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Sample records for mouse cerebral cortical

  1. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes—with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later

  2. Junk DNA Used in Cerebral Cortical Evolution.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Thomas; Price, David J

    2016-06-15

    In this issue of Neuron, Rani et al. (2016) address important questions about the mechanisms of cerebral cortical evolution. They describe how a primate-specific long non-coding RNA titrates the levels of a microRNA that regulates an ancient signaling pathway controlling neuronal numbers. PMID:27311076

  3. MicroRNAs tune cerebral cortical neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Volvert, M-L; Rogister, F; Moonen, G; Malgrange, B; Nguyen, L

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding genes harbor miRNA recognition sequences in their 3′ untranslated region and are thus putative targets. While functions of miRNAs have been extensively characterized in various tissues, their multiple contributions to cerebral cortical development are just beginning to be unveiled. This review aims to outline the evidence collected to date demonstrating a role for miRNAs in cerebral corticogenesis with a particular emphasis on pathways that control the birth and maturation of functional excitatory projection neurons. PMID:22858543

  4. Comparative aspects of cerebral cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Zoltán; Métin, Christine; Stoykova, Anastassia; Tarabykin, Victor; Price, David J.; Francis, Fiona; Meyer, Gundela; Dehay, Colette; Kennedy, Henry

    2006-01-01

    This review intends to provide examples how comparative and genetic analyses both contribute to our understanding of the rules for cortical development and evolution. Genetic studies helped to understand evolutionary rules of telencephalic organization in vertebrates. The control of the establishment of conserved telencephalic subdivisions and the formation of boundaries between these subdivisions has been examined and revealed the very specific alterations at the striatocortical junction. Comparative studies and genetic analyses both demonstrated the differential origin and migratory pattern of the two basic neuron types of the cerebral cortex. GABAergic interneurons are mostly generated in the subpallium and a common mechanisms govern their migration to the dorsal cortex in both mammals and sauropsids. The pyramidal neurons are generated within the cortical germinal zone and migrate radially. The earliest generated cell layers comprising preplate cells. Reelin positive Cajal-Retzius cells are a general feature of all vertebrates studied so far, however, there is a considerable amplification of the reelin signaling, which might have contributed to the establishment of the basic mammalian pattern of cortical development. Based on numerous recent observations we shall present an argument that specialization of the mitotic compartments might constitute a major drive behind the evolution of the mammalian cortex. Comparative developmental studies revealed distinct features in the early compartments of the developing macaque brain drawing our attention to the limitations of some of the current model systems for understanding human developmental abnormalities of the cortex. Comparative and genetic aspects of cortical development both reveal the workings of evolution. PMID:16519657

  5. Genome-wide analyses of human perisylvian cerebral cortical patterning

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, B. S.; Tentler, D.; Perederiy, J. V.; Oldham, M. C.; Coppola, G.; Geschwind, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the well established role of the frontal and posterior perisylvian cortices in many facets of human-cognitive specializations, including language, little is known about the developmental patterning of these regions in the human brain. We performed a genome-wide analysis of human cerebral patterning during midgestation, a critical epoch in cortical regionalization. A total of 345 genes were identified as differentially expressed between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the remaining cerebral cortex. Gene ontology categories representing transcription factors were enriched in STG, whereas cell-adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules were enriched in the other cortical regions. Quantitative RT-PCR or in situ hybridization was performed to validate differential expression in a subset of 32 genes, most of which were confirmed. LIM domain-binding 1 (LDB1), which we show to be enriched in the STG, is a recently identified interactor of LIM domain only 4 (LMO4), a gene known to be involved in the asymmetric pattering of the perisylvian region in the developing human brain. Protocadherin 17 (PCDH17), a neuronal cell adhesion molecule, was highly enriched in focal regions of the human prefrontal cortex. Contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2), in which mutations are known to cause autism, epilepsy, and language delay, showed a remarkable pattern of anterior-enriched cortical expression in human that was not observed in mouse or rat. These data highlight the importance of expression analysis of human brain and the utility of cross-species comparisons of gene expression. Genes identified here provide a foundation for understanding molecular aspects of human-cognitive specializations and the disorders that disrupt them. PMID:17978184

  6. Correlation of cerebral cortical morphology with behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.

    1989-03-01

    Association between functional damage and damage to the central nervous system from toxic agents can be used to determine the value of behavioral tests as predictors of damage to the nervous system. Variability in data from behavioral tests may be caused, in part, by varying levels of structural differences in the nervous system. Stepwise multiple regression is one method for analyzing the relationship between variability in data resulting from linkage between functional and morphological or other parameters of the structure of the nervous system. As an example, the predictive value of four behavioral tests is assessed in detecting thinning of the cerebral cortex following gestational exposure of rats to ionizing radiation. In this analysis, there were seven independent variables for predicting cortical thickness. The sequence of number of times each variable was used in prediction, from most frequent to least frequent, was: angle of stride greater than negative geotaxis greater than continuous corridor greater than body weight greater than width of stride greater than length of stride greater than reflex suspension. The data support the concept that there are varying degrees of predictive associations between these functional and cortical parameters.

  7. Cortical Interneurons Require Jnk1 to Enter and Navigate the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Abigail K.; Meechan, Daniel W.; Adney, Danielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Proper assembly of cortical circuitry relies on the correct migration of cortical interneurons from their place of birth in the ganglionic eminences to their place of terminal differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Although molecular mechanisms mediating cortical interneuron migration have been well studied, intracellular signals directing their migration are largely unknown. Here we illustrate a novel and essential role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in guiding the pioneering population of cortical interneurons into the mouse cerebral cortex. Migrating cortical interneurons express Jnk proteins at the entrance to the cortical rudiment and have enriched expression of Jnk1 relative to noninterneuronal cortical cells. Pharmacological blockade of JNK signaling in ex vivo slice cultures resulted in dose-dependent and highly specific disruption of interneuron migration into the nascent cortex. Time-lapse imaging revealed that JNK-inhibited cortical interneurons advanced slowly and assumed aberrant migratory trajectories while traversing the cortical entry zone. In vivo analyses of JNK-deficient embryos supported our ex vivo pharmacological data. Deficits in interneuron migration were observed in Jnk1 but not Jnk2 single nulls, and those migratory deficits were further exacerbated when homozygous loss of Jnk1 was combined with heterozygous reduction of Jnk2. Finally, genetic ablation of Jnk1 and Jnk2 from cortical interneurons significantly perturbed migration in vivo, but not in vitro, suggesting JNK activity functions to direct their guidance rather than enhance their motility. These data suggest JNK signaling, predominantly mediated by interneuron expressed Jnk1, is required for guiding migration of cortical interneurons into and within the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:24899703

  8. Cerebral perfusion and cortical thickness indicate cortical involvement in mild Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Boord, Peter; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Cortical dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be caused by disruption to ascending systems or by intrinsic cortical neuropathology. We introduce and conduct a joint analysis of metabolism and atrophy capable of identifying whether metabolic disruption occurs in mild PD without cortical atrophy, to determine the extent and spatial pattern of cortical involvement in mild PD. The design was observational, studying 23 cognitively normal participants with mild PD (mean Hoehn & Yahr stage 2) and 21 healthy controls. Cortical thickness (obtained from analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] with FreeSurfer) and cerebral perfusion measures (obtained from arterial spin labeling [ASL]) analyzed independently and then together in a joint multiple factorial analysis to identify spatial patterns of perfusion and cortical thickness. We identify a pattern of changes in perfusion and cortical thickness characterized by symmetric parietal cortical thinning and reduced precuneus perfusion, with relative preservation of thickness and perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right prefrontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus. The expression of this pattern is correlated with motor system symptoms and speed of processing. A spatial pattern of joint parietal cortical thinning and disproportionate reduction in perfusion occurs in our nondemented PD sample. We found no PD-related components of reduced perfusion without cortical thinning. This suggests that PD affects the cortex itself, even when symptoms are relatively mild. PMID:25759166

  9. Loss of Wdfy3 in mice alters cerebral cortical neurogenesis reflecting aspects of the autism pathology

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Lori A.; Ross, Adam P.; Cates, Staci L.; Scott, Sean E.; Wu, Dennis; Sohn, Jiho; Pleasure, David; Pleasure, Samuel J.; Adamopoulos, Iannis E.; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are complex and heterogeneous developmental disabilities affecting an ever-increasing number of children worldwide. The diverse manifestations and complex, largely genetic etiology of ASDs pose a major challenge to the identification of unifying neuropathological features. Here we describe the neurodevelopmental defects in mice that carry deleterious alleles of the Wdfy3 gene, recently recognized as causative in ASDs. Loss of Wdfy3 leads to a regionally enlarged cerebral cortex resembling early brain overgrowth described in many children on the autism spectrum. In addition, affected mouse mutants display migration defects of cortical projection neurons, a recognized cause of epilepsy, which is significantly comorbid with autism. Our analysis of affected mouse mutants defines an important role for Wdfy3 in regulating neural progenitor divisions and neural migration in the developing brain. Furthermore, Wdfy3 is essential to cerebral expansion and functional organization while its loss-of-function results in pathological changes characteristic of ASDs. PMID:25198012

  10. Effect of anxiety on cortical cerebral blood flow and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.C.; Gur, R.E.; Resnick, S.M.; Skolnick, B.E.; Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.

    1987-04-01

    The relation between anxiety and cortical activity was compared in two samples of normal volunteers. One group was studied with the noninvasive xenon-133 inhalation technique for measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the other with positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/Flurodeoxyglucose (/sup 18/FDG) for measuring cerebral metabolic rates (CMR) for glucose. The inhalation technique produced less anxiety than the PET procedure, and for low anxiety subjects, there was a linear increase in CBF with anxiety. For higher anxiety subjects, however, there was a linear decrease in CBF with increased anxiety. The PET group manifested a linear decrease in CMR with increased anxiety. The results indicate that anxiety can have systematic effects on cortical activity, and this should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different procedures. They also suggest a physiologic explanation of a fundamental behavioral law that stipulates a curvilinear, inverted-U relationship between anxiety and performance.

  11. Emerging roles of Axin in cerebral cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tao; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Proper functioning of the cerebral cortex depends on the appropriate production and positioning of neurons, establishment of axon–dendrite polarity, and formation of proper neuronal connectivity. Deficits in any of these processes greatly impair neural functions and are associated with various human neurodevelopmental disorders including microcephaly, cortical heterotopias, and autism. The application of in vivo manipulation techniques such as in utero electroporation has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie neural development in vivo. Axin is a scaffold protein that regulates neuronal differentiation and morphogenesis in vitro. Recent studies provide novel insights into the emerging roles of Axin in gene expression and cytoskeletal regulation during neurogenesis, neuronal polarization, and axon formation. This review summarizes current knowledge on Axin as a key molecular controller of cerebral cortical development. PMID:26106297

  12. In Utero Electroporation: Assay System for Migration of Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    During the development of the cerebral cortex, the majority of cortical neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) facing the lateral ventricle and then migrate toward the pial surface to form the highly organized 6-layered cerebral cortex. Detailed profiles of these processes and their molecular mechanisms had been largely unknown because of the absence of an efficient assay system. The in vivo electroporation system was initially devised for use within chick embryos (Funahashi et al., 1999; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Muramatsu et al., 1997), and we and other groups have used that system as a basis for developing an in utero electroporation system, which allows plasmid DNA to be introduced into cortical progenitor cells in developing mouse embryos in the uterus (Fukuchi-Shimogori and Grove, 2001; Saito and Nakatsuji, 2001; Tabata and Nakajima, 2001; Takahashi et al., 2002). In utero electroporation of other sites in the brain, including the hippocampus (Navarro-Quiroga et al., 2007), cerebral basal ganglia (Borrell et al., 2005; Nakahira et al., 2006), cortical hem (Takiguchi-Hayashi et al., 2004), and dorsal thalamus (Bonnin et al., 2007), has recently been reported. Introducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) enables the entire processes of migration and layer formation to be visualized (Ajioka and Nakajima, 2005; Sasaki et al., 2008; Tabata and Nakajima, 2002, 2003), and the role of any gene involved in these processes can be easily assessed by overexpressing the proteins or their mutants (Ohshima et al., 2007), or by knocking down the genes by the RNA interference technique (Bai et al., 2003). Furthermore, the Tet-On/Off system and/or other plasmid- vector-based technologies will expand the potential of the analyses. In this section we review the principles and methods of gene transfer into the cortical wall of mouse embryos by means of the in utero electroporation system.

  13. Extraction of the cerebral cortical boundaries from MRI for measurement of cortical thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskildsen, Simon F.; Uldahl, Mark; Ostergaard, Lasse R.

    2005-04-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cause atrophy of the cerebral cortex. Measurements of cerebral cortical thickness and volume are used in the quantification and localization of atrophy. It is possible to measure the thickness of the cerebral cortex manually from magnetic resonance imaging, but partial volume effects, orthogonality problems, large amounts of manual labor and operator bias makes it difficult to conduct measurements on large patient populations. Automatic quantification and localization of atrophy is a highly desirable goal, as it facilitates the study of early anatomical changes and track disease progression on large populations. The first step in achieving this goal is to develop robust and accurate methods for measuring cortical thickness and volume automatically. We have developed a new method, capable of both extracting surface representations of the cortical boundaries from magnetic resonance imaging and measuring the cortical thickness. Experiments show that the developed method is robust and performs well on datasets of both healthy subjects and subjects suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Early cortical thickness changes predict β-amyloid deposition in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grand'maison, Marilyn; Zehntner, Simone P; Ho, Ming-Kai; Hébert, François; Wood, Andrew; Carbonell, Felix; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Hamel, Edith; Bedell, Barry J

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have identified aberrant cortical structure in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The association between MRI-derived cortical morphometry measures and β-amyloid, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we explored the potential relationship between early alterations in cortical thickness and later stage β-amyloid deposition, using a novel approach, in a transgenic AD mouse model. We acquired longitudinal anatomical MRI scans from mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and age-matched wild-type mice at 1 and 3.5months-of-age, and employed fully-automated image processing methods to derive objective, quantitative measures of cortical thickness on a region-of-interest basis. We also generated 3D quantitative immunohistochemistry (qIHC) volumes of deposited β-amyloid burden from 18month-old transgenic mice using an automated, production-level process. These studies revealed thinner cortex in most regions in the 1month-old transgenic mice relative to age-matched wild-types, with the exception of the frontal, perirhinal/entorhinal, posterior cingulate, and retrosplenial cortical regions. Between 1 and 3.5months-of-age, the transgenic mice demonstrated stable or increasing cortical thickness, while the wild-type mice showed cortical thinning. Based on data from co-registered 3D MRI and qIHC volumes, we identified an association between abnormal, early, regional cortical thickness change over 2.5months and later β-amyloid deposition. These observations suggest that the spatio-temporal pattern of early (pre-plaque) alterations in cerebral cortical structure is indicative of regional predisposition to later β-amyloid pathology in a transgenic AD mouse model. PMID:23454197

  15. Response of Quiescent Cerebral Cortical Astrocytes to Nanofibrillar Scaffold Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Virginia; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Xie, Kan; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I.

    2013-03-01

    We present results of an investigation to examine the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger specific signaling cascades with morphological consequences. Differences in the morphological responses of quiescent cerebral cortical astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar matrices versus poly-L-lysine functionalized glass and Aclar, and unfunctionalized Aclar surfaces were demonstrated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and phalloidin staining of F-actin. The differences and similarities of the morphological responses were consistent with differences and similarities of the surface polarity and surface roughness of the four surfaces investigated in this work, characterized using contact angle and AFM measurements. The three-dimensional capability of AFM was also used to identify differences in cell spreading. An initial quantitative immunolabeling study further identified significant differences in the activation of the Rho GTPases: Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA, which are upstream regulators of the observed morphological responses: filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  16. Anatomic variations of anterior cerebral artery cortical branches.

    PubMed

    Stefani, M A; Schneider, F L; Marrone, A C; Severino, A G; Jackowski, A P; Wallace, M C

    2000-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is a major vessel responsible for the blood supply to the interhemispheric region. The ACA segment after the anterior communicating artery (AComA) origin is called the distal ACA and has central and cortical branches. The cortical branches are distributed in the different regions of the orbital and medial part of the brain. The objects of this study are the anatomical variations found in the distal ACA. In 76 hemispheres the ACA distal branches were injected with latex and dissected under microscope magnification. Vessel diameters and distances between vessel origins and anterior communicating artery were recorded and analyzed. Microsurgical dissection was carried out to demonstrate anatomic variations of these vessels. Average diameter of ACA at origin was 2.61 +/- 0.34 mm and average diameter of cortical branches diameter ranged from 0.79 +/- 0.27 mm to 1.84 +/- 0.3 mm. Distances between vessel origin and AComA ranged from 7.68 +/- 3.91 mm (orbitofrontal) to 112.6 +/- 11.63 mm (inferior internal parietal). This study found anatomical variations: a single (azygos) ACA was present in one case and three in three cases. Crossing branches of the distal ACA to the contralateral hemisphere were present in 26% of the cases. In some cases a single ACA may supply the posterior hemispheric region through crossing branches. This calls attention to potential bilateral brain infarcts due to a single unilateral ACA occlusion. PMID:10873213

  17. Primary cilia and Gli3 activity regulate cerebral cortical size

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra L.; Wilson, John P.; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Baolin; McConnell, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    During neural development, patterning, neurogenesis and overall growth are highly regulated and coordinated between different brain regions. Here, we show that primary cilia and the regulation of Gli activity, are necessary for the normal expansion of the cerebral cortex. We show that loss of Kif3a, an important functional component of primary cilia, leads to the degeneration of primary cilia, marked overgrowth of the cortex, and altered cell cycle kinetics within cortical progenitors. The G1 phase of the cell cycle is shortened through a mechanism likely involving reduced Gli3 activity and a resulting increase in expression of cyclin D1 and Fgf15. The defects in Gli3 activity alone are sufficient to accelerate cell cycle kinetics and cause the molecular changes seen in brains that lack cilia. Finally, we show that levels of full-length and repressor Gli3 proteins are tightly regulated during normal development and correlate with changes in expression of two known Shh-target genes, CyclinD1 and Fgf15, and with the normal lengthening of the cell cycle during corticogenesis. These data suggest that Gli3 activity is regulated through the primary cilium to control cell cycle length in the cortex and thus determine cortical size. PMID:21976438

  18. Toward a Genetic Dissection of Cortical Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z. Josh

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex gives rise to a wide range of mental activities and consists of a constellation of interconnected areas that are built from a set of basic circuit templates. Major obstacles to understanding cortical architecture include the diversity of cell types, their highly recurrent local and global connectivity, dynamic circuit operations, and a convoluted developmental assembly process rooted in the genome. With our increasing knowledge of gene expression and developmental genetic principles, it is now feasible to launch a program of genetic dissection of cortical circuits through systematic targeting of cell types and fate-mapping of neural progenitors. Strategic design of even a modest number of mouse driver lines will facilitate efforts to compile a cell type parts list, build a Cortical Cell Atlas, establish experimental access to modern tools, and provide coordinates for tracing developmental trajectory from circuit assembly to functional operation. PMID:25233312

  19. Cortical superficial siderosis: detection and clinical significance in cerebral amyloid angiopathy and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Charidimou, Andreas; Linn, Jennifer; Vernooij, Meike W; Opherk, Christian; Akoudad, Saloua; Baron, Jean-Claude; Greenberg, Steven M; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Werring, David J

    2015-08-01

    Cortical superficial siderosis describes a distinct pattern of blood-breakdown product deposition limited to cortical sulci over the convexities of the cerebral hemispheres, sparing the brainstem, cerebellum and spinal cord. Although cortical superficial siderosis has many possible causes, it is emerging as a key feature of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a common and important age-related cerebral small vessel disorder leading to intracerebral haemorrhage and dementia. In cerebral amyloid angiopathy cohorts, cortical superficial siderosis is associated with characteristic clinical symptoms, including transient focal neurological episodes; preliminary data also suggest an association with a high risk of future intracerebral haemorrhage, with potential implications for antithrombotic treatment decisions. Thus, cortical superficial siderosis is of relevance to neurologists working in neurovascular, memory and epilepsy clinics, and neurovascular emergency services, emphasizing the need for appropriate blood-sensitive magnetic resonance sequences to be routinely acquired in these clinical settings. In this review we focus on recent developments in neuroimaging and detection, aetiology, prevalence, pathophysiology and clinical significance of cortical superficial siderosis, with a particular emphasis on cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also highlight important areas for future investigation and propose standards for evaluating cortical superficial siderosis in research studies. PMID:26115675

  20. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Vasistha, Navneet A; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F P; Arnold, Sebastian J; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2(Cre) mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  1. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vasistha, Navneet A.; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F.P.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2Cre mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  2. 17β-Estradiol Modulates Gene Expression in the Female Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Gwendolyn I.; Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) plays critical roles in a number of target tissues including the mammary gland, reproductive tract, bone, and brain. Although it is clear that E2 reduces inflammation and ischemia-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, the molecular mechanisms mediating the effects of E2 in this brain region are lacking. Thus, we examined the cortical transcriptome using a mouse model system. Female adult mice were ovariectomized and implanted with silastic tubing containing oil or E2. After 7 days, the cerebral cortices were dissected and RNA was isolated and analyzed using RNA-sequencing. Analysis of the transcriptomes of control and E2-treated animals revealed that E2 treatment significantly altered the transcript levels of 88 genes. These genes were associated with long term synaptic potentiation, myelination, phosphoprotein phosphatase activity, mitogen activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling. E2 also altered the expression of genes linked to lipid synthesis and metabolism, vasoconstriction and vasodilation, cell-cell communication, and histone modification. These results demonstrate the far-reaching and diverse effects of E2 in the cerebral cortex and provide valuable insight to begin to understand cortical processes that may fluctuate in a dynamic hormonal environment. PMID:25372139

  3. Mouse Embryonic Retina Delivers Information Controlling Cortical Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Ciro; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development [1]. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded [2], the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs) during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal). Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system. PMID:21170332

  4. Prenatal Cerebral Ischemia Disrupts MRI-Defined Cortical Microstructure Through Disturbances in Neuronal Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kelly; Azimi-Zonooz, Aryan; Chen, Kevin; Riddle, Art; Gong, Xi; Sharifnia, Elica; Hagen, Matthew; Ahmad, Tahir; Leigland, Lindsey A.; Back, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Children who survive preterm birth exhibit persistent unexplained disturbances in cerebral cortical growth with associated cognitive and learning disabilities. The mechanisms underlying these deficits remain elusive. We used ex vivo diffusion magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate in a preterm large-animal model that cerebral ischemia impairs cortical growth and the normal maturational decline in cortical fractional anisotropy (FA). Analysis of pyramidal neurons revealed that cortical deficits were associated with impaired expansion of the dendritic arbor and reduced synaptic density. Together, these findings suggest a link between abnormal cortical FA and disturbances of neuronal morphological development. To experimentally investigate this possibility, we measured the orientation distribution of dendritic branches and observed that it corresponds with the theoretically predicted pattern of increased anisotropy within cases that exhibited elevated cortical FA after ischemia. We conclude that cortical growth impairments are associated with diffuse disturbances in the dendritic arbor and synapse formation of cortical neurons, which may underlie the cognitive and learning disabilities in survivors of preterm birth. Further, measurement of cortical FA may be useful for noninvasively detecting neurological disorders affecting cortical development. PMID:23325800

  5. Environmental Enrichment Modulates Cortico-Cortical Interactions in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Santi; Maffei, Lamberto; Caleo, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental protocol based on a complex sensorimotor stimulation that dramatically affects brain development. While it is widely believed that the effects of EE result from the unique combination of different sensory and motor stimuli, it is not known whether and how cortico-cortical interactions are shaped by EE. Since the primary visual cortex (V1) is one of the best characterized targets of EE, we looked for direct cortico-cortical projections impinging on V1, and we identified a direct monosynaptic connection between motor cortex and V1 in the mouse brain. To measure the interactions between these areas under standard and EE rearing conditions, we used simultaneous recordings of local field potentials (LFPs) in awake, freely moving animals. LFP signals were analyzed by using different methods of linear and nonlinear analysis of time series (cross-correlation, mutual information, phase synchronization). We found that EE decreases the level of coupling between the electrical activities of the two cortical regions with respect to the control group. From a functional point of view, our results indicate, for the first time, that an enhanced sensorimotor experience impacts on the brain by affecting the functional crosstalk between different cortical areas. PMID:21966482

  6. A sharp cadherin-6 gene expression boundary in the developing mouse cortical plate demarcates the future functional areal border.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Youhei W; Inoue, Yukiko U; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca(2+) and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas. PMID:22875867

  7. Foxp1 Regulates Cortical Radial Migration and Neuronal Morphogenesis in Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Xiao, Jian; Fröhlich, Henning; Tu, Xiaomeng; Li, Lianlian; Xu, Yue; Cao, Huateng; Qu, Jia; Rappold, Gudrun A.; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2015-01-01

    FOXP1 is a member of FOXP subfamily transcription factors. Mutations in FOXP1 gene have been found in various development-related cognitive disorders. However, little is known about the etiology of these symptoms, and specifically the function of FOXP1 in neuronal development. Here, we report that suppression of Foxp1 expression in mouse cerebral cortex led to a neuronal migration defect, which was rescued by overexpression of Foxp1. Mice with Foxp1 knockdown exhibited ectopic neurons in deep layers of the cortex postnatally. The neuronal differentiation of Foxp1-downregulated cells was normal. However, morphological analysis showed that the neurons with Foxp1 deficiency had an inhibited axonal growth in vitro and a weakened transition from multipolar to bipolar in vivo. Moreover, we found that the expression of Foxp1 modulated the dendritic maturation of neurons at a late postnatal date. Our results demonstrate critical roles of Foxp1 in the radial migration and morphogenesis of cortical neurons during development. This study may shed light on the complex relationship between neuronal development and the related cognitive disorders. PMID:26010426

  8. Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Alicia K.; Humphreys, Gwendolyn I.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Although estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and 17β-estradiol play critical roles in protecting the cerebral cortex from ischemia-induced damage, there has been some controversy about the expression of ERα in this region of the brain. We have examined ERα mRNA and protein levels in the cerebral cortices of female mice at postnatal days 5 and 17 and at 4, 13, and 18 months of age. We found that although ERα transcript levels declined from postnatal day 5 through 18 months of age, ERα protein levels remained stable. Importantly, expression of the E2-regulated progesterone receptor gene was sustained in younger and in older females suggesting that age-related changes in estrogen responsiveness in the cerebral cortex are not due to the absence of ERα protein. PMID:25700604

  9. A Survey of Parents of Children with Cortical or Cerebral Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackel, Bernadette; Wilson, Michelle; Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Cortical or cerebral visual impairment (CVI) can result when the visual pathways and visual processing areas of the brain have been damaged. Children with CVI may have difficulty finding an object among other objects, viewing in the distance, orienting themselves in space, going from grass to pavement or other changes in surface, and copying…

  10. Architecture of the cerebral cortical association connectome underlying cognition

    PubMed Central

    Bota, Mihail; Sporns, Olaf; Swanson, Larry W.

    2015-01-01

    Cognition presumably emerges from neural activity in the network of association connections between cortical regions that is modulated by inputs from sensory and state systems and directs voluntary behavior by outputs to the motor system. To reveal global architectural features of the cortical association connectome, network analysis was performed on >16,000 reports of histologically defined axonal connections between cortical regions in rat. The network analysis reveals an organization into four asymmetrically interconnected modules involving the entire cortex in a topographic and topologic core–shell arrangement. There is also a topographically continuous U-shaped band of cortical areas that are highly connected with each other as well as with the rest of the cortex extending through all four modules, with the temporal pole of this band (entorhinal area) having the most cortical association connections of all. These results provide a starting point for compiling a mammalian nervous system connectome that could ultimately reveal novel correlations between genome-wide association studies and connectome-wide association studies, leading to new insights into the cellular architecture supporting cognition. PMID:25848037

  11. Neuropilin 2 deficiency does not affect cortical neuronal viability in response to oxygen-glucose-deprivation and transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng T; Jiang, Susan X; Slinn, Jacqueline; O'Hare, Michael; Karchewski, Laurie

    2010-04-01

    Neuropilin 2 (NRP2) is a type I transmembrane protein that binds to distinct members of the class III secreted Semaphorin subfamily. NRP2 plays important roles in repulsive axon guidance, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis through partnering with co-receptors such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) during development. Emerging evidence also suggests that NRP2 contributes to injury response and environment changes in adult brains. In this study, we examined the contribution of NRP2 gene to cerebral ischemia-induced brain injury using NRP2 deficient mouse. To our surprise, the lack of NRP2 expression does not affect the outcome of brain injury induced by transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in mouse. The cerebral vasculature in terms of the middle cerebral artery anatomy and microvessel density in the cerebral cortex of NRP2 deficient homozygous (NRP2(-/-)) mice are normal and almost identical to those of the heterozygous (NRP2(+/-)) and wild type (NRP2(+/+)) littermates. MCAO (1h) and 24h reperfusion caused a brain infarction of 23% (compared to the contralateral side) in NRP2(-/-) mice, which is not different from those in NRP2(+/- and +/+) mice at 22 and 21%, respectively (n=19, p>0.05). Correspondingly, NRP2(-/-) mouse also showed a similar level of deterioration of neurological functions after stroke compared with their NRP2(+/- and +/+) littermates. Oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) caused a significant neuronal death in NRP2(-/-) cortical neurons, at the level similar to that in NRP(+/+) cortical neurons (72% death in NRP(-/-) neurons vs. 75% death in NRP2(+/+) neurons; n=4; p>0.05). Together, these loss-of-function studies demonstrated that despite of its critical role in neuronal guidance and vascular formation during development, NRP2 expression dose not affect adult brain response to cerebral ischemia. PMID:20036291

  12. An Evo-Devo Approach to Thyroid Hormones in Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortical Development: Etiological Implications for Autism

    PubMed Central

    Berbel, Pere; Navarro, Daniela; Román, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    The morphological alterations of cortical lamination observed in mouse models of developmental hypothyroidism prompted the recognition that these experimental changes resembled the brain lesions of children with autism; this led to recent studies showing that maternal thyroid hormone deficiency increases fourfold the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), offering for the first time the possibility of prevention of some forms of ASD. For ethical reasons, the role of thyroid hormones on brain development is currently studied using animal models, usually mice and rats. Although mammals have in common many basic developmental principles regulating brain development, as well as fundamental basic mechanisms that are controlled by similar metabolic pathway activated genes, there are also important differences. For instance, the rodent cerebral cortex is basically a primary cortex, whereas the primary sensory areas in humans account for a very small surface in the cerebral cortex when compared to the associative and frontal areas that are more extensive. Associative and frontal areas in humans are involved in many neurological disorders, including ASD, attention deficit-hyperactive disorder, and dyslexia, among others. Therefore, an evo-devo approach to neocortical evolution among species is fundamental to understand not only the role of thyroid hormones and environmental thyroid disruptors on evolution, development, and organization of the cerebral cortex in mammals but also their role in neurological diseases associated to thyroid dysfunction. PMID:25250016

  13. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle. PMID:27184881

  14. Genome-Wide Divergence of DNA Methylation Marks in Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yurong; Chanrion, Benjamin; Liu, Meng-Min; Galfalvy, Hanga; Costa, Ramiro; Ilievski, Boro; Rosoklija, Gorazd; Arango, Victoria; Dwork, Andrew J.; Mann, J. John; Tycko, Benjamin; Haghighi, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests that DNA methylation plays an expansive role in the central nervous system (CNS). Large-scale whole genome DNA methylation profiling of the normal human brain offers tremendous potential in understanding the role of DNA methylation in brain development and function. Methodology/Significant Findings Using methylation-sensitive SNP chip analysis (MSNP), we performed whole genome DNA methylation profiling of the prefrontal, occipital, and temporal regions of cerebral cortex, as well as cerebellum. These data provide an unbiased representation of CpG sites comprising 377,509 CpG dinucleotides within both the genic and intergenic euchromatic region of the genome. Our large-scale genome DNA methylation profiling reveals that the prefrontal, occipital, and temporal regions of the cerebral cortex compared to cerebellum have markedly different DNA methylation signatures, with the cerebral cortex being hypermethylated and cerebellum being hypomethylated. Such differences were observed in distinct genomic regions, including genes involved in CNS function. The MSNP data were validated for a subset of these genes, by performing bisulfite cloning and sequencing and confirming that prefrontal, occipital, and temporal cortices are significantly more methylated as compared to the cerebellum. Conclusions These findings are consistent with known developmental differences in nucleosome repeat lengths in cerebral and cerebellar cortices, with cerebrum exhibiting shorter repeat lengths than cerebellum. Our observed differences in DNA methylation profiles in these regions underscores the potential role of DNA methylation in chromatin structure and organization in CNS, reflecting functional specialization within cortical regions. PMID:20596539

  15. Anxiety and cerebral cortical metabolism in normal persons.

    PubMed

    Giordani, B; Boivin, M J; Berent, S; Betley, A T; Koeppe, R A; Rothley, J M; Modell, J G; Hichwa, R D; Kuhl, D E

    1990-04-01

    The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered to 43 normal volunteers immediately before and after a positron emission tomography (PET) procedure with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG). High trait-anxious individuals had significantly higher state (situational) anxiety associated with the PET scan procedure than did low trait-anxious persons. State anxiety decreased significantly for all respondents following the PET scan procedure. No significant relationships between global or regional cortical metabolic rates and state anxiety were observed. The direct cortical metabolic effects of heightened anxiety in the scan setting, should they exist, are likely obscured in the normal variance of the 18F-FDG method. PMID:2367610

  16. The accessible cerebral vascular proteome in a mouse model of cerebral β-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Roesli, Christoph; Fugmann, Tim; Borgia, Beatrice; Schliemann, Christoph; Neri, Dario; Jucker, Mathias

    2011-04-01

    Assessing protein changes in the cerebral vasculature of brain disorders may increase our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. By combining perfusion of mice with a charged reactive biotin derivative and subsequent quantification of the biotinylated proteins, the proteome accessible from the vasculature in an APPPS1 transgenic mouse model of cerebral β-amyloidosis was identified and compared to that in non-transgenic control mice. Our results provide proof-of-concept of this technology for the identification of new targets for antibody-based therapy or pharmacodelivery, and for neuroimaging in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21262399

  17. A Computational Model for Cerebral Cortical Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vattikuti, Shashaank; Chow, Carson C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Perturbations to the microscopic level balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition and neuron organization in the cerebral cortex are suggested to underlie autism spectrum disorder (ASD) traits. The mechanism linking these perturbations to cognitive behaviors in ASD is unknown. This study strives to bridge this gap by generating clinically testable diagnostic and pharmacological predictions based on the effect of synaptic imbalance and neuron distribution on a computational local circuit model of the cerebral cortex. Methods We use a computational microscopic model of the cerebral cortex that incorporates N-methyl-D-aspartate and gamma-aminobutyric acid synaptic kinetics. We employ the model circuit during model tasks similar to visually guided and gap oculomotor saccade tasks and interpret qualitative model predictions of saccade hypometria and dysmetria. We consider the effects of varying the excitatory to inhibitory synaptic balance, neuron density, and neuron clustering in this model. Results An increase of synaptic excitation over synaptic inhibition results in increased hypometria and dysmetria. Similar effects by either reduced inhibition or increased excitation suggest that a variety of pharmacological compounds can be used for both screening and medical management. On the other hand, any change to the microscopic neuron anatomy that increases the effective maximum distance between excitatory neurons decreases hypometria but has no affect on dysmetria. Conclusions Perturbations to a computational model of a local cerebral cortical circuit can account for saccade hypometria and dysmetria reported in ASD studies. This approach may provide a direct link between cerebral cortical function and ASD behaviors. PMID:19880095

  18. Functional Specialization of Mouse Higher Visual Cortical Areas

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Mark L.; Kerlin, Aaron M.; Roumis, Demetris K.; Glickfeld, Lindsey L.; Reid, R. Clay

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The mouse is emerging as an important model for understanding how sensory neocortex extracts cues to guide behavior, yet little is known about how these cues are processed beyond primary cortical areas. Here, we used two-photon calcium imaging in awake mice to compare visual responses in primary visual cortex (V1) and in two downstream target areas, AL and PM. Neighboring V1 neurons had diverse stimulus preferences spanning five octaves in spatial and temporal frequency. By contrast, AL and PM neurons responded best to distinct ranges of stimulus parameters. Most strikingly, AL neurons preferred fast-moving stimuli while PM neurons preferred slow-moving stimuli. By contrast, neurons in V1, AL, and PM demonstrated similar selectivity for stimulus orientation but not for stimulus direction. Based on these findings, we predict that area AL helps guide behaviors involving fast-moving stimuli (e.g., optic flow), while area PM helps guide behaviors involving slow-moving objects. PMID:22196337

  19. Effects of 810 nm laser on mouse primary cortical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Huang, Ying-Ying; De Taboada, Luis; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    In the past four decades numerous studies have reported the efficacy of low level light (laser) therapy (LLLT) as a treatment for diverse diseases and injuries. Recent studies have shown that LLLT can biomodulate processes in the central nervous system and has been extensively studied as a stroke treatment. However there is still a lack of knowledge on the effects of LLLT at the cellular level in neurons. The present study aimed to study the effect of 810 nm laser on several cellular processes in primary cortical neurons cultured from mouse embryonic brains. Neurons were irradiated with light dose of 0.03, 0.3, 3, 10 and 30 J/cm2 and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and calcium were measured. The changes in mitochondrial function in response to light were studied in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Light induced a significant increase in calcium, ATP and MMP at lower fluences and a decrease at higher fluence. ROS was induced significantly by light at all light doses. Nitric oxide levels also showed an increase on treatment with light. The results of the present study suggest that LLLT at lower fluences is capable of inducing mediators of cell signaling process which in turn may be responsible for the biomodulatory effects of the low level laser. At higher fluences beneficial mediators are reduced but potentially harmful mediators are increased thus offering an explanation for the biphasic dose response.

  20. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  1. Cerebral cortical neurons with activity linked to central neurogenic spontaneous and evoked elevations in cerebral blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We recorded neurons in rat cerebral cortex with activity relating to the neurogenic elevations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) coupled to stereotyped bursts of EEG activity, burst-cerebrovascular wave complexes, appearing spontaneously or evoked by electrical stimulation of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) or fastigial nucleus (FN). Of 333 spontaneously active neurons only 15 (5%), in layers 5-6, consistently (P < 0.05, chi-square) increased their activity during the earliest potential of the complex, approximately 1.3 s before the rise of rCBF, and during the minutes-long elevation of rCBF elicited by 10 s of stimulation of RVL or FN. The results indicate the presence of a small population of neurons in deep cortical laminae whose activity correlates with neurogenic elevations of rCBF. These neurons may function to transduce afferent neuronal signals into vasodilation.

  2. Cerebral cortical activity associated with non-experts' most accurate motor performance.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Ford; Godwin, Maurice M; Goel, Paras; Rehm, Jared; Rietschel, Jeremy C; Hunt, Carly A; Miller, Matthew W

    2014-10-01

    This study's specific aim was to determine if non-experts' most accurate motor performance is associated with verbal-analytic- and working memory-related cerebral cortical activity during motor preparation. To assess this, EEG was recorded from non-expert golfers executing putts; EEG spectral power and coherence were calculated for the epoch preceding putt execution; and spectral power and coherence for the five most accurate putts were contrasted with that for the five least accurate. Results revealed marked power in the theta frequency bandwidth at all cerebral cortical regions for the most accurate putts relative to the least accurate, and considerable power in the low-beta frequency bandwidth at the left temporal region for the most accurate compared to the least. As theta power is associated with working memory and low-beta power at the left temporal region with verbal analysis, results suggest non-experts' most accurate motor performance is associated with verbal-analytic- and working memory-related cerebral cortical activity during motor preparation. PMID:25058623

  3. Cortical reorganization induced by virtual reality therapy in a child with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    You, Sung H; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Yong-Hyun; Barrow, Irene; Hallett, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR) therapy is a new, neurorehabilitation intervention aimed at enhancing motor performance in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP). This case report investigated the effects of VR therapy on cortical reorganization and associated motor function in an 8-year-old male with hemiparetic CP. Cortical activation and associated motor development were measured before and after VR therapy using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and standardized motor tests. Before VR therapy, the bilateral primary sensorimotor cortices (SMCs) and ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) were predominantly activated during affected elbow movement. After VR therapy, the altered activations disappeared and the contralateral SMC was activated. This neuroplastic change was associated with enhanced functional motor skills including reaching, self-feeding, and dressing. These functions were not possible before the intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study in the literature that provides evidence for neuroplasticity after VR therapy in a child with hemiparetic CP. PMID:16138671

  4. Simultaneous imaging of intrinsic optical signals and cerebral vessel responses during cortical spreading depression in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Shangbin; Luo, Weihua; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important disease model for migraine and cerebral ischemia. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of the intrinsic optical signals (IOS) at 570 nm and the cerebral blood vessel responses during CSD simultaneously by optical reflectance imaging in vivo. The CSD were induced by pinprick in 10 α-chloralose/urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. A four-phasic IOS response was observed at pial arteries and parenchymal sites in all experimental animals and an initial slight pial arteries dilation (21.5%+/-13.6%) and constriction (-4.2%+/-3.5%) precedes the dramatic dilation (69.2%+/-26.1%) of pial arterioles was recorded. Our experimental results show a high correlation (r = 0.89+/-0.025) between the IOS response and the diameter changes of the cerebral blood vessels during CSD in rats.

  5. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Arrigoni, F.; Romaniello, R.; Triulzi, F. M.; Peruzzo, D.; Bertoldo, A.

    2016-08-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  6. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Arrigoni, F; Romaniello, R; Triulzi, F M; Peruzzo, D; Bertoldo, A

    2016-08-21

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:27444964

  7. Lipoic acid reduces inflammation in a mouse focal cortical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Priya; Marracci, Gail; Galipeau, Danielle; Pocius, Edvinas; Morris, Brooke; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-12-15

    Cortical lesions are a crucial part of MS pathology and it is critical to determine that new MS therapies have the ability to alter cortical inflammatory lesions given the differences between white and gray matter lesions. We tested lipoic acid (LA) in a mouse focal cortical EAE model. Brain sections were stained with antibodies against CD4, CD11b and galectin-3. Compared with vehicle, treatment with LA significantly decreased CD4+ and galectin-3+ immune cells in the brain. LA treated mice had fewer galectin-3+ cells with no projections indicating decrease in the number of infiltrating monocytes. LA significantly reduces inflammation in a focal cortical model of MS. PMID:26616873

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Underlies Loss of Cortical Dendritic Spine Density in a Mouse Model of Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Anja; Visanji, Naomi P; Momen, M Abdul; Feng, Rui; Francis, Beverly M; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disorder characterized by reduced cardiac output and increased peripheral resistance, ultimately leading to tissue perfusion deficits and devastating consequences for several organs including the brain. We previously described a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)–dependent enhancement of posterior cerebral artery tone and concomitant reduced cerebral blood flow in a mouse model of early HF in which blood pressure remains minimally affected. HF is often associated with cognitive impairments such as memory deficits, even before any overt changes in brain structure and function occur. The pathophysiology underlying the development of cognitive impairments in HF is unknown, and appropriate treatment strategies are lacking. Methods and Results We used a well-established mouse model in which HF was induced by experimental myocardial infarction produced by permanent surgical ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (infarct size ≈25% of the left ventricular wall). Ligated mice developed enlarged hearts, congested lungs, and reduced cardiac output and blood pressure, with elevated peripheral resistance within 6 to 8 weeks after ligation. In this study, we demonstrated the significance of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α during HF-mediated neuroinflammation and associated impaired hippocampus-independent nonspatial episodic memory function. Augmented cerebral TNF-α expression and microglial activation in HF mice, indicative of brain inflammation, were accompanied by morphological changes and significant reduction of cortical dendritic spines (61.39±8.61% for basal and 61.04±9.18% for apical spines [P<0.001]). The significance of TNF-α signaling during the observed HF-mediated neurodegenerative processes is supported by evidence showing that sequestration or genetic deletion of TNF-α ameliorates the observed reduction of cortical dendritic spines (33.51±7.63% for basal and 30.13±6.98% for apical

  9. Regulation of cerebral cortical neurogenesis by the Pax6 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Martine N.; Mi, Da; Mason, John O.; Price, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding brain development remains a major challenge at the heart of understanding what makes us human. The neocortex, in evolutionary terms the newest part of the cerebral cortex, is the seat of higher cognitive functions. Its normal development requires the production, positioning, and appropriate interconnection of very large numbers of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Pax6 is one of a relatively small group of transcription factors that exert high-level control of cortical development, and whose mutation or deletion from developing embryos causes major brain defects and a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders. Pax6 is very highly conserved between primate and non-primate species, is expressed in a gradient throughout the developing cortex and is essential for normal corticogenesis. Our understanding of Pax6’s functions and the cellular processes that it regulates during mammalian cortical development has significantly advanced in the last decade, owing to the combined application of genetic and biochemical analyses. Here, we review the functional importance of Pax6 in regulating cortical progenitor proliferation, neurogenesis, and formation of cortical layers and highlight important differences between rodents and primates. We also review the pathological effects of PAX6 mutations in human neurodevelopmental disorders. We discuss some aspects of Pax6’s molecular actions including its own complex transcriptional regulation, the distinct molecular functions of its splice variants and some of Pax6’s known direct targets which mediate its actions during cortical development. PMID:25805971

  10. Cortical morphometry and IQ in VLBW children without cerebral palsy born in 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Grunewaldt, Kristine H.; Bjuland, Knut J.; Stavnes, Elisabeth M.; Bastholm, Irén A.; Aanes, Synne; Østgård, Heidi F.; Håberg, Asta; Løhaugen, Gro C.C.; Skranes, Jon; Rimol, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Children born prematurely with very low birth weight (VLBW: bw  ≤ 1500 g) have an increased risk of preterm perinatal brain injury, which may subsequently alter the maturation of the brain, including the cerebral cortex. The aim of study was to assess cortical thickness and surface area in VLBW children compared with term-born controls, and to investigate possible relationships between cortical morphology and Full IQ. In this cross-sectional study, 37 VLBW and 104 term children born between the years 2003–2007 were assessed cognitively at 5–10 years of age, using age appropriate Wechsler tests. The FreeSurfer software was used to obtain estimates of cortical thickness and surface area based on T1-weighted MRI images at 1.5 Tesla. The VLBW children had smaller cortical surface area bilaterally in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. A thicker cortex in the frontal and occipital regions and a thinner cortex in posterior parietal areas were observed in the VLBW group. There were significant differences in Full IQ between groups (VLBW M = 98, SD = 9.71; controls M = 108, SD = 13.57; p < 0.001). There was a positive relationship between IQ and surface area in both groups, albeit significant only in the larger control group. In the VLBW group, reduced IQ was associated with frontal cortical thickening and temporo-parietal thinning. We conclude that cortical deviations are evident in childhood even in VLBW children born in 2003–2007 who have received state of the art medical treatment in the perinatal period and who did not present with focal brain injuries on neonatal ultrasonography. The cortical deviations were associated with reduced cognitive functioning. PMID:26106543

  11. Neural network models of cortical functions based on the computational properties of the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Guigon, E; Grandguillaume, P; Otto, I; Boutkhil, L; Burnod, Y

    1994-01-01

    We describe a biologically plausible modelling framework based on the architectural and processing characteristics of the cerebral cortex. Its key feature is a multicellular processing unit (cortical column) reflecting the modular nature of cortical organization and function. In this framework, we describe a neural network model organization and function. In this framework, we describe a neural network model of the neuronal circuits of the cerebral cortex that learn different functions associated with different parts of the cortex: 1) visual integration for invariant pattern recognition, performed by a cooperation between temporal and parietal areas; 2) visual-to-motor transformation for 3D arm reaching movements, performed by parietal and motor areas; and 3) temporal integration and storage of sensorimotor programs, performed by networks linking the prefrontal cortex to associative sensory and motor areas. The architecture of the network is inspired from the features of the architecture of cortical pathways involved in these functions. We propose two rules which describe neural processing and plasticity in the network. The first rule (adaptive tuning if gating) is an analog of operant conditioning and permits to learn to anticipate an action. The second rule (adaptive timing) is based on a bistable state of activity and permits to learn temporally separate events forming a behavioral sequence. PMID:7787829

  12. An automated pipeline for cortical surface generation and registration of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Ibanez, Luis; Gelas, Arnaud; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; Niethammer, Marc; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2011-03-01

    The human cerebral cortex is one of the most complicated structures in the body. It has a highly convoluted structure with much of the cortical sheet buried in sulci. Based on cytoarchitectural and functional imaging studies, it is possible to segment the cerebral cortex into several subregions. While it is only possible to differentiate the true anatomical subregions based on cytoarchitecture, the surface morphometry aligns closely with the underlying cytoarchitecture and provides features that allow the surface of the cortex to be parcellated based on the sulcal and gyral patterns that are readily visible on the MR images. We have developed a fully automated pipeline for the generation and registration of cortical surfaces in the spherical domain. The pipeline initiates with the BRAINS AutoWorkup pipeline. Subsequently, topology correction and surface generation is performed to generate a genus zero surface and mapped to a sphere. Several surface features are then calculated to drive the registration between the atlas surface and other datasets. A spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm is used to co-register an atlas surface onto a subject surface. A lobar based atlas of the cerebral cortex was created from a manual parcellation of the cortex. The atlas surface was then co-registered to five additional subjects using a spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm. The labels from the atlas surface were warped on the subject surface and compared to the manual raters. The average Dice overlap index was 0.89 across all regions.

  13. Differences in cerebral cortical anatomy of left- and right-handers.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Willems, Roel M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2014-01-01

    The left and right sides of the human brain are specialized for different kinds of information processing, and much of our cognition is lateralized to an extent toward one side or the other. Handedness is a reflection of nervous system lateralization. Roughly ten percent of people are mixed- or left-handed, and they show an elevated rate of reductions or reversals of some cerebral functional asymmetries compared to right-handers. Brain anatomical correlates of left-handedness have also been suggested. However, the relationships of left-handedness to brain structure and function remain far from clear. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of cortical surface area differences between 106 left-handed subjects and 1960 right-handed subjects, measured using an automated method of regional parcellation (FreeSurfer, Destrieux atlas). This is the largest study sample that has so far been used in relation to this issue. No individual cortical region showed an association with left-handedness that survived statistical correction for multiple testing, although there was a nominally significant association with the surface area of a previously implicated region: the left precentral sulcus. Identifying brain structural correlates of handedness may prove useful for genetic studies of cerebral asymmetries, as well as providing new avenues for the study of relations between handedness, cerebral lateralization and cognition. PMID:24734025

  14. Immunocompetent young man with cerebral abscess and cortical venous infarction mimicking cerebritis caused by Gemella morbillorum.

    PubMed

    Milnik, Annette; Gazis, Angelos; Tammer, Ina; Bartels, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Gemella morbillorum is an anaerobic gram-positive diplococcus and in most cases a harmless commensal, which occasionally causes infections in the central nervous system. We report on an immunocompetent young man with focal neurological symptoms and cephalgia caused by a cerebral abscess. Although successful treatment was done with neurosurgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, he suffered from a venous infarction 5 weeks after first diagnosis, which mimicked cerebritis as an early stage of relapsing abscess. Imaging and investigation of cerebrospinal fluid was necessary for sufficient differential diagnosis and antibiotic therapy could be stopped after altogether 8 weeks of treatment. In summary, G morbillorum causes not only biphasic infections, but also can be accompanied by infarction in the central nervous system despite sufficient antibiotic therapy. PMID:23355562

  15. Application of in utero electroporation of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) genes, for subcellular localization of hardly identifiable GPCR in mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Kim, Seunghyuk; Hong, Jae Seung; Jeon, Sung Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2014-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor that exerts diverse biological effects through its cognate receptors (LPA1-LPA6). LPA1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, plays a pivotal role in brain development. However, the role of LPA1 in neuronal migration has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we delivered LPA1 to mouse cerebral cortex using in utero electroporation. We demonstrated that neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex was not affected by the overexpression of LPA1. Moreover, these results can be applied to the identification of the localization of LPA1. The subcellular localization of LPA1 was endogenously present in the perinuclear area, and overexpressed LPA1 was located in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, LPA1 in developing mouse cerebral cortex was mainly expressed in the ventricular zone and the cortical plate. In summary, the overexpression of LPA1 did not affect neuronal migration, and the protein expression of LPA1 was mainly located in the ventricular zone and cortical plate within the developing mouse cerebral cortex. These studies have provided information on the role of LPA1 in brain development and on the technical advantages of in utero electroporation. PMID:25078448

  16. Monofilament intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Clark, W M; Lessov, N S; Dixon, M P; Eckenstein, F

    1997-12-01

    The rat middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with an intraluminal filament is well characterized with a two hour period of occlusion in widespread use. The recent availability of transgenic animals has led to an interest in adapting the MCA model in the mouse. To date the model has not been well characterized in the mouse. We performed the present study to compare different durations of MCA occlusion and to validate new functional assessments in this model. The MCA occlusion model (5-0 filament) was used. Swiss-Webster mice, 24-44 g, were randomly assigned to four groups: one hour of occlusion; two hours of occlusion; three hours of occlusion; or permanent occlusion. At 48 hours post-ischemia, the animals were rated on three neurologic function scales, and then the brains were removed for lesion size determination. Overall, there was a significant difference in lesion volume (p < 0.001) between the groups. In the permanent group of mice, the average lesion volume was 78.41 +/- 17.47 mm (n = 12); two and three hours of ischemia produced 51.29 +/- 29.82 mm3 (n = 11) and 54.85 mm3 (n = 13), respectively, significantly different than the one hour group 14.84 +/- 31.34 mm3 (n = 11). All three functional scoring systems found significant overall differences between the four groups with our detailed General and Focal scores producing more robust between group treatment differences and showing correlation coefficients of r = 0.766 and r = 0.788, respectively to infarct volume. The MCA filament occlusion model can be successfully adapted in the mouse with either two or three hour occlusions producing reliable infarcts. New functional scoring systems unique to the mouse appear to add additional information. PMID:9427967

  17. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Bae, Mihyun H; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E; Powell, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  18. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bissonette, Gregory B.; Bae, Mihyun H.; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E.; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  19. Motor Cortical Functional Geometry in Cerebral Palsy and its Relationship to Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kesar, T.M.; Sawaki, L.; Burdette, J. H.; Cabrera, N.; Kolaski, K.; Smith, B.P.; O’Shea, T. M.; Koman, L. A.; Wittenberg, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate motor cortical map patterns in children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), and the relationships between motor cortical geometry and motor function in CP. Methods Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to map motor cortical representations of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in 13 children with CP (age 9–16 years, 6 males.) The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Melbourne upper extremity function were used to quantify motor ability. Results In the hemiplegic participants (N=7), the affected (right) FDI cortical representation was mapped on the ipsilateral (N=4), contralateral (N=2), or bilateral (N=1) cortex. Participants with diplegia (N=6) showed either bilateral (N=2) or contralateral (N=4) cortical hand maps. The FDI and TA motor map center-of-gravity mediolateral location ranged from 2–8 cm and 3–6 cm from the midline, respectively. Among diplegics, more lateral FDI representation locations were associated with lower Melbourne scores, i.e. worse hand motor function (Spearman’s Rho = −0.841, p=0.036) Conclusions Abnormalities in TMS-derived motor maps cut across the clinical classifications of hemiplegic and diplegic CP. The lateralization of the upper and lower extremity motor representation demonstrates reorganization after insults to the affected hemispheres of both diplegic and hemiplegic children. Significance The current study is a step towards defining the relationship between changes in motor maps and functional impairments in CP. These results suggest the need for further work to develop improved classification schemes that integrate clinical, radiologic, and neurophysiologic measures in CP. PMID:22153667

  20. Development of Cerebral Microbleeds in the APP23-Transgenic Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy—A 9.4 Tesla MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Björn; Venus, Alexander; Heiler, Patrick; Schad, Lothar; Ebert, Anne; Hennerici, Michael G.; Grudzenski, Saskia; Fatar, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) around cerebral arteries and capillaries and leads to an increased risk for vascular dementia, spontaneous lobar hemorrhage, convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and transient focal neurological episodes, which might be an indicator of imminent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In CAA cerebral microbleeds (cMBs) with a cortical/juxtacortical distribution are frequently observed in standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo MRI of transgenic mouse models of CAA may serve as a useful tool to investigate translational aspects of the disease. Materials and Methods: APP23-transgenic mice demonstrate cerebrovascular Aβ deposition with subsequent neuropathological changes characteristic for CAA. We performed a 9.4 Tesla high field MRI study using T2, T2* and time of flight-magnetic resonance angiograpy (TOF-MRA) sequences in APP23-transgenic mice and wildtype (wt) littermates at the age of 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 months, respectively. Numbers, size, and location of cMBs are reported. Results: T2* imaging demonstrated cMBs (diameter 50–300 μm) located in the neocortex and, to a lesser degree, in the thalamus. cMBs were detected at the earliest at 16 months of age. Numbers increased exponentially with age, with 2.5 ± 2 (median ± interquartilrange) at 16 months, 15 ± 6 at 20 months, and 31.5 ± 17 at 24 months of age, respectively. Conclusion: We report the temporal and spatial development of cMBs in the aging APP23-transgenic mouse model which develops characteristic pathological patterns known from human CAA. We expect this mouse model to serve as a useful tool to non-invasively monitor mid- and longterm translational aspects of CAA and to investigate experimental therapeutic strategies in longitudinal studies. PMID:27458375

  1. Altered Cortical GABAA Receptor Composition, Physiology, and Endocytosis in a Mouse Model of a Human Genetic Absence Epilepsy Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Huang, Zhiling; Ding, Li; Deel, M. Elizabeth; Arain, Fazal M.; Murray, Clark R.; Patel, Ronak S.; Flanagan, Christopher D.; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with generalized epilepsy exhibit cerebral cortical disinhibition. Likewise, mutations in the inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels, GABAA receptors (GABAARs), cause generalized epilepsy syndromes in humans. Recently, we demonstrated that heterozygous knock-out (Hetα1KO) of the human epilepsy gene, the GABAAR α1 subunit, produced absence epilepsy in mice. Here, we determined the effects of Hetα1KO on the expression and physiology of GABAARs in the mouse cortex. We found that Hetα1KO caused modest reductions in the total and surface expression of the β2 subunit but did not alter β1 or β3 subunit expression, results consistent with a small reduction of GABAARs. Cortices partially compensated for Hetα1KO by increasing the fraction of residual α1 subunit on the cell surface and by increasing total and surface expression of α3, but not α2, subunits. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Hetα1KO increased the fraction of α1 subunits, and decreased the fraction of α3 subunits, that associated in hybrid α1α3βγ receptors. Patch clamp electrophysiology studies showed that Hetα1KO layer VI cortical neurons exhibited reduced inhibitory postsynaptic current peak amplitudes, prolonged current rise and decay times, and altered responses to benzodiazepine agonists. Finally, application of inhibitors of dynamin-mediated endocytosis revealed that Hetα1KO reduced base-line GABAAR endocytosis, an effect that probably contributes to the observed changes in GABAAR expression. These findings demonstrate that Hetα1KO exerts two principle disinhibitory effects on cortical GABAAR-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission: 1) a modest reduction of GABAAR number and 2) a partial compensation with GABAAR isoforms that possess physiological properties different from those of the otherwise predominant α1βγ GABAARs. PMID:23744069

  2. Reduced cerebral cortical thickness in Non-cirrhotic patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter; Sørensen, Leif Hougaard; Østergaard, Leif; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Videbech, Poul

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with fatigue, depression, and cognitive impairment even in the absence of severe liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. HCV has been hypothesised to cause neurodegenerative changes through low-grade neuroinflammation. Our aim was to examine whether cortical thickness (CTh) differs between chronic HCV patients and healthy controls, suggestive of cortical atrophy. In this case-control study 43 HCV patients without severe liver fibrosis, substance abuse, or comorbid HIV or hepatitis B virus infection, and 43 age and sex matched controls underwent MRI. Cortical thickness was measured using a surface based approach. Participants underwent semi-structured psychiatric interview and fatigue was assessed using the fatigue severity scale. HCV was associated with higher fatigue scores, and 58 % of HCV patients suffered from significant fatigue (p < 0.0001). Depression was observed in 16 % of patients. Areas of significantly reduced CTh were found in both left and right occipital cortex and in the left frontal lobe after correction for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). No association between fatigue, former substance abuse, or psychotropic medication and CTh was found. No overall difference in cerebral white and grey matter volume was found. The findings support the hypothesis that HCV is associated with neurodegenerative changes. PMID:26530221

  3. Modulation of Presynaptic GABA Release by Oxidative Stress in Mechanically-isolated Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eu-Teum; Seo, Jung-Woo; Hur, Jinyoung

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the superoxide anion (O2-·), and the hydroxyl radical (OH·), are generated as by-products of oxidative metabolism in cells. The cerebral cortex has been found to be particularly vulnerable to production of ROS associated with conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion, Parkinson's disease, and aging. To investigate the effect of ROS on inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission, we examined the electrophysiological mechanisms of the modulatory effect of H2O2 on GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSCs) in mechanically isolated rat cerebral cortical neurons retaining intact synaptic boutons. The membrane potential was voltage-clamped at -60 mV and mIPSCs were recorded and analyzed. Superfusion of 1-mM H2O2 gradually potentiated mIPSCs. This potentiating effect of H2O2 was blocked by the pretreatment with either 10,000-unit/mL catalase or 300-µM N-acetyl-cysteine. The potentiating effect of H2O2 was occluded by an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and was blocked by a protein kinase A inhibitor, N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino] ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride. This study indicates that oxidative stress may potentiate presynaptic GABA release through the mechanism of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathways, which may result in the inhibition of the cerebral cortex neuronal activity. PMID:20631883

  4. Homocysteine Aggravates Cortical Neural Cell Injury through Neuronal Autophagy Overactivation following Rat Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqian; Huang, Guowei; Chen, Shuang; Gou, Yun; Dong, Zhiping; Zhang, Xumei

    2016-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been reported to be involved in neurotoxicity after ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood to date. In the current study, we hypothesized that neuronal autophagy activation may be involved in the toxic effect of Hcy on cortical neurons following cerebral ischemia. Brain cell injury was determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining. The level and localization of autophagy were detected by transmission electron microscopy, western blot and immunofluorescence double labeling. The oxidative DNA damage was revealed by immunofluorescence of 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Hcy treatment aggravated neuronal cell death, significantly increased the formation of autophagosomes and the expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 in the brain cortex after middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO). Immunofluorescence analysis of LC3B and Beclin-1 distribution indicated that their expression occurred mainly in neurons (NeuN-positive) and hardly in astrocytes (GFAP-positive). 8-OHdG expression was also increased in the ischemic cortex of Hcy-treated animals. Conversely, LC3B and Beclin-1 overexpression and autophagosome accumulation caused by Hcy were partially blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Hcy administration enhanced neuronal autophagy, which contributes to cell death following cerebral ischemia. The oxidative damage-mediated autophagy may be a molecular mechanism underlying neuronal cell toxicity of elevated Hcy level. PMID:27455253

  5. Cross-species functional analyses reveal shared and separate roles for Sox11 in frog primary neurogenesis and mouse cortical neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Jin, Jing; Lee, Garrett A.; Silva, Elena; Donoghue, Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A well-functioning brain requires production of the correct number and types of cells during development; cascades of transcription factors are essential for cellular coordination. Sox proteins are transcription factors that affect various processes in the development of the nervous system. Sox11, a member of the SoxC family, is expressed in differentiated neurons and supports neuronal differentiation in several systems. To understand how generalizable the actions of Sox11 are across phylogeny, its function in the development of the frog nervous system and the mouse cerebral cortex were compared. Expression of Sox11 is largely conserved between these species; in the developing frog, Sox11 is expressed in the neural plate, neural tube and throughout the segmented brain, while in the mouse cerebral cortex, Sox11 is expressed in differentiated zones, including the preplate, subplate, marginal zone and cortical plate. In both frog and mouse, data demonstrate that Sox11 supports a role in promoting neuronal differentiation, with Sox11-positive cells expressing pan-neural markers and becoming morphologically complex. However, frog and mouse Sox11 cannot substitute for one another; a functional difference likely reflected in sequence divergence. Thus, Sox11 appears to act similarly in subserving neuronal differentiation but is species-specific in frog neural development and mouse corticogenesis. PMID:26962049

  6. Crumbs 2 prevents cortical abnormalities in mouse dorsal telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Dudok, Jacobus J; Murtaza, Mariyam; Henrique Alves, C; Rashbass, Pen; Wijnholds, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of a functionally integrated nervous system is dependent on a highly organized sequence of events that includes timely division and differentiation of progenitors. Several apical polarity proteins have been shown to play crucial roles during neurogenesis, however, the role of Crumbs 2 (CRB2) in cortical development has not previously been reported. Here, we show that conditional ablation of Crb2 in the murine dorsal telencephalon leads to defects in the maintenance of the apical complex. Furthermore, within the mutant dorsal telencephalon there is premature expression of differentiation proteins. We examined the physiological function of Crb2 on wild type genetic background as well as on background lacking Crb1. Telencephalon lacking CRB2 resulted in reduced levels of PALS1 and CRB3 from the apical complex, an increased number of mitotic cells and expanded neuronal domain. These defects are transient and therefore only result in rather mild cortical abnormalities. We show that CRB2 is required for maintenance of the apical polarity complex during development of the cortex and regulation of cell division, and that loss of CRB2 results in cortical abnormalities. PMID:26802325

  7. Monoclonal antibody identification of subpopulations of cerebral cortical neurons affected in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Rudnicka, M; Hinton, D R; Blanks, J C; Kozlowski, M

    1987-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). Given the paucity of molecular markers available for the identification of neuronal subtypes, the specificity of neuronal loss within the cerebral cortex has been difficult to evaluate. With a panel of four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) applied to central nervous system tissues from AD patients, we have immunocytochemically identified a population of vulnerable cortical neurons; a subpopulation of pyramidal neurons is recognized by mABs 3F12 and 44.1 in the hippocampus and neocortex, and clusters of multipolar neurons in the entorhinal cortex reactive with mAb 44.1 show selective degeneration. Closely adjacent stellate-like neurons in these regions, identified by mAB 6A2, show striking preservation in AD. The neurons recognized by mAbs 3F12 and 44.1, to the best of our knowledge, do not comprise a single known neurotransmitter system. mAb 3A4 identifies a phosphorylated antigen that is undetectable in normal brain but accumulates early in the course of AD in somas of vulnerable neurons. Antigen 3A4 is distinct from material reactive with thioflavin S or antibody generated against paired helical filaments. Initially, antigen 3A4 is localized to neurons in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum, later in the association neocortex, and, ultimately in cases of long duration, in primary sensory cortical regions. mAb 3F12 recognizes multiple bands on immunoblots of homogenates of normal and AD cortical tissues, whereas mAb 3A4 does not bind to immunoblots containing neurofilament proteins or brain homogenates from AD patients. Ultrastructurally, antigen 3A4 is localized to paired helical filaments. Using these mAbs, further molecular characterization of the affected cortical neurons is now possible. Images PMID:3120196

  8. Cortical electrical stimulation alters erythrocyte perfusion pattern in the cerebral capillary network of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schulte, M L; Wood, J D; Hudetz, A G

    2003-02-14

    The effect of direct cortical electrical stimulation on the pattern of erythrocyte perfusion in the capillary network of the rat cerebral cortex was studied by fluorescence intravital video-microscopy. The movement of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (FRBCs) in individual capillaries 50-70 microm subsurface in the dorsal somatosensory cortex was visualized using a closed cranial window. Cortical stimulation electrodes were placed on opposite sides of the window. FRBC velocity (mm/s) and supply rate (cells/s) were measured in 51 capillaries from six rats before and during electrical stimulation of increasing intensities (15-s trains of 3-Hz, 3-ms, 0.5-5.0-mA, square pulses). FRBC velocity, supply rate, and the instantaneous capillary erythrocyte content (lineal cell density, LCD, cells/mm) increased with the stimulation current and reached maxima of 110, 160 and 33% above control, respectively. Capillaries with low resting velocity showed a greater response than those with high resting velocity. The fraction of capillaries in which FRBC velocity increased was not constant, but increased with the stimulation current, as did the magnitude of the velocity change in these capillaries. A few capillaries showed a negative FRBC velocity response at stimulations <4 mA. These results suggest that a robust rise in the fraction of responding (engaged) capillaries and a smaller rise in the capillary LCD contribute to neuronal activation-induced cortical hyperemia. Thus, capillary engagement and erythrocyte recruitment appear to represent important components of the cortical functional hyperemic response. These results provide insight into some of the specific hemodynamic changes associated with functional hyperemia occurring at the capillary level. PMID:12560113

  9. Fractional Anisotropy of Cerebral White Matter and Thickness of Cortical Gray Matter across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    P., Kochunov; DC, Glahn; J., Lancaster; P.M., Thompson; V., Kochunov; B., Rogers; P., Fox; J., Blangero; D.E., Williamson

    2011-01-01

    We examined age trajectories of fractional anisotropy (FA) of cerebral white matter (WM) and thickness of cortical gray matter (GM) in 1,031 healthy human subjects (aged 11-90 years). Whole-brain FA and GM thickness values followed quadratic trajectories with age but the relationship between them was linear, indicating that a putative biological mechanism may explain the non-linearity of their age trajectories. Inclusion of the FA values into the quadratic model of the whole-brain and regional GM thickness changes with age made the effect of the age2 term no longer significant for the whole-brain GM thickness and greatly reduced its significance for regional GM thickness measurements. The phylogenetic order of cerebral myelination helped to further explain the intersubject variability in GM thickness. FA values for the early maturing WM were significantly better (p=10−6) at explaining variability in GM thickness in maturing (aged 11-20) subjects than FA values for the late maturing WM. The opposite trend was observed for aging subjects (aged 40-90) where FA values for the late maturing WM were better (p=10−16) at explaining the variability in GM thickness. We concluded that the non-linearity of the age trajectory for GM thickness, measured from T1-weighted MRI, was partially explained by the heterogeneity and the heterochronicity of the age-related changes in the microintegrity of cerebral WM. We consider these findings as the evidence that the measurements of age-related changes in GM thickness and FA are driven, in part, by a common biological mechanism, presumed to be related to changes in cerebral myelination. PMID:21640837

  10. Purification of oligodendrocyte lineage cells from mouse cortices by immunopanning.

    PubMed

    Emery, Ben; Dugas, Jason C

    2013-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the vertebrate central nervous system, responsible for generating the myelin sheath necessary for saltatory conduction. The use of increasingly sophisticated genetic tools, particularly in mice, has vastly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate development of the oligodendrocyte lineage. This increased reliance on the mouse as a genetic model has led to a need for the development of culture methods to allow the use of mouse cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Here, we present a protocol for the isolation of different stages of the oligodendrocyte lineage, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and/or postmitotic oligodendrocytes, from the postnatal mouse cortex using immunopanning. This protocol allows for the subsequent culture or biochemical analysis of these cells. PMID:24003195

  11. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development.

    PubMed

    Meechan, Daniel W; Maynard, Thomas M; Tucker, Eric S; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A; Rothblat, Lawrence A; LaMantia, Anthony-S

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic "model" syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that "modeling a model", in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  12. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Rothblat, Lawrence A.; LaMantia, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic “model” syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that “modeling a model”, in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  13. The vertebrate-specific Kinesin-6, Kif20b, is required for normal cytokinesis of polarized cortical stem cells and cerebral cortex size

    PubMed Central

    Janisch, Kerstin M.; Vock, Vita M.; Fleming, Michael S.; Shrestha, Ayushma; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M.; Rasoul, Bareza A.; Neale, Sarah A.; Cupp, Timothy D.; Kinchen, Jason M.; Liem, Karel F.; Dwyer, Noelle D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian neuroepithelial stem cells divide using a polarized form of cytokinesis, which is not well understood. The cytokinetic furrow cleaves the cell by ingressing from basal to apical, forming the midbody at the apical membrane. The midbody mediates abscission by recruiting many factors, including the Kinesin-6 family member Kif20b. In developing embryos, Kif20b mRNA is most highly expressed in neural stem/progenitor cells. A loss-of-function mutant in Kif20b, magoo, was found in a forward genetic screen. magoo has a small cerebral cortex, with reduced production of progenitors and neurons, but preserved layering. In contrast to other microcephalic mouse mutants, mitosis and cleavage furrows of cortical stem cells appear normal in magoo. However, apical midbodies show changes in number, shape and positioning relative to the apical membrane. Interestingly, the disruption of abscission does not appear to result in binucleate cells, but in apoptosis. Thus, Kif20b is required for proper midbody organization and abscission in polarized cortical stem cells and has a crucial role in the regulation of cerebral cortex growth. PMID:24173802

  14. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for “diseases of cortical connectivity” thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. PMID:19805316

  15. Brca1 is required for embryonic development of the mouse cerebral cortex to normal size by preventing apoptosis of early neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Pulvers, Jeremy N; Huttner, Wieland B

    2009-06-01

    The extent of apoptosis of neural progenitors is known to influence the size of the cerebral cortex. Mouse embryos lacking Brca1, the ortholog of the human breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1, show apoptosis in the neural tube, but the consequences of this for brain development have not been studied. Here we investigated the role of Brca1 during mouse embryonic cortical development by deleting floxed Brca1 using Emx1-Cre, which leads to conditional gene ablation specifically in the dorsal telencephalon after embryonic day (E) 9.5. The postnatal Brca1-ablated cerebral cortex was substantially reduced in size with regard to both cortical thickness and surface area. Remarkably, although the thickness of the cortical layers (except for the upper-most layer) was decreased, cortical layering as such was essentially unperturbed. High levels of apoptosis were found at E11.5 and E13.5, but dropped to near-control levels by E16.5. The apoptosis at the early stage of neurogenesis occurred in both BrdU pulse-labeled neural progenitors and the neurons derived therefrom. No changes were observed in the mitotic index of apical (neuroepithelial, radial glial) progenitors and basal (intermediate) progenitors, indicating that Brca1 ablation did not affect cell cycle progression. Brca1 ablation did, however, result in the nuclear translocation of p53 in neural progenitors, suggesting that their apoptosis involved activation of the p53 pathway. Our results show that Brca1 is required for the cerebral cortex to develop to normal size by preventing the apoptosis of early cortical progenitors and their immediate progeny. PMID:19403657

  16. Analysing coupling architecture in the cortical EEG of a patient with unilateral cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, Maksim V.; Baas, C. Marjolein; van Rijn, Clementina M.; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of coupling presence and direction between cortical areas from the EEG is a popular approach in neuroscience. Granger causality method is promising for this task, since it allows to operate with short time series and to detect nonlinear coupling or coupling between nonlinear systems. In this study EEG multichannel data from adolescent children, suffering from unilateral cerebral palsy were investigated. Signals, obtained in rest and during motor activity of affected and less affected hand, were analysed. The changes in inter-hemispheric and intra-hemispheric interactions were studied over time with an interval of two months. The obtained results of coupling were tested for significance using surrogate times series. In the present proceeding paper we report the data of one patient. The modified nonlinear Granger causality is indeed able to reveal couplings within the human brain.

  17. Effects of Controlled Cortical Impact on the Mouse Brain Vasculome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuzhen; Lok, Josephine; Zhao, Song; Leung, Wendy; Som, Angel T; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Wang, Qingzhi; Xing, Changhong; Wang, Xiaoying; Ji, Xunming; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H

    2016-07-15

    Perturbations in blood vessels play a critical role in the pathophysiology of brain injury and neurodegeneration. Here, we use a systematic genome-wide transcriptome screening approach to investigate the vasculome after brain trauma in mice. Mice were subjected to controlled cortical impact and brains were extracted for analysis at 24 h post-injury. The core of the traumatic lesion was removed and then cortical microvesels were isolated from nondirectly damaged ipsilateral cortex. Compared to contralateral cortex and normal cortex from sham-operated mice, we identified a wide spectrum of responses in the vasculome after trauma. Up-regulated pathways included those involved in regulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix processes. Decreased pathways included those involved in regulation of metabolism, mitochondrial function, and transport systems. These findings suggest that microvascular perturbations can be widespread and not necessarily localized to core areas of direct injury per se and may further provide a broader gene network context for existing knowledge regarding inflammation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier alterations after brain trauma. Further efforts are warranted to map the vasculome with higher spatial and temporal resolution from acute to delayed phase post-trauma. Investigating the widespread network responses in the vasculome may reveal potential mechanisms, therapeutic targets, and biomarkers for traumatic brain injury. PMID:26528928

  18. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-01

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis. PMID:26820595

  19. Characterization of rat cerebral cortical beta adrenoceptor subtypes using (-)-( sup 125 I)-iodocyanopindolol

    SciTech Connect

    Tiong, A.H.; Richardson, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    (-)-(125I)-Iodocyanopindolol (-(ICYP)), used to characterize beta adrenoceptors on membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex, was shown to have affinity for both beta adrenoceptors and serotonin receptors. Therefore, 10 microM serotonin was added to the assays to prevent (-)ICYP binding to serotonin receptors. Under these conditions, (-)ICYP binding to the cortical membrane preparation was reversible and saturable, and the association reaction was very slow. The dissociation reaction was also very slow, and revealed two affinity states corresponding to a high and a low affinity state. Scatchard analysis showed a single class of binding sites with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 20.7 pM, and a maximal density of binding sites (Bmax) of 95.1 fmol/mg membrane protein. Displacement binding analyses revealed a potency series of (-) isoproterenol greater than (-) epinephrine equal to (-) norepinephrine, suggesting a predominance of the beta 1 adrenoceptor subtype. Detailed competition ligand binding studies with the selective beta 1 adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-89406 and the selective beta 2 adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118551, showed that about 70% of the beta adrenoceptor population in the rat cortex is of the beta 1 subtype with the remainder being of the beta 2 subtype. We conclude that since (-)ICYP binds to both beta adrenoceptors and serotonin receptors, it is important to prevent the binding of (-)ICYP to serotonin receptors by adding a suppressing ligand like excess cold serotonin when assaying beta adrenoceptors. We have presented the first such characterization of rat cerebral cortical beta adrenoceptors with (-)ICYP in this study.

  20. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  1. HIV-Associated Distal Neuropathic Pain is Associated with Smaller Total Cerebral Cortical Gray Matter

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John R.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J. Allen; Archibald, Sarah L.; Miller, David J.; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Julaton, Michelle D.; Notestine, Randy J.; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A.; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Simpson, David M.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50% of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (R = −0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance. PMID:24549970

  2. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  3. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  4. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  5. A derivative of the CRMP2 binding compound lanthionine ketimine provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nada, Shadia E; Tulsulkar, Jatin; Raghavan, Aparna; Hensley, Kenneth; Shah, Zahoor A

    2012-12-01

    Lanthionines are novel neurotrophic and neuroprotective small molecules that show promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, a recently developed, cell permeable lanthionine derivative known as LKE (lanthionine ketimine 5-ethyl ester) promotes neurite growth at low nanomolar concentrations. LKE also has neuroprotective, anti-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Its therapeutic potential in cerebral ischemia and its mechanisms of neurotrophic action remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we hypothesize that the neuroprotective actions of LKE could result from induction or modulation of CRMP2. We found that treating primary cultured mouse neurons with LKE provided significant protection against t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced neuronal death possibly through CRMP2 upregulation. Similarly, in vivo studies showed that LKE pre and/or post-treatment protects mice against permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (p-MCAO) as evidenced by lower stroke lesions and improved functional outcomes in terms of rotarod, grip strength and neurologic deficit scores in treated groups. Protein expression levels of CRMP2 were higher in brain cortices of LKE pretreated mice, suggesting that LKE's neuroprotective activity may be CRMP2 dependent. Lower activity of cleaved PARP-1 and higher activity of SIRT-1 was also observed in LKE treated group suggesting its anti-apoptotic properties. Our results suggest that LKE has potential as a therapeutic intervention in cerebral ischemia and that part of its protective mechanism may be attributed to CRMP2 mediated action and PARP-1/SIRT-1 modulation. PMID:23036362

  6. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J.; Kis, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    processes. During wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep, the rhythmic firing of cortical GABAergic neurons plays a key role in governing network activity. We investigated subcortical GABAergic projections in the mouse that extend from the medial septum/diagonal band nuclei to GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus and related extrahippocampal cortical areas, including the medial entorhinal cortex. These areas contribute to navigation and show theta rhythmic activity. We found selective GABAergic targeting of different groups of cortical GABAergic neurons, immunoreactive for combinations of cell-type markers. As septal GABAergic neurons also fire rhythmically, their selective innervation of cortical GABAergic neurons suggests an oscillatory synchronization of neuronal activity across functionally related areas. PMID:26631464

  7. Optical coherence microscopy of mouse cortical vasculature surrounding implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Lozzi, Andrea; Abliz, Erkinay; Greenbaum, Noah; Turner, Kevin P.; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Agrawal, Anant; Krauthamer, Victor; Welle, Cristin G.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) provides real-time, in-vivo, three-dimensional, isotropic micron-resolution structural and functional characterization of tissue, cells, and other biological targets. Optical coherence angiography (OCA) also provides visualization and quantification of vascular flow via speckle-based or phase-resolved techniques. Performance assessment of neuroprosthetic systems, which allow direct thought control of limb prostheses, may be aided by OCA. In particular, there is a need to examine the underlying mechanisms of chronic functional degradation of implanted electrodes. Angiogenesis, capillary network remodeling, and changes in flow velocity are potential indicators of tissue changes that may be associated with waning electrode performance. The overall goal of this investigation is to quantify longitudinal changes in vascular morphology and capillary flow around neural electrodes chronically implanted in mice. We built a 1315-nm OCM system to image vessels in neocortical tissue in a cohort of mice. An optical window was implanted on the skull over the primary motor cortex above a penetrating shank-style microelectrode array. The mice were imaged bi-weekly to generate vascular maps of the region surrounding the implanted microelectrode array. Acute effects of window and electrode implantation included vessel dilation and profusion of vessels in the superficial layer of the cortex (0-200 μm). In deeper layers surrounding the electrode, no qualitative differences were seen in this early phase. These measurements establish a baseline vascular tissue response from the cortical window preparation and lay the ground work for future longitudinal studies to test the hypothesis that vascular changes will be associated with chronic electrode degradation.

  8. Layer-specific cholinergic control of human and mouse cortical synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Verhoog, Matthijs B; Obermayer, Joshua; Kortleven, Christian A; Wilbers, René; Wester, Jordi; Baayen, Johannes C; De Kock, Christiaan P J; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2016-01-01

    Individual cortical layers have distinct roles in information processing. All layers receive cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain (BF), which is crucial for cognition. Acetylcholinergic receptors are differentially distributed across cortical layers, and recent evidence suggests that different populations of BF cholinergic neurons may target specific prefrontal cortical (PFC) layers, raising the question of whether cholinergic control of the PFC is layer dependent. Here we address this issue and reveal dendritic mechanisms by which endogenous cholinergic modulation of synaptic plasticity is opposite in superficial and deep layers of both mouse and human neocortex. Our results show that in different cortical layers, spike timing-dependent plasticity is oppositely regulated by the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) either located on dendrites of principal neurons or on GABAergic interneurons. Thus, layer-specific nAChR expression allows functional layer-specific control of cortical processing and plasticity by the BF cholinergic system, which is evolutionarily conserved from mice to humans. PMID:27604129

  9. Predicting cortical bone adaptation to axial loading in the mouse tibia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A. F.; Javaheri, B.; Pitsillides, A. A.; Shefelbine, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of predictive mathematical models can contribute to a deeper understanding of the specific stages of bone mechanobiology and the process by which bone adapts to mechanical forces. The objective of this work was to predict, with spatial accuracy, cortical bone adaptation to mechanical load, in order to better understand the mechanical cues that might be driving adaptation. The axial tibial loading model was used to trigger cortical bone adaptation in C57BL/6 mice and provide relevant biological and biomechanical information. A method for mapping cortical thickness in the mouse tibia diaphysis was developed, allowing for a thorough spatial description of where bone adaptation occurs. Poroelastic finite-element (FE) models were used to determine the structural response of the tibia upon axial loading and interstitial fluid velocity as the mechanical stimulus. FE models were coupled with mechanobiological governing equations, which accounted for non-static loads and assumed that bone responds instantly to local mechanical cues in an on–off manner. The presented formulation was able to simulate the areas of adaptation and accurately reproduce the distributions of cortical thickening observed in the experimental data with a statistically significant positive correlation (Kendall's τ rank coefficient τ = 0.51, p < 0.001). This work demonstrates that computational models can spatially predict cortical bone mechanoadaptation to a time variant stimulus. Such models could be used in the design of more efficient loading protocols and drug therapies that target the relevant physiological mechanisms. PMID:26311315

  10. ASPM and the Evolution of Cerebral Cortical Size in a Community of New World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Perry, George H.; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) gene has been proposed as a major determinant of cerebral cortical size among primates, including humans. Yet the specific functions of ASPM and its connection to human intelligence remain controversial. This debate is limited in part by a taxonomic focus on Old World monkeys and apes. Here we expand the comparative context of ASPM sequence analyses with a study of New World monkeys, a radiation of primates in which enlarged brain size has evolved in parallel in spider monkeys (genus Ateles) and capuchins (genus Cebus). The primate community of Costa Rica is perhaps a model system because it allows for independent pairwise comparisons of smaller- and larger-brained species within two taxonomic families. Accordingly, we analyzed the complete sequence of exon 18 of ASPM in Ateles geoffroyi, Alouatta palliata, Cebus capucinus, and Saimiri oerstedii. As the analysis of multiple species in a genus improves phylogenetic reconstruction, we also analyzed eleven published sequences from other New World monkeys. Our exon-wide, lineage-specific analysis of eleven genera and the ratio of rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) on ASPM revealed no detectable evidence for positive selection in the lineages leading to Ateles or Cebus, as indicated by dN/dS ratios of <1.0 (0.6502 and 0.4268, respectively). Our results suggest that a multitude of interacting genes have driven the evolution of larger brains among primates, with different genes involved in this process in different encephalized lineages, or at least with evidence for positive selection not readily apparent for the same genes in all lineages. The primate community of Costa Rica may serve as a model system for future studies that aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive capacity and cortical size. PMID:23028686

  11. Upper Limb Function and Cortical Organization in Youth with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Anna; Stinear, Cathy; Stott, Susan; Byblow, Winston D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the relationship between motor cortical and descending motor pathway reorganization, lesion type, and upper limb function in youth with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Twenty participants with unilateral CP (mean age 15 ± 3 years; 11 males) completed a range of upper limb functional measures. Structural MRI, diffusion-weighted, and functional MRI were conducted to determine type and extent of brain lesion, descending white matter integrity, and whole-brain activity during affected hand use. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) (n = 12) was used to examine functional integrity of the corticospinal pathway as well as primary motor cortex intracortical and interhemispheric inhibition from motor-evoked potentials and silent periods. Results: Fractional anisotropy measures within the posterior limb of the internal capsule were a predictor of upper limb function (R2 = 0.41, F = 11.3, p = 0.004). Participants with periventricular lesions tended to have better upper limb function [F(2, 17) = 42.48, p < 0.0001]. Five participants with evidence of cortical reorganization and functional ipsilateral projections to their affected hand had worse upper limb function. Deficits in intracortical and interhemispheric inhibitory mechanisms were found in participants with worse upper limb function (Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function: Mann Whitney p = 0.02). Conclusion: Neuroimaging and TMS can provide useful information related to hand function of individuals with unilateral CP and may have potential to assist as a predictive tool and/or guide rehabilitation. PMID:25071705

  12. Sanguinate's effect on pial arterioles in healthy rats and cerebral oxygen tension after controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Mullah, Saad H; Abutarboush, Rania; Moon-Massat, Paula F; Saha, Biswajit K; Haque, Ashraful; Walker, Peter B; Auker, Charles R; Arnaud, Francoise G; McCarron, Richard M; Scultetus, Anke H

    2016-09-01

    Sanguinate, a polyethylene glycol-conjugated carboxyhemoglobin, was investigated for cerebral vasoactivity in healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats (Study 1) and for its ability to increase brain tissue oxygen pressure (PbtO2) after controlled cortical impact (CCI) - traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Study 2). In both studies ketamine-acepromazine anesthetized rats were ventilated with 40% O2. In Study 1, a cranial window was used to measure the diameters of medium - (50-100μm) and small-sized (<50μm) pial arterioles before and after four serial infusions of Sanguinate (8mL/kg/h, cumulative 16mL/kg IV), volume-matched Hextend, or normal saline. In Study 2, PbtO2 was measured using a phosphorescence quenching method before TBI, 15min after TBI (T15) and then every 10min thereafter for 155min. At T15, rats received either 8mL/kg IV Sanguinate (40mL/kg/h) or no treatment (saline, 4mL/kg/h). Results showed: 1) in healthy rats, percentage changes in pial arteriole diameter were the same among the groups, 2) in TBI rats, PbtO2 decreased from 36.5±3.9mmHg to 19.8±3.0mmHg at T15 in both groups after TBI and did not recover in either group for the rest of the study, and 3) MAP increased 16±4mmHg and 36±5mmHg after Sanguinate in healthy and TBI rats, respectively, while MAP was unchanged in control groups. In conclusion, Sanguinate did not cause vasoconstriction in the cerebral pial arterioles of healthy rats but it also did not acutely increase PbtO2 when administered after TBI. Sanguinate was associated with an increase in MAP in both studies. PMID:27287870

  13. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  14. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth Mc; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-03-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  15. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501

  16. Computational model of cerebral blood flow redistribution during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisokin, Andrey Y.; Verveyko, Darya V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades modelling studies on cortical spreading depression (CSD) and migraine waves successfully contributed to formation of modern view on these fundamental phenomena of brain physiology. However, due to the extreme complexity of object under study (brain cortex) and the diversity of involved physiological pathways, the development of new mathematical models of CSD is still a very relevant and challenging research problem. In our study we follow the functional modelling approach aimed to map the action of known physiological pathways to the specific nonlinear mechanisms that govern formation and evolution of CSD wave patterns. Specifically, we address the role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution that is caused by excessive neuronal activity by means of neurovascular coupling and mediates a spatial pattern of oxygen and glucose delivery. This in turn changes the local metabolic status of neural tissue. To build the model we simplify the web of known cell-to-cell interactions within a neurovascular unit by selecting the most relevant ones, such as local neuron-induced elevation of extracellular potassium concentration and biphasic response of arteriole radius. We propose the lumped description of distance-dependent hemodynamic coupling that fits the most recent experimental findings.

  17. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  18. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  19. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gefei; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia; Dai, Jianping; Li, Kangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  20. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  1. Visual cortical areas of the mouse: comparison of parcellation and network structure with primates

    PubMed Central

    Laramée, Marie-Eve; Boire, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Brains have evolved to optimize sensory processing. In primates, complex cognitive tasks must be executed and evolution led to the development of large brains with many cortical areas. Rodents do not accomplish cognitive tasks of the same level of complexity as primates and remain with small brains both in relative and absolute terms. But is a small brain necessarily a simple brain? In this review, several aspects of the visual cortical networks have been compared between rodents and primates. The visual system has been used as a model to evaluate the level of complexity of the cortical circuits at the anatomical and functional levels. The evolutionary constraints are first presented in order to appreciate the rules for the development of the brain and its underlying circuits. The organization of sensory pathways, with their parallel and cross-modal circuits, is also examined. Other features of brain networks, often considered as imposing constraints on the development of underlying circuitry, are also discussed and their effect on the complexity of the mouse and primate brain are inspected. In this review, we discuss the common features of cortical circuits in mice and primates and see how these can be useful in understanding visual processing in these animals. PMID:25620914

  2. Quantitative map of multiple auditory cortical regions with a stereotaxic fine-scale atlas of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukano, Hiroaki; Horie, Masao; Hishida, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging studies have recently revealed the presence of multiple auditory cortical regions in the mouse brain. We have previously demonstrated, using flavoprotein fluorescence imaging, at least six regions in the mouse auditory cortex, including the anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (AI), the secondary auditory field (AII), dorsoanterior field (DA), dorsomedial field (DM), and dorsoposterior field (DP). While multiple regions in the visual cortex and somatosensory cortex have been annotated and consolidated in recent brain atlases, the multiple auditory cortical regions have not yet been presented from a coronal view. In the current study, we obtained regional coordinates of the six auditory cortical regions of the C57BL/6 mouse brain and illustrated these regions on template coronal brain slices. These results should reinforce the existing mouse brain atlases and support future studies in the auditory cortex. PMID:26924462

  3. Cortical mapping of the optically evoked responses in channelrhodopsin-2 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Guk Bae; Cho, Jounhong Ryan; Shin, Hee-Sup; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the information transfer properties of large-scale neural circuit in brain system. We applied optical deep brain stimulation to define the properties of information flow within a living brain assisted by channel rhodopsin-2 (ChR2) transgenic mice, of which neurons express the light-activated ion channel. We first characterized the responses of neuronal ensemble to the impinged light with respect to stimulation parameters by co-registering local field potentials with optical stimulation. Secondly, we applied recently developed polyimide based microarray for mouse electroencephalogram (EEG) to obtain the cortical responses with respect to deep brain stimulation. Particularly, the spatiotemporal cortical mapping with respect to deep brain stimulation of primary somatosensory cortex and hippocampus CA1 were presented in this article. PMID:22255892

  4. Statistical Analysis of Tract-Tracing Experiments Demonstrates a Dense, Complex Cortical Network in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ypma, Rolf J F; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-09-01

    Anatomical tract tracing methods are the gold standard for estimating the weight of axonal connectivity between a pair of pre-defined brain regions. Large studies, comprising hundreds of experiments, have become feasible by automated methods. However, this comes at the cost of positive-mean noise making it difficult to detect weak connections, which are of particular interest as recent high resolution tract-tracing studies of the macaque have identified many more weak connections, adding up to greater connection density of cortical networks, than previously recognized. We propose a statistical framework that estimates connectivity weights and credibility intervals from multiple tract-tracing experiments. We model the observed signal as a log-normal distribution generated by a combination of tracer fluorescence and positive-mean noise, also accounting for injections into multiple regions. Using anterograde viral tract-tracing data provided by the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences, we estimate the connection density of the mouse intra-hemispheric cortical network to be 73% (95% credibility interval (CI): 71%, 75%); higher than previous estimates (40%). Inter-hemispheric density was estimated to be 59% (95% CI: 54%, 62%). The weakest estimable connections (about 6 orders of magnitude weaker than the strongest connections) are likely to represent only one or a few axons. These extremely weak connections are topologically more random and longer distance than the strongest connections, which are topologically more clustered and shorter distance (spatially clustered). Weak links do not substantially contribute to the global topology of a weighted brain graph, but incrementally increased topological integration of a binary graph. The topology of weak anatomical connections in the mouse brain, rigorously estimable down to the biological limit of a single axon between cortical areas in these data, suggests that they might confer functional advantages for integrative

  5. Effects of membrane depolarization on light scattering by cerebral cortical slices

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Peter

    1973-01-01

    1. A system is described for simultaneously measuring the respiration and the reflectance of a tissue slice and is applied to a study of guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices. 2. Reducing bathing medium osmolarity led to a reversible decrease in reflectance of these slices (as well as slices from liver and kidney cortex). In half isotonic solutions reflectance was reduced by 31%. 3. Anoxia led to a decreased reflectance which was eliminated if all the Cl was substituted by the larger glucuronate anion. 4. It is concluded that slice reflectance is lowered when cellular volumes are increased by water or isotonic solution influx. 5. Membrane depolarization effected by ouabain, high (60 mM) K bathing medium, veratridine or repeated electrical pulses led to rapid decreases in reflectance of 25, 27, 31 and 7·5% respectively. Turning off the electrical pulses caused reflectance to return to control values. Reversibility of the chemical effectors was not tested. 6. Substitution of Cl by glucuronate abolished the reflectance changes, although it did not inhibit the increased respiration induced by the depolarizing stimuli. 7. Tetrodotoxin abolished both the respiratory and reflectance effects of veratridine and electrical pulses but had no effect upon those of high K or ouabain. 8. The decrease in reflectance began about 1 sec after initiation of the pulses and was half maximal by 8 sec. 9. Titrating reflectance against [K] showed that an increase of 5 mM-K led to a 4% decrease in reflectance and that reflectance became minimal between 60 and 80 mM-K+. 10. It is concluded that membrane depolarization in excitable cells of the cerebral cortex (and also, possibly, in the glia) causes rapid increases in cell volume due to influx of isotonic solution. 11. The results indicate, more specifically, that changes in intercellular K concentrations of size and duration thought to occur following nervous activity in the C.N.S. cause cell volume changes large enough to drastically reduce

  6. Diphenyl diselenide administration enhances cortical mitochondrial number and activity by increasing hemeoxygenase type 1 content in a methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Viviane; Martins, Roberta de Paula; Vieira, Ana Julia Hoffmann; Oliveira, Eliana de Medeiros; Straliotto, Marcos Raniel; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Inés; de Bem, Andreza Fabro; Farina, Marcelo; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; De Paul, Ana Lucia; Latini, Alexandra

    2014-05-01

    Interest in biochemistry of organoselenium compound has increased in the last decades, mainly due to their chemical and biological activities. Here, we investigated the protective effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 (5 μmol/kg), in a mouse model of methylmercury (MeHg)-induced brain toxicity. Swiss male mice were divided into four experimental groups: control, (PhSe)2 (5 μmol/kg, subcutaneous administration), MeHg (40 mg/L, in tap water), and MeHg + (PhSe)2. After the treatment (21 days), the animals were killed and the cerebral cortex was analyzed. Electron microscopy indicated an enlarged and fused mitochondria leading to a reduced number of organelles, in the MeHg-exposed mice. Furthermore, cortical creatine kinase activity, a sensitive mitochondrial oxidative stress sensor, was almost abolished by MeHg. Subcutaneous (PhSe)2 co-treatment rescued from MeHg-induced mitochondrial alterations. (PhSe)2 also behaved as an enhancer of mitochondrial biogenesis, by increasing cortical mitochondria content in mouse-receiving (PhSe)2 alone. Mechanistically, (PhSe)2 (1 μM; 24 h) would trigger the cytoprotective Nrf-2 pathway for activating target genes, since astroglial cells exposed to the chalcogen showed increased content of hemeoxygenase type 1, a sensitive marker of the activation of this via. Thus, it is proposed that the (PhSe)2-neuroprotective effect might be linked to its mitoprotective activity. PMID:24623265

  7. Increased Susceptibility to Cortical Spreading Depression in the Mouse Model of Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Virginia; De Fusco, Maurizio; Pietrobon, Daniela; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Casari, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2) is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura that is caused by mutations of the α2-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, an isoform almost exclusively expressed in astrocytes in the adult brain. We generated the first FHM2 knock-in mouse model carrying the human W887R mutation in the Atp1a2 orthologous gene. Homozygous Atp1a2R887/R887 mutants died just after birth, while heterozygous Atp1a2+/R887 mice showed no apparent clinical phenotype. The mutant α2 Na,K-ATPase protein was barely detectable in the brain of homozygous mutants and strongly reduced in the brain of heterozygous mutants, likely as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum retention and subsequent proteasomal degradation, as we demonstrate in transfected cells. In vivo analysis of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the phenomenon underlying migraine aura, revealed a decreased induction threshold and an increased velocity of propagation in the heterozygous FHM2 mouse. Since several lines of evidence involve a specific role of the glial α2 Na,K pump in active reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft, we hypothesize that CSD facilitation in the FHM2 mouse model is sustained by inefficient glutamate clearance by astrocytes and consequent increased cortical excitatory neurotransmission. The demonstration that FHM2 and FHM1 mutations share the ability to facilitate induction and propagation of CSD in mouse models further support the role of CSD as a key migraine trigger. PMID:21731499

  8. Bispectral index correlates with regional cerebral blood flow during sleep in distinct cortical and subcortical structures in humans.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Q; Boly, M; Bonhomme, V; Boveroux, P; Phillips, C; Peigneux, P; Soddu, A; Luxen, A; Moonen, G; Maquet, P; Laureys, S

    2009-03-01

    The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS), an EEG-based monitor of anesthesia, and brain activity is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between changes in BIS values during natural sleep and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) variations, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Data were obtained from six young, healthy, right-handed, male volunteers (20-30 years old) using the H2(15)O infusion method. PET scans were performed both during waking and various stages of sleep. BIS values were monitored continuously and recorded during each PET scan. Positive correlations were detected between BIS and rCBF values in dorsolateral prefontal, parietal, anterior and posterior cingulate, precuneal, mesiofrontal, mesiotemporal and insular cortices. These areas belong to a frontoparietal network known to be related to awareness of self conscious sensory perception, attention and memory. BIS values also positively correlated with activity in brainstem and thalami, both structures known to be involved in arousal and wakefulness. These results show that BIS changes associated with physiological sleep depth co-vary with the activity of specific cortical and subcortical areas. The latter are known to modulate arousal, which in turn allows sustained thalamo-cortical enhancement of activity in a specific frontoparietal network known to be related to the content of consciousness. Thus, although mainly derived from frontal EEG, BIS could represent a wider index of cerebral activity. PMID:19678596

  9. Effects of aging and sensory loss on glial cells in mouse visual and auditory cortices

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Zettel, Martha L.; Ison, James R.; Allen, Paul D.; Majewska, Ania K.

    2011-01-01

    Normal aging is often accompanied by a progressive loss of receptor sensitivity in hearing and vision, whose consequences on cellular function in cortical sensory areas have remained largely unknown. By examining the primary auditory (A1) and visual (V1) cortices in two inbred strains of mice undergoing either age-related loss of audition (C57BL/6J) or vision (CBA/CaJ), we were able to describe cellular and subcellular changes that were associated with normal aging (occurring in A1 and V1 of both strains) or specifically with age-related sensory loss (only in A1 of C57BL/6J or V1 of CBA/CaJ), using immunocytochemical electron microscopy and light microscopy. While the changes were subtle in neurons, glial cells and especially microglia were transformed in aged animals. Microglia became more numerous and irregularly distributed, displayed more variable cell body and process morphologies, occupied smaller territories, and accumulated phagocytic inclusions that often displayed ultrastructural features of synaptic elements. Additionally, evidence of myelination defects were observed, and aged oligodendrocytes became more numerous and were more often encountered in contiguous pairs. Most of these effects were profoundly exacerbated by age-related sensory loss. Together, our results suggest that the age-related alteration of glial cells in sensory cortical areas can be accelerated by activity-driven central mechanisms that result from an age-related loss of peripheral sensitivity. In light of our observations, these age-related changes in sensory function should be considered when investigating cellular, cortical and behavioral functions throughout the lifespan in these commonly used C57BL/6J and CBA/CaJ mouse models. PMID:22223464

  10. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects Mouse Cortical Neurons From Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Mediated Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaoyang; Chi, Liying; Ke, Yan; Luo, Chun; Qian, Steven; Gozal, David; Liu, Rugao

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) syndrome has been recognized as a highly prevalent public health problem and is associated with major neurobehavioral morbidity. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a major pathological component of OSA, increases oxidative damage to the brain cortex and decreases neurocognitive function in rodent models resembling human OSA. We employed in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the specific phases and subcellular compartments in which enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during CIH. In addition, we utilized the cell culture and animal models to analyze the consequences of enhanced production of ROS on cortical neuronal cell damage and neurocognitive dysfunction. In a primary cortical neuron culture system, we demonstrated that the transition phase from hypoxia to normoxia (NOX) during CIH generates more ROS than the transition phase from NOX to hypoxia or hypoxia alone, all of which generate more ROS than NOX. Using selective inhibitors of the major pathways underlying ROS generation in the cell membrane, cytosol, and mitochondria, we showed that the mitochondria are the predominant source of enhanced ROS generation during CIH in mouse cortical neuronal cells. Furthermore, in both cell culture and transgenic mice, we demonstrated that overexpression of MnSOD decreased CIH-mediated cortical neuronal apoptosis, and reduced spatial learning deficits measured with the Morris water maze assay. Together, the data from the in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that CIH-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress may play a major role in the neuronal cell loss and neurocognitive dysfunction in OSA. Thus, therapeutic strategies aiming at reducing ROS generation from mitochondria may improve the neurobehavioral morbidity in OSA. PMID:17719231

  11. Rapid Changes in Cortical and Subcortical Brain Regions after Early Bilateral Enucleation in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional sensory and motor areas in the developing mammalian neocortex are formed through a complex interaction of cortically intrinsic mechanisms, such as gene expression, and cortically extrinsic mechanisms such as those mediated by thalamic input from the senses. Both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms are believed to be involved in cortical patterning and the establishment of areal boundaries in early development; however, the nature of the interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic processes is not well understood. In a previous study, we used a perinatal bilateral enucleation mouse model to test some aspects of this interaction by reweighting sensory input to the developing cortex. Visual deprivation at birth resulted in a shift of intraneocortical connections (INCs) that aligned with ectopic ephrin A5 expression in the same location ten days later at postnatal day (P) 10. A prevailing question remained: Does visual deprivation first induce a change in gene expression, followed by a shift in INCs, or vice versa? In the present study, we address this question by investigating the neuroanatomy and patterns of gene expression in post-natal day (P) 1 and 4 mice following bilateral enucleation at birth. Our results demonstrate a rapid reduction in dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) size and ephrin A5 gene expression 24-hours post-enucleation, with more profound effects apparent at P4. The reduced nuclear size and diminished gene expression mirrors subtle changes in ephrin A5 expression evident in P1 and P4 enucleated neocortex, 11 and 8 days prior to natural eye opening, respectively. Somatosensory and visual INCs were indistinguishable between P1 and P4 mice bilaterally enucleated at birth, indicating that perinatal bilateral enucleation initiates a rapid change in gene expression (within one day) followed by an alteration of sensory INCs later on (second postnatal week). With these results, we gain a deeper understanding of how gene expression and

  12. Observations on regional cerebral blood flow in cortical and subcortical structures during language production in normal man

    SciTech Connect

    Wallesch, C.W.; Henriksen, L.; Kornhuber, H.H.; Paulson, O.B.

    1985-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied by single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) of inhaled xenon-133 in six normal volunteers during various language, articulatory, and control conditions. Language production increased rCBF in predominantly left-sided cortical and subcortical areas. The involved regions were anatomically related to a left frontal area (Broca's), to both caudate nuclei, to a left thalamic/pallidal area, and bilaterally in retrorolandic areas. The failure to demonstrate lateralized retrorolandic activity is thought to reflect the complexity of the tasks.

  13. The forkhead transcription factors, Foxp1 and Foxp2, identify different subpopulations of projection neurons in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, T; Nakamura, Y; Senba, E; Morikawa, Y

    2010-03-17

    Foxp1 and Foxp2, which belong to the forkhead transcription factor family, are expressed in the developing and adult mouse brain, including the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Recent reports suggest that FOXP1 and FOXP2 are involved in the development of speech and language in humans. Although both Foxp1 and Foxp2 are expressed in the neural circuits that mediate speech and language, including the corticostriatal circuit, the functions of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the cerebral cortex remain unclear. To gain insight into the functions of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the cerebral cortex, we characterized Foxp1- and Foxp2-expressing cells in postnatal and adult mice using immunohistochemistry. In adult mice, Foxp1 was expressed in neurons of layers III-VIa in the neocortex, whereas the expression of Foxp2 was restricted to dopamine and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32)(+) neurons of layer VI. In addition, Foxp2 was weakly expressed in the neurons of layer V of the motor cortex and hindlimb and forelimb regions of the primary somatosensory cortex. Both Foxp1 and Foxp2 were expressed in the ionotropic glutamate receptor (GluR) 2/3(+) neurons, and colocalized with none of GluR1, gamma-aminobutyric acid, calbindin, and parvalbumin, indicating that expression of Foxp1 and Foxp2 is restricted to projection neurons. During the postnatal stages, Foxp1 was predominantly expressed in Satb2(+)/Ctip2(-) corticocortical projection neurons of layers III-V and in Tbr1(+) corticothalamic projection neurons of layer VIa. Although Foxp2 was also expressed in Tbr1(+) corticothalamic projection neurons of layer VI, no colocalization of Foxp1 with Foxp2 was observed from postnatal day (P) 0 to P7. These findings suggest that Foxp1 and Foxp2 may be involved in the development of different cortical projection neurons during the early postnatal stages in addition to the establishment and maintenance of different cortical circuits from the late postnatal

  14. Geniculo-Cortical Projection Diversity Revealed within the Mouse Visual Thalamus.

    PubMed

    Leiwe, Marcus N; Hendry, Aenea C; Bard, Andrew D; Eglen, Stephen J; Lowe, Andrew S; Thompson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) is an intermediary between retina and primary visual cortex (V1). Recent investigations are beginning to reveal regional complexity in mouse dLGN. Using local injections of retrograde tracers into V1 of adult and neonatal mice, we examined the developing organisation of geniculate projection columns: the population of dLGN-V1 projection neurons that converge in cortex. Serial sectioning of the dLGN enabled the distribution of labelled projection neurons to be reconstructed and collated within a common standardised space. This enabled us to determine: the organisation of cells within the dLGN-V1 projection columns; their internal organisation (topology); and their order relative to V1 (topography). Here, we report parameters of projection columns that are highly variable in young animals and refined in the adult, exhibiting profiles consistent with shell and core zones of the dLGN. Additionally, such profiles are disrupted in adult animals with reduced correlated spontaneous activity during development. Assessing the variability between groups with partial least squares regression suggests that 4-6 cryptic lamina may exist along the length of the projection column. Our findings further spotlight the diversity of the mouse dLGN--an increasingly important model system for understanding the pre-cortical organisation and processing of visual information. Furthermore, our approach of using standardised spaces and pooling information across many animals will enhance future functional studies of the dLGN. PMID:26727264

  15. Geniculo-Cortical Projection Diversity Revealed within the Mouse Visual Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Leiwe, Marcus N.; Hendry, Aenea C.; Bard, Andrew D.; Eglen, Stephen J.; Lowe, Andrew S.; Thompson, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    The mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) is an intermediary between retina and primary visual cortex (V1). Recent investigations are beginning to reveal regional complexity in mouse dLGN. Using local injections of retrograde tracers into V1 of adult and neonatal mice, we examined the developing organisation of geniculate projection columns: the population of dLGN-V1 projection neurons that converge in cortex. Serial sectioning of the dLGN enabled the distribution of labelled projection neurons to be reconstructed and collated within a common standardised space. This enabled us to determine: the organisation of cells within the dLGN-V1 projection columns; their internal organisation (topology); and their order relative to V1 (topography). Here, we report parameters of projection columns that are highly variable in young animals and refined in the adult, exhibiting profiles consistent with shell and core zones of the dLGN. Additionally, such profiles are disrupted in adult animals with reduced correlated spontaneous activity during development. Assessing the variability between groups with partial least squares regression suggests that 4–6 cryptic lamina may exist along the length of the projection column. Our findings further spotlight the diversity of the mouse dLGN–an increasingly important model system for understanding the pre-cortical organisation and processing of visual information. Furthermore, our approach of using standardised spaces and pooling information across many animals will enhance future functional studies of the dLGN. PMID:26727264

  16. PUMA is invovled in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of mouse cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tian, M; Jin, L; Jia, H; Jin, Y

    2015-01-22

    PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for p53-dependent and p53-independent forms of apoptosis. PUMA has been invovled in the onset and progress of several diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and ischemic brain disease. Although many studies have shown that ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) can induce the apoptosis of astrocytes, the role of PUMA in I/R-mediated apoptosis of cerebral astrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. To mimic in vivo I/R conditions, primary mouse cerebral astrocytes were incubated in a combinational cultural condition of oxygen, glucose, and serum deprivation (OSGD) for 1 h followed by reperfusion (OSGD/R). Cell death determination assays and cell viability assays indicated that OSGD and OSGD/R induce the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The expression of PUMA was significantly elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD/R. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of PUMA by siRNA transfection significantly decreased the OSGD/R-induced apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. We also found that OSGD and OSGD/R triggered the release of cytochrome c in astrocytes, indicating the dependence on a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was extremely generated during OSGD and OSGD/R, and the elimination of ROS by treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) remarkably inhibited the expression of PUMA and the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The activation of Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 was extremely elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD. In addition, we found that knockdown of PUMA led to the depressed expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 during OSGD/R. These results indicate that PUMA is invovled in the apoptosis of cerebral astrocytes upon I/R injury. PMID:25451294

  17. Application of Thinned-Skull Cranial Window to Mouse Cerebral Blood Flow Imaging Using Optical Microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of mouse brain vasculature typically requires applying skull window opening techniques: open-skull cranial window or thinned-skull cranial window. We report non-invasive 3D in vivo cerebral blood flow imaging of C57/BL mouse by the use of ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate two cranial window types based on their procedures and ability to visualize surface pial vessel dynamics. Application of the thinned-skull technique is found to be effective in achieving high quality images for pial vessels for short-term imaging, and has advantages over the open-skull technique in available imaging area, surgical efficiency, and cerebral environment preservation. In summary, thinned-skull cranial window serves as a promising tool in studying hemodynamics in pial microvasculature using OMAG or other OCT blood flow imaging modalities. PMID:25426632

  18. Inferring cortical function in the mouse visual system through large-scale systems neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Hawrylycz, Michael; Anastassiou, Costas; Arkhipov, Anton; Berg, Jim; Buice, Michael; Cain, Nicholas; Gouwens, Nathan W; Gratiy, Sergey; Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Lee, Jung Hoon; Mihalas, Stefan; Mitelut, Catalin; Olsen, Shawn; Reid, R Clay; Teeter, Corinne; de Vries, Saskia; Waters, Jack; Zeng, Hongkui; Koch, Christof

    2016-07-01

    The scientific mission of the Project MindScope is to understand neocortex, the part of the mammalian brain that gives rise to perception, memory, intelligence, and consciousness. We seek to quantitatively evaluate the hypothesis that neocortex is a relatively homogeneous tissue, with smaller functional modules that perform a common computational function replicated across regions. We here focus on the mouse as a mammalian model organism with genetics, physiology, and behavior that can be readily studied and manipulated in the laboratory. We seek to describe the operation of cortical circuitry at the computational level by comprehensively cataloging and characterizing its cellular building blocks along with their dynamics and their cell type-specific connectivities. The project is also building large-scale experimental platforms (i.e., brain observatories) to record the activity of large populations of cortical neurons in behaving mice subject to visual stimuli. A primary goal is to understand the series of operations from visual input in the retina to behavior by observing and modeling the physical transformations of signals in the corticothalamic system. We here focus on the contribution that computer modeling and theory make to this long-term effort. PMID:27382147

  19. The Pattern of Cortical Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of a Schizophrenia-Related Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Fénelon, Karine; Xu, Bin; Lai, Cora S.; Mukai, Jun; Markx, Sander; Stark, Kimberly L.; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Gan, Wen-Biao; Fischbach, Gerald D.; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2013-01-01

    We used a mouse model of the schizophrenia-predisposing 22q11.2 microdeletion to evaluate how this genetic lesion affects cortical neural circuits at the synaptic, cellular, and molecular levels. Guided by cognitive deficits, we demonstrated that mutant mice display robust deficits in high-frequency synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity (synaptic depression and potentiation), as well as alterations in long-term plasticity and dendritic spine stability. Apart from previously reported reduction in dendritic complexity of layer 5 pyramidal neurons, altered synaptic plasticity occurs in the context of relatively circumscribed and often subtle cytoarchitectural changes in neuronal density and inhibitory neuron numbers. We confirmed the pronounced DiGeorge critical region 8 (Dgcr8)-dependent deficits in primary micro-RNA processing and identified additional changes in gene expression and RNA splicing that may underlie the effects of this mutation. Reduction in Dgcr8 levels appears to be a major driver of altered short-term synaptic plasticity in prefrontal cortex and working memory but not of long-term plasticity and cytoarchitecture. Our findings inform the cortical synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory impairment in the context of psychiatric disorders. They also provide insight into the link between micro-RNA dysregulation and genetic liability to schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24027283

  20. Neuroprotective effect of the endogenous neural peptide apelin in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiang Jun; Yu, Shan Ping; Zhang, Like; Wei, Ling

    2010-07-01

    The adipocytokine apelin and its G protein-coupled APJ receptor were initially isolated from a bovine stomach and have been detected in the brain and cardiovascular system. Recent studies suggest that apelin can protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. Here, we investigated the effect of apelin on apoptosis in mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons. Exposure of the cortical cultures to a serum-free medium for 24 h induced nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic death; apelin-13 (1.0-5.0 nM) markedly prevented the neuronal apoptosis. Apelin neuroprotective effects were mediated by multiple mechanisms. Apelin-13 reduced serum deprivation (SD)-induced ROS generation, mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3. Apelin-13 prevented SD-induced changes in phosphorylation status of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, apelin-13 attenuated NMDA-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} accumulation. These results indicate that apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective adipocytokine that may block apoptosis and excitotoxic death via cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is suggested that apelins may be further explored as a potential neuroprotective reagent for ischemia-induced brain damage.

  1. Inferring cortical function in the mouse visual system through large-scale systems neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Hawrylycz, Michael; Anastassiou, Costas; Arkhipov, Anton; Berg, Jim; Buice, Michael; Cain, Nicholas; Gouwens, Nathan W.; Gratiy, Sergey; Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Lee, Jung Hoon; Mihalas, Stefan; Mitelut, Catalin; Olsen, Shawn; Reid, R. Clay; Teeter, Corinne; de Vries, Saskia; Waters, Jack; Zeng, Hongkui; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    The scientific mission of the Project MindScope is to understand neocortex, the part of the mammalian brain that gives rise to perception, memory, intelligence, and consciousness. We seek to quantitatively evaluate the hypothesis that neocortex is a relatively homogeneous tissue, with smaller functional modules that perform a common computational function replicated across regions. We here focus on the mouse as a mammalian model organism with genetics, physiology, and behavior that can be readily studied and manipulated in the laboratory. We seek to describe the operation of cortical circuitry at the computational level by comprehensively cataloging and characterizing its cellular building blocks along with their dynamics and their cell type-specific connectivities. The project is also building large-scale experimental platforms (i.e., brain observatories) to record the activity of large populations of cortical neurons in behaving mice subject to visual stimuli. A primary goal is to understand the series of operations from visual input in the retina to behavior by observing and modeling the physical transformations of signals in the corticothalamic system. We here focus on the contribution that computer modeling and theory make to this long-term effort. PMID:27382147

  2. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 alters oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, Beatriz; Riquelme, Raquel; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Jiménez, Antonio Jesús; de Diego, Isabel; Gómez-Conde, Ana Isabel; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Aguirre, José Ángel; Chun, Jerold; Pedraza, Carmen; Santín, Luis Javier; Fernández, Oscar; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an intercellular signaling lipid that regulates multiple cellular functions, acting through specific G-protein coupled receptors (LPA(1-6)). Our previous studies using viable Malaga variant maLPA1-null mice demonstrated the requirement of the LPA1 receptor for normal proliferation, differentiation, and survival of the neuronal precursors. In the cerebral cortex LPA1 is expressed extensively in differentiating oligodendrocytes, in parallel with myelination. Although exogenous LPA-induced effects have been investigated in myelinating cells, the in vivo contribution of LPA1 to normal myelination remains to be demonstrated. This study identified a relevant in vivo role for LPA1 as a regulator of cortical myelination. Immunochemical analysis in adult maLPA1-null mice demonstrated a reduction in the steady-state levels of the myelin proteins MBP, PLP/DM20, and CNPase in the cerebral cortex. The myelin defects were confirmed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Stereological analysis limited the defects to adult differentiating oligodendrocytes, without variation in the NG2+ precursor cells. Finally, a possible mechanism involving oligodendrocyte survival was demonstrated by the impaired intracellular transport of the PLP/DM20 myelin protein which was accompanied by cellular loss, suggesting stress-induced apoptosis. These findings describe a previously uncharacterized in vivo functional role for LPA1 in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the CNS, underlining the importance of the maLPA1-null mouse as a model for the study of demyelinating diseases. PMID:25226845

  3. Consistent Injury to Medium Spiny Neurons and White Matter in the Mouse Striatum after Prolonged Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Katsu, Masataka; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Okami, Nobuya

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A reproducible transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) mouse model has not been fully established. Although striatal neurons and white matter are recognized to be vulnerable to ischemia, their injury after tGCI in mice has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate injuries to striatal neurons and white matter after tGCI in C57BL/6 mice, and to develop a reproducible tGCI model. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to tGCI by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). Mice whose cortical cerebral blood flow after BCCAO decreased to less than 13% of the pre-ischemic value were used. Histological analysis showed that at 3 days after 22 min of BCCAO, striatal neurons were injured more consistently than those in other brain regions. Quantitative analysis of cytochrome c release into the cytosol and DNA fragmentation in the striatum showed consistent injury to the striatum. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that DARPP-32-positive medium spiny neurons, the majority of striatal neurons, were the most vulnerable among the striatal neuronal subpopulations. The striatum (especially medium spiny neurons) was susceptible to oxidative stress after tGCI, which is probably one of the mechanisms of vulnerability. SMI-32 immunostaining showed that white matter in the striatum was also consistently injured 3 days after 22 min of BCCAO. We thus suggest that this is a tGCI model using C57BL/6 mice that consistently produces neuronal and white matter injury in the striatum by a simple technique. This model can be highly applicable for elucidating molecular mechanisms in the brain after global ischemia. PMID:21309724

  4. Detection of Microregional Hypoxia in Mouse Cerebral Cortex by Two-photon Imaging of Endogenous NADH Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Sun, Anita; Salahura, Gheorghe; Silva, Jharon N.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kasischke, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The brain's ability to function at high levels of metabolic demand depends on continuous oxygen supply through blood flow and tissue oxygen diffusion. Here we present a visualized experimental and methodological protocol to directly visualize microregional tissue hypoxia and to infer perivascular oxygen gradients in the mouse cortex. It is based on the non-linear relationship between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) endogenous fluorescence intensity and oxygen partial pressure in the tissue, where observed tissue NADH fluorescence abruptly increases at tissue oxygen levels below 10 mmHg1. We use two-photon excitation at 740 nm which allows for concurrent excitation of intrinsic NADH tissue fluorescence and blood plasma contrasted with Texas-Red dextran. The advantages of this method over existing approaches include the following: it takes advantage of an intrinsic tissue signal and can be performed using standard two-photon in vivo imaging equipment; it permits continuous monitoring in the whole field of view with a depth resolution of ~50 μm. We demonstrate that brain tissue areas furthest from cerebral blood vessels correspond to vulnerable watershed areas which are the first to become functionally hypoxic following a decline in vascular oxygen supply. This method allows one to image microregional cortical oxygenation and is therefore useful for examining the role of inadequate or restricted tissue oxygen supply in neurovascular diseases and stroke. PMID:22370971

  5. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  6. Reduced cortical vasodilatory response to stimulation of the nucleus basalis of Meynert in the aged rat and evidence for a control of the cerebral circulation.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, P; Sercombe, R; Vaucher, E; Seylaz, J

    1997-09-26

    In earlier studies we showed that electrical stimulation of the rat nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) induces large increases in cerebral blood flow, mainly through cholinergic mechanisms. We then investigated the effect of aging on this influence by measuring cortical blood flow (CoBF) and tissue gas partial pressures (PtO2, PtCO2) in the conscious young adult and aged rat. NBM stimulation increased frontal (+101%) and parietal (+29%) CoBF in young rats. The effects were halved in aged rats. Moreover, PtO2 was significantly increased in young but not in aged rats. By contrast, the corticovascular reactivity to hypercapnia did not differ between young and aged rats, nor did the potentiating vasodilator effect of physostigmine. In combined autoradiographic measurements of cerebral blood flow and cerebral glucose utilization, we recently found that the cortical circulatory response to NBM stimulation was not accompanied by significant metabolic change. Thus, the blood flow changes observed in the cortex cannot be ascribed to increased metabolic activity. The distribution of this uncoupling coincides with that of cholinergic NBM projections directly impinging on cortical microvessels. These data support the cortical microcirculation and suggest the possible involvement of NBM dysfunction in the pathology of cortical microcirculation. PMID:9329714

  7. Cortical chemoarchitecture shapes macroscale effective functional connectivity patterns in macaque cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Turk, Elise; Scholtens, Lianne H; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cortex is a complex system of-at the microscale level-interconnected neurons and-at the macroscale level-interconnected areas, forming the infrastructure for local and global neural processing and information integration. While the effects of regional chemoarchitecture on local cortical activity are well known, the effect of local neurotransmitter receptor organization on the emergence of large scale region-to-region functional interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we examined reports of effective functional connectivity-as measured by the action of strychnine administration acting on the chemical balance of cortical areas-in relation to underlying regional variation in microscale neurotransmitter receptor density levels in the macaque cortex. Linking cortical variation in microscale receptor density levels to collated information on macroscale functional connectivity of the macaque cortex, we show macroscale patterns of effective corticocortical functional interactions-and in particular, the strength of connectivity of efferent macroscale pathways-to be related to the ratio of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor densities of cortical areas. Our findings provide evidence for the microscale chemoarchitecture of cortical areas to have a direct stimulating influence on the emergence of macroscale functional connectivity patterns in the mammalian brain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1856-1865, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970255

  8. Visualization of microhemorrhages with optical histology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Patrick; Crouzet, Christian; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Choi, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a neurovascular disease that is strongly associated with an increase in the number and size of spontaneous microhemorrhages. Conventional methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can detect microhemorrhages while positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh Compound B can detect amyloid deposits. MRI and PET can separately demonstrate the presence of microhemorrhages and CAA in affected brains in vivo; however, there is still a lack of strong evidence for the direct involvement of CAA in the presence of microhemorrhage formation. In this study, we use optical histology, a method which combines histochemical staining, chemical optical clearing, and optical imaging, in a Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease to enable simultaneous, co-registered three-dimensional visualization of cerebral microvasculature, microhemorrhages, and amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that microhemorrhages are localized within the brain regions affected by amyloid deposits. All but two observed microhemorrhages (n=18) were closely localized with vessels affected by CAA whereas no microhemorrhages or amyloid deposits were observed in wild type mouse brain sections. Our data also suggest that the predominant type of CAA-related microhemorrhage is associated with leaky or ruptured hemorrhagic microvasculature within the hippocampus and cerebral cortex rather than occluded ischemic microvasculature. The proposed optical histology method will allow future studies about the relationship between CAA and microhemorrhages during disease development and in response to treatment strategies.

  9. The effect of anaesthetic agents on cerebral cortical responses in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, A.; Gratton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    1. In rats, surgically anaesthetized with Urethane, an increase in the depth of anaesthesia upon administration of ethyl carbamate (Urethane), pentobarbitone sodium (Nembutal), thiopentone sodium (Intraval), althesin, ketamine, trichloroethylene, halothane, methoxyflurane, diethyl ether, ethyl-vinyl ether, cyclopropane, enflurane or chloroform resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the latency, the decrease in the amplitudes of the initial positive and negative components of the short latency cortical response to electrical stimuli applied to the forepaw. 2. The same changes were seen when starting from initially unanaesthetized rats and anaesthetizing them with Urethane. 3. With all the inhalational agents used these changes lasted for as long as the administration except with nitrous oxide where the changes in the cortical response were transient. 4. The tranquilizing agents diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and haloperidol showed no such action. Chloral hydrate and chlorpromazine, on the other hand, produced moderate changes in the evoked cortical response similar to those seen with the other anaesthetic agents used. PMID:7104523

  10. Evolutionarily Dynamic Alternative Splicing of GPR56 Regulates Regional Cerebral Cortical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Byoung-Il; Tietjen, Ian; Atabay, Kutay D.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Asare, Ebenezer; Wang, Peter P.; Murayama, Ayako Y.; Im, Kiho; Lisgo, Steven N.; Overman, Lynne; Šestan, Nenad; Chang, Bernard S.; Barkovich, A. James; Grant, P. Ellen; Topçu, Meral; Politsky, Jeffrey; Okano, Hideyuki; Piao, Xianhua; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The human neocortex has numerous specialized functional areas whose formation is poorly understood. Here, we describe a 15–base pair deletion mutation in a regulatory element of GPR56 that selectively disrupts human cortex surrounding the Sylvian fissure bilaterally including “Broca’s area,” the primary language area, by disrupting regional GPR56 expression and blocking RFX transcription factor binding. GPR56 encodes a heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptor required for normal cortical development and is expressed in cortical progenitor cells. GPR56 expression levels regulate progenitor proliferation. GPR56 splice forms are highly variable between mice and humans, and the regulatory element of gyrencephalic mammals directs restricted lateral cortical expression. Our data reveal a mechanism by which control of GPR56 expression pattern by multiple alternative promoters can influence stem cell proliferation, gyral patterning, and, potentially, neocortex evolution. PMID:24531968

  11. Auditory perception vs. recognition: representation of complex communication sounds in the mouse auditory cortical fields.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Diana B; Ehret, Günter

    2004-02-01

    Details of brain areas for acoustical Gestalt perception and the recognition of species-specific vocalizations are not known. Here we show how spectral properties and the recognition of the acoustical Gestalt of wriggling calls of mouse pups based on a temporal property are represented in auditory cortical fields and an association area (dorsal field) of the pups' mothers. We stimulated either with a call model releasing maternal behaviour at a high rate (call recognition) or with two models of low behavioural significance (perception without recognition). Brain activation was quantified using c-Fos immunocytochemistry, counting Fos-positive cells in electrophysiologically mapped auditory cortical fields and the dorsal field. A frequency-specific labelling in two primary auditory fields is related to call perception but not to the discrimination of the biological significance of the call models used. Labelling related to call recognition is present in the second auditory field (AII). A left hemisphere advantage of labelling in the dorsoposterior field seems to reflect an integration of call recognition with maternal responsiveness. The dorsal field is activated only in the left hemisphere. The spatial extent of Fos-positive cells within the auditory cortex and its fields is larger in the left than in the right hemisphere. Our data show that a left hemisphere advantage in processing of a species-specific vocalization up to recognition is present in mice. The differential representation of vocalizations of high vs. low biological significance, as seen only in higher-order and not in primary fields of the auditory cortex, is discussed in the context of perceptual strategies. PMID:15009150

  12. Compartmentalization of cerebral cortical germinal zones in a lissencephalic primate and gyrencephalic rodent.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A; Trevia, Nonata; Bourne, James A; Molnár, Zoltán

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies of macaque and human cortices identified cytoarchitectonically distinct germinal zones; the ventricular zone inner subventricular zone (ISVZ), and outer subventricular zone (OSVZ). To date, the OSVZ has only been described in gyrencephalic brains, separated from the ISVZ by an inner fiber layer and considered a milestone that triggered increased neocortical neurogenesis. However, this observation has only been assessed in a handful of species without the identification of the different progenitor populations. We examined the Amazonian rodent agouti (Dasyprocta agouti) and the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) to further understand relationships among progenitor compartmentalization, proportions of various cortical progenitors, and degree of cortical folding. We identified a similar cytoarchitectonic distinction between the OSVZ and ISVZ at midgestation in both species. In the marmoset, we quantified the ventricular and abventricular divisions and observed similar proportions as previously described for the human and ferret brains. The proportions of radial glia, intermediate progenitors, and outer radial glial cell (oRG) populations were similar in midgestation lissencephalic marmoset as in gyrencephalic human or ferret. Our findings suggest that cytoarchitectonic subdivisions of SVZ are an evolutionary trend and not a primate specific feature, and a large population of oRG can be seen regardless of cortical folding. PMID:22114081

  13. Regulation of Cerebral Cortical Size and Neuron Number by Fibroblast Growth Factors: Implications for Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccarino, Flora M.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Smith, Karen Muller; Stevens, Hanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Increased brain size is common in children with autism spectrum disorders. Here we propose that an increased number of cortical excitatory neurons may underlie the increased brain volume, minicolumn pathology and excessive network excitability, leading to sensory hyper-reactivity and seizures, which are often found in autism. We suggest that…

  14. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lisa A.; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S.; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet’s equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  15. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Christina; Duricki, Denise A; Roy, Lisa A; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet's equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  16. Point application with Angong Niuhuang sticker protects hippocampal and cortical neurons in rats with cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-shu; Liu, Yuan-liang; Zhu, Dao-qi; Huang, Xiao-jing; Luo, Chao-hua

    2015-01-01

    Angong Niuhuang pill, a Chinese materia medica preparation, can improve neurological functions after acute ischemic stroke. Because of its inconvenient application and toxic components (Cinnabaris and Realgar), we used transdermal enhancers to deliver Angong Niuhuang pill by modern technology, which expanded the safe dose range and clinical indications. In this study, Angong Niuhuang stickers administered at different point application doses (1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 g/kg) were administered to the Dazhui (DU14), Qihai (RN6) and Mingmen (DU4) of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was used to determine the learning and memory ability of rats. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Nissl staining were used to observe neuronal damage of the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia. The middle- and high-dose point application of Angong Niuhuang stickers attenuated neuronal damage in the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region, and improved the memory of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia with an efficacy similar to interventions by electroacupuncture at Dazhui (DU14), Qihai (RN6) and Mingmen (DU4). Our experimental findings indicate that point application with Angong Niuhuang stickers can improve cognitive function after chronic cerebral ischemia in rats and is neuroprotective with an equivalent efficacy to acupuncture. PMID:25883629

  17. Cortical Granule Exocytosis Is Mediated by Alpha-SNAP and N-Ethilmaleimide Sensitive Factor in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Paola, Matilde; Bello, Oscar Daniel; Michaut, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), also known as cortical reaction, is a calcium- regulated secretion that represents a membrane fusion process during meiotic cell division of oocytes. The molecular mechanism of membrane fusion during CGE is still poorly understood and is thought to be mediated by the SNARE pathway; nevertheless, it is unkown if SNAP (acronym for soluble NSF attachment protein) and NSF (acronym for N-ethilmaleimide sensitive factor), two key proteins in the SNARE pathway, mediate CGE in any oocyte model. In this paper, we documented the gene expression of α-SNAP, γ-SNAP and NSF in mouse oocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of these proteins maintains a similar level during oocyte maturation and early activation. Their localization was mainly observed at the cortical region of metaphase II oocytes, which is enriched in cortical granules. To evaluate the function of these proteins in CGE we set up a functional assay based on the quantification of cortical granules metaphase II oocytes activated parthenogenetically with strontium. Endogenous α-SNAP and NSF proteins were perturbed by microinjection of recombinant proteins or antibodies prior to CGE activation. The microinjection of wild type α-SNAP and the negative mutant of α-SNAP L294A in metaphase II oocytes inhibited CGE stimulated by strontium. NEM, an irreversibly inhibitor of NSF, and the microinjection of the negative mutant NSF D1EQ inhibited cortical reaction. The microinjection of anti-α-SNAP and anti-NSF antibodies was able to abolish CGE in activated metaphase II oocytes. The microinjection of anti-γ SNAP antibody had no effect on CGE. Our findings indicate, for the first time in any oocyte model, that α-SNAP, γ-SNAP, and NSF are expressed in mouse oocytes. We demonstrate that α-SNAP and NSF have an active role in CGE and propose a working model. PMID:26267363

  18. Cortical Granule Exocytosis Is Mediated by Alpha-SNAP and N-Ethilmaleimide Sensitive Factor in Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    de Paola, Matilde; Bello, Oscar Daniel; Michaut, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), also known as cortical reaction, is a calcium- regulated secretion that represents a membrane fusion process during meiotic cell division of oocytes. The molecular mechanism of membrane fusion during CGE is still poorly understood and is thought to be mediated by the SNARE pathway; nevertheless, it is unkown if SNAP (acronym for soluble NSF attachment protein) and NSF (acronym for N-ethilmaleimide sensitive factor), two key proteins in the SNARE pathway, mediate CGE in any oocyte model. In this paper, we documented the gene expression of α-SNAP, γ-SNAP and NSF in mouse oocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of these proteins maintains a similar level during oocyte maturation and early activation. Their localization was mainly observed at the cortical region of metaphase II oocytes, which is enriched in cortical granules. To evaluate the function of these proteins in CGE we set up a functional assay based on the quantification of cortical granules metaphase II oocytes activated parthenogenetically with strontium. Endogenous α-SNAP and NSF proteins were perturbed by microinjection of recombinant proteins or antibodies prior to CGE activation. The microinjection of wild type α-SNAP and the negative mutant of α-SNAP L294A in metaphase II oocytes inhibited CGE stimulated by strontium. NEM, an irreversibly inhibitor of NSF, and the microinjection of the negative mutant NSF D1EQ inhibited cortical reaction. The microinjection of anti-α-SNAP and anti-NSF antibodies was able to abolish CGE in activated metaphase II oocytes. The microinjection of anti-γ SNAP antibody had no effect on CGE. Our findings indicate, for the first time in any oocyte model, that α-SNAP, γ-SNAP, and NSF are expressed in mouse oocytes. We demonstrate that α-SNAP and NSF have an active role in CGE and propose a working model. PMID:26267363

  19. Resveratrol attenuates 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal-induced oxidative stress in mouse cortical collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Joo, Soo Yeon; Ma, Seong Kwon; Lee, JongUn

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) may provide numerous protective eff ects against chronic inflammatory diseases. Due to local hypoxia and hypertonicity, the renal medulla is subject to extreme oxidative stress, and aldehyde products formed during lipid peroxidation, such as 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE), might be responsible for tubular injury. This study aimed at investigating the eff ects of RSV on renal and its signaling mechanisms. While HHE treatment resulted in decreased expression of Sirt1, AQP2, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), mouse cortical collecting duct cells (M1) cells treated with HHE exhibited increased activation of p38 MAPK, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and increased expression of NOX4, p47phox, Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) and COX2. HHE treatment also induced NF-κB activation by promoting IκB-α degradation. Meanwhile, the observed increases in nuclear NF-κB, NOX4, p47phox, and COX2 expression were attenuated by treatment with Bay 117082, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), or RSV. Our findings indicate that RSV inhibits the expression of inflammatory proteins and the production of reactive oxygen species in M1 cells by inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:27162476

  20. A direct method for measuring mouse capillary cortical blood volume using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vérant, Pascale; Serduc, Raphaël; Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Rémy, Chantal; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2007-05-01

    Knowledge of the blood volume per unit volume of brain tissue is important for understanding brain function in health and disease. We describe a direct method using two-photon laser scanning microscopy to obtain in vivo the local capillary blood volume in the cortex of anesthetized mouse. We infused fluorescent dyes in the circulating blood and imaged the blood vessels, including the capillaries, to a depth of 600 microm below the dura at the brain surface. Capillary cortical blood volume (CCBV) was calculated without any form recognition and segmentation, by normalizing the total fluorescence measured at each depth and integrating the collected intensities all over the stack. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical simulations were performed to validate this method which was weakly sensitive to background noise. Then, CCBV had been estimated on seven healthy mice between 2%+/-0.3% and 2.4%+/-0.4%. We showed that this measure of CCBV is reproductible and that this method is highly sensitive to the explored zones in the cortex (vessel density and size). This method, which dispenses with form recognition, is rapid and would allow to study in vivo temporal and highly resolute spatial variations of CCBV under different conditions or stimulations. PMID:17063147

  1. Assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in ageing by measurements of cerebral blood flow and cortical oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Oudegeest-Sander, Madelijn H; van Beek, Arenda H E A; Abbink, Karin; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Hopman, Maria T E; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2014-03-01

    With ageing, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) decreases; however, to what extent dynamic cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity are influenced by ageing is unknown. The aim was to examine the dynamic responses of CBFV and cortical oxygenation to changes in blood pressure (BP) and arterial CO2 across different ages. Fifty-eight participants in three age groups were included, as follows: young (n = 20, 24 ± 2 years old), elderly (n = 20, 66 ± 1 years old), and older elderly (n = 18, 78 ± 3 years old). The CBFV was measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasound, simultaneously with oxyhaemoglobin (O2Hb) using near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-to-beat BP measurements using Finapres. Postural manoeuvres were performed to induce haemodynamic fluctuations. Cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was tested with hyperventilation and CO2 inhalation. With age, CBFV decreased (young 59 ± 12 cm s(-1), elderly 48 ± 7 cm s(-1) and older elderly 42 ± 9 cm s(-1), P < 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance increased (1.46 ± 0.58, 1.81 ± 0.36 and 1.98 ± 0.52 mmHg cm(-1) s(-1), respectively, P < 0.05). Normalized gain (autoregulatory damping) increased with age for BP-CBFV (0.88 ± 0.18, 1.31 ± 0.30 and 1.06 ± 0.34, respectively, P < 0.05) and CBFV-O2Hb (0.10 ± 0.09, 0.12 ± 0.04 and 0.17 ± 0.08, respectively, P < 0.05) during the repeated sit-stand manoeuvre at 0.05 Hz. Even though the absolute changes in CBFV and cerebrovascular resistance index during the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity were higher in the young group, the percentage changes in CBFV, cerebrovascular resistance index and O2Hb were similar in all age groups. In conclusion, there was no decline in dynamic cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity with increasing age up to 86 years. Despite the decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity and increase in cerebrovascular resistance with advancing age, CBFV and cortical

  2. Mild cognitive impairment, poor episodic memory, and late-life depression are associated with cerebral cortical thinning and increased white matter hyperintensities

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Motonobu; Maikusa, Norihide; Nakamura, Kei; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    In various independent studies to date, cerebral cortical thickness and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume have been associated with episodic memory, depression, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The aim of this study was to uncover variations in cortical thickness and WMH volume in association with episodic memory, depressive state, and the presence of MCI simultaneously in a single study population. The participants were 186 individuals with MCI (clinical dementia rating [CDR] of 0.5) and 136 healthy elderly controls (HCs; CDR of 0) drawn from two community-based cohort studies in northern Japan. We computed cerebral cortical thickness and WMH volume by using MR scans and statistically analyzed differences in these indices between HCs and MCI participants. We also assessed the associations of these indices with memory performance and depressive state in participants with MCI. Compared with HCs, MCI participants exhibited thinner cortices in the temporal and inferior parietal lobes and greater WMH volumes in the corona radiata and semioval center. In MCI participants, poor episodic memory was associated with thinner cortices in the left entorhinal region and increased WMH volume in the posterior periventricular regions. Compared with non-depressed MCI participants, depressed MCI participants showed reduced cortical thickness in the anterior medial temporal lobe and gyrus adjacent to the amygdala bilaterally, as well as greater WMH volume as a percentage of the total intracranial volume (WMHr). A higher WMHr was associated with cortical thinning in the frontal, temporal, and parietal regions in MCI participants. These results demonstrate that episodic memory and depression are associated with both cortical thickness and WMH volume in MCI participants. Additional longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the dynamic associations and interactions among these indices. PMID:25426066

  3. Kidney-specific WNK1 regulates sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion in mouse cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-02-15

    Kidney-specific with-no-lysine kinase 1 (KS-WNK1) is a kinase-deficient variant of WNK1 that is expressed exclusively in the kidney. It is abundantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and to a lesser extent in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL), connecting tubule, and cortical collecting duct (CCD). KS-WNK1 inhibits Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-)- and sodium chloride cotransporter-mediated Na(+) reabsorption in cTAL and DCT, respectively. Here, we investigated the role of KS-WNK1 in regulating Na(+) and K(+) transport in CCD using in vitro microperfusion of tubules isolated from KS-WNK1 knockout mice and control wild-type littermates. Because baseline K(+) secretion and Na(+) reabsorption were negligible in mouse CCD, we studied tubules isolated from mice fed a high-K(+) diet for 2 wk. Compared with that in wild-type tubules, K(+) secretion was reduced in KS-WNK1 knockout CCD perfused at a low luminal fluid rate of ~1.5 nl/min. Na(+) reabsorption and the lumen-negative transepithelial potential difference were also lower in the KS-WNK1 knockout CCD compared with control CCD. Increasing the perfusion rate to ~5.5 nl/min stimulated K(+) secretion in the wild-type as well as knockout CCD. The magnitudes of flow-stimulated increase in K(+) secretion were similar in wild-type and knockout CCD. Maxi-K(+) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin had no effect on K(+) secretion when tubules were perfused at ~1.5 nl/min, but completely abrogated the flow-dependent increase in K(+) secretion at ~5.5 nl/min. These findings support the notion that KS-WNK1 stimulates ROMK-mediated K(+) secretion, but not flow-dependent K(+) secretion mediated by maxi-K(+) channels in CCD. In addition, KS-WNK1 plays a role in regulating Na(+) transport in the CCD. PMID:23195681

  4. Lithium reverses increased rates of cerebral protein synthesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Huang, Tianjian; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), an inherited form of cognitive disability, have a wide range of symptoms including hyperactivity, autistic behavior, seizures and learning deficits. FXS is caused by silencing of FMR1 and the consequent absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that associates with polyribosomes and negatively regulates translation. In a previous study of a mouse model of FXS (Fmr1 knockout (KO)) we demonstrated that in vivo rates of cerebral protein synthesis (rCPS) were elevated in selective brain regions suggesting that the absence of FMRP in FXS may result in dysregulation of cerebral protein synthesis. Lithium, a drug used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, has been used to improve mood dysregulation in individuals with FXS. We reported previously that in the Fmr1 KO mouse chronic dietary lithium treatment reversed or ameliorated both behavioral and morphological abnormalities. Herein we report that chronic dietary lithium treatment reversed the increased rCPS in Fmr1 KO mice with little effect on wild type mice. We also report our results of analyses of key signaling molecules involved in regulation of mRNA translation. Our analyses indicate that neither effects on the PI3K/Akt nor the MAPK/ERK 1/2 pathway fully account for the effects of lithium treatment on rCPS. Collectively our findings and those from other laboratories on the efficacy of lithium treatment in animal models support further studies in patients with FXS. PMID:22227453

  5. Brain immune cell composition and functional outcome after cerebral ischemia: comparison of two mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Whittle, Stephanie C.; Lee, Seyoung; Chu, Hannah X.; Zhang, Shenpeng R.; Wei, Zihui; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Vinh, Anthony; Drummond, Grant R.; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to secondary brain injury following cerebral ischemia. The C57Bl/6 mouse strain is known to exhibit a T helper 1-prone, pro-inflammatory type response to injury, whereas the FVB strain is relatively T helper 2-prone, or anti-inflammatory, in its immune response. We tested whether stroke outcome is more severe in C57Bl/6 than FVB mice. Male mice of each strain underwent sham surgery or 1 h occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by 23 h of reperfusion. Despite no difference in infarct size, C57Bl/6 mice displayed markedly greater functional deficits than FVB mice after stroke, as assessed by neurological scoring and hanging wire test. Total numbers of CD45+ leukocytes tended to be larger in the brains of C57Bl/6 than FVB mice after stroke, but there were marked differences in leukocyte composition between the two mouse strains. The inflammatory response in C57Bl/6 mice primarily involved T and B lymphocytes, whereas neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages were more prominent in FVB mice. Our data are consistent with the concept that functional outcome after stroke is dependent on the immune cell composition which develops following ischemic brain injury. PMID:25477780

  6. Isolation of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Rodent Embryos for use with Dissected Cerebral Cortical Explants

    PubMed Central

    Zappaterra, Mauro W.; LaMantia, Anthony S.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2013-01-01

    The CSF is a complex fluid with a dynamically varying proteome throughout development and in adulthood. During embryonic development, the nascent CSF differentiates from the amniotic fluid upon closure of the anterior neural tube. CSF volume then increases over subsequent days as the neuroepithelial progenitor cells lining the ventricles and the choroid plexus generate CSF. The embryonic CSF contacts the apical, ventricular surface of the neural stem cells of the developing brain and spinal cord. CSF provides crucial fluid pressure for the expansion of the developing brain and distributes important growth promoting factors to neural progenitor cells in a temporally-specific manner. To investigate the function of the CSF, it is important to isolate pure samples of embryonic CSF without contamination from blood or the developing telencephalic tissue. Here, we describe a technique to isolate relatively pure samples of ventricular embryonic CSF that can be used for a wide range of experimental assays including mass spectrometry, protein electrophoresis, and cell and primary explant culture. We demonstrate how to dissect and culture cortical explants on porous polycarbonate membranes in order to grow developing cortical tissue with reduced volumes of media or CSF. With this method, experiments can be performed using CSF from varying ages or conditions to investigate the biological activity of the CSF proteome on target cells. PMID:23524481

  7. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  8. Cadmium-Induced Apoptosis in Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons Culture Is Mediated by a Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sun, Ya; Hu, Fei-fei; Bian, Jian-chun; Liu, Xue-zhong; Gu, Jian-hong; Liu, Zong-ping

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an extremely toxic metal, capable of severely damaging several organs, including the brain. Studies have shown that Cd disrupts intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis, leading to apoptosis in a variety of cells including primary murine neurons. Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular ion which acts as a signaling mediator in numerous cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival/death. However, little is known about the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells. Thus we investigated the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons. Consistent with known toxic properties of Cd, exposure of cerebral cortical neurons to Cd caused morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and cell death. It also induced elevation of [Ca2+]i and inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase activities. This Cd-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was suppressed by an IP3R inhibitor, 2-APB, suggesting that ER-regulated Ca2+ is involved. In addition, we observed elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, dysfunction of cytochrome oxidase subunits (COX-I/II/III), depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) during Cd exposure. Z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor, partially prevented Cd-induced apoptosis and cell death. Interestingly, apoptosis, cell death and these cellular events induced by Cd were blocked by BAPTA-AM, a specific intracellular Ca2+ chelator. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed an up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulated expression of Bax. However, these were not blocked by BAPTA-AM. Thus Cd toxicity is in part due to its disruption of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, by compromising ATPases activities and ER-regulated Ca2+, and this elevation in Ca2+ triggers the activation of the Ca2+-mitochondria apoptotic signaling pathway. This

  9. Abnormal Excitability and Episodic Low-Frequency Oscillations in the Cerebral Cortex of the tottering Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Carter, Russell E.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The Ca2+ channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca2+ channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca2+ channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  10. Abnormal excitability and episodic low-frequency oscillations in the cerebral cortex of the tottering mouse.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Samuel W; Popa, Laurentiu S; Carter, Russell E; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    The Ca(2+) channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca(2+) channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  11. Down regulation of cerebral cortical 3H imipramine binding sites during chronic antidepressant treatment is independent of the central serotonergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Stockert, M; Silveira, R; Zieher, L M; Dajas, F; Medina, J H

    1992-01-01

    The effects of chronic antidepressant (AD) administration (amitryptiline 12 mg/Kg i.p., 20 days) on cerebral cortical [3H] imipramine binding sites were examined in control rats and in serotonergic denervated animals. Both treatments independently reduced the density of [3H] imipramine binding sites by 33-40%. Animals submitted to both treatments showed a slightly higher decrease in the Bmax (-50%). No alterations were observed in the apparent dissociation constant. Preincubation of cerebral cortical synaptosomal membranes with Triton X-100 (0.2% v/v), which preferentially dissolves the presynaptic component of the synaptosomes, reduced by 40% the maximal number of [3H] imipramine binding sites in control rats. In chronic AD treated rats or in serotonergic lesioned rats, membranes preincubated with Triton X-100 showed a 30% decrease in the number of [3H] imipramine sites in comparison to the sham group. The combination of both treatments produced an even larger decrease in the density of [3H] imipramine binding sites in Triton X-100 treated membranes (-55%) compared to the sham group. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that cerebral cortical [3H] imipramine binding sites located both pre- and postsynaptically, are down regulated by the long term AD administration independently of the integrity of the central serotonergic system. PMID:1583619

  12. Laser acupuncture induced specific cerebral cortical and subcortical activations in humans.

    PubMed

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Haala, Ilka Anna; Haid, Veronika; Rhomberg, Paul; Ischebeck, Anja; Buchberger, Waltraud; Felber, Stephan; Schlager, Andreas; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2005-09-01

    As recent studies demonstrated, acupuncture can elicit activity in specific brain areas. This study aims to explore further the central effect using laser acupuncture. We investigated the cerebral effects of laser acupuncture at both acupoints GB43 with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a control condition the laser was mounted at the same acupoints but without application of laser stimulation. The group results showed significant brain activations within the thalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nucleus ruber, the brainstem, and the Brodmann areas 40 and 22 for the acupuncture condition. No significant brain activations were observed within the placebo condition. The activations we observed were laser acupuncture-specific and predominantly ipsilateral. This supports the assumption that acupuncture is mediated by meridians, since meridians do not cross to the other side. Furthermore, we could show that laser acupuncture allows one to design a pure placebo condition. PMID:15990948

  13. Proliferation and differentiation characteristics of neural stem cells during course of cerebral cortical histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in the research field of stem cell biology have enabled the realization of regenerative medicine in various systems of the body, including the central nervous system. However, fundamental knowledge regarding how neural stem cells divide and generate young neurons in mammals, especially in vivo, is still inadequate. In this article, we shall summarize the concept of cell cycle/division of neural stem cells that generate projection neurons in the murine cerebral cortex. We shall also review the molecular mechanisms that modulate the critical parameters related to the cell cycle regulatory mechanisms, with special reference to the cell cycle regulatory protein p27(Kip1) , an inhibitor of progression of the cell cycle at the G1 phase. A better understanding of the mechanisms controlling cell cycle progression is expected to contribute to the development of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of neural cell/tissue production, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26058879

  14. Flattened cortical maps of cerebral function in the rat: a region-of-interest approach to data sampling, analysis and display.

    PubMed

    Holschneider, D P; Scremin, O U; Chialvo, D R; Kay, B P; Maarek, J-M I

    2008-03-28

    We describe a method for the measurement, analysis and display of cerebral cortical data obtained from coronal brain sections of the adult rat. In this method, regions-of-interest (ROI) are selected in the cortical mantle in a semiautomated fashion using a radial grid overlay, spaced in 15 degrees intervals from the midline. ROI measurements of intensity are mapped on a flattened two-dimensional surface. Topographic maps of statistical significance at each ROI allow for the rapid viewing of group differences. Cortical z-scores are displayed with the boundaries of brain regions defined according to a standard atlas of the rat brain. This method and accompanying software implementation (Matlab, Labview) allow for compact data display in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic studies of the structure and function of the rat brain. PMID:18325664

  15. Primary Somatosensory Cortices Contain Altered Patterns of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in the Interictal Phase of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, Duncan J.; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Wilcox, Sophie L.; Scrivani, Steven; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a complex integrated process that is critical for supporting healthy brain function. Studies have demonstrated a high incidence of alterations in CBF in patients suffering from migraine with and without aura during different phases of attacks. However, the CBF data collected interictally has failed to show any distinguishing features or clues as to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. In this study we used the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique—arterial spin labeling (ASL)—to non-invasively and quantitatively measure regional CBF (rCBF) in a case-controlled study of interictal migraine. We examined both the regional and global CBF differences between the groups, and found a significant increase in rCBF in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of migraine patients. The CBF values in S1 were positively correlated with the headache attack frequency, but were unrelated to the duration of illness or age of the patients. Additionally, 82% of patients reported skin hypersensitivity (cutaneous allodynia) during migraine, suggesting atypical processing of somatosensory stimuli. Our results demonstrate the presence of a disease-specific functional deficit in a known region of the trigemino-cortical pathway, which may be driven by adaptive or maladaptive functional plasticity. These findings may in part explain the altered sensory experiences reported between migraine attacks. PMID:26372461

  16. GSK-3β downregulates Nrf2 in cultured cortical neurons and in a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Yuanling; Zhu, Jin; Lei, Shipeng; Dong, Yuan; Li, Lingyu; Jiang, Beibei; Tan, Li; Wu, Jingxian; Yu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway plays a critical role in protecting against oxidative stress in brain ischemia and reperfusion injury. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) may play a critical role in regulating Nrf2 in a Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-independent manner. However, the relationship between GSK-3β and Nrf2 in brain ischemia and reperfusion injury is not clear. In this study, we explored the mechanisms through which GSK-3β regulates Nrf2 and Nrf-2/ARE pathways in vitro and in vivo. We used oxygen and glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) in primary cultured cortical neurons and a middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO/R) rat model to mimic ischemic insult. In this study, GSK-3β siRNA and inhibitors (SB216763 and LiCl) were used to inhibit GSK-3β in vitro and in vivo. After inhibiting GSK-3β, expression of total and nuclear Nrf2, Nrf2-ARE binding activity, and expression of Nrf2/ARE pathway-driven genes HO-1 and NQO-1 increased. Overexpression of GSK-3β yielded opposite results. These results suggest that GSK-3β downregulates Nrf2 and the Nrf2/ARE pathway in brain ischemia and reperfusion injury. GSK-3β may be an endogenous antioxidant relevant protein, and may represent a new therapeutic target in treatment of ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:26838164

  17. Putative cerebral cortical involvement in the ventilatory response to inhaled CO2 in conscious man.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, K; Mier, A; Adams, L; Guz, A

    1990-01-01

    1. The response of the diaphragm to both transcranial magnetic stimulation and electrical phrenic nerve stimulation was studied in thirteen normal subjects under conditions of either a 'reflex' drive to ventilation with inhaled CO2 or during volitional ventilation of similar magnitude. 2. The induced compound action potential in the diaphragm was recorded using an oesophageal electrode, and in some cases transdiaphragmatic pressure was recorded using oesophageal and gastric balloon catheters. 3. The response of the diaphragm to transcranial magnetic stimulation was invariably facilitated with volitional inspiration; there was either minimal or no response at functional residual capacity. 4. Facilitation with inspiration was also seen during a 'reflex' drive to ventilation with inhaled CO2 in the presumed absence of any volitional contribution to ventilation. A similar degree of facilitation was seen with voluntary ventilation of similar magnitude and pattern. 5. If the facilitation is predominantly a cortical phenomenon, then these results imply that there is a behavioural component in the previously supposed purely 'reflex' drive to ventilation with inhaled CO2. We also discuss the interpretation of these results if some of the facilitation occurs at the phrenic motoneurone. PMID:2109059

  18. Cellullar insights into cerebral cortical development: focusing on the locomotion mode of neuronal migration

    PubMed Central

    Kawauchi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian brain consists of numerous compartments that are closely connected with each other via neural networks, comprising the basis of higher order brain functions. The highly specialized structure originates from simple pseudostratified neuroepithelium-derived neural progenitors located near the ventricle. A long journey by neurons from the ventricular side is essential for the formation of a sophisticated brain structure, including a mammalian-specific six-layered cerebral cortex. Neuronal migration consists of several contiguous steps, but the locomotion mode comprises a large part of the migration. The locomoting neurons exhibit unique features; a radial glial fiber-dependent migration requiring the endocytic recycling of N-cadherin and a neuron-specific migration mode with dilation/swelling formation that requires the actin and microtubule organization possibly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), Dcx, p27kip1, Rac1, and POSH. Here I will introduce the roles of various cellular events, such as cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion, and membrane trafficking, in the regulation of the neuronal migration, with particular focus on the locomotion mode. PMID:26500496

  19. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MINERAL IN DUCTILE AND BRITTLE CORTICAL MOUSE BONE

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J.; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone’s mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone’s mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta murine (oim−/−) mice were used to model brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants (Phospho1−/−) had ductile bone. They were compared to their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification, to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (qbSEM). Interestingly, the mineral of brittle oim−/− and ductile Phospho1−/− bones had many similar characteristics. Both pathology models had smaller apatite crystals, lower mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild-types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. The degree of mineralization of the bone matrix was different for each strain: oim−/− were hypermineralized, while Phospho1−/− were hypomineralized. However, alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results revealed that despite having extremely different whole bone mechanics, the mineral of oim−/− and Phospho1−/− has several similar trends at smaller length scales. This

  20. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Derungs, Rebecca; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Henkelman, Mark; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure, metabolism, and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD, yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several preclinical murine models of AD have been generated based on transgenic insertion of human mutated APP genes. Depending on the specific mutations, mouse strains express different aspects of amyloid pathology, e.g. intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates, parenchymal plaques, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We have applied multi-parametric MRI in three transgenic mouse lines to compare changes in brain function with resting-state fMRI and structure with diffusion tensor imaging and high resolution anatomical imaging. E22ΔAβ developing intracellular Aβ aggregates did not present functional or structural alterations compared to their wild-type littermates. PSAPP mice displaying parenchymal amyloid plaques displayed mild functional changes within the supplementary and barrel field cortices, and increased isocortical volume relative to controls. Extensive reduction in functional connectivity in the sensory-motor cortices and within the default mode network, as well as local volume increase in the midbrain relative to wild-type have been observed in ArcAβ mice bearing intracellular Aβ aggregates as well as parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. Patterns of functional and structural changes appear to be strain-specific and not directly related to amyloid deposition. PMID:27033685

  1. Restoration of Oligodendrocyte Pools in a Mouse Model of Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, Jamie; Reimer, Michell M.; Holland, Philip R.; Manso, Yasmina; McLaughlin, Mark; Fowler, Jill H.; Horsburgh, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, a sustained modest reduction in cerebral blood flow, is associated with damage to myelinated axons and cognitive decline with ageing. Oligodendrocytes (the myelin producing cells) and their precursor cells (OPCs) may be vulnerable to the effects of hypoperfusion and in some forms of injury OPCs have the potential to respond and repair damage by increased proliferation and differentiation. Using a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion we have characterised the acute and long term responses of oligodendrocytes and OPCs to hypoperfusion in the corpus callosum. Following 3 days of hypoperfusion, numbers of OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes were significantly decreased compared to controls. However following 1 month of hypoperfusion, the OPC pool was restored and increased numbers of oligodendrocytes were observed. Assessment of proliferation using PCNA showed no significant differences between groups at either time point but showed reduced numbers of proliferating oligodendroglia at 3 days consistent with the loss of OPCs. Cumulative BrdU labelling experiments revealed higher numbers of proliferating cells in hypoperfused animals compared to controls and showed a proportion of these newly generated cells had differentiated into oligodendrocytes in a subset of animals. Expression of GPR17, a receptor important for the regulation of OPC differentiation following injury, was decreased following short term hypoperfusion. Despite changes to oligodendrocyte numbers there were no changes to the myelin sheath as revealed by ultrastructural assessment and fluoromyelin however axon-glial integrity was disrupted after both 3 days and 1 month hypoperfusion. Taken together, our results demonstrate the initial vulnerability of oligodendroglial pools to modest reductions in blood flow and highlight the regenerative capacity of these cells. PMID:24498301

  2. Visualization of microbleeds with optical histology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Patrick; Crouzet, Christian; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Choi, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a neurovascular disease that is strongly associated with an increase in the number and size of spontaneous microbleeds. Conventional methods of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of microbleeds, and positron emission tomography with Pittsburgh Compound B imaging for amyloid deposits, can separately demonstrate the presence of microbleeds and CAA in affected brains in vivo; however, there still is a critical need for strong evidence that shows involvement of CAA in microbleed formation. Here, we show in a Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, that the combination of histochemical staining and an optical clearing method called optical histology, enables simultaneous, co-registered three-dimensional visualization of cerebral microvasculature, microbleeds, and amyloid deposits. Our data suggest that microbleeds are localized within the brain regions affected by vascular amyloid deposits. All observed microhemorrhages (n=39) were in close proximity (0 to 144μm) with vessels affected by CAA. Our data suggest that the predominant type of CAA-related microbleed is associated with leaky or ruptured hemorrhagic microvasculature. The proposed methodological and instrumental approach will allow future study of the relationship between CAA and microbleeds during disease development and in response to treatment strategies. PMID:26876114

  3. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value. PMID:20087768

  4. Effects of the flavonoid hesperidin in cerebral cortical progenitors in vitro: indirect action through astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nones, Jader; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio; Gomes, Flávia Carvalho Alcantara

    2012-06-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that are integral components of the human diet, universally present as constituents of fruits and vegetables as well as plant-derived foods and beverages such as oil, tea, and red wine. The biological activities of flavonoids cover a very broad spectrum, from anticancer and antibacterial activities to inhibition of bone reabsorption and modulation of inflammatory response. Although emerging evidence has suggested that flavonoids might have an impact on brain pathology and aging, their role as a mediator in interactions between neurons and glial cells has been poorly explored. In the present work, we have performed a screening of flavonoid actions by analyzing the effects of hesperidin, quercetin and rutin on murine cerebral cortex astrocytes and neural progenitors. Treatment of astrocytes with flavonoids did not interfere with cell viability and proliferation. However a culture of neural progenitors with conditioned medium from hesperidin treated-astrocyte (H-CM) yielded produced a 41% and 25% increase in the number of neural progenitors and post-mitotic neurons, respectively. The H-CM effect was mainly due to modulation of neuronal progenitor survival. Pools of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte progenitors were not affected by H-CM (hesperidin), Q-CM (quercetin) and R-CM (rutin). Q-CM and R-CM did not increase neuronal population. These results suggest that H-CM might be composed by a new factor that could modulate neuroglial interactions during central nervous system development and opens the possibility for using flavonoids as new therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22322314

  5. Cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculation rarefaction precede white matter lesions in a mouse genetic model of cerebral ischemic small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Joutel, Anne; Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Gosele, Claudia; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Hammes, Annette; Schmidt, Sabine; Lemaire-Carrette, Barbara; Domenga, Valérie; Schedl, Andreas; Lacombe, Pierre; Hubner, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic small vessel disease (SVD) is the leading cause of vascular dementia and a major contributor to stroke in humans. Dominant mutations in NOTCH3 cause cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic archetype of cerebral ischemic SVD. Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of this disease and developing effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a good animal model. Here, we report the development of a mouse model for CADASIL via the introduction of a CADASIL-causing Notch3 point mutation into a large P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC). In vivo expression of the mutated PAC transgene in the mouse reproduced the endogenous Notch3 expression pattern and main pathological features of CADASIL, including Notch3 extracellular domain aggregates and granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits in brain vessels, progressive white matter damage, and reduced cerebral blood flow. Mutant mice displayed attenuated myogenic responses and reduced caliber of brain arteries as well as impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation and functional hyperemia. Further, we identified a substantial reduction of white matter capillary density. These neuropathological changes occurred in the absence of either histologically detectable alterations in cerebral artery structure or blood-brain barrier breakdown. These studies provide in vivo evidence for cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculatory failure as key contributors to hypoperfusion and white matter damage in this genetic model of ischemic SVD. PMID:20071773

  6. Genes expressed in mouse cortical progenitors are enriched in Pax, Lhx, and Sox transcription factor putative binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bery, Amandine; Mérot, Yohann; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2016-02-15

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling the development of the mammalian cortex. The proliferative and neurogenic properties of cortical progenitors located in the ventricular germinal zone start being understood. Little is known however on the cis-regulatory control that finely tunes gene expression in these progenitors. Here, we undertook an in silico-based approach to address this question, followed by some functional validation. Using the Eurexpress database, we established a list of 30 genes specifically expressed in the cortical germinal zone, we selected mouse/human conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) around these genes and we performed motif-enrichment search in these CNEs. We found an over-representation of motifs corresponding to binding sites for Pax, Sox, and Lhx transcription factors, often found as pairs and located within 100bp windows. A small subset of CNEs (n=7) was tested for enhancer activity, by ex-vivo and in utero electroporation assays. Two showed strong enhancer activity in the germinal zone progenitors. Mutagenesis experiments on a selected CNE showed the functional importance of the Pax, Sox, and Lhx TFBS for conferring enhancer activity to the CNE. Overall, from a cis-regulatory viewpoint, our data suggest an input from Pax, Sox and Lhx transcription factors to orchestrate corticogenesis. These results are discussed with regards to the known functional roles of Pax6, Sox2 and Lhx2 in cortical development. PMID:26721689

  7. Ethanol activation of protein kinase A regulates GABAA α1 receptor function and trafficking in cultured cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephen L; Kumar, Sandeep; Werner, David F; Comerford, Christopher E; Morrow, A Leslie

    2013-05-01

    Ethanol exposure produces alterations in GABAergic signaling that are associated with dependence and withdrawal. Previously, we demonstrated that ethanol-induced protein kinase C (PKC) γ signaling selectively contributes to changes in GABAA α1 synaptic receptor activity and surface expression. Here, we demonstrate that protein kinase A (PKA) exerts opposing effects on GABAA receptor adaptations during brief ethanol exposure. Cerebral cortical neurons from day 0-1 rat pups were tested after 18 days in culture. Receptor trafficking was assessed by Western blot analysis, and functional changes were measured using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of evoked and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) responses. One-hour ethanol exposure increased membrane-associated PKC and PKA, but steady-state GABAA α1 subunit levels were maintained. Activation of PKA by Sp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine alone increased GABAA α1 subunit surface expression and zolpidem potentiation of GABA responses, whereas coexposure of ethanol with the PKA inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine decreased α1 subunit expression and zolpidem responses. Exposure to the PKC inhibitor calphostin-C with ethanol mimicked the effect of direct PKA activation. The effects of PKA modulation on mIPSC decay τ were consistent with its effects on GABA currents evoked in the presence of zolpidem. Overall, the results suggest that PKA acts in opposition to PKC on α1-containing GABAA receptors, mediating the GABAergic effects of ethanol exposure, and may provide an important target for the treatment of alcohol dependence/withdrawal. PMID:23408117

  8. Comparative three-dimensional connectome map of motor cortical projections in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Minju; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Jeongjin; Ferrante, Daniel D.; Mitra, Partha P.; Osten, Pavel; Kim, Daesoo

    2016-01-01

    The motor cortex orchestrates simple to complex motor behaviors through its output projections to target areas. The primary (MOp) and secondary (MOs) motor cortices are known to produce specific output projections that are targeted to both similar and different target areas. These projections are further divided into layer 5 and 6 neuronal outputs, thereby producing four cortical outputs that may target other areas in a combinatorial manner. However, the precise network structure that integrates these four projections remains poorly understood. Here, we constructed a whole-brain, three-dimensional (3D) map showing the tract pathways and targeting locations of these four motor cortical outputs in mice. Remarkably, these motor cortical projections showed unique and separate tract pathways despite targeting similar areas. Within target areas, various combinations of these four projections were defined based on specific 3D spatial patterns, reflecting anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral, and core-capsular relationships. This 3D topographic map ultimately provides evidence for the relevance of comparative connectomics: motor cortical projections known to be convergent are actually segregated in many target areas with unique targeting patterns, a finding that has anatomical value for revealing functional subdomains that have not been classified by conventional methods. PMID:26830143

  9. Contrasting effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and neurotrophin 3 on cell cycle kinetics of mouse cortical stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukaszewicz, Agnès; Savatier, Pierre; Cortay, Véronique; Kennedy, Henry; Dehay, Colette

    2002-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exerts a mitogenic effect on cortical neuroblasts, whereas neurotrophin 3 (NT3) promotes differentiation in these cells. Here we provide evidence that both the mitogenic effect of bFGF and the differentiation-promoting effect of NT3 are linked with modifications of cell cycle kinetics in mouse cortical precursor cells. We adapted an in vitro assay, which makes it possible to evaluate (1) the speed of progression of the cortical precursors through the cell cycle, (2) the duration of individual phases of the cell cycle, (3) the proportion of proliferative versus differentiative divisions, and (4) the influence on neuroglial differentiation. Contrary to what has been claimed previously, bFGF promotes proliferation via a change in cell cycle kinetics by simultaneously decreasing G1 duration and increasing the proportion of proliferative divisions. In contrast, NT3 lengthens G1 and promotes differentiative divisions. We investigated the molecular foundations of these effects and show that bFGF downregulates p27kip1 and upregulates cyclin D2 expression. This contrasts with NT3, which upregulates p27kip1 and downregulates cyclin D2 expression. Neither bFGF nor NT3 influences the proportion of glia or neurons in short to medium term cultures. The data point to links between the length of the G1 phase and the type of division of cortical precursors: differentiative divisions are correlated with long G1 durations, whereas proliferative divisions correlate with short G1 durations. The present results suggest that concerted mechanisms control the progressive increase in the cell cycle duration and proportion of differentiative divisions that is observed as corticogenesis proceeds. PMID:12151540

  10. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gunes; Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J; Kis, Viktor; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. PMID:26631464

  11. Minocycline Reduces Spontaneous Hemorrhage in Mouse Models of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Xiao, Qingli; Kraft, Andrew; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ron; Greenberg, Steven M.; Holtzman, David; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA) is a common cause of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the elderly. Previous studies have shown that CAA induces inflammation and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (gelatinases) in amyloid-laden vessels. Here, we inhibited both using minocycline in CAA mouse models to determine if spontaneous ICH could be reduced. Methods Tg2576 (n=16) and 5×FAD/ApoE4 knock-in mice (n=16), aged to 17 and 12 months, respectively, were treated with minocycline (50 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline every other day for two months. Brains were extracted and stained with X-34 (to quantify amyloid), Perl’s blue (to quantify hemorrhage), and immunostained to examined Aβ load, gliosis (GFAP, Iba-1), and vascular markers of blood-brain-barrier integrity (ZO-1 and collagen IV). Brain extracts were used to quantify mRNA for a variety of inflammatory genes. Results Minocycline treatment significantly reduced hemorrhage frequency in the brains of Tg2576 and 5×FAD/ApoE4 mice relative to the saline-treated mice, without affecting CAA load. Gliosis (GFAP and Iba-1 immunostaining), gelatinase activity, and expression of a variety of inflammatory genes (MMP-9, Nox4, CD45, S-100b, Iba-1) were also significantly reduced. Higher levels of microvascular tight junction and basal lamina proteins were found in the brains of minocycline-treated Tg2576 mice relative to saline-treated controls. Conclusions Minocycline reduced gliosis, inflammatory gene expression, gelatinase activity, and spontaneous hemorrhage in two different mouse models of CAA, supporting the importance of MMP-related and inflammatory pathways in ICH pathogenesis. As an FDA-approved drug, minocycline might be considered for clinical trials to test efficacy in preventing CAA-related ICH. PMID:25944329

  12. Local cerebral hyperthermia induces spontaneous thrombosis and arteriolar constriction in the pia mater of the mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabban, Farouk; Fahim, Mohamed A.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of local cerebral hyperthermia on responses of pial microvessels of the mouse was investigated. A set protocol was followed, involving the performance of a craniotomy on anaesthetized animals and using intravital microscope-television closed circuitry. Controlled hyperthermic exposure was applied regionally by heating the brain surface with irrigating artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular responses such as changes in diameter, thrombosis and embolism were monitored and video-taped observations were further viewed and analysed. When both brain surface and core body temperatures were kept at 37° C, no changes in pial microvessels were noted. With core body temperature kept at 37° C and at a brain surface temperature of 43.1° C, passing emboli and arteriolar constriction were observed. A few minutes later, visible thrombosis was prevalent. Further spontaneous thrombo-embolic activity continued and at the end of a 50-min hyperthermic exposure, arterioles attained a constriction of 37%. Thrombus formation was sometimes massive enough to occlude fully the microvessel. The protocol followed in this study can be adopted to other small animal species and for a variety of experimental procedures involving hyperthermia and the pial microcirculation.

  13. Activation of antioxidant response element in mouse primary cortical cultures with sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Tanacetum parthenium

    PubMed Central

    Fischedick, Justin T; Standiford, Miranda; Johnson, Delinda A.; De Vos, Ric C.H.; Todorović, Slađana; Banjanac, Tijana; Verpoorte, Rob; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Tanacetum parthenium (Asteraceae) produces biologically active sesquiterpene lactones (SL). Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to activate a series of genes termed the antioxidant response element (ARE). Activation of the Nrf2/ARE may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In this study we isolated 11 sesquiterpene lactones from T. parthenium with centrifugal partition chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC. Compounds were screened in-vitro for their ability to activate the ARE on primary mouse cortical cultures as well as for their toxicity towards the cultures. All sesquiterpene lactones containing the α-methylene-γ-lactone moiety were able to activate the ARE although a number of compounds displayed significant cellular toxicity towards the cultures. The structure activity relationship of the sesquiterpene lactones indicate that the guaianolides isolated were more active and less toxic then the germacranolides. PMID:22923197

  14. Distinct microRNA Expression Profiles in Mouse Renal Cortical Tissue after 177Lu-octreotate Administration

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z.; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the variation of the miRNA expression levels in normal renal cortical tissue after 177Lu-octreotate administration, a radiopharmaceutical used for treatment of neuroendocrine cancers. Methods Female BALB/c nude mice were i.v. injected with 1.3, 3.6, 14, 45, or 140 MBq 177Lu-octreotate, while control animals received saline. The animals were killed at 24 h after injection and total RNA, including miRNA, was extracted from the renal cortical tissue and hybridized to the Mouse miRNA Oligo chip 4plex to identify differentially regulated miRNAs between exposed and control samples. Results In total, 57 specific miRNAs were differentially regulated in the exposed renal cortical tissues with 1, 29, 21, 27, and 31 miRNAs identified per dose-level (0.13, 0.34, 1.3, 4.3, and 13 Gy, respectively). No miRNAs were commonly regulated at all dose levels. miR-194, miR-107, miR-3090, and miR-3077 were commonly regulated at 0.34, 1.3, 4.3, and 13 Gy. Strong effects on cellular mechanisms ranging from immune response to p53 signaling and cancer-related pathways were observed at the highest absorbed dose. Thirty-nine of the 57 differentially regulated miRNAs identified in the present study have previously been associated with response to ionizing radiation, indicating common radiation responsive pathways. Conclusion In conclusion, the 177Lu-octreotate associated miRNA signatures were generally dose-specific, thereby illustrating transcriptional regulation of radiation responsive miRNAs. Taken together, these results imply the importance of miRNAs in early immunological responses in the kidneys following 177Lu-octreotate administration. PMID:25386939

  15. During postnatal development endogenous neurosteroids influence GABA-ergic neurotransmission of mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Mitchell, Scott J.; Peden, Dianne R.; Herd, Murray B.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    As neuronal development progresses, GABAergic synaptic transmission undergoes a defined program of reconfiguration. For example, GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synaptic currents, (miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; mIPSCs), which initially exhibit a relatively slow decay phase, become progressively reduced in duration, thereby supporting the temporal resolution required for mature network activity. Here we report that during postnatal development of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, GABAAR-mediated phasic inhibition is influenced by a resident neurosteroid tone, which wanes in the second postnatal week, resulting in the brief phasic events characteristic of mature neuronal signalling. Treatment of cortical slices with the immediate precursor of 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α), the GABAAR-inactive 5α-dihydroprogesterone, (5α-DHP), greatly prolonged the mIPSCs of P20 pyramidal neurons, demonstrating these more mature neurons retain the capacity to synthesize GABAAR-active neurosteroids, but now lack the endogenous steroid substrate. Previously, such developmental plasticity of phasic inhibition was ascribed to the expression of synaptic GABAARs incorporating the α1 subunit. However, the duration of mIPSCs recorded from L2/3 cortical neurons derived from α1 subunit deleted mice, were similarly under the developmental influence of a neurosteroid tone. In addition to principal cells, synaptic GABAARs of L2/3 interneurons were modulated by native neurosteroids in a development-dependent manner. In summary, local neurosteroids influence synaptic transmission during a crucial period of cortical neurodevelopment, findings which may be of importance for establishing normal network connectivity. PMID:26626485

  16. Silencing TRPM7 in Mouse Cortical Astrocytes Impairs Cell Proliferation and Migration via ERK and JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhao; Leng, Tiandong; Feng, Xuechao; Sun, Huawei; Inoue, Koichi; Zhu, Li; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a non-selective cation channel, is highly expressed expressed in the brain and plays a critical role in ischemic neuronal death. Astrocyte, the most abundant cell type in central nervous system (CNS), exerts many essential functions in the physiological and pathological conditions. Here we investigated the expression and functions of the TRPM7 channel in mouse cortical astrocytes. Using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, immunostaining, western blot and patch clamp recording, we showed that functional TRPM7 channel is expressed in cultured mouse cortical astrocytes. Knocking down TRPM7 with specific siRNA impairs the proliferation and migration of astrocytes by 40.2% ± 3.9% and 40.1% ± 11.5%, respectively. Consistently, inhibition of TRPM7 with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) also decreases astrocyte proliferation and migration by 46.1% ± 2.5% and 64.2% ± 2.4%. MAPKs and Akt signaling pathways have been shown to be implicated in TRPM7-mediated responses including cell proliferation and migration. Our data show that suppression of TRPM7 in astrocytes reduces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt. In addition, TRPM7, as a cation channel, has been involved in the Ca2+ and Mg2+ homeostasis in several types of cells. In our study, we found that silencing TRPM7 decreases the intracellular basal Mg2+ concentration without affecting Ca2+ concentration in astrocytes. However, an addition of Mg2+ to the growth medium could not rescue the impaired proliferation of astrocytes. Together, our data suggest that TRPM7 channel may play a critical role in the proliferation and migration of astrocytes via the ERK and JNK pathways. PMID:25799367

  17. Increased Cortical Synaptic Activation of TrkB and Downstream Signaling Markers in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nosheny, RL; Belichenko, PV; Busse, BL; Weissmiller, AM; Dang, V; Das, D; Fahimi, A; Salehi, A; Smith, SJ; Mobley, WC

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS), trisomy 21, is characterized by synaptic abnormalities and cognitive deficits throughout the lifespan and with development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology and progressive cognitive decline in adults. Synaptic abnormalities are also present in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, but which synapses are affected and the mechanisms underlying synaptic dysfunction are unknown. Here we show marked increases in the levels and activation status of TrkB and associated signaling proteins in cortical synapses in Ts65Dn mice. Proteomic analysis at the single synapse level of resolution using array tomography (AT) uncovered increased colocalization of activated TrkB with signaling endosome related proteins, and demonstrated increased TrkB signaling. The extent of increases in TrkB signaling differed in each of the cortical layers examined and with respect to the type of synapse, with the most marked increases seen in inhibitory synapses. These findings are evidence of markedly abnormal TrkB-mediated signaling in synapses. They raise the possibility that dysregulated TrkB signaling contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits in DS. PMID:25753471

  18. Promotion of Cortical Neurogenesis from the Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Kyuhyun; Shaker, Mohammed R; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Boram; Lee, Eunsoo; Park, Jae-Yong; Lim, Mi-Sun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Shin, Ki Soon; Kim, Hyun; Geum, Dongho; Sun, Woong

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis occurs spontaneously in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in adult rodent brain, but it has long been debated whether there is sufficient adult neurogenesis in human SVZ. Subcallosal zone (SCZ), a posterior continuum of SVZ closely associated with posterior regions of cortical white matter, has also been reported to contain adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in both rodents and humans. However, little is known whether SCZ-derived aNSC (SCZ-aNSCs) can produce cortical neurons following brain injury. We found that SCZ-aNSCs exhibited limited neuronal differentiation potential in culture and after transplantation in mice. Neuroblasts derived from SCZ initially migrated toward injured cortex regions following brain injury, but later exhibited apoptosis. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic bcl-xL in the SCZ by retroviral infection rescued neuroblasts from cell death in the injured cortex, but neuronal maturation was still limited, resulting in atrophy. In combination with Bcl-xL, infusion of brain-derived neurotropic factor rescued atrophy, and importantly, a subset of such SCZ-aNSCs differentiated and attained morphological and physiological characteristics of mature, excitatory neurons. These results suggest that the combination of anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic factors might enable the use of aNSCs derived from the SCZ in cortical neurogenesis for neural replacement therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:888-901. PMID:26701067

  19. Activation of cerebral sodium-glucose transporter type 1 function mediated by post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Ogihara, S; Harada, S; Tokuyama, S

    2015-12-01

    The regulation of post-ischemic hyperglycemia plays an important role in suppressing neuronal damage in therapeutic strategies for cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) was involved in the post-ischemic hyperglycemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. Cortical SGLT-1, one of the cerebral SGLT isoforms, is dramatically increased by focal cerebral ischemia. In this study, we focused on the involvement of cerebral SGLT-1 in the development of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. It was previously reported that activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases SGLT-1 expression. Moreover, ischemic stress-induced activation of AMPK exacerbates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. Therefore, we directly confirmed the relationship between cerebral SGLT-1 and cerebral AMPK activation using in vitro primary culture of mouse cortical neurons. An in vivo mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The development of infarct volume and behavioral abnormalities on day 3 after MCAO were ameliorated in cerebral SGLT-1 knock down mice. Cortical and striatal SGLT-1 expression levels were significantly increased at 12h after MCAO. Immunofluorescence revealed that SGLT-1 and the neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) were co-localized in the cortex and striatum of MCAO mice. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were cultured for five days before each treatment with reagents. Concomitant treatment with hydrogen peroxide and glucose induced the elevation of SGLT-1 and phosphorylated AMPK/AMPK ratio, and this elevation was suppressed by compound C, an AMPK inhibitor in primary cortical neurons. Moreover, compound C suppressed neuronal cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment in primary cortical neurons. Therefore, we concluded that enhanced cerebral SGLT-1 function mediated by post

  20. A novel role for Dbx1-derived Cajal-Retzius cells in early regionalization of the cerebral cortical neuroepithelium.

    PubMed

    Griveau, Amélie; Borello, Ugo; Causeret, Frédéric; Tissir, Fadel; Boggetto, Nicole; Karaz, Sonia; Pierani, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Patterning of the cortical neuroepithelium occurs at early stages of embryonic development in response to secreted molecules from signaling centers. These signals have been shown to establish the graded expression of transcription factors in progenitors within the ventricular zone and to control the size and positioning of cortical areas. Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells are among the earliest generated cortical neurons and migrate from the borders of the developing pallium to cover the cortical primordium by E11.5. We show that molecularly distinct CR subtypes distribute in specific combinations in pallial territories at the time of cortical regionalization. By means of genetic ablation experiments in mice, we report that loss of septum Dbx1-derived CR cells in the rostromedial pallium between E10.5 and E11.5 results in the redistribution of CR subtypes. This leads to changes in the expression of transcription factors within the neuroepithelium and in the proliferation properties of medial and dorsal cortical progenitors. Early regionalization defects correlate with shifts in the positioning of cortical areas at postnatal stages in the absence of alterations of gene expression at signaling centers. We show that septum-derived CR neurons express a highly specific repertoire of signaling factors. Our results strongly suggest that these cells, migrating over long distances and positioned in the postmitotic compartment, signal to ventricular zone progenitors and, thus, function as modulators of early cortical patterning. PMID:20668538

  1. A Novel Role for Dbx1-Derived Cajal-Retzius Cells in Early Regionalization of the Cerebral Cortical Neuroepithelium

    PubMed Central

    Griveau, Amélie; Tissir, Fadel; Boggetto, Nicole; Karaz, Sonia; Pierani, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Patterning of the cortical neuroepithelium occurs at early stages of embryonic development in response to secreted molecules from signaling centers. These signals have been shown to establish the graded expression of transcription factors in progenitors within the ventricular zone and to control the size and positioning of cortical areas. Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells are among the earliest generated cortical neurons and migrate from the borders of the developing pallium to cover the cortical primordium by E11.5. We show that molecularly distinct CR subtypes distribute in specific combinations in pallial territories at the time of cortical regionalization. By means of genetic ablation experiments in mice, we report that loss of septum Dbx1-derived CR cells in the rostromedial pallium between E10.5 and E11.5 results in the redistribution of CR subtypes. This leads to changes in the expression of transcription factors within the neuroepithelium and in the proliferation properties of medial and dorsal cortical progenitors. Early regionalization defects correlate with shifts in the positioning of cortical areas at postnatal stages in the absence of alterations of gene expression at signaling centers. We show that septum-derived CR neurons express a highly specific repertoire of signaling factors. Our results strongly suggest that these cells, migrating over long distances and positioned in the postmitotic compartment, signal to ventricular zone progenitors and, thus, function as modulators of early cortical patterning. PMID:20668538

  2. Quantification of Alterations in Cortical Bone Geometry Using Site Specificity Software in Mouse models of Aging and the Responses to Ovariectomy and Altered Loading

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Gabriel L.; Hannuna, Sion; Meakin, Lee B.; Delisser, Peter J.; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into the effect of (re)modeling stimuli on cortical bone in rodents normally rely on analysis of changes in bone mass and architecture at a narrow cross-sectional site. However, it is well established that the effects of axial loading produce site-specific changes throughout bones’ structure. Non-mechanical influences (e.g., hormones) can be additional to or oppose locally controlled adaptive responses and may have more generalized effects. Tools currently available to study site-specific cortical bone adaptation are limited. Here, we applied novel site specificity software to measure bone mass and architecture at each 1% site along the length of the mouse tibia from standard micro-computed tomography (μCT) images. Resulting measures are directly comparable to those obtained through μCT analysis (R2 > 0.96). Site Specificity analysis was used to compare a number of parameters in tibiae from young adult (19-week-old) versus aged (19-month-old) mice; ovariectomized and entire mice; limbs subjected to short periods of axial loading or disuse induced by sciatic neurectomy. Age was associated with uniformly reduced cortical thickness and site-specific decreases in cortical area most apparent in the proximal tibia. Mechanical loading site-specifically increased cortical area and thickness in the proximal tibia. Disuse uniformly decreased cortical thickness and decreased cortical area in the proximal tibia. Ovariectomy uniformly reduced cortical area without altering cortical thickness. Differences in polar moment of inertia between experimental groups were only observed in the proximal tibia. Aging and ovariectomy also altered eccentricity in the distal tibia. In summary, site specificity analysis provides a valuable tool for measuring changes in cortical bone mass and architecture along the entire length of a bone. Changes in the (re)modeling response determined at a single site may not reflect the response at different locations within the same

  3. The magnitude of the somatosensory cortical activity is related to the mobility and strength impairments seen in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Becker, Katherine M.; Wilson, Tony W.

    2015-01-01

    The noted disruption of thalamocortical connections and abnormalities in tactile sensory function has resulted in a new definition of cerebral palsy (CP) that recognizes the sensorimotor integration process as central to the motor impairments seen in these children. Despite this updated definition, the connection between a child's motor impairments and somatosensory processing remains almost entirely unknown. In this investigation, we explored the relationship between the magnitude of neural activity within the somatosensory cortices, the strength of the ankle plantarflexors, and the gait spatiotemporal kinematics of a group of children with CP and a typically developing matched cohort. Our results revealed that the magnitude of somatosensory cortical activity in children with CP had a strong positive relationship with the ankle strength, step length, and walking speed. These results suggest that stronger activity within the somatosensory cortices in response to foot somatosensations was related to enhanced ankle plantarflexor strength and improved mobility in the children with CP. These results provide further support for the notion that children with CP exhibit, not only musculoskeletal deficits, but also somatosensory deficits that potentially contribute to their overall functional mobility and strength limitations. PMID:25717160

  4. Magnetic Resonance Q Mapping Reveals a Decrease in Microvessel Density in the arcAβ Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Schlegel, Felix; Füchtemeier, Martina; Xandry, Jael; Rudin, Markus; Klohs, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in density and morphology of the cerebral microvasculature have been reported to occur in Alzheimer's disease patients and animal models of the disease. In this study we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for their utility to detect age-dependent changes of the cerebral vasculature in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI was performed by tracking the passage of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle in the brain with dynamic gradient echo planar imaging (EPI). From this measurements relative cerebral blood volume [rCBV(DSC)] and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were estimated. For the same animal maps of the relaxation shift index Q were computed from high resolution gradient echo and spin echo data that were acquired before and after superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle injection. Q-values were used to derive estimates of microvessel density. The change in the relaxation rates ΔR2* obtained from pre- and post-contrast gradient echo data was used for the alternative determination of rCBV [rCBV(ΔR2*)]. Linear mixed effects modeling found no significant association between rCBV(DSC), rCBV(ΔR2*), rCBF, and Q with genotype in 13-month old mice [compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates (NTLs)] for any of the evaluated brain regions. In 24-month old mice there was a significant association for rCBV(DSC) with genotype in the cerebral cortex, and for rCBV(ΔR2*) in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. For rCBF there was a significant association in the cerebellum but not in other brain regions. Q-values in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum in 24-month old mice were significantly associated with genotype. In those regions Q-values were reduced between 11 and 26% in arcAβ mice compared to age-matched NTLs. Vessel staining with CD31 immunohistochemistry confirmed a reduction of microvessel density in the old arcAβ mice

  5. Conditional Tat protein brain expression in the GT-tg bigenic mouse induces cerebral fractional anisotropy abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Amanda N.; Liu, Xiaoxu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Paris, Jason J.; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral white matter changes including tissue water diffusion abnormalities detected with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) are commonly found in humans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, as well as in animal models of the disorder. The severities of some of these abnormalities have been reported to correlate with measures of disease progression or severity, or with the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Accordingly, DTI may be a useful translational biomarker. HIV-Tat protein appears to be an important factor in the viral pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurotoxicity. We previously reported cerebral gray matter density reductions in the GT-tg bigenic mouse treated with doxycycline (Dox) to conditionally induce Tat protein expression. Presently, we administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) Dox (100 mg/kg/day) for 7 days to GT-tg mice to determine whether induction of conditional Tat expression led to the development of cerebral DTI abnormalities. Perfused and fixed brains from eight GT-tg mice administered Dox and eight control mice administered saline i.p. were extracted and underwent DTI scans on a 9.4 Tesla scanner. A whole brain analysis detected fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions in several areas including insular and endopiriform regions, as well as within the dorsal striatum. These findings suggest that exposure to Tat protein is sufficient to induce FA abnormalities, and further support the use of the GT-tg mouse to model some effects of HIV. PMID:25619988

  6. A Neural Circuit That Controls Cortical State, Plasticity, and the Gain of Sensory Responses in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Stryker, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex were first found to be exquisitely selective for particular properties of visual stimuli in anesthetized animals, including mice. Studies of alert mice in an apparatus that allowed them to stand or run revealed that locomotion causes a change in cortical state that dramatically increases the magnitude of responses in neurons of the visual cortex without altering selectivity, effectively changing the gain of sensory responses. Locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity in the recovery from long-term visual deprivation. We have studied the elements and operation of the neural circuit responsible for the enhancement of activity and shown that it enhances plasticity even in mice not free to run. The circuit consists of projections ascending from the midbrain locomotor region (MLR) to the basal forebrain, activating cholinergic and perhaps other projections to excite inhibitory interneurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the visual cortex. VIP cells activated by locomotion inhibit interneurons that express somatostatin (SST), thereby disinhibiting the excitatory principal neurons and allowing them to respond more strongly to effective visual stimuli. These findings reveal in alert animals how the ascending reticular activating system described in anesthetized animals 50 years ago operates to control cortical state. PMID:25948638

  7. Cortical and trabecular deterioration in mouse models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Elaine W; Carmody, Jill S; Brooks, Daniel J; LaJoie, Scott; Kaplan, Lee M; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2016-04-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a profoundly effective treatment for severe obesity, but results in significant bone loss in patients. Developing a murine model that recapitulates this skeletal phenotype will provide a robust tool with which to study the physiologic mechanisms of this bone loss. We studied adult male C57BL/6J mice who underwent either RYGB or sham operation. Twelve weeks after surgery, we characterized biochemical bone markers (parathyroid hormone, PTH; C-telopeptide, CTX; and type 1 procollagen, P1NP) and bone microarchitectural parameters as measured by microcomputed tomography. RYGB-treated mice had significant trabecular and cortical bone deficits compared with sham-operated controls. Although adjustment for final body weight eliminated observed cortical differences, the trabecular bone volume fraction remained significantly lower in RYGB mice even after weight adjustment. PTH levels were similar between groups, but RYGB mice had significantly higher indices of bone turnover than sham controls. These data demonstrate that murine models of RYGB recapitulate patterns of bone loss and turnover that have been observed in human clinical studies. Future studies that exploit this murine model will help delineate the alterations in bone metabolism and mechanisms of bone loss after RYGB. PMID:26806052

  8. Spatiotemporal SERT expression in cortical map development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoning; Petit, Emilie I; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Sze, Ji Ying

    2016-09-01

    The cerebral cortex is organized into morphologically distinct areas that provide biological frameworks underlying perception, cognition, and behavior. Profiling mouse and human cortical transcriptomes have revealed temporal-specific differential gene expression modules in distinct neocortical areas during cortical map establishment. However, the biological roles of spatiotemporal gene expression in cortical patterning and how cortical topographic gene expression is regulated are largely unknown. Here, we characterize temporal- and spatial-defined expression of serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) in glutamatergic neurons during sensory map development in mice. SERT is transiently expressed in glutamatergic thalamic neurons projecting to sensory cortices and in pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) during the period that lays down the basic functional neural circuits. We previously identified that knockout of SERT in the thalamic neurons blocks 5-HT uptake by their thalamocortical axons, resulting in excessive 5-HT signaling that impairs sensory map architecture. In contrast, here we show that selective SERT knockout in the PFC and HPC neurons does not perturb sensory map patterning. These data suggest that transient SERT expression in specific glutamatergic neurons provides area-specific instructions for cortical map patterning. Hence, genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this SERT function could illuminate the fundamental genetic programming of cortex-specific maps and biological roles of temporal-specific cortical topographic gene expression in normal development and mental disorders. PMID:27282696

  9. Comparative analysis of H&E and Prussian blue staining in a mouse model of cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Grigoryan, Mher Mahoney; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Sumbria, Rachita K; Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Cribbs, David H; Fisher, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are microscopic hemorrhages with deposits of blood products in the brain, which can be visualized with MRI and are implicated in cerebrovascular diseases. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Perl's Prussian blue are popular staining methods used to localize cerebral microbleeds in pathology. This paper compared these two staining techniques in a mouse model of cerebral microbleeds. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cerebral microhemorrhages. C57B6 mice were treated with LPS (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at baseline and at 24 hr. The brains were extracted 48 hr after the first injection and adjacent coronal sections were stained with H&E and Prussian blue to compare the effectiveness of the two staining techniques. H&E-positive stains were increased with LPS treatment and were correlated with grossly visible microhemorrhages on the brain surface; Prussian blue-positive stains, by comparison, showed no significant increase with LPS treatment and did not correlate with either H&E-positive stains or surface microhemorrhages. H&E staining is thus a more reliable indicator of acute bleeding events induced by LPS in this model within a short time span. PMID:25063000

  10. Bone Marrow-Derived Nonreactive Astrocytes in the Mouse Brain After Permanent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna E.; Leker, Ronen R.; Shahar, Tal; Bratincsak, Andras; Szalayova, Ildiko; Key, Sharon; Palkovits, Miklós; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effect of permanent unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO) on the generation of bone marrow (BM)-derived astrocytes in female mice previously transplanted with enchanced green fluorescent protein-expressing BM from male donors. In addition to an untreated PMCAO group, one group of mice also received intracerebral infusion of transforming growth factor-alpha, resulting in a decrease in the size of the infarct. Two months after PMCAO, we found a specific type of astrocyte of BM origin in the side of the injury, near the lesion. These astrocytes did not express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) by conventional fluorescence immunostaining; however, GFAP was easily detectable by tyramide signal amplification. These cells also expressed S100β, confirming their astrocytic character. Unlike the endogenous reactive astrocytes, these BM-derived astrocytes did not proliferate during the first week of ischemia and did not contribute to the glial scar formation. Transforming growth factor-alpha infusion increased the number of BM-derived astrocytes, without affecting their distribution. Interestingly, exclusively by tyramide signal amplification staining, we found that endogenous astrocytes displaying an identical morphology were also present in control mouse and human brains. Our data demonstrate that a subpopulation of nonreactive astrocytes expressing low levels of GFAP can originate from transplanted BM in the ischemic brain. We believe that these cells represent a subpopulation of astrocytes earlier considered to be GFAP negative. The high number of astrocytes with identical morphology and chemical character in control brains suggest that these type of astrocytes may have important functional role in the central nervous system that calls for further studies. PMID:20604679

  11. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)serotonin into plasma membrane vesicles from mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, C.A.; Reith, M.E.A.

    1988-05-05

    Preparations of plasma membrane vesicles were used as a tool to study the properties of the serotonin transporter in the central nervous system. The vesicles were obtained after hypotonic shock of synaptosomes purified from mouse cerebral cortex. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)serotonin had a Na/sup +/-dependent and Na/sup +/-independent component. The Na/sup +/-dependent uptake was inhibited by classical blockers of serotonin uptake and had a K/sub m/ of 63-180 nM, and a V/sub max/ of 0.1-0.3 pmol mg/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ at 77 mM Na/sup +/. The uptake required the presence of external Na/sup +/ and internal K/sup +/. Replacement of Cl/sup -/ by other anions (NO/sub 2//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/) reduced uptake appreciably. Gramicidin prevented uptake. Although valinomycin increased uptake somewhat, the membrane potential per se could not drive uptake because no uptake was observed when a membrane potential was generated by the SCN/sup -/ ion in the absence of internal K/sup +/ and with equal (Na/sup +/) inside and outside. The increase of uptake as a function of (Na/sup +/) indicated a K/sub m/ for Na/sup +/ of 118 mM and a Hill number of 2.0, suggesting a requirement of two sodium ions for serotonin transport. The present results are accommodated very well by the model developed for porcine platelet serotonin transport except for the number of sodium ions that are required for transport.

  12. Allopurinol protects against ischemic insults in a mouse model of cortical microinfarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Lan, Yue; He, Xiao-Fei; Luo, Chuan-Ming; Wang, Qin-Mei; Liang, Feng-Yin; Xu, Guang-Qing; Pei, Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Microinfarcts are common in patients with cognitive decline and dementia. Allopurinol (ALLO), a xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme inhibitor, has been found to reduce proinflammatory molecules and oxidative stress in the vasculature. We here examined the effect of pre-treatment with allopurinol on the cortical microinfarction. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a permanent single penetrating arteriole occlusion induced by two-photon laser irradiation. Infarction volume, the activation of glial cells and nitrosative stress in the ischemic brain was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Pre-treatment with ALLO achieved 42% reduction of infarct volume and significantly reduced microglia infiltration, astrocyte proliferation and nitrosative stress in the ischemic brain. These data indicate that ALLO protects against microinfarcts possibly through inhibition of nitrosative stress and attenuation of microglia infiltration as well as astrocytes reactivation. PMID:26187758

  13. Non-invasive measurement of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the mouse brain by ultra-high field (17)O MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weina; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Vollmers, Manda L; Colonna, Emily T; Adriany, Gregor; Tramm, Brandon; Dubinsky, Janet M; Öz, Gülin

    2013-12-01

    To assess cerebral energetics in transgenic mouse models of neurologic disease, a robust, efficient, and practical method for quantification of cerebral oxygen consumption is needed. (17)O magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been validated to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in the rat brain; however, mice present unique challenges because of their small size. We show that CMRO2 measurements with (17)O MRS in the mouse brain are highly reproducible using 16.4 Tesla and a newly designed oxygen delivery system. The method can be utilized to measure mitochondrial function in mice quickly and repeatedly, without oral intubation, and has numerous potential applications to study cerebral energetics. PMID:24064490

  14. Non-invasive measurement of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the mouse brain by ultra-high field 17O MR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Weina; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Vollmers, Manda L; Colonna, Emily T; Adriany, Gregor; Tramm, Brandon; Dubinsky, Janet M; Öz, Gülin

    2013-01-01

    To assess cerebral energetics in transgenic mouse models of neurologic disease, a robust, efficient, and practical method for quantification of cerebral oxygen consumption is needed. 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been validated to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in the rat brain; however, mice present unique challenges because of their small size. We show that CMRO2 measurements with 17O MRS in the mouse brain are highly reproducible using 16.4 Tesla and a newly designed oxygen delivery system. The method can be utilized to measure mitochondrial function in mice quickly and repeatedly, without oral intubation, and has numerous potential applications to study cerebral energetics. PMID:24064490

  15. Assessment of MRI-Based Automated Fetal Cerebral Cortical Folding Measures in Prediction of Gestational Age in the Third Trimester

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.; Awate, S.P.; Licht, D.J.; Clouchoux, C.; du Plessis, A.J.; Avants, B.B.; Vossough, A.; Gee, J.C.; Limperopoulos, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Traditional methods of dating a pregnancy based on history or sonographic assessment have a large variation in the third trimester. We aimed to assess the ability of various quantitative measures of brain cortical folding on MR imaging in determining fetal gestational age in the third trimester. MATERIALS AND METHODS We evaluated 8 different quantitative cortical folding measures to predict gestational age in 33 healthy fetuses by using T2-weighted fetal MR imaging. We compared the accuracy of the prediction of gestational age by these cortical folding measureswiththeaccuracyofpredictionbybrainvolumemeasurementandbyapreviouslyreportedsemiquantitativevisualscaleofbrain maturity. Regression models were constructed, and measurement biases and variances were determined via a cross-validation procedure. RESULTS The cortical folding measures are accurate in the estimation and prediction of gestational age (mean of the absolute error, 0.43 ± 0.45 weeks) and perform better than (P = .024) brain volume (mean of the absolute error, 0.72 ± 0.61 weeks) or sonography measures (SDs approximately 1.5 weeks, as reported in literature). Prediction accuracy is comparable with that of the semiquantitative visual assessment score (mean, 0.57 ± 0.41 weeks). CONCLUSIONS Quantitative cortical folding measures such as global average curvedness can be an accurate and reliable estimator of gestational age and brain maturity for healthy fetuses in the third trimester and have the potential to be an indicator of brain-growth delays for at-risk fetuses and preterm neonates. PMID:26045578

  16. Feasibility of event-related potential methodology to evaluate changes in cortical processing after rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, Nathalie L.; Henderson, Gena; Gogliotti, Shirley; Pearson, Jennifer; Simmons, Ashley; Wang, Lu; Slaughter, James C.; Key, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using event-related potentials (ERPs) to measure changes in cortical processing following an established rehabilitative intervention (constraint-induced movement therapy, CIMT) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Sixteen participants with a diagnosis of hemiparetic CP, with a median age of 6 years, were assessed pre and immediately post CIMT and at 6-month follow-up, using a picture–word match/mismatch discrimination task and standard neurobehavioral measures. Intervention effects were evident in improved performance on behavioral tests of sensory and motor function and the increased mean ERP amplitude of the N400 match/mismatch response on the side ipsilateral to the lesion. These effects were maintained 6 months after the intervention. No such changes were observed on the side contralateral to the lesion. This research suggests that ERPs can measure rehabilitation-induced changes in neural function in children with CP. PMID:24953907

  17. Altered branching patterns of Purkinje cells in mouse model for cortical development disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Kwon, Namseop; Chang, Soeun; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Yun, So Jeong; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Jee Woong; Hwu, Yeukuang; Margaritondo, Giorgio; Je, Jung Ho; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2011-01-01

    Disrupted cortical cytoarchitecture in cerebellum is a typical pathology in reeler. Particularly interesting are structural problems at the cellular level: dendritic morphology has important functional implication in signal processing. Here we describe a combinatorial imaging method of synchrotron X-ray microtomography with Golgi staining, which can deliver 3-dimensional(3-D) micro-architectures of Purkinje cell(PC) dendrites, and give access to quantitative information in 3-D geometry. In reeler, we visualized in 3-D geometry the shape alterations of planar PC dendrites (i.e., abnormal 3-D arborization). Despite these alterations, the 3-D quantitative analysis of the branching patterns showed no significant changes of the 77 ± 8° branch angle, whereas the branch segment length strongly increased with large fluctuations, comparing to control. The 3-D fractal dimension of the PCs decreased from 1.723 to 1.254, indicating a significant reduction of dendritic complexity. This study provides insights into etiologies and further potential treatment options for lissencephaly and various neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:22355639

  18. Acute systemic LPS-mediated inflammation induces lasting changes in mouse cortical neuromodulation and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ming, Z; Sawicki, G; Bekar, L K

    2015-03-17

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widely used to induce a neuroinflammatory response that is associated with short-term 'sickness'-behavior that can include fever, loss of activity, loss of appetite, impaired cognition, anxiety and depression. If large enough or left unchecked, this neuroinflammatory response can become self-perpetuating and lead to long-term neurodegenerative processes. In this study, we assess the longer-term effects of a single systemic LPS injection on electrophysiological neuromodulator effects and basic behavioral analysis in mice. Five months after LPS injection, we find a mild reduction in cortical inhibition and altered temporal dynamics of acetylcholine but not norepinephrine or serotonin neuromodulator effects. Consistent with electrophysiological findings, LPS treated mice showed a deficit in memory performance in the novel object recognition test with no effect on measures of anxiety or despair as measured in the open field test and tail suspension test, respectively. Furthermore, LPS-treated mice showed an increase in acetylcholinesterase activity. As increased acetylcholinesterase activity is associated with reduced acetylcholine signaling and impaired cognitive ability, these studies demonstrate the potential for a single inflammatory event to initiate processes that may lead to long-term neurodegeneration. PMID:25650524

  19. Pharmacological Rescue of Cortical Synaptic and Network Potentiation in a Mouse Model for Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Jing-Shan; Song, Qian; Liu, Ming-Gang; Koga, Kohei; Descalzi, Giannina; Li, Yun-Qing; Zhuo, Min

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, caused by the mutation of the Fmr1 gene, is characterized by deficits of attention and learning ability. In the hippocampus of Fmr1 knockout mice (KO), long-term depression is enhanced whereas long-term potentiation (LTP) including late-phase LTP (L-LTP) is reduced or unaffected. Here we examined L-LTP in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in Fmr1 KO mice by using a 64-electrode array recording system. In wild-type mice, theta-burst stimulation induced L-LTP that does not occur in all active electrodes/channels within the cingulate circuit and is typically detected in ∼75% of active channels. Furthermore, L-LTP recruited new responses from previous inactive channels. Both L-LTP and the recruitment of inactive responses were blocked in the ACC slices of Fmr1 KO mice. Bath application of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antagonist or glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitors rescued the L-LTP and network recruitment. Our results demonstrate that loss of FMRP will greatly impair L-LTP and recruitment of cortical network in the ACC that can be rescued by pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or GSK3. This study is the first report of the network properties of L-LTP in the ACC, and provides basic mechanisms for future treatment of cortex-related cognitive defects in fragile X patients. PMID:24553731

  20. Synaptic Properties of Thalamic Input to the Subgranular Layers of Primary Somatosensory and Auditory Cortices in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Viaene, Angela N.; Petrof, Iraklis; Sherman, S. Murray

    2011-01-01

    The classification of synaptic inputs is an essential part of understanding brain circuitry. In the present study, we examined the synaptic properties of thalamic inputs to pyramidal neurons in layers 5a, 5b, and 6 of primary somatosensory (S1) and auditory (A1) cortices in mouse thalamocortical slices. Stimulation of the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM) and the ventral division of the medial geniculate body (MGBv) resulted in three distinct response classes, two of which have never been described before in thalamocortical projections. Class 1A responses included synaptic depression and all-or-none responses while Class 1B responses exhibited synaptic depression and graded responses. Class 1C responses are characterized by mixed facilitation and depression as well as graded responses. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors was not observed in any of the response classes. We conclude that Class 1 responses can be broken up into three distinct subclasses, and that thalamic inputs to the subgranular layers of cortex may combine with other, intracortical inputs to drive their postsynaptic target cells. We also integrate these results with our recent, analogous study of thalamocortical inputs to granular and supragranular layers (Viaene et al., 2011). PMID:21900553

  1. Large-Scale Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigation of Consequences of Cortical Spreading Depression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, Ricardo J.; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Abdelmoula, Walid M.; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; van Zeijl, Rene J.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Ferrari, Michel D.; Tolner, Else A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura. Transgenic mice carrying the R192Q missense mutation in the Cacna1a gene, which in patients causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), exhibit increased propensity to CSD. Herein, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was applied for the first time to an animal cohort of transgenic and wild type mice to study the biomolecular changes following CSD in the brain. Ninety-six coronal brain sections from 32 mice were analyzed by MALDI-MSI. All MSI datasets were registered to the Allen Brain Atlas reference atlas of the mouse brain so that the molecular signatures of distinct brain regions could be compared. A number of metabolites and peptides showed substantial changes in the brain associated with CSD. Among those, different mass spectral features showed significant ( t-test, P < 0.05) changes in the cortex, 146 and 377 Da, and in the thalamus, 1820 and 1834 Da, of the CSD-affected hemisphere of FHM1 R192Q mice. Our findings reveal CSD- and genotype-specific molecular changes in the brain of FHM1 transgenic mice that may further our understanding about the role of CSD in migraine pathophysiology. The results also demonstrate the utility of aligning MSI datasets to a common reference atlas for large-scale MSI investigations.

  2. Large-scale mass spectrometry imaging investigation of consequences of cortical spreading depression in a transgenic mouse model of migraine.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Ricardo J; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Abdelmoula, Walid M; van Heiningen, Sandra H; van Zeijl, Rene J; Dijkstra, Jouke; Ferrari, Michel D; Tolner, Else A; McDonnell, Liam A; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura. Transgenic mice carrying the R192Q missense mutation in the Cacna1a gene, which in patients causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), exhibit increased propensity to CSD. Herein, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was applied for the first time to an animal cohort of transgenic and wild type mice to study the biomolecular changes following CSD in the brain. Ninety-six coronal brain sections from 32 mice were analyzed by MALDI-MSI. All MSI datasets were registered to the Allen Brain Atlas reference atlas of the mouse brain so that the molecular signatures of distinct brain regions could be compared. A number of metabolites and peptides showed substantial changes in the brain associated with CSD. Among those, different mass spectral features showed significant (t-test, P < 0.05) changes in the cortex, 146 and 377 Da, and in the thalamus, 1820 and 1834 Da, of the CSD-affected hemisphere of FHM1 R192Q mice. Our findings reveal CSD- and genotype-specific molecular changes in the brain of FHM1 transgenic mice that may further our understanding about the role of CSD in migraine pathophysiology. The results also demonstrate the utility of aligning MSI datasets to a common reference atlas for large-scale MSI investigations. PMID:25877011

  3. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Eva; Ribot, Jérôme; Di Nardo, Ariel A.; Volovitch, Michel; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-01-01

    During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells). In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these “transfer” sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system. PMID:27171438

  4. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Clémence; Vincent, Clémentine; Testa, Damien; Bertini, Eva; Ribot, Jérôme; Di Nardo, Ariel A; Volovitch, Michel; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-05-01

    During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells). In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these "transfer" sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system. PMID:27171438

  5. Combination of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated 9 technique with the piggybac transposon system for mouse in utero electroporation to study cortical development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Man; Jin, Xubin; Mu, Lili; Wang, Fangyu; Li, Wei; Zhong, Xiaoling; Liu, Xuan; Shen, Wenchen; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In utero electroporation (IUE) is commonly used to study cortical development of cerebrum by downregulating or overexpressing genes of interest in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of small mammals. However, exogenous plasmids are lost or diluted over time. Furthermore, gene knockdown based on short-hairpin RNAs may exert nonspecific effects that lead to aberrant neuronal migration. Genomic engineering by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) system has great research and therapeutic potentials. Here we integrate the CRISPR/Cas9 components into the piggyBac (PB) transposon system (the CRISPR/Cas9-PB toolkit) for cortical IUEs. The mouse Sry-related HMG box-2 (Sox2) gene was selected as the target for its application. Most transduced cortical NPCs were depleted of SOX2 protein as early as 3 days post-IUE, whereas expressions of SOX1 and PAX6 remained intact. Furthermore, both the WT Cas9 and the D10A nickase mutant Cas9n showed comparable knockout efficiency. Transduced cortical cells were purified with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and effective gene editing at the Sox2 loci was confirmed. Thus, application of the CRISPR/Cas9-PB toolkit in IUE is a promising strategy to study gene functions in cortical NPCs and their progeny. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317429

  6. Cognitive ability is associated with altered medial frontal cortical circuits in the LgDel mouse model of 22q11.2DS.

    PubMed

    Meechan, D W; Rutz, H L H; Fralish, M S; Maynard, T M; Rothblat, L A; LaMantia, A-S

    2015-05-01

    We established a relationship between cognitive deficits and cortical circuits in the LgDel model of 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS)-a genetic syndrome with one of the most significant risks for schizophrenia and autism. In the LgDel mouse, optimal acquisition, execution, and reversal of a visually guided discrimination task, comparable to executive function tasks in primates including humans, are compromised; however, there is significant individual variation in degree of impairment. The task relies critically on the integrity of circuits in medial anterior frontal cortical regions. Accordingly, we analyzed neuronal changes that reflect previously defined 22q11DS-related alterations of cortical development in the medial anterior frontal cortex of the behaviorally characterized LgDel mice. Interneuron placement, synapse distribution, and projection neuron frequency are altered in this region. The magnitude of one of these changes, layer 2/3 projection neuron frequency, is a robust predictor of behavioral performance: it is substantially and selectively lower in animals with the most significant behavioral deficits. These results parallel correlations of volume reduction and altered connectivity in comparable cortical regions with diminished executive function in 22q11DS patients. Apparently, 22q11 deletion alters behaviorally relevant circuits in a distinct cortical region that are essential for cognitive function. PMID:24217989

  7. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  8. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  9. Neuroprotective properties of lifarizine compared with those of other agents in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C. M.; Calder, C.; Linton, C.; Small, C.; Kenny, B. A.; Spedding, M.; Patmore, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. Changes in the peripheral type benzodiazepine binding site density following middle cerebral artery occlusion in the mouse, have been used as a marker of neuronal damage. These sites can be identified using the selective ligand [3H]-PK 11195 located on non neuronal cells, macrophages and astroglia, within the CNS. Glial cell proliferation and macrophage invasion is an unvoidable sequelae to cerebral ischaemic injury, secondary to neuronal loss. Following occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (left MCA) a reproducible lesion was found in the parietal cortex within 7 days which gave rise to a significant increase in [3H]-PK 11195 binding. 2. Treatment of animals with the sodium channel blocker, lifarizine, significantly reduced the ischaemia-induced increase in [3H]-PK 11195 binding when given either 30 min pre-ischaemia and three times daily for 7 days at 0.5 mg kg-1, i.p. (P < 0.01) or delayed until 15 min post-ischaemia and three times daily for 7 days at 0.5 mg kg-1, i.p. (P < 0.001). Lifarizine was an effective neuroprotective agent in this model of focal ischaemia in the mouse. 3. Lifarizine also showed a dose-related protection against the ischaemia-induced increase in [3H]-PK 11195 binding with significant protection at doses of 0.1 mg kg-1, i.p. (P < 0.05), 0.25 mg kg-1, i.p. (P < 0.01) or 0.5 mg kg-1, i.p. (P < 0.01) 15 min post-ischaemia and b.i.d. for 7 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564201

  10. Arsenic Exposure Induces Unscheduled Mitotic S Phase Entry Coupled with Cell Death in Mouse Cortical Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Htike, Nang T. T.; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Soutome, Haruka; Sano, Kazuhiro; Maejima, Sho; Aung, Kyaw H.; Tokuda, Masaaki; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    There is serious concern about arsenic in the natural environment, which exhibits neurotoxicity and increases the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. Adverse effects of arsenic have been demonstrated in neurons, but it is not fully understood how arsenic affects other cell types in the brain. In the current study, we examined whether sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) affects the cell cycle, viability, and apoptosis of in vitro-cultured astrocytes isolated from the cerebral cortex of mice. Cultured astrocytes from transgenic mice expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) were subjected to live imaging analysis to assess the effects of NaAsO2 (0, 1, 2, and 4 μM) on the cell cycle and number of cells. Fucci was designed to express monomeric Kusabira Orange2 (mKO2) fused with the ubiquitylation domain of hCdt1, a marker of G1 phase, and monomeric Azami Green (mAG) fused with the ubiquitylation domain of hGem, a marker of S, G2, and M phases. NaAsO2 concentration-dependently decreased the peak levels of the mAG/mKO2 emission ratio when the ratio had reached a peak in astrocytes without NaAsO2 exposure, which was due to attenuating the increase in the mAG-expressing cell number. In contrast, the mAG/mKO2 emission ratio and number of mAG-expressing cells were concentration-dependently increased by NaAsO2 before their peak levels, indicating unscheduled S phase entry. We further examined the fate of cells forced to enter S phase by NaAsO2. We found that most of these cells died up to the end of live imaging. In addition, quantification of the copy number of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene expressed specifically in astrocytes revealed a concentration-dependent decrease caused by NaAsO2. However, NaAsO2 did not increase the amount of nucleosomes generated from DNA fragmentation and failed to alter the gene expression of molecules relevant to unscheduled S phase entry-coupled apoptosis (p21, p53, E2F1, E2F4, and Gm36566). These findings

  11. Phenotype-dependent alteration of pathways and networks reveals a pure synergistic mechanism for compounds treating mouse cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-qian; Li, Bing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ying-ying; Yu, Ya-nan; Zhang, Xiao-xu; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Zhi-li; Wu, Hong-li; Li, Hai-xia; Dang, Hai-xia; Guo, Shan-shan; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Our previous studies have showed that ursodeoxycholic acid (UA) and jasminoidin (JA) effectively reduce cerebral infarct volume in mice. In this study we explored the pure synergistic mechanism of these compounds in treatment of mouse cerebral ischemia, which was defined as synergistic actions specific for phenotype variations after excluding interference from ineffective compounds. Methods: Mice with focal cerebral ischemia were treated with UA, JA or a combination JA and UA (JU). Concha margaritifera (CM) was taken as ineffective compound. Cerebral infarct volume of the mice was determined, and the hippocampi were taken for microarray analysis. Particular signaling pathways and biological functions were enriched based on differentially expressed genes, and corresponding networks were constructed through Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results: In phenotype analysis, UA, JA, and JU significantly reduced the ischemic infarct volume with JU being superior to UA or JA alone, while CM was ineffective. As a result, 4 pathways enriched in CM were excluded. Core pathways in the phenotype-positive groups (UA or JA) were involved in neuronal homeostasis and neuropathology. JU-contributing pathways included all UA-contributing and the majority (71.7%) of JA-contributing pathways, and 10 new core pathways whose effects included inflammatory immunity, apoptosis and nervous system development. The functions of JU group included all functions of JA group, the majority (93.1%) of UA-contributing functions, and 3 new core functions, which focused on physiological system development and function. Conclusion: The pure synergism between UA and JA underlies 10 new core pathways and 3 new core functions, which are involved in inflammation, immune responses, apoptosis and nervous system development. PMID:25960134

  12. Decreased cerebral cortical serotonin transporter binding in ecstasy users: a positron emission tomography/[11C]DASB and structural brain imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Jason; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Tong, Junchao; McCluskey, Tina; Wilkins, Diana; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey; Mundo, Emanuela; Wilson, Alan A.; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Saint-Cyr, Jean A.; Guttman, Mark; Collins, D. Louis; Shapiro, Colin; Warsh, Jerry J.; Boileau, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Animal data indicate that the recreational drug ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) can damage brain serotonin neurons. However, human neuroimaging measurements of serotonin transporter binding, a serotonin neuron marker, remain contradictory, especially regarding brain areas affected; and the possibility that structural brain differences might account for serotonin transporter binding changes has not been explored. We measured brain serotonin transporter binding using [11C] N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio) benzylamine in 50 control subjects and in 49 chronic (mean 4 years) ecstasy users (typically one to two tablets bi-monthly) withdrawn from the drug (mean 45 days). A magnetic resonance image for positron emission tomography image co-registration and structural analyses was acquired. Hair toxicology confirmed group allocation but also indicated use of other psychoactive drugs in most users. Serotonin transporter binding in ecstasy users was significantly decreased throughout all cerebral cortices (range –19 to –46%) and hippocampus (–21%) and related to the extent of drug use (years, maximum dose), but was normal in basal ganglia and midbrain. Substantial overlap was observed between control and user values except for insular cortex, in which 51% of ecstasy user values fell below the lower limit of the control range. Voxel-based analyses confirmed a caudorostral gradient of cortical serotonin transporter binding loss with occipital cortex most severely affected. Magnetic resonance image measurement revealed no overall regional volume differences between groups; however, a slight left-hemispheric biased cortical thinning was detected in methamphetamine-using ecstasy users. The serotonin transporter binding loss was not related to structural changes or partial volume effect, use of other stimulant drugs, blood testosterone or oestradiol levels, major serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms, gender, psychiatric status, or self

  13. Maturation of neuronal form and function in a mouse thalamo-cortical circuit.

    PubMed

    Warren, R A; Jones, E G

    1997-01-01

    Postnatal development of physiological properties underlying slow intrathalamic oscillations was studied by whole-cell recording from synaptically coupled neurons of the reticular nucleus (RTN) and ventral posterior nucleus (VPN) of mouse brain slices in vitro and compared with the morphological development of dye-injected cells. Between postnatal days 3 and 11 (P3-P11), progressive changes in RTN and VPN neurons included shortening of the membrane time constant, decreasing input resistance, and lowering of the resting membrane potential (RMP). Low-threshold Ca2+ spikes (LTS) were present from P3, but their capacity to sustain multispike bursts was limited before P11. Synaptic responses were evoked in RTN and VPN neurons by electrical stimulation of the internal capsule from P3. Younger RTN neurons responded with a single spike, but their capacity to fire bursts gradually improved as the RMP reached levels below the LTS activation potential. Concomitantly, as the reversal potential of the inhibitory postsynaptic potential in VPN neurons became more negative, its capacity to deinactivate the LTS increased, and rebound bursts that could maintain oscillations were produced; sustained oscillations became the typical response to internal capsule stimulation at P12. The functional maturation of the intrathalamic circuitry, particularly between P10 and P14, occurs in parallel with the morphological maturation (size, dendritic growth, and dendritic field structure) of individual RTN and VPN neurons, as studied by confocal microscopy. Maturation of RTN cells led that of VPN cells by 2-3 d. The appearance of intrathalamic oscillations is probably correlated with the appearance of slow-wave sleep in postnatal animals. PMID:8987755

  14. The influence of social evaluation on cerebral cortical activity and motor performance: a study of "Real-Life" competition.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Bradley D; Costanzo, Michelle E; Goodman, Ronald N; Lo, Li-Chuan; Oh, Hyuk; Rietschel, Jeremy C; Saffer, Mark; Bradberry, Trent; Contreras-Vidal, Jose; Haufler, Amy

    2013-11-01

    Motor performance in a social evaluative environment was examined in participants (N = 19) who completed a pistol shooting task under both performance-alone (PA) and competitive (C) conditions. Electroencephalographic (EEG), autonomic, and psychoendocrine activity were recorded in addition to kinematic measures of the aiming behavior. State anxiety, heart rate, and cortisol were modestly elevated during C and accompanied by relative desynchrony of high-alpha power, increased cortico-cortical communication between motor and non-motor regions, and degradation of the fluency of aiming trajectory, but maintenance of performance outcome (i.e., score). The findings reveal that performance in a complex social-evaluative environment characterized by competition results in elevated cortical activity beyond that essentially required for motor performance that translated as less efficient motor behavior. PMID:23954302

  15. Effects of Shaoyao-Gancao Decoction on Infarcted Cerebral Cortical Neurons: Suppression of the Inflammatory Response following Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinling; Yang, Jian; Li, Qing; Yan, Guofeng; Xu, Zhongju; Wang, Jingye

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Shaoyao-Gancao decoction (SGD) inhibits the production of inflammatory cytokines in serum and brain tissue after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (CI-RP) in rats were investigated. A right middle cerebral artery occlusion was used to induce CI-RP after which the rats were divided into model (n = 39), SGD (n = 28), clopidogrel (n = 25) and sham operated (n = 34) groups. The Bederson scale was used to evaluate changes in behavioral indices. The levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-10, RANTES, VEGF, and TGF-β1 in the serum and infarcted brain tissues were measured. Nissl body and immunohistochemical staining methods were used to detect biochemical changes in neurons, microglial cells, and astrocytes. Serum levels of VEGF, TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-1β, and IL-10 increased significantly 24 h after CI-RP. In brain tissue, levels of TNF-α and IL-1β significantly increased 24 h after CI-RP, whereas levels of TGF-β1 and MCP-1 were significantly higher 96 h after CI-RP (P < 0.05). SGD or clopidogrel after CI-RP reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in brain tissue and serum levels of MCP-1, IL-1β, and IL-10. SGD increased the number of NeuN-positive cells in infarcted brain tissue and reduced the number of IBA1-positive and GFAP-positive cells. The efficacy of SGD was significantly higher than that of clopidogrel. PMID:27413737

  16. Mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator forms cAMP-PKA-regulated apical chloride channels in cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Dong, Ke; Egan, Marie E; Giebisch, Gerhard H; Boulpaep, Emile L; Hebert, Steven C

    2010-03-30

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in many segments of the mammalian nephron, where it may interact with and modulate the activity of a variety of apical membrane proteins, including the renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) K(+) channel. However, the expression of CFTR in apical cell membranes or its function as a Cl(-) channel in native renal epithelia has not been demonstrated. Here, we establish that CFTR forms protein kinase A (PKA)-activated Cl(-) channels in the apical membrane of principal cells from the cortical collecting duct obtained from mice. These Cl(-) channels were observed in cell-attached apical patches of principal cells after stimulation by forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Quiescent Cl(-) channels were present in patches excised from untreated tubules because they could be activated after exposure to Mg-ATP and the catalytic subunit of PKA. The single-channel conductance, kinetics, and anion selectivity of these Cl(-) channels were the same as those of recombinant mouse CFTR channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The CFTR-specific closed-channel blocker CFTR(inh)-172 abolished apical Cl(-) channel activity in excised patches. Moreover, apical Cl(-) channel activity was completely absent in principal cells from transgenic mice expressing the DeltaF508 CFTR mutation but was present and unaltered in ROMK-null mice. We discuss the physiologic implications of open CFTR Cl(-) channels on salt handling by the collecting duct and on the functional CFTR-ROMK interactions in modulating the metabolic ATP-sensing of ROMK. PMID:20231442

  17. Homeobox genes d11–d13 and a13 control mouse autopod cortical bone and joint formation

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo; Kuss, Pia; Friedrich, Julia; Haupt, Julia; Farooq, Muhammed; Türkmen, Seval; Duboule, Denis; Hecht, Jochen; Mundlos, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that govern bone and joint formation are complex, involving an integrated network of signaling pathways and gene regulators. We investigated the role of Hox genes, which are known to specify individual segments of the skeleton, in the formation of autopod limb bones (i.e., the hands and feet) using the mouse mutant synpolydactyly homolog (spdh), which encodes a polyalanine expansion in Hoxd13. We found that no cortical bone was formed in the autopod in spdh/spdh mice; instead, these bones underwent trabecular ossification after birth. Spdh/spdh metacarpals acquired an ovoid shape and developed ectopic joints, indicating a loss of long bone characteristics and thus a transformation of metacarpals into carpal bones. The perichondrium of spdh/spdh mice showed abnormal morphology and decreased expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which was identified as a direct Hoxd13 transcriptional target. Hoxd11–/–Hoxd12–/–Hoxd13–/– triple-knockout mice and Hoxd13–/–Hoxa13+/– mice exhibited similar but less severe defects, suggesting that these Hox genes have similar and complementary functions and that the spdh allele acts as a dominant negative. This effect was shown to be due to sequestration of other polyalanine-containing transcription factors by the mutant Hoxd13 in the cytoplasm, leading to their degradation. These data indicate that Hox genes not only regulate patterning but also directly influence bone formation and the ossification pattern of bones, in part via Runx2. PMID:20458143

  18. Optical measurement of mouse strain differences in cerebral blood flow using indocyanine green

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Kim, Seunggyu; Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2015-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice have more cerebral arterial branches and collaterals than BALB/c mice. We measured and compared blood flow dynamics of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in these two strains, using noninvasive optical imaging with indocyanine green (ICG). Relative maximum fluorescence intensity (Imax) and the time needed for ICG to reach Imax in the MCA of C57BL/c were lower than that in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the mean transit time was significantly lower in C57BL/6 than in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the higher number of arterial branches and collaterals in C57BL/6 mice yields a lower blood flow per cerebral artery. PMID:25833343

  19. Regional Changes of AQP0-dependent Square Array Junction and Gap Junction Associated with Cortical Cataract Formation in the Emory Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sondip K.; Brako, Lawrence; Gu, Sumin; Jiang, Jean X.; Lo, Woo-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    The Emory mutant mouse has been widely used as an animal model for human senile cataract since it develops late-onset hereditary cataract. Here, we focus on the regional changes of aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins that are associated with the cortical cataract formation in the Emory mutant mice. Emory mutant and CFW wild-type mice at age 1 to 16 months were used in this study. By using an established photography system with dissecting microscopy, the opacities were first detected at the anterior or posterior lens center surface in Emory mice at age 7 months, and gradually extended toward the equator during the 16 months examined. Scanning EM verified that disorganized and fragmented fiber cells were associated with the areas of opacities within approximately 200 µm from the lens surface, indicating that Emory mouse cataracts belong to the cortical cataracts. Freeze-fracture TEM further confirmed that cortical cataracts exhibited extensive wavy square array junctions, small gap junctions and globules. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that in contrast to the high labeling intensity of AQP0-loop antibody, the labeling of AQP0 C-terminus antibody was decreased considerably in superficial fibers in Emory cataracts. Similarly, a significant decrease in the labeling of the antibody against Cx50 C-terminus, but not Cx46 C-terminus, occurred in superficial and outer cortical fibers in Emory cataracts. Western blotting further revealed that the C-termini of both AQP0 and Cx50 in Emory cataracts were decreased to over 50% to that of the wild-type. Thus, this systematic study concludes that the Emory mouse cataract belongs to the cortical cataract which is due to regional breakdown of superficial fibers associated with formation of AQP0-dependent wavy square array junctions, small gap junctions and globules. The marked decreases of the C-termini of both AQP0 and Cx50 in the superficial fibers may disturb the needed interaction between these two proteins during fiber cell

  20. In-vivo Fluorescent X-ray CT Imaging of Mouse Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Wu, J.; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M.; Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T.; Hyodo, K.; Hontani, H.

    2007-01-19

    Using a non-radioactive iodine-127 labeled cerebral perfusion agent (I-127 IMP), fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) clearly revealed the cross-sectional distribution of I-127 IMP in normal mouse brain in-vivo. Cerebral perfusion of cortex and basal ganglion was depicted with 1 mm in-plane spatial resolution and 0.1 mm slice thickness. Degree of cerebral perfusion in basal ganglion was about 2-fold higher than that in cortical regions. This result suggests that in-vivo cerebral perfusion imaging is realized quantitatively by FXCT at high volumetric resolution.

  1. In vivo imaging of activated microglia in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia by two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bok, Seoyeon; Wang, Taejun; Lee, Chan-Ju; Jeon, Seong-Uk; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Jeongwoo; Hong, Beom-Ju; Yoon, Calvin Jinse; Kim, Sungjee; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Ki Hean; Ahn, G-One

    2015-09-01

    Microglia are brain resident macrophages rapidly responding to various stimuli to exert appropriate inflammatory responses. Although they have recently been exploited as an attractive candidate for imaging neuroinflammation, it is still difficult to visualize them at the cellular and molecular levels. Here we imaged activated microglia by establishing intracranial window chamber (ICW) in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia by using two-photon microscopy (TPM), in vivo. Intravenous injection of fluorescent antibodies allowed us to detect significantly elevated levels of Iba-1 and CD68 positive activated microglia in the ipsilateral compared to the contralateral side of the infarct. We further observed that indomethacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug significantly attenuated CD68-positive microglial activation in ICW, which was further confirmed by qRT-PCR biochemical analyses. In conclusion, we believe that in vivo TPM imaging of ICW would be a useful tool to screen for therapeutic interventions lowering microglial activation hence neuroinflammation. PMID:26417502

  2. In vivo imaging of activated microglia in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia by two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Seoyeon; Wang, Taejun; Lee, Chan-Ju; Jeon, Seong-Uk; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Jeongwoo; Hong, Beom-Ju; Yoon, Calvin Jinse; Kim, Sungjee; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Ki Hean; Ahn, G-One

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are brain resident macrophages rapidly responding to various stimuli to exert appropriate inflammatory responses. Although they have recently been exploited as an attractive candidate for imaging neuroinflammation, it is still difficult to visualize them at the cellular and molecular levels. Here we imaged activated microglia by establishing intracranial window chamber (ICW) in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia by using two-photon microscopy (TPM), in vivo. Intravenous injection of fluorescent antibodies allowed us to detect significantly elevated levels of Iba-1 and CD68 positive activated microglia in the ipsilateral compared to the contralateral side of the infarct. We further observed that indomethacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug significantly attenuated CD68-positive microglial activation in ICW, which was further confirmed by qRT-PCR biochemical analyses. In conclusion, we believe that in vivo TPM imaging of ICW would be a useful tool to screen for therapeutic interventions lowering microglial activation hence neuroinflammation. PMID:26417502

  3. Measurement of ischemic changes in cerebral blood flow by the hydrogen clearance technique and brain cortical temperature. Influence of flunarizine.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, R; Edmonds, H L; Wauquier, A; Melis, W; Van Loon, J

    1986-06-01

    In dogs global cerebral ischemia was produced by clamping reversibly the left subclavian and brachiocephalic arteries, supplying the head. The intercostal arteries were ligated permanently. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured discontinuously using a hydrogen saturation-desaturation technique. Clamping of the former two vessels caused an increase in systemic blood pressure. When this increase was not blunted by previous splenectomy and blood withdrawal a still important CBF remained during the clamp. However, if this rise in blood pressure was impaired, CBF decreased to 9 +/- 8% (mean +/- S.D., n = 14) of the pre-ischemic value. Flunarizine is known to have anti-hypoxic/ischemic properties. The influence of this drug (0.1 mg/kg i.v.), injected 10 min after the beginning of a 30-min ischemia period, on the post-ischemic CBF was investigated. Two-three hour after ischemia CBF was significantly lower in the solvent-treated animals than in the flunarizine-treated group, in which CBF approached the preischemic values. Changes in CBF were also followed continuously by measurement of the variations of brain versus aortic temperature. It was analyzed what information this can provide on CBF. PMID:3753102

  4. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of acute vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoyte, Lisa C; Brooks, Keith J; Nagel, Simon; Akhtar, Asim; Chen, Ruoli; Mardiguian, Sylvie; McAteer, Martina A; Anthony, Daniel C; Choudhury, Robin P; Buchan, Alastair M; Sibson, Nicola R

    2010-06-01

    The pathogenesis of stroke is multifactorial, and inflammation is thought to have a critical function in lesion progression at early time points. Detection of inflammatory processes associated with cerebral ischemia would be greatly beneficial in both designing individual therapeutic strategies and monitoring outcome. We have recently developed a new approach to imaging components of the inflammatory response, namely endovascular adhesion molecule expression on the brain endothelium. In this study, we show specific imaging of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression in a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and a reduction in this inflammatory response, associated with improved behavioral outcome, as a result of preconditioning. The spatial extent of VCAM-1 expression is considerably greater than the detectable lesion using diffusion-weighted imaging (25% versus 3% total brain volume), which is generally taken to reflect the core of the lesion at early time points. Thus, VCAM-1 imaging seems to reveal both core and penumbral regions, and our data implicate VCAM-1 upregulation and associated inflammatory processes in the progression of penumbral tissue to infarction. Our findings indicate that such molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches could be important clinical tools for patient evaluation, acute monitoring of therapy, and design of specific treatment strategies. PMID:20087364

  5. Thiazine Red+ platelet inclusions in Cerebral Blood Vessels are first signs in an Alzheimer’s Disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M.; Wenzel, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence shows an association between cerebral vascular diseases and Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In order to study the interaction of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques with brain vessels, we crossbred an AD mouse model (overexpressing amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations, APP_SweDI) with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the flt-1/VEGFR1 promoter in vessels (GFP_FLT1). Our data show, that only very few Aβ plaques were seen in 4-months old mice, focused in the mammillary body and in the lateral septal nucleus. The number of plaques markedly increased with age being most prominent in 12-months old mice. Thiazine Red was used to verify the plaques. Several Thiazine Red+ inclusions were found in GFP+ vessels, but only in non-perfused 4-months old mice. These inclusions were verified by Resorufin stainings possibly representing cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The inclusions were also seen in non-crossbred APP_SweDI but not in wildtype and GFP_FLT1 mice. In order to characterize these inclusions Flow Cytometry (FACS) analysis demonstrated that platelets were specifically stained by Thiazine Red+, more pronounced when aggregated. In conclusion, our data show that Thiazine Red+ inclusions representing aggregated platelets are a first pathological sign in AD before plaque development and may become important therapeutic targets in early AD. PMID:27345467

  6. Thiazine Red(+) platelet inclusions in Cerebral Blood Vessels are first signs in an Alzheimer's Disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M; Wenzel, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence shows an association between cerebral vascular diseases and Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In order to study the interaction of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques with brain vessels, we crossbred an AD mouse model (overexpressing amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations, APP_SweDI) with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the flt-1/VEGFR1 promoter in vessels (GFP_FLT1). Our data show, that only very few Aβ plaques were seen in 4-months old mice, focused in the mammillary body and in the lateral septal nucleus. The number of plaques markedly increased with age being most prominent in 12-months old mice. Thiazine Red was used to verify the plaques. Several Thiazine Red(+) inclusions were found in GFP(+) vessels, but only in non-perfused 4-months old mice. These inclusions were verified by Resorufin stainings possibly representing cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The inclusions were also seen in non-crossbred APP_SweDI but not in wildtype and GFP_FLT1 mice. In order to characterize these inclusions Flow Cytometry (FACS) analysis demonstrated that platelets were specifically stained by Thiazine Red(+), more pronounced when aggregated. In conclusion, our data show that Thiazine Red(+) inclusions representing aggregated platelets are a first pathological sign in AD before plaque development and may become important therapeutic targets in early AD. PMID:27345467

  7. Bidirectional radial Ca2+ activity regulates neurogenesis and migration during early cortical column formation

    PubMed Central

    Rash, Brian G.; Ackman, James B.; Rakic, Pasko

    2016-01-01

    Cortical columns are basic cellular and functional units of the cerebral cortex that are malformed in many brain disorders, but how they initially develop is not well understood. Using an optogenetic sensor in the mouse embryonic forebrain, we demonstrate that Ca2+ fluxes propagate bidirectionally within the elongated fibers of radial glial cells (RGCs), providing a novel communication mechanism linking the proliferative and postmitotic zones before the onset of synaptogenesis. Our results indicate that Ca2+ activity along RGC fibers provides feedback information along the radial migratory pathway, influencing neurogenesis and migration during early column development. Furthermore, we find that this columnar Ca2+ propagation is induced by Notch and fibroblast growth factor activities classically implicated in cortical expansion and patterning. Thus, cortical morphogens and growth factors may influence cortical column assembly in part by regulating long-distance Ca2+ communication along the radial axis of cortical development. PMID:26933693

  8. FNIRS-based evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2 ± 2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger tapping task were quantified before, immediately after, and six months after CIMT. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8 ± 1.3 years old) were also imaged at the same time points to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. In children with CP the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted six months later. In contrast to this longer term improvement in localized activation response, the laterality index that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed six months later.

  9. In vivo simultaneous cortical and intracortical monitoring of cerebral blood flow and mitochondrial redox state in experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiro-Michaely, E.; Zuckerman, T.; Zarchin, N.; Rinkevich, S.; Knoller, N.; Hadani, M.; Mayevsky, A.

    2003-07-01

    Monitoring of intra-mitochondrial NADH redox state is a common in-vivo technique in experimental animals and is rare in clinical studies. The combination of NADH monitoring with the Laser Doppler flowmetry for cerebral blood flow monitoring was described in various publications. Until now, very small effort was made to monitor NADH and CBF inside the cortex of experimental animals. The significance of this monitoring is in its application to experimental models of Parkinson"s disease or to clinical monitoring situations in the intensive care unit, when ICP is monitored. Here we compared the responses of the gerbil or rat brain to oxygen deficiency, monitored on the brain surface and in different depths. After the animals were anesthetized, the two common carotid arteries (gerbil) were isolated and prepared for following occlusion. The brain was exposed and two optical probes were located on its surface. Ischemia was induced by occluding the two carotid arteries, and anoxia was preformed by inhalation of pure N2. After recovery, one of the probes was inserted into the cortex (0.5-3mm) and a second ischemia or anoxia was preformed. The results showed that: 1. It is possible to monitor both CBF and NADH on the brain surface simultaneously with intracortical location. 2. The responses of the brain to ischemia or anoxia was smaller inside the cortex comparing to brain surface. 3. Negative correlation was found between CBF and NADH in both locations and models. In conclusion, this new model of simultaneously monitoring of CBF and NADH in different cerebral locations can shed light on various pathophysiological situations.

  10. Cell swelling activates ATP-dependent voltage-gated chloride channels in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K; Korbmacher, C

    1996-09-01

    In the present study we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to investigate swelling-activated Cl-currents (ICl-swell) in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. Hypotonic cell swelling reversibly increased the whole-cell Cl- conductance by about 30-fold. The I-V relationship was outwardly-rectifying and ICl-swell displayed a characteristic voltage-dependence with relatively fast inactivation upon large depolarizing and slow activation upon hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Reversal potential measurements revealed a selectivity sequence SCN- > I- > Br- > Cl- > > gluconate. ICl-swell was inhibited by tamoxifen, NPPB (5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate), DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), flufenamic acid, niflumic acid, and glibenclamide, in descending order of potency. Extracellular cAMP had no significant effect. ICl-swell was Ca2+ independent, but current activation depended on the presence of a high-energy gamma-phosphate group from intracellular ATP or ATP gamma S. Moreover, it depended on the presence of intracellular Mg2+ and was inhibited by staurosporine, which indicates that a phosphorylation step is involved in channel activation. Increasing the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by using ionomycin stimulated Cl- currents with a voltage dependence different from that of ICl-swell. Analysis of whole-cell current records during early onset of ICl-swell and during final recovery revealed discontinuous step-like changes of the whole-cell current level which were not observed under nonswelling conditions. A single-channel I-V curve constructed using the smallest resolvable current transitions detected at various holding potentials and revealed a slope conductance of 55, 15, and 8 pS at +120, 0, and -120 mV, respectively. The larger current steps observed in these recordings had about 2, 3, or 4 times the size of the putative single-channel current amplitude, suggesting a coordinated gating of several individual channels or channel

  11. Cerebral hemodynamic responses to seizure in the mouse brain: simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungduk; Lee, Mina; Koh, Dalkwon; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2010-05-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) simultaneously on the mouse brain and investigated the hemodynamic response to epileptic episodes under pharmacologically driven seizure. γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied to induce absence and tonic-clonic seizures, respectively. The epileptic episodes were identified from the single-channel EEG, and the corresponding hemodynamic changes in different regions of the brain were characterized by multichannel frequency-domain NIRS. Our results are the following: (i) the oxyhemoglobin level increases in the case of GBL-treated mice but not 4-AP-treated mice compared to the predrug state; (ii) the dominant response to each absence seizure is a decrease in deoxyhemolobin; (iii) the phase shift between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reduces in GBL-treated mice but no 4-AP-treated mice; and (iv) the spatial correlation of hemodynamics increased significantly in 4-AP-treated mice but not in GBL-treated mice. Our results shows that spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral hemodynamics using NIRS can be successfully applied to the mouse brain in conjunction with electrophysiological recording, which will support the study of molecular, cellular, and network origin of neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  12. The role of cerebral spinal fluid in light propagation through the mouse head: improving fluorescence tomography with Monte Carlo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancora, Daniele; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-03-01

    Optical Neuroimaging is a highly dynamical field of research owing to the combination of many advanced imaging techniques and computational tools that uncovered unexplored paths through the functioning of the brain. Light propagation modelling through such complicated structures has always played a crucial role as the basis for a high resolution and quantitative imaging where even the slightest improvement could lead to significant results. Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (fDOT), a widely used technique for three dimensional imaging of small animals and tissues, has been proved to be inaccurate for neuroimaging the mouse head without the knowledge of a-priori anatomical information of the subject. Commonly a normalized Born approximation model is used in fDOT reconstruction based on forward photon propagation using Diffusive Equation (DE) which has strong limitations in the optically clear regime. The presence of the Cerebral Spinal Fluid (CSF) instead, a thin optically clear layer surrounding the brain, can be more accurately taken into account using Monte Carlo approaches which nowadays is becoming more usable thanks to parallelized GPU algorithms. In this work we discuss the results of a synthetic experimental comparison, resulting to the increase of the accuracy for the Born approximation by introducing the CSF layer in a realistic mouse head structure with respect to the current model. We point out the importance of such clear layer for complex geometrical models, while for simple slab phantoms neglecting it does not introduce a significant error.

  13. Automatic anatomical labeling of the complete cerebral vasculature in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Ghanavati, Sahar; Lerch, Jason P; Sled, John G

    2014-07-15

    Study of cerebral vascular structure broadens our understanding of underlying variations, such as pathologies that can lead to cerebrovascular disorders. The development of high resolution 3D imaging modalities has provided us with the raw material to study the blood vessels in small animals such as mice. However, the high complexity and 3D nature of the cerebral vasculature make comparison and analysis of the vessels difficult, time-consuming and laborious. Here we present a framework for automated segmentation and recognition of the cerebral vessels in high resolution 3D images that addresses this need. The vasculature is segmented by following vessel center lines starting from automatically generated seeds and the vascular structure is represented as a graph. Each vessel segment is represented as an edge in the graph and has local features such as length, diameter, and direction, and relational features representing the connectivity of the vessel segments. Using these features, each edge in the graph is automatically labeled with its anatomical name using a stochastic relaxation algorithm. We have validated our method on micro-CT images of C57Bl/6J mice. A leave-one-out test performed on the labeled data set demonstrated the recognition rate for all vessels including major named vessels and their minor branches to be >75%. This automatic segmentation and recognition methods facilitate the comparison of blood vessels in large populations of subjects and allow us to study cerebrovascular variations. PMID:24680868

  14. Quantitative analyses of postmortem heat shock protein mRNA profiles in the occipital lobes of human cerebral cortices: implications in cause of death.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ukhee; Seo, Joong-Seok; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Son, Gi Hoon; Hwang, Juck-Joon

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative RNA analyses of autopsy materials to diagnose the cause and mechanism of death are challenging tasks in the field of forensic molecular pathology. Alterations in mRNA profiles can be induced by cellular stress responses during supravital reactions as well as by lethal insults at the time of death. Here, we demonstrate that several gene transcripts encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs), a gene family primarily responsible for cellular stress responses, can be differentially expressed in the occipital region of postmortem human cerebral cortices with regard to the cause of death. HSPA2 mRNA levels were higher in subjects who died due to mechanical asphyxiation (ASP), compared with those who died by traumatic injury (TI). By contrast, HSPA7 and A13 gene transcripts were much higher in the TI group than in the ASP and sudden cardiac death (SCD) groups. More importantly, relative abundances between such HSP mRNA species exhibit a stronger correlation to, and thus provide more discriminative information on, the death process than does routine normalization to a housekeeping gene. Therefore, the present study proposes alterations in HSP mRNA composition in the occipital lobe as potential forensic biological markers, which may implicate the cause and process of death. PMID:23135635

  15. Cerebral cortical mechanisms of copying geometrical shapes: a multidimensional scaling analysis of fMRI patterns of activation

    PubMed Central

    Tzagarakis, Charidimos; Jerde, Trenton A.; Lewis, Scott M.; Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2013-01-01

    We used multidimensional scaling (MDS) to characterize the integrative neural mechanisms during viewing and subsequently copying nine geometrical shapes. Human subjects initially looked at a central fixation point (“rest” period), then looked at a geometrical shape (“visual” period) which they copied without visual feedback (“copying” period). BOLD signal was recorded from voxels in 28 cortical areas (14 from each hemisphere) using a 4 Tesla magnet. For each voxel, signal ratios of “Visual versus Rest” (VR), and “Copy versus Visual” (CV) were calculated and used to construct two sets of Euclidean distance dissimilarity matrices for the nine shapes, with separate matrices defined for each region of interest (ROI) across subjects. The relations of perceptual and motor aspects of the shapes to MDS dimensions and specific ROIs were assessed using stepwise multiple regressions. The optimal individually scaled (INDSCAL) solutions were 2-dimensional. For the VR condition, MDS dimensions were significantly associated with the presence of crossing in a shape (Dimension 1), and with perimeter, height, cycles, peak segment speed, and horizontal symmetry (Dimension 2). ROIs most prominently associated with these dimensions essentially comprised the medial frontal lobe bilaterally, the inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, and the left intraparietal sulcus (Dimension 1), and visual areas, including the calcarine sulcus and cuneus bilaterally (Dimension 2). These results document the expected involvement of visual areas and support the hypothesis advanced on the basis of previous findings (Lewis et al. 2003a) that a motor rehearsal of the upcoming shape copying is occurring during this visual presentation period. For the CV condition, practically one motor feature (number of segments drawn) dominated both dimensions, with a secondary engagement of horizontal symmetry in Dimension 1. The right postcentral gyrus, right intraparietal sulcus, right superior

  16. Comparison of stimulus-evoked cerebral hemodynamics in the awake mouse and under a novel anesthetic regime

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Paul S.; Shaw, Kira; Boorman, Luke; Harris, Samuel; Kennerley, Aneurin J.; Azzouz, Mimoun; Berwick, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity is closely followed by a localised change in cerebral blood flow, a process termed neurovascular coupling. These hemodynamic changes form the basis of contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and are used as a correlate for neural activity. Anesthesia is widely employed in animal fMRI and neurovascular studies, however anesthetics are known to profoundly affect neural and vascular physiology, particularly in mice. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of a novel ‘modular’ anesthesia that combined injectable (fentanyl-fluanisone/midazolam) and volatile (isoflurane) anesthetics in mice. To characterize sensory-evoked cortical hemodynamic responses, we used optical imaging spectroscopy to produce functional maps of changes in tissue oxygenation and blood volume in response to mechanical whisker stimulation. Following fine-tuning of the anesthetic regime, stimulation elicited large and robust hemodynamic responses in the somatosensory cortex, characterized by fast arterial activation, increases in total and oxygenated hemoglobin, and decreases in deoxygenated hemoglobin. Overall, the magnitude and speed of evoked hemodynamic responses under anesthesia resembled those in the awake state, indicating that the novel anesthetic combination significantly minimizes the impact of anesthesia. Our findings have broad implications for both neurovascular research and longitudinal fMRI studies that increasingly require the use of genetically engineered mice. PMID:26218081

  17. Cerebral Cortical Aβ42 and PHF-τ in 325 Consecutive Brain Autopsies Varies by Diagnosis, Location, and APOE

    PubMed Central

    Postupna, Nadia; Keene, C. Dirk; Crane, Paul K.; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Hewitt, Jessica; Rice, Samantha; Howard, Kimberly; Montine, Kathleen S.; Larson, Eric B.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    We used a novel approach for molecular quantification in standard fixed and embedded tissue to measure Aβ42 and paired helical filament-τ) (PHF-τ) in frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex from 325 consecutive brain autopsies collected as part of a population-based study of brain aging and incident dementia in the Seattle area. We observed significant effects of APOE ε4 on Aβ42 levels in both diagnostic groups by disease stage and region. In contrast, we did not observe a significant effect of APOE ε4 on PHF-τ levels by disease stage in any region. Aβ42 and PHF-τ levels in cerebral cortex were correlated more strongly in the Dementia group, and these measures had independent explanatory power for dementia beyond those of standard neuropathologic indices. Associations between Lewy body disease and levels of Aβ42 or PHF-τ and between Aβ42 levels and microvascular brain injury suggested that these co-morbid diseases enhanced the penetrance of AD. Our novel approach brings additional insights into the molecular pathogenesis of common causes of dementia and may serve as a platform for future studies that pursue associations between molecular changes of AD and genetic or environmental risk. PMID:25575135

  18. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of mouse cerebral edema induced by cold injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-06-01

    For the first time, we have implemented photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to image the water content of an edema in vivo. We produced and imaged a cold-induced cerebral edema transcranially, then obtained blood vessel and water accumulation images at 610 and 975 nm, respectively. We tracked the changes at 12, 24, and 36 h after the cold injury. The blood volume decreased after the cold injury, and the maximum area of edema was observed 24 h after the cold injury. We validated PAT of the water content of the edema through magnetic Resonance Imaging and the water spectrum from the spectrophotometric measurement.

  19. Axonal elongation and dendritic branching is enhanced by adenosine A2A receptors activation in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Filipa F; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Santos, Telma E; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sousa, Mónica M; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-06-01

    Axon growth and dendrite development are key processes for the establishment of a functional neuronal network. Adenosine, which is released by neurons and glia, is a known modulator of synaptic transmission but its influence over neuronal growth has been much less investigated. We now explored the action of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) upon neurite outgrowth, discriminating actions over the axon or dendrites, and the mechanisms involved. Morphometric analysis of primary cultures of cortical neurons from E18 Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated that an A2AR agonist, CGS 21680, enhances axonal elongation and dendritic branching, being the former prevented by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase and phospholipase C, but not of protein kinase A. By testing the influence of a scavenger of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) over the action of the A2AR agonist and the action of a selective A2AR antagonist over the action of BDNF, we could conclude that while the action of A2ARs upon dendritic branching is dependent on the presence of endogenous BDNF, the influence of A2ARs upon axonal elongation is independent of endogenous BDNF. In consonance with the action over axonal elongation, A2AR activation promoted a decrease in microtubule stability and an increase in microtubule growth speed in axonal growth cones. In conclusion, we disclose a facilitatory action of A2ARs upon axonal elongation and microtubule dynamics, providing new insights for A2ARs regulation of neuronal differentiation and axonal regeneration. PMID:26068054

  20. Aerobic Glycolysis in the Frontal Cortex Correlates with Memory Performance in Wild-Type Mice But Not the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Richard A.; Tindale, Lauren; Lone, Asad; Singh, Olivia; Macauley, Shannon L.; Stanley, Molly; Holtzman, David M.; Bartha, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis and lactate production in the brain plays a key role in memory, yet the role of this metabolism in the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains poorly understood. Here we examined the relationship between cerebral lactate levels and memory performance in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD, which progressively accumulates amyloid-β. In vivo 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an age-dependent decline in lactate levels within the frontal cortex of control mice, whereas lactate levels remained unaltered in APP/PS1 mice from 3 to 12 months of age. Analysis of hippocampal interstitial fluid by in vivo microdialysis revealed a significant elevation in lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice relative to control mice at 12 months of age. An age-dependent decline in the levels of key aerobic glycolysis enzymes and a concomitant increase in lactate transporter expression was detected in control mice. Increased expression of lactate-producing enzymes correlated with improved memory in control mice. Interestingly, in APP/PS1 mice the opposite effect was detected. In these mice, increased expression of lactate producing enzymes correlated with poorer memory performance. Immunofluorescent staining revealed localization of the aerobic glycolysis enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and lactate dehydrogenase A within cortical and hippocampal neurons in control mice, as well as within astrocytes surrounding amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice. These observations collectively indicate that production of lactate, via aerobic glycolysis, is beneficial for memory function during normal aging. However, elevated lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice indicate perturbed lactate processing, a factor that may contribute to cognitive decline in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Lactate has recently emerged as a key metabolite necessary for memory consolidation. Lactate is the end product of aerobic glycolysis, a unique form of metabolism that occurs within certain

  1. A mouse model for testing remyelinating therapies.

    PubMed

    Bai, C Brian; Sun, Sunny; Roholt, Andrew; Benson, Emily; Edberg, Dale; Medicetty, Satish; Dutta, Ranjan; Kidd, Grahame; Macklin, Wendy B; Trapp, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Used in combination with immunomodulatory therapies, remyelinating therapies are a viable therapeutic approach for treating individuals with multiple sclerosis. Studies of postmortem MS brains identified greater remyelination in demyelinated cerebral cortex than in demyelinated brain white matter and implicated reactive astrocytes as an inhibitor of white matter remyelination. An animal model that recapitulates these phenotypes would benefit the development of remyelination therapeutics. We have used a modified cuprizone protocol that causes a consistent and robust demyelination of mouse white matter and cerebral cortex. Spontaneous remyelination occurred significantly faster in the cerebral cortex than in white matter and reactive astrocytes were more abundant in white matter lesions. Remyelination of white matter and cerebral cortex was therapeutically enhanced by daily injections of thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3). In summary, we describe an in vivo demyelination/remyelination paradigm that can be powered to determine efficacy of therapies that enhance white matter and cortical remyelination. PMID:27384502

  2. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  3. Ethanol reduces GABAA alpha1 subunit receptor surface expression by a protein kinase Cgamma-dependent mechanism in cultured cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Suryanarayanan, Asha; Boyd, Kevin N; Comerford, Chris E; Lai, Marvin A; Ren, Qinglu; Morrow, A Leslie

    2010-05-01

    Prolonged ethanol exposure causes central nervous system hyperexcitability that involves a loss of GABAergic inhibition. We previously demonstrated that long-term ethanol exposure enhances the internalization of synaptic GABA(A) receptors composed of alpha1beta2/3gamma2 subunits. However, the mechanisms of ethanol-mediated internalization are unknown. This study explored the effect of ethanol on surface expression of GABA(A) alpha1 subunit-containing receptors in cultured cerebral cortical neurons and the role of protein kinase C (PKC) beta, gamma, and epsilon isoforms in their trafficking. Cultured neurons were prepared from rat pups on postnatal day 1 and maintained for 18 days. Cells were exposed to ethanol, and surface receptors were isolated by biotinylation and P2 fractionation, whereas functional analysis was conducted by whole-cell patch-clamp recording of GABA- and zolpidem-evoked responses. Ethanol exposure for 4 h decreased biotinylated surface expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits and reduced zolpidem (100 nM) enhancement of GABA-evoked currents. The PKC activator phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate mimicked the effect of ethanol, and the selective PKC inhibitor calphostin C prevented ethanol-induced internalization of these receptors. Ethanol exposure for 4 h also increased the colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation of PKCgamma with alpha1 subunits, whereas PKCbeta/alpha1 association and PKCepsilon/alpha1 colocalization were not altered by ethanol exposure. Selective PKCgamma inhibition by transfection of selective PKCgamma small interfering RNAs blocked ethanol-induced internalization of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits, whereas PKCbeta inhibition using pseudo-PKCbeta had no effect. These findings suggest that ethanol exposure selectively alters PKCgamma translocation to GABA(A) receptors and PKCgamma regulates GABA(A) alpha1 receptor trafficking after ethanol exposure. PMID:20159950

  4. Effects of Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal on Fast Spiking Neurons in Mouse Cortical Layer 6B

    PubMed Central

    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Fast spiking (FS) GABAergic neurons are thought to be involved in the generation of high-frequency cortical rhythms during the waking state. We previously showed that cortical layer 6b (L6b) was a specific target for the wake-promoting transmitter, hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx). Here, we have investigated whether L6b FS cells were sensitive to hcrt/orx and other transmitters associated with cortical activation. Recordings were thus made from L6b FS cells in either wild-type mice or in transgenic mice in which GFP-positive GABAergic cells are parvalbumin positive. Whereas in a control condition hcrt/orx induced a strong increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of spontaneous synaptic currents, in the presence of TTX, it had no effect at all on miniature synaptic currents. Hcrt/orx effect was thus presynaptic although not by an action on glutamatergic terminals but rather on neighboring cells. In contrast, noradrenaline and acetylcholine depolarized and excited these cells through a direct postsynaptic action. Neurotensin, which is colocalized in hcrt/orx neurons, also depolarized and excited these cells but the effect was indirect. Morphologically, these cells exhibited basket-like features. These results suggest that hcrt/orx, noradrenaline, acetylcholine, and neurotensin could contribute to high-frequency cortical activity through an action on L6b GABAergic FS cells. PMID:27235100

  5. Beneficial Effects of Polygonum multiflorum on Hippocampal Neuronal Cells and Mouse Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Min; Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Ha Neui; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of the water extract of Polygonum multiflorum (WEPM) and their mechanisms were investigated in HT22 hippocampal cells and hippocampus of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) mice. In HT22 cells against glutamate-induced oxidative stress, pretreatment with WEPM resulted in significantly reduced apoptotic neuronal death. Pretreatment with WEPM resulted in the suppression of ROS accumulation in connection with cellular Ca (2+) level after exposure to glutamate. Treatment with glutamate alone led to suppressed protein level of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB); however, pretreatment with either WEPM or anti-oxidant N-acetyl-ʟ-cysteine (NAC) resulted in the significant enhancement of levels of these proteins. In addition, levels of mature BDNF expression and CREB phosphorylation were increased by combined treatment with WEPM, NAC, and intracellular Ca (2+) inhibitor BAPTA compared to other treatment groups. In MCAO mice, we confirmed the critical role of mature BDNF expression and CREB phosphorylation by WEPM in the neurons of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that WEPM mainly exerted beneficial effects on hippocampal neurons through the suppression of ROS accumulation and up-regulation of mature BDNF expression and CREB phosphorylation. PMID:26119951

  6. Electroacupuncture ameliorates memory impairments by enhancing oligodendrocyte regeneration in a mouse model of prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung Min; Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Ha Neui; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We modeled prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion in mice using bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) and electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation was applied at two acupoints, Baihui (GV20) and Dazhui (GV14). In behavioral tests of memory, BCAS produced impairments in spatial and short-term memory in mice that were attenuated by therapeutic EA stimulation. Therapeutic use of EA in BCAS also enhanced oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), in association with white matter improvements in the corpus callosum (CC). In PCR analyses of growth factor gene expression, significant positive changes in 3 genes were observed following EA stimulation in BCAS, and here we highlight alterations in neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5). We confirmed EA-mediated positive changes in the expression of NT4/5 and its receptor, tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB). Treatment of naïve and BCAS + EA animals with a selective TrkB antagonist, ANA-12, produced losses of myelin and cognitive function that were ameliorated by EA therapy. Moreover, following BCAS we observed an EA-dependent increase in phospho-activated CREB (a downstream mediator of NT4/5-TrkB signaling) in OPCs and OLs of the CC. Our results suggest that EA stimulation promotes the recovery of memory function following white matter injury via a mechanism that promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration and involves NT4/5-TrkB signaling. PMID:27350403

  7. Oridonin ameliorates neuropathological changes and behavioural deficits in a mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Daniels, Rolf; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2013-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegeneration and the major cause of dementia. This multifactorial disorder is clinically defined by progressive behavioural and cognitive deficits, and neuropathologically characterized by β-amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau and neuroinflammation. Oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from Chinese herb Rabdosia rubescens, has multiple biological properties, especially anti-inflammatory and neuroregulatory activities. Potential therapeutic effects of Oridonin were investigated in an animal model of cerebral amyloidosis for AD, transgenic APP/PS1 mice. Oridonin was suspended in carboxymethylcellulose or loaded with a nanostructured emulsion, and was orally administrated or injected. Before, during and following the experimental treatments, behavioural tests were performed with these transgenic mice and their naive littermates. Following relatively short-term treatments of 10 days, brain tissue of mice were removed for immunohistochemical assays. The results indicate that both oral treatment and injection of Oridonin significantly attenuated β-amyloid deposition, plaque-associated APP expression and microglial activation in brain of transgenic mice. Furthermore, injection of Oridonin-nanoemulsion ameliorated deficits in nesting, an important affiliative behaviour, and in social interaction. Additional in vitro studies indicated that Oridonin effectively attenuated inflammatory reaction of macrophage and microglial cell lines. Our results suggest that Oridonin might be considered a promising therapeutic option for human AD or other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24034629

  8. Electroacupuncture ameliorates memory impairments by enhancing oligodendrocyte regeneration in a mouse model of prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Min; Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Ha Neui; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We modeled prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion in mice using bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) and electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation was applied at two acupoints, Baihui (GV20) and Dazhui (GV14). In behavioral tests of memory, BCAS produced impairments in spatial and short-term memory in mice that were attenuated by therapeutic EA stimulation. Therapeutic use of EA in BCAS also enhanced oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), in association with white matter improvements in the corpus callosum (CC). In PCR analyses of growth factor gene expression, significant positive changes in 3 genes were observed following EA stimulation in BCAS, and here we highlight alterations in neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5). We confirmed EA-mediated positive changes in the expression of NT4/5 and its receptor, tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB). Treatment of naïve and BCAS + EA animals with a selective TrkB antagonist, ANA-12, produced losses of myelin and cognitive function that were ameliorated by EA therapy. Moreover, following BCAS we observed an EA-dependent increase in phospho-activated CREB (a downstream mediator of NT4/5-TrkB signaling) in OPCs and OLs of the CC. Our results suggest that EA stimulation promotes the recovery of memory function following white matter injury via a mechanism that promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration and involves NT4/5-TrkB signaling. PMID:27350403

  9. Alteration of the cerebral zinc pool in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Yong; Cho, Eunsil; Seo, Jung-Woo; Hwang, Jung Jin; Koh, Jae-Young

    2012-03-01

    Synaptic vesicle Zn is regulated by zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) and is involved in neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Here, we describe extensive alterations of ZnT3-regulated Zn pools in the brains of human amyloid precursor protein-transgenic (Tg2576) mice. In contrast to wild-type littermates in which ZnT3 expression and synaptic Zn increased with age, there were age-dependent reductions in ZnT3 expression and synaptic Zn levels in the hippocampal mossy fiber area of Tg2576 mice. In these mice, a novel Zn pool and ZnT3 expression were colocalized and appeared along dystrophic neurites surrounding compact amyloid plaques that were identified by in situ blue fluorescence, congophilic birefringence, and Aβ42 immunoreactivity. Zn-specific histofluorescence and ZnT3 immunofluorescence in dystrophic neurites were also colocalized with the δ-subunit of adaptor protein complex 3, lysosome-associated membrane protein, cathepsin D, and neurofilament-containing hyperphosphorylated paired helical filaments. The synaptic vesicle marker protein synaptophysin and vesicle-associated membrane protein were not found in these neurites, suggesting a role of ZnT3 distinct from itsnormal role in synaptic Zn. ZnT3 immunoreactivity and Zn histofluorescence were also evident in activated astrocytes. These datasuggest that extensive modifications of the cerebral Zn pool, particularly synaptic Zn, may underlie neuronal dysfunction characteristic of Alzheimer disease. PMID:22318122

  10. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (INMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated INMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on INMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated INMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of INMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516