischemia. M1 Macrophages are regarded as one of the key inflammatory cells having functions for disease progression. Methods To investigate the effect of GSRd on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and macrophage functional status, and their regulatory role on mouse polarized macrophages in vitro, GSRd (10–100 mg/kg) and vehicle were applied to mice 30 min before renal IRI modeling. Renal functions were reflected by blood serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level and histopathological examination. M1 polarized macrophages infiltration was identified by flow cytometry analysis and immunofluorescence staining with CD11b+, iNOS+/interleukin-12/tumor necrosis factor-α labeling. For the in vitro study, GSRd (10–100 μg/mL) and vehicle were added in the culture medium of M1 macrophages to assess their regulatory function on polarization phenotype. Results In vivo data showed a protective role of GSRd at 50 mg/kg on Day 3. Serum level of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen significantly dropped compared with other groups. Reduced renal tissue damage and M1 macrophage infiltration showed on hematoxylin–eosin staining and flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining confirmed this improvement. With GSRd administration, in vitro cultured M1 macrophages secreted less inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, macrophage polarization-related pancake-like morphology gradually changed along with increasing concentration of GSRd in the medium. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that GSRd possess a protective function against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury via downregulating M1 macrophage polarization. PMID:27158241

  3. Drinking citrus fruit juice inhibits vascular remodeling in cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  4. Autophagy Modulation by Lanthionine Ketimine Ethyl Ester Improves Long-Term Outcome after Central Fluid Percussion Injury in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Kenneth; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Johnson, Ming F; Eslami, Pirooz; Gabbita, S Prasad; Hristov, Alexandar M; Venkova-Hristova, Kalina M; Harris-White, Marni E

    2016-08-15

    Diffuse axonal injury is recognized as a progressive and long-term consequence of traumatic brain injury. Axonal injury can have sustained negative consequences on neuronal functions such as anterograde and retrograde transport and cellular processes such as autophagy that depend on cytoarchitecture and axon integrity. These changes can lead to somatic atrophy and an inability to repair and promote plasticity. Obstruction of the autophagic process has been noted after brain injury, and rapamycin, a drug used to stimulate autophagy, has demonstrated positive effects in brain injury models. The optimization of drugs to promote beneficial autophagy without negative side effects could be used to attenuate traumatic brain injury and promote improved outcome. Lanthionine ketimine ethyl ester, a bioavailable derivative of a natural sulfur amino acid metabolite, has demonstrated effects on autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. Thirty minutes after a moderate central fluid percussion injury and throughout the survival period, lanthionine ketimine ethyl ester was administered, and mice were subsequently evaluated for learning and memory impairments and biochemical and histological changes over a 5-week period. Lanthionine ketimine ethyl ester, which we have shown previously to modulate autophagy markers and alleviate pathology and slow cognitive decline in the 3 × TgAD mouse model, spared cognition and pathology after central fluid percussion injury through a mechanism involving autophagy modulation. PMID:26530250

  5. Differential Expression Levels of Integrin α6 Enable the Selective Identification and Isolation of Atrial and Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wiencierz, Anne Maria; Kernbach, Manuel; Ecklebe, Josephine; Monnerat, Gustavo; Tomiuk, Stefan; Raulf, Alexandra; Christalla, Peter; Malan, Daniela; Hesse, Michael; Bosio, Andreas; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Eckardt, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Central questions such as cardiomyocyte subtype emergence during cardiogenesis or the availability of cardiomyocyte subtypes for cell replacement therapy require selective identification and purification of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes. However, current methodologies do not allow for a transgene-free selective isolation of atrial or ventricular cardiomyocytes due to the lack of subtype specific cell surface markers. Methods and Results In order to develop cell surface marker-based isolation procedures for cardiomyocyte subtypes, we performed an antibody-based screening on embryonic mouse hearts. Our data indicate that atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized by differential expression of integrin α6 (ITGA6) throughout development and in the adult heart. We discovered that the expression level of this surface marker correlates with the intracellular subtype-specific expression of MLC-2a and MLC-2v on the single cell level and thereby enables the discrimination of cardiomyocyte subtypes by flow cytometry. Based on the differential expression of ITGA6 in atria and ventricles during cardiogenesis, we developed purification protocols for atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse hearts. Atrial and ventricular identities of sorted cells were confirmed by expression profiling and patch clamp analysis. Conclusion Here, we introduce a non-genetic, antibody-based approach to specifically isolate highly pure and viable atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse hearts of various developmental stages. This will facilitate in-depth characterization of the individual cellular subsets and support translational research applications. PMID:26618511

  6. Transcriptional and Functional Profiling of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoyan; Fu, Ji-Dong; Drukker, Micha; Lee, Andrew; Li, Ronald A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can serve as a potentially limitless source of cells that may enable regeneration of diseased tissue and organs. Here we investigate the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in promoting recovery from cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury in a mouse model. Using microarrays, we have described the hESC-CM transcriptome within the spectrum of changes that occur between undifferentiated hESCs and fetal heart cells. The hESC-CMs expressed cardiomyocyte genes at levels similar to those found in 20-week fetal heart cells, making this population a good source of potential replacement cells in vivo. Echocardiographic studies showed significant improvement in heart function by 8 weeks after transplantation. Finally, we demonstrate long-term engraftment of hESC-CMs by using molecular imaging to track cellular localization, survival, and proliferation in vivo. Taken together, global gene expression profiling of hESC differentiation enables a systems-based analysis of the biological processes, networks, and genes that drive hESC fate decisions, and studies such as this will serve as the foundation for future clinical applications of stem cell therapies. PMID:18941512

  7. Zinc-induced metallothionein overexpression prevents doxorubicin toxicity in cardiomyocytes by regulating the peroxiredoxins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Li, Lizhong; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Zhiwei; Peng, Shuangqing

    2016-08-01

    1. Cardiotoxicity is an important factor that limits the clinical use of doxorubicin (Dox). Metallothionein (MT) can antagonize the Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Using a proteomics approach we have detected that major peroxiredoxins (Prxs) may be involved in this process. In the present study, we further investigate the mechanisms of the MT effects against Dox-induced cytotoxicity and the interactions between MT and Prxs. 2. We have established a primary cardiomyocyte culture system from MT-I/II null (MT(-/-)) and corresponding wild type (MT(+/+)) neonatal mice, and pretreated the MT(+/+) cardiomyocytes with ZnCl2 to establish the MT overexpression cardiomyocyte model. 3. Based on the results, in MT(+/+) cardiomyocytes, ZnCl2 pretreatment significantly increased the cardiomyocytes MT levels and inhibited the cardiotoxicity of Dox; it can resist LDH leakage, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, DNA damage, ROS accumulation and inhibit the decrease in activity of antioxidant enzymes induced by Dox. Moreover, ZnCl2 enhanced the expression of Prx-2, -3, -5 and -6, it can inhibit the expression of Prxs decrease in MT(+/+) cardiomyocytes induced by Dox, but had no effect in MT(-/-) cardiomyocytes. 4. Therefore, the present study suggests that ZnCl2 can protect the cardiomyocytes from the Dox-induced oxidative injury and can inhibit the changes in Prxs expression through induced MT overexpression. PMID:26599915

  8. Obesity does not aggravate vitrification injury in mouse embryos: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with poor reproductive outcomes, but few reports have examined thawed embryo transfer in obese women. Many studies have shown that increased lipid accumulation aggravates vitrification injury in porcine and bovine embryos, but oocytes of these species have high lipid contents (63 ng and 161 ng, respectively). Almost nothing is known about lipids in human oocytes except that these cells are anecdotally known to be relatively lipid poor. In this regard, human oocytes are considered to be similar to those of the mouse, which contain approximately 4 ng total lipids/oocyte. To date, no available data show the impact of obesity on vitrification in mouse embryos. The aim of this study was to establish a murine model of maternal diet-induced obesity and to characterize the effect of obesity on vitrification by investigating the survival rate and embryo developmental competence after thawing. Methods Prospective comparisons were performed between six–eight-cell embryos from obese and normal-weight mice and between fresh and vitrified embryos. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed standard rodent chow (normal-weight group) or a high-fat diet (obese group) for 6 weeks. The mice were mated, zygotes were collected from oviducts and cultured for 3 days, and six–eight-cell embryos were then selected to assess lipid content in fresh embryos and to evaluate differences in apoptosis, survival, and development rates in response to vitrification. Results In fresh embryos from obese mice, the lipid content (0.044 vs 0.030, P<0.01) and apoptosis rate (15.1% vs.9.3%, P<0.05)were significantly higher, the survival rate (83.1% vs. 93.1%, P<0.01) on day 5 was significantly lower, and embryo development was notably delayed on days 3–5 compared with the normal-weight group. After vitrification, no significant difference was found between thawed embryos from obese and normal-weight mice in apoptosis, survival, and development rates on days 4 and 5. In both groups

  9. Differences in Liver Injury and Trophoblastic Mitochondrial Damage in Different Preeclampsia-like Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi-Wei; Yang, Zi; Ding, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia is a multifactorial disease during pregnancy. Dysregulated lipid metabolism may be related to some preeclampsia. We investigated the relationship between triglycerides (TGs) and liver injury in different preeclampsia-like mouse models and their potential common pathways. Methods: Preeclampsia-like models (Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester [L-NAME], lipopolysaccharide [LPS], apolipoprotein C-III [Apo] transgnic mice + L-NAME, β2 glycoprotein I [βGPI]) were used in four experimental groups: L-NAME (LN), LPS, Apo-LN and βGPI, respectively, and controls received saline (LN-C, LPS-C, Apo-C, βGPI-C). The first three models were established in preimplantation (PI), early-, mid- and late-gestation (EG, MG and LG). βGPI and controls were injected before implantation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), 24-hour urine protein, placental and fetal weight, serum TGs, total cholesterol (TC) and pathologic liver and trophocyte changes were assessed. Results: MAP and proteinuria were significantly increased in the experimental groups. Placenta and fetal weight in PI, EP and MP subgroups were significantly lower than LP. Serum TGs significantly increased in most groups but controls. TC was not different between experimental and control groups. Spotty hepatic cell necrosis was observed in PI, EG, MG in LN, Apo-LN and βGPI, but no morphologic changes were observed in the LPS group. Similar trophoblastic mitochondrial damage was observed in every experimental group. Conclusions: Earlier preeclampsia onset causes a higher MAP and urine protein level, and more severe placental and fetal damage. Preeclampsia-like models generated by varied means lead to different changes in lipid metabolism and associated with liver injury. Trophoblastic mitochondrial damage may be the common terminal pathway in different preeclampsia-like models. PMID:26063365

  10. Oral Administration of Ginseng Ameliorates Cyclosporine-Induced Pancreatic Injury in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Jin, Long; Piao, Shang Guo; Heo, Seong Beom; Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Kyung; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate whether ginseng has a protective effect in an experimental mouse model of cyclosporine-induced pancreatic injury. Methods Mice were treated with cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and Korean red ginseng extract (0.2 or 0.4 g/kg/day, oral gavage) for 4 weeks while on a 0.01% salt diet. The effect of ginseng on cyclosporine-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction was investigated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and measurements of serum insulin level, β cell area, macrophage infiltration, and apoptosis. Using an in vitro model, we further examined the effect of ginseng on a cyclosporine-treated insulin-secreting cell line. Oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in serum, tissue sections, and culture media. Results Four weeks of cyclosporine treatment increased blood glucose levels and decreased insulin levels, but cotreatment with ginseng ameliorated the cyclosporine-induced glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Pancreatic β cell area was also greater with ginseng cotreatment compared with cyclosporine monotherapy. The production of proinflammatory molecules, such as induced nitric oxide synthase and cytokines, and the level of apoptotic cell death also decreased in pancreatic β cell with ginseng treatment. Consistent with the in vivo results, the in vitro study showed that the addition of ginseng protected against cyclosporine-induced cytotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptotic cell death. These in vivo and in vitro changes were accompanied by decreases in the levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in pancreatic β cell in tissue section, serum, and culture media during cotreatment of ginseng with cyclosporine. Conclusions The results of our in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that ginseng has a protective effect against cyclosporine-induced pancreatic β cell injury via reducing oxidative stress. PMID:24009697

  11. Molecular mechanisms of cardiomyocyte regeneration and therapeutic outlook.

    PubMed

    Germani, Antonia; Di Rocco, Giuliana; Limana, Federica; Martelli, Fabio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2007-03-01

    Differently from some lower vertebrates, which can completely regenerate their heart, in higher vertebrates cardiac injury generally leads to progressive failure. Induction of cycle re-entry in terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes and stem-cell transplantation are strategies to increase the regenerative potential of the heart. As experimental and clinical studies progress, demonstrating that adult stem-cell administration has a favorable impact on myocardial function, the identification of cardiac stem cells suggests that some endogenous repair mechanisms actually exist in the mammalian heart. However, a deeper understanding of the mechanism that drives cardiomyocyte proliferation and stem-cell-mediated cardiac repair is required to translate such strategies into effective therapies. PMID:17257896

  12. Genetics of Cardiac Developmental Disorders: Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Growth and Relevance to Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Wilsbacher, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-23

    Cardiac developmental disorders represent the most common of human birth defects, and anomalies in cardiomyocyte proliferation drive many of these disorders. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms of prenatal cardiac growth. Trabeculation represents the initial ventricular growth phase and is necessary for embryonic survival. Later in development, the bulk of the ventricular wall derives from the compaction process, yet the arrest of this process can still be compatible with life. Cardiomyocyte proliferation and growth form the basis of both trabeculation and compaction, and mouse models indicate that cardiomyocyte interactions with the surrounding environment are critical for these proliferative processes. The human genetics of left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy suggest that cardiomyocyte cell-autonomous mechanisms contribute to the compaction process. Understanding the determinants of prenatal or early postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation and growth provides critical information that identifies risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including heart failure and its associated complications of arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. PMID:26925501

  13. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  14. Laser injury and in vivo multimodal imaging using a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Gupta, Praveena; Oliver, Jeff W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2011-03-01

    Balb/c wild type mice were used to perform in vivo experiments of laser-induced thermal damage to the retina. A Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer was used to obtain fundus and cross-sectional images of laser induced injury in the retina. Sub-threshold, threshold, and supra-threshold lesions were observed using optical coherence tomography (OCT), infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, fluorescence angiography, and autofluorescence imaging modalities at different time points post-exposure. Lesions observed using all imaging modalities, except autofluorescence, were not visible immediately after exposure but did resolve within an hour and grew in size over a 24 hour period. There was a decrease in fundus autofluorescence at exposure sites immediately following exposure that developed into hyper-fluorescence 24-48 hours later. OCT images revealed threshold damage that was localized to the RPE but extended into the neural retina over a 24 hour period. Volumetric representations of the mouse retina were created to visualize the extent of damage within the retina over a 24 hour period. Multimodal imaging provides complementary information regarding damage mechanisms that may be used to quantify the extent of the damage as well as the effectiveness of treatments without need for histology.

  15. Rapamycin Attenuates Mouse Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Hua, X; Li, D; Zhang, J; Xia, Q

    2015-01-01

    The roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in liver ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) have been well recognized. However, the impact of rapamycin (Rapa), a broadly used immunosuppressive agent in human liver transplantation, on ER stress during IRI remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the roles of Rapa in the regulation of ER stress in vivo and in vitro. In a mouse liver partial warm ischemia and reperfusion mode, we demonstrated that Rapa markedly protected livers from IRI, as evidenced by serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) levels and liver histology. Then we also confirmed the protection of Rapa from thapsigargin (Tg)-induced cell death in primary hepatocytes. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the ER stress markers were markedly up-regulated by IRI and Tg treatment, whereas they were down-regulated by Rapa pretreatment, as monitored by Western blot at the protein levels and by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. In addition, it was also revealed that Rapa was able to remarkably inhibit the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and enhance autophagy both in IR-stressed livers and Tg-treated primary hepatocytes. Thus, these results suggest that Rapa protects livers from IRI through inhibiting the ER stress pathway. PMID:26293028

  16. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  17. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation. PMID:26617279

  18. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  19. Toll Like Receptor 4 Dependent Kupffer Cell Activation and Liver Injury in a Novel Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Fillon, Sophie A.; Harris, J. Kirk; Lovell, Mark A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with intestinal failure who are parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent may develop cholestatic liver injury and cirrhosis (PN-associated liver injury: PNALI). The pathogenesis of PNALI remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that intestinal injury with increased intestinal permeability combined with administration of PN promotes LPS-TLR4 signaling dependent Kupffer cell activation as an early event in the pathogenesis of PNALI. We developed a mouse model in which intestinal injury and increased permeability were induced by oral treatment for 4 days with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) followed by continuous infusion of soy lipid-based PN solution through a central venous catheter for 7 (PN/DSS7d) and 28 (PN/DSS28d) days. Liver injury and cholestasis were evaluated by serum AST, ALT, bile acids, total bilirubin, and by histology. Purified Kupffer cells were probed for transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PN/DSS7d mice showed elevated portal vein LPS levels, evidence of hepatocyte injury and cholestasis, and increased Kupffer cell expression of IL6, TNFα, and TGFβ. Serological markers of liver injury remained elevated in PN/DSS28d mice associated with focal inflammation, hepatocyte apoptosis, peliosis, and Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. PN infusion without DSS pre-treatment or DSS pre-treatment alone did not result in liver injury or Kupffer cell activation. Suppression of the intestinal microbiota with broad spectrum antibiotics or ablation of TLR4 signaling in TLR4 mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced Kupffer cell activation and markedly attenuated liver injury in PN/DSS7d mice. Conclusion These data suggest that intestinal-derived LPS activates Kupffer cells through TLR4 signaling in early stages of PNALI. PMID:22120983

  20. Glucocorticoid signaling in the heart: A cardiomyocyte perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Robert H; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death in the Western world. Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones that regulate a vast array of biological processes, and synthetic derivatives of these steroids have been mainstays in the clinic for the last half century. Abnormal levels of glucocorticoids are known to negatively impact the cardiovascular system; however, surprisingly little is known about the direct role of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart. The actions of glucocorticoids are mediated classically by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In certain cells, such as cardiomyocytes, glucocorticoid occupancy and activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) may also contribute to the observed response. Recently, there has been a surge of reports investigating the in vivo function of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart using transgenic mice that specifically target GR or MR in cardiomyocytes. Results from these studies suggest that GR signaling in cardiomyocytes is critical for the normal development and function of the heart. In contrast, MR signaling in cardiomyocytes participates in the development and progression of cardiac disease. In the following review, we discuss these genetic mouse models and the new insights they are providing into the direct role cardiomyocyte glucocorticoid signaling plays in heart physiology and pathophysiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid Perspectives'. PMID:25804222

  1. Profilin modulates sarcomeric organization and mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Viola; Viswanathan, Meera C.; Lee, Dong I.; Rainer, Peter P.; Schmidt, William; Kronert, William A.; Harding, Sian E.; Kass, David A.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Aims Heart failure is often preceded by cardiac hypertrophy, which is characterized by increased cell size, altered protein abundance, and actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Profilin is a well-conserved, ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional actin-binding protein, and its role in cardiomyocytes is largely unknown. Given its involvement in vascular hypertrophy, we aimed to test the hypothesis that profilin-1 is a key mediator of cardiomyocyte-specific hypertrophic remodelling. Methods and results Profilin-1 was elevated in multiple mouse models of hypertrophy, and a cardiomyocyte-specific increase of profilin in Drosophila resulted in significantly larger heart tube dimensions. Moreover, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of profilin-1 in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) induced a hypertrophic response, measured by increased myocyte size and gene expression. Profilin-1 silencing suppressed the response in NRVMs stimulated with phenylephrine or endothelin-1. Mechanistically, we found that profilin-1 regulates hypertrophy, in part, through activation of the ERK1/2 signalling cascade. Confocal microscopy showed that profilin localized to the Z-line of Drosophila myofibrils under normal conditions and accumulated near the M-line when overexpressed. Elevated profilin levels resulted in elongated sarcomeres, myofibrillar disorganization, and sarcomeric disarray, which correlated with impaired muscle function. Conclusion Our results identify novel roles for profilin as an important mediator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We show that overexpression of profilin is sufficient to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and sarcomeric remodelling, and silencing of profilin attenuates the hypertrophic response. PMID:26956799

  2. Ultrastructure and stereology of cardiomyocytes in the development of regenerative and plastic myocardial insufficiency during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Lushnikova, E L; Molodykh, N A; Klinnikova, M G; Molodykh, O P

    2011-05-01

    The age-related features of ultrastructural reorganization of cardiomyocytes were studied in rats with anthracycline-induced injury. The development of regenerative and plastic insufficiency of cardiomyocytes in animals of various age groups was accompanied by stereotypic ultrastructural reorganization. The major changes concerned the nucleus, myofibrillar compartment, and rough sarcoplasmic reticulum. Intracellular reorganization of cardiomyocytes in young animals was observed in the same period, but included a greater decrease in the volume density of myofibrils as compared to that in old rats. The recovery of cardiomyocyte ultrastructure in young animals occurred in the earlier period. Cardiomyocytes of old rats were characterized by greater structural modification of mitochondria and considerable area of lytic changes in myofibrillar bundles. Cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in young animals was manifested in severe destruction of the capillary endothelium, which occurred in the early period after treatment. PMID:22442810

  3. Metformin protects against hyperglycemia-induced cardiomyocytes injury by inhibiting the expressions of receptor for advanced glycation end products and high mobility group box 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Hu, Xiaorong; Cai, Yuli; Yi, Bo; Wen, Zhongyuan

    2014-03-01

    Metformin (MET), an anti-diabetic oral drug with antioxidant properties, has been proved to provide cardioprotective effects in patients with diabetic disease. However, the mechanism is unclear. This study aimd to investigate the effects of MET on the expressions of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in hyperglycemia-treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Cardiocytes were prepared and cultured with high glucose and different concentrations of MET. The expressions of RAGE and HMGB1 were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured. After 12 h-incubation, MET significantly inhibited the increase of MDA, TNF-α, LDH and CK levels induced by high glucose, especially at the 5 × 10(-5) to 10(-4 )mol/L concentrations while inhibiting the decrease of SOD level. Meanwhile, RAGE and HMGB1 expression were significantly increased induced by hyperglycaemia for 24 h (P < 0.05). MET inhibited the expressions of RAGE and HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner, especially at the 5 × 10(-5) to 10(-4 )mol/L concentrations (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our study suggested that MET could reduce hyperglycemia-induced cardiocytes injury by inhibiting the expressions of RAGE and HMGB1. PMID:24420848

  4. Effect of heat shock pretreatment on apoptosis and metallothionein expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Sha, Ming-Lei; Yao, Yu-Ting; Da, Jia; Ni, Xiu-Shi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of heat shock pretreatment on apoptosis and mitochondrial metallothionein (MT) expression in rat cardiomyocytes. In vitro cultured H9C2 cells were randomly divided into three groups: control, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) injury, and H2O2 injury after heat shock pretreatment (n = 6 per group). Cardiomyocyte apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were assayed after treatment. Mitochondrial cytochrome (cyt) c and MT expression was assayed by Western blotting. Compared with the control group, the H2O2 injury group had a growing number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes (P < 0.01) and significantly elevated caspase-3 activity (P < 0.01) with markedly increased mitochondrial cyt c and MT expression (P < 0.01). After heat shock pretreatment, the numbers of apoptotic and necrotic cardiomyocytes (P < 0.01) and the caspase-3 activity significantly declined (P < 0.01), while mitochondrial cyt c and MT expression continued to increase (P < 0.01) compared with the H2O2 injury group. Heat shock pretreatment inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which may have a protective effect on cardiomyocytes by increasing the expression of myocardial protective MT and reducing the release of mitochondrial cyt c. PMID:26221315

  5. MEF2D deficiency in neonatal cardiomyocytes triggers cell cycle re-entry and programmed cell death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Nelsa L; Clark, Amanda L; Desjardins, Cody A; Nocco, Sarah E; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-10-01

    The cardiomyocyte cell cycle is a poorly understood process. Mammalian cardiomyocytes permanently withdraw from the cell cycle shortly after birth but can re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate when subjected to injury within a brief temporal window in the neonatal period. Thus, investigating the mechanisms of cell cycle regulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes may provide critical insight into the molecular events that prevent adult myocytes from proliferating in response to injury or stress. MEF2D is a key transcriptional mediator of pathological remodeling in the adult heart downstream of various stress-promoting insults. However, the specific gene programs regulated by MEF2D in cardiomyocytes are unknown. By performing genome-wide transcriptome analysis using MEF2D-depleted neonatal cardiomyocytes, we found a significant impairment in the cell cycle, characterized by the up-regulation of numerous positive cell cycle regulators. Expression of Pten, the primary negative regulator of PI3K/Akt, was significantly reduced in MEF2D-deficient cardiomyocytes and found to be a direct target gene of MEF2D. Consistent with these findings mutant cardiomyocytes showed activation of the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Paradoxically, prolonged deficiency of MEF2D in neonatal cardiomyocytes did not trigger proliferation but instead resulted in programmed cell death, which is likely mediated by the E2F transcription factor. These results demonstrate a critical role for MEF2D in cell cycle regulation of post-mitotic, neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. PMID:26294766

  6. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the injured zebrafish and mouse hearts identifies miRNA-dependent repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Stefania; Nemir, Mohamed; Ounzain, Samir; Ibberson, Mark; Berthonneche, Corinne; Sarre, Alexandre; Boisset, Gaëlle; Maison, Damien; Harshman, Keith; Xenarios, Ioannis; Diviani, Dario; Schorderet, Daniel; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Aims The adult mammalian heart has poor regenerative capacity. In contrast, the zebrafish heart retains a robust capacity for regeneration into adulthood. These distinct responses are consequences of a differential utilization of evolutionary-conserved gene regulatory networks in the damaged heart. To systematically identify miRNA-dependent networks controlling cardiac repair following injury, we performed comparative gene and miRNA profiling of the cardiac transcriptome in adult mice and zebrafish. Methods and results Using an integrated approach, we show that 45 miRNA-dependent networks, involved in critical biological pathways, are differentially modulated in the injured zebrafish vs. mouse hearts. We study, more particularly, the miR-26a-dependent response. Therefore, miR-26a is down-regulated in the fish heart after injury, whereas its expression remains constant in the mouse heart. Targets of miR-26a involve activators of the cell cycle and Ezh2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Importantly, PRC2 exerts repressive functions on negative regulators of the cell cycle. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, inhibition of miR-26a stimulates, therefore, cardiomyocyte proliferation. Accordingly, miR-26a knockdown prolongs the proliferative window of cardiomyocytes in the post-natal mouse heart. Conclusions This novel strategy identifies a series of miRNAs and associated pathways, in particular miR-26a, which represent attractive therapeutic targets for inducing repair in the injured heart. PMID:26857418

  7. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3–V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents. PMID:25957290

  8. C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 2 Promotes Graft Injury via the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition After Mouse Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Theruvath, T. P.; Czerny, C.; Ramshesh, V. K.; Zhong, Z.; Chavin, K. D.; Lemasters, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway enhances graft injury after liver transplantation (LT). We hypothesized that the JNK2 isoform promotes graft injury via the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Livers of C57BL/6J (wild-type, WT) and JNK2 knockout (KO) mice were transplanted into WT recipients after 30 h of cold storage in UW solution. Injury after implantation was assessed by serum ALT, histological necrosis, TUNEL, Caspase 3 activity, 30-day survival, and cytochrome c and 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining. Multiphoton microscopy after LT monitored mitochondrial membrane potential in vivo. After LT, ALT increased three times more in WT compared to KO (p < 0.05). Necrosis and TUNEL were more than two times greater in WT than KO (p < 0.05). Immunostaining showed a >80% decrease of mitochondrial cytochrome c release in KO compared to WT (p < 0.01). Lipid peroxidation was similarly decreased. Every KO graft but one survived longer than all WT grafts (p < 0.05, Kaplan-Meier). After LT, depolarization of mitochondria occurred in 73% of WT hepatocytes, which decreased to 28% in KO (p < 0.05). In conclusion, donor JNK2 promotes injury after mouse LT via the MPT. MPT inhibition using specific JNK2 inhibitors may be useful in protecting grafts against adverse outcomes from ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:18671679

  9. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model.

    PubMed

    Mak, J; Jablonski, C L; Leonard, C A; Dunn, J F; Raharjo, E; Matyas, J R; Biernaskie, J; Krawetz, R J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  10. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mak, J.; Jablonski, C. L.; Leonard, C. A.; Dunn, J. F.; Raharjo, E.; Matyas, J. R.; Biernaskie, J.; Krawetz, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ “super-healer” strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  11. Cardiomyocyte proliferation in cardiac development and regeneration: a guide to methodologies and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Leone, Marina; Magadum, Ajit; Engel, Felix B

    2015-10-01

    The newt and the zebrafish have the ability to regenerate many of their tissues and organs including the heart. Thus, a major goal in experimental medicine is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the regenerative capacity of these species. A wide variety of experiments have demonstrated that naturally occurring heart regeneration relies on cardiomyocyte proliferation. Thus, major efforts have been invested to induce proliferation of mammalian cardiomyocytes in order to improve cardiac function after injury or to protect the heart from further functional deterioration. In this review, we describe and analyze methods currently used to evaluate cardiomyocyte proliferation. In addition, we summarize the literature on naturally occurring heart regeneration. Our analysis highlights that newt and zebrafish heart regeneration relies on factors that are also utilized in cardiomyocyte proliferation during mammalian fetal development. Most of these factors have, however, failed to induce adult mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, our analysis of mammalian neonatal heart regeneration indicates experiments that could resolve conflicting results in the literature, such as binucleation assays and clonal analysis. Collectively, cardiac regeneration based on cardiomyocyte proliferation is a promising approach for improving adult human cardiac function after injury, but it is important to elucidate the mechanisms arresting mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation after birth and to utilize better assays to determine formation of new muscle mass. PMID:26342071

  12. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

    PubMed

    Vangansewinkel, Tim; Geurts, Nathalie; Quanten, Kirsten; Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Stefanie; Geboes, Lies; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia M; Pejler, Gunnar; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-05-01

    An important barrier for axon regeneration and recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is attributed to the scar that is formed at the lesion site. Here, we investigated the effect of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP) 6, a mast cell (MC)-specific tryptase, on scarring and functional recovery after a spinal cord hemisection injury. Functional recovery was significantly impaired in both MC-deficient and mMCP6-knockout (mMCP6(-/-)) mice after SCI compared with wild-type control mice. This decrease in locomotor performance was associated with an increased lesion size and excessive scarring at the injury site. Axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV were significantly up-regulated in MC-deficient and mMCP6(-/-) mice, with an increase in scar volume between 23 and 32%. A degradation assay revealed that mMCP6 directly cleaves fibronectin and collagen IV in vitro In addition, gene expression levels of the scar components fibronectin, aggrecan, and collagen IV were increased up to 6.8-fold in mMCP6(-/-) mice in the subacute phase after injury. These data indicate that endogenous mMCP6 has scar-suppressing properties after SCI via indirect cleavage of axon growth-inhibitory scar components and alteration of the gene expression profile of these factors.-Vangansewinkel, T., Geurts, N., Quanten, K., Nelissen, S., Lemmens, S., Geboes, L., Dooley, D., Vidal, P. M., Pejler, G., Hendrix, S. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6. PMID:26917739

  13. Pine Oil Effects on Chemical and Thermal Injury in Mice and Cultured Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Clark, SP; Bollag, WB; Westlund, KN; Ma, F; Falls, G; Xie, D; Johnson, M; Isales, CM; Bhattacharyya, MH

    2013-01-01

    A commercial resin-based pine oil derived from Pinus palustris and Pinus elliottii was the major focus of this investigation. Extracts of pine resins, needles and bark are folk medicines commonly used to treat skin ailments, including burns. The American Burn Association estimates that 500,000 people with burn injuries receive medical treatment each year; one-half of US burn victims are children, most with scald burns. This systematic study was initiated as follow-up to personal anecdotal evidence acquired over more than 10 years by MH Bhattacharyya regarding pine oil’s efficacy for treating burns. The results demonstrate that pine oil counteracted dermal inflammation in both a mouse ear model of contact irritant-induced dermal inflammation and a 2nd degree scald burn to the mouse paw. Furthermore, pine oil significantly counteracted the tactile allodynia and soft tissue injury caused by the scald burn. In mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cultures, pine oil added to the medium blocked ATP-activated, but not capsaicin-activated, pain pathways, demonstrating specificity. These results together support the hypothesis that a pine-oil-based treatment can be developed to provide effective in-home care for 2nd degree burns. PMID:23595692

  14. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  15. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  16. Acute Reduction of Microglia Does Not Alter Axonal Injury in a Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathological processes that lead to long-term consequences of multiple concussions are unclear. Primary mechanical damage to axons during concussion is likely to contribute to dysfunction. Secondary damage has been hypothesized to be induced or exacerbated by inflammation. The main inflammatory cells in the brain are microglia, a type of macrophage. This research sought to determine the contribution of microglia to axon degeneration after repetitive closed-skull traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) using CD11b-TK (thymidine kinase) mice, a valganciclovir-inducible model of macrophage depletion. Low-dose (1 mg/mL) valganciclovir was found to reduce the microglial population in the corpus callosum and external capsule by 35% after rcTBI in CD11b-TK mice. At both acute (7 days) and subacute (21 days) time points after rcTBI, reduction of the microglial population did not alter the extent of axon injury as visualized by silver staining. Further reduction of the microglial population by 56%, using an intermediate dose (10 mg/mL), also did not alter the extent of silver staining, amyloid precursor protein accumulation, neurofilament labeling, or axon injury evident by electron microscopy at 7 days postinjury. Longer treatment of CD11b-TK mice with intermediate dose and treatment for 14 days with high-dose (50 mg/mL) valganciclovir were both found to be toxic in this injury model. Altogether, these data are most consistent with the idea that microglia do not contribute to acute axon degeneration after multiple concussive injuries. The possibility of longer-term effects on axon structure or function cannot be ruled out. Nonetheless, alternative strategies directly targeting injury to axons may be a more beneficial approach to concussion treatment than targeting secondary processes of microglial-driven inflammation. PMID:24797413

  17. A Cytochrome P450–Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G.; Lehner, Andreas F.; Scott, Michael A.; Buchweitz, John P.; James, Laura P.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0–14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  18. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth.

    PubMed

    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1), regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21(Cip1) knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21(Cip1) knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1)) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21(Cip1) inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. PMID:26363457

  19. A novel mouse model of pediatric cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation reveals age-dependent neuronal sensitivities to ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G; Yonchek, JC; Quillinan, N; Strnad, FA; Exo, J; Herson, PS; Traystman, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is an unfortunate and devastating condition, often leading to poor neurologic outcomes. However, little experimental data on the pathophysiology of pediatric CA is currently available due to the scarcity of animal models. New Method We developed a novel experimental model of pediatric cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) using postnatal day 20–25 mice. Adult (8–12 weeks) and pediatric (P20–25) mice were subjected to 6 min CA/CPR. Hippocampal CA1 and striatal neuronal injury were quantified 3 days after resuscitation by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Fluoro-Jade B staining, respectively. Results Pediatric mice exhibited less neuronal injury in both CA1 hippocampal and striatal neurons compared to adult mice. Increasing ischemia time to 8 min CA/CPR resulted in an increase in hippocampal injury in pediatric mice, resulting in similar damage in adult and pediatric brains. In contrast, striatal injury in the pediatric brain following 6 or 8 min CA/CPR remained extremely low. As observed in adult mice, cardiac arrest causes delayed neuronal death in pediatric mice, with hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage maturing at 72 hours after insult. Finally, mild therapeutic hypothermia reduced hippocampal CA1 neuronal injury after pediatric CA/CPR. Comparison with Existing Method This is the first report of a cardiac arrest and CPR model of global cerebral ischemia in mice Conclusions Therefore, the mouse pediatric CA/CPR model we developed is unique and will provide an important new tool to the research community for the study of pediatric brain injury. PMID:24192226

  20. Establishment of a mouse model for amiodarone-induced liver injury and analyses of its hepatotoxic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shohei; Oda, Shingo; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent cause of post-marketing warnings and withdrawals. Amiodarone (AMD), an antiarrhythmic, presents a risk of liver injury in humans, and its metabolites, formed by cytochrome P450 3A4, are likely more toxic to hepatocytes than AMD is. However, it remains to be clarified whether the metabolic activation of AMD is involved in liver injury in vivo. In this study, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of AMD-induced liver injury, mice were administered AMD [1000 mg kg(-1), per os (p.o.)] after pretreatment with dexamethasone [DEX, 60 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneal (i.p.)], which induces P450 expression, once daily for 3 days. The plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were significantly increased by AMD administration in the DEX-pretreated mice, and the liver concentrations of desethylamiodarone (DEA), a major metabolite of AMD, were correlated with the changes in the plasma ALT levels. Cytochrome c release into the hepatic cytosol and triglyceride levels in the plasma were increased in DEX plus AMD-administered mice. Furthermore, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione disulfide in the liver significantly decreased in the DEX plus AMD-administered mice. The increase of ALT levels was suppressed by treatment with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3 ), which is an inhibitor of Kupffer cell function. From these results, it is suggested that AMD and/or DEA contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD-induced liver injury by producing mitochondrial and oxidative stress and Kupffer cell activation. This study proposes the mechanisms of AMD-induced liver injury using an in vivo mouse model. PMID:25900201

  1. Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury with impact acceleration in the mouse: Multifocal axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leyan; Nguyen, Judy V; Lehar, Mohamed; Menon, Adarsh; Rha, Elizabeth; Arena, John; Ryu, Jiwon; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Marmarou, Christina R; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is implicated in chronic neurological illness. The development of animal models of repetitive mTBI in mice is essential for exploring mechanisms of these chronic diseases, including genetic vulnerability by using transgenic backgrounds. In this study, the rat model of impact acceleration (IA) was redesigned for the mouse cranium and used in two clinically relevant repetitive mTBI paradigms. We first determined, by using increments of weight dropped from 1m that the 40g weight was most representative of mTBI and was not associated with fractures, brain contusions, anoxic-ischemic injury, mortality, or significant neurological impairments. Quantitative evaluation of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the optic nerve/tract, cerebellum and corpus callosum confirmed that weight increase produced a graded injury. We next evaluated two novel repetitive mTBI paradigms (1 time per day or 3 times per day at days 0, 1, 3, and 7) and compared the resulting TAI, neuronal cell death, and neuroinflammation to single hit mTBI at sub-acute (7days) and chronic time points (10weeks) post-injury. Both single and repetitive mTBI caused TAI in the optic nerve/tract, cerebellum, corticospinal tract, lateral lemniscus and corpus callosum. Reactive microglia with phagocytic phenotypes were present at injury sites. Severity of axonal injury corresponded to impact load and frequency in the optic nerve/tract and cerebellum. Both single and repeat injury protocols were associated with retinal ganglion cell loss and optic nerve degeneration; these outcomes correlated with impact load and number/frequency. No phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity was detected in the brains of animals subjected to repetitive mTBI. Our findings establish a new model of repetitive mTBI model featured by TAI in discrete CNS tracts, especially the visual system and cerebellum. Injury in retina and optic nerve provides a sensitive measure of severity of mTBI, thus enabling

  2. CUEDC2 modulates cardiomyocyte oxidative capacity by regulating GPX1 stability.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhao; Liang, Bing; Pan, Xin; Xu, Guang; Guo, Sai-Sai; Li, Ting; Zhou, Tao; Xiao, Ying-Bin; Li, Ai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes due to oxidative stress is the main cause of heart dysfunction following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and ageing-induced cardiomyopathy. Here, we report that CUEDC2, a CUE domain-containing protein, plays a critical role in oxidative stress-induced cardiac injury. Cuedc2(-/-) cardiomyocytes exhibited a greater resistance to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Loss of CUEDC2 enhanced the antioxidant capacity of cardiomyocytes, promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, and subsequently inhibited the redox-dependent activation of signaling pathways. Notably, CUEDC2 promoted E3 ubiquitin ligases tripartite motif-containing 33 (TRIM33)-mediated the antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) ubiquitination, and proteasome-dependent degradation. Ablation of CUEDC2 upregulated the protein level of GPX1 in the heart significantly. Strikingly, in vivo, the infarct size of Cuedc2(-/-) heart was significantly decreased after I/R injury, and aged Cuedc2(-/-) mice preserved better heart function as the overall ROS levels in their hearts were significantly lower. Our results demonstrated a novel role of CUEDC2 in cardiomyocyte death regulation. Manipulating CUEDC2 level might be an attractive therapeutic strategy for promoting cardiomyocyte survival following oxidative stress-induced cardiac injury. PMID:27286733

  3. Intravital Imaging of Axonal Interactions with Microglia and Macrophages in a Mouse Dorsal Column Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay T.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury causes an inflammatory reaction involving blood-derived macrophages and central nervous system (CNS)-resident microglia. Intra-vital two-photon microscopy enables the study of macrophages and microglia in the spinal cord lesion in the living animal. This can be performed in adult animals with a traumatic injury to the dorsal column. Here, we describe methods for distinguishing macrophages from microglia in the CNS using an irradiation bone marrow chimera to obtain animals in which only macrophages or microglia are labeled with a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein. We also describe a injury model that crushes the dorsal column of the spinal cord, thereby producing a simple, easily accessible, rectangular lesion that is easily visualized in an animal through a laminectomy. Furthermore, we will outline procedures to sequentially image the animals at the anatomical site of injury for the study of cellular interactions during the first few days to weeks after injury. PMID:25489963

  4. The in-vivo monitoring method for traumatic brain injury of mouse based on near-infrared light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weitao; Wang, Xuena; Qian, Zhiyu; Xie, Jieru; Liu, Xing

    2012-02-01

    A system based on near-infrared light intensity was used to monitor mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) noninvasively. The measurement system was controlled by microcontroller. Light from a 760/850nm dual-wavelength light emitting diode was coupled to a 0.6-mm-diameter optical fiber. The collection fibers were coupled to optoelectronic detectors, which were placed in the different distance from the source fiber. The system consisted of a constant current bias, a circuit lock-in amplifier (including band pass filter, lock-in amplifier, and low pass filter), a PCI 6240 data acquisition card and a multi-core-processor computer. The modified Lambert Beer law was used to calculate the concentration of ΔHbO2 and ΔHb. The sensitivity matrix was defined to evaluate the region of effective detection of optical probe. Five groups of TBI mouse models were built by Feeney's free-falling method. The data measured by system show after TBI the concentration of ΔHbO2 decreased and that of ΔHb increased. It can be concluded that the system can be used to monitor the changes of TBI of mouse non-invasively.

  5. Closed Head Injury in a Mouse Model Results in Molecular Changes Indicating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Israelsson, Charlotte; Wang, Yun; Kylberg, Annika; Pick, Chaim G.; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral gene expression changes in response to traumatic brain injury will provide useful information in the search for future trauma treatment. In order to characterize the outcome of mild brain injury, we studied C57BL/6J mice in a weight-drop, closed head injury model. At various times post-injury, mRNA was isolated from neocortex and hippocampus and transcriptional alterations were studied using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and gene array analysis. At three days post-injury, the results showed unilateral injury responses, both in neocortex and hippocampus, with the main effect seen on the side of the skull hit by the dropping weight. Upregulated transcripts encoded products characterizing reactive astrocytes, phagocytes, microglia, and immune-reactive cells. Markers for oligodendrocytes and T-cells were not altered. Notably, strong differences in the responses among individual mice were seen (e.g., for the Gfap transcript expressed by reactive astrocytes and the chemokine Ccl3 transcript expressed by activated microglial cells). In conclusion, mild TBI chiefly activates transcripts leading to tissue signaling, inflammatory processes, and chemokine signaling, as in focal brain injury, suggesting putative targets for drug development. PMID:19317611

  6. Tanshinone IIA Attenuates Renal Fibrosis after Acute Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model through Inhibition of Fibrocytes Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunming; Shao, Qiuyuan; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with an increased risk of developing advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Yet, effective interventions to prevent this conversion are unavailable for clinical practice. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of Tanshinone IIA on renal fibrosis in a mouse model of folic acid induced AKI. We found that Tanshinone IIA treatment significantly attenuated the folic acid elicited kidney dysfunction on days 3, 14, and 28. This effect was concomitant with a much lessened accumulation of fibronectin and collagen in tubulointerstitium 28 days after folic acid injury, denoting an ameliorated renal fibrosis. The kidney protective and antifibrotic effect of Tanshinone IIA was likely attributable to an early inhibition of renal recruitment of fibrocytes positive for both CD45 and collagen I. Mechanistically, Tanshinone IIA treatment not only markedly diminished renal expression of chemoattractants for fibrocytes such as TGFβ1 and MCP-1, but also significantly reduced circulating fibrocytes at the acute phase of kidney injury. These data suggested that Tanshinone IIA might be a novel therapy for preventing progression of CKD after AKI. PMID:26885500

  7. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of mouse cerebral edema induced by cold injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-06-01

    For the first time, we have implemented photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to image the water content of an edema in vivo. We produced and imaged a cold-induced cerebral edema transcranially, then obtained blood vessel and water accumulation images at 610 and 975 nm, respectively. We tracked the changes at 12, 24, and 36 h after the cold injury. The blood volume decreased after the cold injury, and the maximum area of edema was observed 24 h after the cold injury. We validated PAT of the water content of the edema through magnetic Resonance Imaging and the water spectrum from the spectrophotometric measurement.

  8. Chapter 7. Mouse models of ischemic angiogenesis and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Joshua I; Suliman, Ahmed; Barillas, Samuel; Angle, Niren

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) events are distinct but interrelated processes etiologic to the most prevalent human diseases. A delicate balance exists whereby ischemic injury can result in beneficial angiogenesis or in detrimental reperfusion injury overwhelming the organism. Here, we describe in vivo models of ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury with emphasis on murine hindlimb ischemia models. We also provide a brief introduction to murine myocardial ischemia experiments. Each model is described in the context of human disease. Emphasis is made on the strengths and weaknesses of the available techniques, particularly as it relates to data analysis, interpretation, and translational relevance. PMID:19007664

  9. Acute over-the-counter pharmacological intervention does not adversely affect behavioral outcome following diffuse traumatic brain injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jordan L; Rowe, Rachel K; O'Hara, Bruce F; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients may self-treat symptoms of concussion, including post-traumatic headache, taking over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Administering one dose of OTC analgesics immediately following experimental brain injury mimics the at-home treated population of concussed patients and may accelerate the understanding of the relationship between brain injury and OTC pharmacological intervention. In the current study, we investigate the effect of acute administration of OTC analgesics on neurological function and cortical cytokine levels after experimental diffuse TBI in the mouse. Adult, male C57BL/6 mice were injured using a midline fluid percussion (mFPI) injury model of concussion (6-10 min righting reflex time for brain-injured mice). Experimental groups included mFPI paired with either ibuprofen (60 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 16), acetaminophen (40 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 9), or vehicle (15% ethanol (v/v) in 0.9% saline; n = 13) and sham injury paired OTC medicine or vehicle (n = 7-10 per group). At 24 h after injury, functional outcome was assessed using the rotarod task and a modified neurological severity score. Following behavior assessment, cortical cytokine levels were measured by multiplex ELISA at 24 h post-injury. To evaluate efficacy on acute inflammation, cortical cytokine levels were measured also at 6 h post-injury. In the diffuse brain-injured mouse, immediate pharmacological intervention did not attenuate or exacerbate TBI-induced functional deficits. Cortical cytokine levels were affected by injury, time, or their interaction. However, levels were not affected by treatment at 6 or 24 h post-injury. These data indicate that acute administration of OTC analgesics did not exacerbate or attenuate brain-injury deficits which may inform clinical recommendations for the at-home treated mildly concussed patient. PMID:24760409

  10. A mouse diversity panel approach reveals the potential for clinical kidney injury due to DB289 not predicted by classical rodent models.

    PubMed

    Harrill, Alison H; Desmet, Kristina D; Wolf, Kristina K; Bridges, Arlene S; Eaddy, J Scott; Kurtz, C Lisa; Hall, J Ed; Paine, Mary F; Tidwell, Richard R; Watkins, Paul B

    2012-12-01

    DB289 is the first oral drug shown in clinical trials to have efficacy in treating African trypanosomiasis (African sleeping sickness). Mild liver toxicity was noted but was not treatment limiting. However, development of DB289 was terminated when several treated subjects developed severe kidney injury, a liability not predicted from preclinical testing. We tested the hypothesis that the kidney safety liability of DB289 would be detected in a mouse diversity panel (MDP) comprised of 34 genetically diverse inbred mouse strains. MDP mice received 10 days of oral treatment with DB289 or vehicle and classical renal biomarkers blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr), as well as urine biomarkers of kidney injury were measured. While BUN and sCr remained within reference ranges, marked elevations were observed for kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) in the urine of sensitive mouse strains. KIM-1 elevations were not always coincident with elevations in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), suggesting that renal injury was not linked to hepatic injury. Genome-wide association analyses of KIM-1 elevations indicated that genes participating in cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis and transport, oxidative stress, and cytokine release may play a role in DB289 renal injury. Taken together, the data resulting from this study highlight the utility of using an MDP to predict clinically relevant toxicities, to identify relevant toxicity biomarkers that may translate into the clinic, and to identify potential mechanisms underlying toxicities. In addition, the sensitive mouse strains identified in this study may be useful in screening next-in-class compounds for renal injury. PMID:22940726

  11. Long-Term Cognitive Impairments and Pathological Alterations in a Mouse Model of Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Nguyen, Andy; Villeda, Saul; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Zhaoqing; Lindsey, Derek; Bieri, Gregor; Castellano, Joseph M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, also referred to as concussion) accounts for the majority of all traumatic brain injuries. The consequences of repetitive mTBI have become of particular concern for individuals engaged in certain sports or in military operations. Many mTBI patients suffer long-lasting neurobehavioral impairments. In order to expedite pre-clinical research and therapy development, there is a need for animal models that reflect the long-term cognitive and pathological features seen in patients. In the present study, we developed and characterized a mouse model of repetitive mTBI, induced onto the closed head over the left frontal hemisphere with an electromagnetic stereotaxic impact device. Using GFAP-luciferase bioluminescence reporter mice that provide a readout of astrocyte activation, we observed an increase in bioluminescence relative to the force delivered by the impactor after single impact and cumulative effects of repetitive mTBI. Using the injury parameters established in the reporter mice, we induced a repetitive mTBI in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and characterized the long-term outcome. Animals received repetitive mTBI showed a significant impairment in spatial learning and memory when tested at 2 and 6 months after injury. A robust astrogliosis and increased p-Tau immunoreactivity were observed upon post-mortem pathological examinations. These findings are consistent with the deficits and pathology associated with mTBI in humans and support the use of this model to evaluate potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:24550885

  12. Consistent Injury to Medium Spiny Neurons and White Matter in the Mouse Striatum after Prolonged Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Katsu, Masataka; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Okami, Nobuya

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A reproducible transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) mouse model has not been fully established. Although striatal neurons and white matter are recognized to be vulnerable to ischemia, their injury after tGCI in mice has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate injuries to striatal neurons and white matter after tGCI in C57BL/6 mice, and to develop a reproducible tGCI model. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to tGCI by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). Mice whose cortical cerebral blood flow after BCCAO decreased to less than 13% of the pre-ischemic value were used. Histological analysis showed that at 3 days after 22 min of BCCAO, striatal neurons were injured more consistently than those in other brain regions. Quantitative analysis of cytochrome c release into the cytosol and DNA fragmentation in the striatum showed consistent injury to the striatum. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that DARPP-32-positive medium spiny neurons, the majority of striatal neurons, were the most vulnerable among the striatal neuronal subpopulations. The striatum (especially medium spiny neurons) was susceptible to oxidative stress after tGCI, which is probably one of the mechanisms of vulnerability. SMI-32 immunostaining showed that white matter in the striatum was also consistently injured 3 days after 22 min of BCCAO. We thus suggest that this is a tGCI model using C57BL/6 mice that consistently produces neuronal and white matter injury in the striatum by a simple technique. This model can be highly applicable for elucidating molecular mechanisms in the brain after global ischemia. PMID:21309724

  13. Glucocorticoid protects rodent hearts from ischemia/reperfusion injury by activating lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase–derived PGD2 biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tokudome, Satori; Sano, Motoaki; Shinmura, Ken; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Morizane, Shintaro; Moriyama, Hidenori; Tamaki, Kayoko; Hayashida, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Endo, Jin; Katayama, Takaharu; Murata, Mitsushige; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Kaneda, Ruri; Tomita, Kengo; Eguchi, Naomi; Urade, Yoshihiro; Asano, Koichiro; Utsunomiya, Yasunori; Suzuki, Takeshi; Taguchi, Ryo; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS), which was originally identified as an enzyme responsible for PGD2 biosynthesis in the brain, is highly expressed in the myocardium, including in cardiomyocytes. However, the factors that control expression of the gene encoding L-PGDS and the pathophysiologic role of L-PGDS in cardiomyocytes are poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that glucocorticoids, which act as repressors of prostaglandin biosynthesis in most cell types, upregulated the expression of L-PGDS together with cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 and COX2 via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in rat cardiomyocytes. Accordingly, PGD2 was the most prominently induced prostaglandin in vivo in mouse hearts and in vitro in cultured rat cardiomyocytes after exposure to GR-selective agonists. In isolated Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts, dexamethasone alleviated ischemia/reperfusion injury. This cardioprotective effect was completely abrogated by either pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 or disruption of the gene encoding L-PGDS. In in vivo ischemia/reperfusion experiments, dexamethasone reduced infarct size in wild-type mice. This cardioprotective effect of dexamethasone was markedly reduced in L-PGDS–deficient mice. In cultured rat cardiomyocytes, PGD2 protected against cell death induced by anoxia/reoxygenation via the D-type prostanoid receptor and the ERK1/2-mediated pathway. Taken together, these results suggest what we believe to be a novel interaction between glucocorticoid-GR signaling and the cardiomyocyte survival pathway mediated by the arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:19451694

  14. Inhaled nitric oxide protects males but not females from neonatal mouse hypoxia-ischemia brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changlian; Sun, Yanyan; Gao, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Blomgren, Klas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently discovered that while under normal conditions inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) does not affect cerebral blood flow, it selectively dilates arterioles in the ischemic penumbra during experimental cerebral ischemia, thereby increasing collateral blood flow and reducing ischemic brain damage. The mechanism was verified in multiple models, but only in male animals. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of iNO on brain injury in neonatal males and females. Nine-day-old mice were subjected to unilateral hypoxia-ischemia (HI), using 10% oxygen balanced with nitrogen, with or without 50 ppm NO. Brain injury 72 h after HI was reduced by iNO as judged by percentage of injury (-21.7%), atrophy (-23.7%), and total pathological score (-29%). The injury was significantly reduced in males (-32.4%, p<0.05) but not in females (-7.1%, n.s.). Neither the numbers nor the proliferation rates of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus were affected by iNO. In summary, intraischemic iNO reduced neonatal HI brain injury in a gender-related manner. PMID:24323275

  15. Origin of Cardiomyocytes in the Adult Heart

    PubMed Central

    Leri, Annarosa; Rota, Marcello; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Goichberg, Polina; Anversa, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This review article discusses the mechanisms of cardiomyogenesis in the adult heart. They include the reentry of cardiomyocytes into the cell cycle; dedifferentiation of preexisting cardiomyocytes which assume an immature replicating cell phenotype; transdifferentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cardiomyocytes; and cardiomyocytes derived from activation and lineage specification of resident cardiac stem cells. The recognition of the origin of cardiomyocytes is of critical importance for the development of strategies capable of enhancing the growth response of the myocardium; in fact, cell therapy for the decompensated heart has to be based on the acquisition of this fundamental biological knowledge. PMID:25552694

  16. RNA sequence reveals mouse retinal transcriptome changes early after axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Ryu, Morin; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by axonal injury. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in RGC death remain unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the transcriptome profile following axonal injury in mice (C57BL/6) with RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. The experiment group underwent an optic nerve crush (ONC) procedure to induce axonal injury in the right eye, and the control group underwent a sham procedure. Two days later, we extracted the retinas and performed RNA-seq and a pathway analysis. We identified 177 differentially expressed genes with RNA-seq, notably the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes Atf3, Atf4, Atf5, Chac1, Chop, Egr1 and Trb3, which were significantly upregulated. The pathway analysis revealed that ATF4 was the most significant upstream regulator. The antioxidative response-related genes Hmox1 and Srxn1, as well as the immune response-related genes C1qa, C1qb and C1qc, were also significantly upregulated. To our knowledge, this is the first reported RNA-seq investigation of the retinal transcriptome and molecular pathways in the early stages after axonal injury. Our results indicated that ER stress plays a key role under these conditions. Furthermore, the antioxidative defense and immune responses occurred concurrently in the early stages after axonal injury. We believe that our study will lead to a better understanding of and insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying RGC death after axonal injury. PMID:24676137

  17. RNA Sequence Reveals Mouse Retinal Transcriptome Changes Early after Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Ryu, Morin; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by axonal injury. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in RGC death remain unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the transcriptome profile following axonal injury in mice (C57BL/6) with RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. The experiment group underwent an optic nerve crush (ONC) procedure to induce axonal injury in the right eye, and the control group underwent a sham procedure. Two days later, we extracted the retinas and performed RNA-seq and a pathway analysis. We identified 177 differentially expressed genes with RNA-seq, notably the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes Atf3, Atf4, Atf5, Chac1, Chop, Egr1 and Trb3, which were significantly upregulated. The pathway analysis revealed that ATF4 was the most significant upstream regulator. The antioxidative response-related genes Hmox1 and Srxn1, as well as the immune response-related genes C1qa, C1qb and C1qc, were also significantly upregulated. To our knowledge, this is the first reported RNA-seq investigation of the retinal transcriptome and molecular pathways in the early stages after axonal injury. Our results indicated that ER stress plays a key role under these conditions. Furthermore, the antioxidative defense and immune responses occurred concurrently in the early stages after axonal injury. We believe that our study will lead to a better understanding of and insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying RGC death after axonal injury. PMID:24676137

  18. A Possible Role of Neuroglobin in the Retina After Optic Nerve Injury: A Comparative Study of Zebrafish and Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a new member of the family of heme proteins and is specifically expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems in all vertebrates. In particular, the retina has a 100-fold higher concentration of Ngb than do other nervous tissues. The role of Ngb in the retina is yet to be clarified. Therefore, to understand the functional role of Ngb in the retina after optic nerve injury (ONI), we used two types of retina, from zebrafish and mice, which have permissible and non-permissible capacity for nerve regeneration after ONI, respectively. After ONI, the Ngb protein in zebrafish was upregulated in the amacrine cells within 3 days, whereas in the mouse retina, Ngb was downregulated in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) within 3 days. Zebrafish Ngb (z-Ngb) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in retinal explant culture. According to these results, we designed an overexpression experiment with the mouse Ngb (m-Ngb) gene in RGC-5 cells (retinal precursor cells). The excess of m-Ngb actually rescued RGC-5 cells under hypoxic conditions and significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in cell culture. These data suggest that mammalian Ngb has positive neuroprotective and neuritogenic effects that induce nerve regeneration after ONI. PMID:26427474

  19. Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) limits pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription in cardiomyocytes by inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Furrer, Antonia; Hottiger, Michael O; Valaperti, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is highly upregulated during heart inflammation and enhances the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an IFN-inducible protein implicated as a component of the inflammasome. Here we seek to determine the role of AIM2 during inflammation in cardiac cells. We found that the presence of AIM2, but not of the other inflammasome components Nod-like receptor (NLR) NLRP3 or NLRC4, specifically limited the transcription of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IP-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Similarly, AIM2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription in primary mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes (MNC), but not in primary mouse neonatal cardiac fibroblasts (MNF). Interestingly, AIM2-dependent reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in cardiomyocytes was independent of Caspase-1. Mechanistically, AIM2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription in cardiomyocytes by interacting with and inhibiting the phosphorylation of STAT1. In AIM2-depleted cardiomyocytes, increased STAT1 phosphorylation enhanced the NF-κB pathway by promoting NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and acetylation. These results show for the first time that AIM2 plays an important anti-inflammatory, yet inflammasome-independent function in cardiomyocytes. Our findings will help to further understand how the various heart cell types differently react to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27148820

  20. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K⁺ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/ or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin- B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (~9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  1. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K+ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin-B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (∼9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  2. Temporal MRI characterization, neurobiochemical and neurobehavioral changes in a mouse repetitive concussive head injury model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihui; Wang, Ping; Morgan, Drake; Lin, Dan; Pan, Jianchun; Lin, Fan; Strang, Kevin H.; Selig, Tyler M.; Perez, Pablo D.; Febo, Marcelo; Chang, Binggong; Rubenstein, Richard; Wang, Kevin K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Single and repeated sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also referred to as concussion, can result in chronic post-concussive syndrome (PCS), neuropsychological and cognitive deficits, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However PCS is often difficult to diagnose using routine clinical, neuroimaging or laboratory evaluations, while CTE currently only can be definitively diagnosed postmortem. We sought to develop an animal model to simulate human repetitive concussive head injury for systematic study. In this study, mice received single or multiple head impacts by a stereotaxic impact device with a custom-made rubber tip-fitted impactor. Dynamic changes in MRI, neurobiochemical markers (Tau hyperphosphorylation and glia activation in brain tissues) and neurobehavioral functions such as anxiety, depression, motor function and cognitive function at various acute/subacute (1-7 day post-injury) and chronic (14-60 days post-injury) time points were examined. To explore the potential biomarkers of rCHI, serum levels of total Tau (T-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau) were also monitored at various time points. Our results show temporal dynamics of MRI consistent with structural perturbation in the acute phase and neurobiochemical changes (P-Tau and GFAP induction) in the subacute and chronic phase as well as development of chronic neurobehavioral changes, which resemble those observed in mTBI patients. PMID:26058556

  3. Parabronchial smooth muscle constitutes an airway epithelial stem cell niche in the mouse lung after injury.

    PubMed

    Volckaert, Thomas; Dill, Erik; Campbell, Alice; Tiozzo, Caterina; Majka, Susan; Bellusci, Saverio; De Langhe, Stijn P

    2011-11-01

    During lung development, parabronchial SMC (PSMC) progenitors in the distal mesenchyme secrete fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which acts on distal epithelial progenitors to promote their proliferation. β-catenin signaling within PSMC progenitors is essential for their maintenance, proliferation, and expression of Fgf10. Here, we report that this Wnt/Fgf10 embryonic signaling cascade is reactivated in mature PSMCs after naphthalene-induced injury to airway epithelium. Furthermore, we found that this paracrine Fgf10 action was essential for activating surviving variant Clara cells (the cells in the airway epithelium from which replacement epithelial cells originate) located at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions and adjacent to neuroendocrine bodies. After naphthalene injury, PSMCs secreted Fgf10 to activate Notch signaling and induce Snai1 expression in surviving variant Clara cells, which subsequently underwent a transient epithelial to mesenchymal transition to initiate the repair process. Epithelial Snai1 expression was important for regeneration after injury. We have therefore identified PSMCs as a stem cell niche for the variant Clara cells in the lung and established that paracrine Fgf10 signaling from the niche is critical for epithelial repair after naphthalene injury. These findings also have implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and cancer. PMID:21985786

  4. Regression of Copper-Deficient Heart Hypertrophy: Reduction in the Size of Hypertrophic Cardiomyocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary copper deficiency causes cardiac hypertrophy and its transition to heart failure in a mouse model. Copper repletion results in a rapid regression of cardiac hypertrophy and prevention of heart failure. The present study was undertaken to understand dynamic changes of cardiomyocytes in the hy...

  5. Peripheral nerve injury is accompanied by chronic transcriptome-wide changes in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury can have long-term consequences including pain-related manifestations, such as hypersensitivity to cutaneous stimuli, as well as affective and cognitive disturbances, suggesting the involvement of supraspinal mechanisms. Changes in brain structure and cortical function associated with many chronic pain conditions have been reported in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC is implicated in pain-related co-morbidities such as depression, anxiety and impaired emotional decision-making ability. We recently reported that this region is subject to significant epigenetic reprogramming following peripheral nerve injury, and normalization of pain-related structural, functional and epigenetic abnormalities in the PFC are all associated with effective pain reduction. In this study, we used the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain to test the hypothesis that peripheral nerve injury triggers persistent long-lasting changes in gene expression in the PFC, which alter functional gene networks, thus providing a possible explanation for chronic pain associated behaviors. Results SNI or sham surgery where performed in male CD1 mice at three months of age. Six months after injury, we performed transcriptome-wide sequencing (RNAseq), which revealed 1147 differentially regulated transcripts in the PFC in nerve-injured vs. control mice. Changes in gene expression occurred across a number of functional gene clusters encoding cardinal biological processes as revealed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Significantly altered biological processes included neurological disease, skeletal muscular disorders, behavior, and psychological disorders. Several of the changes detected by RNAseq were validated by RT-QPCR and included transcripts with known roles in chronic pain and/or neuronal plasticity including the NMDA receptor (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, NMDA; grin1), neurite outgrowth (roundabout 3; robo3), gliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein

  6. Selective endothelin A receptor antagonism with sitaxentan reduces neointimal lesion size in a mouse model of intraluminal injury

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, Karolina M; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Miller, Eileen; Ivy, Jessica R; McShane, John F; Lim, Win Gel; Webb, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endothelin (ET) receptor antagonism reduces neointimal lesion formation in animal models. This investigation addressed the hypothesis that the selective ETA receptor antagonist sitaxentan would be more effective than mixed ETA/B receptor antagonism at inhibiting neointimal proliferation in a mouse model of intraluminal injury. Experimental Approach Antagonism of ETA receptors by sitaxentan (1–100 nM) was assessed in femoral arteries isolated from adult, male C57Bl6 mice using isometric wire myography. Neointimal lesion development was induced by intraluminal injury in mice receiving sitaxentan (ETA antagonist; 15 mg·kg−1·day−1), A192621 (ETB antagonist; 30 mg·kg−1·day−1), the combination of both antagonists or vehicle. Treatment began 1 week before, and continued for 28 days after, surgery. Femoral arteries were then harvested for analysis of lesion size and composition. Key Results Sitaxentan produced a selective, concentration-dependent parallel rightward shift of ET-1-mediated contraction in isolated femoral arteries. Sitaxentan reduced neointimal lesion size, whereas ETB and combined ETA/B receptor antagonism did not. Macrophage and α-smooth muscle actin content were unaltered by ET receptor antagonism but sitaxentan reduced the amount of collagen in lesions. Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that ETA receptor antagonism would be more effective than combined ETA/ETB receptor antagonism at reducing neointimal lesion formation. PMID:25598351

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injury in a mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengwei; Chi, Feifei; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Chen, Yongquan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 was screened for high antioxidative activity from 55 lactobacilli. The present study attempted to explore the protective properties of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 in alcoholic liver injury. A mouse model was induced by orally feeding alcohol when simultaneously treated with L. rhamnosus CCFM1107, the drug Hu-Gan- Pian (HGP), L. rhamnosus GG (LGG), and L. plantarum CCFM1112 for 3 months. Biochemical analysis was performed for both serum and liver homogenate. Detailed intestinal flora and histological analyses were also carried out. Our results indicated that the administration of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 significantly inhibited the increase in the levels of serum aminotransferase and endotoxin, as well as the levels of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CHO) in the serum and in the liver. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were decreased. The enteric dysbiosis caused by alcohol was restored by increasing the numbers of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and decreasing the numbers of both enterococci and enterobacter. Histological analysis confirmed the protective effect of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107. Compared with the other lactobacilli and to the drug Hu-Gan-Pian, there is a high chance that L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 provides protective effects on alcoholic liver injury by reducing oxidative stress and restoring the intestinal flora. PMID:26626356

  8. Cardiomyocytes display low mitochondrial priming and are highly resistant toward cytotoxic T-cell killing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiang; Halle, Stephan; Yu, Kai; Mishra, Pooja; Scherr, Michaela; Pietzsch, Stefan; Willenzon, Stefanie; Janssen, Anika; Boelter, Jasmin; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Eder, Matthias; Förster, Reinhold

    2016-06-01

    Following heart transplantation, alloimmune responses can cause graft rejection by damaging donor vascular and parenchymal cells. However, it remains unclear whether cardiomyocytes are also directly killed by immune cells. Here, we used two-photon microscopy to investigate how graft-specific effector CD8(+) T cells interact with cardiomyocytes in a mouse heart transplantation model. Surprisingly, we observed that CD8(+) T cells are completely impaired in killing cardiomyocytes. Even after virus-mediated preactivation, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells largely fail to lyse these cells although both cell types engage in dynamic interactions. Furthermore, we established a two-photon microscopy-based assay using intact myocardium to determine the susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis. This feature, also known as mitochondrial priming reveals an unexpected weak predisposition of cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis in situ. These observations together with the early exhaustion phenotype of graft-infiltrating specific T cells provide an explanation why cardiomyocytes are largely protected from direct CD8(+) T-cell-mediated killing. PMID:26970349

  9. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; de Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2–10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections.

  10. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections.

    PubMed

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; De Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2-10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections. PMID:27048757

  11. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; De Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2–10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections. PMID:27048757

  12. Learning impairment by minimal cortical injury in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jingyu; Wang, Min; Uchiumi, Osamu; Shui, Yuan; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tajima, Nobuyoshi; Akai, Takuya; Iizuka, Hideaki; Kato, Nobuo

    2016-04-15

    Brain injury accelerates amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and exacerbates Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulation of intracellular soluble Aβ impairs cognition prior to emergence of Aβ plaques. However, it is not known whether brain injury affects learning impairment attributable to intracellular soluble Aβ. We made a small injury by injecting glutamate into the parietal cortex in 3xTg AD mice of 4-5 months old, at which age soluble Aβ is accumulated without Aβ deposits. The size of glutamate-induced lesion was significantly larger than that of saline-injected control lesion. We reduced the relative difficulty of Morris water maze (MWM) task by repeating it twice, so that saline-injected 3xTg mice could perform as well as wild-type control mice. Under this condition, glutamate-injected 3xTg mice exhibited learning deficits. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 3 genes are upregulated, with one gene downregulated, more than 2 folds in the hippocampus. These 4 genes do not appear to be involved directly in learning but may be a part of signal cascade triggered by glutamate-induced small injury. Hippocampal content of soluble Aβ1-42 was increased in the glutamate 3xTg group. Facilitation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel accompanied learning recovery in the saline-control 3xTg group in agreement with our previous reports, in which learning deficits attributable to intracellular Aβ were alleviated by facilitating BK channels. However, BK channel remained suppressed in the glutamate 3xTg group. It is suggested that glutamate-induced injury worsens learning by enhancing the toxicity of soluble Aβ or increasing its content per se. PMID:26876740

  13. Repair and regeneration of tracheal surface epithelium and submucosal glands in a mouse model of hypoxic-ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    HEGAB, AHMED E.; NICKERSON, DEREK W.; HA, VI LUAN; DARMAWAN, DAPHNE O.; GOMPERTS, BRIGITTE N.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The heterotopic syngeneic tracheal transplant mouse model is an acute hypoxic-ischemic injury model that undergoes complete repair and regeneration. We hypothesized that the repair and regeneration process of the surface epithelium and submucosal glands would occur in a reproducible pattern that could be followed by the expression of specific markers of epithelial cell types. Methods We used the syngeneic heterotopic tracheal transplant model to develop a temporal and spatial map of cellular repair and regeneration by examining the tracheal grafts at post-transplant days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14. We used pulsed BrdU and immunofluorescent staining to identify and follow proliferating and repairing cell populations. Results We confirmed the reproducibility of the injury and repair in the model and we found a distinct sequence of reappearance of the various stem/ progenitor and differentiated cell populations of the tracheal surface epithelium and submucosal glands. In the initial phase, the basal and duct cells that survived the injury proliferated to re-epithelialize the basement membrane with K5 and K14 expressing cells. Then these cells proliferated further and differentiated to restore the function of the epithelium. During this repair process, TROP-2 marked all repairing submucosal gland tubules and ducts. Non-CCSP-expressing serous cells were found to differentiate 4–5 days before Clara, mucus and ciliated cells. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the reparative process of the airway epithelium will allow us to identify cell-specific mechanisms of repair that could be used as novel therapeutic approaches for abnormal repair leading to airway diseases. PMID:22617027

  14. Ratiometric imaging of calcium during ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated mouse hearts using Fura-2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We present an easily implementable method for measuring Fura-2 fluorescence from isolated mouse hearts using a commercially available switching light source and CCD camera. After calibration, it provides a good estimate of intracellular [Ca2+] with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, permitting study of changes in dispersion of diastolic [Ca2+], Ca2+ transient dynamics, and conduction velocities in mouse hearts. In a proof-of-principle study, we imaged isolated Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts with reversible regional myocardial infarctions. Methods Isolated mouse hearts were perfused in the Landendorff-mode and loaded with Fura-2. Hearts were then paced rapidly and subjected to 15 minutes of regional ischemia by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, following which the ligation was removed to allow reperfusion for 15 minutes. Fura-2 fluorescence was recorded at regular intervals using a high-speed CCD camera. The two wavelengths of excitation light were interleaved at a rate of 1 KHz with a computer controlled switching light source to illuminate the heart. Results Fura-2 produced consistent Ca2+ transients from different hearts. Ligating the coronary artery rapidly generated a well defined region with a dramatic rise in diastolic Ca2+ without a significant change in transient amplitude; Ca2+ handling normalized during reperfusion. Conduction velocity was reduced by around 50% during ischemia, and did not recover significantly when monitored for 15 minutes following reperfusion. Conclusions Our method of imaging Fura-2 from isolated whole hearts is capable of detecting pathological changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels in cardiac tissue. The persistent change in the conduction velocities indicates that changes to tissue connectivity rather than altered intracellular Ca2+ handling may be underlying the electrical instabilities commonly seen in patients following a myocardial infarction. PMID:22812644

  15. The Immune Response to Skin Trauma Is Dependent on the Etiology of Injury in a Mouse Model of Burn and Excision.

    PubMed

    Valvis, Samantha M; Waithman, Jason; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark W; Fear, Vanessa S

    2015-08-01

    Skin trauma has many different causes including incision, blunt force, and burn. All of these traumas trigger an immune response. However, it is currently unclear whether the immune response is specific to the etiology of the injury. This study was established to determine whether the immune response to excision and burn injury of equivalent extent was the same. Using a mouse model of a full-thickness 19 mm diameter excision or 19 mm diameter full-thickness burn injury, we examined the innate immune response at the level of serum cytokine induction, whole-blood lymphocyte populations, dendritic cell function/phenotype, and the ensuing adaptive immune responses of CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations. Strikingly, both the innate and adaptive immune system responses differed between the burn and excision injuries. Acute cytokine induction was faster and different in profile to that of excision injury, leading to changes in systemic monocyte and neutrophil levels. Differences in the immune profile between burn and excision were also noted up to day 84 post injury, suggesting that the etiology of injury leads to sustained changes in the response. This may in part underlie clinical observations of differences in patient morbidity and mortality in response to different skin injury types. PMID:25826422

  16. Effects of zileuton and montelukast in mouse experimental spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, T; Rossi, A; Mazzon, E; Di Paola, R; Muià, C; Caminiti, R; Bramanti, P; Sautebin, L; Cuzzocrea, S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis from arachidonic acid (AA). Here, we examined the role of the 5-LO-product, cysteinyl-LT (Cys-LT), with a 5-LO inhibitor (zileuton) and a Cys-LT, receptor antagonist (montelukast), in the inflammatory response and tissue injury associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Experimental approach: SCI was induced in mice by the application of vascular clips to the dura via a two-level T6 to T7 laminectomy for 1 min. Cord inflammation was assessed histologically and by measuring inflammatory mediators (ELISA) and apoptosis by annexin V, TUNEL, Fas ligand staining and Bax and Bcl-2 expression (immunohistochemistry and western blots). Motor function in hindlimbs was assessed by a locomotor rating scale, for 10 days after cord injury. Key results: SCI in mice resulted in tissue damage, oedema, neutrophil infiltration, apoptosis, tumour necrosis-α (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in injured tissue. Treatment of the mice with zileuton or montelukast reduced the spinal cord inflammation and tissue injury, neutrophil infiltration, TNF-α, COX-2 and pERK1/2 expression, PGE2 and LTB4 production, and apoptosis. In separate experiments, zileuton or montelukast significantly improved the recovery of limb function over 10 days. Conclusions and implications: Zileuton and montelukast produced a substantial reduction of inflammatory events associated with experimental SCI. Our data underline the important role of 5-LO and Cys-LT in neurotrauma. PMID:18059327

  17. Lipocalin-2 promotes m1 macrophages polarization in a mouse cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injury model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Xing, H; Mao, X; Li, L; Li, X; Li, Q

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a major issue in cardiac transplantation. Inflammatory processes play a major role in myocardial IR injury. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2), which is also known as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, has multiple functions that include the regulation of cell death/survival, cell migration/invasion, cell differentiation and iron delivery. In our study, the hearts of C57BL/6 mice were flushed with and stored in cold Bretschneider solution for 8 h and then transplanted into a syngeneic recipient. We found that Lcn2 neutralization decreased the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages. Troponin T (TnT) production, 24 h after myocardial IR injury, was reduced through anti-Lcn2 antibody administration. The cardiac output at 60 mmHg of afterload pressure was significantly increased in hearts administrated with anti-Lcn2 antibody administration (anti-Lcn-2: 58.9 ± 5.62 ml/min; control: 25.8 ± 4.1 ml/min; P < 0.05). Anti-Lcn2 antibody treatment suppressed M1 marker (IL-12, IL-23 and iNOS) expression but increased M2 marker (IL-10, Arg1 and Mrc1) expression. Furthermore, in our vitro and vivo experiments, we found that anti-Lcn2 antibody treatment failed to induce M1-related gene expression in response to LPS and that Lcn2 neutralization enhanced the expression of M2-related genes following IL-4 treatment. In conclusion, Lcn2 promotes M1 polarization, and Lcn2 neutralization attenuates cardiac IR injury. PMID:25359467

  18. Skeletal muscle reperfusion injury is enhanced in extracellular superoxide dismutase knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Woong; Qi, Wen-Ning; Cai, Yongting; Zelko, Igor; Liu, John Q; Chen, Long-En; Urbaniak, James R; Folz, Rodney J

    2005-07-01

    This study investigates the role of extracellular SOD (EC-SOD), the major extracellular antioxidant enzyme, in skeletal muscle ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Pedicled cremaster muscle flaps from homozygous EC-SOD knockout (EC-SOD-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 4.5-h ischemia and 90-min reperfusion followed by functional and molecular analyses. Our results revealed that EC-SOD-/- mice showed significantly profound I/R injury compared with WT littermates. In particular, there was a delayed and incomplete recovery of arterial spasm and blood flow during reperfusion, and more severe acute inflammatory reaction and muscle damage were noted in EC-SOD-/- mice. After 90-min reperfusion, intracellular SOD [copper- and zinc-containing SOD (CuZn-SOD) and manganese-containing (Mn-SOD)] mRNA levels decreased similarly in both groups. EC-SOD mRNA levels increased in WT mice, whereas EC-SOD mRNA was undetectable, as expected, in EC-SOD-/- mice. In both groups of animals, CuZn-SOD protein levels decreased and Mn-SOD protein levels remained unchanged. EC-SOD protein levels decreased in WT mice. Histological analysis showed diffuse edema and inflammation around muscle fibers, which was more pronounced in EC-SOD-/- mice. In conclusion, our data suggest that EC-SOD plays an important role in the protection from skeletal muscle I/R injury caused by excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:15778274

  19. [Macrophages promote the migration of neural stem cells into mouse spinal cord injury site].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhijian; Zhu, Wen; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the role of macrophages in the migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo and in vitro . Methods NSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were isolated from GFP transgenic mice and the immunofluorescence cytochemical staining of nestin was used to identify NSCs. After spinal cord injury was induced, the tissue level of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA was detected using quantitative real time PCR. The migration of GFP-NSCs was investigated 1 week after GFP-NSCs were injected into both sides of the damaged area. The effect of macrophage on the migration of NSCs in vitro was tested by Transwell(TM) system and the content of MCP-1 was detected by ELISA. Results NSCs highly expressed nestin. Compared with the control group, the level of MCP-1 mRNA significantly increased in the spinal cord injury group. The NSCs which were injected into the spinal cord migrated into the center of the injured site where F4/80 was highly expressed. Macrophages significantly increased the number of migrating NSCs in vitro and the secretion of MCP-1. Conclusion Macrophages induce NSC migrating into the spinal cord injury site possibly through promoting the secretion of MCP-1. PMID:27609570

  20. Cardiomyocyte specific deletion of PP2A causes cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Fang, Chao; Xu, Di; Xu, Yidan; Fu, Heling; Li, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common pathological alteration in heart disease, which has been reported to be connected with serine/threonine protein phosphatases that control the dephosphorylation of a variety of cardiac proteins. Herein, we generated protein phosphatase type 2A knockout expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase protein fused to two mutant estrogen-receptor ligand-binding domains (MerCreMer) under the control of the a-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac function of mice was determined by echocardiography. Decrease in PP2A activity leads to increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Loss of PP2ACα leads to the heart failure, including the changes of EF, FS, LV, ANP and BNP. On the molecular level, knockout mice shows increased expression of B55a and B56e at 60 days after tamoxifen injection. Additionally, the regulation of the Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway is severely disturbed in knockout mice. In conclusion, cardiomyocyte specific deletion of PP2A gene causes the cardiac hypertrophy. We will use the knockout mice to generate a type of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy mouse model with myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27186301

  1. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Enhances Endogenous Cardiomyocyte Regeneration after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Masato; Nagai, Toshio; Takahashi, Toshinao; Liu, Mei Lan; Kondou, Naomichi; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Sashida, Goro; Iwama, Atsushi; Komuro, Issei; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells or precursor cells regenerate cardiomyocytes; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. We generated CreLacZ mice in which more than 99.9% of the cardiomyocytes in the left ventricular field were positive for 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactoside (X-gal) staining immediately after tamoxifen injection. Three months after myocardial infarction (MI), the MI mice had more X-gal-negative (newly generated) cells than the control mice (3.04 ± 0.38/mm2, MI; 0.47 ± 0.16/mm2, sham; p < 0.05). The cardiac side population (CSP) cell fraction contained label-retaining cells, which differentiated into X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes after MI. We injected a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-expression construct at the time of MI and identified a significant functional improvement in the LIF-treated group. At 1 month after MI, in the MI border and scar area, the LIF-injected mice had 31.41 ± 5.83 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2, whereas the control mice had 12.34 ± 2.56 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2 (p < 0.05). Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyurinide (EdU) administration after MI, the percentages of EdU-positive CSP cells in the LIF-treated and control mice were 29.4 ± 2.7% and 10.6 ± 3.7%, respectively, which suggests that LIF influenced CSP proliferation. Moreover, LIF activated the Janus kinase (JAK)signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK)extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathways in CSPs in vivo and in vitro. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-bone marrow-chimeric CreLacZ mouse results indicated that LIF did not stimulate cardiogenesis via circulating bone marrow-derived cells during the 4 weeks following MI. Thus, LIF stimulates, in part, stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte regeneration by activating cardiac stem or precursor cells. This approach may represent a novel therapeutic

  2. The neuroprotective effect of salubrinal in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Barak, Shani; Rachmany, Lital; Goldstein, Renana Baratz; Zilberstein, Yael; Pick, Chaim G

    2015-03-01

    We have previously reported that mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) induced cognitive deficits as well as apoptotic changes in the brains of mice. Apoptosis may be caused by severe, prolonged accumulation of misfolded proteins, and protein aggregation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress). In an additional study, we have reported that mTBI activated the pro-apoptotic arm of the integrated stress response (ISR). The main goal of the present study was to test the involvement of the adaptive eIF2α/ATF4 pathway in mTBI-affected brains. Head injury was induced with a noninvasive, closed-head weight drop (30 g) to ICR mice. Salubrinal, the selective phosphatase inhibitor of p-eIF2α, was injected immediately and 24 h after mTBI (1 mg/kg, ip). Y-maze and novel object recognition tests to assess spatial and visual memories, respectively, were conducted either 7 or 30 days post-trauma. Salubrinal administration significantly improved memory deficits following mTBI. Slaubrinal also prevented the elevation of degenerating neurons and the reduction of mature neurons in the cortex (as seen by immunofluorescent staining with Fluoro-Jade-B and NeuN antibodies, 72 h and 1 week post-mTBI, respectively). Western blot analysis revealed that salubrinal prevented the significant reduction in eIF2α and ATF4 phosphorylation in mTBI brains 72 h post-injury. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that although the reduction in p-eIF2α did not reach significance, salubrinal administration elevated it dramatically. Our results show that targeting the translational/adaptive arm of the ISR with salubrinal may serve as a therapeutic strategy for brain damage. PMID:25582550

  3. Magnesium lithospermate B reduces inflammatory response in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaohua; Liu, Wenyu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Zhengxin; Ding, Guoshan; Guo, Wenyuan; Fu, Zhiren

    2014-06-01

    It has been well proved that acute inflammatory response and hepatocellular apoptosis contributed to the pathogenesis of liver ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury. A vast amount of research has demonstrated that magnesium lithospermate B (MLB) has potent anti-apoptosis and potential anti-inflammatory pharmacological properties. However, it has not previously been examined whether MLB can attenuate hepatic IR injury. Firstly, the optimal dose of MLB to protect against hepatic IR injury was determined using hepatic IR model in mice. Then, the effect of MLB on IR-induced inflammatory response was detected in detail. We found that MLB exhibited protective effect from the beginning of 50 mg/kg and culminated at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. The alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in MLB group were markedly decreased. Severe hepatocellular swelling/necrosis, sinusoidal/vascular congestion and inflammatory cell infiltration were seen and a large number of apoptotic cells were found in the liver samples from Saline group, while minimal damage and very few apoptotic cells were noted in the samples from MLB group. Kuppfer cells infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and mRNA level of CD11b in MLB group was significantly decreased. Serum TNF-a and IL-6, and mRNA expression of CXCL-10 and ICAM-1 was markedly decreased in the samples from MLB group. Inflammatory signaling pathway activation was largely prevented in MLB group. MLB can significantly attenuate IR-induced hepatocellular damage and hepatocellular apoptosis by preventing inflammatory signaling pathways activation, inflammatory mediators expression and macrophage and neutrophil infiltration. PMID:24385154

  4. Noncoding RNAs as regulators of cardiomyocyte proliferation and death.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Maria-Teresa; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Thum, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease, in particular, is responsible for the majority of cardiac-related deaths. Given the negligible regenerative potential of the human myocardium, there is a strong need for therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancing cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation following injury or at inhibiting their death. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules regulating gene expression at a post-transcriptional level with important functions in cardiovascular physiology and disease. It has been demonstrated that miRNAs can influence the ability of cardiomyocytes to enter the cell cycle and/or escape from death pathways. Additionally, long non coding-RNAs could be involved in such pathways. This review summarizes recent evidences on noncoding RNAs regulating proliferation and death of cardiomyocytes representing a future therapeutic for the treatment of heart diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25665459

  5. Role of cysteinyl leukotriene signaling in a mouse model of noise-induced cochlear injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Sub; Kang, Seo-Jun; Seo, Mi-Kyoung; Jou, Ilo; Woo, Hyun Goo; Park, Sang Myun

    2014-07-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common types of sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of leukotriene receptors and their respective changes in the cochlea after hazardous noise exposure. We found that the expression of cysteinyl leukotriene type 1 receptor (CysLTR1) was increased until 3 d after noise exposure and enhanced CysLTR1 expression was mainly observed in the spiral ligament and the organ of Corti. Expression of 5-lipoxygenase was increased similar to that of CysLTR1, and there was an accompanying elevation of CysLT concentration. Posttreatment with leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), montelukast, for 4 consecutive days after noise exposure significantly decreased the permanent threshold shift and also reduced the hair cell death in the cochlea. Using RNA-sequencing, we found that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) was up-regulated after noise exposure, and it was significantly inhibited by montelukast. Posttreatment with a MMP-3 inhibitor also protected the hair cells and reduced the permanent threshold shift. These findings suggest that acoustic injury up-regulated CysLT signaling in the cochlea and cochlear injury could be attenuated by LTRA through regulation of MMP-3 expression. This study provides mechanistic insights into the role of CysLTs signaling in noise-induced hearing loss and the therapeutic benefit of LTRA. PMID:24958862

  6. Stanniocalcin-1 Protects a Mouse Model from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Affecting ROS-Mediated Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dajun; Shang, Huiping; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). However, the molecular mechanisms remain widely unknown. STC-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas most ROS-mediated pathways are associated with ischemic injury. Therefore, to explore the mechanism, the effects of STC-1 on ROS-medicated pathways were studied. Non-traumatic vascular clamps were used to establish RIRI mouse models. The serum levels of STC-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon (IFN) γ, P53, and capase-3 were measured by ELISA kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by fluorescence spectrofluorometer. All these molecules changed significantly in a RIRI model mouse when compared with those in a sham control. Kidney cells were isolated from sham and model mice. STC-1 was overexpressed or knockout in these kidney cells. The molecules in ROS-medicated pathways were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The results showed that STC-1 is an effective ROS scavenger. The serum levels of STC-1, MDA and SOD activity were increased while the serum levels of IL-6, iIFN-γ, P53, and capase-3 were decreased in a model group when compared with a sham control (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of STC-1,p53, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (p-MEKK-1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), IkB kinase (p-IKK), nuclear factor (NF) κB, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) and caspase-3 changed significantly in kidney cells isolated from a RIRI model when compared to those isolated from a sham control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, STC-1 overexpression or silence caused significant changes of the levels of these ROS-mediated molecules. Therefore, STC-1 maybe improve anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis activities by affecting ROS-mediated pathways, especially the phospho-modifications of the respective proteins, resulting in the increase of SOD and

  7. Enrichment of live unlabelled cardiomyocytes from heterogeneous cell populations using manipulation of cell settling velocity by magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Sofla, Aarash; Cirkovic, Bojana; Hsieh, Anne; Miklas, Jason W.; Filipovic, Nenad; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    The majority of available cardiomyocyte markers are intercellular proteins, limiting our ability to enrich live cardiomyocytes from heterogeneous cell preparations in the absence of genetic labeling. Here, we describe enrichment of live cardiomyocytes from the hearts of adult mice in a label-free microfluidic approach. The separation device consisted of a vertical column (15 mm long, 700 μm diameter), placed between permanent magnets resulting in a field strength of 1.23 T. To concentrate the field at the column wall, the column was wrapped with 69 μm diameter nickel wire. Before passing the cells through the column, the cardiomyocytes in the cell suspension had been rendered paramagnetic by treatment of the adult mouse heart cell preparation with sodium nitrite (2.5 mM) for 20 min on ice. The cell suspension was loaded into the vertical column from the top and upon settling, the non-myocytes were removed by the upward flow from the column. The cardiomyocytes were then collected from the column by applying a higher flow rate (144 μl/min). We found that by applying a separation flow rate of 4.2 μl/min in the first step, we can enrich live adult cardiomyocytes to 93% ± 2% in a label-free manner. The cardiomyocytes maintained viability immediately after separation and upon 24 h in culture. PMID:24404002

  8. Gαi2-mediated protection from ischaemic injury is modulated by endogenous RGS proteins in the mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Waterson, Rachael E.; Thompson, Corbin G.; Mabe, Nathaniel W.; Kaur, Kuljeet; Talbot, Jeffery N.; Neubig, Richard R.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Regulator of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins act as molecular ‘off switches’ that terminate G protein signalling by catalyzing the hydrolysis of Gα-bound GTP to GDP. Many different Gαi-coupled receptors have been implicated in the cardioprotective effects of ischaemic preconditioning. However, the role of RGS proteins in modulating cardioprotection has not been previously investigated. We used mice that were homozygous (GS/GS) or heterozygous (GS/+) for a mutation in Gαi2 rendering it RGS-insensitive (G184S) to determine whether interactions between endogenous RGS proteins and Gαi2 modulate Gαi-mediated protection from ischaemic injury. Methods and results Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischaemia and 2 h reperfusion. Infarcts in GS/GS (14.5% of area at risk) and GS/+ (22.6% of AAR) hearts were significantly smaller than those of +/+ hearts (37.2% of AAR) and recovery of contractile function was significantly enhanced in GS/GS and GS/+ hearts compared with +/+ hearts. The cardioprotective phenotype was not reversed by wortmannin or U0126 but was reversed by 5-hydroxydecanoic acid and HMR 1098, indicating that RGS-insensitive Gαi2 protects the heart through a mechanism that requires functional ATP-dependent potassium channels but does not require acute activation of extracellular-regulated kinase or Akt signalling pathways. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that Gαi2-mediated cardioprotection is suppressed by RGS proteins. These data suggest that RGS proteins may provide novel therapeutic targets to protect the heart from ischaemic injury. PMID:21349876

  9. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tzekov, Radouil; Dawson, Clint; Orlando, Megan; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon; Evans, James; Crynen, Gogce; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL), tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B), collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3) and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1), APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the involvement of

  10. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil; Dawson, Clint; Orlando, Megan; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon; Evans, James; Crynen, Gogce; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL), tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B), collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3) and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1), APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the involvement of