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Sample records for mouse digestive system

  1. Your Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Puberty Video: Am I Normal? (Girls and Puberty) Movie: Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page ... Are Your Bowels Moving? Indigestion Quiz: Digestive System Movie: Digestive System Belly Pain Food Poisoning Irritable Bowel ...

  2. Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... left over from a previous time in human evolution. It no longer appears to be useful to ... bowel movement. Back Continue Things That Can Go Wrong Nearly everyone has a digestive problem at one ...

  3. Digestive System general organization throughout

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Digestive System general organization throughout: mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, serosa digestive glands salivary pancreas liver (lobes: right, left, caudate, quadrate, diaphragmatic surface, bare

  4. Effects of Aging on the Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Google+ LinkedIn Merck Manuals Consumer Version Digestive Disorders Biology of the Digestive System Effects of Aging on ... to Consumer Version DOCTORS: Go to Professional Version Biology of the Digestive System Overview of the Digestive ...

  5. Your Digestive System and How It Works

    MedlinePLUS

    ... URL Español Your Digestive System and How It Works Page Content On this page: What is the ... Government Printing Office; 2010. [ Top ] How does digestion work? Digestion works by moving food through the GI ...

  6. MOUSE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cost or risk analysis equations. t was especially intended for use by individuals with li...

  7. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE DUAL DIGESTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dual digestion system (DDS) was developed to provide stabilized, pathogen free sludge. DDS consists of a 1-day detention time, pure-oxygen, covered aerobic digester (Step I) followed by an 8-day detention time anaerobic reactor. The temperature in the Step I digester is contr...

  8. Problems of the Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are examples of common digestive disorders? • What is irritable bowel syndrome? • What is celiac disease? • What is colorectal ... Taking medications, especially antibiotics • Digestive diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome What should I do if I have ...

  9. Delivery Systems for Distance Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamber, Linda

    This ERIC digest provides a brief overview of the video, audio, and computer technologies that are currently used to deliver instruction for distance education programs. The video systems described include videoconferencing, low-power television (LPTV), closed-circuit television (CCTV), instructional fixed television service (ITFS), and cable…

  10. Regions of the Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ureters Urinary Bladder Urethra Review Quiz Reproductive System Male Reproductive System Testes Duct System Accessory Glands Penis Male Sexual Response & Hormone Control Female Reproductive System Ovaries Genital Tract External Genitalia Female Sexual Response & ...

  11. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells. PMID:25573173

  12. Integrated Library Systems. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopata, Cynthia L.

    An automated library system usually consists of a number of functional modules, such as acquisitions, circulation, cataloging, serials, and an online public access catalog (OPAC). An "integrated" library system is an automated system in which all of the function modules share a common bibliographic database. There are several ways the integration…

  13. PATHOGEN AND INDICATOR ORGANISM DESTRUCTION BY THE DUAL DIGESTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of the dual digestion system (DDS) to destroy pathogenic microorganisms was evaluated at a full-scale treatment facility. The DDS incorporates a pure oxygen aerobic digester (1-day detention time) followed by an anaerobic digester (8-day detention time). Heat bi...

  14. Student Teachers' Ways of Thinking and Ways of Understanding Digestion and the Digestive System in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çimer, Sabiha Odabasi; Ursavas, Nazihan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the ways in which student teachers understand digestion and the digestive system and, subsequently, their ways of thinking, as reflected in their problem solving approaches and the justification schemes that they used to validate their claims. For this purpose, clinical interviews were conducted with 10…

  15. Dietary Sodium Suppresses Digestive Efficiency via the Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Voong, Susan; Morales-Santiago, Fabiola I.; Kahn, Michael Z.; Ni, Jonathan; Littlejohn, Nicole K.; Claflin, Kristin E.; Burnett, Colin M.L.; Pearson, Nicole A.; Lutter, Michael L.; Grobe, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats and sodium are both palatable and are hypothesized to synergistically contribute to ingestive behavior and thereby obesity. Contrary to this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice fed a 45% high fat diet exhibited weight gain that was inhibited by increased dietary sodium content. This suppressive effect of dietary sodium upon weight gain was mediated specifically through a reduction in digestive efficiency, with no effects on food intake behavior, physical activity, or resting metabolism. Replacement of circulating angiotensin II levels reversed the effects of high dietary sodium to suppress digestive efficiency. While the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan had no effect in mice fed low sodium, the AT2 receptor antagonist PD-123,319 suppressed digestive efficiency. Correspondingly, genetic deletion of the AT2 receptor in FVB/NCrl mice resulted in suppressed digestive efficiency even on a standard chow diet. Together these data underscore the importance of digestive efficiency in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implicate dietary sodium, the renin-angiotensin system, and the AT2 receptor in the control of digestive efficiency regardless of mouse strain or macronutrient composition of the diet. These findings highlight the need for greater understanding of nutrient absorption control physiology, and prompt more uniform assessment of digestive efficiency in animal studies of energy balance. PMID:26068176

  16. Digestive Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. Your digestive system is a series of hollow ... are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. There are many types of digestive disorders. The ...

  17. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION OF THE DUAL DIGESTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Full-scale performance and costs of an innovative sludge stabilization process were evaluated at the three plants. The DDS incorporates a 1-day-detention-time, pure oxygen aerobic digester followed in series by an 8-day-detention-time anaerobic digester. Heat of biological oxidat...

  18. Rab27A Is Present in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Is Required for Digestive Enzyme Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A.; Stuenkel, Edward L.; Lentz, Stephen I.; Williams, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The small G-protein Rab27A has been shown to regulate the intracellular trafficking of secretory granules in various cell types. However, the presence, subcellular localization and functional impact of Rab27A on digestive enzyme secretion by mouse pancreatic acinar cells are poorly understood. Ashen mice, which lack the expression of Rab27A due to a spontaneous mutation, were used to investigate the function of Rab27A in pancreatic acinar cells. Isolated pancreatic acini were prepared from wild-type or ashen mouse pancreas by collagenase digestion, and CCK- or carbachol-induced amylase secretion was measured. Secretion occurring through the major-regulated secretory pathway, which is characterized by zymogen granules secretion, was visualized by Dextran-Texas Red labeling of exocytotic granules. The minor-regulated secretory pathway, which operates through the endosomal/lysosomal pathway, was characterized by luminal cell surface labeling of lysosomal associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1). Compared to wild-type, expression of Rab27B was slightly increased in ashen mouse acini, while Rab3D and digestive enzymes (amylase, lipase, chymotrypsin and elastase) were not affected. Localization of Rab27B, Rab3D and amylase by immunofluorescence was similar in both wild-type and ashen acinar cells. The GTP-bound states of Rab27B and Rab3D in wild-type and ashen mouse acini also remained similar in amount. In contrast, acini from ashen mice showed decreased amylase release induced by CCK- or carbachol. Rab27A deficiency reduced the apical cell surface labeling of LAMP1, but did not affect that of Dextran-Texas Red incorporation into the fusion pockets at luminal surface. These results show that Rab27A is present in mouse pancreatic acinar cells and mainly regulates secretion through the minor-regulated pathway. PMID:25951179

  19. Waste heat utilization in an anaerobic digestion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissevain, Brett

    Anaerobic digestion has great potential as an energy source. Not only does it provide an effective method for waste mitigation, but it has the potential to generate significant quantities of fuel and electricity. In order to ensure efficient digestion and biomass utilization, however, the system must be continuously maintained at elevated temperatures. It is technically feasible to supplement such a system with outside energy, but it is more cost effective to heat the system using only the produced biogas. While there is considerable literature covering the theory of anaerobic digestion, there are very few practical studies to show how heat utilization affects system operation. This study considers the effect of major design variables (i.e. heat exchanger efficiencies and biogas conditioning) on promoting a completely self-sustaining digestion system. The thesis considers a real world system and analyzes how it can be improved to avoid the need of an external energy source.

  20. Digestive system fistula: a problem still relevant today.

    PubMed

    G?uszek, Stanis?aw; Korczak, Maria; Kot, Marta; Matykiewicz, Jaros?aw; Kozie?, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    Digestive system fistula originates most frequently as a complication after surgical procedures, less often occurs in the course of inflammatory diseases, but it can also result from neoplasm and injuries. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was to analyze the causes and retrospectively assess the perioperative procedures as well as the results of digestive system fistula treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Own experience in digestive system fistula treatment was presented. The subject group consisted of 32 patients treated at the General Surgery, Oncology and Endocrinology Clinical Department between 01.05.2005 and 30.04.2010 due to different digestive tract diseases. The causes of the occurrence of digestive system fistula, methods and results of treatment were analyzed. RESULTS. The analysis covered 32 patients with digestive system fistula, among them 15 men and 17 women. Average age for men was 57 years (20-78), and for women 61 years (24-88). In 11 patients idiopathic fistula causally connected with primary inflammatory disease (7 cases) and with neoplasm (4 cases) was diagnosed, in 19 patients fistula was the result of complications after surgery, in 2 - after abdominal cavity injury. Recovery from fistula was achieved in 23 patients (72%) with the use of individually planned conservative therapy (TPN, EN, antibiotics, drainage, and others) and surgery, depending on the needs of individual patient. 5 patients (16%) died, whereas in 4 left (12%) recovery wasn't achieved (fistula in palliative patients, with advanced stages of neoplasm - bronchoesophageal fistula, the recurrence of uterine carcinoma). CONCLUSIONS. Recently the results of digestive system fistula treatment showed an improvement which manifests itself in mortality decrease and shortening of fistula healing time. Yet, digestive system fistula as a serious complication still poses a very difficult surgical problem. PMID:22166240

  1. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  2. Your Digestive System and How It Works

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that the body digests into smaller molecules called amino acids. The body absorbs amino acids through the small intestine into the blood, which ... into the bloodstream. The bloodstream carries simple sugars, amino acids, glycerol, and some vitamins and salts to the ...

  3. 75 FR 82428 - VASRD Improvement Forum-Updating Disability Criteria for the Genitourinary System, Digestive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...System, Digestive System, Dental Conditions...Infectious Diseases, Immune Disorders and...System, Digestive System, Dental Conditions...Infectious Diseases, Immune Disorders and...following four body systems: (1) Infectious Diseases, Immune Disorders...

  4. Procedures for Identifying Infectious Prions After Passage Through the Digestive System of an Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Justin W; Nichols, Tracy A; Phillips, Gregory E; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2013-01-01

    Infectious prion (PrPRes) material is likely the cause of fatal, neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases1. Transmission of TSE diseases, such as chronic wasting disease (CWD), is presumed to be from animal to animal2,3 as well as from environmental sources4-6. Scavengers and carnivores have potential to translocate PrPRes material through consumption and excretion of CWD-contaminated carrion. Recent work has documented passage of PrPRes material through the digestive system of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), a common North American scavenger7. We describe procedures used to document passage of PrPRes material through American crows. Crows were gavaged with RML-strain mouse-adapted scrapie and their feces were collected 4 hr post gavage. Crow feces were then pooled and injected intraperitoneally into C57BL/6 mice. Mice were monitored daily until they expressed clinical signs of mouse scrapie and were thereafter euthanized. Asymptomatic mice were monitored until 365 days post inoculation. Western blot analysis was conducted to confirm disease status. Results revealed that prions remain infectious after traveling through the digestive system of crows and are present in the feces, causing disease in test mice. PMID:24300668

  5. Psoriasis vulgaris and digestive system disorders: is there a linkage?

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Aldona; Jastrzebska, Iwona; Chodorowska, Grazyna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Dybiec, Ewa; Juszkiewicz-Borowiec, Maria; Krasowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis is well-known immune-mediated skin disease often associated with co-morbidities, including dyslipidaemia and obesity. Few reports imply that the disease might be also related to pathology of mucosal surfaces, especially that of the digestive system. The authors present a case of psoriasis and concurrent digestive system abnormalities, and review the literature regarding the topic. A 40-year-old man suffered from an exacerbation of exudative psoriasis for about 6 months. Topical antipsoriatics proved ineffective and the disease gradually progressed to a severe disseminated form. Subsequent detailed examinations revealed persistent gastroduodenitis due to H. pylori infection, pancreatic dysfunction and fatty change of the liver, although the patient denied any gastrointestinal symptoms. As a result appropriate treatment of the diagnosed digestive system disorders was added to topical antipsoriatic therapy. Within 2 weeks of treatment clinical symptoms and laboratory signs showed a marked trend to normalisation. The presented medical history seems to suggest that there may be some kind of interplay between psoriasis and digestive system disorders. PMID:20164041

  6. Student Science Teachers' Ideas of the Digestive System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardak, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to reveal the levels of understanding of student science teachers regarding the digestive system. In this research, 116 student science teachers were tested by applying the drawing method. Upon the analysis of the drawings they made, it was found that some of them had misconceptions such as "the organs of the…

  7. 75 FR 82428 - VASRD Improvement Forum-Updating Disability Criteria for the Genitourinary System, Digestive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... System, Digestive System, Dental Conditions, and Infectious Diseases, Immune Disorders and Nutritional..., Immune Disorders and Nutritional Deficiencies (38 CFR 4.88-4.89), (2) the Digestive System (38 CFR 4.110... VASRD Improvement Forum--Updating Disability Criteria for the Genitourinary System, Digestive...

  8. Effect of Mouse Maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) Knockout on Starch Digestion to Glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digestion of starch requires activities provided by six different alpha-glucosidase enzymes. Two activities are luminal alpha-amylases (AMY). Four activities are mucosal activities described as maltases. Two of the activities are associated with sucrase-isomaltase (Si) activities. Two activities ...

  9. 38 CFR 4.114 - Schedule of ratings-digestive system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-digestive system. 4.114 Section 4.114 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.114 Schedule of ratings—digestive system. Ratings under diagnostic codes 7301 to 7329, inclusive, 7331, 7342, and 7345 to...

  10. 38 CFR 4.114 - Schedule of ratings-digestive system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-digestive system. 4.114 Section 4.114 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.114 Schedule of ratings—digestive system. Ratings under diagnostic codes 7301 to 7329, inclusive, 7331, 7342, and 7345 to...

  11. 38 CFR 4.114 - Schedule of ratings-digestive system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-digestive system. 4.114 Section 4.114 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.114 Schedule of ratings—digestive system. Ratings under diagnostic codes 7301 to 7329, inclusive, 7331, 7342, and 7345 to...

  12. [Mental disorders in digestive system diseases - internist's and psychiatrist's insight].

    PubMed

    Kukla, Urszula; ?abuzek, Krzysztof; Chronowska, Justyna; Krzystanek, Marek; Okopie?, Bogus?aw

    2015-05-01

    Mental disorders accompanying digestive system diseases constitute interdisciplinary yet scarcely acknowledged both diagnostic and therapeutic problem. One of the mostly recognized examples is coeliac disease where patients endure the large spectrum of psychopathological symptoms, starting with attention deficit all the way down to the intellectual disability in extreme cases. It has not been fully explained how the pathomechanism of digestive system diseases affects patient's mental health, however one of the hypothesis suggests that it is due to serotonergic or opioid neurotransmission imbalance caused by gluten and gluten metabolites effect on central nervous system. Behavioral changes can also be invoked by liver or pancreatic diseases, which causes life-threatening abnormalities within a brain. It occurs that these abnormalities reflexively exacerbate the symptoms of primary somatic disease and aggravate its course, which worsens prognosis. The dominant mental disease mentioned in this article is depression which because of its effect on a hypothalamuspituitary- adrenal axis and on an autonomic nervous system, not only aggravates the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases but may accelerate their onset in genetically predisposed patients. Depression is known to negatively affects patients' ability to function in a society and a quality of their lives. Moreover, as far as children are concerned, the occurrence of digestive system diseases accompanied by mental disorders, may adversely affect their further physical and psychological development, which merely results in worse school performance. All those aspects of mental disorders indicate the desirability of the psychological care for patients with recognized digestive system disease. The psychological assistance should be provided immediately after diagnosis of a primary disease and be continued throughout the whole course of treatment. PMID:26039016

  13. Curriculum and Assessment in an Age of Computer Algebra Systems. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meagher, Michael

    This digest provides research on curriculum and assessment in the age of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS). The digest presents research on assessment with CAS technology, teacher accounts of assessment with CAS technology and curriculum issues. (Contains 18 references.) (MM)

  14. Systems Theory and the Earth Systems Approach in Science Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyongyong

    The systems approach provides a framework for integrating different scientific disciplines. This approach is used often in Earth Systems Education. This ERIC Digest describes the systems theory and its influence on science education. (Contains 16 references.) (YDS)

  15. Left-Right Asymmetric Morphogenesis in the Xenopus Digestive System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Jennifer K.; Prather, D.R.; Nascone-Yoder, N. M.

    2003-01-01

    The morphogenetic mechanisms by which developing organs become left-right asymmetric entities are unknown. To investigate this issue, we compared the roles of the left and right sides of the Xenopus embryo during the development of anatomic asymmetries in the digestive system. Although both sides contribute equivalently to each of the individual digestive organs, during the initial looping of the primitive gut tube, the left side assumes concave topologies where the right side becomes convex. Of interest, the concave surfaces of the gut tube correlate with expression of the LR gene, Pitx2, and ectopic Pitx2 mRNA induces ectopic concavities in a localized manner. A morphometric comparison of the prospective concave and convex surfaces of the gut tube reveals striking disparities in their rate of elongation but no significant differences in cell proliferation. These results provide insight into the nature of symmetry-breaking morphogenetic events during left-right asymmetric organ development. ?? 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Comparative study on open system digestion and microwave assisted digestion methods for metal determination in shrimp sludge compost.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Keivan; Abu Bakar, Nor Kartini; Bin Abas, Mhd Radzi; Sobhanzadeh, Elham; Low, Kah Hin

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate two different digestion methods for the determination of the total concentration of metals (Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd) in shrimp sludge compost. The compost made from shrimp aquaculture sludge co-composted with organic materials (peat, crushed bark and manure) was used as an organic growing medium for crop. Open system digestion and microwave assisted digestion procedures were employed in sample preparation. Various combinations and volumes of hydrofluoric, nitric and hydrochloric acids were evaluated for the efficiency of both methods. A certified reference material (CRM 146) was used in the comparison of these two digestion methods. The results revealed a good agreement between both procedures and the certified valued. The best recoveries were found in the range between 95% and 99% for microwave assisted digestion with a mixture of 2 ml of HF, 6 ml of HNO(3) and 2 ml of HCl. This procedure was recommended as the method for digestion the compost herein based on the recovery analysis and time taken. PMID:20638781

  17. Expression Patterns Suggest that Despite Considerable Functional Redundancy, Galectin-4 and -6 Play Distinct Roles in Normal and Damaged Mouse Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Maurer, Marie; Netter, Pierre; Higuet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The galectin-4 protein is mostly expressed in the digestive tract and is associated with lipid raft stabilization, protein apical trafficking, wound healing, and inflammation. While most mammalian species, including humans, have a single Lgals4 gene, some mice have two paralogues: Lgals4 and Lgals6. So far, their significant similarities have hindered the analysis of their respective expression and function. We took advantage of two antibodies that discriminate between the galectin-4 and galectin-6 proteins to document their patterns of expression in the normal and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-damaged digestive tract in the mouse. In the normal digestive tract, their pattern of expression from tongue to colon is quite similar, which suggests functional redundancy. However, the presence of galectin-4, but not galectin-6, in the lamina propria of the DSS-damaged colon, its association with luminal colonic bacteria, and differences in subcellular localization of these proteins suggest that they also have distinct roles in the normal and the damaged mouse digestive tract. Our results provide a rare example of ancestral and derived functions evolving after tandem gene duplication. PMID:23360694

  18. Mouse Genome Editing using CRISPR/Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou

    2015-01-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much faster than the previously used techniques and more importantly multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models. PMID:25271839

  19. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  20. Small scale units testing low cost anaerobic digestion (AD) systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the potential for low technology and low cost digesters for small dairies, BARC and researchers from the University of Maryland installed six modified Taiwanese-model field-scale (FS) digesters near the original dairy manure digester. The FS units receive the same post-separated liquid ...

  1. Primary mouse hepatocytes for systems biology approaches: a standardized in vitro system for

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Jens

    Primary mouse hepatocytes for systems biology approaches: a standardized in vitro system for the preparation and cultivation of primary mouse hepatocytes. To reliably monitor the dynamic induction was studied in the in vitro system. Thus, the mouse hepatocyte in vitro system provides an important basis

  2. Is the food-entrainable circadian oscillator in the digestive system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, A. J.; Poole, A. S.; Yamazaki, S.; Menaker, M.

    2003-01-01

    Food-anticipatory activity (FAA) is the increase in locomotion and core body temperature that precedes a daily scheduled meal. It is driven by a circadian oscillator but is independent of the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Recent results that reveal meal-entrained clock gene expression in rat and mouse peripheral organs raise the intriguing possibility that the digestive system is the site of the feeding-entrained oscillator (FEO) that underlies FAA. We tested this possibility by comparing FAA and Per1 rhythmicity in the digestive system of the Per1-luciferase transgenic rat. First, rats were entrained to daytime restricted feeding (RF, 10 days), then fed ad libitum (AL, 10 days), then food deprived (FD, 2 days). As expected FAA was evident during RF and disappeared during subsequent AL feeding, but returned at the correct phase during deprivation. The phase of Per1 in liver, stomach and colon shifted from a nocturnal to a diurnal peak during RF, but shifted back to nocturnal phase during the subsequent AL and remained nocturnal during food deprivation periods. Second, rats were entrained to two daily meals at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0400 and ZT 1600. FAA to both meals emerged after about 10days of dual RF. However, all tissues studied (all five liver lobes, esophagus, antral stomach, body of stomach, colon) showed entrainment consistent with only the night-time meal. These two results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that FAA arises as an output of rhythms in the gastrointestinal (GI) system. The results also highlight an interesting diversity among peripheral oscillators in their ability to entrain to meals and the direction of the phase shift after RF ends.

  3. Relationships between Digestive, Circulatory, and Urinary Systems in Portuguese Primary Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Graça S.; Clèment, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 63 Portuguese primary schoolbooks (1920-2005) were analyzed. The analysis focused on text information (reference to blood absorption and association of the digestive system to other human systems) and on information from images (presence or absence of image "confusion" (when the sequence of the digestive tract is not…

  4. Volume ratios between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion system affect their performance and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wen; Zhang, Wenfei; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-25

    An experimental temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system, with the thermophilic digester operated at neutral pH and with a balanced acidogenesis and methanogenesis (referred to as NT-TPAD), was evaluated with respect to the microbial communities and population dynamics of methanogens when digesting dairy cattle manure at 15-day overall system hydraulic retention time (HRT). When fed a manure slurry of 10% total solid (TS), similar system performance, 36-38% volatile solid (VS) removal and 0.21-0.22L methaneg(-1) VS fed, was achieved between a 5-day and 7.5-day HRT for the thermophilic digester. However, the thermophilic digester achieved a greater volumetric biogas yield when operated at a 5-day RT than at a 7.5-day HRT (6.3 vs. 4.7L/L/d), while the mesophilic digester had a stable volumetric biogas yield (about 1.0L/L/d). Each of the digesters harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, and some of the methanogens were significantly correlated with methane productions. Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta were the most important methanogenic genera in the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters, respectively. The microbiological findings may help understand the metabolism that underpins the anaerobic processes within each of the two digesters of TPAD systems when fed dairy manure. PMID:26232524

  5. Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

  6. Effect of organic loading on the microbiota in a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Abraham, Christopher; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-10-01

    Temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) has gained increasing attention because it provides the flexibility to operate digesters under conditions that enhance overall digester performance. However, research on impact of organic overloading rate (OLR) to microbiota of TPAD systems was limited. In this study, we investigated the composition and successions of the microbiota in both the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a laboratory-scale TPAD system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey before and during organic overloading. The thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters were operated at 50 and 35 °C, respectively, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days for each digester. High OLR (dairy manure with 5 % total solid and waste whey of ?60.4 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/l/day) resulted in decrease in pH and in biogas production and accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the thermophilic digester, while the mesophilic digester remained unchanged except a transient increase in biogas production. Both denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons showed dramatic change in microbiota composition and profound successions of both bacterial and methanogenic communities. During the overloading, Thermotogae was replaced by Proteobacteria, while Methanobrevibacter and archaeon classified as WCHD3-02 grew in predominance at the expense of Methanoculleus in the thermophilic digester, whereas Methanosarcina dominated the methanogenic community, while Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter became less predominant in the mesophilic digester. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that digester temperature and pH were the most influential environmental factors that explained much of the variations of the microbiota in this TPAD system when it was overloaded. PMID:26084892

  7. Blocking c-myc and stat3 by E. coli expressed and enzyme digested siRNA in mouse melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Jie; Zhao Yingchun; Huang Weida . E-mail: whuang@fudan.edu.cn

    2006-09-22

    Tumour cells often show alteration in the signal-transduction pathways, leading to proliferation in response to external signals. Oncogene overexpression and constitutive expression is a common phenomenon in the development and progression of many human cancers. Therefore oncogenes provide potential targets for cancer therapy. RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA), silences genes with a high degree of specificity and potentially represents a general approach for molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapy. The data presented in this report evaluated the method of systemically administering combined esiRNAs to multiple targets as compared with the method of using a single kind of esiRNA to a single target. Our experimental data revealed that the mixed treatment of esiC-MYC and esiSTAT3 had a better inhibition effect than the single treatment of esiC-MYC or esiSTAT3 on mouse B16 melanoma.

  8. Ontogeny of the digestive system of the Octopus bimaculatus paralarvae (Verril, 1883).

    PubMed

    López-Peraza, Diana Judith; Hernández-Rodríguez, Mónica; Barón-Sevilla, Benjamín

    2014-01-01

    The high mortalities registered in the larval stage during octopus culturing are mainly due to nutritional deficiencies of the food provided. To understand the cause of this problem, we studied the ontogenetic development of the digestive system of Octopus bimaculatus paralarvae. An egg batch was obtained from a gravid female collected in the Bay of Los Angeles, Baja California, Mexico, and it was incubated in the laboratory during the summer of 2011. We observed that the formation of the digestive system began at 33 days post-laying (DPL). The newly hatched paralarvae had already formed the organs involved in food ingestion and digestion, although it was not possible to know accurately their degree of maturity. The present research constitutes the first description at the histological level of the ontogenic development of the digestive system of the O. bimaculatus paralarvae. This serves as a basis for future studies of the digestive physiology of this species. PMID:24683531

  9. Structure and function of the digestive system of solen grandis dunker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiuzhen, Sheng; Wenbin, Zhan; Sulian, Ren

    2003-10-01

    Structure and function of the digestive system of a bivalve mollusc, Solen grandis, were studied using light microscopy and histochemical methods. The wall of digestive tube consists of four layers: the mucosal epithelium, connective tissue, muscular and fibrosa or serosa (only in the portion of rectum) from the inner to the outer. The ciliated columnar epithelial cells, dispersed by cup-shaped mucous cells, rest on a thin base membrane. There are abundant blood spaces in connective tissue layer. The digestive diverticula are composed of multi-branched duct and digestive tubules. The digestive tubules are lined with digestive and basophilic secretory cells, and surrounded by a layer of smooth muscle fibers and connective tissues. Activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases, esterase and lipase are detected in the digestive cells, and the epithelia of stomach and intestine, suggesting that these cells are capable of intracellular digesting of food materials and absorbing. Besides, acid phosphatase and esterase activities are present in the posterior portion of esophagus. Phagocytes are abundant in blood spaces and the lumens of stomach and intestine, containing brown granules derived from the engulfed food materials. The present work indicates that phagocytes play important roles in ingestion and digestion of food materials, which is supported as well by the activities of acid phosphatase, esterase and lipase detected in blood spaces.

  10. Effects of dietary components on cancer of the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Sara; Marzotto, Marta; Giovinazzo, Francesco; Bassi, Claudio; Bellavite, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in developed countries and poor diet and physical inactivity are major risk factors in cancer-related deaths. Therefore, interventions to reduce levels of smoking, improve diet, and increase physical activity must become much higher priorities in the general population's health and health care systems. The consumption of fruit and vegetables exerts a preventive effect towards cancer and in recent years natural dietary agents have attracted great attention in the scientific community and among the general public. Foods, such as tomatoes, olive oil, broccoli, garlic, onions, berries, soy bean, honey, tea, aloe vera, grapes, rosemary, basil, chili peppers, carrots, pomegranate, and curcuma contain active components that can influence the initiation and the progression of carcinogenesis, acting on pathways implied in cell proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis. The present review illustrates the main foods and their active components, including their antioxidant, cytotoxic, and pro-apoptotic properties, with a particular focus on the evidence related to cancers of the digestive system. PMID:24841279

  11. Mouse vocal communication system: are ultrasounds learned or innate?

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are often used as behavioral readouts of internal states, to measure effects of social and pharmacological manipulations, and for behavioral phenotyping of mouse models for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms of rodent USV production. Here we discuss the available data to assess whether male mouse song behavior and the supporting brain circuits resemble those of known vocal non-learning or vocal learning species. Recent neurobiology studies have demonstrated that the mouse USV brain system includes motor cortex and striatal regions, and that the vocal motor cortex sends a direct sparse projection to the brainstem vocal motor nucleus ambiguous, a projection thought be unique to humans among mammals. Recent behavioral studies have reported opposing conclusions on mouse vocal plasticity, including vocal ontogeny changes in USVs over early development that might not be explained by innate maturation processes, evidence for and against a role for auditory feedback in developing and maintaining normal mouse USVs, and evidence for and against limited vocal imitation of song pitch. To reconcile these findings, we suggest that the trait of vocal learning may not be dichotomous but encompass a broad set of behavioral and neural traits we call the continuum hypothesis, and that mice possess some of the traits associated with a capacity for limited vocal learning. PMID:23295209

  12. AN IMPROVEMENT TO THE MOUSE COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cast or risk analysis equations. It was especially intended for use by individuals with l...

  13. Digestive system development and study of acid and alkaline protease digestive capacities using biochemical and molecular approaches in totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi) larvae.

    PubMed

    Galaviz, Mario A; López, Lus M; García Gasca, Alejandra; Álvarez González, Carlos Alfonso; True, Conal D; Gisbert, Enric

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to describe and understand the development of the digestive system in totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi) larvae from hatching to 40 days post-hatch (dph) from morphological and functional perspectives. At hatch, the digestive system of totoaba was undifferentiated. The anus and the mouth opened at 4 and 5 dph, respectively. During exogenous feeding, development of the esophagus, pancreas, liver and intestine was observed with a complete differentiation of all digestive organs. Expression and activity of trypsin and chymotrypsin were observed as early as at 1 dph, and increments in their expression and activity coincided with changes in food items (live and compound diets) and morpho-physiological development of the accessory digestive glands. In contrast, pepsin was detected later during development, which includes the appearance of the gastric glands between 24 and 28 dph. One peak in gene expression was detected at 16 dph, few days before the initial development of the stomach at 20 dph. A second peak of pepsin expression was detected at day 35, followed by a peak of activity at day 40, coinciding with the change from live to artificial food. Totoaba larvae showed a fully morphologically developed digestive system between 24 and 28 dph, as demonstrated by histological observations. However, gene expression and activity of alkaline and acid proteases were detected earlier, indicating the functionality of the exocrine pancreas and stomach before the complete morphological development of the digestive organs. These results showed that integrative studies are needed to fully understand the development of the digestive system from a morphological and functional point of views, since the histological organization of digestive structures does not reflect their real functionality. These results indicate that the digestive system of totoaba develops rapidly during the first days post-hatch, especially for alkaline proteases, and the stomach becomes functional between 20 and 24 dph allowing the weaning process to begin at this age. PMID:25987008

  14. Digestive system and Body Cavities Know the boundaries and contents of each of the divisions of the body

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Digestive system and Body Cavities Objectives Know the boundaries and contents of each of the divisions of the body cavities and the mediastinum Be able to define the serosa of each of the divisions of the body cavities Know the tissue layers of the digestive tract Know the parts and functions of digestive

  15. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  16. Optimisation of sewage sludge anaerobic digestion through co-digestion with OFMSW: Effect of collection system and particle size.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Gracia; Bonmatí, August; Fernández, Belén

    2015-09-01

    The effect of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) loading rate and particulate size on the sewage sludge (SS) mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion was assessed in continuous stirred tank reactor at hydraulic retention time of 20days. The SS-OFMSW mixture composed by 54% of the volatile solids fed (inlet-VS), at OLR of 3.1kgCODm(-3)d(-1) (1.9kgVSm(-3)d(-1)), showed the highest increment on the volumetric methane production and yield of +200% and +59% respectively, under stable conditions. The effect of particulate size was assessed with the same mixture and same operational conditions but reducing the OFMSW particulate size from 20mm to 8mm with the aim to improve the hydrolysis step, but the results showed any influence in the OFMSW particulate size range analysed. In addition, specific biomass activity was assessed at the end of each co-digestion period. Results showed that OFMSW promoted ?-oxidation syntrophic acetogens and the acetoclastic methanogens activity; although the last increase of the OFMSW percentage (from 47% to 54% inlet-VS) affected negatively the specific substrate activity, but not inhibitory effect was observed. Therefore, the results obtained in the continuous experiment could be related with some inhibitory or toxic effect and not due to hydrolysis limitation. The specific biomass activity test was demonstrated to be an interesting tool to evaluate and control the co-digestion process, especially when conventional parameters did not explain the behaviour of the biological system. PMID:26139136

  17. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, S.; Karimi-Jashni, A.; Sartaj, M.

    2010-06-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

  18. Dynamics of digestive proteolytic system during blood feeding of the hard tick Ixodes ricinus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ticks are vectors of a wide variety of pathogens causing severe diseases in humans and domestic animals. Intestinal digestion of the host blood is an essential process of tick physiology and also a limiting factor for pathogen transmission since the tick gut represents the primary site for pathogen infection and proliferation. Using the model tick Ixodes ricinus, the European Lyme disease vector, we have previously demonstrated by genetic and biochemical analyses that host blood is degraded in the tick gut by a network of acidic peptidases of the aspartic and cysteine classes. Results This study reveals the digestive machinery of the I. ricinus during the course of blood-feeding on the host. The dynamic profiling of concentrations, activities and mRNA expressions of the major digestive enzymes demonstrates that the de novo synthesis of peptidases triggers the dramatic increase of the hemoglobinolytic activity along the feeding period. Overall hemoglobinolysis, as well as the activity of digestive peptidases are negligible at the early stage of feeding, but increase dramatically towards the end of the slow feeding period, reaching maxima in fully fed ticks. This finding contradicts the established opinion that blood digestion is reduced at the end of engorgement. Furthermore, we show that the digestive proteolysis is localized intracellularly throughout the whole duration of feeding. Conclusions Results suggest that the egressing proteolytic system in the early stage of feeding and digestion is a potential target for efficient impairment, most likely by blocking its components via antibodies present in the host blood. Therefore, digestive enzymes are promising candidates for development of novel 'anti-tick' vaccines capable of tick control and even transmission of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:21156061

  19. The effect of 1-week feed restriction on performance, digestibility of nutrients and digestive system development in the growing rabbit.

    PubMed

    T?mová, E; Volek, Z; Chodová, D; Härtlová, H; Makovický, P; Svobodová, J; Ebeid, T A; Uhlí?ová, L

    2016-01-01

    A 3 to 4 week feed restriction of about 20% to 25% of the free intake is widely applied in rabbit breeding systems to reduce post-weaning digestive disorders. However, a short intensive feed restriction is described in few studies and can be beneficial for growing rabbits due to a longer re-alimentation period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ad libitum (AL) and two restriction levels of feeding (50 and 65 g/rabbit per day) applied for 1 week on performance, gastrointestinal morphology and physiological parameters during the restriction and during the re-alimentation period. Rabbits were divided into three experimental groups: AL rabbits were fed AL, R1 rabbits were restricted from 42 to 49 days of age and received 50 g daily (29% of AL) and R2 rabbits were restricted at the same age and were fed 65 g of feed daily (37% of AL). In the 1st week after weaning and in the weeks after restriction, all the groups were fed AL. During the restriction period, daily weight gain (DWG) in R1 significantly dropped to 11% (experiment 1) and 5% (experiment 2) compared with rabbits in the AL group, although they were fed 29% of AL, whereas in the R2 group it decreased to 20% (experiment 1) and 10% (experiment 2). In the week following feed restriction, DWG in the restricted groups increased (P<0.001) to 166% and 148% in R1 and to 128% and 145% in R2. Restricted rabbits in both the experiments reached up to 90% to 93% of the final live weight (70 days) of the AL group. Over the entire experimental period, feed restriction significantly decreased feed intake to 85% to 88% of the AL group; however, the feed conversion ratio was lower (P<0.05) only in experiment 1 (-6% in R1 and -4% in R2). Digestibilities of CP and fat were not significantly higher during the restriction period and during the 1st week of re-alimentation compared with the AL group. Significant interactions between feeding regime and age revealed the shortest large intestine in the AL group at 49 days of age and the longest at 70 days in the AL and R1 groups. Small intestinal villi were significantly higher and the crypts were significantly deeper in the restricted groups. It could be concluded that short intensive feed restriction increased digestible area in the small and large intestines, including the height of villi and depth of crypts, which might be involved in the compensatory growth and defence mechanism. PMID:26677933

  20. The role of hypoxia-inducible factor-2 in digestive system cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Du, F; Shen, G; Zheng, F; Xu, B

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an all but ubiquitous phenomenon in cancers. Two known hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), HIF-1? and HIF-2?, primarily mediate the transcriptional response to hypoxia. Despite the high homology between HIF-1? and HIF-2?, emerging evidence suggests differences between both molecules in terms of transcriptional targets as well as impact on multiple physiological pathways and tumorigenesis. To date, much progress has been made toward understanding the roles of HIF-2? in digestive system cancers. Indeed, HIF-2? has been shown to regulate multiple aspects of digestive system cancers, including cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis, metabolism, metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. These findings make HIF-2? a critical regulator of this malignant phenotype. Here we summarize the function of HIF-2 during cancer development as well as its contribution to tumorigenesis in digestive system malignancies. PMID:25590810

  1. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  2. Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

  3. Early warning indicators for monitoring the process failure of anaerobic digestion system of food waste.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; He, Qingming; Wei, Yunmei; He, Qin; Peng, Xuya

    2014-11-01

    To determine reliable state parameters which could be used as early warning indicators of process failure due to the acidification of anaerobic digestion of food waste, three mesophilic anaerobic digesters of food waste with different operation conditions were investigated. Such parameters as gas production, methane content, pH, concentrations of volatile fatty acid (VFA), alkalinity and their combined indicators were evaluated. Results revealed that operation conditions significantly affect the responses of parameters and thus the optimal early warning indicators of each reactor differ from each other. None of the single indicators was universally valid for all the systems. The universally valid indicators should combine several parameters to supply complementary information. A combination of total VFA, the ratio of VFA to total alkalinity (VFA/TA) and the ratio of bicarbonate alkalinity to total alkalinity (BA/TA) can reflect the metabolism of the digesting system and realize rapid and effective early warning. PMID:25218457

  4. A robust automated system elucidates mouse home cage behavioral structure

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Evan H.; Schenk, A. Katrin; Juneja, Punita; MacKay, Adrienne W.; Wade, Jennifer M.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of behavior exhibited by mice in their home cages reflect the function and interaction of numerous behavioral and physiological systems. Detailed assessment of these patterns thus has the potential to provide a powerful tool for understanding basic aspects of behavioral regulation and their perturbation by disease processes. However, the capacity to identify and examine these patterns in terms of their discrete levels of organization across diverse behaviors has been difficult to achieve and automate. Here, we describe an automated approach for the quantitative characterization of fundamental behavioral elements and their patterns in the freely behaving mouse. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by identifying unique features of home cage behavioral structure and changes in distinct levels of behavioral organization in mice with single gene mutations altering energy balance. The robust, automated, reproducible quantification of mouse home cage behavioral structure detailed here should have wide applicability for the study of mammalian physiology, behavior, and disease. PMID:19106295

  5. Histological development of the digestive system of the Amazonian pimelodid catfish Pseudoplatystoma punctifer.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, E; Moreira, C; Castro-Ruiz, D; Oztürk, S; Fernández, C; Gilles, S; Nuñez, J; Duponchelle, F; Tello, S; Renno, J F; García-Dávila, C; Darias, M J

    2014-11-01

    The organogenesis of the digestive system was described in the Amazonian pimelodid catfish species Pseudoplatystoma punctifer from hatching (3.5 mm total length, TL) to 41 days post-fertilization (dpf) (58.1 mm TL) reared at 28°C. Newly hatched larvae showed a simple digestive tract, which appeared as a straight undifferentiated and unfolded tube lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells (future enterocytes). During the endogenous feeding period, comprised between 20 and 96 h post-fertilization (3.5 to 6.1 mm TL), the larval digestive system experienced a fast transformation with the almost complete development and differentiation of most of digestive organs (buccopahrynx, oesophagus, intestine, liver and exocrine pancreas). Yolk reserves were not completely depleted at the onset of exogenous feeding (4 dpf, 6.1 mm TL), and a period of mixed nutrition was observed up to 6 to 7 dpf (6.8 to 7.3 mm TL) when yolk was definitively exhausted. The stomach was the organ that latest achieved its complete differentiation, characterized by the development of abundant gastric glands in the fundic stomach between 10 and 15 dpf (10.9 to 15.8 mm TL) and the formation of the pyloric sphincter at the junction of the pyloric stomach and the anterior intestine at 15 dpf (15.8 mm TL). The above-mentioned morphological and histological features observed suggested the achievement of a digestive system characteristic of P. punctifer juveniles and adults. The ontogeny of the digestive system in P. punctifer followed the same general pattern as in most Siluriform species so far, although some species-specific differences in the timing of differentiation of several digestive structures were noted, which might be related to different reproductive guilds, egg and larval size or even different larval rearing practices. According to present findings on the histological development of the digestive system in P. punctifer, some recommendations regarding the rearing practices of this species are also provided in order to improve the actual larval rearing techniques of this fast-growing Neotropical catfish species. PMID:25045855

  6. Objectives -Urogenital System and Hernia why are the urinary, reproductive, and digestive systems in such close proximity?

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Objectives - Urogenital System and Hernia why are the urinary, reproductive, and digestive systems ? Reproductive System what are "secondary" sexual characters? knowledge of the homologous parts of the reproductive systems and genitalia of the two sexes will form the basis of understanding of how the sexes

  7. AN ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS TISSUE DIGESTION SYSTEM FOR A BSL-3-AG CONTAINMENT FACILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alkaline hydrolysis tissue digestion system was installed at the Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research Laboratory (ABADRL) Biosafety Level (BSL) 3-AG containment facility in 2000 to replace the antiquated pathologic waste incinerator because of significant costs for upgrading this incinerator ...

  8. Modification of digestive system microbiome of lactating dairy cows by feeding Bovamine: effect on ruminal fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the immune modulatory effects as well as effects on productivity of Bovamine® (Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 and Probionibacterium freudenreichii) on the digestive system microbiome of dairy cattle during late lactation (average DIM = 202). To unveil the underlying mechanisms, ...

  9. The Effects of Swedish Knife Model on Students' Understanding of the Digestive System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrah Ozsevgec, Lale; Artun, Huseyin; Unal, Melike

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of Swedish Knife Model on students' understanding of digestive system. A simple experimental design (pretest-treatment-posttest) was used in the study and internal comparison of the results of the one group was made. The sample consisted of 40 7th grade Turkish students whose ages range from 13 to 15.…

  10. 38 CFR 4.114 - Schedule of ratings-digestive system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-digestive system. 4.114 Section 4.114 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... will be considered when there is history of operative or other traumatic or infectious...

  11. Post Tenure Faculty Development: Building a System of Faculty Improvement and Appreciation. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstete, Jeffrey

    This digest suggests post-tenure faculty development programs as a way to address pressures on the tenure system and calls for the elimination of tenure in higher education. The paper notes that tenure policies are being impacted by internal factors such as the uncapping of the mandatory retirement age and the aging of faculty, as well as by…

  12. Modeling a solar-heated anaerobic digester for the developing world using system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Johanna Lynn

    Much of the developing world lacks access to a dependable source of energy. Agricultural societies such as Mozambique and Papua New Guinea could sustain a reliable energy source through the microbacterial decomposition of animal and crop waste. Anaerobic digestion produces methane, which can be used directly for heating, cooking, and lighting. Adding a solar component to the digester provides a catalyst for bacteria activity, accelerating digestion and increasing biogas production. Using methane decreases the amount of energy expended by collecting and preparing firewood, eliminates hazardous health effects linked to inhalation of particles, and provides energy close to where it is needed. The purpose of this work is two fold: initial efforts focus on the development and validation of a computer-based system dynamics model that combines elements of the anaerobic digestion process in order to predict methane output; second, the model is flexed to explore how the addition of a solar component increases robustness of the design, examines predicted biogas generation as a function of varying input conditions, and determines how best to configure such systems for use in varying developing world environments. Therefore, the central components of the system: solar insolation, waste feedstock, bacteria population and consumption rates, and biogas production are related both conceptually and mathematically through a serious of equations, conversions, and a causal loop and feedback diagram. Given contextual constraints and initial assumptions for both locations, it was determined that solar insolation and subsequent digester temperature control, amount of waste, and extreme weather patterns had the most significant impact on the system as a whole. Model behavior was both reproducible and comparable to that demonstrated in existing experimental systems. This tool can thus be flexed to fit specific contexts within the developing world to improve the standard of living of many people, without significantly altering everyday activities.

  13. Molecular analysis of the digestive microbiota in a gnotobiotic mouse model during antibiotic treatment: Influence of Saccharomyces boulardii.

    PubMed

    Barc, Marie-Claude; Charrin-Sarnel, Céline; Rochet, Violaine; Bourlioux, François; Sandré, Catherine; Boureau, Hélène; Doré, Joël; Collignon, Anne

    2008-10-01

    The probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii is a non-pathogenic yeast that has been proven efficient in the prevention of antimicrobial-associated diarrhea and of Clostridium difficile associated colitis. We evaluated the influence of the administration of S. boulardii on the composition of the fecal microbiota in a human microbiota-associated mouse model. This evaluation was run before, during and after a 7-day oral treatment with amoxicillin clavulanic acid. Predominant groups of bacteria were quantified with fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with flow cytometry using group-specific 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes designed for the Eubacteria, Bacteroides-Porphyromonas-Prevotella, Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Clostridium histolyticum, Lactobacillus-Enterococcus and Enterobacteriaceae groups and Bifidobacterium species. S. boulardii did not quantitatively alter the total anaerobic microbiota nor the dominant bacterial groups. During the antibiotic treatment in the two groups of mice receiving the yeast or not, the level of Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides groups increased when the C. coccoides-E. rectale group decreased dramatically. After the antibiotic treatment was discontinued, the return to the initial level was reached more rapidly in the S. boulardii-treated mice than in the control mice (p<0.05) for the C. coccoides-E. rectale and Bacteroides-Porphyromonas-Prevotella groups. This quicker recovery of normal intestinal microbiota equilibrium after antibiotic therapy could be a mechanism for S. boulardii preventive effect on antibiotic-associated diarrhea in humans. PMID:18511310

  14. Finger mouse system based on computer vision in complex backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xiong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a human-computer interaction system and realizes a real-time virtual mouse. Our system emulates the dragging and selecting functions of a mouse by recognizing bare hands, hence the control style is simple and intuitive. A single camera is used to capture hand images and a DSP chip is embedded as the image processing platform. To deal with complex backgrounds, particularly where skin-like or moving objects appear, we develop novel hand recognition algorithms. Hand segmentation is achieved by skin color cue and background difference. Each input image is corrected according to the luminance and then skin color is extracted by Gaussian model. We employ a Camshift tracking algorithm which receives feedbacks from the recognition module. In fingertip recognition, a method combining template matching and circle drawing is proposed. Our system has advantages of good real-time performance, easy integration and energy conservation. Experiments show that the system is robust to the scaling and rotation of hands.

  15. Cogeneration system using digester gas for Macon-Bibb county water and sewerage authority

    SciTech Connect

    Priester, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    With rise in energy cost, there is renewed focus on alternate energy sources, and especially sources that previously were not feasible to utilize, but were readily available. One of these is methane gas generated in biomass conversion in wastewater treatment plant anaerobic digestion process. The gas generated has been historically wasted and only used where it has been convenient. Now it is economically feasible to engineer systems to make the best use of the gas. The combination of cogeneration and digester gas utilization is particularly attractive for medium to large wastewater treatment plants. This paper describes the system designed for the Poplar Street Water Pollution Control Plant of the Macon-Bibb County Water and Sewerage Authority. The system consists of gas collection, cleaning and drying systems, storage vessel, and a utilization system of gas turbine generators.

  16. An inducible and reversible mouse genetic rescue system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongkui; Horie, Kyoji; Madisen, Linda; Pavlova, Maria N; Gragerova, Galina; Rohde, Alex D; Schimpf, Brian A; Liang, Yuqiong; Ojala, Ethan; Kramer, Farah; Roth, Patricia; Slobodskaya, Olga; Dolka, Io; Southon, Eileen A; Tessarollo, Lino; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Gragerov, Alexander; Pavlakis, George N; Gaitanaris, George A

    2008-05-01

    Inducible and reversible regulation of gene expression is a powerful approach for uncovering gene function. We have established a general method to efficiently produce reversible and inducible gene knockout and rescue in mice. In this system, which we named iKO, the target gene can be turned on and off at will by treating the mice with doxycycline. This method combines two genetically modified mouse lines: a) a KO line with a tetracycline-dependent transactivator replacing the endogenous target gene, and b) a line with a tetracycline-inducible cDNA of the target gene inserted into a tightly regulated (TIGRE) genomic locus, which provides for low basal expression and high inducibility. Such a locus occurs infrequently in the genome and we have developed a method to easily introduce genes into the TIGRE site of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by recombinase-mediated insertion. Both KO and TIGRE lines have been engineered for high-throughput, large-scale and cost-effective production of iKO mice. As a proof of concept, we have created iKO mice in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene, which allows for sensitive and quantitative phenotypic analyses. The results demonstrated reversible switching of ApoE transcription, plasma cholesterol levels, and atherosclerosis progression and regression. The iKO system shows stringent regulation and is a versatile genetic system that can easily incorporate other techniques and adapt to a wide range of applications. PMID:18464897

  17. Systemic vasculitis: an annual critical digest of the most recent literature.

    PubMed

    Della Rossa, Alessandra; Cioffi, Elisa; Elefante, Elena; Ferro, Francesco; Parma, Alice; Vagelli, Roberta; Talarico, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Herewith we provide our annual digest of the recent literature on systemic vasculitis in which we reviewed all the articles published during the last 12 months on large-, medium- and small-vessel vasculitis, and selected the most relevant studies regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of systemic vasculitis. In particular, we focused the attention on giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis and cryoglobulinaemia. PMID:24854379

  18. Chromosomal organization of the herpes simplex virus genome during acute infection of the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Muggeridge, M I; Fraser, N W

    1986-01-01

    After corneal inoculation, herpes simplex virus type 1 replicates in the mouse eye, trigeminal ganglia, and brainstem, producing first an acute and then a latent infection. Previous work from this laboratory focused on the structure of the viral DNA in this system. We have now examined the structure of the viral genome at the chromosome level by using micrococcal nuclease digestion. Studies with disaggregated cell preparations made from the brainstems of acutely infected mice show that the majority of the viral DNA is in a nonnucleosomal form; however, a nucleosomelike fraction was also consistently detected. A similar result was obtained for viral DNA in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected C1300 (clone NA) neuroblastoma cells (a neuronal cell line). Images PMID:3016340

  19. Manganese Accumulation in the Mouse Ear Following Systemic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ci; Schneider, Scott N.; Miller, Marian; Nebert, Daniel W.; Lind, Caroline; Roda, Sandy M.; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Genter, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence in human populations that exposure to manganese (Mn), or Mn in combination with excessive noise exposure, results in hearing loss. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed expression of the metal transporters DMT1, ZIP8, and ZIP14 in control mouse ears. ZIP8 is known to have a high affinity (Km = 2.2 ?M) for Mn transport, and ZIP8 protein was localized to the blood vessels of the ear by immunohistochemistry. We treated mice (strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J) with Mn (100 mg/kg MnCl2, by subcutaneous injection, on three alternating days), and Mn was significantly elevated in the ears of the treated mice. Mn concentrations remained elevated over controls for at least 2 weeks after treatment. These studies demonstrate that metal transporters are present in the mouse ear and that Mn can accumulate in the ear following systemic exposure. Future studies should focus on whether Mn exposure is associated with hearing deficits. PMID:18972394

  20. Efficient and Specific Trypsin Digestion of Microgram to Nanogram Quantities of Proteins in Organic-Aqueous Solvent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Michael B; Tabb, Dave L; Hervey, IV, William Judson; Pan, Chongle; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2006-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based identification of the components of multiprotein complexes often involves solution-phase proteolytic digestion of the complex. The affinity purification of individual protein complexes often yields nanogram to low-microgram amounts of protein, which poses several challenges for enzymatic digestion and protein identification. We tested different solvent systems to optimize trypsin digestions of samples containing limited amounts of protein for subsequent analysis by LC-MS-MS. Data collected from digestion of 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2- g portions of a protein standard mixture indicated that an organicaqueous solvent system containing 80% acetonitrile consistently provided the most complete digestion, producing more peptide identifications than the other solvent systems tested. For example, a 1-h digestion in 80% acetonitrile yielded over 52% more peptides than the overnight digestion of 1 g of a protein mixture in purely aqueous buffer. This trend was also observed for peptides from digested ribosomal proteins isolated from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In addition to improved digestion efficiency, the shorter digestion times possible with the organic solvent also improved trypsin specificity, resulting in smaller numbers of semitryptic peptides than an overnight digestion protocol using an aqueous solvent. The technique was also demonstrated for an affinityisolated protein complex, GroEL. To our knowledge, this report is the first using mass spectrometry data to show a linkage between digestion solvent and trypsin specificity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a widely used method for studying proteins, protein complexes, and whole proteomes because of innovations in soft ionization techniques, bioinformatics, and chromatographic separation techniques.1-7 An example of a high-throughput mass spectrometry strategy commonly used for this purpose is a variation of the "shotgun" approach, involving in-solution digestion of a protein complex followed by onedimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) MS-MS.6-8 One of the applications of this method is for characterizing multiprotein complexes by identifying large numbers of proteins in a single data acquisition.9 Large-scale implementations of this strategy have been reported for yeast and Escherichia coli.10-12 To achieve a goal of characterizing large numbers of protein complexes13 isolated by affinity purification from Rhodopseudomonas palustris,14 an efficient protocol for digesting these complexes is required.

  1. Quiz Making Activities Using the Multi-Mouse Quiz System in an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Juan; Mori, Mikihiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Kita, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Mouse Quiz System is an application used to treat quizzes in a classroom or other learning environment. The system comprises the Multi Mouse Quiz (MMQ) and MMQEditor. The MMQ is an application of Single Display Groupware (SDG), which enables multiple users to answer quizzes by connecting several mice to an ordinary computer. The…

  2. Validation of a digestion system using a digester block/cold finger system for the determination of lead in vegetable foods by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, Robson M; Junior, Mario M S; Matos, Geraldo D; Dos Santos, Ana M P; Ferreira, Sérgio L C

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the validation of a system for sample digestion using a digester block/cold finger to determine the lead content in vegetables by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After mineralization, lead contents were determined by ETAAS using a calibration curve based on aqueous standards prepared in 2.60 M nitric acid solutions containing 5 microg ammonium phosphate as chemical modifier. A pyrolysis temperature of 900 degrees C and atomization temperature of 2000 degrees C were used. This method allowed the determination of lead with a characteristic mass of 35 pg; LOD and LOQ of 0.6 and 2 nglg, respectively, were found. The precision was investigated in terms of reproducibility and repeatability. Reproducibility was estimated by analysis of nine different portions of a certified reference material (CRM) of spinach leaves, and the repeatability was determined through the analysis of nine aliquots of the same solution. The reproducibility and repeatability were found to be 4.27 and 2.94% RSD, respectively. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of whole meal flour, spinach leaves, and orchard leaves CRMs, all furnished by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Lead contents were measured using the newly developed technique in 11 different potato samples. The lead contents ranged from 12.80 to 69.27 ng/g, with an average value of 28.59 ng/g. These values were in agreement with data reported in the literature. PMID:21797023

  3. Student Tracking Systems in Community Colleges. ERIC Digest, September 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quimbita, Grace

    Student tracking systems are enabling increasing numbers of community colleges to respond to external demands for accountability with tangible measurements of student progress and institutional outcomes. Several recent trends in marketing, accountability, communications with students, and internal competition for resources have prompted interest…

  4. Predictive role of XRCC5/XRCC6 genotypes in digestive system cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Due; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Tsou, Yung-An; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Bau, Da-Tian

    2011-01-01

    Cancers are a worldwide concern; oral, esophageal and gastrointestinal cancers represent important causes of cancer-related mortality and contribute to a significant burden of human health. The DNA repair systems are the genome caretakers, playing a critical role in the initiation and progression of cancers. However, the association between the genomic variations of DNA repair genes and cancer susceptibility is not well understood. This review focuses on the polymorphic genotypes of the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair system, highlighting the role of two genes of this pathway, XRCC5 and XRCC6, in the susceptibility to digestive system cancers and discussing their potential contributions to personalized medicine. PMID:22224172

  5. Mouse Vocal Communication System: Are Ultrasounds Learned or Innate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are often used as behavioral readouts of internal states, to measure effects of social and pharmacological manipulations, and for behavioral phenotyping of mouse models for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms of rodent USV production.…

  6. MOUSE (MODULAR ORIENTED UNCERTAINTY SYSTEM): A COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM. OPERATIONAL MANUAL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm) deals with the problem of uncertainties in models that consist of one or more algebraic equations. It was especially designed for use by those with little or no knowledge of computer languages or programming. It is compact (and thus can...

  7. Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by bacteria (such as Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter , or E. coli ), or by intestinal parasites (such as amebiasis and ... Reflux Peptic Ulcers Lactose Intolerance Celiac Disease Indigestion E. Coli Inflammatory Bowel Disease Have You Heard of GERD? ...

  8. Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system

    SciTech Connect

    Stabnikova, O. Liu, X.Y.; Wang, J.Y.

    2008-07-01

    The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24 h at -20 deg. C and then thawed for 12 h at 25 deg. C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 deg. C for 1 h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 deg. C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 deg. C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

  9. On the Morphology of the Digestive System of Two Monomorium Ant Species

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Daniel Russ; Rossi, Mônica Lanzoni; Fox, Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson; Nogueira, Neusa de Lima; Tanaka, Francisco André Ossamu; Bueno, Odair Correa

    2013-01-01

    The digestive system of adults and mature larvae of two ant species of Monomorium Mayr (Hymoneptera: Formicidae) were described with the aid of light and scanning electron microscopy, as there is a lack of studies in this area. These two ant species are recurrently found in urban habitats and are known as ‘tramp species,’ as they cause problems in households, businesses, and hospitals. The most interesting finds of the present study include the existence of spinules in the crop of adults, and the number of Malpighian tubules and rectal pads was constant among different castes, ages, and species. PMID:24224520

  10. On the morphology of the digestive system of two Monomorium ant species.

    PubMed

    Solis, Daniel Russ; Rossi, Mônica Lanzoni; Fox, Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson; Nogueira, Neusa de Lima; Tanaka, Francisco André Ossamu; Bueno, Odair Correa

    2013-01-01

    The digestive system of adults and mature larvae of two ant species of Monomorium Mayr (Hymoneptera: Formicidae) were described with the aid of light and scanning electron microscopy, as there is a lack of studies in this area. These two ant species are recurrently found in urban habitats and are known as 'tramp species,' as they cause problems in households, businesses, and hospitals. The most interesting finds of the present study include the existence of spinules in the crop of adults, and the number of Malpighian tubules and rectal pads was constant among different castes, ages, and species. PMID:24224520

  11. [Digestive system functioning during simulation of the microgravity effects on humans by immersion].

    PubMed

    Afonin, B V; Sedova, E A

    2009-01-01

    Functioning of the digestive system was investigated in 10 volunteers for 7-day dry immersion. The experimental conditions were found to raise secretory activities of the stomach, pancreas and liver, and to increase spectral indices of the GI electrical activity on the background of a higher than usual insular secretion and lowered gastrin secretion. The elevated GI electrical activities and changes in their ratios were a fallout of the increased gastric secretion and elevated intestines tone in fasting test-subjects and displayed a close similarity to the changes induced by caffeine stimulation, long-term bed rest or space flight. PMID:19462782

  12. FGF signaling facilitates postinjury recovery of mouse hematopoietic system

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Ross, Jason T.; Itkin, Tomer; Perry, John M.; Venkatraman, Aparna; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Hembree, Mark J.; Deng, Chu-Xia; Lapidot, Tsvee; He, Xi C.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling promotes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion in vitro. However, it is unknown whether FGF promotes HSPC expansion in vivo. Here we examined FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) expression and investigated its in vivo function in HSPCs. Conditional knockout (CKO) of Fgfr1 did not affect phenotypical number of HSPCs and homeostatic hematopoiesis, but led to a reduced engraftment only in the secondary transplantation. When treated with 5-fluorouracil (5FU), the Fgfr1 CKO mice showed defects in both proliferation and subsequent mobilization of HSPCs. We identified megakaryocytes (Mks) as a major resource for FGF production, and further discovered a novel mechanism by which Mks underwent FGF-FGFR signaling dependent expansion to accelerate rapid FGF production under stress. Within HSPCs, we observed an up-regulation of nuclear factor ?B and CXCR4, a receptor for the chemoattractant SDF-1, in response to bone marrow damage only in control but not in Fgfr1 CKO model, accounting for the corresponding defects in proliferation and migration of HSPCs. This study provides the first in vivo evidence that FGF signaling facilitates postinjury recovery of the mouse hematopoietic system by promoting proliferation and facilitating mobilization of HSPCs. PMID:22802336

  13. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as drug targets for diseases of the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 of the 30 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subunits are expressed by specific neurons and cells within the alimentary canal. They subserve important roles in taste, chemesthesis, mechanosensation, pain and hyperalgesia and contribute to the regulation of gastrointestinal motility, absorptive and secretory processes, blood flow, and mucosal homeostasis. In a cellular perspective, TRP channels operate either as primary detectors of chemical and physical stimuli, as secondary transducers of ionotropic or metabotropic receptors, or as ion transport channels. The polymodal sensory function of TRPA1, TRPM5, TRPM8, TRPP2, TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 enables the digestive system to survey its physical and chemical environment, which is relevant to all processes of digestion. TRPV5 and TRPV6 as well as TRPM6 and TRPM7 contribute to the absorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. TRPM7 participates in intestinal pacemaker activity, and TRPC4 transduces muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation to smooth muscle contraction. Changes in TRP channel expression or function are associated with a variety of diseases/disorders of the digestive system, notably gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pain and hyperalgesia in heartburn, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome, cholera, hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, esophageal, gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancer, and polycystic liver disease. These implications identify TRP channels as promising drug targets for the management of a number of gastrointestinal pathologies. As a result, major efforts are put into the development of selective TRP channel agonists and antagonists and the assessment of their therapeutic potential. PMID:21420431

  14. LONGEVITY AND VIABILITY OF Taenia solium EGGS IN THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM OF THE BEETLE Ammophorus rubripes

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis Antonio; Lopez-Urbina, Maria Teresa; Garcia, Hector Hugo; Gonzalez, Armando Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the capacity of Ammophorus rubripes beetles to carry Taenia solium eggs, in terms of duration and viability of eggs in their digestive system. One hundred beetles were distributed into five polyethylene boxes, and then they were infected with T. solium eggs. Gravid proglottids of T. solium were crushed and then mixed with cattle feces. One gram of this mixture was placed in each box for 24 hours, after which each group of beetles was transferred into a new clean box. Then, five beetles were dissected every three days. Time was strongly associated with viability (r=0.89; P<0.001) and the calculated time to cero viability is 36 days. The eggs in the intestinal system of each beetle were counted and tested for viability. Taenia solium eggs were present in the beetle’s digestive system for up to 39 days (13th sampling day out of 20), gradually reducing in numbers and viability, which was 0 on day 36 post-infection. Egg viability was around 40% up to day 24 post-infection, with a median number of eggs of 11 per beetle at this time. Dung beetles may potentially contribute towards dispersing T. solium eggs in endemic areas. PMID:24728368

  15. Fluorescence molecular imaging system with a novel mouse surface extraction method and a rotary scanning scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhu, Dianwen; Baikejiang, Reheman; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system, in which we utilized a phase shifting method to extract the mouse surface geometry optically and a rotary laser scanning approach to excite fluorescence molecules and acquire fluorescent measurements on the whole mouse body. Nine fringe patterns with a phase shifting of 2?/9 are projected onto the mouse surface by a projector. The fringe patterns are captured using a webcam to calculate a phase map that is converted to the geometry of the mouse surface with our algorithms. We used a DigiWarp approach to warp a finite element mesh of a standard digital mouse to the measured mouse surface thus the tedious and time-consuming procedure from a point cloud to mesh is avoided. Experimental results indicated that the proposed method is accurate with errors less than 0.5 mm. In the FMT imaging system, the mouse is placed inside a conical mirror and scanned with a line pattern laser that is mounted on a rotation stage. After being reflected by the conical mirror, the emitted fluorescence photons travel through central hole of the rotation stage and the band pass filters in a motorized filter wheel, and are collected by a CCD camera. Phantom experimental results of the proposed new FMT imaging system can reconstruct the target accurately.

  16. Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1 

    E-print Network

    Carter, Kristen

    2011-04-19

    restriction enzyme digestion, which creates unique 4 base overhangs to allow for sequential ligation of the cDNAs. Mutations that will not affect the coding sequence were introduced into these plasmid cDNA overhangs to make them compatible with MHV-A59...

  17. Immunohistochemical observations of methionine-enkephalin and delta opioid receptor in the digestive system of Octopus ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Sha, Ailong; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan

    2013-02-01

    The study was designed to determine whether methionine-enkephalin (met-Enk) or delta opioid receptor was present in the digestive system of Octopus ocellatus. The results showed that they were both in the bulbus oris, esophagus, crop, stomach, gastric cecum, intestine, posterior salivary glands of O. ocellatus, one of them, met-Enk in the rectum, anterior salivary glands, digestive gland. And the distributions were extensive in the digestive system. Strong or general met-Enk immunoreactivity was observed in the inner epithelial cells of the bulbus oris, esophagus, stomach, gastric cecum, intestine, anterior salivary glands and the adventitia of the intestine and rectum, and so was the delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in the inner epithelial cells of the bulbus oris, esophagus, and crop, however, they were weak in other parts. Combining with delta opioid receptor, met-Enk may be involved in the regulations of food intake, absorption, movement of gastrointestinal smooth muscle and secretion of digestive gland. The different densities of met-Enk and delta opioid receptor may be related to the different functions in the digestive system of O. ocellatus. PMID:22795872

  18. Prospective cohort study of tea consumption and risk of digestive system cancers: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study123

    PubMed Central

    Nechuta, Sarah; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Hui; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Data from in vitro and animal studies support a protective role for tea in the etiology of digestive system cancers; however, results from prospective cohort studies have been inconsistent. In addition, to our knowledge, no study has investigated the association of tea consumption with the incidence of all digestive system cancers in Chinese women. Objective: We investigated the association of regular tea intake (?3 times/wk for >6 mo) with risk of digestive system cancers. Design: We used the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort study of middle-aged and older Chinese women who were recruited in 1996–2000. Adjusted HRs and associated 95% CIs were derived from Cox regression models. Results: After a mean follow-up of 11 y, 1255 digestive system cancers occurred (stomach, esophagus, colorectal, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder/bile duct cancers) in 69,310 nonsmoking and non–alcohol-drinking women. In comparison with women who never drank tea, regular tea intake (mostly green tea) was associated with reduced risk of all digestive system cancers combined (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.98), and the reduction in risk increased as the amount and years of tea consumption increased (P-trend = 0.01 and P-trend < 0.01, respectively). For example, women who consumed ?150 g tea/mo (?2–3 cups/d) had a 21% reduced risk of digestive system cancers combined (HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.99). The inverse association was found primarily for colorectal and stomach/esophageal cancers. Conclusion: In this large prospective cohort study, tea consumption was associated with reduced risk of colorectal and stomach/esophageal cancers in Chinese women. PMID:23053557

  19. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in an electric-anaerobic system to increase methane production from sludge digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Wang, Liying; Quan, Xie

    2015-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between Geobacter species and Methanosaeta species is an alternative to interspecies hydrogen transfer (IHT) in anaerobic digester, which however has not been established in anaerobic sludge digestion as well as in bioelectrochemical systems yet. In this study, it was found that over 50% of methane production of an electric-anaerobic sludge digester was resulted from unknown pathway. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Geobacter species were significantly enriched with electrodes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) further confirmed that the dominant Geobacter species enriched belonged to Geobacter metallireducens. Together with Methanosaeta species prevailing in the microbial communities, the direct electron exchange between Geobacter species and Methanosaeta species might be an important reason for the “unknown” increase of methane production. Conductivity of the sludge in this electric-anaerobic digester was about 30% higher than that of the sludge in a control digester without electrodes. This study not only revealed for the first time that DIET might be the important mechanism on the methanogenesis of bioelectrochemical system, but also provided a new method to enhance DIET by means of bioelectric enrichment of Geobacter species. PMID:26057581

  20. Digestion Experiments. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1908-01-01

    STATION. ppp DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS G. S. FRAPS, PH. D., CHEMIST. POSTOFFICE COLLEGE SL'ATION, HRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. AUSTIN, TEXAS: \\'ON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRLNTEHP. 1908 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 8TArFIONS. OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD... OF CONTENTS . 1 . Digestibility of 1Caffir Corn. Milo Maize. and Molasses ....... G .................................... Ilcfinition of Terms 7 .................................. Method of Experiment 7 ............ Digestibility of Basal Ration of Meal...

  1. Marine biomass program: anaerobic digestion systems development and stability study. Final report 1 Feb-31 Dec 82

    SciTech Connect

    Fannin, K.F.; Srivastava, V.J.; Mensinger, J.D.; Chynoweth, D.P.

    1983-07-01

    Marine biomass represents a significant potential worldwide energy resource that can be converted to methane by anaerobic digestion. Through efficient biomass production, harvesting, and conversion techniques, competitive methane gas costs are achievable. The objective of this research project is to develop and define an anaerobic digestion process for producing methane from giant brown kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). Kelp continues to show superior performance as a feedstock for gas production when compared with other particulate biomass feedstocks. Further work on upflow solids reactors and two-phase reactor systems is expected to improve gas cost estimates over those made using other state-of-the-art reactors.

  2. Mortality from Cancers of the Digestive System among Grand Multiparous Women in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian K.; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance of grand multiparous (GM) status in the mortality from cancers of the digestive system among a cohort of GM women in Taiwan during the period 1978–2008. The study cohort consisted of 144,922 women with at least five children (GM women) in the Taiwan Birth Register between 1 January 1978 and 31 December 2003. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for cancers of the digestive system including esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, and pancreas were calculated by dividing the numbers of observed cancer deaths to the expected numbers of deaths based on the rates of national female population. Among the 144,922 GM women, a total of 23, 220, 213, 92, 397, and 65 deaths were caused by cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, and pancreas, respectively. The SMRs among GM women were 1.61 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.95–2.27) for esophageal cancer, 1.15 (95% CI: 1.00–1.31) for stomach cancer, 1.07 (95% CI: 0.93–1.22) for colon cancer, 0.94 (95% CI: 0.75–1.14) for rectal cancer, 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06–1.30) for liver cancer, and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.60–0.98) for pancreatic cancer. This study provides evidence that grand multiparity may confer a protective effect on the risk of death from pancreatic cancer. However, the results suggest that GM women may increase the risk of death from cancers of the liver and stomach. PMID:24758892

  3. The Journey of a Sandwich: Computer-Based Laboratory Experiments about the Human Digestive System in High School Biology Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgo, Andrej; Hajdinjak, Zdravka; Briski, Darko

    2008-01-01

    Teaching high school students about the digestive system can be a challenge for a teacher when s/he wants to overcome rote learning of facts without a deeper understanding of the physiological processes inside the alimentary tract. A series of model experiments illustrating the journey of a sandwich was introduced into teaching high school…

  4. What Happens to the Food We Eat? Children's Conceptions of the Structure and Function of the Digestive System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Francimar Martins

    2000-01-01

    Describes children's conceptions of the structure and function of the human digestive system based on an investigation carried out with children aged 4-10 (n=45). Finds that children possess biological knowledge as an independent knowledge domain from the age of four. Discusses acquisition of and barriers to scientific concepts related to human…

  5. The isolation and characterization of new C. thermocellum strains and the evaluation of multiple anaerobic digestion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wen

    The overall objective of my research was to improve the efficiencies of bioconversions that produce renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass. To this end, my studies addressed issues important to two promising strategies: consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and anaerobic digestion (AD). CBP achieves saccharolytic enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation in a single step and is considered to be the most cost-effective model. Anaerobic bacteria that can be used in CBP are highly desirable. To that end, two thermophilic and cellulolytic bacterial strains were isolated and characterized (Chapter 3). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, both strains CS7 and CS8 are closely related to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. However, they had significantly higher specific cellulase activities and ethanol/acetate ratios than C. thermocellum ATCC 27405. As a result, CS7 and CS8 are two new highly cellulolytic and ethanologenic C. thermocellum strains, with application potentials in research and development of CBP. As some of the most promising AD processes, two temperature-phased AD (TPAD) systems, in comparison with a thermophilic single-stage AD (TSAD) system and a mesophilic two-stage AD (MTAD) system, were studied in treating high-strength dairy cattle manure. The TPAD systems, with the thermophilic digesters acidified (AT-TPAD, Chapter 4) or operated at neutral pH (NT-TPAD, Chapter 5), were optimized at the thermophilic temperature of 50°C and a volume ratio between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of 1:2. Despite similar methane productions, the NT-TPAD system achieved significantly higher volatile solid (VS) removal than the AT-TPAD system and needed no external pH adjustments (Chapter 6). At the same overall OLR, the TSAD system achieved the highest performance, followed by the NT-TPAD and the MTAD systems (Chapter 7). Each digester harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, some of which were significantly correlated or associated with system performances. Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were the most important methanogenic genera in the digesters where intense hydrolysis/acidogenesis and methanogenesis occurred, while Methanosaeta established itself in the mesophilic digesters with sufficient retention time and low concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The populations of all the quantified methanogen genera (Methanobacterium, Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta , and Methanoculleus) were inversely correlated or associated with high concentrations of VFA. The results of DGGE and qPCR were confirmed and improved by the pyrosequencing data (Chapter 8). Different operation conditions led to the development of different microbial communities that resulted in the functional differences among AD systems. The bacterial community tended to be more diverse in the digesters with more lenient conditions. Firmicutes was a major phylum in each AD system and might be associated with system performance. Chloroflexi was a major phylum in each thermophilic digester with balanced hydrolysis/acidogenesis and methanogenesis, so it might be indicative of efficient operations of thermophilic digesters. Thermotogae only appeared as a major phylum in the AT-TPAD system and might be important to its performance. The results of my studies had impacts on the development of renewable bioenergy. On one hand, the two new thermophilic cellulolytic isolates may be further evaluated for development of CBP strains. On the other hand, the series of comparative and integrated studies of different AD systems provided new knowledge that may guide future research and development of AD systems, particularly TPAD systems. Furthermore, the correlation between system performances and microbial communities may help improve design and operation of AD in general.

  6. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  7. Modelling anaerobic digestion of concentrated black water and faecal matter in accumulation system.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek; Zeeman, Grietje; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic mathematical model based on anaerobic digestion model no. 1 (ADM1) was developed for accumulation (AC) system treating concentrated black water and faecal matter at different temperatures. The AC system was investigated for the treatment of waste (water) produced from the following systems: vacuum toilet for black water (VBW), vacuum toilet for faeces with urine separation (VF), dry toilet (DT), dry toilets for faeces with urine separation (DF), separated faecal matter from conventional black water by filter bag (FB). For evaluation of the AC system treating the proposed waste (water) sources at 20 and 35 degrees C, two options were studied: (1) The filling period of the AC system was constant for all waste (water) sources (either 1, 3 or 6 months) and for each period, the seed sludge volume was varied; (2) The volume of the AC system was constant for all proposed waste (water) sources. The results showed that the filling period of the AC system was the main parameter affecting the system performance, followed by operational temperature, while the increase of the seed sludge volume slightly enhanced the performance of the system. The model results indicated that the filling period of the AC system should be higher than 150 days for obtaining a stable performance. It was found that the hydrolysis of biodegradable particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD) is the rate limiting step, as volatile fatty acid concentration is very low in all experimental conditions (< 200 mgCOD/L at 20 degrees C and < 100 mgCOD/L at 35 degrees C). Based on the results of the two options, it was found that the concentrated waste (water) sources have better performance than the diluted waste (water) sources, like VBW waste (water). Furthermore, smaller volume will be required for the AC system. PMID:21902047

  8. [Heterochronies in the Formation of the Nervous and Digestive Systems in Early Postlarval Development of Opistobranch Mollusks: Organization of Basic Functional Systems of the Arctic Dorid Cadlina laevis].

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, V; Shumeev, A N; Korshunova, T A; Martynov, A V

    2015-01-01

    For the first time using laser confocal microscopy and histochemical and immunocytochemical methods (detection of F-actine, catecholamines, acetylcholintransferase, substances of P and FM RFamide) in combination with classical histological methods and electron microscopy of total preparations, the general structure and regularities of formation of the main organs and the nervous, muscular, and digestive systems in early postlarval development (2 to 4 months) in the opistobranch mollusk Cadlina laevis were studied. Heterochronies manifested in positive allometry of the sensory organs, ganglia of the central nervous system, and the pharyngeal region of the digestive system in relation to general body sizes in juvenile individuals compared to adult animals were detected. PMID:26349228

  9. Spare capacity and phenotypic flexibility in the digestive system of a migratory bird: defining the limits of animal design

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Scott R.; Karasov, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible phenotypes enable animals to live in environments that change over space and time, and knowing the limits to and the required time scale for this flexibility provides insights into constraints on energy and nutrient intake, diet diversity and niche width. We quantified the level of immediate and ultimate spare capacity, and thus the extent of phenotypic flexibility, in the digestive system of a migratory bird in response to increased energy demand, and identified the digestive constraints responsible for the limits on sustained energy intake. Immediate spare capacity decreased from approximately 50% for birds acclimated to relatively benign temperatures to less than 20% as birds approached their maximum sustainable energy intake. Ultimate spare capacity enabled an increase in feeding rate of approximately 126% as measured in birds acclimated for weeks at ?29°C compared with +21°C. Increased gut size and not tissue-specific differences in nutrient uptake or changes in digestive efficiency or retention time were primarily responsible for this increase in capacity with energy demand, and this change required more than 1–2 days. Thus, the pace of change in digestive organ size may often constrain energy intake and, for birds, retard the pace of their migration. PMID:24718764

  10. Influence of different substrates on the performance of a two-stage high pressure anaerobic digestion system.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, A; Chen, Y; Lindner, J; Wonneberger, A M; Zielonka, S; Oechsner, H; Jungbluth, T

    2015-02-01

    The two-stage autogenerative high-pressure digestion technique is a novel and promising approach for the production of gaseous fuels or upgraded biogas. This new technique is described in the patent DE 10 2011 015415 A1 and integrates biogas production, its upgrading and pressure boosting in one process. Anaerobic digestion under elevated pressure conditions leads to decreasing pH-values in the digestate due to the augmented formation of carboxylic acid. Model calculations carried out to evaluate the two-stage design showed that the pH-value in the pressurized anaerobic filter has a major influence on the methane content of the biogas produced. Within this study, the influence of the nitrogen content as one of the most important buffering substances on the performance of the system has been tested. The results show that higher NH4 contents lead to higher pH-values in the digester and as a consequence to higher methane contents. PMID:25451774

  11. Encapsulation altered starch digestion: toward developing starch-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2014-01-30

    Starch is an abundant biomaterial that forms a vital energy source for humans. Altering its digestion, e.g. increasing the proportions of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS), would revolutionize starch utility in addressing a number of health issues related to glucose absorption, glycemic index and colon health. The research reported in this article is based on my hypothesis that water channels present in the B-type starch crystalline matrix, particularly in tuber starches, can embed guest molecules such as nutraceuticals, drugs, flavor compounds and vitamins leading to altered starch digestion. Toward this goal, potato starch has been chosen as the model tuber starch, and ibuprofen, benzocaine, sulfapyridine, curcumin, thymol and ascorbic acid as model guest molecules. X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR analyses clearly suggest the incorporation of guest molecules in the water channels of potato starch. Furthermore, the in vitro digestion profiles of complexes are intriguing with major variations occurring after 60 min of starch digestion and finally at 120 min. These changes are concomitantly reflected in the SDS and RS amounts, with about 24% decrease in SDS for benzocaine complex and 6% increase in RS for ibuprofen complex, attesting the ability of guest molecule encapsulation in modulating the digestion properties of potato starch. Overall, this research provides an elegant opportunity for the design and development of novel starch-based stable carriers that not only bestow tailored glucose release rates but could also transport health promoting and disease preventing compounds. PMID:24299816

  12. Development of the mouse vestibular system in the absence of gravity perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael; Yuan Wang, Xiang; Wolgemuth, Debra J.; Murashov, Alexander K.

    2003-01-01

    The tilted mutant mouse, which lacks otoconia in the inner ear, was used to study development of the mouse vestibular system in the absence of gravity perception. Otoconia are dense particles composed of proteins and calcium carbonate crystals suspended in the gelatinous macular membrane. They enhance, and are largely responsible for, sensitivity to gravity. Morphometric analysis of the vestibular ganglion showed that the mutant developed more slowly than the normal controls, both in rate of development and cell number, particularly during the first week of post-natal development. The mutant ganglia also exhibited a reduction of cells during the first 6 days of post-natal development.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTACT HEPATOCYTE ACTIVATION SYSTEM FOR ROUTINE USE WITH THE MOUSE LYMPHOMA ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have developed a method for cocultivating primary rat hepatocytes with L5178Y/TK+/- 3.7.2C mouse lymphoma cells. The system should provide a means to simulate more closely in vivo metabolism compared to metabolism by liver homogenates, while still being useful for rou...

  14. INDUCED HEPATOCYTES AS A METABOLIC ACTIVATION SYSTEM FOR THE MOUSE-LYMPHOMA ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed methods for the coculture of hepatocytes and mouse lymphoma cells and have shown the utility of this system for testing promutagens from several chemical classes (Brock et al., 1987). In the present study we investigated the use of hepatocytes isolated from rats...

  15. Ontogeny of the Digestive System of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) and Effects of Soybean Meal from Start-Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Sahlmann, Christian; Gu, Jinni; Kortner, Trond M.; Lein, Ingrid; Krogdahl, Åshild; Bakke, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Despite a long history of rearing Atlantic salmon in hatcheries in Norway, knowledge of molecular and physiological aspects of juvenile development is still limited. To facilitate introduction of alternative feed ingredients and feed additives during early phases, increased knowledge regarding the ontogeny of the digestive apparatus in salmon is needed. In this study, we characterized the development of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory digestive organs for five months following hatch by using histological, biochemical and molecular methods. Furthermore, the effects of a diet containing 16.7% soybean meal (SBM) introduced at start-feeding were investigated, as compared to a fishmeal based control diet. Salmon yolk sac alevins and fry were sampled at 18 time points from hatch until 144 days post hatch (dph). Histomorphological development was investigated at 7, 27, 46, 54 and 144 dph. Ontogenetic expression patterns of genes encoding key digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters, gastrointestinal peptide hormones and T-cell markers were analyzed from 13 time points by qPCR. At 7 dph, the digestive system of Atlantic salmon alevins was morphologically distinct with an early stomach, liver, pancreas, anterior and posterior intestine. About one week before the yolk sac was internalized and exogenous feeding was started, gastric glands and developing pyloric caeca were observed, which coincided with an increase in gene expression of gastric and pancreatic enzymes and nutrient transporters. Thus, the observed organs seemed ready to digest external feed well before the yolk sac was absorbed into the abdominal cavity. In contrast to post-smolt Atlantic salmon, inclusion of SBM did not induce intestinal inflammation in the juveniles. This indicates that SBM can be used in compound feeds for salmon fry from start-feeding to at least 144 dph and/or 4-5 g body weight. PMID:25923375

  16. 77 FR 38075 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases...Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Type 1 Diabetes Mouse Resource. Date: July...

  17. Long Noncoding RNAs in Digestive System Malignancies: A Novel Class of Cancer Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets?

    PubMed Central

    Kladi-Skandali, Athina; Michaelidou, Kleita; Scorilas, Andreas; Mavridis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    High throughput methodologies have revealed the existence of an unexpectedly large number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). The unconventional role of lncRNAs in gene expression regulation and their broad implication in oncogenic and tumor suppressive pathways have introduced lncRNAs as novel biological tumor markers. The most prominent example of lncRNAs application in routine clinical practice is PCA3, a FDA-approved biomarker for prostate cancer. Regarding digestive system malignancies, the oncogenic HOTAIR is one of the most widely studied lncRNAs in the preclinical level and has already been identified as a potent prognostic marker for major malignancies of the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we provide an overview of recent findings regarding the emerging role of lncRNAs not only as key regulators of cancer initiation and progression in colon, stomach, pancreatic, liver, and esophageal cancers, but also as reliable tumor markers and therapeutic tools. lncRNAs can be easily, rapidly, and cost-effectively determined in tissues, serum, and gastric juice, making them highly versatile analytes. Taking also into consideration the largely unmet clinical need for early diagnosis and more accurate prognostic/predictive markers for gastrointestinal cancer patients, we comment upon the perspectives of lncRNAs as efficient molecular tools that could aid in the clinical management. PMID:26064090

  18. Insights into bread melanoidins: fate in the upper digestive tract and impact on the gut microbiota using in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Helou, Cynthia; Denis, Sylvain; Spatz, Madeleine; Marier, David; Rame, Véronique; Alric, Monique; Tessier, Frédéric J; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    Bread melanoidins are heterogeneous, nitrogen-containing, brown macromolecules generated during the last stages of the Maillard reaction in bread. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact and fate of these bread melanoidins in the human gastrointestinal tract using in vitro systems. Batch systems as well as the TNO gastrointestinal tract were used for studying the digestion of various bread samples. These samples included bread crumb, bread crust and two bread-crust-simulating models: a fiber-free model (gluten, starch and glucose heated together) and its control, free of Maillard reaction products (gluten heated separately than starch and glucose). Furthermore, the impact of these two bread-crust-simulating models on the gut microbiota was assessed using a static anaerobic batch system. Bread melanoidins from bread crust and its model were shown to be partially digested by amylases and proteases, suggesting that these melanoidins have peptidic as well as glycosidic bonds in their skeleton. The impact of bread melanoidins from the bread-crust-simulating models and their digestion products on the gut microbiota revealed an individual-dependent response for most flora except for enterobacteria. This flora decreased by -22%, -48% & -100% depending on the individual. Thus, bread melanoidins seem to exert an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting enterobacteria. PMID:26364594

  19. Molecular Analysis of Atypical Family 18 Chitinase from Fujian Oyster Crassostrea angulata and Its Physiological Role in the Digestive System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bingye; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinolytic enzymes have an important physiological significance in immune and digestive systems in plants and animals, but chitinase has not been identified as having a role in the digestive system in molluscan. In our study, a novel chitinase homologue, named Ca-Chit, has been cloned and characterized as the oyster Crassostrea angulate. The 3998bp full-length cDNA of Ca-Chit consisted of 23bp 5-UTR, 3288 ORF and 688bp 3-UTR. The deduced amino acids sequence shares homologue with the chitinase of family 18. The molecular weight of the protein was predicted to be 119.389 kDa, with a pI of 6.74. The Ca-Chit protein was a modular enzyme composed of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain, threonine-rich region profile and a putative membrane anchor domain. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in different adult tissues showed that the mRNA of Ca-Chit expressed markedly higher visceral mass than any other tissues. The results of the whole mount in-situ hybridization displayed that Ca-Chit starts to express the visceral mass of D-veliger larvae and then the digestive gland forms a crystalline structure during larval development. Furthermore, the adult oysters challenged by starvation indicated that the Ca-Chit expression would be regulated by feed. All the observations made suggest that Ca-Chit plays an important role in the digestive system of the oyster, Crassostrea angulate. PMID:26046992

  20. High-Frequency Ultrasound for the Study of Early Mouse Embryonic Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Greco, Adelaide; Coda, Anna Rita Daniela; Albanese, Sandra; Ragucci, Monica; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Auletta, Luigi; Gargiulo, Sara; Lamagna, Francesco; Salvatore, Marco; Mancini, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    An accurate diagnosis of congenital heart defects during fetal development is critical for interventional planning. Mice can be used to generate animal models with heart defects, and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging enables in utero imaging of live mouse embryos. A wide range of physiological measurements is possible using Doppler-HFUS imaging; limitations of any single measurement warrant a multiparameter approach to characterize cardiovascular function. Doppler-HFUS was used to explore the embryonic (heart, aorta) and extraembryonic (umbilical blood flow) circulatory systems to create a database in normal mouse embryos between 9.5 and 16.5 days of gestation. Multivariate analyses were performed to explore correlations between gestational age and embryo echocardiographic parameters. Heart rate and peak velocity in the aorta were positively correlated with gestational time, whereas cardiac cycle length, isovolumetric relaxation time, myocardial performance index, and arterial deceleration time of the umbilical cord were negatively correlated with it. Doppler-HFUS facilitated detailed characterization of the embryonic mouse circulation and represents a useful tool for investigation of the early mouse embryonic cardiovascular system. PMID:26142278

  1. Atmosphere stabilization and element recycle in an experimental mouse-algal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Experiments conducted with a gas-closed mouse-algal system designed to investigate principles of photosynthetic gas exchange focus primarily on observing gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions and secondarily on studying element cycling through compartments of the experimental system. Inherent instabilities exit between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide CO2 and oxygen O2 by the mouse and algae. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable maintenance of physiologic concentrations of CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations have been examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system. Elemental mass balances through the experimental systems compartments are being studied with the concurrent development of a mathematical simulation model. Element cycling experiments include quantification of elemental flows through system compartments and wet oxidation of system waste materials for use as an algal nutrient source. Oxidized waste products demonstrate inhibitory properties although dilution has been shown to allow normal growth.

  2. Evaluating a model of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes through system identification

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, R.P.; Kiely, G.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), on its own or co-digested with primary sewage sludge (PSS), produces high quality biogas, suitable as renewable energy. Parameter estimation and evaluation of a two-stage mathematical model of the anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of MSW and PSS are described. Measured data are from a bench scale laboratory experiment using a continuously stirred tank reactor and operated at 36 C for 115 days. The two-stage model simulates acidogenesis and methanogenesis, including ammonia inhibition. Model parameters are estimated using an output error, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. Sensitivity of the estimated parameter values and the model outputs to non-estimated model parameters and measurement errors are evaluated. The estimated mathematical model successfully predicts the performance of the anaerobic reactor. Sensitivity results provide guidance for improving the model structure and experimental procedures.

  3. [THE ROLE OF FOOD OBJECTS AND ENTERAL MICROBIOTA PROTEASES IN NUTRITIVE AND TEMPERATURE ADAPTATIONS OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM IN FISH].

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, V V

    2015-01-01

    The review presents data on the activity and some temperature characteristics of proteases in the potential food objects of fishes and some enteral microbiota representatives that provide induced autolysis and symbiotic digestion. It is shown that during the active feeding period the total protease activity in the prey tissues exceeds the total protease activity in the fish gastric mucosa by 5-10 times. At low temperature, the relative activity of the prey tissue lysosomal hydrolases (20-35%) and the enteral microbiota enzymes (up to 45%) may exceed that of proteases synthesized by the hepatopancreas and functioning in the consumers' intestinal mucosa (less than 10% maximal activity). The data presented indicate the important role of proteases of food objects and enteral microbiota in nutritive adaptations of the fish digestive system. PMID:26281217

  4. Navigating wastewater energy recovery strategies: a life cycle comparison of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and conventional treatment systems with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Stadler, Lauren B; Cao, Ling; Love, Nancy G; Raskin, Lutgarde; Skerlos, Steven J

    2014-05-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate emerging anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology in comparison with conventional wastewater energy recovery technologies. Wastewater treatment process modeling and systems analyses were combined to evaluate the conditions under which AnMBR may produce more net energy and have lower life cycle environmental emissions than high rate activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (HRAS+AD), conventional activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (CAS+AD), and an aerobic membrane bioreactor with anaerobic digestion (AeMBR+AD). For medium strength domestic wastewater treatment under baseline assumptions at 15 °C, AnMBR recovered 49% more energy as biogas than HRAS+AD, the most energy positive conventional technology considered, but had significantly higher energy demands and environmental emissions. Global warming impacts associated with AnMBR were largely due to emissions of effluent dissolved methane. For high strength domestic wastewater treatment, AnMBR recovered 15% more net energy than HRAS+AD, and the environmental emissions gap between the two systems was reduced. Future developments of AnMBR technology in low energy fouling control, increased flux, and management of effluent methane emissions would make AnMBR competitive with HRAS+AD. Rapid advancements in AnMBR technology must continue to achieve its full economic and environmental potential as an energy recovery strategy for domestic wastewater. PMID:24742289

  5. Biodistribution and stability of CdSe core quantum dots in mouse digestive tract following per os administration: Advantages of double polymer/silica coated nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Loginova, Y.F.; Dezhurov, S.V.; Zherdeva, V.V.; Kazachkina, N.I.; Wakstein, M.S.; Savitsky, A.P.

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New QDs coated with combination of polythiol ligands and silica shell were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the QDs stability in digestive tract of mice after per os administration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymer/silica shell prevents QDs degradation and fluorescence quenching in vivo. -- Abstract: CdSe-core, ZnS-capped semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are of great potential for biomedical applications. However, applications in the gastrointestinal tract for in vivo imaging and therapeutic purposes are hampered by their sensitivity to acidic environments and potential toxicity. Here we report the use of coatings with a combination of polythiol ligands and silica shell (QDs PolyT-APS) to stabilize QDs fluorescence under acidic conditions. We demonstrated the stability of water-soluble QDs PolyT-APS both in vitro, in strong acidic solutions, and in vivo. The biodistribution, stability and photoluminescence properties of QDs in the gastrointestinal tract of mice after per os administration were assessed. We demonstrated that QDs coated with current traditional materials - mercapto compounds (QDs MPA) and pendant thiol group (QDs PolyT) - are not capable of protecting QDs from chemically induced degradation and surface modification. Polythiol ligands and silica shell quantum dots (QDs PolyT-APS) are suitable for biological and biomedical applications in the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. A replaceable microreactor for on-line protein digestion in a two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis system with tandem mass spectrometry detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihan; Wojcik, Roza; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis system that incorporates a replaceable enzymatic microreactor for on-line protein digestion. In this system, trypsin is immobilized on magnetic beads. At the start of each experiment, old beads are flushed to waste and replaced with a fresh plug of beads, which is captured by a pair of magnets at the distal tip of the first capillary. For analysis, proteins are separated in the first capillary. A fraction is then parked in the reactor to create peptides. Digested peptides are periodically transferred to the second capillary for separation; a fresh protein fraction is simultaneously moved to the reactor for digestion. An electrospray interface is used to introduce peptides into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This procedure is repeated for several dozen fractions under computer control. The system was demonstrated by the separation and digestion of insulin chain b oxidized and ?-casein as model proteins. PMID:21030030

  7. Influence of Surfactants on Lipase Fat Digestion in a Model Gastro-intestinal System

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Pedro M.; Raab, Thomas W.; Chuat, Jean Y.; Leser, Martin E.; Miller, Reinhard; Watzke, Heribert J.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we use a model gastro-intestinal system to study the influence of different food-grade surface-active molecules (Sn-2 monopalmitin, ?-lactoglobulin, or lysophosphatodylcholine) on lipase activity. The interfacial activity of lipase and surfactants are assessed with the pendant drop technique, a commonly used tensiometry instrument. A mathematical model is adopted which enables quantitative determination of the composition of the water–oil interface as a function of bulk surfactant concentration in the water–oil mixtures. Our results show a decrease in gastric lipolysis when interfacially active molecules are incorporated into a food matrix. However, only the Sn-2 monopalmitin caused a systematic decrease in triglyceride hydrolysis throughout the gastro-intestinal tract. This effect is most likely due to exclusion of both lipase and triglyceride from the water–oil interface together with a probable saturation of the solubilization capacity of bile with monoglycerides. Addition of ?-lactoglobulin or lysophopholipids increased the hydrolysis of fat after the gastric phase. These results can be attributed to an increasing interfacial area with lipase and substrate present at the interface. Otherwise, ?-lactoglobulin, or lysophopholipids reduced fat hydrolysis in the stomach. From the mathematical modeling of the interface composition, we can conclude that Sn-2 monopalmitin can desorb lipase from the interface, which, together with exclusion of substrate from the interface, explains the gradually decreased triglyceride hydrolysis that occurs during the digestion. Our results provide a biophysics approach on lipolysis that can bring new insights into the problem of fat uptake. PMID:20401181

  8. The estrogen receptor fusion system in mouse models: a reversible switch.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jonathan; Littlewood, Trevor; Evan, Gerard I; Soucek, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Reversible regulatory mouse models have significantly contributed to our understanding of normal tissue and cancer biology, providing the opportunity to temporally control initiation, progression, and evolution of physiological and pathological events. The tamoxifen inducible system, one of the best-characterized "reversible switch" models, has a number of beneficial features. In this system, the hormone-binding domain of the mammalian estrogen receptor is used as a heterologous regulatory domain. Upon ligand binding, the receptor is released from its inhibitory complex and the fusion protein becomes functional. We summarize the advantages and drawbacks of the system, describe several mouse models that rely on it, and discuss potential improvements that could render it even more useful and versatile. PMID:25734072

  9. 1274 Full-Open Reading Frames of Transcripts Expressed in the Developing Mouse Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldo, Maria F.; Bair, Thomas B.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Snir, Einat; Akabogu, Ike; Bair, Jennifer L.; Berger, Brian; Crouch, Keith; Davis, Aja; Eyestone, Mari E.; Keppel, Catherine; Kucaba, Tamara A.; Lebeck, Mark; Lin, Jenny L.; de Melo, Anna I.R.; Rehmann, Joshua; Reiter, Rebecca S.; Schaefer, Kelly; Smith, Christina; Tack, Dylan; Trout, Kurtis; Sheffield, Val C.; Lin, Jim J-C.; Casavant, Thomas L.; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the trans-National Institutes of Health (NIH) Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project (BMAP), and in close coordination with the NIH Mammalian Gene Collection Program (MGC), we initiated a large-scale project to clone, identify, and sequence the complete open reading frame (ORF) of transcripts expressed in the developing mouse nervous system. Here we report the analysis of the ORF sequence of 1274 cDNAs, obtained from 47 full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, constructed by using a novel approach, herein described. cDNA libraries were derived from size-fractionated cytoplasmic mRNA isolated from brain and eye tissues obtained at several embryonic stages and postnatal days. Altogether, including the full-ORF MGC sequences derived from these libraries by the MGC sequencing team, NIH_BMAP full-ORF sequences correspond to ?20% of all transcripts currently represented in mouse MGC. We show that NIH_BMAP clones comprise 68% of mouse MGC cDNAs ?5 kb, and 54% of those ?4 kb, as of March 15, 2004. Importantly, we identified transcripts, among the 1274 full-ORF sequences, that are exclusively or predominantly expressed in brain and eye tissues, many of which encode yet uncharacterized proteins. PMID:15489326

  10. Mn Enhancement and Respiratory Gating for In Utero MRI of the Embryonic Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Deans, Abby E.; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Berrios-Otero, César A.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse is the preferred model organism for genetic studies of mammalian brain development. MRI has potential for in utero studies of mouse brain development, but has been limited previously by challenges of maximizing image resolution and contrast while minimizing artifacts due to physiological motion. Manganese (Mn)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) studies have demonstrated central nervous system (CNS) contrast enhancement in mice from the earliest postnatal stages. The purpose of this study was to expand MEMRI to in utero studies of the embryonic CNS in combination with respiratory gating to decrease motion artifacts. We investigated MEMRI-facilitated CNS segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) analysis in wild-type mouse embryos from midgestation, and explored effects of Mn on embryonic survival and image contrast. Motivated by observations that MEMRI provided an effective method for visualization and volumetric analysis of embryonic CNS structures, especially in ventral regions, we used MEMRI to examine Nkx2.1 mutant mice that were previously reported to have ventral forebrain defects. Quantitative MEMRI analysis of Nkx2.1 knockout mice demonstrated volumetric changes in septum (SE) and basal ganglia (BG), as well as alterations in hypothalamic structures. This method may provide an effective means for in utero analysis of CNS phenotypes in a variety of mouse mutants. PMID:18506798

  11. Water as a leaching medium for hydrolysis of sorghum in anaerobic digestion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Egg, R.; Coble, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of using water to leach hydrolysis products from sorghum used as an anaerobic digestion feedstock. The pH of the leachate had no effect on the cumulative COD measured in the leachate. Milling the sorghum with a three roll mill prior to leaching appeared to slightly increase the hydrolysis of structural carbohydrates in the sorghum.

  12. GRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF THE INTERRELATIONSHIPS AMONG WATERBORNE ASBESTOS, DIGESTIVE SYSTEM CANCER AND POPULATION DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five statistical procedures were used to partial the correlation between water-borne asbestos and digestive site cancer for the putative effects of population density. These include: analysis based on a data subset with roughly homogeneous population density; standard residual an...

  13. Early post-metamorphic, Carboniferous blastoid reveals the evolution and development of the digestive system in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Imran A; Waters, Johnny A; Sumrall, Colin D; Astolfo, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Inferring the development of the earliest echinoderms is critical to uncovering the evolutionary assembly of the phylum-level body plan but has long proven problematic because early ontogenetic stages are rarely preserved as fossils. Here, we use synchrotron tomography to describe a new early post-metamorphic blastoid echinoderm from the Carboniferous (approx. 323 Ma) of China. The resulting three-dimensional reconstruction reveals a U-shaped tubular structure in the fossil interior, which is interpreted as the digestive tract. Comparisons with the developing gut of modern crinoids demonstrate that crinoids are an imperfect analogue for many extinct groups. Furthermore, consideration of our findings in a phylogenetic context allows us to reconstruct the evolution and development of the digestive system in echinoderms more broadly; there was a transition from a straight to a simple curved gut early in the phylum's evolution, but additional loops and coils of the digestive tract (as seen in crinoids) were not acquired until much later. PMID:26510677

  14. Behavior of vitamin E acetate delivery systems under simulated gastrointestinal conditions: lipid digestion and bioaccessibility of low-energy nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sinja; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2013-08-15

    Colloidal delivery systems are needed to incorporate oil-soluble vitamins into aqueous-based foods and beverage products. In this study, we encapsulated vitamin E acetate into oil-in-water nanoemulsions produced using either a low-energy method (Emulsion Phase Inversion, EPI) or a high energy method (microfluidization). Oil-in-water nanoemulsions (d<200 nm) could be produced using both low- and high-energy methods from a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80) and medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). The influence of surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR) on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility of EPI nanoemulsions was determined using a gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model that simulated the mouth, stomach, and small intestine. There were increases in the size and negative charge of the oil droplets after passage through the GIT, which was attributed to droplet coalescence and changes in interfacial composition. The rate and extent of lipid digestion decreased with increasing surfactant concentration, but the bioaccessibility of vitamin E acetate was high in all of the samples (>95%). No appreciable influence of the preparation method (low-energy versus high-energy) on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility was observed. The major advantage of the EPI method for forming nanoemulsions is that no expensive equipment is required, but relatively high surfactant concentrations are needed compared to microfluidization. PMID:23721832

  15. Dog and mouse: toward a balanced view of the mammalian olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Sánchez-Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Although the most intensively studied mammalian olfactory system is that of the mouse, in which olfactory chemical cues of one kind or another are detected in four different nasal areas [the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), the septal organ (SO), Grüneberg's ganglion, and the sensory epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO)], the extraordinarily sensitive olfactory system of the dog is also an important model that is increasingly used, for example in genomic studies of species evolution. Here we describe the topography and extent of the main olfactory and vomeronasal sensory epithelia of the dog, and we report finding no structures equivalent to the Grüneberg ganglion and SO of the mouse. Since we examined adults, newborns, and fetuses we conclude that these latter structures are absent in dogs, possibly as the result of regression or involution. The absence of a vomeronasal component based on VR2 receptors suggests that the VNO may be undergoing a similar involutionary process. PMID:25309347

  16. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system

    E-print Network

    Regev, Aviv

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cells of the immune system has been studied extensively in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry that controls it is still only partially understood. Here, the ...

  17. Multiparametric and semiquantitative scoring systems for the evaluation of mouse model histopathology - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histopathology has initially been and is still used to diagnose infectious, degenerative or neoplastic diseases in humans or animals. In addition to qualitative diagnoses semiquantitative scoring of a lesion`s magnitude on an ordinal scale is a commonly demanded task for histopathologists. Multiparametric, semiquantitative scoring systems for mouse models histopathology are a common approach to handle these questions and to include histopathologic information in biomedical research. Results Inclusion criteria for scoring systems were a first description of a multiparametric, semiquantiative scoring systems which comprehensibly describe an approach to evaluate morphologic lesion. A comprehensive literature search using these criteria identified 153 originally designed semiquantitative scoring systems for the analysis of morphologic changes in mouse models covering almost all organs systems and a wide variety of disease models. Of these, colitis, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, lupus nephritis and collagen induced osteoarthritis colitis were the disease models with the largest number of different scoring systems. Closer analysis of the identified scoring systems revealed a lack of a rationale for the selection of the scoring parameters or a correlation between scoring parameter value and the magnitude of the clinical symptoms in most studies. Conclusion Although a decision for a particular scoring system is clearly dependent on the respective scientific question this review gives an overview on currently available systems and may therefore allow for a better choice for the respective project. PMID:23800279

  18. Atmosphere behavior in gas-closed mouse-algal systems - An experimental and modelling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.; Moore, B., III; Bartholomew, I.; Wharton, R.

    1984-01-01

    A NASA-sponsored research program initiated using mathematical modelling and laboratory experimentation aimed at examining the gas-exchange characteristics of artificial animal/plant systems closed to the ambient atmosphere is studied. The development of control techniques and management strategies for maintaining the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen at physiological levels is considered. A mathematical model simulating the behavior of a gas-closed mouse-algal system under varying environmental conditions is described. To verify and validate the model simulations, an analytical system with which algal growth and gas exchange characteristics can be manipulated and measured is designed, fabricated, and tested. The preliminary results are presented.

  19. Digestion and dewatering characteristics of waste activated sludge treated by an anaerobic biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfeng; Shao, Liming; Li, Tianshui; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing

    2014-02-01

    Immobilization of microorganisms for sludge anaerobic digestion was investigated in this study. The effects of filler properties on anaerobic digestion and dewaterability of waste activated sludge were assessed at mesophilic temperature in batch mode. The results showed that the duration of the methanogenic stage of reactors without filler, with only filler, and with pre-incubated filler was 39days, 19days and 13days, respectively, during which time the protein was degraded by 45.0%, 29.4% and 30.0%, and the corresponding methane yield was 193.9, 107.2 and 108.2mL/g volatile suspended solids added, respectively. On day 39, the final protein degradation efficiency of the three reactors was 45.0%, 40.9% and 42.0%, respectively. The results of normalized capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration suggested that the reactor incorporating pre-incubated filler could improve the dewaterability of digested sludge, while the effect of the reactor incorporating only filler on sludge dewaterability was uncertain. PMID:24355503

  20. Effect of substrates and intermediate compounds on foaming in manure digestion systems.

    PubMed

    Boe, K; Kougias, P G; Pacheco, F; O-Thong, S; Angelidaki, I

    2012-01-01

    Manure contains several compounds that can potentially cause foaming during anaerobic digestion. Understanding the effect of substrates and intermediate compounds on foaming tendency and stability could facilitate strategies for foaming prevention and recovery of the process. In this study, the effect of physicochemical properties of substrates and intermediate compounds on liquid properties such as surface tension, surfactant property, and hydrophobicity were investigated and compared with the effect on foaming tendency and foam stability. The results showed that there was no consistent correlation between foaming potential and hydrophobicity, oil displacement area (ODA) or surface tension of the tested solutions, and the best way to determine the foaming property of the solution was to directly measure foaming tendency and foam stability. Na-oleate and acetic acid showed the highest potential to create foam in a manure digester. Moreover, high organic loading of lipids and protein, and high concentrations of acetic and butyric acids also showed a strong tendency to create foaming during anaerobic digestion. Due to their great ability to stabilize foam, high organic loadings of Na-oleate or gelatine were considered to be the main potential foaming problem. PMID:22949245

  1. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  2. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater: A comparison of single and two-phase reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borja, R.; Banks, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    The anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater, a complex substrate which includes milk proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, has received little attention. Work using an aerobic contact system showed that at a 7.5-d hydraulic retention time (HRT), with an organic loading rate of 1.7 g COD/Ld and influent TSS (total suspended solids) of 5870 mg/L, the effluent COD was 628 mg/L, BOD was 91 mg/L and TSS was 674. Anaerobic filters have also been used at organic loadings of 6 kg COD/m{sup 3}d applied at a HRT of 0.42 day, with COD removals of 80%. Goodwing showed that this waste was capable of being treated by the UASB process with granulation commencing after 60-70 days, and gas production ranging between 0.73 and 0.93 L CH{sub 4}/g COD removed with loading rates between 0.7 and 3.0 g TOC/Ld. Two-phase anaerobic digestion is an innovative fermentation mode that has recently received increased attention. The kinetically dissimilar fermentation phases, hydrolysis-acidification and acetogenesis-methanation are operated in two separate reactors; the first of which is maintained at a very short HRT. The effluent from the first, acid-forming, phase is used as the substrate for the methane-phase reactor which has a longer HRT or cell immobilization. The aim of this work was to compare the methane production capability and performance of a single-phase upflow fixed bed reactor with a two-phase digestion system. The two-phase digestion system consists of a completely mixed reactor for the acidogenic reaction and an upflow fixed bed reactor for the methanogenic reaction. Because of the high lipid content and COD of ice cream wastewater off site disposal has proved to be both expensive and poses problems to the receiving effluent treatment plant. For this reason the potential for a rapid anaerobic stabilization of the waste, with energy recovery in the form of methane gas, has been investigated in an attempt to minimize plant size and maximize gas production. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. A Support System for Mouse Operations Using Eye-Gaze Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kiyohiko; Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Ohi, Shoichi; Ohyama, Minoru

    We have developed an eye-gaze input system for people with severe physical disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. This system utilizes a personal computer and a home video camera to detect eye-gaze under natural light. The system detects both vertical and horizontal eye-gaze by simple image analysis, and does not require special image processing units or sensors. Our conventional eye-gaze input system can detect horizontal eye-gaze with a high degree of accuracy. However, it can only classify vertical eye-gaze into 3 directions (up, middle and down). In this paper, we propose a new method for vertical eye-gaze detection. This method utilizes the limbus tracking method for vertical eye-gaze detection. Therefore our new eye-gaze input system can detect the two-dimension coordinates of user's gazing point. By using this method, we develop a new support system for mouse operation. This system can move the mouse cursor to user's gazing point.

  5. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  6. Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Lieber, Samuel C; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Gaussin, Vincian; Goumans, Marie José

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a major burden in the Western world and no effective treatment is available. This is mainly due to a lack of knowledge of the molecular, cellular and mechanical mechanisms underlying the maintenance and/or loss of the valvular structure. Current models used to study valvular biology include in vitro cultures of valvular endothelial and interstitial cells. Although, in vitro culturing models provide both cellular and molecular mechanisms, the mechanisms involved in the 3D-organization of the valve remain unclear. While in vivo models have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying valvular development, insight into adult valvular biology is still elusive. In order to be able to study the regulation of the valvular 3D-organization on tissue, cellular and molecular levels, we have developed the Miniature Tissue Culture System. In this ex vivo flow model the mitral or the aortic valve is cultured in its natural position in the heart. The natural configuration and composition of the leaflet are maintained allowing the most natural response of the valvular cells to stimuli. The valves remain viable and are responsive to changing environmental conditions. This MTCS may provide advantages on studying questions including but not limited to, how does the 3D organization affect valvular biology, what factors affect 3D organization of the valve, and which network of signaling pathways regulates the 3D organization of the valve. PMID:26555276

  7. Pointright: a system to redirect mouse and keyboard control among multiple machines

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Bradley E. (Palo Alto, CA); Winograd, Terry A. (Stanford, CA); Hutchins, Gregory M. (Mountain View, CA)

    2008-09-30

    The present invention provides a software system, PointRight, that allows for smooth and effortless control of pointing and input devices among multiple displays. With PointRight, a single free-floating mouse and keyboard can be used to control multiple screens. When the cursor reaches the edge of a screen it seamlessly moves to the adjacent screen and keyboard control is simultaneously redirected to the appropriate machine. Laptops may also redirect their keyboard and pointing device, and multiple pointers are supported simultaneously. The system automatically reconfigures itself as displays go on, go off, or change the machine they display.

  8. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Luis R; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S; Marioni, John C; Korsching, Sigrun I; Logan, Darren W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430?million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  9. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S.; Marioni, John C.; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430?million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  10. Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent

    E-print Network

    Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent: Significant Energy Savings over Traditional Activated Sludge Treatment This report presents results for an anaerobic digestion system operated;Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  11. Short-term exposure to dimethylformamide and the impact on digestive system disease: an outdoor study for volatile organic compound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Huang, Canke; Wei, Yumei; Zhu, Qi; Tian, Weili; Zhang, Qingyu

    2014-07-01

    Occupational and experimental studies have revealed the organs most affected by dimethylformamide (DMF) are liver and gastrointestinal tract. However, few studies have focused on the potential effect of outdoor pollution of DMF. This study examined the health risk of hospitalization due to digestive system disease by time series studies in a case city Longwan, China. The urine metabolite of DMF was correlated well with DMF exposure concentration (EC). A 101.0-?g/m(3) (interquartile range) increase in the two-day moving average of DMF EC was associated with a 1.10 (1.01 ˜ 1.20), 1.22 (1.10 ˜ 1.35), and 1.05 (0.90 ˜ 1.22) increase in hospitalization for total digestive system diseases, liver disease, and gastrointestinal tract disease, respectively. The exposure-dose response between DMF and the relative risk of liver disease was linear only below 350 ?g/m(3). These findings highlight a previously unrecognized health problem related to VOCs released into the outdoor environment. PMID:24747345

  12. Evaluation of a Piezoelectric System as an Alternative to Electroencephalogram/ Electromyogram Recordings in Mouse Sleep Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Géraldine M.; Nicod, Jérôme; Emmenegger, Yann; Donohue, Kevin D.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Franken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Traditionally, sleep studies in mammals are performed using electroencephalogram/electromyogram (EEG/EMG) recordings to determine sleep-wake state. In laboratory animals, this requires surgery and recovery time and causes discomfort to the animal. In this study, we evaluated the performance of an alternative, noninvasive approach utilizing piezoelectric films to determine sleep and wakefulness in mice by simultaneous EEG/EMG recordings. The piezoelectric films detect the animal's movements with high sensitivity and the regularity of the piezo output signal, related to the regular breathing movements characteristic of sleep, serves to automatically determine sleep. Although the system is commercially available (Signal Solutions LLC, Lexington, KY), this is the first statistical validation of various aspects of sleep. Design: EEG/EMG and piezo signals were recorded simultaneously during 48 h. Setting: Mouse sleep laboratory. Participants: Nine male and nine female CFW outbred mice. Interventions: EEG/EMG surgery. Measurements and Results: The results showed a high correspondence between EEG/EMG-determined and piezo-determined total sleep time and the distribution of sleep over a 48-h baseline recording with 18 mice. Moreover, the piezo system was capable of assessing sleep quality (i.e., sleep consolidation) and interesting observations at transitions to and from rapid eye movement sleep were made that could be exploited in the future to also distinguish the two sleep states. Conclusions: The piezo system proved to be a reliable alternative to electroencephalogram/electromyogram recording in the mouse and will be useful for first-pass, large-scale sleep screens for genetic or pharmacological studies. Citation: Mang GM, Nicod J, Emmenegger Y, Donohue KD, O'Hara BF, Franken P. Evaluation of a piezoelectric system as an alternative to electroencephalogram/electromyogram recordings in mouse sleep studies. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1383-1392. PMID:25083019

  13. Enhancement of Anaerobic Digestion to Treat Saline Sludge from Recirculating Aquaculture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guo-zhi; Ma, Niannian; Li, Ping; Tan, Hong-xin; Liu, Wenchang

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbohydrate addition and the use of ultrasonication as a pretreatment for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of saline aquacultural sludge was assessed. Analyses were conducted using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), which included stopped gas production attributed to the saline inhibition. After increasing the C?:?N ratio, gas production was observed, and the total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency increased from 75% to 80%. The TCOD removal efficiency of the sonication period was approximately 85%, compared to 75% for the untreated waste. Ultrasonication of aquaculture sludge was also found to enhance the gas production rate and the TCOD removal efficiency. The average volatile fatty acid (VFA) to alkalinity ratios ranged from 0.1 to 0.05, confirming the stability of the digesters. Furthermore, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), VFA, and PO43? concentrations increased in the effluents. There was a 114% greater gas generation during the ultrasonication period, with an average production of 0.08?g COD/L·day?1. PMID:26301258

  14. Mouse chimeras as a system to investigate development, cell and tissue function, disease mechanisms and organ regeneration.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Sigrid; McLaughlin, K John; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-07-01

    Chimeras are organisms composed of at least two genetically distinct cell lineages originating from different zygotes. In the laboratory, mouse chimeras can be produced experimentally; various techniques allow combining different early stage mouse embryos with each other or with pluripotent stem cells. Identification of the progeny of the different lineages in chimeras permits to follow cell fate and function, enabling correlation of genotype with phenotype. Mouse chimeras have become a tool to investigate critical developmental processes, including cell specification, differentiation, patterning, and the function of specific genes. In addition, chimeras can also be generated to address biological processes in the adult, including mechanisms underlying diseases or tissue repair and regeneration. This review summarizes the different types of chimeras and how they have been generated and provides examples of how mouse chimeras offer a unique and powerful system to investigate questions pertaining to cell and tissue function in the developing and adult organism. PMID:21606677

  15. Mouse chimeras as a system to investigate development, cell and tissue function, disease mechanisms and organ regeneration

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, K John; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Chimeras are organisms composed of at least two genetically distinct cell lineages originating from different zygotes. In the laboratory, mouse chimeras can be produced experimentally; various techniques allow combining different early stage mouse embryos with each other or with pluripotent stem cells. Identification of the progeny of the different lineages in chimeras permits to follow cell fate and function, enabling correlation of genotype with phenotype. Mouse chimeras have become a tool to investigate critical developmental processes, including cell specification, differentiation, patterning and the function of specific genes. In addition, chimeras can also be generated to address biological processes in the adult, including mechanisms underlying diseases or tissue repair and regeneration. This review summarizes the different types of chimeras and how they have been generated and provides examples of how mouse chimeras offer a unique and powerful system to investigate questions pertaining to cell and tissue function in the developing and adult organism. PMID:21606677

  16. A quantitative comparison of rates of phagocytosis and digestion of apoptotic cells by macrophages from normal

    E-print Network

    Keshet, Leah

    A quantitative comparison of rates of phagocytosis and digestion of apoptotic cells by macrophages head: Phagocytosis and digestion by NOD mice macrophages Corresponding author: Leah Edelstein, thus quantifying kinetics of uptake and digestion of apoptotic cells in both mouse strains (Mar´ee et

  17. Enhancement of biogas production by co-digestion of potato pulp with cow manure in a CSTR system.

    PubMed

    Sanaei-Moghadam, Akbar; Abbaspour-Fard, Mohammad Hossein; Aghel, Hasan; Aghkhani, Mohammad Hossein; Abedini-Torghabeh, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) process is a well-established method to generate energy from the organic wastes both from the environmental and economical perspectives. The purpose of present study is to evaluate energy production from potato wastes by incorporating cow manure into the process. Firstly, a laboratory pilot of one-stage biogas production was designed and built according to continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The setup was able to automatically control the environmental conditions of the process including temperature, duration, and rate of stirring. AD experiment was exclusively performed on co-digestion of potato peel (PP) and cow manure (CM) in three levels of mixing ratio including 20:80, 50:50, 80:20 (PP:CM), and 0:100 as control treatment based on the volatile solid (VS) weight without adding initial inoculums. After hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days on average 193, 256, 348, and 149 norm liter (LN) (kg VS)(-1), methane was produced for different mixing ratios, respectively. Statistical analysis shows that these gas productions are significantly different. The average energy was determined based on the produced methane which was about 2.8 kWh (kg VS)(-1), implying a significant energy production potential. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of treatments was about 61%, showing that it can be leached significantly with high organic matter by the employed pilot. The energy efficiency of 92% of the process also showed the optimum control of the process by the pilot. PMID:24894660

  18. Exceptionally preserved Cambrian trilobite digestive system revealed in 3D by synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Mats E; Terfelt, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The Cambrian 'Orsten' fauna comprises exceptionally preserved and phosphatised microscopic arthropods. The external morphology of these fossils is well known, but their internal soft-tissue anatomy has remained virtually unknown. Here, we report the first non-biomineralised tissues from a juvenile polymerid trilobite, represented by digestive structures, glands, and connective strands harboured in a hypostome from the Swedish 'Orsten' fauna. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy enabled three-dimensional internal recordings at sub-micrometre resolution. The specimen provides the first unambiguous evidence for a J-shaped anterior gut and the presence of a crop with a constricted alimentary tract in the Trilobita. Moreover, the gut is Y-shaped in cross section, probably due to a collapsed lumen of that shape, another feature which has not previously been observed in trilobites. The combination of anatomical features suggests that the trilobite hypostome is functionally analogous to the labrum of euarthropods and that it was a sophisticated element closely integrated with the digestive system. This study also briefly addresses the preservational bias of the 'Orsten' fauna, particularly the near-absence of polymerid trilobites, and the taphonomy of the soft-tissue-harbouring hypostome. PMID:22558180

  19. Development of an efficient on-chip digestion system for protein analysis using MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Soper, Steven A; Murray, Kermit K

    2009-12-01

    A solid-phase trypsin microreactor was constructed and operated with electrokinetically-driven flow for the digestion of proteins and coupled off-line with MALDI-TOF MS. The bioreactor was fabricated from poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, by hot embossing using a mold master prepared by micro-milling. The solid-phase bioreactor consisted of a 4 cm long, 200 microm wide, and 50 microm deep microfluidic channel that was populated with an array of 50 microm diameter micropost structures with a 50 microm inter-post spacing. The bioreactor was prepared by covalently attaching the proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, to the UV-modified surface of the PMMA microstructures using the appropriate coupling reagents. The performance of the system was evaluated using a set of proteins. The bioreactor provided efficient digestion of cytochrome c at a field strength of 375 V/cm, producing a reaction time of approximately 20 s to produce 97% sequence coverage for protein identification. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), phosphorylase b, and beta-casein were also assessed and the sequence coverages were 46, 63, and 79%, respectively, using the same reactor residence time. Furthermore, Escherichia coli was used as a model to demonstrate the feasibility of fingerprint analysis for intact cells using this solid-phase bioreactor. PMID:19918612

  20. Exceptionally Preserved Cambrian Trilobite Digestive System Revealed in 3D by Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Tomographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mats E.; Terfelt, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The Cambrian ‘Orsten’ fauna comprises exceptionally preserved and phosphatised microscopic arthropods. The external morphology of these fossils is well known, but their internal soft-tissue anatomy has remained virtually unknown. Here, we report the first non-biomineralised tissues from a juvenile polymerid trilobite, represented by digestive structures, glands, and connective strands harboured in a hypostome from the Swedish ‘Orsten’ fauna. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy enabled three-dimensional internal recordings at sub-micrometre resolution. The specimen provides the first unambiguous evidence for a J-shaped anterior gut and the presence of a crop with a constricted alimentary tract in the Trilobita. Moreover, the gut is Y-shaped in cross section, probably due to a collapsed lumen of that shape, another feature which has not previously been observed in trilobites. The combination of anatomical features suggests that the trilobite hypostome is functionally analogous to the labrum of euarthropods and that it was a sophisticated element closely integrated with the digestive system. This study also briefly addresses the preservational bias of the ‘Orsten’ fauna, particularly the near-absence of polymerid trilobites, and the taphonomy of the soft-tissue-harbouring hypostome. PMID:22558180

  1. Minimally invasive microendoscopy system for in vivo functional imaging of deep nuclei in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Bocarsly, Miriam E.; Jiang, Wan-chen; Wang, Chen; Dudman, Joshua T.; Ji, Na; Aponte, Yeka

    2015-01-01

    The ability to image neurons anywhere in the mammalian brain is a major goal of optical microscopy. Here we describe a minimally invasive microendoscopy system for studying the morphology and function of neurons at depth. Utilizing a guide cannula with an ultrathin wall, we demonstrated in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of deeply buried nuclei such as the striatum (2.5 mm depth), substantia nigra (4.4 mm depth) and lateral hypothalamus (5.0 mm depth) in mouse brain. We reported, for the first time, the observation of neuronal activity with subcellular resolution in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia nigra of head-fixed awake mice. PMID:26601017

  2. Minimally invasive microendoscopy system for in vivo functional imaging of deep nuclei in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bocarsly, Miriam E; Jiang, Wan-Chen; Wang, Chen; Dudman, Joshua T; Ji, Na; Aponte, Yeka

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image neurons anywhere in the mammalian brain is a major goal of optical microscopy. Here we describe a minimally invasive microendoscopy system for studying the morphology and function of neurons at depth. Utilizing a guide cannula with an ultrathin wall, we demonstrated in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of deeply buried nuclei such as the striatum (2.5 mm depth), substantia nigra (4.4 mm depth) and lateral hypothalamus (5.0 mm depth) in mouse brain. We reported, for the first time, the observation of neuronal activity with subcellular resolution in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia nigra of head-fixed awake mice. PMID:26601017

  3. Effect of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on Mouse Resistance to Systemic Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blumstein, Gideon W.; Parsa, Arya; Park, Anthony K.; McDowell, Beverly L. P.; Arroyo-Mendoza, Melissa; Girguis, Marie; Adler-Moore, Jill P.; Olson, Jon; Buckley, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is known to suppress the immune responses to bacterial, viral and protozoan infections, but its effects on fungal infections have not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic ?9-THC treatment on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection. To determine the outcome of chronic ?9-THC treatment on primary, acute systemic candidiasis, c57BL/6 mice were given vehicle or ?9-THC (16 mg/kg) in vehicle on days 1–4, 8–11 and 15–18. On day 19, mice were infected with 5×105 C. albicans. We also determined the effect of chronic ?9-THC (4–64 mg/kg) treatment on mice infected with a non-lethal dose of 7.5×104 C. albicans on day 2, followed by a higher challenge with 5×105 C. albicans on day 19. Mouse resistance to the infection was assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. Serum cytokine levels were determine to evaluate the immune responses. In the acute infection, chronic ?9-THC treatment had no effect on mouse survival or tissue fungal load when compared to vehicle treated mice. However, ?9-THC significantly suppressed IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 as well as marginally suppressed IL-17 versus vehicle treated mice. In comparison, when mice were given a secondary yeast infection, ?9-THC significantly decreased survival, increased tissue fungal burden and suppressed serum IFN-? and IL-12p40 levels compared to vehicle treated mice. The data showed that chronic ?9-THC treatment decreased the efficacy of the memory immune response to candida infection, which correlated with a decrease in IFN-? that was only observed after the secondary candida challenge. PMID:25057822

  4. Microalgal system for treatment of effluent from poultry litter anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjinder; Reynolds, David L; Das, Keshav C

    2011-12-01

    The potential of mixotrophic microalgae to utilize poultry litter anaerobic digester (AD) effluent (PLDE) as nutritional growth medium was evaluated. Three algal strains viz. Chlorella minutissima, Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus bijuga and their consortium showed significant biomass productivity in 6% (v/v) concentration of PLDE in deionized water. Multiple booster dosage of PLDE supported better growth relative to a single dose PLDE. The maximum biomass productivity of 76 mg L(-1) d(-1) was recorded. The biomass was rich in protein (39% w/w) and carbohydrates (22%) while lipids (<10%) were low, making it most suitable as an animal feed supplement. The mixotrophic algae showed sustainable growth against variations in PLDE composition in different AD batches, thus proving to be a suitable candidate for large scale wastewater treatment with concomitant production of renewable biomass feedstock for animal feed and bioenergy applications. PMID:21967714

  5. Graphical analysis of the interrelationships among waterborne asbestos, digestive system cancer and population density

    SciTech Connect

    Tarter, M.E.; Cooper, R.C.; Freeman, W.R.

    1983-11-01

    Five statistical procedures were used to partial the correlation between waterborne asbestos and digestive site cancer for the putative effects of population density. These include: analysis based on a data subset with roughly homogeneous population density; standard residual analysis (partial correlation); conditional probability integral transformation; analysis based upon ranked data, and use of logarithmic transformation. To examine the nature or shape of the asbestos-cancer dose-response curve, nonparametric regression graphical techniques are applied. There appears to be a considerable difference between analyses involving non-high-density tracts and non-San Francisco tracts. Evidence is also presented that the modal-type nonparametric regression curve forks or bifurcates when adjustment is made for population density. 24 references, 25 figures.

  6. Toward a Systems Biology of Mouse Inner Ear Organogenesis: Gene Expression Pathways, Patterns and Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sajan, Samin A.; Warchol, Mark E.; Lovett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We describe the most comprehensive study to date on gene expression during mouse inner ear (IE) organogenesis. Samples were microdissected from mouse embryos at E9–E15 in half-day intervals, a period that spans all of IE organogenesis. These included separate dissections of all discernible IE substructures such as the cochlea, utricle, and saccule. All samples were analyzed on high density expression microarrays under strict statistical filters. Extensive confirmatory tests were performed, including RNA in situ hybridizations. More than 5000 genes significantly varied in expression according to developmental stage, tissue, or both and defined 28 distinct expression patterns. For example, upregulation of 315 genes provided a clear-cut “signature” of early events in IE specification. Additional, clear-cut, gene expression signatures marked specific structures such as the cochlea, utricle, or saccule throughout late IE development. Pathway analysis identified 53 signaling cascades enriched within the 28 patterns. Many novel pathways, not previously implicated in IE development, including ?-adrenergic, amyloid, estrogen receptor, circadian rhythm, and immune system pathways, were identified. Finally, we identified positional candidate genes in 54 uncloned nonsyndromic human deafness intervals. This detailed analysis provides many new insights into the spatial and temporal genetic specification of this complex organ system. PMID:17660535

  7. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development

    PubMed Central

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D.; Brehm, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these “humanized models” is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow optimal development of human immune systems. However there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. PMID:25062635

  8. Closeout final report on a demonstration test and evaluation of the Cannon Low-NOx Digester System

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Cannon Boiler Works Inc. has been investigating a system for removing NOx from the exhaust gases of furnaces, gas turbines, chemical reactors, incinerators, and boilers. Computer simulations, bench-scale and pilot plant tests have proved that the system is capable of removing substantially all of the NOx from natural gas fired equipment exhaust streams. Originally designated as the Cannon NOx Digester, it has recently been renamed the Low Temperature Oxidation (LTO) System for NOx and SOx Reduction. The principal elements in the system are a fan, heat exchanger, oxidation chamber, spray chamber acting as a gas/liquid absorber, demister, an ozone generator, liquid oxygen storage or dry air supply system for the ozonator, chemical storage and metering system for the caustic neutralizer, and a data acquisition and control system. Most of the ozone is consumed in converting NOx to N{sub 2}O{sub 5} which hydrates to nitric acid which is then scrubbed out of the gas as it passes through the absorber. CO also reacts with ozone to form CO{sub 2} which is subsequently scrubbed out with NaOH. A demonstration, planned for the Alta Dena Dairy located near Los Angeles and in violation of California`s air quality regulations for natural gas fired boilers, was started, delayed due to boiler modifications, and will be continued shortly with new funding. This paper describes the LTO process and presents results from the initial demonstration.

  9. In vitro digestion of short-dough biscuits enriched in proteins and/or fibres using a multi-compartmental and dynamic system (2): Protein and starch hydrolyses.

    PubMed

    Villemejane, C; Denis, S; Marsset-Baglieri, A; Alric, M; Aymard, P; Michon, C

    2016-01-01

    The influence of protein and/or fibre enrichment on the nutritional properties of biscuits was studied in terms of proteolysis and amylolysis. Biscuits were digested using a multi-compartmental and dynamic system that simulates the main physiological digestive functions of the upper tract of healthy adult humans: the TIM-1. A control biscuit and three biscuits enriched in proteins and/or fibres were digested under the same conditions. Samples were collected in each compartment of the TIM-1 (stomach, duodenum, jejunum and ileum) at different times of digestion and analysed in terms of proteolysis and amylolysis. Results indicate that both formulation and processing impacted the digestive fate of the biscuits. Incorporating proteins or fibres in biscuits lowered or delayed proteolysis. Moreover a protein-plus-fibre additional or synergic effect was observed. Biscuits enriched in proteins and/or fibres displayed a higher amylolysis degree than the control biscuit, probably due to lower starch amounts and higher gelatinization degrees. PMID:26212956

  10. Anxiety and depression, cognitive coping strategies, and health locus of control in patients with digestive system cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulpa, Marta; Kosowicz, Mariola; Kazalska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Contemporary psycho-oncology focuses on the study of the psychological determinants of the functioning of cancer patients. Among the psychological factors that significantly affect the functioning of the patients are anxiety and depressive disorders. Aim To assess the psychological functioning of patients with digestive system cancer in the cancer-treating process and to develop guidelines for psychological care dedicated to this group of patients based on the results of the study. Material and methods A total of 69 patients aged 23 to 91 (average 56) years with digestive system cancer treated in the Gastroenterology Cancer Clinic in the Institute of Oncology in Warsaw were examined using HADS, Mini-MAC, and MHLC. The results were analysed using statistical tests and correlation analysis. Another 532 patients from other wards formed the reference group. Results Measured HLC, anxiety, and depression did not differ significantly from the overall patient population. The investigation of the relationships between anxiety and depression and mental adjustment to cancer showed a positive correlation between anxiety and depression and anxious preoccupation and hopelessness-helplessness, and negative correlation between anxiety and depression and fighting spirit. Conclusions The obtained research results on the correlation of anxiety and depression with health locus of control show that the lower the severity of anxiety and depression, the higher the severity of internal health locus of control. The results confirm the necessity of psychological support forcancer patients showing evidence of destructive attitudes and external health locus of control, so that the severity of anxiety-depressive disorders can indirectly be reduced. PMID:25653727

  11. Study on the Volatility of Cesium in Dry Ashing Pretreatment and Dissolution of Ash by Microwave Digestion System - 13331

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyuseok

    2013-07-01

    Based on the regulation of the activity concentration of Cs-137, Co-58, Co-60, Fe-55, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Nb-94, and Tc-99, and the total alpha from the radioactive waste acceptance criteria, the measurement of the activity concentration of these nuclides in low and intermediate levels of radioactive waste such as in paper, cotton, vinyl and plastic samples was investigated. A dry ashing method was applied to obtain a concentration effect of the samples. Owing to the temperature dependence of the volatility for cesium, the temperature of 300 to 650 deg. C was examined. It was found that 450 deg. C is the optimum dry ashing temperature. After dry ashing, the produced ash was dissolved with HNO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system. The ash sample, for the most part, was completely dissolved with 10 mL of HNO{sub 3}, 4 mL of HCl, and 0.25 mL of HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system using a nova high temperature rotor at 250 deg. C for 90 min until reaching 0.2 g. To confirm the reliability of cesium loss after the performance of the dry ashing procedure, a cesium standard solution for AAS and a Cs-137 standard solution for gamma spectrometry were added to a paper towel or a planchet of stainless steel, respectively. Cesium was measured by AAS, ICP-MS, and gamma spectrometry. The volatility of cesium did not occur until 450 deg. C ashing. (authors)

  12. Fast synchronized dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging system for monitoring hemodynamic changes in a stroke mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Reif, Roberto; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a newly developed synchronized dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (SDW-LSCI) system, which contains two cameras that are synchronously triggered to acquire data. The system can acquire data at a high spatiotemporal resolution (up to 500Hz for ~1000×1000 pixels). A mouse model of stroke is used to demonstrate the capability for imaging the fast changes (within tens of milliseconds) in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and the relative changes in blood flow in the mouse brain, through an intact cranium. This novel imaging technology will enable the study of fast hemodynamics and metabolic changes in vascular diseases. PMID:23027260

  13. A microbial clock provides an accurate estimate of the postmortem interval in a mouse model system

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Wegener Parfrey, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonio; Lauber, Christian L; Knights, Dan; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Gregory C; Gebert, Matthew J; Van Treuren, Will; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Keepers, Kyle; Guo, Yan; Bullard, James; Fierer, Noah; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Establishing the time since death is critical in every death investigation, yet existing techniques are susceptible to a range of errors and biases. For example, forensic entomology is widely used to assess the postmortem interval (PMI), but errors can range from days to months. Microbes may provide a novel method for estimating PMI that avoids many of these limitations. Here we show that postmortem microbial community changes are dramatic, measurable, and repeatable in a mouse model system, allowing PMI to be estimated within approximately 3 days over 48 days. Our results provide a detailed understanding of bacterial and microbial eukaryotic ecology within a decomposing corpse system and suggest that microbial community data can be developed into a forensic tool for estimating PMI. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01104.001 PMID:24137541

  14. Functional Analysis of Dopaminergic Systems in a DYT1 Knock-in Mouse Model of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chang-Hyun; Fan, Xueliang; Exeter, Cicely J.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal posturing. The most common of the inherited dystonias is DYT1 dystonia, which is due to deletion of a single GAG codon (?E) in the TOR1A gene that encodes torsinA. Since some forms of dystonia have been linked with dysfunction of brain dopamine pathways, the integrity of these pathways was explored in a knock-in mouse model of DYT1 dystonia. In DYT1(?E) knock-in mice, neurochemical measures revealed only small changes in the content of dopamine or its metabolites in tissue homogenates from caudoputamen or midbrain, but microdialysis studies revealed robust decreases in baseline and amphetamine-stimulated extracellular dopamine in the caudoputamen. Quantitative stereological methods revealed no evidence for striatal or midbrain atrophy, but substantia nigra neurons immunopositive for tyrosine hydroxylase were slightly reduced in numbers and enlarged in size. Behavioral studies revealed subtle abnormalities in gross motor activity and motor coordination without overt dystonia. Neuropharmacological challenges of dopamine systems revealed normal behavioral responses to amphetamine and a minor increase in sensitivity to haloperidol. These results demonstrate that this DYT1(?E) knock-in mouse model of dystonia harbors neurochemical and structural changes of the dopamine pathways, as well as motor abnormalities. PMID:22659308

  15. Peripheral nervous system defects in a mouse model for peroxisomal biogenesis disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M. Gartz; Fregoso, Veronica; Vrana, Justin D.; Tucker, Chandra L.; Niswander, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are autosomal recessive disorders in humans characterized by skeletal, eye and brain abnormalities. Despite the fact that neurological deficits, including peripheral nervous system (PNS) defects, can be observed at birth in some PBD patients including those with PEX10 mutations, the embryological basis of the PNS defects is unclear. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified a mouse model for Pex10 deficiency that exhibits neurological abnormalities during fetal development. Homozygous Pex10 mutant mouse embryos display biochemical abnormalities related to a PBD deficiency. During late embryogenesis, Pex10 homozygous mutant mice experience progressive loss of movement and at birth they become cyanotic and die shortly thereafter. Homozygous Pex10 mutant fetuses display decreased integrity of axons and synapses, over-extension of axons in the diaphragm and decreased Schwann cell numbers. Our neuropathological, molecular and electrophysiological studies provide new insights into the embryological basis of the PNS deficits in a PBD model. Our findings identify PEX10 function, and likely other PEX proteins, as an essential component of the spinal locomotor circuit. PMID:25176044

  16. Two-phase anaerobic digestion within a solid waste/wastewater integrated management system

    SciTech Connect

    De Gioannis, G.; Diaz, L.F.; Muntoni, A. Pisanu, A.

    2008-07-01

    A two-phase, wet anaerobic digestion process was tested at laboratory scale using mechanically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) as the substrate. The proposed process scheme differs from others due to the integration of the MSW and wastewater treatment cycles, which makes it possible to avoid the recirculation of process effluent. The results obtained show that the supplying of facultative biomass, drawn from the wastewater aeration tank, to the solid waste acidogenic reactor allows an improvement of the performance of the first phase of the process which is positively reflected on the second one. The proposed process performed successfully, adopting mesophilic conditions and a relatively short hydraulic retention time in the methanogenic reactor, as well as high values of organic loading rate. Significant VS removal efficiency and biogas production were achieved. Moreover, the methanogenic reactor quickly reached optimal conditions for a stable methanogenic phase. Studies conducted elsewhere also confirm the feasibility of integrating the treatment of the organic fraction of MSW with that of wastewater.

  17. A demonstration test and evaluation of the Cannon Low-NO{sub x} Digester System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Since 1985, Cannon Boiler Works, Inc. has been carrying out research and development efforts to perfect a system for removing nitrogen oxides, NO{sub x}, from the exhaust gases of furnaces, gas turbines, chemical reactors, incinerators and boilers.Computer simulations, bench-scale tests and pilot plant testing have proved that the system is capable of removing substantially all of the NO{sub x} from natural gas-fired equipment exhaust streams. Furthermore when retrofit to industrial boilers, both capital costs and operating costs are lower than for competing processes, while performance is much better. The Cannon system for removing NO{sub x}, originally designated as the Cannon NO{sub x} Digester, has recently been renamed the Low Temperature Oxidation (LTO) System for NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} Reduction. It will be engineered and marketed by Cannon Technology, Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Cannon Boiler Works, Inc. Cannon has US patents for the process and for the associated equipment and has patent applications pending in Europe. Cannon`s Low Temperature Oxidation, LTO, process has proved effective for reducing the levels of NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and particulates from boiler flue gases.

  18. CWD prions remain infectious after passage through the digestive system of coyotes (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Nichols, Tracy A; Fischer, Justin W; Spraker, Terry R; Kong, Qingzhong; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2015-09-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a geographically expanding prion disease of wild and captive cervids in North America. Disease can be transmitted directly, animal to animal, or indirectly via the environment. CWD contamination can occur residually in the environment via soil, water, and forage following deposition of bodily fluids such as urine, saliva, and feces, or by the decomposition of carcasses. Recent work has indicated that plants may even take up prions into the stems and leaves. When a carcass or gut pile is present in the environment, a large number of avian and mammalian species visit and consume the carrion. Additionally, predators like coyotes, likely select for disease-compromised cervids. Natural cross-species CWD transmission has not been documented, however, passage of infectious prion material has been observed in the feces of crows. In this study we evaluated the ability of CWD-infected brain material to pass through the gastrointestinal tract of coyotes (Canis latrans) following oral ingestion, and be infectious in a cervidized transgenic mouse model. Results from this study indicate that coyotes can pass infectious prions via their feces for at least 3 days post ingestion, demonstrating that mammalian scavengers could contribute to the translocation and contamination of CWD in the environment. PMID:26636258

  19. Pressurized Pepsin Digestion in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    López-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Robinson, Errol W.; Hixson, Kim K.; Tian, Zhixin; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Sang-Won; Toli?, Nikola; Weitz, Karl K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Toli?, Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Integrated top-down bottom-up proteomics combined with on-line digestion has great potential to improve the characterization of protein isoforms in biological systems and is amendable to high throughput proteomics experiments. Bottom-up proteomics ultimately provides the peptide sequences derived from the tandem MS analyses of peptides after the proteome has been digested. Top-down proteomics conversely entails the MS analyses of intact proteins for more effective characterization of genetic variations and/or post-translational modifications. Herein, we describe recent efforts toward efficient integration of bottom-up and top-down LC-MS-based proteomics strategies. Since most proteomics separations utilize acidic conditions, we exploited the compatibility of pepsin (where the optimal digestion conditions are at low pH) for integration into bottom-up and top-down proteomics work flows. Pressure-enhanced pepsin digestions were successfully performed and characterized with several standard proteins in either an off-line mode using a Barocycler or an on-line mode using a modified high pressure LC system referred to as a fast on-line digestion system (FOLDS). FOLDS was tested using pepsin and a whole microbial proteome, and the results were compared against traditional trypsin digestions on the same platform. Additionally, FOLDS was integrated with a RePlay configuration to demonstrate an ultrarapid integrated bottom-up top-down proteomics strategy using a standard mixture of proteins and a monkey pox virus proteome. PMID:20627868

  20. A pilot plant two-phase anaerobic digestion system for bioenergy recovery from swine wastes and garbage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chuanping; Shimada, Sadoru; Zhang, Zhenya; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    A pilot plant bioenergy recovery system from swine waste and garbage was constructed. A series of experiments was performed using swine feces (SF); a mixture of swine feces and urine (MSFU); a mixture of swine feces, urine and garbage (MSFUG); garbage and a mixture of urine and garbage (AUG). The system performed well for treating the source materials at a high organic loading rate (OLR) and short hydraulic retention time (HRT). In particular, the biogas production for the MSFUG was the highest, accounting for approximately 865-930 L kg(-1)-VS added at the OLR of 5.0-5.3 kg-VS m(-3) day(-1) and the HRT of 9 days. The removal of VS was 67-75%, and that of COD was 73-74%. Therefore, co-digestion is a promising method for the recovery of bioenergy from swine waste and garbage. Furthermore, the results obtained from this study provide fundamental information for scaling up a high-performance anaerobic system in the future. PMID:17904349

  1. Merits of the fat-tailed Barbarine sheep raised in different production systems in Tunisia: digestive, productive and reproductive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Hichem; Lassoued, Narjess; Rekik, Mourad

    2011-10-01

    Barbarine sheep is the dominant breed in Tunisia. This fat-tailed breed present in all production systems is characterised by metabolic and digestive adaptation to the contrasting environment conditions prevailing in the country (heat stress, water deprivation, salinity etc.). The fat tail (1.5 to 7 kg) is an energy reservoir that is used in periods of feed scarcity. Moreover, the rumen of this breed harbours a microflora enabling it to valorize low-quality roughages and native range vegetation. Barbarine sheep could make benefit from a wide range of local feed resources like fodder shrubs (e.g. cactus and oldman saltbushes), tannin-containing shrubs (e.g. Acacia cyanophylla) and agro-industrial by-products (e.g. olive cake, bran etc. conserved in the form of feed blocks or pellets). It has a very shallow anoestrous, the intensity of which is dependant upon nutrition conditions rather than day length as temperate breeds. Productive and reproductive performances of late pregnant-early suckling, pre-mating ewes and also rams of this breed are not affected when some alternative feed resources replace common feedstuffs which are expensive and cannot afford regularly to smallholders. In brief, the merits of the Barbarine sheep in the production systems and other main adaptive mechanisms of this breed are discussed in this paper. The prospective of Barbarine sheep husbandry in the system dynamics, climate change and the evolution of the socioeconomic context are also envisaged. PMID:21533615

  2. Comparison of single-stage and two-phase anaerobic sludge digestion systems - Performance and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maspolim, Yogananda; Zhou, Yan; Guo, Chenghong; Xiao, Keke; Ng, Wun Jern

    2015-12-01

    This study compared reactor performance and the respective microbial community dynamics in the conventional single-stage and 2-phase anaerobic digestion (AD) systems, treating municipal sludge to generate methane. The 2-phase system's COD and VS reduction, and methane production could be maintained throughout the three HRTs tested (p=0.05), which was associated with an increase in organic loading (30d=1.5gCODL(-1)d(-1), 20d=2.2gCODL(-1)d(-1) and 10d=3.5gCODL(-1)d(-1)); but this was not so in the single-stage system where it deteriorated at HRT of 10d (p=0.05) due to impairment of particulate COD reduction. qPCR, DGGE and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that microbial adaptation occurred as the seed sludge formed a different community in each reactor at 30d HRT; however, no further significant microbial shift occurred at lower HRTs. The presence of specific hydrolytic and acidogenic Flavobacteriales and Clostriales in the acidogenic reactor may have allowed for enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis, leading to higher organic loading tolerance at 10d HRT. Methanogenic activity in the acidogenic reactor may have been performed by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinaceae. Operation of the acidogenic reactor at neutral pH may have to be considered to ensure the cultivation of propionate oxidising bacteria, which could in turn, prevent reactor "souring" during high load conditions. PMID:25096961

  3. MONICA: A Compact, Portable Dual Gamma Camera System for Mouse Whole-Body Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Wenze; Seidel, Jurgen; Karkareka, John W.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Milenic, Diane E.; Proffitt, James; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Green, Michael V.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We describe a compact, portable dual-gamma camera system (named “MONICA” for MObile Nuclear Imaging CAmeras) for visualizing and analyzing the whole-body biodistribution of putative diagnostic and therapeutic single photon emitting radiotracers in animals the size of mice. Methods Two identical, miniature pixelated NaI(Tl) gamma cameras were fabricated and installed “looking up” through the tabletop of a compact portable cart. Mice are placed directly on the tabletop for imaging. Camera imaging performance was evaluated with phantoms and field performance was evaluated in a weeklong In-111 imaging study performed in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Results Tc-99m performance measurements, using a photopeak energy window of 140 keV ± 10%, yielded the following results: spatial resolution (FWHM at 1-cm), 2.2-mm; sensitivity, 149 cps/MBq (5.5 cps/?Ci); energy resolution (FWHM), 10.8%; count rate linearity (count rate vs. activity), r2 = 0.99 for 0–185 MBq (0–5 mCi) in the field-of-view (FOV); spatial uniformity, < 3% count rate variation across the FOV. Tumor and whole-body distributions of the In-111 agent were well visualized in all animals in 5-minute images acquired throughout the 168-hour study period. Conclusion Performance measurements indicate that MONICA is well suited to whole-body single photon mouse imaging. The field study suggests that inter-device communications and user-oriented interfaces included in the MONICA design facilitate use of the system in practice. We believe that MONICA may be particularly useful early in the (cancer) drug development cycle where basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors, e.g. limited imaging space, portability, and, potentially, cost are important. PMID:20346864

  4. MARS: a mouse atlas registration system based on a planar x-ray projector and an optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongkai; Stout, David B.; Taschereau, Richard; Gu, Zheng; Vu, Nam T.; Prout, David L.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces a mouse atlas registration system (MARS), composed of a stationary top-view x-ray projector and a side-view optical camera, coupled to a mouse atlas registration algorithm. This system uses the x-ray and optical images to guide a fully automatic co-registration of a mouse atlas with each subject, in order to provide anatomical reference for small animal molecular imaging systems such as positron emission tomography (PET). To facilitate the registration, a statistical atlas that accounts for inter-subject anatomical variations was constructed based on 83 organ-labeled mouse micro-computed tomography (CT) images. The statistical shape model and conditional Gaussian model techniques were used to register the atlas with the x-ray image and optical photo. The accuracy of the atlas registration was evaluated by comparing the registered atlas with the organ-labeled micro-CT images of the test subjects. The results showed excellent registration accuracy of the whole-body region, and good accuracy for the brain, liver, heart, lungs and kidneys. In its implementation, the MARS was integrated with a preclinical PET scanner to deliver combined PET/MARS imaging, and to facilitate atlas-assisted analysis of the preclinical PET images.

  5. Non-steady peristaltic propulsion with exponential variable viscosity: a study of transport through the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Pandey, S K; Siddiqui, Abdul; Bég, O Anwar

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented for transient peristaltic flow of an incompressible fluid with variable viscosity in a finite length cylindrical tube as a simulation of transport in physiological vessels and biomimetic peristaltic pumps. The current axisymmetric analysis is qualitatively similar to two-dimensional analysis but exhibits quantitative variations. The current analysis is motivated towards further elucidating the physiological migration of gastric suspensions (food bolus) in the human digestive system. It also applies to variable viscosity industrial fluid (waste) peristaltic pumping systems. First, an axisymmetric model is analysed in the limit of large wavelength ([Formula: see text]) and low Reynolds number ([Formula: see text]) for axial velocity, radial velocity, pressure, hydromechanical efficiency and stream function in terms of radial vibration of the wall ([Formula: see text]), amplitude of the wave ([Formula: see text]), averaged flow rate ([Formula: see text]) and variable viscosity ([Formula: see text]). Subsequently, the peristaltic flow of a fluid with an exponential viscosity model is examined, which is based on the analytical solutions for pressure, wall shear stress, hydromechanical efficiency and streamline patterns in the finite length tube. The results are found to correlate well with earlier studies using a constant viscosity formulation. This study reveals some important features in the flow characteristics including the observation that pressure as well as both number and size of lower trapped bolus increases. Furthermore, the study indicates that hydromechanical efficiency reduces with increasing magnitude of viscosity parameter. PMID:22817394

  6. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  7. Establishment of a specific cell death induction system in Bombyx mori by a transgene with the conserved apoptotic regulator, mouse Bcl-2-associated X protein (mouse Bax).

    PubMed

    Sumitani, M; Sakurai, T; Kasashima, K; Kobayashi, S; Uchino, K; Kanzaki, R; Tamura, T; Sezutsu, H

    2015-12-01

    The induction of apoptosis in vivo is a useful tool for investigating the functions and importance of particular tissues. B-cell leukaemia/lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax) functions as a pro-apoptotic factor and induces apoptosis in several organisms. The Bax-mediated apoptotic system is widely conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. In order to establish a tissue-specific cell death system in the domestic silkworm, Bombyx mori, we constructed a transgenic silkworm that overexpressed mouse Bax (mBax) in particular tissues by the Gal4-upstream activation sequence system. We found that the expression of mBax induced specific cell death in the silk gland, fat body and sensory cells. Fragmentation of genomic DNA was observed in the fat body, which expressed mBax, thereby supporting apoptotic cell death in this tissue. Using this system, we also demonstrated that specific cell death in sensory cells attenuated the response to the sex pheromone bombykol. These results show that we successfully established a tissue-specific cell death system in vivo that enabled specific deficiencies in particular tissues. The inducible cell death system may provide useful means for industrial applications of the silkworm and possible utilization for other species. PMID:26426866

  8. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying A? concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  9. Studies on the effect of dimecron on the digestive system of a fresh water fish, Channa punctatus.

    PubMed

    Sastry, K V; Malik, P V

    1979-01-01

    The effect of exposure to a sublethal concentration (0.32 mg/L) of Dimecron for 20 days on the digestive system of a fresh water teleost fish, Channa punctatus has been studied. The most conspicuous pathological changes in the liver were vacuolation of the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, enlargement of nuclei, rupture of the cell membrane, liver cord disarray, damage of connective tissue, infiltration of phagocytes and necrosis. The mucosa of stomach was ruptured and the gastric glands were degenerated. The mucosal epithelium of intestine and pyloric caeca was also degenerated. The mucus secreting goblet cells showed hyperactivity and the intestinal lumen was filled with mucus. No conspicuous changes were noted in the rectum except for hypersecretion of mucus. Histochemical tests revealed that alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase were inhibited by Dimecron treatment. However, acid phosphatase showed slight increase in activity. Biochemical tests for enzyme activity confirmed the histochemical findings. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly inhibited in liver and intestine. There was a slight elevation in the activity of acid phosphatase in the liver and pyloric caeca of exposed fish, but this was not statistically significant. The glucose-6-phosphatase activity was significantly inhibited in the liver, intestine and pyloric caeca. PMID:485208

  10. Design and Economic Analysis of a Heating/Absorption Cooling System Operating with Municipal Solid Waste Digester: A Case Study of Gazi University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co?ar, Gökhan; Pooyanfar, Mirparham; Amirabedin, Ehsan; Topal, Hüseyin

    2013-12-01

    Recovering energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the most important issues of energy management in developed countries. This raises even more interest as world fossil fuel reserves diminish and fuel prices rise. Being one of main processes of waste disposal, anaerobic digestion can be used as a means to reduce fossil fuel and electricity consumption as well as reducing emissions. With growing demand for cooling in Turkey, especially during warm seasons and considering the energy costs, utilizing heat-driven absorption cooling systems coupled with an anaerobic digester for local cooling purposes is a potentially interesting alternative for electricity driven compression cooling. The aim of this article is to study the viability of utilizing biogas obtained from MSW anaerobic digestion as the main fuel for heating facilities of Gazi University, Turkey and also the energy source for an absorption cooling system designed for the central library of the aforementioned campus. The results prove that the suggested system is sustainably and financially appealing and has the potential to replace the conventional electricity driven cooling systems with a reasonable net present worth; moreover, it can notably reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  11. A Throughput-Optimized Array System for Multiple-Mouse MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Marc S.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2012-01-01

    MRI is a versatile tool for systematically assessing anatomical and functional changes in small animal models of human disease. Its noninvasive nature makes MRI an ideal candidate for longitudinal evaluations of disease progression, but relatively long scan times limit the number of observations that can be made in a given interval of time, imposing restrictions on experiment design and potentially compromising statistical power. Methods that reduce the overall time that is required to scan multiple cohorts of animals in distinct experimental groups are therefore highly desirable. Multiple-mouse MRI, in which several animals are simultaneously scanned in a common MRI system, has been successfully used to improve study throughput. However, to best utilize the next generation of small-animal MRI systems that will be equipped with an increased number of receive channels, a paradigm shift from simultaneously scanning as many animals as possible to scanning a more manageable number, at a faster rate, must be considered. This work explores the tradeoffs between the number of animals to scan at once and the number of array elements dedicated to each animal, to maximize throughput in systems with 16 receive channels. An array system consisting of 15 receive and five transmit coils allows acceleration by a combination of multi-animal and parallel imaging techniques. The array system was designed and fabricated for use on a 7.0-T/30-cm Bruker Biospec MRI system, and tested for high-throughput imaging performance in phantoms and live mice. Results indicate that up to a ninefold throughput improvement of a single sequence is possible compared to an unaccelerated single-animal acquisition. True data throughput of a contrast-enhanced anatomical study is estimated to be improved by just over six-fold. PMID:22887122

  12. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  13. Axonal regeneration of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons studied by an optical nano-surgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difato, F.; Tsushima, H.; Pesce, M.; Guiggiani, A.; Benfenati, F.; Blau, A.; Basso, M.; Vassalli, M.; Chieregatti, E.

    2012-02-01

    During development, the axons of neurons in the mammalian central nervous system lose their ability to regenerate after injury. In order to study the regeneration process, we developed a system integrating an optical tweezers and a laser dissector to manipulate the sample. A sub-nanosecond pulsed UVA laser was used to inflict a partial damage to the axon of mouse hippocampal neurons at early days in vitro. Partial axonal transections were performed in a highly controlled and reproducible way without affecting the regeneration process. Force spectroscopy measurements, during and after the ablation of the axon, were performed by optical tweezers with a bead attached to the neuronal membrane. Thus, the release of tension in the neurite could be analyzed in order to quantify the inflicted damage. After dissection, we monitored the viscoelastic properties of the axonal membrane, the cytoskeleton reorganization, and the dynamics of the newly formed growth cones during regeneration. In order to follow cytoskeleton dynamics in a long time window by tracking a bead attached to the neuron, we developed a real-time control of the microscope stage position with sub-millisecond and nanometer resolution. Axonal regeneration was documented by long-term (24-48 hours) bright-field live imaging using an optical microscope equipped with a custom-built cell culture incubator.

  14. Creation of a Human Immune System in a SCID Mouse Model

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    ) Cell Isolation from Mouse Spleen and Thymus Tissue Implanted Matrix Mouse Thymu SCID Mouse Model 200X Splee n Thymus Bone Marrow 64% 33% 91% 29% 66% CFSE #12;M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 Implanted Cord Blood Cells CD19 CD3 CD8 CD4 Dissecte d thymus Thymus M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 M1 M2 86 % 14 % 89

  15. Does perineural invasion of the myenteric plexus have a key role in annular rectal invasion and digestive system symptoms of prostate carcinoma patients?

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hirotsugu; Kurata, Atsushi; Nashiro, Tamaki; Kuroda, Masahiko; Horiuchi, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    Prostate carcinoma is one of the most common cancers globally. It relatively rarely invades the rectum, accounting for only about 4% of resected cases. About half of these cases of rectal invasion show an annular rectal stricture pattern. It has been hypothesized that anatomical structures, namely Denonvilliers fascia, may play an important role in annular rectal involvement of prostate carcinoma. Here, we propose another hypothesis: the reason for annular rectal invasion by prostate carcinoma is its extension along the myenteric plexus (Auerbach's plexus). We illustrate this using a case presentation and description of the symptoms of such cases. From a review of the literature, autonomic digestive system symptoms of rectal invasion of prostatic carcinoma, such as diarrhea, tenesmus, or fecal incontinence is seen in about half of cases, coinciding with the frequency of annular rectal invasion. Thus, by modifying the long-established hypothesis, our suggestion that prostate carcinoma spreads along the myenteric plexus when cancer cells invade beyond the Denonvilliers fascia to the rectum could explain the cause and frequency not only of the annular rectal invasion but also the digestive system symptoms related to this disease. The prognosis of prostate carcinoma invading the rectum is very poor; however, this new hypothesis might shed light on the digestive system symptoms associated with prostate carcinoma and might lead to recognition and treatment of these cases at a relatively early stage of rectal invasion. PMID:26433688

  16. AAV6-mediated Systemic shRNA Delivery Reverses Disease in a Mouse Model of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bortolanza, Sergia; Nonis, Alessandro; Sanvito, Francesca; Maciotta, Simona; Sitia, Giovanni; Wei, Jessica; Torrente, Yvan; Di Serio, Clelia; Chamberlain, Joel R; Gabellini, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dominantly inherited muscle disorders remains a difficult task considering the need to eliminate the pathogenic gene product in a body-wide fashion. We show here that it is possible to reverse dominant muscle disease in a mouse model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). FSHD is a common form of muscular dystrophy associated with a complex cascade of epigenetic events following reduction in copy number of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats located on chromosome 4q35. Several 4q35 genes have been examined for their role in disease, including FRG1. Overexpression of FRG1 causes features related to FSHD in transgenic mice and the FRG1 mouse is currently the only available mouse model of FSHD. Here we show that systemic delivery of RNA interference expression cassettes in the FRG1 mouse, after the onset of disease, led to a dose-dependent long-term FRG1 knockdown without signs of toxicity. Histological features including centrally nucleated fibers, fiber size reduction, fibrosis, adipocyte accumulation, and inflammation were all significantly improved. FRG1 mRNA knockdown resulted in a dramatic restoration of muscle function. Through RNA interference (RNAi) expression cassette redesign, our method is amenable to targeting any pathogenic gene offering a viable option for long-term, body-wide treatment of dominant muscle disease in humans. PMID:21829175

  17. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-?-muricholic acid, tauro-?-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-?-muricholic acid, tauro-?-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity. PMID:25870546

  18. Expression of the mouse PR domain protein Prdm8 in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Komai, Tae; Iwanari, Hiroko; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Hamakubo, Takao; Shinkai, Yoichi

    2009-10-01

    It was first shown in the PR (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology) domain family proteins that the PR domain has homology to the SET (Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste and Trithorax) domain, a catalytic domain of the histone lysine methyltransferases. Recently, there are many reports that the PR domain proteins have important roles in development and/or cell differentiation. In this report, we show the expression patterns of one of the mouse PR domain proteins, Prdm8, in the developing central nervous system. In the developing retina, Prdm8 expression was detected in postmitotic neurons in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer, and its expression became restricted predominantly to the rod bipolar cells when retinogenesis was completed. In the developing spinal cord, Prdm8 was expressed first in the progenitor populations of ventral interneurons and motor neurons, and later in a subpopulation of interneurons. In the developing brain, Prdm8 expression was observed in postmitotic neurons in the intermediate zone and the cortical plate. In the postnatal brain, Prdm8 was expressed mainly in layer 4 neurons of the cerebral cortex. These results show that Prdm8 expression is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner during neural development and mainly restricted to postmitotic neurons, except in the spinal cord. PMID:19616129

  19. Quantification, Distribution, and Possible Source of Bacterial Biofilm in Mouse Automated Watering Systems

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas R; Maute, Carrie J; Cadillac, Joan M; Lee, Ji Young; Righter, Daniel J; Hugunin, Kelly MS; Deininger, Rolf A; Dysko, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    The use of automated watering systems for providing drinking water to rodents has become commonplace in the research setting. Little is known regarding bacterial biofilm growth within the water piping attached to the racks (manifolds). The purposes of this project were to determine whether the mouse oral flora contributed to the aerobic bacterial component of the rack biofilm, quantify bacterial growth in rack manifolds over 6 mo, assess our rack sanitation practices, and quantify bacterial biofilm development within sections of the manifold. By using standard methods of bacterial identification, the aerobic oral flora of 8 strains and stocks of mice were determined on their arrival at our animal facility. Ten rack manifolds were sampled before, during, and after sanitation and monthly for 6 mo. Manifolds were evaluated for aerobic bacterial growth by culture on R2A and trypticase soy agar, in addition to bacterial ATP quantification by bioluminescence. In addition, 6 racks were sampled at 32 accessible sites for evaluation of biofilm distribution within the watering manifold. The identified aerobic bacteria in the oral flora were inconsistent with the bacteria from the manifold, suggesting that the mice do not contribute to the biofilm bacteria. Bacterial growth in manifolds increased while they were in service, with exponential growth of the biofilm from months 3 to 6 and a significant decrease after sanitization. Bacterial biofilm distribution was not significantly different across location quartiles of the rack manifold, but bacterial levels differed between the shelf pipe and connecting elbow pipes. PMID:18351724

  20. Large scale expression and purification of mouse melanopsin-L in the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Shirzad-Wasei, Nazhat; van Oostrum, Jenny; Bovee-Geurts, Petra H; Wasserman, Maud; Bosman, Giel J; Degrip, Willem J

    2013-10-01

    Melanopsin is the mammalian photopigment that primarily mediates non-visual photoregulated physiology. So far, this photopigment is poorly characterized with respect to structure and function. Here, we report large-scale production and purification of the intact long isoform of mouse melanopsin (melanopsin-L) using the baculovirus/insect cell expression system. Exploiting the baculoviral GP67 signal peptide, we obtained expression levels that varied between 10-30pmol/10(6)cells, equivalent to 2-5mg/L. This could be further enhanced using DMSO as a chemical chaperone. LC-MS analysis confirmed that full-length melanopsin-L was expressed and demonstrated that the majority of the expressed protein was N-glycosylated at Asn(30) and Asn(34). Other posttranslational modifications were not yet detected. Purification was achieved exploiting a C-terminal deca-histag, realizing a purification factor of several hundred-fold. The final recovery of purified melanopsin-L averaged 2.5% of the starting material. This was mainly due to low extraction yields, probably since most of the protein was present as the apoprotein. The spectral data we obtained agree with an absorbance maximum in the 460-500nm wavelength region and a significant red-shift upon illumination. This is the first report on expression and purification of full length melanopsin-L at a scale that can easily be further amplified. PMID:23921072

  1. Primary systemic amyloidosis initially presenting with digestive symptoms: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiu; Mao, Yueping; Qi, Qing; Zhang, Chuyi; Tian, Yongzhen; Chen, Yanyang

    2015-01-01

    Primary systemic amyloidosis (PSA) is one of systemic amyloidosis, characterized by clonal plasma cell disorder. The disease is rare and with high fatality. Signs and symptoms of PSA are various and complex, which depend on the organs involved. Here we report a case in which the patient initially suffered from gastrointestinal symptoms. Gradually periorbital purpura, skin fragility, and subsequent petechiae, ecchymoses and sclerosis of the distal limbs, appeared. Biopsy of his palmar skin showed scleroderma-like changes. However, histopathology of the petechiae lesion on forehead with Crystal Violet Staining prompted deposition of amyloid; gastric mucosal biopsy with Congo Red staining was also positive, which made clear the diagnosis of PSA. Bone marrow biopsy and serum immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) revealed plasmacytosis and M proteinemia. Other examinations were performed to assess the function of organs. PSA was challenging due to the initial atypical clinical presentation and absence of biopsy with special staining. The case demonstrates that PSA should be considered in patients with multisystemic symptoms and biopsy with Congo Red staining should be performed to exclusively diagnose amyloidosis. PMID:26390868

  2. Lewy Body Digest

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Help End Lewy body dementia now! Donate Lewy Body Digest eNewsletter Click here to subscribe today to ... latest developments in treatment and research in Lewy body dementia. Archival issues of the Lewy Body Digest ...

  3. A Self-regulatory System of Interlinked Signaling Feedback Loops Controls Mouse Limb Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benazet, Jean-Denis; Bischofberger, Mirko; Tiecke, Eva; Gonalves, Alexandre; Martin, James F.; Zuniga, Aime; Naef, Felix; Zeller, Rolf

    Developmental pathways need to be robust against environmental and genetic variation to enable reliable morphogenesis. Here, we take a systems biology approach to explain how robustness is achieved in the developing mouse limb, a classical model of organogenesis. By combining quantitative genetics with computational modeling we established a computational model of multiple interlocked feedback modules, involving sonic hedgehog (SHH) morphogen, fibroblast growth factor (FGFs) signaling, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and its antagonist GREM1. Earlier modeling work had emphasized the versatile kinetic characteristics of interlocked feedback loops operating at different time scales. Here we develop and then validate a similar computational model to show how BMP4 first initiates and SHH then propagates feedback in the network through differential transcriptional regulation of Grem1 to control digit specification. This switch occurs by linking a fast BMP4/GREM1 module to a slower SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop. Simulated gene expression profiles modeled normal limb development as well those of single-gene knockouts. Sensitivity analysis showed how the model was robust and insensitive to variability in parameters. A surprising prediction of the model was that an early Bmp4 signal is essential to kick-start Grem1 expression and the digit specification system. We experimentally validated the prediction using inducible alleles and showed that early, but not late, removal of Bmp4 dramatically disrupted limb development. Sensitivity analysis showed how robustness emerges from this circuitry. This study shows how modeling and computation can help us understand how self-regulatory signaling networks achieve robust regulation of limb development, by exploiting interconnectivity among the three signaling pathways. We expect that similar computational analyses will shed light on the origins of robustness in other developmental systems, and I will discuss some recent examples from our ongoing research on developmental patterning.

  4. Video Games: Research, Ratings, Recommendations. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesarone, Bernard

    This Digest reviews research on the demographics and effects of video game playing, discusses game rating systems, and offers recommendations for parents. The Digest begins by discussing research on the time children spend playing electronic games, which shows that younger children's game playing at home (90% of fourth-graders played at least one…

  5. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  6. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  7. Imaging of biological tissues with optical coherence tomography system using Jones-Mueller calculus; Technical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, Shamaraz; Ikram, Masroor

    2005-05-01

    The polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system provides useful informations about the biological tissues. The exact tissue parameters measurement and comparison predicts about the malignant and normal tissues. The degree of polarization changes with the depth of tissue samples. We have established the analytical modeling with Jones-Mueller matrix for imaging technique, which experimentally extract the birefringence, depolarization, absorption and scattering information of tissues. The Jones matrix of thermally treated porcine tendon showed a reduction of birefringence from thermal damage. The Jones matrices of porcine skin and bovine cartilage also revealed that the density and orientation of the collagen fibers in porcine skin and bovine cartilage are not distributed as uniformly as in porcine tendon. Birefringence is sensitive to changes in tissue because it is based on phase contrast.

  8. Sulfide-induced nitrate reduction in the sludge of an anaerobic digester of a zero-discharge recirculating mariculture system.

    PubMed

    Sher, Yonatan; Schneider, Kenneth; Schwermer, Carsten U; van Rijn, Jaap

    2008-10-01

    The anaerobic digester is a vital component in a zero-discharge mariculture system as therein most of the organic matter is mineralized and nitrogen-containing compounds are converted to gaseous N(2). Although denitrification is a major respiratory process in this nitrate-rich treatment stage, also sulfate respiration takes place and may cause undesirable high sulfide concentrations in the effluent water. To examine the effect of sulfide on nitrate reduction, in situ depth profiles of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur compounds were determined. Additionally, nitrate reduction was examined as a function of ambient sulfide concentrations in sludge collected from different locations in the anaerobic reactor. Depth profiles showed high concentrations of nitrate and low concentrations of sulfide and ammonia in the aqueous layer of the reactor. A sharp decrease of nitrate and an increase in sulfide and ammonia concentrations was measured at the water-sludge interface. Nitrate reduction was highest in this interface zone with rates of up to 8.05+/-0.57 micromol NO(3)(-)h(-1)g((sludge))(-1). Addition of sulfide increased the nitrate reduction rate at all sludge depths, pointing to the important role of autotrophic denitrification in the anaerobic reactor. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) was found to be low in all sludge layers but was enhanced when sludge was incubated at high sulfide concentrations. Although nitrate reduction rates increased as a result of sulfide addition to sludge samples, no differences in nitrate reduction rates were observed between the samples incubated with different initial sulfide concentrations. This as opposed to sulfide oxidation rates, which followed Michaelis-Menten enzymatic kinetics. Partial oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur instead of a complete oxidation to sulfate, could explain the observed patterns of nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation in sludge incubated with different initial sulfide concentrations. PMID:18718629

  9. 3D mouse shape reconstruction based on phase-shifting algorithm for fluorescence molecular tomography imaging system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Zhu, Dianwen; Baikejiang, Reheman; Li, Changqing

    2015-11-10

    This work introduces a fast, low-cost, robust method based on fringe pattern and phase shifting to obtain three-dimensional (3D) mouse surface geometry for fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging. We used two pico projector/webcam pairs to project and capture fringe patterns from different views. We first calibrated the pico projectors and the webcams to obtain their system parameters. Each pico projector/webcam pair had its own coordinate system. We used a cylindrical calibration bar to calculate the transformation matrix between these two coordinate systems. After that, the pico projectors projected nine fringe patterns with a phase-shifting step of 2?/9 onto the surface of a mouse-shaped phantom. The deformed fringe patterns were captured by the corresponding webcam respectively, and then were used to construct two phase maps, which were further converted to two 3D surfaces composed of scattered points. The two 3D point clouds were further merged into one with the transformation matrix. The surface extraction process took less than 30 seconds. Finally, we applied the Digiwarp method to warp a standard Digimouse into the measured surface. The proposed method can reconstruct the surface of a mouse-sized object with an accuracy of 0.5 mm, which we believe is sufficient to obtain a finite element mesh for FMT imaging. We performed an FMT experiment using a mouse-shaped phantom with one embedded fluorescence capillary target. With the warped finite element mesh, we successfully reconstructed the target, which validated our surface extraction approach. PMID:26560789

  10. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, Darren R; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Chamberlain, Joel R

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUG(exp) mRNA in the human ?-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSA(LR)) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSA(LR) mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSA(LR) mice, including a reduction in the CUG(exp) mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUG(exp) mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSA(LR) mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple System Atrophy: Immunomodulation and Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Stemberger, Sylvia; Jamnig, Angelika; Stefanova, Nadia; Lepperdinger, Günter; Reindl, Markus; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently strong candidates for cell-based therapies. They are well known for their differentiation potential and immunoregulatory properties and have been proven to be potentially effective in the treatment of a large variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Currently there is no treatment that provides consistent long-term benefits for patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), a fatal late onset ?-synucleinopathy. Principally neuroprotective or regenerative strategies, including cell-based therapies, represent a powerful approach for treating MSA. In this study we investigated the efficacy of intravenously applied MSCs in terms of behavioural improvement, neuroprotection and modulation of neuroinflammation in the (PLP)-?synuclein (?SYN) MSA model. Methodology/Principal Findings MSCs were intravenously applied in aged (PLP)-?SYN transgenic mice. Behavioural analyses, defining fine motor coordination and balance capabilities as well as stride length analysis, were performed to measure behavioural outcome. Neuroprotection was assessed by quantifying TH neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). MSC treatment on neuroinflammation was analysed by cytokine measurements (IL-1?, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, GM-CSF, INF?, MCP-1, TGF-?1, TNF-?) in brain lysates together with immunohistochemistry for T-cells and microglia. Four weeks post MSC treatment we observed neuroprotection in the SNc, as well as downregulation of cytokines involved in neuroinflammation. However, there was no behavioural improvement after MSC application. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge this is the first experimental approach of MSC treatment in a transgenic MSA mouse model. Our data suggest that intravenously infused MSCs have a potent effect on immunomodulation and neuroprotection. Our data warrant further studies to elucidate the efficacy of systemically administered MSCs in transgenic MSA models. PMID:21625635

  12. Evidence Suggesting a Role of Iron in a Mouse Model of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chhanda; Megyesi, Judit K.; Shah, Sudhir V.; Hiatt, Kim M.; Hall, Kimberly A.; Karaduta, Oleg; Swaminathan, Sundararaman

    2015-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is associated with gadolinium contrast exposure in patients with reduced kidney function and carries high morbidity and mortality. We have previously demonstrated that gadolinium contrast agents induce in vivo systemic iron mobilization and in vitro differentiation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells into ferroportin (iron exporter)-expressing fibrocytic cells. In the present study we examined the role of iron in a mouse model of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Chronic kidney disease was induced in 8-week-old male Balb/C mice with a two-step 5/6 nephrectomy surgery. Five groups of mice were studied: control (n = 5), sham surgery control (n = 5), chronic kidney disease control (n = 4), chronic kidney disease injected with 0.5 mmol/kg body weight of Omniscan 3 days per week, for a total of 10 injections (n = 8), and chronic kidney disease with Omniscan plus deferiprone, 125 mg/kg, in drinking water (n = 9). Deferiprone was continued for 16 weeks until the end of the experiment. Mice with chronic kidney disease injected with Omniscan developed skin changes characteristic of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis including hair loss, reddening, ulceration, and skin tightening by 10 to 16 weeks. Histopathological sections demonstrated dermal fibrosis with increased skin thickness (0.25±0.06 mm, sham; 0.34±+0.3 mm, Omniscan-injected). Additionally, we observed an increase in tissue infiltration of ferroportin-expressing, fibrocyte-like cells accompanied by tissue iron accumulation in the skin of the Omniscan-treated mice. The deferiprone-treated group had significantly decreased skin thickness (p<0.05) and significantly decreased dermal fibrosis compared to the Omniscan-only group. In addition, iron chelation prevented tissue infiltration of ferroportin-expressing, fibrocyte-like cells. Our in vitro experiments demonstrated that exposure to Omniscan resulted in the release of catalytic iron and this was prevented by the iron chelator deferiprone. Deferiprone inhibited the differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into ferroportin-expressing cells by immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. Our studies support an important role of iron in the pathophysiology of gadolinium chelate toxicity and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. PMID:26305890

  13. China's Vocational Universities. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Anning

    This ERIC Digest describes the development and characteristics of vocational universities (VUs) in China. In response to the demand for increased numbers of trained technical workers in the 1980's, VUs developed and the higher vocational education system in China was reformed. Currently, 101 vocational universities are in existence in China. These…

  14. Neuropathic Pain Activates the Endogenous ? Opioid System in Mouse Spinal Cord and Induces Opioid Receptor Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei; Petraschka, Michael; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Caron, Marc G.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Pintar, John E.; Terman, Gregory W.; Chavkin, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Release of endogenous dynorphin opioids within the spinal cord after partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) is known to contribute to the neuropathic pain processes. Using a phosphoselective antibody [? opioid receptor (KOR-P)] able to detect the serine 369 phosphorylated form of the KOR, we determined possible sites of dynorphin action within the spinal cord after pSNL. KOR-P immunoreactivity (IR) was markedly increased in the L4 –L5 spinal dorsal horn of wild-type C57BL/6 mice (7–21 d) after lesion, but not in mice pretreated with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI). In addition, knock-out mice lacking prodynorphin, KOR, or G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) did not show significant increases in KOR-P IR after pSNL. KOR-P IR was colocalized in both GABAergic neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes in both ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horn. Consistent with sustained opioid release, KOR knock-out mice developed significantly increased tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both the early (first week) and late (third week) interval after lesion. Similarly, mice pretreated with norBNI showed enhanced hyperalgesia and allodynia during the 3 weeks after pSNL. Because sustained activation of opioid receptors might induce tolerance, we measured the antinociceptive effect of the ? agonist U50,488 using radiant heat applied to the ipsilateral hindpaw, and we found that agonist potency was significantly decreased 7 d after pSNL. In contrast, neither prodynorphin nor GRK3 knock-out mice showed U50,488 tolerance after pSNL. These findings suggest that pSNL induced a sustained release of endogenous prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides that activated an anti-nociceptive KOR system in mouse spinal cord. Thus, endogenous dynorphin had both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions after nerve injury and induced GRK3-mediated opioid tolerance. PMID:15140929

  15. Nonlinear optical techniques for imaging and manipulating the mouse central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Matthew John

    The spinal cord of vertebrates serves as the conduit for somatosensory information and motor control, as well as being the locus of neural circuits that govern fast reflexes and patterned behaviors, such as walking in mammals or swimming in fish. Consequently, pathologies of the spinal cord -such as spinal cord injury (SCI)- lead to loss of motor control and sensory perception, with accompanying decline in life expectancy and quality of life. Despite the devastating effects of these diseases, few therapies exist to substantially ameliorate patient outcome. In part, studies of spinal cord pathology have been limited by the inability to perform in vivo imaging at the level of cellular processes. The focus of this thesis is to present the underlying theory for and demonstration of novel multi-photon microscopy (MPM) and optical manipulation techniques as they apply to studies the mouse central nervous system (CNS), with an emphasis on the spinal cord. The scientific findings which have resulted from the implementation of these techniques are also presented. In particular, we have demonstrated that third harmonic generation is a dye-free method of imaging CNS myelin, a fundamental constituent of the spinal cord that is difficult to label using exogenous dyes and/or transgenic constructs. Since gaining optical access to the spinal cord is a prerequisite for spinal cord imaging, we review our development of a novel spinal cord imaging chamber and surgical procedure which allowed us to image for multiple weeks following implantation without the need for repeated surgeries. We also have used MPM to characterize spinal venous blood flow before and after point occlusions. We review a novel nonlinear microscopy technique that may serve to show optical interfaces in three dimensions inside scattering tissue. Finally, we discuss a model and show results of optoporation, a means of transfecting cells with genetic constructs. Brief reviews of MPM and SCI are also presented.

  16. Automated phenotyping of mouse social behavior

    E-print Network

    Edelman, Nicholas (Nicholas A.)

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the connections between social behavior and intelligence, I have developed a trainable system to phenotype mouse social behavior. This system is of immediate interest to researchers studying mouse models of ...

  17. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  18. Distinct Human and Mouse Membrane Trafficking Systems for Sweet Taste Receptors T1r2 and T1r3

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  19. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  20. Central nervous system inammation is a hallmark of pathogenesis in mouse models of GM1 and

    E-print Network

    , Oxford OX1 3QU, UK E-mail: fran@glycob.ox.ac.uk Summary Mouse models of the GM2 gangliosidoses [Tay-Sachs, late onset Tay-Sachs (LOTS), Sandhoff] and GM1 gang- liosidosis have been studied to determine whetherNOS = inducible nitric oxide synthase; LOTS = late onset Tay-Sachs; Mf = macrophages; NB-DNJ = n

  1. A Novel System To Accelerate The Progression of Nerve Degeneration In Transgenic Mouse Models of Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Trinh, Minh; Griffin, John W.; Nguyen, Thien

    2012-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a common hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. There is now an abundance of spontaneous and genetically engineered mice available to study the mechanisms of axonal degeneration and to screen for axonal protective agents. However, many of these mouse models exhibit slow progressive axonal loss which can span over many months. Consequently, there is a pressing need to accelerate the pace of axonal loss over a short interval for high-throughput screening of pharmacological and genetic therapies. Here, we present a novel technique using acrylamide, an axonal neurotoxin, to provoke rapid axonal degeneration in murine models of neuropathies. The progressive axonal loss which typically occurs over 8 months was reproduced within 7 to 10 days of the acrylamide intoxication. This approach was successfully applied to Myelin Associated Glycoprotein knockout (MAG?/?) mouse and Trembler-J mouse, a popular murine model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT-1). Acrylamide intoxication in transgenic mouse models offers a novel experimental approach to accelerate the rate of axonal loss over short intervals for timely in vivo studies of nerve degeneration. This report also provides for the first time an animal model for medication or toxin induced exacerbation of pre-existing neuropathies, a phenomenon widely reported in patients with neuropathies. PMID:22688009

  2. CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE L5178Y/TK+/- YIELDS TK-/- MOUSE LYMPHOMA MUTAGENESIS ASSAY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The L5178Y/TK t/- TK-/- mouse lymphoma mutagen assay, which allows selection of forward mutations at the autosomal thymidine kinase (TK) locus, uses a TK t/- heterozygous cell line, TK t/- 3.7.2C Quantitation of colonies of mutant TK-/- cells in the assay forms the basis for calc...

  3. Digestive Organ in the Female Reproductive Tract Borrows Genes from Multiple Organ Systems to Adopt Critical Functions

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Plakke, Melissa S.; Deutsch, Aaron B.; Small, Brandon S.; Morehouse, Nathan I.; Clark, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent adaptive challenges are often met with the evolution of novel physiological traits. Although there are specific examples of single genes providing new physiological functions, studies on the origin of complex organ functions are lacking. One such derived set of complex functions is found in the Lepidopteran bursa copulatrix, an organ within the female reproductive tract that digests nutrients from the male ejaculate or spermatophore. Here, we characterized bursa physiology and the evolutionary mechanisms by which it was equipped with digestive and absorptive functionality. By studying the transcriptome of the bursa and eight other tissues, we revealed a suite of highly expressed and secreted gene products providing the bursa with a combination of stomach-like traits for mechanical and enzymatic digestion of the male spermatophore. By subsequently placing these bursa genes in an evolutionary framework, we found that the vast majority of their novel digestive functions were co-opted by borrowing genes that continue to be expressed in nonreproductive tissues. However, a number of bursa-specific genes have also arisen, some of which represent unique gene families restricted to Lepidoptera and may provide novel bursa-specific functions. This pattern of promiscuous gene borrowing and relatively infrequent evolution of tissue-specific duplicates stands in contrast to studies of the evolution of novelty via single gene co-option. Our results suggest that the evolution of complex organ-level phenotypes may often be enabled (and subsequently constrained) by changes in tissue specificity that allow expression of existing genes in novel contexts, such as reproduction. The extent to which the selective pressures encountered in these novel roles require resolution via duplication and sub/neofunctionalization is likely to be determined by the need for specialized reproductive functionality. Thus, complex physiological phenotypes such as that found in the bursa offer important opportunities for understanding the relative role of pleiotropy and specialization in adaptive evolution. PMID:25725432

  4. Systemic pathology in aged mouse models of Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Seymour; Saltzman, Arthur; Levy, Efrat; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) in humans is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (HSA 21). DS patients have a variety of pathologies, including mental retardation and an unusually high incidence of leukemia or lymphoma such as megakaryocytic leukemia. Individuals with DS develop the characteristic neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in early adulthood, generally by the fourth decade of life. There are several mouse models of DS that have a segmental trisomy of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU 16) with triplicated genes orthologous to HSA 21. These mice display neurodegeneration similar to DS. Although brain pathology in DS models is known, little information is available about other organs. We studied the extraneural pathology in aged DS mice (Ts65Dn, Ts2 and Ts1Cje aged 8 to 24 months) as well as other mouse models of neurodegeneration, including presenilin (PS), amyloid-? precursor protein (APP), and tau (hTau and JNPL) transgenic mice. An increased incidence of peripheral amyloidosis, positive for amyloid A (AA) but not amyloid-? peptide (A?), was found in APP over-expressing and tauopathic mice as compared to nontransgenic (ntg) littermates or to DS mouse models. A higher incidence of lymphoma was found in the DS models, including Ts1Cje that is trisomic for a small segment of MMU 16 not including the App gene, but not in the APP over-expressing mice, suggesting that high APP expression is not the cause of lymphoma in DS. The occurrence of lymphomas in mouse DS models is of interest in relation to the increased incidence of malignant conditions in human DS. PMID:19041304

  5. Effects of steam-treated rice straw feeding on growth, digestibility, and plasma volatile fatty acids of goats under different housing systems.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Naeem; Nasir, Rajput; Li, Dong; Lili, Zhang; Tian, Wang

    2014-12-01

    In order to use rice straw as forage in livestock feeding, the effects of steam-treated rice straw (at 15.5 kgf/cm(2) for 120 s) feeding on growth performance, plasma volatile fatty acid profile, and nutrient digestibility of goats were determined. Twenty male goats (18.69?±?0.34 kg) were used in an 84-day trial. The goats were divided into four groups of five goats each to receive steam-treated (STRS) or untreated (UTRS) rice straw diet under closed house (CH) and open house (OH) systems. The results revealed that the goats fed with STRS had significantly higher dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) digestibility; similarly, the average daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio were higher for STRS groups under both CH and OH systems than those for UTRS. The plasma protein and insulin in STRS and cholesterol in UTRS groups was higher (P??0.05) at 30 days. The plasma amylase, lipase, T3, T4 and glucagon at 30 and 60 days were not different (P?>?0.05) among the groups. The plasma acetate, propionate, butyrate, and total volatile fatty acid were higher (P??0.05) on these parameters. It could be concluded that steam treatment of rice straw at 15.5 kgf/cm(2) for 120 s increased apparent nutrient digestibility, hence increased the growth and feed efficiency of growing goats. PMID:25277493

  6. Poultry waste digester. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, J.C.H.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and low-cost poultry waste digester (PWD) was constructed at North Carolina State University's Poultry Research Farm at Raleigh, N.C. The PWD system was designed to process a daily output of 600 kg of manure from 4000 caged laying hens. The system consisted of two digesters connected in series, a heating system, a hot water tank, and other metering equipment. The primary and secondary digesters were horizontal cylinders located partially below ground level. They were made of Red Mud plastic lining, supported in the insulated trenches, and covered with insulated roofs. The primary digester volume was 15 m/sup 3/ with an 8 m/sup 3/ liquid volume and a gas head-space above the liquid. The secondary digester volume was 30 m/sup 3/ with a 16 m/sup 3/ liquid volume. The temperature (50/sup 0/C) of the primary digester was maintained by the hot dilution water added with manure and a SolaRoll heating mat laid underneath the plastic lining. The design, operation, performance, energy balance, and economics of the digester are discussed and evaluated in this final progress report.

  7. Analysis of the Fibroblast Growth Factor System Reveals Alterations in a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Niko; Ratzka, Andreas; Brinkmann, Hella; Klimaschewski, Lars; Grothe, Claudia; Claus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The monogenetic disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is characterized by a progressive loss of motoneurons leading to muscle weakness and atrophy due to severe reduction of the Survival of Motoneuron (SMN) protein. Several models of SMA show deficits in neurite outgrowth and maintenance of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) structure. Survival of motoneurons, axonal outgrowth and formation of NMJ is controlled by neurotrophic factors such as the Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) system. Besides their classical role as extracellular ligands, some FGFs exert also intracellular functions controlling neuronal differentiation. We have previously shown that intracellular FGF-2 binds to SMN and regulates the number of a subtype of nuclear bodies which are reduced in SMA patients. In the light of these findings, we systematically analyzed the FGF-system comprising five canonical receptors and 22 ligands in a severe mouse model of SMA. In this study, we demonstrate widespread alterations of the FGF-system in both muscle and spinal cord. Importantly, FGF-receptor 1 is upregulated in spinal cord at a pre-symptomatic stage as well as in a mouse motoneuron-like cell-line NSC34 based model of SMA. Consistent with that, phosphorylations of FGFR-downstream targets Akt and ERK are increased. Moreover, ERK hyper-phosphorylation is functionally linked to FGFR-1 as revealed by receptor inhibition experiments. Our study shows that the FGF system is dysregulated at an early stage in SMA and may contribute to the SMA pathogenesis. PMID:22348054

  8. Factor VIIa binding to endothelial cell protein C receptor: Differences between mouse and human systems

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Prosenjit; Clark, Curtis A.; Gopalakrishnan, Ramakrishnan; Hedner, Ulla; Esmon, Charles T.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent in vitro studies have shown that the zymogen and activated form of FVII bind to endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR). At present, there is no evidence that FVIIa binds to EPCR on vascular endothelium in vivo in the presence of circulating protein C, a primary ligand for EPCR. The present study was carried out to investigate the interaction of murine and human ligands with murine EPCR both in vivo and in vitro. Measurement of endogenous plasma levels of FVII in wild-type, EPCR-deficient and EPCR-over expressing mice showed slightly lower levels of FVII in EPCR-over expressing mice. However, infusion of high concentrations of competing ligands, either human APCi or FVIIai, to EPCR-over expressing mice failed to increase plasma levels of mouse FVII whereas they increased the plasma levels of protein C by 2 to 3-fold. Examining the association of exogenously administered mouse FVIIa or human FVIIa by immunohistochemistry revealed that human, but not murine FVIIa, binds to the murine endothelium in an EPCR-dependent manner. In vitro binding studies performed using surface plasmon resonance and endothelial cells revealed that murine FVIIa binds murine EPCR negligibly. Human FVIIa binding to EPCR, particularly to mouse EPCR, is markedly enhanced by availability of Mg2+ ions. In summary, our data show that murine FVIIa binds poorly to murine EPCR, whereas human FVIIa binds efficiently to both murine and human EPCR. Our data suggest that one should consider the use of human FVIIa in mouse models to investigate the significance of FVIIa and EPCR interaction. PMID:22370814

  9. A 20-Channel Receive-Only Mouse Array Coil for a 3T Clinical MRI System

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wiggins, Graham C.; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.; Meise, Florian M.; Schreiber, Laura M.; Klose, Klaus J.; Heverhagen, Johannes T.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-channel phased-array coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of mice has been designed, constructed and validated with bench measurements and high resolution accelerated imaging. The technical challenges of designing a small, high density array have been overcome using individual small-diameter coil elements arranged on a cylinder in a hexagonal overlapping design with adjacent low impedance preamplifiers to further decouple the array elements. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification in accelerated imaging were simulated and quantitatively evaluated in phantoms and in vivo mouse images. Comparison between the 20-channel mouse array and a length-matched quadrature driven small animal birdcage coil showed an SNR increase at the periphery and in the center of the phantom of 3-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively. Comparison to a shorter but SNR-optimized birdcage coil (aspect ratio 1:1 and only half mouse coverage) showed an SNR gain of 2-fold at the edge of the phantom and similar SNR in the center. G-factor measurements indicate that the coil is well suited to acquire highly accelerated images. PMID:21433066

  10. Nanobiocatalysis for protein digestion in proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-02-01

    The process of protein digestion is a critical step for successful protein identification in the bottom-up proteomic analysis. To substitute the present practice of in-solution protein digestion, which is long, tedious, and difficult to automate, a lot of efforts have been dedicated for the development of a rapid, recyclable and automated digestion system. Recent advances of nanobiocatalytic approaches have improved the performance of protein digestion by using various nanomaterials such as nanoporous materials, magnetic nanoparticles, and polymer nanofibers. Especially, the unprecedented success of trypsin stabilization in the form of trypsin-coated nanofibers, showing no activity decrease under repeated uses for one year and retaining good resistance to proteolysis, has demonstrated its great potential to be employed in the development of automated, high-throughput, and on-line digestion systems. This review discusses recent developments of nanobiocatalytic approaches for the improved performance of protein digestion in speed, detection sensitivity, recyclability, and trypsin stability. In addition, we also introduce the protein digestions under unconventional energy inputs for protein denaturation and the development of microfluidic enzyme reactors that can benefit from recent successes of these nanobiocatalytic approaches.

  11. UTI Instructions: Understanding Digestion Introduction

    E-print Network

    Martins, Emília

    UTI Instructions: Understanding Digestion Introduction: In this activity, students will review fundamental characteristics of digestion by examining data taken from the primary literature and answering analyzing data and learn general features of digestion. Procedure: Briefly introduce the activity by telling

  12. Biomethanization of sugar beet byproduct by semi-continuous single digestion and co-digestion with cow manure.

    PubMed

    Aboudi, Kaoutar; Álvarez-Gallego, Carlos José; Romero-García, Luis Isidoro

    2016-01-01

    Dried pellet of exhausted sugar beet cossettes were digested alone and combined with cow manure as co-substrate in a mesophilic semi-continuous anaerobic system. In single digestion assay, the stable biogas production and stable reactor operation was observed at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20days (OLR: 3.26gVS/Lreactord) which was the minimum HRT tolerated by the system. However, co-digestion with cow manure allowed to decrease the HRT until 15days (OLR: 4.97gVS/Lreactord) with 32% higher biogas generation and efficient reactor operation. Propionic acid was the predominant VFA observed during single digestion assay failure, while acetic acid accumulation was observed in the co-digestion assay. In both single and co-digestion assays, the recovery of digesters was possible by ceasing the feeding and re-inoculation with a well-adapted inoculum. PMID:26512853

  13. Development of a cell system for siRNA screening of pathogen responses in human and mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Sun, Jing; Benet, Zachary L; Wang, Ze; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; John, Sinu P; Lin, Bin; Sung, Myong-Hee; Fraser, Iain D C

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in the innate immune response to pathogen infection, but few tools exist for systematic dissection of these responses using modern genome-wide perturbation methods. To develop an assay platform for high-throughput analysis of macrophage activation by pathogenic stimuli, we generated reporter systems in human and mouse macrophages with dynamic readouts for NF-?B and/or TNF-? responses. These reporter cells show responsiveness to a broad range of TLR ligands and to gram-negative bacterial infection. There are significant challenges to the use of RNAi in innate immune cells, including efficient small RNA delivery and non-specific immune responses to dsRNA. To permit the interrogation of the macrophage pathogen response pathways with RNAi, we employed the stably expressed reporter genes to develop efficient siRNA delivery protocols for maximal target gene silencing with minimal activation of the innate macrophage response to nucleic acids. We demonstrate the utility of these macrophage cell systems for siRNA screening of pathogen responses by targeting components of the human and mouse TLR pathways, and observe species-specific perturbation of signaling and cytokine responses. Our approach to reporter cell development and siRNA delivery optimization provides an experimental paradigm with significant potential for developing genetic screening platforms in mammalian cells. PMID:25831078

  14. Antidepressants reduce neuroinflammatory responses and astroglial alpha-synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model of multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Valera, Elvira; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-02-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the pathological accumulation of alpha-synuclein (?-syn) within oligodendroglial cells. This accumulation is accompanied by neuroinflammation with astrogliosis and microgliosis, that leads to neuronal death and subsequent parkinsonism and dysautonomia. Antidepressants have been explored as neuroprotective agents as they normalize neurotrophic factor levels, increase neurogenesis and reduce neurodegeneration, but their anti-inflammatory properties have not been fully characterized. We analyzed the anti-inflammatory profiles of three different antidepressants (fluoxetine, olanzapine and amitriptyline) in the MBP1-h?-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model of MSA. We observed that antidepressant treatment decreased the number of ?-syn-positive cells in the basal ganglia of 11-month-old tg animals. This reduction was accompanied with a similar decrease in the colocalization of ?-syn with astrocyte markers in this brain structure. Consistent with these results, antidepressants reduced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and basal ganglia of the MBP1-h?-syn tg mice, and modulated the expression levels of key cytokines that were dysregulated in the tg mouse model, such as IL-1?. In vitro experiments in the astroglial cell line C6 confirmed that antidepressants inhibited NF-?B translocation to the nucleus and reduced IL-1? protein levels. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory properties of antidepressants in the MBP1-h?-syn tg mouse model of MSA might be related to their ability to inhibit ?-syn propagation from oligodendrocytes to astroglia and to regulate transcription factors involved in cytokine expression. Our results suggest that antidepressants might be of interest as anti-inflammatory and ?-syn-reducing agents for MSA and other ?-synucleinopathies. PMID:24310907

  15. Expression of social behaviors of C57BL/6J versus BTBR inbred mouse strains in the visible burrow system

    PubMed Central

    Pobbe, Roger L. H.; Pearson, Brandon L.; Defensor, Erwin B.; Bolivar, Valerie J.; Blanchard, D. Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) include deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Mouse models with behavioral phenotypes relevant to these core symptoms offer an experimental approach to advance the investigation of genes associated with ASD. Previous findings demonstrate that BTBR T+ tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred mouse strain that shows robust behavioral phenotypes with analogies to all three of the diagnostic symptoms of ASD. In the present study, we investigated the expression of social behaviors in a semi-natural visible burrow system (VBS), during colony formation and maintenance in groups comprising three adult male mice of the same strain, either C57BL/6J (B6) or BTBR. For comparative purposes, an extensively investigated three-chambered test was subsequently used to assess social approach in both strains. The effects of strain on these two situations were consistent and highly significant. In the VBS, BTBR mice showed reductions in all interactive behaviors: approach (front and back), flight, chase/follow, allo-grooming and huddling, along with increases in self-grooming and alone, as compared to B6. These results were corroborated in the three-chambered test: in contrast to B6, male BTBR mice failed to spend more time in the side of the test box containing the unfamiliar CD-1 mouse. Overall, the present data indicates that the strain profile for BTBR mice, including consistent social deficits and high levels of repetitive self-grooming, models multiple components of the ASD phenotype. PMID:20600340

  16. A detailed analysis of the erythropoietic control system in the human, squirrel, monkey, rat and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The erythropoiesis modeling performed in support of the Body Fluid and Blood Volume Regulation tasks is described. The mathematical formulation of the species independent model, the solutions to the steady state and dynamic versions of the model, and the individual species specific models for the human, squirrel monkey, rat and mouse are outlined. A detailed sensitivity analysis of the species independent model response to parameter changes and how those responses change from species to species is presented. The species to species response to a series of simulated stresses directly related to blood volume regulation during space flight is analyzed.

  17. Molecular and functional diversity of GABA-A receptors in the enteric nervous system of the mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Mohsen; Brown, James F; Mills, Jeremy; Bhandari, Pradeep; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Rudolph, Uwe; Swinny, Jerome D

    2014-07-30

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic neural control of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and regulates virtually all GI functions. Altered neuronal activity within the ENS underlies various GI disorders with stress being a key contributing factor. Thus, elucidating the expression and function of the neurotransmitter systems, which determine neuronal excitability within the ENS, such as the GABA-GABAA receptor (GABAAR) system, could reveal novel therapeutic targets for such GI disorders. Molecular and functionally diverse GABAARs modulate rapid GABAergic-mediated regulation of neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. However, the cellular and subcellular GABAAR subunit expression patterns within neurochemically defined cellular circuits of the mouse ENS, together with the functional contribution of GABAAR subtypes to GI contractility remains to be determined. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that immunoreactivity for the GABAAR gamma (?) 2 and alphas (?) 1, 2, 3 subunits was located on somatodendritic surfaces of neurochemically distinct myenteric plexus neurons, while being on axonal compartments of submucosal plexus neurons. In contrast, immunoreactivity for the ?4-5 subunits was only detected in myenteric plexus neurons. Furthermore, ?-?2 subunit immunoreactivity was located on non-neuronal interstitial cells of Cajal. In organ bath studies, GABAAR subtype-specific ligands had contrasting effects on the force and frequency of spontaneous colonic longitudinal smooth muscle contractions. Finally, enhancement of ?2-GABAAR function with alprazolam reversed the stress-induced increase in the force of spontaneous colonic contractions. The study demonstrates the molecular and functional diversity of the GABAAR system within the mouse colon providing a framework for developing GABAAR-based therapeutics in GI disorders. PMID:25080596

  18. Molecular and Functional Diversity of GABA-A Receptors in the Enteric Nervous System of the Mouse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Mohsen; Brown, James F.; Mills, Jeremy; Bhandari, Pradeep; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rudolph, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic neural control of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and regulates virtually all GI functions. Altered neuronal activity within the ENS underlies various GI disorders with stress being a key contributing factor. Thus, elucidating the expression and function of the neurotransmitter systems, which determine neuronal excitability within the ENS, such as the GABA-GABAA receptor (GABAAR) system, could reveal novel therapeutic targets for such GI disorders. Molecular and functionally diverse GABAARs modulate rapid GABAergic-mediated regulation of neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. However, the cellular and subcellular GABAAR subunit expression patterns within neurochemically defined cellular circuits of the mouse ENS, together with the functional contribution of GABAAR subtypes to GI contractility remains to be determined. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that immunoreactivity for the GABAAR gamma (?) 2 and alphas (?) 1, 2, 3 subunits was located on somatodendritic surfaces of neurochemically distinct myenteric plexus neurons, while being on axonal compartments of submucosal plexus neurons. In contrast, immunoreactivity for the ?4–5 subunits was only detected in myenteric plexus neurons. Furthermore, ?-?2 subunit immunoreactivity was located on non-neuronal interstitial cells of Cajal. In organ bath studies, GABAAR subtype-specific ligands had contrasting effects on the force and frequency of spontaneous colonic longitudinal smooth muscle contractions. Finally, enhancement of ?2-GABAAR function with alprazolam reversed the stress-induced increase in the force of spontaneous colonic contractions. The study demonstrates the molecular and functional diversity of the GABAAR system within the mouse colon providing a framework for developing GABAAR-based therapeutics in GI disorders. PMID:25080596

  19. Engineering the rabbit digestive ecosystem to improve digestive health and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Combes, S; Fortun-Lamothe, L; Cauquil, L; Gidenne, T

    2013-09-01

    In rabbits, the bacterial and archaeal community of caecal ecosystem is composed mostly of species not yet described and very specific to that species. In mammals, the digestive ecosystem plays important physiological roles: hydrolysis and fermentation of nutrients, immune system regulation, angiogenesis, gut development and acting as a barrier against pathogens. Understanding the functioning of the digestive ecosystem and how to control its functional and specific diversity is a priority, as this could provide new strategies to improve the resistance of the young rabbit to digestive disorders and improve feed efficiency. This review first recalls some facts about the specificity of rabbit digestive microbiota composition in the main fermentation compartment, and its variability with some new insights based on recent molecular approaches. The main functions of the digestive microbiota will then be explained. Finally, some possible ways to control rabbit caecal microbiota will be proposed and a suitable timing for action will be defined. PMID:23769161

  20. A new mouse model of Canavan leukodystrophy displays hearing impairment due to central nervous system dysmyelination

    PubMed Central

    Carpinelli, Marina R.; Voss, Anne K.; Manning, Michael G.; Perera, Ashwyn A.; Cooray, Anne A.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Burt, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Canavan disease is a leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the ASPA gene. This gene encodes the enzyme that converts N-acetylaspartate into acetate and aspartic acid. In Canavan disease, spongiform encephalopathy of the brain causes progressive mental retardation, motor deficit and death. We have isolated a mouse with a novel ethylnitrosourea-induced mutation in Aspa. This mutant, named deaf14, carries a c.516T>A mutation that is predicted to cause a p.Y172X protein truncation. No full-length ASPA protein is produced in deaf14 brain and there is extensive spongy degeneration. Interestingly, we found that deaf14 mice have an attenuated startle in response to loud noise. The first auditory brainstem response peak has normal latency and amplitude but peaks II, III, IV and V have increased latency and decreased amplitude in deaf14 mice. Our work reveals a hitherto unappreciated pathology in a mouse model of Canavan disease, implying that auditory brainstem response testing could be used in diagnosis and to monitor the progression of this disease. PMID:24682784

  1. Advantages of using the CRISPR/Cas9 system of genome editing to investigate male reproductive mechanisms using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Young, Samantha AM; Aitken, R John; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Gene disruption technology has long been beneficial for the study of male reproductive biology. However, because of the time and cost involved, this technology was not a viable method except in specialist laboratories. The advent of the CRISPR/Cas9 system of gene disruption has ushered in a new era of genetic investigation. Now, it is possible to generate gene-disrupted mouse models in very little time and at very little cost. This Highlight article discusses the application of this technology to study the genetics of male fertility and looks at some of the future uses of this system that could be used to reveal the essential and nonessential genetic components of male reproductive mechanisms. PMID:25994645

  2. Transcytosis in the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier of the mouse brain with an engineered receptor/ligand system

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R; Galera-Prat, Albert; Meyers, Craig; Chen, Weijun; Singh, Jasbir; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Crossing the blood–brain and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barriers (BCSFB) is one of the fundamental challenges in the development of new therapeutic molecules for brain disorders because these barriers prevent entry of most drugs from the blood into the brain. However, some large molecules, like the protein transferrin, cross these barriers using a specific receptor that transports them into the brain. Based on this mechanism, we engineered a receptor/ligand system to overcome the brain barriers by combining the human transferrin receptor with the cohesin domain from Clostridium thermocellum, and we tested the hybrid receptor in the choroid plexus of the mouse brain with a dockerin ligand. By expressing our receptor in choroidal ependymocytes, which are part of the BCSFB, we found that our systemically administrated ligand was able to bind to the receptor and accumulate in ependymocytes, where some of the ligand was transported from the blood side to the brain side. PMID:26491705

  3. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

    E-print Network

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spadon, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Defaults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal systems is a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with neither contrast agent nor a destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is a crucial tool for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries. In particular, it s...

  4. Anaerobic digestion and milking frequency as mitigation strategies of the environmental burden in the milk production system.

    PubMed

    Bacenetti, Jacopo; Bava, Luciana; Zucali, Maddalena; Lovarelli, Daniela; Sandrucci, Anna; Tamburini, Alberto; Fiala, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, through a cradle to farm gate Life Cycle Assessment, different mitigation strategies of the potential environmental impacts of milk production at farm level. The environmental performances of a conventional intensive dairy farm in Northern Italy (baseline scenario) were compared with the results obtained: from the introduction of the third daily milking and from the adoption of anaerobic digestion (AD) of animal slurry in a consortium AD plant. The AD plant, fed only with animal slurries coming also from nearby farms. Key parameters concerning on-farm activities (forage production, energy consumptions, agricultural machines maintenance, manure and livestock management), off-farm activities (production of fertilizers, pesticides, bedding materials, purchased forages, purchased concentrate feed, replacement animals, agricultural machines manufacturing, electricity, fuel) and transportation were considered. The functional unit was 1kg fat and protein corrected milk (FPCM) leaving the farm gate. The selected environmental impact categories were: global warming potential, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation and non-renewable energy use. The production of 1kg of FPCM caused, in the baseline scenario, the following environmental impact potentials: global warming potential 1.12kg CO2 eq; acidification 15.5g SO2 eq; eutrophication 5.62g PO4(3-) eq; photochemical oxidation 0.87g C2H4 eq/kg FPCM; energy use 4.66MJeq. The increase of milking frequency improved environmental performances for all impact categories in comparison with the baseline scenario; in particular acidification and eutrophication potentials showed the largest reductions (-11 and -12%, respectively). In anaerobic digestion scenario, compared to the baseline one, most of the impact potentials were strongly reduced. In particular the most important advantages were in terms of acidification (-29%), global warming (-22%) and eutrophication potential (-18%). The AD of cow slurry is confirmed as an effective strategy to mitigate the environmental impact of milk production at farm level. PMID:26383852

  5. New reliable scoring system, Toyama mouse score, to evaluate locomotor function following spinal cord injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the variety of methods used to evaluate locomotor function following a spinal cord injury (SCI), the Basso Mouse Scale score (BMS) has been widely used for mice. However, the BMS mainly focuses on hindlimb movement rather than on graded changes in body support ability. In addition, some of the scoring methods include double or triple criteria within a single score, which likely leads to an increase in the deviation within the data. Therefore we aimed to establish a new scoring method reliable and easy to perform in mice with SCI. Findings Our Toyama Mouse Score (TMS) was established by rearranging and simplifying the BMS score and combining it with the Body Support Scale score (BSS). The TMS reflects changes in both body support ability and hindlimb movement. The definition of single score is made by combing multiple criteria in the BMS. The ambiguity was improved in the TMS. Using contusive SCI mice, hindlimb function was measured using the TMS, BMS and BSS systems. The TMS could distinguish changes in hindlimb movements that were evaluated as the same score by the BMS. An analysis of the coefficient of variation (CV) of score points recorded for 11 days revealed that the CV for the TMS was significantly lower than the CV obtained using the BMS. A variation in intra evaluators was lower in the TMS than in the BMS. Conclusion These results suggest that the TMS may be useful as a new reliable method for scoring locomotor function for SCI models. PMID:24890391

  6. Teaching and Learning about the Earth. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyonyong

    This ERIC Digest investigates the earth and space science guidelines of the National Science Education Standards. These guidelines are frequently referred to as the earth system and include components such as plate tectonics, the water cycle, and the carbon cycle. This Digest describes the development of earth systems science and earth systems

  7. Human Anatomy III: Respiratory, Urinary & Digestive

    E-print Network

    Brown, Christopher A.

    1 Human Anatomy III: Respiratory, Urinary & Digestive Systems The Respiratory System Major in an aquatic insect larva Basic Anatomy of the Respiratory System I Air enters through the nose Inside nose Anatomy of the Respiratory System II #12;3 The Alveoli Alveoli are the capillaries of the lung; gas

  8. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  9. INTRODUCTION The mouse has been increasingly

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    INTRODUCTION The mouse has been increasingly recognized as an optimal genetic system for the study the search region for candidate genes. With the completion of the mouse genome project, the number of vali- dated mouse single nucleotide poly- morphisms (SNPs) has increased dramatically. Greater than 13

  10. Mouse model systems to study sex chromosome genes and behavior: relevance to humans

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kimberly H.; Bonthuis, Paul J.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome genes directly influence sex differences in behavior. The discovery of the Sry gene on the Y chromosome (Gubbay et al., 1990; Koopman et al., 1990) substantiated the sex chromosome mechanistic link to sex differences. Moreover, the pronounced connection between X chromosome gene mutations and mental illness produces a strong sex bias in these diseases. Yet, the dominant explanation for sex differences continues to be the gonadal hormones. Here we review progress made on behavioral differences in mouse models that uncouple sex chromosome complement from gonadal sex. We conclude that many social and cognitive behaviors are modified by sex chromosome complement, and discuss the implications for human research. Future directions need to include identification of the genes involved and interactions with these genes and gonadal hormones. PMID:24388960

  11. Steam Digest 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  12. Digestive Diseases Materials

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIDDK INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSES Diabetes Digestive Diseases Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Hematologic Diseases Kidney and Urologic Diseases Weight-control Information Network EDUCATION PROGRAMS National Diabetes Education Program National Kidney Disease ...

  13. Steam Digest Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  14. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in one-cell mouse embryos mediated by the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    Yasue, Akihiro; Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Watanabe, Takahito; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Since the establishment of embryonic stem (ES) cell lines, the combined use of gene targeting with homologous recombination has aided in elucidating the functions of various genes. However, the ES cell technique is inefficient and time-consuming. Recently, two new gene-targeting technologies have been developed: the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system. In addition to aiding researchers in solving conventional problems, these technologies can be used to induce site-specific mutations in various species for which ES cells have not been established. Here, by targeting the Fgf10 gene through RNA microinjection in one-cell mouse embryos with the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas systems, we produced the known limb-defect phenotypes of Fgf10-deficient embryos at the F0 generation. Compared to the TALEN system, the CRISPR/Cas system induced the limb-defect phenotypes with a strikingly higher efficiency. Our results demonstrate that although both gene-targeting technologies are useful, the CRISPR/Cas system more effectively elicits single-step biallelic mutations in mice. PMID:25027812

  15. Lab Digest or 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    STATION =====-======-=================--===- --- --- - - - BULLETIN NO. I 75. MAY, 1915. DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Distribution and Digestibility of the Pentosans of Feeds. POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS VON BOECKl\\l .\\ ~='1-JONES CO...., P RI NTERS, AUSTI N, TEXA S 19lfi BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL A117-715-10m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT ST A liON BULLETIN NO. 175 MAY, 1915 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Distribution and Digestibility of the Pentosans of Feeds. BY G. S. FRAPS...

  16. A comparative study of the effects of sparteine, lupanine and lupin extract on the central nervous system of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Pothier, J; Cheav, S L; Galand, N; Dormeau, C; Viel, C

    1998-08-01

    Lupin is toxic because of its alkaloid content, sparteine and lupanine in particular. Although the pharmacological properties of sparteine are well known those of lupanine have not been much studied. This paper reports procedures for extraction, purification and crystallization of lupanine, and methods for the preparation of an extract for injection of Lupinus mutabilis Sweet, and for the determination of the acute toxicity and maximum non-lethal dose (DL0) of lupanine, sparteine and lupin extract in the mouse. The three substances were tested on the central nervous system (CNS) for locomotor activity, for interaction with specific drugs used for treatment of the CNS (the stimulant drugs amphetamine and pentetrazol and the depressant drugs pentobarbital and chlorpromazine) and for analgesic activity. The results indicate that lupanine and lupin extract are less toxic than sparteine and that at the doses studied the three products have a weak sedative effect on the CNS. PMID:9751462

  17. Outlining microbial community dynamics during temperature drop and subsequent recovery period in anaerobic co-digestion systems.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Leticia; Carballa, Marta; Lema, Juan M

    2014-12-20

    To improve the stability of anaerobic reactors, more knowledge is required about how the different communities react against operating perturbations and which specific ones respond better. The objective of this work was to monitor the changes in microbial community structure of an anaerobic digester during a temperature drop by applying different complementary molecular techniques. Temperature decrease led to an increase of Bacteroidales order, Porphyromonadaceae family and Bacteroides genus and a decrease in Syntrophomonas and Clostridium genera. Once the temperature was restored, the reactor recovered the steady state performance without requiring any modification in operational conditions or in the microbiome. During the recovery period, Sedimentibacter genus and Porphyromonadaceae family played an important role in the degradation of the accumulated volatile fatty acids. The hydrogenotrophic methanogens appeared to be the keystone archaeal population at low temperatures as well as in the recovery period. This study stands out that the understanding of microbial community dynamics during temperature drop could be utilized to develop strategies for the mitigation of temperature change consequences and speed up the recovery of stable reactor performance. PMID:25450643

  18. LIFE QUALITY RELATED TO SPIRITUAL HEALTH AND FACTORS AFFECTING IT IN PATIENTS AFFLICTED BY DIGESTIVE SYSTEM METASTATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Jabbar; Jafari, Hedayat; Janbabaei, Ghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spiritual health is of the basic elements in chronic patients. This concept can be considered as an important approach in promoting physical & spiritual health & life quality Goal: The present study has been planned aiming to study life quality related to metastatic phase gastrointestinal (digestive) cancer referring to Mazandaran Medical Science University Educational Center in Iran. Material and Methods: This research has been done by descriptive-analytical method with 250 patients through available sampling method. The data has been collected via spiritual health & life quality questionnaire. The data analysis has been performed by calculating X², T Test, variance analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The mean & standard deviation of the patients were 12.56 ±94/47. The highest relationship between age & spirituality was related to ages over 60. There was a meaningful statistical relationship between spirituality & life quality scale (p<0.001), between spirituality & respiratory disorder (p<0.047), anorexia (p<0.004), exhaustion (p<0.006), financial problems (p<0.006). Conclusion: regarding the results, we can perceive the necessity behind improving spiritual health aspect as an influencing factor on the patients’ life quality. Through enhancing spiritual beliefs, it is possible to help the patients’ spiritual quality get promoted. PMID:26622196

  19. A highly efficient short hairpin RNA potently down-regulates CCR5 expression in systemic lymphoid organs in the hu-BLT mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Saki; Hong, Patrick; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Pokomo, Lauren; Boyer, Joshua; Koizumi, Naoya; Kittipongdaja, Panyamol; Chen, Angela; Bristol, Greg; Galic, Zoran; Zack, Jerome A.; Yang, Otto; Chen, Irvin S. Y.; Lee, Benhur

    2010-01-01

    Inhibiting the expression of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 holds great promise for controlling HIV-1 infection in patients. Here we report stable knockdown of human CCR5 by a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in a humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) mouse model. We delivered a potent shRNA against CCR5 into human fetal liver-derived CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells (HPSCs) by lentiviral vector transduction. We transplanted vector-transduced HPSCs solidified with Matrigel and a thymus segment under the mouse kidney capsule. Vector-transduced autologous CD34+ cells were subsequently injected in the irradiated mouse, intended to create systemic reconstitution. CCR5 expression was down-regulated in human T cells and monocytes/macrophages in systemic lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue, the major site of HIV-1 replication. The shRNA-mediated CCR5 knockdown had no apparent adverse effects on T-cell development as assessed by polyclonal T-cell receptor V? family development and naive/memory T-cell differentiation. CCR5 knockdown in the secondary transplanted mice suggested the potential of long-term hematopoietic reconstitution by the shRNA-transduced HPSCs. CCR5 tropic HIV-1 infection was effectively inhibited in mouse-derived human splenocytes ex vivo. These results demonstrate that lentiviral vector delivery of shRNA into human HPSCs could stably down-regulate CCR5 in systemic lymphoid organs in vivo. PMID:20018916

  20. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Takashi; Ido, Atsushi; Kusano, Kie; Miura, Chiemi; Miura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named “dipterose”, with a molecular weight of 1.01×106 and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose was synthesized in the melon fly itself at the pupal stage. The NO-producing activity of dipterose was approximately equal to that of lipopolysaccharide, a potent immunostimulator. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) led to the suppression of NO production by dipterose. Furthermore, dipterose induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon ? (IFN?) and promoted the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) in macrophages, indicating that it stimulates the induction of various cytokines in RAW264 cells via the TLR4 signaling pathway. Our results thus suggest that dipterose activates the innate immune response against various pathogenic microorganisms and viral infections. This is the first identification of an innate immune-activating polysaccharide from an animal. PMID:25490773

  1. A model microfluidics-based system for the human and mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shawn; Thakur, Ankush; Redenti, Stephen; Vazquez, Maribel

    2015-12-01

    The application of microfluidics technologies to the study of retinal function and response holds great promise for development of new and improved treatments for patients with degenerative retinal diseases. Restoration of vision via retinal transplantation therapy has been severely limited by the low numbers of motile cells observed post transplantation. Using modern soft lithographic techniques, we have developed the ?Retina, a novel and convenient biomimetic microfluidics device capable of examing the migratory behavior of retinal lineage cells within biomimetic geometries of the human and mouse retina. Coupled computer simulations and experimental validations were used to characterize and confirm the formation of chemical concentration gradients within the ?Retina, while real-time images within the device captured radial and theta cell migration in response to concentration gradients of stromal derived factor (SDF-1), a known chemoattractant. Our data underscore how the ?Retina can be used to examine the concentration-dependent migration of retinal progenitors in order to enhance current therapies, as well as develop novel migration-targeted treatments. PMID:26475458

  2. Emodin inhibits splenocyte proliferation and inflammation by modulating cytokine responses in a mouse model system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2016-01-01

    Emodin, an anthraquinone derivative, was investigated for potential anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects in vitro. The potential to induce these outcomes was assessed using concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Dose-response studies showed that emodin at 100?µM was not cytotoxic to naive cells, and that the same dose caused proliferation to be significantly reduced in ConA-stimulated cells. In addition, emodin significantly reduced ConA-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and the formation/release of TH1 (IL-2, IFN?, TNF?) and TH17 (IL-6 and IL-17) cell cytokines, but induced those of TH2 (IL-4) and Treg (IL-10) cells. From the results, it is concluded that earlier-reported immunomodulatory effects imparted by emodin may have been attributable, in part, to anti-proliferative effects on lymphocytes, as well as a shift within the TH1/TH2 and TH17/Treg balance (towards TH2 and Treg). These findings, while providing evidence of mechanisms of emodin immunomodulation, are also potentially important for sparking studies that ultimately may result in the potential use of this agent in preventive and/or corrective strategies against autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25565015

  3. The "missing" mouse plasmacytoma (MPC) associated translocation T(15;16) occurs repeatedly in new MPC induction systems.

    PubMed

    Wiener, F; Silva, S; Sugiyama, H; Babonits, M; Klein, G

    1990-05-01

    A reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 15 and 16 has been detected in seven murine plasmacytomas induced by a combination of pristane and Abelson virus. Six of the tumors were induced in a new, unconventional experimental system based on transfer of uninfected or Abelson virus infected bone marrow and spleen cells, respectively, into pristane treated mice. All six tumors were of donor type. The seventh tumor appeared in a conventional pristane + Abelson virus treated mouse. This tumor was unusual in carrying both the 15;16 variant translocation and the typical 12;15 translocation, in the same tumor cells. In the new 15;16 variant, the breakpoint of chromosome 15 was at the interphase of the D2/3 sub-bands, as in mouse plasmacytomas with the previously well-known typical 12;15 and variant 6;15 translocations. The breakpoint on chromosome 16 was mapped to band 16B1, corresponding to the presumed cytogenetic site of the Ig-lambda gene. In three of the seven tumors with the 15;16 translocation, the derivative chromosome 15 had undergone a duplication, a feature that has not been previously encountered in the MPC-associated 12;15 and 6;15 translocation carriers. The reciprocal derivative chromosome 16 was lost from one of the seven tumors. We postulate that the 15;16 translocation results in juxtaposition of the myc gene to lambda sequences, probably in a similar orientation as previously described for the variant 6;15 translocation. PMID:2126192

  4. Using mushroom farm and anaerobic digestion wastewaters as supplemental fertilizer sources for growing container nursery stock in a closed system.

    PubMed

    Chong, C; Purvis, P; Lumis, G; Holbein, B E; Voroney, R P; Zhou, H; Liu, H-W; Alam, M Z

    2008-04-01

    Wastewaters from farm and composting operations are often rich in select nutrients that potentially can be reutilized in crop production. Liners of silverleaf dogwood (Cornus alba L. 'Argenteo-marginata'), common ninebark [Physocarpus opulifolius (L.) Maxim.], and Anthony Waterer spirea (Spiraeaxbumalda Burvénich 'Anthony Waterer') were grown in 6L containers filled with a bark-based commercial mix. Plants were fertigated daily via a computer-controlled multi-fertilizer injector with three recirculated fertilizer treatments: (1) a stock (control) solution with complete macro- and micro-nutrients, electrical conductivity (EC) 2.2 dS m(-1); (2) wastewater from a mushroom farm; and (3) process wastewater from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. The wastewaters used in both treatments 2 and 3 were diluted with tap water, and the computer was programmed to amend, dispense and recirculate nutrients based on the same target EC as in treatment 1. For comparison, there was a traditional controlled-release fertilizer treatment [Nutryon 17-5-12 (17N-2P-10K) plus micro-nutrients topdressed at a rate of 39 g/plant, nutrients not recirculated]. All three species responded similarly to the three recirculated fertilizer treatments. Growth with the recirculated treatments was similar and significantly higher than that obtained with controlled-release fertilizer. Throughout the study, the EC measured in wastewater-derived nutrient solutions, and also in the container substrate, were similar or close to those of the control treatment, although there were small to large differences among individual major nutrients. There was no sign of nutrient deficiency or toxicity symptoms to the plants. Small to moderate excesses in concentrations of SO(4), Na, and/or Cl were physiologically tolerable to the species. PMID:17481890

  5. Soil sample preparation using microwave digestion for uranium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MOHAGHEGHI,AMIR H.; PRESTON,ROSE; AKBARZADEH,MANSOOR; BAKHTIAR,STEVEN

    2000-04-05

    A new sample preparation procedure has been developed for digestion of soil samples for uranium analysis. The technique employs a microwave oven digestion system to digest the sample and to prepare it for separation chemistry and analysis. The method significantly reduces the volume of acids used, eliminates a large fraction of acid vapor emissions, and speeds up the analysis time. The samples are analyzed by four separate techniques: Gamma Spectrometry, Alpha Spectroscopy using the open digestion method, Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) using open digestion, and KPA by Microwave digestion technique. The results for various analytical methods are compared and used to confirm the validity of the new procedure. The details of the preparation technique along with its benefits are discussed.

  6. Recent advances in transport of water-soluble vitamins in organs of the digestive system: a focus on the colon and the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of water-soluble vitamin (WSV) transport in the large intestine and pancreas, two important organs of the digestive system that have only recently received their fair share of attention. WSV, a group of structurally unrelated compounds, are essential for normal cell function and development and, thus, for overall health and survival of the organism. Humans cannot synthesize WSV endogenously; rather, WSV are obtained from exogenous sources via intestinal absorption. The intestine is exposed to two sources of WSV: a dietary source and a bacterial source (i.e., WSV generated by the large intestinal microbiota). Contribution of the latter source to human nutrition/health has been a subject of debate and doubt, mostly based on the absence of specialized systems for efficient uptake of WSV in the large intestine. However, recent studies utilizing a variety of human and animal colon preparations clearly demonstrate that such systems do exist in the large intestine. This has provided strong support for the idea that the microbiota-generated WSV are of nutritional value to the host, and especially to the nutritional needs of the local colonocytes and their health. In the pancreas, WSV are essential for normal metabolic activities of all its cell types and for its exocrine and endocrine functions. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in the uptake of WSV and the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on the uptake processes. PMID:23989008

  7. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  8. Labscale Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Elements Used in Anaerobic Digestion

    E-print Network

    Labscale Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Elements Used in Anaerobic Digestion This report presents performance data for an anaerobic digestion system (at a 10-liter scale) utilizing corncob biochar as biofilm support. The system operated on grease-trap wastewater and high-rate anaerobic digestion of this material

  9. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Michela; Bukreeva, Inna; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spanò, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Faults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal system represents a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of ex-vivo mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with nor contrast agent nor sectioning and neither destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is very suitable for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries, in particular to resolve the entangled relationship between VN and neuronal system. PMID:25686728

  10. Comparison between efficacy of allicin and fluconazole against Candida albicans in vitro and in a systemic candidiasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Khodavandi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Fahimeh; Harmal, Nabil S; Sidik, Shiran M; Othman, Fauziah; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahromi, Mohammad Ali Farboodniay; Ng, Kee-Peng; Chong, Pei Pei

    2011-02-01

    The efficacy of allicin compared with fluconazole in alleviating systemic Candida albicans infections was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo through a systemic candidiasis mouse model. Determination of in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for different C. albicans isolates revealed that both allicin and fluconazole showed different MICs that ranged from 0.05 to 12.5 ?g mL(-1) and 0.25 to 16 ?g mL(-1) , respectively. A time-kill study showed a significant effect of allicin (P<0.01) against C. albicans, comparable to that of fluconazole. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that, similar to fluconazole, allicin produced structural destruction of C. albicans cell surface at low MIC and lysis or puncture at high MIC concentrations. Treatment of BALB/c mice systemically infected with C. albicans showed that although the allicin treatment (at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) was slightly less efficacious than fluconazole treatment in terms of the fungal load reduction and host survival time, it was still effective against C. albicans in terms of mean survival time, which increased from 8.4 to 15.8 days. These results demonstrate the efficacy of anticandidal effects of allicin both in vitro and in an animal model of candidiasis and affirm the potential of allicin as an adjuvant therapy to fluconazole. PMID:21204918

  11. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Fratini, Michela; Bukreeva, Inna; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spanò, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Faults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal system represents a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of ex-vivo mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with nor contrast agent nor sectioning and neither destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is very suitable for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries, in particular to resolve the entangled relationship between VN and neuronal system. PMID:25686728

  12. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Bukreeva, Inna; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spanò, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-02-01

    Faults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal system represents a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of ex-vivo mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with nor contrast agent nor sectioning and neither destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is very suitable for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries, in particular to resolve the entangled relationship between VN and neuronal system.

  13. Paraoxonase 2 (PON2) in the mouse central nervous system: A neuroprotective role?

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Gennaro; Cole, Toby B.; Dept. of Medicine , University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Dept. of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA ; Furlong, Clement E.; Dept. of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA ; Costa, Lucio G.

    2011-11-15

    The aims of this study were to characterize the expression of paraoxonase 2 (PON2) in mouse brain and to assess its antioxidant properties. PON2 levels were highest in the lung, intestine, heart and liver, and lower in the brain; in all tissues, PON2 expression was higher in female than in male mice. PON2 knockout [PON2{sup -/-}] mice did not express any PON2, as expected. In the brain, the highest levels of PON2 were found in the substantia nigra, the nucleus accumbens and the striatum, with lower levels in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and brainstem. A similar regional distribution of PON2 activity (measured by dihydrocoumarin hydrolysis) was also found. PON3 was not detected in any brain area, while PON1 was expressed at very low levels, and did not show any regional difference. PON2 levels were higher in astrocytes than in neurons isolated from all brain regions, and were highest in cells from the striatum. PON2 activity and mRNA levels followed a similar pattern. Brain PON2 levels were highest around birth, and gradually declined. Subcellular distribution experiments indicated that PON2 is primarily expressed in microsomes and in mitochondria. The toxicity in neurons and astrocytes of agents known to cause oxidative stress (DMNQ and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was higher in cells from PON2{sup -/-} mice than in the same cells from wild-type mice, despite similar glutathione levels. These results indicate that PON2 is expressed in the brain, and that higher levels are found in dopaminergic regions such as the striatum, suggesting that this enzyme may provide protection against oxidative stress-mediated neurotoxicity.

  14. Development of a natural treatment system consisting of red ball earth and alfalfa for the post-treatment of anaerobically digested livestock wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochen; Fukushi, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    With the objective of developing a post-treatment process for anaerobically digested livestock wastewater, an innovative natural treatment system composed of two units is proposed. The first trickling filter unit further reduced biochemical oxygen demand and achieved a certain degree of nitrification. The second soil-plant unit was targeted at the removal and recovery of nutrients N, P and K. For the feasibility study, a bench-scale soil column test was carried out, in which red ball earth and alfalfa were utilized for treating synthetic nutrient-enriched wastewater. Through long-term operation, the nitrification function was well established in the top layers, especially the top 20 cm, although a supplementary denitrification process was still required before discharge. P and K were retained by the soil through different mechanisms, and their plant-available forms that remained in the soil were considered suitable for indirect nutrient reuse. As for alfalfa, with wastewater application it fixed more N from the atmosphere, and directly recovered 6% of P and 4% of K input from wastewater. More importantly, alfalfa was verified to have an indispensable role in stimulating the soil nitrifying microorganisms by sustaining their abundance during substrate (NH3) and oxygen scarcity, and enhancing cell-specific nitrification potential during substrate (NH3) and oxygen sufficiency. The proposed system is expected to be further improved, and adopted as a sound countermeasure for livestock wastewater pollution. PMID:25225925

  15. Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the anaerobic co-digestion of agro-industrial wastes in a two-stage CSTR system.

    PubMed

    Dareioti, Margarita Andreas; Kornaros, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A two-stage anaerobic digestion system consisting of two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) operating at mesophilic conditions (37°C) were used to investigate the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on hydrogen and methane production. The acidogenic reactor was fed with a mixture consisting of olive mill wastewater, cheese whey and liquid cow manure (in a ratio 55:40:5, v/v/v) and operated at five different HRTs (5, 3, 2, 1 and 0.75 d) aiming to evaluate hydrogen productivity and operational stability. The highest system efficiency was achieved at HRT 0.75 d with a maximum hydrogen production rate of 1.72 L/LRd and hydrogen yield of 0.54 mol H2/mol carbohydrates consumed. The methanogenic reactor was operated at HRTs 20 and 25 d with better stability observed at HRT 25 d, whereas accumulation of volatile fatty acids took place at HRT 20 d. The methane production rate at the steady state of HRT 25 d reached 0.33 L CH4/LRd. PMID:25000396

  16. Role of peptidases of the intestinal microflora and prey in temperature adaptations of the digestive system in planktivorous and benthivorous fish.

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, V V; Skvortsova, E G; Shalygin, M V; Kovalenko, K E

    2015-12-01

    Many fish enzymatic systems possess limited adaptations to low temperature; however, little data are available to judge whether enzymes of fish prey and intestinal microbiota can mitigate this deficiency. In this study, the activity of serine peptidases (casein-lytic, mainly trypsin and hemoglobin-lytic, mainly chymotrypsin) of intestinal mucosa, chyme and intestinal microflora in four species of planktivorous (blue bream) and benthivorous (roach, crucian carp, perch) was investigated across a wide temperature range (0-70 °C) to identify adaptations to low temperature. At 0 °C, the relative activity of peptidases of intestinal mucosa (<13 %) and usually intestinal microflora (5-12.6 %) is considerably less than that of chyme peptidases (up to 40 % of maximal activity). The level of peptidase relative activity in crucian carp intestinal microflora was 45 % of maximal activity. The shape of t°-function curves of chyme peptidase also differs in fish from different biotopes. Fish from the littoral group are characterized by a higher degree of adaptation of chyme casein-lytic peptidases to functioning at low temperatures as compared to fish from the pelagic group. The role of intestinal microbiota and prey peptidases in digestive system adaptations of planktivorous and benthivorous fish to low temperatures is discussed. PMID:26251288

  17. Imaging of pharmacokinetic rates of indocyanine green in mouse liver with a hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography/x-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Bin; He, Yun; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic rates have the potential to provide quantitative physiological and pathological information for biological studies and drug development. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an attractive imaging tool for three-dimensionally resolving fluorophore distribution in small animals. In this letter, pharmacokinetic rates of indocyanine green (ICG) in mouse liver are imaged with a hybrid FMT and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. A recently developed FMT method using structural priors from an XCT system is adopted to improve the quality of FMT reconstruction. In the in vivo experiments, images of uptake and excretion rates of ICG in mouse liver are obtained, which can be used to quantitatively evaluate liver function. The accuracy of the results is validated by a fiber-based fluorescence measurement system.

  18. Atmosphere Behavior in Gas-Closed Mouse-Algal Systems: An Experimental and Modelling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.; Moore, B., III; Bartholomew, I.; Wharton, R.

    1985-01-01

    A dual approach of mathematical modelling and laboratory experimentation aimed at examining the gas exchange characteristics of artificial animal/plant systems closed to the ambient atmosphere was initiated. The development of control techniques and management strategies for maintaining the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen at physiological levels is examined. A mathematical model simulating the atmospheric behavior in these systems was developed and an experimental gas closed system was constructed. These systems are described and preliminary results are presented.

  19. Investigation of the role of inositol and the phosphatidylinositol signal transduction system in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Duffy, C; Kane, M T

    1996-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate in mouse embryonic stem cells (1) the requirement for myo-inositol for cell proliferation, (2) the incorporation of inositol into the phosphoinositides and inositol phosphates of the phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) signal transduction system and (3) the effect of serum growth factors on PtdIns turnover. Exogenous myo-inositol was not essential for embryonic stem cell proliferation. Lithium, an inhibitor of endogenous inositol recycling, inhibited embryonic stem cell proliferation but this effect was not reversible by the addition of high concentrations of exogenous inositol. [3H]inositol was incorporated into the phosphoinositides, PtdIns, PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 in similar proportions as reported for other cells. [3H]inositol was also incorporated into a fourth lipid, tentatively identified as an inositolglycan. [3H]inositol was also incorporated into a number of inositol phosphates, with the greatest amount of incorporation after 24 h into an inositol pentakisphosphate. After serum starvation for 24 h, the addition of 10% whole or dialysed serum for 2 or 20 min increased (P < 0.05) incorporation into inositol tris- and tetrakisphosphates. These results demonstrate the presence of PtdIns system components in embryonic stem cells and increased PtdIns turnover in response to serum growth factors. PMID:8958833

  20. A quick and efficient method to generate hemophilia B mouse models by the CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Qihan, Wang; Cong, Huai; Ruilin, Sun; Hua, Zhuang; Hongyan, Chen; Jian, Fei; Daru, Lu

    2015-11-20

    Hemophilia B, or the Christmas disease, is a common human disease caused by coagulation factor ? (F?) deficiency. It is an X-linked recessive hereditary disease. Here we obtained F?-knockout mouse strains with phenotype of hemophilia B with the CRISPR/Cas system efficiently. We chose the 8th exon as the target locus, and co-injected codon-optimized Cas9 mRNA with sgRNA of F? into C57BL/6 mice zygotes. We obtained 60 mice in total and genotyped them by high resolution melting (HRM) and sequencing. The results showed the mutation rate was 85.0% in total, and 79.5% and 95.2% in males and females, respectively. No off-targets were detected in the similar locus by HRM. We future measured the F? activity of each mice. The F?: C of mutant mice were significantly below the normal level and reduced to 6.82% of wild-type mice. The activity assay demonstrated that all the mutant mice were lack of F?. In summary, we have generated hemophilia B model mice with extreme efficiency, using the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene editing system. PMID:26582528

  1. Visualization of specific DNA sequences in living mouse embryonic stem cells with a programmable fluorescent CRISPR/Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Tobias; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Markaki, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Labeling and tracing of specific sequences in living cells has been a major challenge in studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of native chromatin. Here we repurposed the prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas adaptive immunity system to specifically detect endogenous genomic loci in mouse embryonic stem cells. We constructed a catalytically inactive version of the Cas9 endonuclease, fused it with eGFP (dCas9-eGFP) and co-expressed small guide RNAs (gRNAs) to target pericentric, centric, and telomeric repeats, which are enriched in distinct nuclear structures. With major satellite specific gRNAs we obtained a characteristic chromocenter (CC) pattern, while gRNAs targeting minor satellites and telomeres highlighted smaller foci coinciding with centromere protein B (CENP-B) and telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2), respectively. DNA sequence specific labeling by gRNA/dCas9-eGFP complexes was directly shown with 3D-fluorescent in situ hybridization (3D-FISH). Structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) of gRNA/dCas9-eGFP expressing cells revealed chromatin ultrastructures and demonstrated the potential of this approach for chromatin conformation studies by super resolution microscopy. This programmable dCas9 labeling system opens new perspectives to study functional nuclear architecture. PMID:24637835

  2. Susceptibility of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) peel proteins to digestive enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet potato proteins have been shown to possess antioxidant and antidiabetic properties in vivo. The ability of a protein to exhibit systemic effects is somewhat unusual as proteins are typically susceptible to digestive enzymes. This study was undertaken to better understand how digestive enzymes ...

  3. Aerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This manual contains the textual material for a single-lesson unit on aerobic sludge digestion. Topic areas addressed include: (1) theory of aerobic digestion; (2) system components; (3) performance factors; (4) indicators of stable operation; and (5) operational problems and their solutions. A list of objectives, glossary of key terms, and…

  4. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  5. FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Mouse ENCODE

    E-print Network

    Petrov, Dmitri

    FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Mouse ENCODE The authors outline the focus of the encyclopaedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE), which is already underway. The project will functionally annotate the mouse genome using the same experimental pipelines that were established for human ENCODE. Mouse ENCODE aims to add

  6. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Modulate Nociception Only in the Presence of Systemic Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sarah L.; Watson, Christopher J.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Human obesity is associated with increased leptin levels and pain, but the specific brain regions and neurochemical mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. This study used adult male C57BL/6J (B6, n = 14) mice and leptin-deficient, obese B6.Cg-Lepob/J (obese, n = 10) mice to evaluate the hypothesis that nociception is altered by systemic leptin levels and by adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation. Nociception was quantified as paw withdrawal latency (PWL) in s after onset of a thermal stimulus. PWL was converted to percent maximum possible effect (%MPE). After obtaining baseline PWL measures, the pontine reticular formation was microinjected with saline (control), three concentrations of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-p-sulfophenyladenosine (SPA), or super-active mouse leptin receptor antagonist (SMLA) followed by SPA 15 min later, and PWL was again quantified. In obese, leptin-deficient mice, nociception was quantified before and during leptin replacement via subcutaneous osmotic pumps. SPA was administered into the pontine reticular formation of leptin-replaced mice and PWL testing was repeated. During baseline (before vehicle or SPA administration), PWL was significantly (p = 0.0013) lower in leptin-replaced obese mice than in B6 mice. Microinjecting SPA into the pontine reticular formation of B6 mice caused a significant (p = 0.0003) concentration-dependent increase in %MPE. SPA also significantly (p < 0.05) increased %MPE in B6 mice and in leptin-replaced obese mice, but not in leptin-deficient obese mice. Microinjection of the mouse super-active leptin antagonist (SMLA) into the pontine reticular formation before SPA did not alter PWL. The results show for the first time that pontine reticular formation administration of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist SPA produced antinociception only in the presence of systemic leptin. The concentration-response data support the interpretation that adenosine A1 receptors localized to the pontine reticular formation significantly alter nociception. PMID:24976513

  7. Increased cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor-?B/p65 expression in mouse hippocampi after systemic administration of tetanus toxin.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing Chun; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Park, Joon Ha; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chul; Ahn, Ji Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Hong, Seongkweon

    2015-12-01

    Brain inflammation has a crucial role in various diseases of the central nervous system. The hippocampus in the mammalian brain exerts an important memory function, which is sensitive to various insults, including inflammation induced by exo/endotoxin stimuli. Tetanus toxin (TeT) is an exotoxin with the capacity for neuronal binding and internalization. The present study investigated changes in inflammatory mediators in the mouse hippocampus proper (CA1?3 regions) and dentate gyrus (DG) after TeT treatment. The experimental mice were intraperitoneally injected with TeT at a low dosage (100 ng/kg), while the control mice were injected with the same volume of saline. At 6, 12 and 24 h after TeT treatment, changes in the hippocampal levels of inflammatory mediators cyclooxygenase?2 (COX?2) and nuclear factor kappa?B (NF??B/p65) were assessed using immunohistochemical and western blot analysis. In the control group, moderate COX?2 immunoreactivity was observed in the stratum pyramidal (SP) of the CA2?3 region, while almost no expression was identified in the CA1 region and the DG. COX?2 immunoreactivity was increased by TeT in the SP and granule cell layer (GCL) of the DG in a time?dependent manner. At 24 h post?treatment, COX?2 immunoreactivity in the SP of the CA1 region and in the GCL of the DG was high, and COX?2 immunoreactivity in the SP of the CA2/3 region was highest. Furthermore, the present study observed that NF??B/p65 immunoreactivity was obviously increased in the SP and GCL at 6, 12 and 24 h after TeT treatment. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that systemic treatment with TeT significantly increased the expression of COX-2 and NF-?B/p65 in the mouse hippocampus, suggesting that increased COX?2 and NF-?B/65 expression may be associated with inflammation in the brain induced by exotoxins. PMID:26498481

  8. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Preventing Bullying. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda

    Students who are the target of bullying episodes commonly suffer serious, long-term academic, physical, and emotional consequences. Unfortunately, school personnel often minimize, underestimate, tolerate, or ignore the extent of bullying and the harm it can cause. This digest examines the problem of bullying and some of its effects, and discusses…

  10. School Calendars. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzker, Bill

    This digest discusses the rationale for changing school calendars. It describes what some districts are doing and advises school leaders and board members on the issues that typically arise when a calendar is changed. It examines the nationwide push toward a longer school year, driven in part by so-called high-stakes testing and mandated increases…

  11. Exercise Adherence. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Pat

    This digest discusses exercise adherence, noting its vital role in maximizing the benefits associated with physical activity. Information is presented on the following: (1) factors that influence adherence to self-monitored programs of regular exercise (childhood eating habits, and psychological, physical, social, and situational factors); (2)…

  12. Bibliotherapy. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Mardziah Hayati

    This digest suggests that bibliotherapy is a potentially powerful method for school teachers and counselors to use on many levels and in every school grade. It begins with a brief review of the history of bibliotherapy; continues with a discussion of some approaches to bibliotherapy (interactive, clinical, and developmental); then addresses the…

  13. Carbohydrate digestion and absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of simple and complex carbohydrates are present in human diets. Food carbohydrates include the sugars, starches, and fibers found mainly in fruits, vegetables, grains, and milk products. Small amounts of digestible carbohydrates come from non-plant sources (e.g., trehalose in insects and...

  14. Development of a database system for mapping insertional mutations onto the mouse genome with large-scale experimental data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Insertional mutagenesis is an effective method for functional genomic studies in various organisms. It can rapidly generate easily tractable mutations. A large-scale insertional mutagenesis with the piggyBac (PB) transposon is currently performed in mice at the Institute of Developmental Biology and Molecular Medicine (IDM), Fudan University in Shanghai, China. This project is carried out via collaborations among multiple groups overseeing interconnected experimental steps and generates a large volume of experimental data continuously. Therefore, the project calls for an efficient database system for recording, management, statistical analysis, and information exchange. Results This paper presents a database application called MP-PBmice (insertional mutation mapping system of PB Mutagenesis Information Center), which is developed to serve the on-going large-scale PB insertional mutagenesis project. A lightweight enterprise-level development framework Struts-Spring-Hibernate is used here to ensure constructive and flexible support to the application. The MP-PBmice database system has three major features: strict access-control, efficient workflow control, and good expandability. It supports the collaboration among different groups that enter data and exchange information on daily basis, and is capable of providing real time progress reports for the whole project. MP-PBmice can be easily adapted for other large-scale insertional mutation mapping projects and the source code of this software is freely available at http://www.idmshanghai.cn/PBmice. Conclusion MP-PBmice is a web-based application for large-scale insertional mutation mapping onto the mouse genome, implemented with the widely used framework Struts-Spring-Hibernate. This system is already in use by the on-going genome-wide PB insertional mutation mapping project at IDM, Fudan University. PMID:19958505

  15. Prenatal methylmercury exposure hampers glutathione antioxidant system ontogenesis and causes long-lasting oxidative stress in the mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Stringari, James; Nunes, Adriana K.C.; Franco, Jeferson L.; Bohrer, Denise; Garcia, Solange C.; Dafre, Alcir L.; Milatovic, Dejan; Souza, Diogo O.; Rocha, Joao B.T.; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2008-02-15

    During the perinatal period, the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely sensitive to metals, including methylmercury (MeHg). Although the mechanism(s) associated with MeHg-induced developmental neurotoxicity remains obscure, several studies point to the glutathione (GSH) antioxidant system as an important molecular target for this toxicant. To extend our recent findings of MeHg-induced GSH dyshomeostasis, the present study was designed to assess the developmental profile of the GSH antioxidant system in the mouse brain during the early postnatal period after in utero exposure to MeHg. Pregnant mice were exposed to different doses of MeHg (1, 3 and 10 mg/l, diluted in drinking water, ad libitum) during the gestational period. After delivery, pups were killed at different time points - postnatal days (PND) 1, 11 and 21 - and the whole brain was used for determining biochemical parameters related to the antioxidant GSH system, as well as mercury content and the levels of F{sub 2}-isoprostane. In control animals, cerebral GSH levels significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period; gestational exposure to MeHg caused a dose-dependent inhibition of this developmental event. Cerebral glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period in control animals; gestational MeHg exposure induced a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both developmental phenomena. These adverse effects of prenatal MeHg exposure were corroborated by marked increases in cerebral F{sub 2}-isoprostanes levels at all time points. Significant negative correlations were found between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GSH, as well as between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GPx activity, suggesting that MeHg-induced disruption of the GSH system maturation is related to MeHg-induced increased lipid peroxidation in the pup brain. In utero MeHg exposure also caused a dose-dependent increase in the cerebral levels of mercury at birth. Even though the cerebral mercury concentration decreased to nearly basal levels at postnatal day 21, GSH levels, GPx and GR activities remained decreased in MeHg-exposed mice, indicating that prenatal exposure to MeHg affects the cerebral GSH antioxidant systems by inducing biochemical alterations that endure even when mercury tissue levels decrease and become indistinguishable from those noted in pups born to control dams. This study is the first to show that prenatal exposure to MeHg disrupts the postnatal development of the glutathione antioxidant system in the mouse brain, pointing to an additional molecular mechanism by which MeHg induces pro-oxidative damage in the developing CNS. Moreover, our experimental observation corroborates previous reports on the permanent functional deficits observed after prenatal MeHg exposure.

  16. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of coffee grounds with and without waste activated sludge as co-substrate using a submerged AnMBR: system amendments and membrane performance.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wei; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki; Shofie, Mohammad; Niu, Qigui; Yu, Han Qing; Li, Yu-You

    2013-12-01

    Coffee grounds are deemed to be difficult for degradation by thermophilic anaerobic process. In this research, a 7 L AnMBR accepting coffee grounds was operated for 82 days and failed with pH dropping to 6.6. The deficiency of micronutrients in the reactor was identified. The system was recovered by supplying micronutrient, pH adjustment and influent ceasing for 22 days. In the subsequent 160 days of co-digestion experiment, waste activated sludge (15% in the mixture) was mixed into coffee grounds. The COD conversion efficiency of 67.4% was achieved under OLR of 11.1 kg-COD/m(3) d and HRT of 20 days. Tannins was identified affecting protein degradation by a batch experiment. Quantitative supplements of NH4HCO3 (0.12 g-N/g-TSin) were effective to maintain alkalinity and pH. The solid concentration in the AnMBR reached 75 g/L, but it did not significantly affect membrane filtration under a flux of 5.1 L/m(2) h. Soluble carbohydrate, lipid and protein were partially retained by the membrane. PMID:24177158

  17. The type II secretion system is essential for erythrocyte lysis and gut colonization by the leech digestive tract symbiont Aeromonas veronii.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Michele; Graf, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Hemolysin and the type II secretion system (T2SS) have been shown to be important for virulence in many pathogens, but very few studies have shown their importance in beneficial microbes. Here, we investigated the importance of the type II secretion pathway in the beneficial digestive-tract association of Aeromonas veronii and the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana and revealed a critical role for the hemolysis of erythrocytes. A mutant with a miniTn5 insertion in exeM, which is involved in forming the inner membrane platform in the T2SS, was isolated by screening mutants for loss of hemolysis on blood agar plates. A hemolysis assay was used to quantify the mutant's deficiency in lysing sheep erythrocytes and revealed a 99.9% decrease compared to the parent strain. The importance of the T2SS in the colonization of the symbiotic host was assessed. Colonization assays revealed that the T2SS is critical for initial colonization of the leech gut. The defect was tied to the loss of hemolysin production by performing a colonization assay with blood containing lysed erythrocytes. This restored the colonization defect in the mutant. Complementation of the mutant using the promoter region and exeMN revealed that the T2SS is responsible for secreting hemolysin into the extracellular space and that both the T2SS and hemolysin export by the T2SS are critical for initial establishment of A. veronii in the leech gut. PMID:21097598

  18. The Type II Secretion System Is Essential for Erythrocyte Lysis and Gut Colonization by the Leech Digestive Tract Symbiont Aeromonas veronii ?

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Michele; Graf, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Hemolysin and the type II secretion system (T2SS) have been shown to be important for virulence in many pathogens, but very few studies have shown their importance in beneficial microbes. Here, we investigated the importance of the type II secretion pathway in the beneficial digestive-tract association of Aeromonas veronii and the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana and revealed a critical role for the hemolysis of erythrocytes. A mutant with a miniTn5 insertion in exeM, which is involved in forming the inner membrane platform in the T2SS, was isolated by screening mutants for loss of hemolysis on blood agar plates. A hemolysis assay was used to quantify the mutant's deficiency in lysing sheep erythrocytes and revealed a 99.9% decrease compared to the parent strain. The importance of the T2SS in the colonization of the symbiotic host was assessed. Colonization assays revealed that the T2SS is critical for initial colonization of the leech gut. The defect was tied to the loss of hemolysin production by performing a colonization assay with blood containing lysed erythrocytes. This restored the colonization defect in the mutant. Complementation of the mutant using the promoter region and exeMN revealed that the T2SS is responsible for secreting hemolysin into the extracellular space and that both the T2SS and hemolysin export by the T2SS are critical for initial establishment of A. veronii in the leech gut. PMID:21097598

  19. Role of the PhoP-PhoQ gene regulatory system in adaptation of Yersinia pestis to environmental stress in the flea digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Vadyvaloo, Viveka; Viall, Austin K; Jarrett, Clayton O; Hinz, Angela K; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Joseph Hinnebusch, B

    2015-06-01

    The Yersinia pestis PhoPQ gene regulatory system is induced during infection of the flea digestive tract and is required to produce adherent biofilm in the foregut, which greatly enhances bacterial transmission during a flea bite. To understand the in vivo context of PhoPQ induction and to determine PhoP-regulated targets in the flea, we undertook whole-genome comparative transcriptional profiling of Y. pestis WT and ?phoP strains isolated from infected fleas and from temperature-matched in vitro planktonic and flow-cell biofilm cultures. In the absence of PhoP regulation, the gene expression program indicated that the bacteria experienced diverse physiological stresses and were in a metabolically less active state. Multiple stress response genes, including several toxin-antitoxin loci and YhcN family genes responsible for increased acid tolerance, were upregulated in the phoP mutant during flea infection. The data implied that PhoPQ was induced by low pH in the flea gut, and that PhoP modulated physiological adaptation to acid and other stresses encountered during infection of the flea. This adaptive response, together with PhoP-dependent modification of the bacterial outer surface that includes repression of pH?6 antigen fimbriae, supports stable biofilm development in the flea foregut. PMID:25804213

  20. Voluntary intake, chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of fresh forages fed to guinea pigs in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo).

    PubMed

    Bindelle, J; Ilunga, Y; Delacollette, M; Kayij, M Muland; di M'Balu, J Umba; Kindele, E; Buldgen, A

    2007-08-01

    The daily voluntary intake (DVI) of Guinea pigs (GP) fed 15 fresh forages used in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) was investigated. In order to determine the best forages combination for GP diet, DVI was compared to their nutritional value measured in vitro using (1) a pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis, (2) an gas fermentation test on the hydrolysed residues with an inoculum prepared from GP faeces, and (3) the chemical composition of the offered feeds and the hydrolysis residues. The forages ranking based on the DVI was correlated to the NDF content, but not to their nutritional values determined in vitro. According to their high DVI (from 4.23 to 7.75 g/kg liveweigth), and their valuable in vitro nutritional values (crude protein ranging from 261 to 279 g crude protein kg(-1) DM, pepsin-pancreatin digestibilities of the dry matter from 0.55 to 0.59 and final gas production from 170 to 196 1 kg(-1) DM), Desmodium intortum, Euphorbia heterophylla or Amaranthus hybridus, can be suggested to the farmers to complement the usual diet distributed to the GP based on Panicum maximum. PMID:17966272

  1. Role of the PhoP–PhoQ gene regulatory system in adaptation of Yersinia pestis to environmental stress in the flea digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Viall, Austin K.; Jarrett, Clayton O.; Hinz, Angela K.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Joseph Hinnebusch, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Yersinia pestis PhoPQ gene regulatory system is induced during infection of the flea digestive tract and is required to produce adherent biofilm in the foregut, which greatly enhances bacterial transmission during a flea bite. To understand the in vivo context of PhoPQ induction and to determine PhoP-regulated targets in the flea, we undertook whole-genome comparative transcriptional profiling of Y. pestis WT and ?phoP strains isolated from infected fleas and from temperature-matched in vitro planktonic and flow-cell biofilm cultures. In the absence of PhoP regulation, the gene expression program indicated that the bacteria experienced diverse physiological stresses and were in a metabolically less active state. Multiple stress response genes, including several toxin–antitoxin loci and YhcN family genes responsible for increased acid tolerance, were upregulated in the phoP mutant during flea infection. The data implied that PhoPQ was induced by low pH in the flea gut, and that PhoP modulated physiological adaptation to acid and other stresses encountered during infection of the flea. This adaptive response, together with PhoP-dependent modification of the bacterial outer surface that includes repression of pH?6 antigen fimbriae, supports stable biofilm development in the flea foregut. PMID:25804213

  2. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/. PMID:12618011

  3. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  4. Systemic Delivery of MeCP2 Rescues Behavioral and Cellular Deficits in Female Mouse Models of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Saurabh K.; Lioy, Daniel T.; Cheval, Hélène; McGann, James C.; Bissonnette, John M.; Murtha, Matthew J.; Foust, Kevin D.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Bird, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    De novo mutations in the X-linked gene encoding the transcription factor methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) are the most frequent cause of the neurological disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). Hemizygous males usually die of neonatal encephalopathy. Heterozygous females survive into adulthood but exhibit severe symptoms including microcephaly, loss of purposeful hand motions and speech, and motor abnormalities, which appear after a period of apparently normal development. Most studies have focused on male mouse models because of the shorter latency to and severity in symptoms, yet how well these mice mimic the disease in affected females is not clear. Very few therapeutic treatments have been proposed for females, the more gender-appropriate model. Here, we show that self-complementary AAV9, bearing MeCP2 cDNA under control of a fragment of its own promoter (scAAV9/MeCP2), is capable of significantly stabilizing or reversing symptoms when administered systemically into female RTT mice. To our knowledge, this is the first potential gene therapy for females afflicted with RTT. PMID:23966684

  5. Oxidative stress regulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system and immunoproteasome functioning in a mouse model of X-adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Launay, Nathalie; Ruiz, Montserrat; Fourcade, Stéphane; Schlüter, Agatha; Guilera, Cristina; Ferrer, Isidre; Knecht, Erwin; Pujol, Aurora

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative damage is a pivotal aetiopathogenic factor in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. This is a neurometabolic disease characterized by the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids owing to the loss of function of the peroxisomal transporter Abcd1. Here, we used the X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mouse model and patient's fibroblasts to detect malfunctioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resulting from the accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins, some involved in bioenergetic metabolism. Furthermore, the immunoproteasome machinery appears upregulated in response to oxidative stress, in the absence of overt inflammation. i-Proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria when fibroblasts are exposed to an excess of very-long-chain fatty acids in response to oxidative stress. Antioxidant treatment regulates proteasome expression, prevents i-proteasome induction and translocation of i-proteasomes to mitochondria. Our findings support a key role of i-proteasomes in quality control in mitochondria during oxidative damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and perhaps in other neurodegenerative conditions with similar pathogeneses. PMID:23436506

  6. OMR-Arena: Automated Measurement and Stimulation System to Determine Mouse Visual Thresholds Based on Optomotor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Friedrich; Kretschmer, Viola; Kunze, Vincent P.; Kretzberg, Jutta

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of the optomotor response is a common way to determine thresholds of the visual system in animals. Particularly in mice, it is frequently used to characterize the visual performance of different genetically modified strains or to test the effect of various drugs on visual performance. Several methods have been developed to facilitate the presentation of stimuli using computer screens or projectors. Common methods are either based on the measurement of eye movement during optokinetic reflex behavior or rely on the measurement of head and/or body-movements during optomotor responses. Eye-movements can easily and objectively be quantified, but their measurement requires invasive fixation of the animals. Head movements can be observed in freely moving animals, but until now depended on the judgment of a human observer who reported the counted tracking movements of the animal during an experiment. In this study we present a novel measurement and stimulation system based on open source building plans and software. This system presents appropriate 360 stimuli while simultaneously video-tracking the animal's head-movements without fixation. The on-line determined head gaze is used to adjust the stimulus to the head position, as well as to automatically calculate visual acuity. Exemplary, we show that automatically measured visual response curves of mice match the results obtained by a human observer very well. The spatial acuity thresholds yielded by the automatic analysis are also consistent with the human observer approach and with published results. Hence, OMR-arena provides an affordable, convenient and objective way to measure mouse visual performance. PMID:24260105

  7. Billiards Digest April, 2011 David Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave") ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-print Network

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest April, 2011 David Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave") ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES "VEPS GEMS shots, Coriolis' system is a good place to start. #12;Billiards Digest April, 2011 a) side view b) top shot speed effects #12;Billiards Digest April, 2011 Diagram 3 (similar t

  8. HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION USING CARBON SUPPORT FOR BIOFILM IMMOBILIZATION

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION USING CARBON SUPPORT FOR BIOFILM IMMOBILIZATION A THESIS SUBMITTED-rate anaerobic digestion reactor system utilizing corn cob biochar as biofilm support was characterized at 10 of approximately 85% with a methane production rate of 0.89 m3 m-3 d-1 were achieved for digestion of the synthetic

  9. DESTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION OF SLUDGE BY MULTIPLE-STATE DIGESTION AND THERMAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study compared conventional, anaerobic sludge digestion and three stage, anaerobic sludge digestion. The conventional digester and the first two stages of the multiple stage system were operated at 35 deg C; the third stage was maintained at 49 deg C. The influent feed sludge...

  10. The Effect of Enzyme Addition on Anaerobic Digestion of Jose Tall Wheat Grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the addition of enzyme products containing cellulase, hemicellulase, and Beta-glucosidase to anaerobic digestion systems were studied. Anaerobic digestion tests were performed using batch reactors operated at 35°C. The application of enzyme products in three digestion configurations w...

  11. Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into Biogas: System@cornell.edu URL: http://www.jove.com/video/3978/ DOI: 10.3791/3978 Keywords: Anaerobic Digestion, J.G., Spirito, C.M., Angenent, L.T. Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic

  12. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion, yet in temperate climate digesters, require a considerable amount of additional heat en...

  13. COMPARISON OF SYSTEMIC AND MUCOSAL ROUTES OF SENSITIZATION TO OVALBUMIN ANTIGEN IN THREE MOUSE STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown strain differences in allergic lung responses following ovalbumin (OVA) antigen sensitization and challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these differences were maintained between systemic and mucosal sensitization routes, and to ...

  14. Conservation and divergence in the transcriptional programs of the human and mouse immune systems

    E-print Network

    Shay, Tal

    Much of the knowledge about cell differentiation and function in the immune system has come from studies in mice, but the relevance to human immunology, diseases, and therapy has been challenged, perhaps more from anecdotal ...

  15. Digestibility index and factors affecting rate of starch digestion in vitro in conventional food preparation.

    PubMed

    Urooj, A; Puttraj, S

    1999-02-01

    The rate of starch hydrolysis in ten cereal-based food preparations was studied using an in vitro dialysis system. The foods were incubated with human saliva and porcine pancreatin. The sugars released after 3 h digestion were expressed as digestibility index (DI), the percentage starch digested was determined and correlated with the degree of gelatinization (DG). Granule morphology was also investigated and related with starch availability for hydrolysis. Significant differences were observed in the in vitro starch digestibility of the 10 foods (P < 0.05). The DI ranged from 53 for chapathi to 78 for rice flakes. DI was inversely related to the protein (r = -0.79, P < 0.01), fat (r = -0.63, P < 0.05) and energy (r = -0.61, P < 0.01). Percent starch digested was inversely related to the insoluble (r = -0.49, P < 0.05) and total dietary fiber (r = -0.63, P < 0.01) content of the foods. The SEM results provided a better understanding of granular morphology on cooking and the effect of protein on limiting DG. The results suggest that carbohydrate foods of potential use in the therapeutic diets may be identified by their in vitro digestion characteristics. PMID:10079465

  16. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    A Cre-inducible luciferase transgene was targeted into the Rosa26 locus and is driven by a CMV-based promoter. This allele when used in combination with Cre-regulated oncogenes or tumor suppressors can allow for noninvasive detection of tumors in mice. This allele permits serial imaging of mice, thus increasing the utility of mouse tumor models as a system to test therapeutics.

  17. Hypertext: Behind the Hype. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevilacqua, Ann F.

    This digest begins by defining the concept of hypertext and describing the two types of hypertext--static and dynamic. Three prototype applications are then discussed: (1) Intermedia, a large-scale multimedia system at Brown University; (2) the Perseus Project at Harvard University, which is developing interactive courseware on classical Greek…

  18. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, V S; Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Tsybko, A S; Tikhonova, M A; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2012-07-12

    The effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on depressive-like behavior and serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain of antidepressant sensitive cataleptics (ASC)/Icg mouse strain, characterized by depressive-like behavior, in comparison with the parental nondepressive CBA/Lac mouse strain was examined. Significant decrease of catalepsy and tail suspension test (TST) immobility was shown 17days after acute central BDNF administration (300ng i.c.v.) in ASC mice. In CBA mouse strain, BDNF moderately decreased catalepsy without any effect on TST immobility time. Significant difference between ASC and CBA mice in the effect of BDNF on 5-HT system was revealed. It was shown that central administration of BDNF led to increase of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression but not 5-HT(1A) functional activity in ASC mice. Increased tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2) and 5-HT(2A) receptor genes expression accompanied by 5-HT(2A) receptor sensitization was shown in BDNF-treated ASC but not in CBA mouse strain, suggesting BDNF-induced increase of the brain 5-HT system functional activity and activation of neurogenesis in "depressive" ASC mice. There were no changes found in the 5-HT transporter mRNA level in BDNF-treated ASC and CBA mice. In conclusion, central administration of BDNF produced prolonged ameliorative effect on depressive-like behavior accompanied by increase of the Tph-2, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) genes expression and 5-HT(2A) receptor functional activity in animal model of hereditary behavior disorders. PMID:22531372

  19. Establishment of a quantitative PCR system for discriminating chitinase-like proteins: catalytically inactive breast regression protein-39 and Ym1 are constitutive genes in mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mice and humans produce chitinase-like proteins (CLPs), which are highly homologous to chitinases but lack chitinolytic activity. Mice express primarily three CLPs, including breast regression protein-39 (BRP-39) [chitinase 3-like-1 (Chi3l1) or 38-kDa glycoprotein (gp38k)], Ym1 (Chi3l3) and Ym2 (Chi3l4). Recently, CLPs have attracted considerable attention due to their increased expression in a number of pathological conditions, including asthma, allergies, rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors. Although the exact functions of CLPs are largely unknown, the significance of their increased expression levels during pathophysiological states needs to be determined. The quantification of BRP-39, Ym1 and Ym2 is an important step in gaining insight into the in vivo regulation of the CLPs. Methods We constructed a standard DNA for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) by containing three CLPs target fragments and five reference genes cDNA in a one-to-one ratio. We evaluated this system by analyzing the eight target cDNA sequences. Tissue cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription from total RNA from four embryonic stages and eight adult tissues were analyzed using the qPCR system with the standard DNA. Results We established a qPCR system detecting CLPs and comparing their expression levels with those of five reference genes using the same scale in mouse tissues. We found that BRP-39 and Ym1 were abundant in the mouse lung, whereas Ym2 mRNA was abundant in the stomach, followed by lung. The expression levels of BRP-39 and Ym1 in the mouse lung were higher than those of two active chitinases and were comparable to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a housekeeping gene which is constitutively expressed in all tissues. Conclusion Our results indicate that catalytically inactive BRP-39 and Ym1 are constitutive genes in normal mouse lung. PMID:25294623

  20. AUTOMOUSE: AN IMPROVEMENT TO THE MOUSE COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM OPERATIONAL MANUAL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory is responsible ...

  1. A systems approach implicates nuclear receptor targeting in the Atp7b?/? mouse model of Wilson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilmarth, Phillip; Short, Kristopher; Fiehn, Oliver; Lutsenko, Svetlana; David, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Wilson’s disease (WD) is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism characterized by liver disease and/or neurologic and psychiatric pathology. The disease is a result of mutation in ATP7B, which encodes the ATP7B copper transporting ATPase. Loss of copper transport function by ATP7B results in copper accumulation primarily in the liver, but also in other organs including the brain. Studies in the Atp7b?/? mouse model of WD revealed specific transcript and metabolic changes that precede development of liver pathology, most notably downregulation of transcripts in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of transcriptomic and metabolic changes, we used a systems approach analysing the pre-symptomatic hepatic nuclear proteome and liver metabolites. We found that ligand-activated nuclear receptors FXR/NR1H4 and GR/NR3C1 and nuclear receptor interacting partners are less abundant in Atp7b?/? hepatocyte nuclei, while DNA repair machinery and the nucleus-localized glutathione peroxidase, SelH, are more abundant. Analysis of metabolites revealed an increase in polyol sugar alcohols, indicating a change in osmotic potential that precedes hepatocyte swelling observed later in disease. This work is the first application of quantitative Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MuDPIT) to a model of WD to investigate protein-level mechanisms of WD pathology. The systems approach using “shotgun” proteomics and metabolomics in the context of previous transcriptomic data reveals molecular-level mechanisms of WD development and facilitates targeted analysis of hepatocellular copper toxicity. PMID:22565294

  2. Microbial community analysis in a combined anaerobic and aerobic digestion system for treatment of cellulosic ethanol production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lili; Yu, Yanling; Zhu, Zebing; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Haiman; Ambuchi, John J; Feng, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the microbial diversity established in a combined system composed of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor, and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of cellulosic ethanol production wastewater. Excellent wastewater treatment performance was obtained in the combined system, which showed a high chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 95.8 % and completely eliminated most complex organics revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed differences in the microbial community structures of the three reactors. Further identification of the microbial populations suggested that the presence of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in CSTR played an active role in the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The most diverse microorganisms with analogous distribution patterns of different layers were observed in the EGSB reactor, and bacteria affiliated with Firmicutes, Synergistetes, and Thermotogae were associated with production of acetate and carbon dioxide/hydrogen, while all acetoclastic methanogens identified belonged to Methanosaetaceae. Overall, microorganisms associated with the ability to degrade cellulose, hemicellulose, and other biomass-derived organic carbons were observed in the combined system. The results presented herein will facilitate the development of an improved cellulosic ethanol production wastewater treatment system. PMID:26160121

  3. Mouse models for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Moore, Lynette; Ji, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to learn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Journal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue. PMID:21352691

  4. Systemic inflammation is associated with a reduction in Synaptopodin expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Strehl, Andreas; Lenz, Maximilian; Itsekson-Hayosh, Zeev; Becker, Denise; Chapman, Joab; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Systemic inflammation is known to affect memory function through the activation of immune cells and the release of inflammatory cytokines. However, the neuronal targets by which inflammatory signaling pathways affect synaptic plasticity remain not well understood. Here, we addressed the question of whether systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation influences the expression of Synaptopodin (SP). SP is an actin-binding protein, which is considered to control the ability of neurons to express synaptic plasticity by regulating the actin-cytoskeleton and/or intracellular Ca(2+) stores. This makes SP an interesting target molecule in the context of inflammation-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR)-analysis and immunohistochemistry we here demonstrate that intraperitoneal LPS-injection in two-month old male Balb/c mice leads to a reduction in hippocampal SP-levels (area CA1; 24h after injection). These changes are accompanied by a defect in the ability to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, similar to what is observed in SP-deficient mice. We therefore propose that systemic inflammation could exert its effects on neural plasticity, at least in part, through the down-regulation of SP in vivo. PMID:24837317

  5. A Novel Mouse Model for Stable Engraftment of a Human Immune System and Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Strick-Marchand, Helene; Dusséaux, Mathilde; Darche, Sylvie; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Legrand, Nicolas; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Corcuff, Erwan; Ahodantin, James; Weijer, Kees; Spits, Hergen; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS) and human hepatocytes (HUHEP) in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2R?c-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20–50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months) and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates. PMID:25782010

  6. Generation of a Nkx2.2(Cre) knock-in mouse line: Analysis of cell lineages in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Wassan; Vauti, Franz; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Holz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A Nkx2.2(cre) knock-in mutant mouse line was generated that on the appropriate reporter strain enables cell fate analysis of the Nkx2.2 cell lineage in the central nervous system and elsewhere. We here demonstrate that Nkx2.2 lineage-marked cells reside in the ventral p3 region along the entire length of the CNS and also in pancreas of mouse embryos. Nkx2.2(+) progenitor cells develop into V3 interneurons in spinal cord and generate the branchio-visceral motor nuclei of cranial nerves in hindbrain. Nkx2.2(+) cells in hindbrain also form serotonergic neurons and oligodendrocytes during later developmental stages. In mouse mutants lacking Nkx2.2 protein the neuronal progenitor cells in spinal cord are transformed to the distinct fate of somatic motor neurons including their axonal projections that exit the CNS ventrally and no longer cross the midline at the commissure. These data identify Nkx2.2 as key regulator to determine neuronal subtypes in the p3 domain of the central nervous system. PMID:25840610

  7. Design and Development of a Robotized System Coupled to µCT Imaging for Intratumoral Drug Evaluation in a HCC Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bour, Gaétan; Martel, Fernand; Goffin, Laurent; Bayle, Bernard; Gangloff, Jacques; Aprahamian, Marc; Marescaux, Jacques; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancer related deaths worldwide. One of the main challenges in cancer treatment is drug delivery to target cancer cells specifically. Preclinical evaluation of intratumoral drugs in orthotopic liver cancer mouse models is difficult, as percutaneous injection hardly can be precisely performed manually. In the present study we have characterized a hepatoma model developing a single tumor nodule by implantation of Hep55.1C cells in the liver of syngeneic C57BL/6J mice. Tumor evolution was followed up by µCT imaging, and at the histological and molecular levels. This orthotopic, poorly differentiated mouse HCC model expressing fibrosis, inflammation and cancer markers was used to assess the efficacy of drugs. We took advantage of the high precision of a previously developed robotized system for automated, image-guided intratumoral needle insertion, to administer every week in the tumor of the Hep55.1C mouse model. A significant tumor growth inhibition was observed using our robotized system, whereas manual intraperitoneal administration had no effect, by comparison to untreated control mice. PMID:25203629

  8. Comparative Digestive Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Karasov, William H.; Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, morphological and functional features of gastrointestinal (GI) tracts generally reflect food chemistry, such as content of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and material(s) refractory to rapid digestion (e.g., cellulose). The expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters approximately matches the dietary load of their respective substrates, with relatively modest excess capacity. Mechanisms explaining differences in hydrolase activity between populations and species include gene copy number variations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional adjustments mediate phenotypic changes in the expression of hydrolases and transporters in response to dietary signals. Many species respond to higher food intake by flexibly increasing digestive compartment size. Fermentative processes by symbiotic microorganisms are important for cellulose degradation but are relatively slow, so animals that rely on those processes typically possess special enlarged compartment(s) to maintain a microbiota and other GI structures that slow digesta flow. The taxon richness of the gut microbiota, usually identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, is typically an order of magnitude greater in vertebrates than invertebrates, and the interspecific variation in microbial composition is strongly influenced by diet. Many of the nutrient transporters are orthologous across different animal phyla, though functional details may vary (e.g., glucose and amino acid transport with K+ rather than Na+ as a counter ion). Paracellular absorption is important in many birds. Natural toxins are ubiquitous in foods and may influence key features such as digesta transit, enzymatic breakdown, microbial fermentation, and absorption PMID:23720328

  9. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1991-01-01

    This is the twenty-ninth issue of NASA's Space Life Sciences Digest. It is a double issue covering two issues of the Soviet Space Biology and Aerospace Medicine Journal. Issue 29 contains abstracts of 60 journal papers or book chapters published in Russian and of three Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. A review of a book on environmental hygiene and a list of papers presented at a Soviet conference on space biology and medicine are also included. The materials in this issue were identified as relevant to 28 areas of space biology and medicine. The areas are: adaptation, aviation medicine, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, digestive system, endocrinology, equipment and instrumentation, genetics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive system, space biology and medicine, and the economics of space flight.

  10. Acute systemic LPS-mediated inflammation induces lasting changes in mouse cortical neuromodulation and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ming, Z; Sawicki, G; Bekar, L K

    2015-03-17

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widely used to induce a neuroinflammatory response that is associated with short-term 'sickness'-behavior that can include fever, loss of activity, loss of appetite, impaired cognition, anxiety and depression. If large enough or left unchecked, this neuroinflammatory response can become self-perpetuating and lead to long-term neurodegenerative processes. In this study, we assess the longer-term effects of a single systemic LPS injection on electrophysiological neuromodulator effects and basic behavioral analysis in mice. Five months after LPS injection, we find a mild reduction in cortical inhibition and altered temporal dynamics of acetylcholine but not norepinephrine or serotonin neuromodulator effects. Consistent with electrophysiological findings, LPS treated mice showed a deficit in memory performance in the novel object recognition test with no effect on measures of anxiety or despair as measured in the open field test and tail suspension test, respectively. Furthermore, LPS-treated mice showed an increase in acetylcholinesterase activity. As increased acetylcholinesterase activity is associated with reduced acetylcholine signaling and impaired cognitive ability, these studies demonstrate the potential for a single inflammatory event to initiate processes that may lead to long-term neurodegeneration. PMID:25650524

  11. A Sensitive Assay System To Test Antisense Oligonucleotides for Splice Suppression Therapy in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Villar, Lorena; Viecelli, Hiu Man; Pérez, Belén; Harding, Cary O; Ugarte, Magdalena; Thöny, Beat; Desviat, Lourdes R

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of antisense therapy for splicing defects in cellular models of metabolic diseases, suppressing the use of cryptic splice sites or pseudoexon insertions. To date, no animal models with these defects are available. Here, we propose exon skipping of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) gene expressed in liver and kidney to generate systemic hyperphenylalaninemia in mice as a sensitive in vivo assay to test splice suppression. Systemic elevation of blood L-Phe can be quantified using tandem MS/MS. Exon 11 and/or 12 skipping for the normal PAH gene was validated in hepatoma cells for comparing two oligonucleotide chemistries, morpholinos and locked nucleic acids. Subsequently, Vivo-morpholinos (VMO) were tested in wild-type and in phenotypically normal Pahenu2/+ heterozygous mice to target exon 11 and/or 12 of the murine Pah gene using different VMO dosing, mode of injection and treatment regimes. Consecutive intravenous injections of VMO resulted in transient hyperphenylalaninemia correlating with complete exon skipping and absence of PAH protein and enzyme activity. Sustained effect required repeated injection of VMOs. Our results provide not only a sensitive in vivo assay to test for splice-modulating antisense oligonucleotides, but also a simple method to generate murine models for genetic liver diseases. PMID:25226162

  12. Absence of systemic toxicity in mouse model towards BaTiO3 nanoparticulate based eluate treatment.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Ashutosh Kumar; Thrivikraman, Greeshma; Basu, Bikramjit

    2015-02-01

    One of the existing issues in implant failure of orthopedic biomaterials is the toxicity induced by the fine particles released during long term use in vivo, leading to acute inflammatory response. In developing a new class of piezobiocomposite to mimic the integrated electrical and mechanical properties of bone, bone-mimicking physical properties as well as in vitro cytocompatibility properties have been achieved with spark plasma sintered hydroxyapatite (HA)-barium titanate (BaTiO3) composites. However, the presence of BaTiO3 remains a concern towards the potential toxicity effect. To address this issue, present work reports the first result to conclusively confirm the non-toxic effect of HA-BaTiO3 piezobiocomposite nanoparticulates, in vivo. Twenty BALB/c mice were intra-articularly injected at their right knee joints with different concentrations of HA-BaTiO3 composite of up to 25 mg/ml. The histopathological examination confirmed the absence of any trace of injected particles or any sign of inflammatory reaction in the vital organs, such as heart, spleen, kidney and liver at 7 days post-exposure period. Rather, the injected nanoparticulates were found to be agglomerated in the vicinity of the knee joint, surrounded by macrophages. Importantly, the absence of any systemic toxicity response in any of the vital organs in the treated mouse model, other than a mild local response at the site of delivery, was recorded. The serum biochemical analyses using proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-? and IL-1?) also complimented to the non-immunogenic response to injected particulates. Altogether, the absence of any inflammatory/adverse reaction will open up myriad of opportunities for BaTiO3 based piezoelectric implantable devices in biomedical applications. PMID:25655497

  13. Activation of transcription factors STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence after systemic ciliary neurotrophic factor administration.

    PubMed

    Severi, Ilenia; Senzacqua, Martina; Mondini, Eleonora; Fazioli, Francesca; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Exogenously administered ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes weight loss in obese rodents and humans through leptin-like activation of the Jak-STAT3 signaling pathway in hypothalamic arcuate neurons. Here we report for the first time that 40min after acute systemic treatment, rat recombinant CNTF (intraperitoneal injection of 0.3mg/kg of body weight) induced nuclear translocation of the tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence and other circumventricular organs, including the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis and the subfornical organ. In the tuberal hypothalamus of treated mice, specific nuclear immunostaining for phospo-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 was detected in ependymal cells bordering the third ventricle floor and lateral recesses, and in median eminence cells. Co-localization studies documented STAT1 and STAT5 activation in median eminence ?-tanycytes and underlying radial glia-like cells. A few astrocytes in the arcuate nucleus responded to CNTF by STAT5 activation. The vast majority of median eminence tanycytes and radial glia-like cells showing phospho-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity were also positive for phospho-STAT3. In contrast, STAT3 was the sole STAT isoform activated by CNTF in arcuate nucleus and median eminence neurons. Finally, immunohistochemical evaluation of STAT activation 20, 40, 80, and 120min from the injection demonstrated that cell activation was accompanied by c-Fos expression. Collectively, our findings show that CNTF activates STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 in vivo. The distinctive activation pattern of these STAT isoforms in the median eminence may disclose novel targets and pathways through which CNTF regulates food intake. PMID:26133794

  14. Neuropathic pain activates the endogenous kappa opioid system in mouse spinal cord and induces opioid receptor tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Petraschka, Michael; McLaughlin, Jay P; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Caron, Marc G; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Pintar, John E; Terman, Gregory W; Chavkin, Charles

    2004-05-12

    Release of endogenous dynorphin opioids within the spinal cord after partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) is known to contribute to the neuropathic pain processes. Using a phosphoselective antibody [kappa opioid receptor (KOR-P)] able to detect the serine 369 phosphorylated form of the KOR, we determined possible sites of dynorphin action within the spinal cord after pSNL. KOR-P immunoreactivity (IR) was markedly increased in the L4-L5 spinal dorsal horn of wild-type C57BL/6 mice (7-21 d) after lesion, but not in mice pretreated with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI). In addition, knock-out mice lacking prodynorphin, KOR, or G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) did not show significant increases in KOR-P IR after pSNL. KOR-P IR was colocalized in both GABAergic neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes in both ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horn. Consistent with sustained opioid release, KOR knock-out mice developed significantly increased tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both the early (first week) and late (third week) interval after lesion. Similarly, mice pretreated with norBNI showed enhanced hyperalgesia and allodynia during the 3 weeks after pSNL. Because sustained activation of opioid receptors might induce tolerance, we measured the antinociceptive effect of the kappa agonist U50,488 using radiant heat applied to the ipsilateral hindpaw, and we found that agonist potency was significantly decreased 7 d after pSNL. In contrast, neither prodynorphin nor GRK3 knock-out mice showed U50,488 tolerance after pSNL. These findings suggest that pSNL induced a sustained release of endogenous prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides that activated an anti-nociceptive KOR system in mouse spinal cord. Thus, endogenous dynorphin had both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions after nerve injury and induced GRK3-mediated opioid tolerance. PMID:15140929

  15. Contribution of B-1a cells to systemic lupus erythematosus in the NZM2410 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiwei; Morel, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of complex etiology in which B cells play a central role. An expanded number of B-1a cells have been consistently associated with murine lupus, and more recently with human SLE. We have identified Cdkn2c, a gene that controls cell cycle progression, as a key regulator of B-1a cell numbers and have associated Cdkn2c deficiency with autoimmune pathology, including the production of autoantibodies and the skewing of CD4(+) T cells toward inflammatory effector functions. We review the genetic studies that have led to these findings, as well as the possible mechanisms by which B-1a cell expansion and Cdkn2c deficiency are related to SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25728381

  16. Systemic administration of strontium or NBD peptide ameliorates early stage cartilage degradation of mouse mandibular condyles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.-Y.; Lu, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, J.; He, J.-J.; Wu, Y.-P.; Chen, Di; Wang, M.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To determine whether mandibular condylar cartilage degradation induced by experimentally abnormal occlusion could be ameliorated via systemic administration of strontium or NBD peptide. Methods Six-week-old female C57BL/6J mice were used. From the seventh day after mock operation or unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) treatment, the control and UAC mice were further respectively pharmacologically treated for 2 weeks or 4 weeks of saline (CON + Saline and UAC + Saline groups), SrCl2 (CON + SrCl2 and UAC + SrCl2 groups) or NBD peptide (CON + NBD peptide and UAC + NBD peptide groups). Changes in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone were assessed 21 and 35 days after mock operation or UAC procedure by histology and micro-CT. Real-time PCR and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed to evaluate changes in expression levels of col2a1, aggrecan, ADAMTS-5, tnf-?, il-1?, nfkbia, nuclear factor-kappaB phospho-p65 in condylar cartilage, and rankl/rank/opg in both condylar cartilage and subchondral bone. Results Cartilage degradation with decreased col2a1 and aggrecan expression, and increased ADAMTS-5, tnf-?/il1-?, nfkbia and NF-?B phospho-p65 was observed in UAC + Saline groups. Subchondral bone loss with increased osteoclast numbers and decreased opg/rankl ratio was found in UAC + Saline groups compared to age-match CON + Saline groups. Cartilage degradation and subchondral bone loss were reversed by treatment of SrCl2 or NBD peptide while the same dosage in control mice induced few changes in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone. Conclusions The results demonstrate reverse effect of systemic administration of strontium or NBD peptide on UAC-induced condylar cartilage degradation and subchondral bone loss. PMID:26256766

  17. Induction and suppression of allergic diarrhea and systemic anaphylaxis in a mouse model of food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Zeynep Yesim; Strait, Richard; Khodoun, Marat V.; Mahler, Ashley; Hogan, Simon; Finkelman, Fred D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical manifestations of food allergy include diarrhea and systemic anaphylaxis (shock), which can occur together or by themselves in different individuals. Although ingested food antigens need to be absorbed to induce shock, it is not known whether they need to be absorbed to induce diarrhea. Objective Identify mechanisms that determine whether food allergy induces diarrhea versus shock and determine whether diarrhea requires absorption of ingested antigens. Methods: These issues were studied in mice in active, passive and hybrid immunization models. The active model was used to determine the allergic diarrhea susceptibility of J chain- and pIgR-deficient mice, which are unable to secrete IgA. The hybrid model was used to determine whether intravenously administered antigen-specific IgG antibody, which is not secreted into the gut, can protect against allergic diarrhea as well as shock. Results Shock, but not diarrhea was induced in naïve mice by intravenous IgE anti-TNP antibody, followed by oral TNP-bovine serum albumin, whereas both were induced in mice presensitized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin/alum plus oral ovalbumin. More TNP-bovine serum albumin was required to induce shock than diarrhea in presensitized mice and intravenous IgG anti-TNP antibody, which is not secreted into the gut, protected these mice against both diarrhea and shock. Consistent with this, OVA-immunized J chain- and pIgR-deficient mice, which have high serum IgA but little intestinal IgA, resisted diarrhea induction. Conclusion Intestinal immunity and oral Ag dose determine whether diarrhea and/or systemic anaphylaxis are induced and ingested Ag must be absorbed to induce either response. PMID:22465213

  18. MOUSE SETS MITCH RUDOMINER

    E-print Network

    Rudominer, Mitch

    MOUSE SETS MITCH RUDOMINER terms, M is a "mouse". Consequently, we * *say that A is a mouse set. For a concrete examplenis* * a mouse set. Our work extends some similar results due to D.A. Martin, J.R. Steel, and

  19. Rehmannia glutinosa activates intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems in mouse auditory cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hwa; Jung, Su-Young; Shin, Mee-Kyung; Park, Rae-Kil; So, Hong-Seob; Kim, Ki-Young; Lee, Da-Hong; You, Yong-Ouk

    2006-01-01

    Steamed roots of Rehmannia glutinosa (R. glutinosa) have been traditionally used in Oriental medicine for the treatment of auditory diseases such as tinnitus and hearing loss. To investigate whether the ethanol extract of steamed roots of R. glutinosa (SRG) increases activity of antioxidant enzymes and the level of glutathione (GSH), we measured activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR) and GSH level in HEI-OC1 cells after treatment with 5-50 microg/ml of SRG. The SOD and CAT activities were significantly increased in the presence of SRG compared to the control group. Maximal activities of SOD and CAT were observed in these cells exposed to 10 microg/ml of SRG. The GPX activity also increased dramatically in response to the treatment with SRG in a dose-dependent manner. The GR activity was only increased in the presence of 50 microg/ml of SRG compared to the control group. The level of GSH gradually increased in the presence of 5-50 microg/ml of SRG. In the cytotoxicity test, 5-50 microg/ml of SRG did not show any significant cytotoxicity. These results suggest that the traditional use of R. glutinosa for the treatment of auditory diseases may be explained, in part, by activation of intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems. Further studies are necessary to clarify the active constituents of SRG responsible for such biomolecular activities. PMID:17163596

  20. A Systems Genetic Analysis of High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism and Network Preservation across Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Langfelder, Peter; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Paul, Eric; Davis, Richard; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Horvath, Steve; Mehrabian, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    We report a systems genetics analysis of high density lipoproteins (HDL) levels in an F2 intercross between inbred strains CAST/EiJ and C57BL/6J. We previously showed that there are dramatic differences in HDL metabolism in a cross between these strains, and we now report co-expression network analysis of HDL that integrates global expression data from liver and adipose with relevant metabolic traits. Using data from a total of 293 F2 intercross mice, we constructed weighted gene co-expression networks and identified modules (subnetworks) associated with HDL and clinical traits. These were examined for genes implicated in HDL levels based on large human genome-wide associations studies (GWAS) and examined with respect to conservation between tissue and sexes in a total of 9 data sets. We identify genes that are consistently ranked high by association with HDL across the 9 data sets. We focus in particular on two genes, Wfdc2 and Hdac3, that are located in close proximity to HDL QTL peaks where causal testing indicates that they may affect HDL. Our results provide a rich resource for studies of complex metabolic interactions involving HDL. PMID:21807117

  1. Cerebral Developmental Abnormalities in a Mouse with Systemic Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Lioudmila; Hausknecht, Kathryn A.; Stachowiak, Michal K.; Dlugos, Cynthia A.; Richards, Jerry B.; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) deficiency is an inborn error of pyruvate metabolism causing a variety of neurologic manifestations. Systematic analyses of development of affected brain structures and the cellular processes responsible for their impairment have not been performed due to the lack of an animal model for PDC deficiency. METHODS: In the present study we investigated a murine model of systemic PDC deficiency by interrupting the X-linked Pdha1 gene encoding the ? subunit of PDH to study its role on brain development and behavioral studies. RESULTS: Male embryos died prenatally but heterozygous females were born. PDC activity was reduced in the brain and other tissues in female progeny compared to age-matched control females. Immunohistochemical analysis of several brain regions showed that approximately 40% of cells were PDH?. The oxidation of glucose to CO2 and incorporation of glucose-carbon into fatty acids were reduced in brain slices from 15 day-old PDC-deficient females. Histological analyses showed alterations in several structures in white and gray matters in 35 day-old PDC-deficient females. Reduction in total cell number and reduced dendritic arbors in Purkinje neurons were observed in PDC-deficient females. Furthermore, cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into neurons by newly generated cells were reduced in the affected females during pre- and postnatal periods. PDC-deficient mice had normal locomotor activity in a novel environment but displayed decreased startle responses to loud noises and there was evidence of abnormal pre-pulse inhibition of the startle reflex. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that a reduction in glucose metabolism resulting in deficit in energy production and fatty acid biosynthesis impairs cellular differentiation and brain development in PDC-deficient mice. PMID:23840713

  2. Partial Restriction Digests Leslie Vosshall

    E-print Network

    Partial Restriction Digests 4/18/2001 Leslie Vosshall · Purpose: To generate DNA cut at a subset to the following schedule for digests [A] ­ [F]: [A] 1.0 ul Enzyme [B] 0.1 ul Enzyme [C] 0.05 ul Enzyme [D] 0.01 ul Enzyme [E] 0.005 ul Enzyme [F] 0.001 ul Enzyme [A] add 1 ul of enzyme and mix well; place digest on wet

  3. COMPARATIVE GUT PHYSIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Comparative physiology of digestion.

    PubMed

    Furness, J B; Cottrell, J J; Bravo, D M

    2015-02-01

    The digestive systems of all species have been shaped by environmental pressures over long evolutionary time spans. Nevertheless, all digestive systems must achieve the same end points, the ingestion of biological material and its conversion to molecules that serve as energy substrates and structural components of tissues. A range of strategies to extract nutrients, including for animals reliant primarily on foregut fermentation, hindgut fermentation, and enzymatic degradation, have evolved. Moreover, animals have adapted to different foodstuffs as herbivores (including frugivores, folivores, granivores, etc.), carnivores, and omnivores. We present evidence that humans have diverged from other omnivores because of the long history of consumption of cooked or otherwise prepared food. We consider them to be cucinivores. We present examples to illustrate that the range of foodstuffs that can be efficiently assimilated by each group or species is limited and is different from that of other groups or species. Differences are reflected in alimentary tract morphology. The digestive systems of each group and of species within the groups are adaptable, with constraints determined by individual digestive physiology. Although overall digestive strategies and systems differ, the building blocks for digestion are remarkably similar. All vertebrates have muscular tubular tracts lined with a single layer of epithelial cells for most of the length, use closely related digestive enzymes and transporters, and control the digestive process through similar hormones and similarly organized nerve pathways. Extrapolations among species that are widely separated in their digestive physiologies are possible when the basis for extrapolation is carefully considered. Divergence is greatest at organ or organismal levels, and similarities are greatest at the cell and molecular level. PMID:26020739

  4. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  5. Systems toxicology approaches enable mechanistic comparison of spontaneous and cigarette smoke-related lung tumor development in the A/J mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Iskandar, Anita; Sewer, Alain; Martin, Florian; Talikka, Marja; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Berges, An; Veljkovic, Emilija; Gonzalez-Suarez, Ignacio; Schlage, Walter; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The A/J mouse is highly susceptible to lung tumor induction and has been widely used as a screening model in carcinogenicity testing and chemoprevention studies. However, the A/J mouse model has several disadvantages. Most notably, it develops lung tumors spontaneously. Moreover, there is a considerable gap in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of pulmonary chemical carcinogenesis in the A/J mouse. Therefore, we examined the differences between spontaneous and cigarette smoke-related lung tumors in the A/J mouse model using mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) profiling. Male A/J mice were exposed whole-body to mainstream cigarette smoke (MS) for 18 months. Gene expression interaction term analysis of lung tumors and surrounding non-tumorous parenchyma samples from animals that were exposed to either 300 mg/m3 MS or sham-exposed to fresh air indicated significant differential expression of 296 genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® (IPA®) indicated an overall suppression of the humoral immune response, which was accompanied by a disruption of sphingolipid and glycosaminoglycan metabolism and a deregulation of potentially oncogenic miRNA in tumors of MS-exposed A/J mice. Thus, we propose that MS exposure leads to severe perturbations in pathways essential for tumor recognition by the immune system, thereby potentiating the ability of tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance. Further, exposure to MS appeared to affect expression of miRNA, which have previously been implicated in carcinogenesis and are thought to contribute to tumor progression. Finally, we identified a 50-gene expression signature and show its utility in distinguishing between cigarette smoke-related and spontaneous lung tumors. PMID:26109882

  6. Minimizing Carry-Over in an Online Pepsin Digestion System used for the H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometric Analysis of an IgG1 Monoclonal Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Ranajoy; Manikwar, Prakash; Hickey, John M.; Arora, Jayant; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.; Weis, David D.

    2012-12-01

    Chromatographic carry-over can severely distort measurements of amide H/D exchange in proteins analyzed by LC/MS. In this work, we explored the origin of carry-over in the online digestion of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody using an immobilized pepsin column under quenched H/D exchange conditions (pH 2.5, 0 °C). From a consensus list of 169 different peptides consistently detected during digestion of this large, ~150 kDa protein, approximately 30 % of the peptic peptides exhibited carry-over. The majority of carry-over originates from the online digestion. Carry-over can be substantially decreased by washing the online digestion flow-path and pepsin column with two wash cocktails: [acetonitrile (5 %)/ isopropanol (5 %)/ acetic acid (20 %) in water] and [2 M guanidine hydrochloride in 100 mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5]. Extended use of this two-step washing procedure does not adversely affect the specificity or activity of the immobilized pepsin column. The results suggest that although the mechanism of carry-over appears to be chemical in nature, and not hydrodynamic, carry-over cannot be attributed to a single factor such as mass, abundance, pI, or hydrophobicity of the peptides.

  7. Effect of simulated processing on the antioxidant capacity and in vitro protein digestion of fruit juice-milk beverage model systems.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyong; Yuan, Bo; Zeng, Maomao; Tao, Guanjun; Chen, Jie

    2015-05-15

    The effects of simulated processing (pH adjustment and thermal treatment) on the antioxidant capacity and in vitro protein digestion of fruit juice-milk beverage (FJMB) models consisting of whey protein (WP), and chlorogenic acid (CHA) or catechin (CAT) were investigated. Results indicated that CAT was more susceptible to processing than CHA, and showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in ABTS and FRAP after sterilization (121°C/10 min) and pH adjustment to 6.8. WP addition had different effects (none, masking, synergetic effect) on the antioxidant activity of FJMB. Pasteurization (63°C/30 min) and pH adjustment (pH 3.7 or pH 6.8) had either non-significant or slight effects on FJMB's antioxidant capacity, while sterilization significantly (p<0.05) increased or decreased its ABTS and FRAP depending on the different models. In vitro digestion of WP in FJMB was obviously (p < 0.05) inhibited by phenolics to varying degrees, and little influenced (p>0.05) by pasteurization, whereas sterilization initially accelerated WP digestion but did not change its overall digestibility. PMID:25577106

  8. Vortex-assisted tryptic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyo-Jik; Shin, Seongjae; Kim, Jinhee; Hong, Jangmi; Lee, Sunyoung; Kim, Jeongkwon

    2011-01-15

    The effect of vortex-induced vibration during tryptic digestion was investigated by applying different vibrational speeds (0, 600, 1200, or 2500?rpm) to digestion solutions for varying durations (10, 20, 30, 40, or 60?min) at two different incubation temperatures (25°C or 37°C). The most rapid digestion was observed with the highest vibrational speed and temperature. With the application of 2500?rpm at 37°C, the tryptic digestion of each of three standard proteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, or bovine serum albumin) provided complete disappearance of the protein within 60?min, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Compared to conventional overnight digestion, 60-min vortex-assisted tryptic digestion generated longer peptides, due primarily to the limited digestion time and provided better sequence coverages (89% vs. 78% for cytochrome c, 100% vs. 87% for myoglobin, and 38% vs. 26% for BSA). The longer peptides should be advantageous to analytical methods such as the middle-down approach that benefit from increased sequence coverage of proteins. Vortex-assisted tryptic digestion is expected to be a useful method for rapid tryptic digestion of proteins. PMID:21154656

  9. Effect of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain color and hardness on the consumption preference of a mouse model system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain is a staple food and provides necessary nutrients for human health and nutrition. Yet, flavor differences among wheat varieties are not well understood. Grain flavor and consumption preference can be examined using the house mouse (Mus musculus L.) as a...

  10. Hog farm in California uses anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.

    1995-12-31

    This article describes a system of covered lagoons which help address the waste management problems of hog farmers as well as producing methane used to power generators. Four advantages of anaerobic digestion are described along with the system: energy production from methane; fertilizer for fields; economic development in rural areas; and improved water quality through reduction of nonpoint source pollution. Address for full report is given.

  11. Biogas stripping of ammonia from fresh digestate from a food waste digester.

    PubMed

    Serna-Maza, A; Heaven, S; Banks, C J

    2015-08-01

    The efficiency of ammonia removal from fresh source-segregated domestic food waste digestate using biogas as a stripping agent was studied in batch experiments at 35, 55 and 70°C, at gas flow rates of 0.125 and 0.250Lbiogasmin(-1)L(-1)digestate with and without pH adjustment. Higher temperatures and alkaline conditions were required for effective ammonia removal, and at 35°C with or without pH adjustment or 55°C with unadjusted pH there was little or no removal. Results were compared to those from earlier studies with digestate that had been stored prior to stripping and showed that ammonia removal from fresh digestate was more difficult, with time constants 1.6-5.7 times higher than those previously reported. This has implications for the design of large-scale systems where continuous stripping of fresh digestate is likely to be the normal operating mode. A mass balance approach showed that thermal-alkaline stripping improved hydrolysis. PMID:25930942

  12. DIGESTIVE HEALTH CENTER AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    DIGESTIVE HEALTH CENTER AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE FUNCTIONAL BOWEL PROGRAM #12;"Northwestern. Through our Functional Bowel Program within the Digestive Health Center, we emphasize multidisciplinary for H. pylori, and carbohydrate testing for lactose, sucrose, and fructose intolerance. DIGESTIVE HEALTH

  13. Plants and Photosynthesis: Level III, Unit 3, Lesson 1; The Human Digestive System: Lesson 2; Functions of the Blood: Lesson 3; Human Circulation and Respiration: Lesson 4; Reproduction of a Single Cell: Lesson 5; Reproduction by Male and Female Cells: Lesson 6; The Human Reproductive System: Lesson 7; Genetics and Heredity: Lesson 8; The Nervous System: Lesson 9; The Glandular System: Lesson 10. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for the high-school level contains lessons in the following subjects: Plants and Photosynthesis; The Human Digestive System; Functions of the Blood; Human Circulation and Respiration; Reproduction of a Single Cell; Reproduction by Male and Female Cells; The Human Reproductive System; Genetics and Heredity; The Nervous…

  14. Economic evaluation of a swine farm covered anaerobic lagoon digester

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is helpful to evaluate anaerobic digestion technologies using objective economic criteria. Options can then be ranked in terms of their relative cost effectiveness, leading to rational deployment decisions. This study presents the results of a hypothetical pro forma economic evaluation of one type of digestion system that could commonly be found on many swine farms; a covered anaerobic lagoon. The digester was assumed to be located in North Carolina, a major swine-producing state. Electricity generation with waste heat recovery was assumed to be the major end-use application of biogas manufactured from this process.

  15. Smoking and Your Digestive System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... priorities, and trends Funding Process Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and ...

  16. Efficient Web Change Monitoring with Page Digest

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, D J; Rocco, D; Liu, L

    2004-02-20

    The Internet and the World Wide Web have enabled a publishing explosion of useful online information, which has produced the unfortunate side effect of information overload: it is increasingly difficult for individuals to keep abreast of fresh information. In this paper we describe an approach for building a system for efficiently monitoring changes to Web documents. This paper has three main contributions. First, we present a coherent framework that captures different characteristics of Web documents. The system uses the Page Digest encoding to provide a comprehensive monitoring system for content, structure, and other interesting properties of Web documents. Second, the Page Digest encoding enables improved performance for individual page monitors through mechanisms such as short-circuit evaluation, linear time algorithms for document and structure similarity, and data size reduction. Finally, we develop a collection of sentinel grouping techniques based on the Page Digest encoding to reduce redundant processing in large-scale monitoring systems by grouping similar monitoring requests together. We examine how effective these techniques are over a wide range of parameters and have seen an order of magnitude speed up over existing Web-based information monitoring systems.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of high-strength cheese whey utilizing semicontinuous digesters and chemical flocculant addition

    SciTech Connect

    Barford, J.P.; Cail, R.G.; Callander, I.J.; Floyd, E.J.

    1986-11-01

    Semicontinuous digesters were used to anaerobically treat high-strength whey (70 kg/cubic m COD). A maximum loading of 16.1 kg COD/cubic m/day was obtained with soluble COD removal efficiencies greater than 99%. The use of a chemical flocculant resulted in an increased biomass concentration in the digester compared to a control, thus enabling correspondingly higher space loadings to be applied. With the onset of substantial levels of granulation of the biomass, flocculant dosage was able to be discontinued. This article discusses the performance of the digesters in detail and, briefly, the long-term operational difficulties experienced and the control strategies employed on such systems. 24 references.

  18. Colocalization properties of elementary Ca(2+) release signals with structures specific to the contractile filaments and the tubular system of intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Zapiec, Bolek; Förderer, Moritz; Fink, Rainer H A; Vogel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Ca(2+) regulates several important intracellular processes. We combined second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) to simultaneously record the SHG signal of the myosin filaments and localized elementary Ca(2+) release signals (LCSs). We found LCSs associated with Y-shaped structures of the myosin filament pattern (YMs), so called verniers, in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers under hypertonic treatment. Ion channels crucial for the Ca(2+) regulation are located in the tubular system, a system that is important for Ca(2+) regulation and excitation-contraction coupling. We investigated the tubular system of intact, living mouse skeletal muscle fibers using 2PFM and the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 dissolved in the external solution or the membrane dye di-8-ANEPPS. We simultaneously measured the SHG signal from the myosin filaments of the skeletal muscle fibers. We found that at least a subset of the YMs observed in SHG images are closely juxtaposed with Y-shaped structures of the transverse tubules (YTs). The distances of corresponding YMs and YTs yield values between 1.3?m and 4.1?m including pixel uncertainty with a mean distance of 2.52±0.10?m (S.E.M., n=41). Additionally, we observed that some of the linear-shaped areas in the tubular system are colocalized with linear-shaped areas in the SHG images. PMID:26431893

  19. Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury with impact acceleration in the mouse: Multifocal axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leyan; Nguyen, Judy V; Lehar, Mohamed; Menon, Adarsh; Rha, Elizabeth; Arena, John; Ryu, Jiwon; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Marmarou, Christina R; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is implicated in chronic neurological illness. The development of animal models of repetitive mTBI in mice is essential for exploring mechanisms of these chronic diseases, including genetic vulnerability by using transgenic backgrounds. In this study, the rat model of impact acceleration (IA) was redesigned for the mouse cranium and used in two clinically relevant repetitive mTBI paradigms. We first determined, by using increments of weight dropped from 1m that the 40g weight was most representative of mTBI and was not associated with fractures, brain contusions, anoxic-ischemic injury, mortality, or significant neurological impairments. Quantitative evaluation of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the optic nerve/tract, cerebellum and corpus callosum confirmed that weight increase produced a graded injury. We next evaluated two novel repetitive mTBI paradigms (1 time per day or 3 times per day at days 0, 1, 3, and 7) and compared the resulting TAI, neuronal cell death, and neuroinflammation to single hit mTBI at sub-acute (7days) and chronic time points (10weeks) post-injury. Both single and repetitive mTBI caused TAI in the optic nerve/tract, cerebellum, corticospinal tract, lateral lemniscus and corpus callosum. Reactive microglia with phagocytic phenotypes were present at injury sites. Severity of axonal injury corresponded to impact load and frequency in the optic nerve/tract and cerebellum. Both single and repeat injury protocols were associated with retinal ganglion cell loss and optic nerve degeneration; these outcomes correlated with impact load and number/frequency. No phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity was detected in the brains of animals subjected to repetitive mTBI. Our findings establish a new model of repetitive mTBI model featured by TAI in discrete CNS tracts, especially the visual system and cerebellum. Injury in retina and optic nerve provides a sensitive measure of severity of mTBI, thus enabling further studies on mechanisms and experimental therapeutics. Our model can also be useful in exploring mechanisms of chronic neurological disease caused by repetitive mTBI in wild-type and transgenic mice. PMID:25450468

  20. Children and Grief. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntire, Nancy

    Noting that the death of a loved one brings grief to children as well as adults, this Digest draws on research to examine how children respond to death and the role of parents and teachers in helping children cope with loss. The Digest delineates children's "tasks" during mourning that are essential to their adjustment to loss, such as accepting…

  1. Digest of Education Statistics, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Thomas D.; Hoffman, Charlene M.

    This edition of the "Digest of Education Statistics" is the 36th in a series that provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of U.S. education from kindergarten through graduate school. The Digest includes data from many sources, both government and private, and draws heavily on work done by the National Center for…

  2. Gene expression in the digestive tissues of ruminants and their relationships with feeding and digestive processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has multiple functions including digestion, nutrient absorption, secretion of hormones, and excretion of wastes. In the ruminant animal, development of this organ system is more complex than that of the monogastric animal due to the necessity to establish a fully fun...

  3. Gene expression in the digestive tissues of ruminants and their relationships with feeding and digestive processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has multiple functions including digestion, nutrient absorption, secretion of hormones, and excretion of wastes. In the ruminant animal, development of this organ system is more complex than that of the monogastric animal due to the necessity to establish a fully func...

  4. Nanoemulsion delivery systems for oil-soluble vitamins: Influence of carrier oil type on lipid digestion and vitamin D3 bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-15

    The influence of carrier oil type on the bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 encapsulated within oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared using a natural surfactant (quillaja saponin) was studied using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model: mouth; stomach; small intestine. The rate of free fatty acid release during lipid digestion decreased in the following order: medium chain triglycerides (MCT) > corn oil ? fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil. Conversely, the measured bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 decreased in the following order: corn oil ? fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil > MCT. These results show that carrier oil type has a considerable impact on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility, which was attributed to differences in the release of bioactives from lipid droplets, and their solubilization in mixed micelles. Nanoemulsions prepared using long chain triglycerides (corn or fish oil) were most effective at increasing vitamin bioaccessibility. PMID:25977056

  5. Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1995-08-01

    Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates new opportunities for proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products, including a renewable fuel. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, based on estimates of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

  6. Assessment and mitigation of the environmental burdens to air from land applied food-based digestate.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, A; Williams, I D; Pant, D C; Kishore, V V N

    2015-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of putrescible urban waste for energy recovery has seen rapid growth over recent years. In order to ascertain its systems scale sustainability, however, determination of the environmental fate of the large volume of digestate generated during the process is indispensable. This paper evaluates the environmental burdens to air associated with land applied food-based digestate in terms of primary pollutants (ammonia, nitrogen dioxide) and greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide). The assessments have been made in two stages - first, the emissions from surface application of food-based digestate are quantified for the business as usual (BAU). In the next step, environmental burden minimisation potentials for the following three mitigation measures are estimated - mixed waste digestate (MWD), soil-incorporated digestate (SID), and post-methanated digestate (PMD). Overall, the mitigation scenarios demonstrated considerable NH3, CH4 and N2O burden minimisation potentials, with positive implications for both climate change and urban pollution. PMID:25690986

  7. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bogdanik, Laurent P; Osborne, Melissa A; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M

    2015-10-27

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  8. Novel system using microliter order sample volume for measuring arterial radioactivity concentrations in whole blood and plasma for mouse PET dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Seki, Chie; Hashizume, Nobuya; Yamada, Takashi; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Nishimoto, Takahiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Kitamura, Keishi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to develop a new system, named CD-Well, for mouse PET dynamic study. CD-Well allows the determination of time-activity curves (TACs) for arterial whole blood and plasma using 2-3 µL of blood per sample; the minute sample size is ideal for studies in small animals. The system has the following merits: (1) measures volume and radioactivity of whole blood and plasma separately; (2) allows measurements at 10 s intervals to capture initial rapid changes in the TAC; and (3) is compact and easy to handle, minimizes blood loss from sampling, and delay and dispersion of the TAC. CD-Well has 36 U-shaped channels. A drop of blood is sampled into the opening of the channel and stored there. After serial sampling is completed, CD-Well is centrifuged and scanned using a flatbed scanner to define the regions of plasma and blood cells. The length measured is converted to volume because the channels have a precise and uniform cross section. Then, CD-Well is exposed to an imaging plate to measure radioactivity. Finally, radioactivity concentrations are computed. We evaluated the performance of CD-Well in in vitro measurement and in vivo 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and [11C]2-carbomethoxy-3?-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane studies. In in vitro evaluation, per cent differences (mean±SE) from manual measurement were 4.4±3.6% for whole blood and 4.0±3.5% for plasma across the typical range of radioactivity measured in mouse dynamic study. In in vivo studies, reasonable TACs were obtained. The peaks were captured well, and the time courses coincided well with the TAC derived from PET imaging of the heart chamber. The total blood loss was less than 200 µL, which had no physiological effect on the mice. CD-Well demonstrates satisfactory performance, and is useful for mouse PET dynamic study.

  9. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanik, Laurent P.; Osborne, Melissa A.; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P.; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  10. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    The successful development of new cancer therapeutics requires reliable preclinical data that are obtained from mouse models for cancer. Human tumor xenografts, which require transplantation of human tumor cells into an immune compromised mouse, represent the current standard mouse model for cancer. Since the immune system plays an important role in tumor growth, progression and metastasis, the current standard mouse model is not ideal for accurate prediction of therapeutic effectiveness in patients.

  11. Revealing biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters: detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within full-scale digesters.

    PubMed

    Huber, B; Drewes, J E; Lin, K C; König, R; Müller, E

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion (BSA) is a costly problem affecting both sewerage infrastructure and sludge handling facilities such as digesters. The aim of this study was to verify BSA in full-scale digesters by identifying the microorganisms involved in the concrete corrosion process, that is, sulfate-reducing (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). To investigate the SRB and SOB communities, digester sludge and biofilm samples were collected. SRB diversity within digester sludge was studied by applying polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) targeting the dsrB-gene (dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit). To reveal SOB diversity, cultivation dependent and independent techniques were applied. The SRB diversity studies revealed different uncultured SRB, confirming SRB activity and H2S production. Comparable DGGE profiles were obtained from the different sludges, demonstrating the presence of similar SRB species. By cultivation, three pure SOB strains from the digester headspace were obtained including Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiomonas intermedia and Thiomonas perometabolis. These organisms were also detected with PCR-DGGE in addition to two new SOB: Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus solventivorans. The SRB and SOB responsible for BSA were identified within five different digesters, demonstrating that BSA is a problem occurring not only in sewer systems but also in sludge digesters. In addition, the presence of different SOB species was successfully associated with the progression of microbial corrosion. PMID:25353947

  12. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1991-01-01

    This is the thirtieth issue of NASA's Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 47 journal papers or book chapters published in Russian and of three Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 20 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas include: adaptation, biospheric research, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal system, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  13. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1990-01-01

    This is the twenty-eighth issue of NASA's Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 60 journal papers or book chapters published in Russian and of 3 Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 20 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas include: adaptation, aviation medicine, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive system, and space medicine.

  14. NCI Mouse Repository - Information

    Cancer.gov

    General Information About the NCI Mouse Repository Pricing Ordering Information Ordering Live Mice Ordering Cryoarchived Strains Health Reports Getting Assistance / Reporting a Problem Submitting Strains to the NCI Mouse Repository Material Transfer

  15. Development and adaptation of protein digestion.

    PubMed

    Austic, R E

    1985-05-01

    Protein digestion is a complex process in which most aspects have a developmental pattern of activity. Gastric pH and intestinal peptide and amino acid transport as well as the activities of pepsinogen, trypsin, chymotrypsin, enterokinase and intestinal dipeptidases vary during development. No one species has been assessed for all these aspects and it is not possible to present an integrated developmental view of protein digestion. The following developmental changes, however, have been observed. Gastric pH declines, and peptic and pancreatic proteases exhibit increasing activity in pigs and rats after birth. The increase in pigs is gradual over several weeks starting at birth, whereas the increases in the rat begin at 2 wk, just prior to the time of weaning. The activities of dipeptidases in the rat and pig, peptide transport systems in the guinea pig and rabbit and amino acid transport systems in the rat, rabbit, guinea pig and chicken, however, appear (with few exceptions) to be active in the small intestine at the time of birth. Frequently, these activities peak in the neonate and decline during the postnatal period. In the rat, dietary protein tends to increase the activities of pancreatic proteases and intestinal peptidases and to increase the rate of uptake of amino acids by the intestinal epithelium. Individual dietary amino acids also influence amino acid transport systems. The data indicate that most processes in protein digestion undergo marked changes during prenatal and postnatal development and are influenced by the level of feeding and composition of the diet. PMID:3889240

  16. Comprehensive Enzymatic Analysis of the Cellulolytic System in Digestive Fluid of the Sea Hare Aplysia kurodai. Efficient Glucose Release from Sea Lettuce by Synergistic Action of 45 kDa Endoglucanase and 210 kDa ß-Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Tominaga, Keiko; Nishiyama, Nami; Yuasa, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    Although many endo-ß-1,4-glucanases have been isolated in invertebrates, their cellulolytic systems are not fully understood. In particular, gastropod feeding on seaweed is considered an excellent model system for production of bioethanol and renewable bioenergy from third-generation feedstocks (microalgae and seaweeds). In this study, enzymes involved in the conversion of cellulose and other polysaccharides to glucose in digestive fluids of the sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) were screened and characterized to determine how the sea hare obtains glucose from sea lettuce (Ulva pertusa). Four endo-ß-1,4-glucanases (21K, 45K, 65K, and 95K cellulase) and 2 ß-glucosidases (110K and 210K) were purified to a homogeneous state, and the synergistic action of these enzymes during cellulose digestion was analyzed. All cellulases exhibited cellulase and lichenase activities and showed distinct cleavage specificities against cellooligosaccharides and filter paper. Filter paper was digested to cellobiose, cellotriose, and cellotetraose by 21K cellulase, whereas 45K and 65K enzymes hydrolyzed the filter paper to cellobiose and glucose. 210K ß-glucosidase showed unique substrate specificity against synthetic and natural substrates, and 4-methylumbelliferyl (4MU)-ß-glucoside, 4MU–ß-galactoside, cello-oligosaccharides, laminarin, and lichenan were suitable substrates. Furthermore, 210K ß-glucosidase possesses lactase activity. Although ß-glucosidase and cellulase are necessary for efficient hydrolysis of carboxymethylcellulose to glucose, laminarin is hydrolyzed to glucose only by 210K ß-glucosidase. Kinetic analysis of the inhibition of 210K ß-glucosidase by D-glucono-1,5-lactone suggested the presence of 2 active sites similar to those of mammalian lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Saccharification of sea lettuce was considerably stimulated by the synergistic action of 45K cellulase and 210K ß-glucosidase. Our results indicate that 45K cellulase and 210K ß-glucosidase are the core components of the sea hare digestive system for efficient production of glucose from sea lettuce. These findings contribute important new insights into the development of biofuel processing biotechnologies from seaweed. PMID:23762366

  17. Hyperpolarized 129Xe phase-selective imaging of mouse lung at 9.4T using a continuous-flow hyperpolarizing system.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Tetsuya; Narazaki, Michiko; Kimura, Atsuomi; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to regionally evaluate gas diffusion and perfusion processes as well as ventilation in the lung has been expected. In this study, we used a continuous-flow hyperpolarizing (CF-HP) system to acquire gas- and dissolved-phase 129Xe images from mouse lung, employing standard gradient echo sequence equipped with chemical shift selective excitation and 90 degrees flip angle. The character of non-recoverable HP magnetization enabled the use of a phase (frequency)-selective 90 degrees pulse for direct visualization of only a given-phase 129Xe magnetization replenished into the slice during repetition time (TR). We combined gas- and dissolved-phase 129Xe images to map the ratio of dissolved- to gas-phase 129Xe replenished into the slice during TR (Mdissolved/Mgas) and found it to be approximately 0.05 to 0.08 in the peripheral regions of mouse lungs. This result suggested that replenishment of dissolved-phase 129Xe magnetization by gas diffusion and pulmonary perfusion would be faster than that of gas-phase by ventilation. The use of a CF-HP system that allows the application of relatively long TR to HP 129Xe imaging using a phase-selective 90 degrees pulse would be useful in evaluating gas transport mechanisms in the lung. PMID:18603837

  18. Effects of the Cellcultured Acanthopanax senticosus Extract on Antioxidative Defense System and Membrane Fluidity in the Liver of Type 2 Diabetes Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung-Hee; Cha, Youn-Soo; Rhee, Soon-Jae

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of cellcultured Acanthopanax senticosus (A. senticosus) extract on the antioxidative defense system, oxidative stress and cell membrane fluidity in the liver of type 2 diabetes in the C57BL/6J mouse as an animal which is genetically prone to develop insulin resistance and obesity/diabetes. C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided, control diet (N-C), high fat diet (DM-C), control diet plus A. senticosus extract (N-CASM), and high fat diet plus A. senticosus extract (DM-CASM). The mice were orally administered an A. senticosus extract (0.5 g/kg body weight) in the N-CASM and DM-CASM groups once a day for 12 weeks, and distilled water in the N-C and DM-C groups. Cellcultured A. senticosus extract was found to be excellent for strengthening the antioxidative defense system, reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and damaging oxidative substances, and maintaing membrane fluidity (MF) in the liver of type 2 diabetes mouse. PMID:19590714

  19. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  20. Photic stimulation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus via the non-visual optic system. A gene expression study in the blind Crx-/- mouse.

    PubMed

    Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-10-01

    The visual system of vertebrates consists of an image-forming and a non-image-forming optic system; the image-forming optic system involves the classic photoreceptors, the rods and cones, whereas the non-image-forming optic system involves the melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells. Both optic systems make direct neuroanatomical connections to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus in which the biological clock of vertebrates is located. The rhythmic output from SCN neurons is entrained by light via the retina and the retinohypothalamic tract. The response of exposure to light during the subjective night is an immediate expression of several early response genes in the SCN. We show, by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, that the amount of melanopsin mRNA in the retinal ganglion cells is preserved in the blind Crx(-/-) mouse with degenerated classic photoreceptors. At zeitgeber time 16, the Crx(-/-) and wild-type mice were exposed to 1 h of light. This resulted in a strong up-regulation of the immediate early genes Nr4a1, Erg, and Rrad in the SCN of both genotypes. Light stimulation during the subjective night resulted in a strong up-regulation of c-fos in both genotypes with a significantly higher up-regulation in the blind Crx(-/-) mouse. Expression of Grp and Vip, the genes for two classic peptides located in the SCN, was not influenced by light stimulation. The data strongly indicate the involvement of the melanopsin-based non-visual optic system in the regulation of immediate early genes in the SCN. PMID:24865246

  1. [Knockdown of Larp4b in Lin(-) cells does not affect the colony forming ability of mouse hematopoietic cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Pang, Ya-Kun; Cheng, Hui; Dong, Fang; Liang, Hao-Yue; Zhang, Ying-Chi; Wang, Xiao-Min; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2013-06-01

    Larp4b is a member of the LARP family, which can interact with RNA and generally stimulate the translation of mRNA. Abnormal expression of Larp4b can be found in leukemia patients in our previous study. This study was purposed to detect the relative expression of Larp4b mRNA in different subpopulations of mouse hematopoietic cells, to construct lentivirus vector containing shLarp4b targeting mouse gene Larp4b and to explore its effects on mouse Lin(-) cells infected with shLarp4b by lentivirus. SF-LV-shLarP4b-EGFP and control vectors were constructed and two-plasmid lentivirus packing system was used to transfect 293T cells. After 48 h and 72 h, lentivirus SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was harvested and was used to infect Lin(-) cells. After 48 h, EGFP(+) cells was sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). Meanwhile, semi-quantitative real time-PCR, AnnexinV-PE/7-AAD staining, PI staining and colony forming cell assay (CFC) were performed to determine the expression of Larp4b and its effect on the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The results showed that Larp4b was highly expressed in myeloid cells. SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was successfully constructed according to the restriction endonuclease digestion assay. RT-PCR confirmed that Larp4b was efficiently knockdown in mouse Lin(-) cells. The low expression of Larp4b did not affect the colony forming number, the apoptosis and cell cycle of Lin(-) cells. It is concluded that knockdown of Larp4b in mouse Lin(-) cells do not contribute to the colony forming ability and the growth of Lin(-) cells in vitro. This useful knockdown system will be used to study in vivo Larp4b in future. PMID:23815932

  2. Phenotypical Analysis of Atypical PKCs In Vivo Function Display a Compensatory System at Mouse Embryonic Day 7.5

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Sebastian; Braun, Ursula; Roos, Norbert; Li, Shaohua; Lüdtke, Timo H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The atypical protein kinases C (PKC) isoforms ?/? and ? play crucial roles in many cellular processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Possible redundancy between the two isoforms has always been an issue since most biochemical tools do not differentiate between the two proteins. Thus, much effort has been made during the last decades to characterize the functions of aPKCs using gene targeting approaches and depletion studies. However, little is known about the specific roles of each isoform in mouse development. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the importance of PKC? in mouse development we designed PKC? deletion mutants using the gene targeting approach. We show that the deletion of PKC?, results in a reduced size of the amniotic cavity at E7.5 and impaired growth of the embryo at E8.5 with subsequent absorption of the embryo. Our data also indicate an impaired localization of ZO-1 and disorganized structure of the epithelial tissue in the embryo. Importantly, using electron microscopy, embryoid body formation and immunofluorescence analysis, we found, that in the absence of PKC?, tight junctions and apico-basal polarity were still established. Finally, our study points to a non-redundant PKC? function at E9.5, since expression of PKC? is able to rescue the E7.5 phenotype, but could not prevent embryonic lethality at a later time-point (E9.5). Conclusion Our data show that PKC? is crucial for mouse embryogenesis but is dispensable for the establishment of polarity and tight junction formation. We present a compensatory function of PKC? at E7.5, rescuing the phenotype. Furthermore, this study indicates at least one specific, yet unknown, PKC? function that cannot be compensated by the overexpression of PKC? at E9.5. PMID:23690951

  3. Localisation and activation of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the enteric nervous system of the mouse distal colon.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Juan-Carlos; Veldhuis, Nicholas A; Eriksson, Emily M; Bunnett, Nigel W; Poole, Daniel P

    2014-05-01

    The substance P neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) regulates motility, secretion, inflammation and pain in the intestine. The distribution of the NK1R is a key determinant of the functional effects of substance P in the gut. Information regarding the distribution of NK1R in subtypes of mouse enteric neurons is lacking and is the focus of the present study. NK1R immunoreactivity (NK1R-IR) is examined in whole-mount preparations of the mouse distal colon by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The distribution of NK1R-IR within key functional neuronal subclasses was determined by using established neurochemical markers. NK1R-IR was expressed by a subpopulation of myenteric and submucosal neurons; it was mainly detected in large multipolar myenteric neurons and was colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide, neurofilament M, choline acetyltransferase and calretinin. The remaining NK1R-immunoreactive neurons were positive for nitric oxide synthase. NK1R was expressed by most of the submucosal neurons and was exclusively co-expressed with vasoactive intestinal peptide, with no overlap with choline acetyltransferase. Treatment with substance P resulted in the concentration-dependent internalisation of NK1R from the cell surface into endosome-like structures. Myenteric NK1R was mainly expressed by intrinsic primary afferent neurons, with minor expression by descending interneurons and inhibitory motor neurons. Submucosal NK1R was restricted to non-cholinergic secretomotor neurons. These findings highlight key differences in the neuronal distribution of NK1R-IR between the mouse, rat and guinea-pig, with important implications for the functional role of NK1R in regulating intestinal motility and secretion. PMID:24728885

  4. Acid digestion demonstration (WeDID)

    SciTech Connect

    Crippen, M.D.

    1993-11-01

    Acid digestion process development began at the Hanford Site in 1972 with a beaker of laboratory acid and progressed through laboratory and pilot-scale development culminating in the Radioactive Acid Digestion Test Unit (RADTU). The RADTU was operational from 1977 through 1982 and processed over 5,000 kg of synthetic and combustible waste forms from Hanford Site operations. It routinely reacted plastics, wood, paper, cloth, ion-exchange resins, metals, and solvents. Operation of RADTU routinely gave volume reductions of 100:1 for most plastics and other combustibles. The residue was inert and was disposed of both as generated and after application of other immobilization techniques, such as calcination, addition to glass, and cement addition. The system was designed to accommodate offgas surges from highly reactive nitrated organics and successfully demonstrated that capability. The system was designed and operated under very stringent safety standards. The Weapons Destruction Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) program required a technology that could dispose of an assortment of weapon components, such as complex electronics, neutron generators, thermal batteries, plastics, cases, cables, and others. A program objective was to recycle and reuse materials wherever possible, but many unique components would need to be rendered inactive, inert, and suitable for disposal under current environmental laws. Acid digestion technology was a key candidate for treating many of the above components; it provided accepted technology for treatment of chemicals and elements that have posed disposal difficulties designated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

  5. A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.J.; Everitt, T.; Villa, R.

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

  6. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Garshnek, Victoria (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1990-01-01

    This is the thirty first issue of NASA's Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 55 journal papers or book chapters published in Russian and of 5 Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 18 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas include: adaptation, biological rhythms, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, enzymology, genetics, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, life support systems, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  7. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1992-01-01

    This is the thirty-second issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 34 journal or conference papers published in Russian and of 4 Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 18 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas include: adaptation, aviation medicine, biological rhythms, biospherics, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, exobiology, habitability and environmental effects, human performance, hematology, mathematical models, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, operational medicine, and reproductive system.

  8. Improved Design of Anaerobic Digesters for Household Biogas Production in Indonesia: One Cow, One Digester, and One Hour of Cooking per Day

    PubMed Central

    Usack, Joseph G.; Wiratni, Wiratni; Angenent, Largus T.

    2014-01-01

    A government-sponsored initiative in Indonesia to design and implement low-cost anaerobic digestion systems resulted in 21 full-scale systems with the aim to satisfy the cooking fuel demands of rural households owning at least one cow. The full-scale design consisted of a 0.3?m diameter PVC pipe, which was operated as a conventional plug-flow system. The system generated enough methane to power a cooking stove for ?1?h. However, eventual clogging from solids accumulation inside the bioreactor proved to be a major drawback. Here, we improved the digester configuration to remedy clogging while maintaining system performance. Controlled experiments were performed using four 9-L laboratory-scale digesters operated at a temperature of 27 ± 1°C, a volatile solids loading rate of 2.0?g VS·L?1·day?1, and a 21-day hydraulic retention time. Two of the digesters were replicates of the original design (control digesters), while the other two digesters included internal mixing or effluent recycle (experimental digesters). The performance of each digester was compared based on methane yields, VS removal efficiencies, and steady-state solids concentrations during an operating period of 311 days. Statistical analyses revealed that internal mixing and effluent recycling resulted in reduced solids accumulation compared to the controls without diminishing methane yields or solids removal efficiencies. PMID:24715809

  9. Muscle and Heart Function Restoration in a Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) Mouse Model by Systemic FKRP Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in ?-dystroglycan (?-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276IKI) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276IKI mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of ?-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective. PMID:25048216

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  11. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as ?-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. PMID:25801455

  12. Performance and microbial community dynamics in a two-phase anaerobic co-digestion system using cassava dregs and pig manure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiwei; Yuan, Xufeng; Li, Jie; Ma, Xuguang; Zhao, Ye; Zhu, Wanbing; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2014-03-01

    The two-phase anaerobic co-digestion of cassava dregs (CD) with pig manure (PM) was evaluated using four sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The effect of seven different PM to CD volatile solid ratios (10:0, 8:2, 6:4, 5:5, 4:6, 2:8 and 0:10) on the acidification phase was investigated. Results indicated the concentrations of soluble chemical oxygen demand, NH4-N and volatile fatty acids increased substantially at seven ratios. Co-acidification of PM and CD performed well. Methanogenic fermentation of the acidification products at seven ratios was steady in CSTR. The highest methane yield and VS removal of 0.352m(3)/kg VSadded and 68.5% were achieved at PM:CD (4:6). The microbial population in CSTR was analyzed using molecular methods. Findings revealed that bacteria such as Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, archaea such as Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales were advantageous populations. Co-digestion of PM and CD supported higher quantity and diversity of methanogens. PMID:24463413

  13. Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

  14. Anaerobic Digestion II. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the second of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include classification of digester by function, roof design, and temperature range, mixing systems, gas system components, operational control basics, and general safety considerations. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The…

  15. Study of Resource Recovery and Epidemiology in an Anaerobic Digester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Cao, Song; Hunt, M. D.; Fu, Xuping

    1995-01-01

    Three 4-liter packed bed anaerobic digesters were fabricated and operated at 35 degrees C, pH around 7, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20, 10 and 5 days to study the resource recovery and epidemiology in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). A simulated wastewater, consisted of shower water, clothwash water, dishwasher water, handwash water, and urine flush water was used as the feeding solution. Under steady-state operation, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium wer monitored in the digester input and output solutions. The volume and the CH4/CO2 ratios in the biogas produced from the anaerobic digesters were measured. The results indicate about 90 percent of TOC is converted while only 5-8 percent of N-P-K are consumed in the digester. A multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis was used as the indicator bacterium in the epidemiology study. The levels of Salmonella choleraesuis in the influent and the effluent wer determined and decimal decay rate constants, k(d), were estimated. The k(d) values were greater at higher initial doses than lower doses for the same HR, and greater for batch digestion (7.89/d) than for continuous digestion (4.28, 3.82, and 3.82/d for 20, 10, and 5 d HRT, respectively).

  16. Silica Triggers Inflammation and Ectopic Lymphoid Neogenesis in the Lungs in Parallel with Accelerated Onset of Systemic Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis in the Lupus-Prone NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental factors influence the development of human autoimmune disease. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (cSiO2) has been etiologically linked to increased incidence of autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early repeated short-term cSiO2 exposure will modulate both latency and severity of autoimmunity in the lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mouse. Weekly intranasal exposure to cSiO2 (0.25 and 1.0 mg) for 4 wk beginning at 9 wk of age both reduced latency and increased intensity of glomerulonephritis. cSiO2 elicited robust inflammatory responses in the lungs as evidenced by extensive perivascular and peribronchial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration consisting of IgG-producing plasma cells, and CD45R+ and CD3+ lymphocytes that were highly suggestive of ectopic lymphoid tissue (ELT). In addition, there were elevated concentrations of immunoglobulins and the cytokines MCP-1, TNF-? and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. cSiO2-associated kidney and lung effects paralleled dose-dependent elevations of autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines in plasma. Taken together, cSiO2-induced pulmonary inflammation and ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the NZBWF1 mouse corresponded closely to systemic inflammatory and autoimmune responses as well as the early initiation of pathological outcomes in the kidney. These findings suggest that following airway exposure to crystalline silica, in mice genetically prone to SLE, the lung serves as a platform for triggering systemic autoimmunity and glomerulonephritis. PMID:25978333

  17. A study of whirlin isoforms in the mouse vestibular system suggests potential vestibular dysfunction in DFNB31-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Pranav Dinesh; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Vashist, Deepti; Jones, Sherri M; Jones, Timothy A; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-15

    The DFNB31 gene plays an indispensable role in the cochlea and retina. Mutations in this gene disrupt its various isoforms and lead to non-syndromic deafness, blindness and deaf-blindness. However, the known expression of Dfnb31, the mouse ortholog of DFNB31, in vestibular organs and the potential vestibular-deficient phenotype observed in one Dfnb31 mutant mouse (Dfnb31(wi/wi)) suggest that DFNB31 may also be important for vestibular function. In this study, we find that full-length (FL-) and C-terminal (C-) whirlin isoforms are expressed in the vestibular organs, where their stereociliary localizations are similar to those of developing cochlear inner hair cells. No whirlin is detected in Dfnb31(wi/wi) vestibular organs, while only C-whirlin is expressed in Dfnb31(neo/neo) vestibular organs. Both FL- and C-whirlin isoforms are required for normal vestibular stereociliary growth, although they may play slightly different roles in the central and peripheral zones of the crista ampullaris. Vestibular sensory-evoked potentials demonstrate severe to profound vestibular deficits in Dfnb31(neo/neo) and Dfnb31(wi/wi) mice. Swimming and rotarod tests demonstrate that the two Dfnb31 mutants have balance problems, with Dfnb31(wi/wi) mice being more affected than Dfnb31(neo/neo) mice. Because Dfnb31(wi/wi) and Dfnb31(neo/neo) mice faithfully recapitulate hearing and vision symptoms in patients, our findings of vestibular dysfunction in these Dfnb31 mutants raise the question of whether DFNB31-deficient patients may acquire vestibular as well as hearing and vision loss. PMID:26420843

  18. Appearance of Cholinergic Myenteric Neurons during Enteric Nervous System Development: Comparison of Different ChAT Fluorescent Mouse Reporter Lines

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Christopher S.; Lee, Scott J.; Barlow-Anacker, Amanda J.; Druckenbrod, Noah R.; Epstein, Miles L.; Gosain, Ankush

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholinergic neurons have been identified with the acetylcholine synthetic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). However, ChAT is difficult to localize in newly differentiated peripheral neurons making the study of cholinergic neuronal development problematic. Consequently researchers have used mouse reporter lines to indicate the presence of ChAT. Methods Our objective was to determine which ChAT reporter line was the most sensitive indicator of ChAT expression. We utilized two different fluorescent ChAT reporter lines (ChAT-GFP and ChAT-Cre;R26R:floxSTOP:tdTomato) together with immunolocalization of ChAT protein (ChAT-IR) to characterize the spatial and temporal expression of ChAT in myenteric neurons throughout ENS development. Key Results ChAT-IR cells were first seen in the intestine at E10.5, even within the migration wavefront of neural precursors. Myenteric neurons within the distal small intestine (dSI) and proximal colon were first labeled by ChAT-IR, then ChAT-GFP, and finally ChAT-Cre tdTomato. The percentage of ChAT-IR neurons is equivalent to adult levels in the dSI by E13.5 and proximal colon by P0. After these stages, the percentages remained relatively constant throughout development despite dramatic changes in neuronal density. Conclusions and Inferences These observations indicate that neurotransmitter expression occurs early and there is only a brief gap between neurogenesis and neurotransmitter expression. Our finding that the proportion of ChAT myenteric neurons reached adult levels during embryonic development suggests that the fate of cholinergic neurons is tightly regulated and that their differentiation might influence further neuronal development. ChAT-GFP is a more accurate indicator of early ENS cholinergic neuronal differentiation than the ChAT-Cre;R26R:floxSTOP:tdTomato reporter mouse. PMID:24712519

  19. Transient expression of human neutral alpha-glucosidase AB (glucosidase II) in enzyme-deficient mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martiniuk, F; Pellicer, A; Hirschhorn, R

    1985-11-15

    To define new methods for gene isolation exploiting mutant mammalian cells we transformed a mutant mouse cell line deficient in glucosidase II with total human genomic DNA and detected transient expression of the human glucosidase II gene. Maximum gene expression was detected 48 h after addition of DNA as a 2.5-fold increase in neutral alpha-glucosidase activity (2.47 +/- 0.15, n = 4). When mutant mouse DNA was used for transformation, no increase in enzyme activity was seen. The increased enzyme activity was due to expression of the human gene product. Thus, by rocket immunoelectrophoresis, cells transformed with human DNA yielded a "rocket" which reacted with antibody to human but not to mouse glucosidase II and which hydrolyzed substrate in situ. Specific DNA sequences were required for expression of the enzyme activity, since digestion of DNA with EcoRI and SstI rendered the DNA ineffective for eliciting expression of the enzyme, while digestion of DNA with BamHI and XhoI did not affect the increase. Transfection with intact phage from a human genomic DNA library also resulted in transient expression of the human gene. These results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting, by enzymatic assay, transient expression of a human gene for an intracellular enzyme following DNA-mediated transformation both with total human DNA and with intact phage from a human recombinant library. This system could be used as an assay for isolation of a gene from a genomic library by sibling selection. PMID:2997206

  20. Impact of physical pre-treatment of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste on greenhouse-gas emissions and the economy in a Swedish anaerobic digestion system.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, My; Holmström, David; Bohn, Irene; Bisaillon, Mattias; Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Several methods for physical pre-treatments of source sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SSOFMSW) before for anaerobic digestion (AD) are available, with the common feature that they generate a homogeneous slurry for AD and a dry refuse fraction for incineration. The selection of efficient methods relies on improved understanding of how the pre-treatment impacts on the separation and on the slurry's AD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the performance of physical pre-treatment of SSOFMSW on greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions and on the economy of an AD system including a biogas plant with supplementary systems for heat and power production in Sweden. Based on the performance of selected Swedish facilities, as well as chemical analyses and BMP tests of slurry and refuse, the computer-based evaluation tool ORWARE was improved as to accurately describe mass flows through the physical pre-treatment and anaerobic degradation. The environmental and economic performance of the evaluated system was influenced by the TS concentration in the slurry, as well as the distribution of incoming solids between slurry and refuse. The focus to improve the efficiency of these systems should primarily be directed towards minimising the water addition in the pre-treatment provided that this slurry can still be efficiently digested. Second, the amount of refuse should be minimised, while keeping a good quality of the slurry. Electricity use/generation has high impact on GHG emissions and the results of the study are sensitive to assumptions of marginal electricity and of electricity use in the pre-treatment. PMID:25661691

  1. Interfacial & colloidal aspects of lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Wilde, P J; Chu, B S

    2011-06-01

    Amongst the main issues challenging the food manufacturing sector, health and nutrition are becoming increasingly important. Global concerns such as obesity, the ageing population and food security will have to be addressed. Food security is not just about assuring food supply, but is also about optimising nutritional delivery from the food that is available [1]. Therefore one challenge is to optimise the health benefits from the lipids and lipid soluble nutrients. Colloid scientists have an affinity for lipids because they are water insoluble, however this presents a challenge to the digestive system, which has to convert them to structures that are less insoluble so they are available for uptake. Despite this, the human digestive system is remarkably effective at digesting and absorbing most lipids. This is primarily driven through maximising energy intake, as lipids possess the highest calorific value, which was a survival trait to survive times of famine, but is now an underlying cause of obesity in developed countries with high food availability. The critical region here is the lipid-water interface, where the key reactions take place to solubilise lipids and lipid soluble nutrients. Digestive lipases have to adsorb to the oil water interface in order to hydrolyse triacylglycerols into fatty acids and mono glycerides, which accumulate at the interface [2], and inhibit lipase activity. Pancreatic lipase, which is responsible for the majority of lipid hydrolysis, also requires the action of bile salts and colipase to function effectively. Bile salts both aid the adsorption of co-lipase and lipase, and help solubilise the lipolysis products which have accumulated at the interface, into mixed micelles composing bile salts and a range of other lipids, to facilitate transport to the gut mucosal surface prior to uptake and absorption. The process can be affected by the lipid type, as shorter chain, fatty acids are more easily absorbed, whereas the uptake of longer chain fatty acids, particularly the very long chain n-3 fatty acids from fish oils are dependent on source and so may depend on food microstructure for optimal uptake [3]. The uptake of some poorly water soluble nutrients are enhanced by the presence of lipids, but the mechanisms are not clear. In addition, controlling the digestion of lipids can be beneficial as slower release of lipids into the bloodstream can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and can promote gut feedback processes that reduce appetite. This presents an opportunity to colloid and interfacial science, as there are many unanswered questions regarding the specific physicochemical mechanisms underlying the process of lipid digestion and uptake. I will review our current knowledge of lipid digestion and present examples of how fundamental research in colloidal and interface science is beginning to address these issues. These include the adsorption behaviour of physiological surfactants such as bile salts; interfacial processes by which different polar lipids can influence lipolysis; and the effect of emulsion based delivery systems on cellular uptake of lipid soluble nutrients. A fundamental understanding of these processes is required if we are to develop intelligent design strategies for foods that will deliver optimal nutrition and improved health benefits in order to address the global challenges facing the food sector in the future. PMID:21377138

  2. Protein denaturation improves enzymatic digestion efficiency for direct tissue analysis using mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setou, M.; Hayasaka, T.; Shimma, S.; Sugiura, Y.; Matsumoto, M.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular identification using high-sensitivity tandem mass spectrometry is essential for protein analysis on the tissue surface. Here we report an improved digestion protocol for protein identification directly on the tissue surface using mass spectrometry. By denaturation process and the use of detergent-supplemented trypsin solution, we could successfully detect and identify many molecules such as tubulin, neurofilament, and synaptosomal-associated 25 kDa protein directly from a mouse cerebellum section.

  3. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R.; Radtke, M.; Rowe, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 49 Soviet periodical articles in 19 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology, published in Russian during the first quarter of 1985. Translated introductions and table of contents for nine Russian books on topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered include: botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, endocrinology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medicine, hematology, immunology, life support systems, man machine systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive system, and space biology. This issue concentrates on aerospace medicine and space biology.

  4. Directions for in-gel tryptic digestions of coomassie-stained 1D Bands and 2D Spots. NOTE: Although nearly any SDS-PAGE system can be utilized upstream of an LC-MS analysis, the DPCF

    E-print Network

    Richardson, David

    Directions for in-gel tryptic digestions of coomassie-stained 1D Bands and 2D Spots. NOTE: Although digestion should be done in a BSC or laminar flow hood. 2. Wear nitrile (not latex) gloves. 3. Wear a lab gel spot, use 25-30 µL of 10 ng/µL trypsin). 5. Digest overnight for 16-18 hours at 37°C. 6. Following

  5. Directions for in-gel tryptic digestions of coomassie-stained 1D Bands and 2D Spots. NOTE: Although nearly any SDS-PAGE system can be utilized upstream of an LC-MS analysis, the DPCF

    E-print Network

    Richardson, David

    Directions for in-gel tryptic digestions of coomassie-stained 1D Bands and 2D Spots. NOTE: Although digestion should be done in a BSC or laminar flow hood. 2. Wear nitrile (not latex) gloves. 3. Wear a lab (for a single 2D gel spot, use 25-30 µL of 10 ng/µL trypsin). 9. Digest overnight for 16-18 hours at 37

  6. Anaerobic digestion of the liquid fraction of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, V.; Dahlberg, S.; Lindley, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    The authors tested several solid liquid separation systems suitable for processing dairy manure prior to anaerobic digestion. None of the systems tried have completely satisfied the requirements. Evaluated effects of separation on biogas production. Unseparated dairy manure produced more biogas than the liquid fraction.

  7. Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis

    E-print Network

    Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

    2006-01-01

    The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

  8. Systemically administered human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem home into peripheral organs but do not induce neuroprotective effects in the MCAo-mouse model for cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Barbara; Roch, Manfred; Holtkamp, Nikola; Kurtz, Andreas

    2012-03-28

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow induce neuroprotective effects and improve clinical symptoms in animal models for acute cerebral ischemia. So far only few data are available from the murine system. Moreover, no data exist regarding neuroprotective effects depending on the application route. Because most preclinical trials regarding restorative therapy in stroke are performed in mice, we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective capacities of human MSC (hMSC) in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-mouse model of cerebral ischemia. As systemic transplantation of MSC could provide a gentle therapeutic procedure for the (mostly elderly) stroke patients, we analyzed effects of this application at a clinically relevant time point. Bone marrow-derived hMSCs were administered intravenously 24 h after MCAo. Mortality and clinical outcome of the transplanted mice did not differ from PBS-treated controls. After 3 and 7 days hMSC were robustly detected in lung, spleen, kidney and intestine, but not in the brain. MRI measurements revealed no differences in infarct size in hMSC injected animals compared to controls. In the neurogenic subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus no significant increase of endogenous cell proliferation was detected following systemic hMSC transplantation. This data further prove the week neurogenic and neuroprotective effect and the limitations of systemically administered hMSCs in cerebral ischemia. PMID:22342911

  9. Digest of NASA earth observation sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A digest of technical characteristics of remote sensors and supporting technological experiments uniquely developed under NASA Applications Programs for Earth Observation Flight Missions is presented. Included are camera systems, sounders, interferometers, communications and experiments. In the text, these are grouped by types, such as television and photographic cameras, lasers and radars, radiometers, spectrometers, technology experiments, and transponder technology experiments. Coverage of the brief history of development extends from the first successful earth observation sensor aboard Explorer 7 in October, 1959, through the latest funded and flight-approved sensors under development as of October 1, 1972. A standard resume format is employed to normalize and mechanize the information presented.

  10. A Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Role of the Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein System in Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Ricardo J.; Ortega, Arantxa; Izquierdo, Adriana; Arribas, Ignacio; Bover, Jordi; Esbrit, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone- (PTH-) related protein (PTHrP) and its receptor, the PTH1 receptor (PTH1R), are widely expressed in the kidney, where PTHrP exerts a modulatory action on renal function. PTHrP is known to be upregulated in several experimental nephropathies such as acute renal failure (ARF), obstructive nephropathy (ON) as well as diabetic nephropathy (DN). In this paper, we will discuss the functional consequences of chronic PTHrP overexpression in the damaged kidney using a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing PTHrP in the renal proximal tubule. In both ARF and ON, PTHrP displays proinflammatory and profibrogenic actions including the induction of epithelia to mesenquima transition. Moreover, PTHrP participates in the mechanisms of renal hypertrophy as well as proteinuria in experimental DN. Angiotensin II (Ang II), a critical factor in the progression of renal injury, appears to be, at least in part, responsible for endogenous PTHrP upregulation in these pathophysiological settings. These findings provide novel insights into the well-known protective effects of Ang II antagonists in renal diseases, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21052497

  11. DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

    2002-03-01

    GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

  12. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Siegel, Bette (editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (editor); Leveton, Lauren B. (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the sixteenth issue of NASA's USSR Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 57 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 2 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. An additional feature is the review of a book concerned with metabolic response to the stress of space flight. The abstracts included in this issue are relevant to 33 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, bionics, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, and space biology.

  13. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, Issue 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Garshnek, Victoria (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the 18th issue of NASA's USSR Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 50 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 8 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. A review of a recent Aviation Medicine Handbook is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 37 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, aviation medicine, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, gravitational biology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, space biology and medicine, and space industrialization.

  14. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Garshnek, Victoria (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1990-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth issue of NASA's Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 42 journal papers or book chapters published in Russian and of 3 Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 26 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas include: adaptation, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive system, and space biology and medicine.

  15. Current evidence on the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 + 49G > A polymorphism and digestive system cancer risks: a meta-analysis involving 11,923 subjects.

    PubMed

    Xiaolei, Liu; Baohong, Yang; Haipeng, Ren; Shuzhen, Liu; Jianfeng, Gao; Xiangpo, Pan; Haiyu, Liu; Yuan, Yu; Dejie, Zheng; Jinhong, Yang; Huanxin, Wang; Wenhui, Wang; Guohua, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen (CTLA-4) plays an important role in downregulating T cell activation and proliferation. The CTLA-4 + 49G > A polymorphism is one of the most commonly studied polymorphisms in this gene due to its association with many cancer types, but the association between CTLA-4 + 49G > A polymorphism and digestive system cancer risks remain inconclusive. An updated meta-analysis based on 17 independent case-control studies consisting of 5176 cancer patients and 6747 controls was performed to address this association. Overall, there was no statistically increased risk of digestive system cancers in every genetic comparison. In subgroup analysis, this polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for pancreatic cancer (GG vs. AA, OR = 1.976, 95% CI = 1.496-2.611; GA vs. AA, OR = 1.433, 95% CI = 1.093-1.879; GG/GA vs. AA, OR = 1.668, 95% CI = 1.286-2.164; GG vs. GA/AA, OR = 1.502, 95% CI = 1.098-2.054; G vs. A, OR = 1.394, 95% CI = 1.098-1.770). We also observed increased susceptibility of hepatocellular cell carcinoma in homozygote comparison (OR = 1.433, 95% CI = 1.100-1.866) and dominant model (OR = 1.360, 95% CI = 1.059-1.746). According to the source of controls, significant effects were only observed in hospital-based studies (GA/AA vs. GG, OR = 1.257, 95% CI = 1.129-1.399). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, no significantly increased risks were found in either Asian or Caucasian. Our findings suggest that the CTLA-4 + 49G > A polymorphism may be associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer and hepatocellular cell carcinoma. PMID:26629416

  16. Current evidence on the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 + 49G > A polymorphism and digestive system cancer risks: a meta-analysis involving 11,923 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Xiaolei, Liu; Baohong, Yang; Haipeng, Ren; Shuzhen, Liu; Jianfeng, Gao; Xiangpo, Pan; Haiyu, Liu; Yuan, Yu; Dejie, Zheng; Jinhong, Yang; Huanxin, Wang; Wenhui, Wang; Guohua, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen (CTLA-4) plays an important role in downregulating T cell activation and proliferation. The CTLA-4 + 49G > A polymorphism is one of the most commonly studied polymorphisms in this gene due to its association with many cancer types, but the association between CTLA-4 + 49G > A polymorphism and digestive system cancer risks remain inconclusive. An updated meta-analysis based on 17 independent case–control studies consisting of 5176 cancer patients and 6747 controls was performed to address this association. Overall, there was no statistically increased risk of digestive system cancers in every genetic comparison. In subgroup analysis, this polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for pancreatic cancer (GG vs. AA, OR = 1.976, 95% CI = 1.496–2.611; GA vs. AA, OR = 1.433, 95% CI = 1.093–1.879; GG/GA vs. AA, OR = 1.668, 95% CI = 1.286–2.164; GG vs. GA/AA, OR = 1.502, 95% CI = 1.098–2.054; G vs. A, OR = 1.394, 95% CI = 1.098–1.770). We also observed increased susceptibility of hepatocellular cell carcinoma in homozygote comparison (OR = 1.433, 95% CI = 1.100–1.866) and dominant model (OR = 1.360, 95% CI = 1.059–1.746). According to the source of controls, significant effects were only observed in hospital-based studies (GA/AA vs. GG, OR = 1.257, 95% CI = 1.129–1.399). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, no significantly increased risks were found in either Asian or Caucasian. Our findings suggest that the CTLA-4 + 49G > A polymorphism may be associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer and hepatocellular cell carcinoma.

  17. Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    (see below), and digest with second enzyme. E. Inactivation: chelate Mg++ heat inactivation phenol in order: sterile dH2O, 10X buffer, BSA, plasmid DNA, enzyme. · For multiple digestions, set up a "Master

  18. Kinetic modeling and experimentation of anaerobic digestion

    E-print Network

    Rea, Jonathan (Jonathan E.)

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digesters convert organic waste (agricultural and food waste, animal or human manure, and other organic waste), into energy (in the form of biogas or electricity). An added benefit to bio-digestion is a leftover ...

  19. Juegos de videos: Investigacion, puntajes y recomendaciones (Video Games: Research, Ratings and Recommendations). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesarone, Bernard

    This Spanish-language digest reviews research on the demographics and effects of video game playing, discusses game rating systems, and offers recommendations for parents. The digest begins by discussing research on the time children spend playing electronic games, which shows that younger children's game playing at home (90% of fourth-graders…

  20. Performance-Driven Budgeting: The Example of New York City's Schools. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Dorothy

    This digest examines a completed pilot program in performance-driven budgeting (PDB) in the New York City public-school system. PDB links school-level budgeting and school planning; that is, decisions about resources must be aligned with school-developed instructional-improvement plans. The digest highlights how PDB came about; its primary goal;…

  1. Environmental variability and/or stability of stem fiber content and digestibility in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration and low digestibility of stem fiber constituents in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L, herbage can limit dry matter intake and energy availability in dairy and beef production systems. Stem neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), and stem neutral detergent fiber digest...

  2. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF MESOPHILIC AND THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC DIGESTION. PHASE 2. STEADY STATE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted of the relative performance of anaerobic digestion systems under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Fifty liter laboratory scale digesters were fed primary sludge from the Allentown, PA Waste Water Treatment Plant. Long-term, steady-state performance da...

  3. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF MESOPHILIC AND THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION - PHASE II. STEADY STATE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the relative performance of anaerobic digestion systems under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions was conducted. Fifty liter laboratory scale digesters were fed primary sludge from the Allentown, PA Waste Water Treatment Plant. Long-term, steady-state performance da...

  4. Growth, nutrient utilization, and digestibility of soy products by Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The apparent nutrient digestibilities of 3 plant-based alternative proteins were determined during an 8 week digestibility study of juvenile pompano. Two 4X4 Latin square experiments were conducted within four 60L tanks on two separate recirculating systems. For both experiments, a menhaden meal-...

  5. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    These mice express human c-Myc in the mouse prostate. They develop PIN lesions as early as 2 weeks which progress to cancer by 6 months. They serve as a good tool to study the progression of prostate cancer in a mouse model.

  6. JB6 Mouse Model

    Cancer.gov

    JB6 Mouse Model The mouse Balb/C JB6 model (1) is the only well characterized model of genetic variants for a neoplastic transformation response to tumor promoters. These cells are not differentially sensitive to tumor promoter induced mitogenesis or diff

  7. Mouse Proteomic Technologies Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    Mouse models of human cancer offer many opportunities to optimize procedures for profiling major human cancers. The National Cancer Institute's Mouse Proteomic Technologies Initiative, designed to use these animal models to develop and standardize technologies to help improve the accurate measurement of proteins and peptides linked to cancer processes.

  8. L.-W. Hung and C. T.-C. Nguyen, "Silicide-Based Release of High Aspect Ratio Microstructures," Tech. Digest, 23rd Int. Conf. on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS'09), Hong Kong, China, Jan. 24-28, 2010, pp. 120-123.

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Clark T.-C.

    . Digest, 23rd IEEE Int. Conf. on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS'09), Hong Kong, China, Jan. 24. The key enabling element is the use of a self-sufficient chemical reaction (such as silicidation such structures. 1. INTRODUCTION Release processes, whereby sacrificial material be- tween two structural

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas Production in Small-scale Household Digesters in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Vu, T. K. V.; Vu, D. Q.; Jensen, L. S.; Sommer, S. G.; Bruun, S.

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale household digesters have been promoted across Asia as a sustainable way of handling manure. The major advantages are that they produce biogas and reduce odor. However their disadvantages include the low recycling of nutrients, because digestate is dilute and therefore difficult to transport, and the loss of biogas as a result of cracks and the intentional release of excess biogas. In this study, life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to assess the environmental impacts associated with biogas digesters in Vietnam. Handling 1,000 kg of liquid manure and 100 kg of solid manure in a system with a biogas digester reduced the impact potential from 4.4 kg carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents to 3.2 kg CO2 equivalents compared with traditional manure management. However, this advantage could easily be compromised if digester construction is considered in the LCA or in situations where there is an excess of biogas which is intentionally released. A sensitivity analysis showed that biogas digesters could be a means of reducing global warming if methane emissions can be kept low. In terms of eutrophication, farms with biogas digesters had 3 to 4 times greater impacts. In order to make biogas digesters sustainable, methods for recycling digestates are urgently required. PMID:25715690

  10. Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles were developed from a series of chemical reactions using chitosan, polyethylene glycol, and a cell-targeting peptide (CP15). The nanoparticles were complexed with PLK1-siRNA. The optimal siRNA loading was achieved at an N?:?P ratio of 129.2 yielding a nanoparticle size of >200?nm. These nanoparticles were delivered intraperitoneally and tested for efficient delivery, cytotoxicity, and biodistribution in a mouse xenograft model of colorectal cancer. Both unmodified and modified chitosan nanoparticles showed enhanced accumulation at the tumor site. However, the modified chitosan nanoparticles showed considerably, less distribution in other organs. The relative gene expression as evaluated showed efficient delivery of PLK1-siRNA (0.5?mg/kg) with 50.7 ± 19.5% knockdown (P = 0.031) of PLK1 gene. The in vivo data reveals no systemic toxicity in the animals, when tested for systemic inflammation and liver toxicity. These results indicate a potential of using peptide-tagged nanoparticles for systemic delivery of siRNA at the targeted tumor site. PMID:24159333

  11. Digestion Experiments With Texas Feeding Stuffs. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S.

    1914-01-01

    EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 166. MAK, 1914 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Digestion Experiments With Texas Feeding Stuffs Digeisston oExxprp gmWmhETa FdWSEu oEfTm1a ep2Wu VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, AUSTIN, TEXAS 1914 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL....................................................................................... 5 Digestibility ............................................................................................... 6 Digestible nutrients in the feeds............................................................. 7 Productive values of feeds...

  12. Sequence Assembly Validation by Restriction Digest Fingerprint

    E-print Network

    Rouchka, Eric

    Sequence Assembly Validation by Restriction Digest Fingerprint Comparison Eric C. Rouchka and David examines the use of restriction digest analysis as a method for testing the fidelity of sequence assembly. Restriction digest fingerprint matching is an established technology for high resolution physical map

  13. Lesson Plan: Understanding Digestion General Description

    E-print Network

    Martins, Emília

    Lesson Plan: Understanding Digestion General Description In this activity, students analyze data from the primary literature to explore multiple aspects of digestion. The questions often ask students. Students will learn about the relationships among various digestive characters and life history traits. 2

  14. Expression of the haemopexin-transport system in cultured mouse hepatoma cells. Links between haemopexin and iron metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A; Ledford, B E

    1988-01-01

    Minimal deviation hepatoma (Hepa) cells, from the mouse hepatoma B7756, synthesize and secrete haemopexin and express both the haemopexin receptor and the membrane haem-binding protein (MHBP) associated with the receptor, making this cell line the first available for detailed study of both haemopexin metabolism and hepatic transport. The 17.5 kDa MHBP was detected in Triton X-100 extracts of Hepa cells by immunoblotting with goat anti-rabbit MHBP. Scatchard-type analysis of haem-125I-haemopexin binding at 4 degrees C revealed 35,000 receptors per cell of high affinity (Kd 17 nM). Haemopexin-mediated haem transport at 37 degrees C is saturable, having an apparent Km of 160 nM and a Vmax. of 7.5 pmol of haem/10(6) cells per h during exponential growth. Haem-transport capacity is highest in the period just before the cells enter their exponential phase of growth and slowest in stationary phase. Interestingly, haem-haemopexin serves as effectively as iron-transferrin as the sole source of iron for cell growth by Hepa cells. Furthermore, depriving Hepa cells of iron by treatment with desferrioxamine (DF) increases the number of cell-surface haemopexin receptors to 65,000 per cell and consequently increases haemopexin-mediated haem transport. The effects of DF do not appear to require protein synthesis since they are not prevented by cycloheximide. Treatment of Hepa cells with hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of the iron-requiring enzyme ribonucleotide reductase that is obligatory for DNA synthesis, enhanced haemopexin-mediated haem transport. Thus, these studies provide the first evidence for regulation of haem transport by the iron status of cells and suggest a linkage between haemopexin, iron homeostasis and cell growth. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2852010

  15. Systemic morphine treatment induces changes in firing patterns and responses of nociceptive afferent fibers in mouse glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dale; Baker, Alyssa L; Morón, Jose A; Carlton, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Patients receiving opioids for pain may experience decreased effectiveness of the drug and even abnormal pain sensitivity-hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. We hypothesized that peripheral nociceptor hyperexcitability contributes to opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tested this using an in vitro mouse glabrous skin-nerve preparation. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of morphine (5, 8, 10, 15 mg/kg) or saline every 12 hours for 48 hours and killed approximately 12 hours after the last injection. Receptive fields of nociceptors were tested for mechanical, heat, and cold sensitivity. Activity was also measured during an initial 2-minute period and during 5-minute periods between stimuli. Aberrant activity was common in fibers from morphine-treated mice but rare in saline-treated mice. Resting background activity was elevated in C-fibers from morphine-treated mice. Both C- and A?-fibers had afterdischarge in response to mechanical, heat, and/or cold stimulation of the skin as well as spontaneous, unevoked activity. Compared to saline, morphine treatment increased the proportion of fibers displaying polymodal rather than mechanical-only responses. A significant increase in A?-mechanoreceptive fibers responding to cold accounted for most of this change. In agreement with this, morphine-treated mice showed increased sensitivity in the cold tail flick test. In morphine-treated mice, aberrant activity and hyperexcitability of nociceptors could contribute to increased pain sensitivity. Importantly, this activity is likely driving central sensitization, a phenomenon contributing to abnormal sensory processing and chronic pain. If similar changes occur in human patients, aberrant nociceptor activity is likely to be interpreted as pain and could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:23711478

  16. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R. (editor); Radtke, M. (editor); Garshnek, V. (editor); Rowe, J. E. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    The second issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 39 Soviet periodical articles in 16 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the first half of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures from the original. Translated introductions and tables of contents for 14 Russian books on 11 topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are: adaptation, biospheric, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, gastrointestinal system, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology. Two book reviews translated from Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available either in English or in Russian only are appended.

  17. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Donaldson, P. Lynn; Garshnek, Victoria; Rowe, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This is the twenty-first issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 37 papers published in Russian language periodicals or books or presented at conferences and of a Soviet monograph on animal ontogeny in weightlessness. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. A book review of a work on adaptation to stress is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 25 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, operational medicine, perception, psychology, and reproductive system.

  18. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor)

    1987-01-01

    This is the thirteenth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 39 papers recently published in Russian-language periodicals and bound collections, two papers delivered at an international life sciences symposium, and three new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Also included is a review of a recent Soviet-French symposium on Space Cytology. Current Soviet Life Sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 31 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cosmonaut training, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, genetics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, space biology, and space medicine.

  19. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Teeter, Ronald; Radtke, Mike; Rowe, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    This is the fourteenth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 32 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of three new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Also included is a review of a recent Soviet conference on Space Biology and Aerospace Medicine. Current Soviet life sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to the following areas of aerospace medicine and space biology: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, habitability and environment effects, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  20. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Radtke, Mike (editor); Radtke, Mike (editor); Radtke, Mike (editor); Radtke, Mike (editor); Radtke, Mike (editor)

    1987-01-01

    This is the eleventh issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 54 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of four new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated. Additional features include the translation of a paper presented in Russian to the United Nations, a review of a book on space ecology, and report of a conference on evaluating human functional capacities and predicting health. Current Soviet Life Sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 30 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, aviation physiology, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cosmonaut training, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, group dynamics, genetics, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, and radiobiology.

  1. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Garshnek, Victoria (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the 19th issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 47 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 5 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Reports on two conferences, one on adaptation to high altitudes, and one on space and ecology are presented. A book review of a recent work on high altitude physiology is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 33 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, biology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  2. Single Sex Education. WEEA Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Diane S.

    Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational institutions that receive federal financial assistance. This digest focuses on the theme of single-sex education. Articles featured in this issue include: (1) "Single-Sex Education" (Diane S. Pollard); (2) "A Legal Framework for Single-Sex…

  3. Library Latchkey Children. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Frances Smardo

    This digest discusses ways in which public libraries deal with latchkey children who spend their after-school hours at public libraries while their parents are at work. Research conducted in 1990 of 110 public libraries revealed that almost all libraries encountered unattended children after school hours, and that most libraries surveyed were not…

  4. Readiness for Kindergarten. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurss, Joanne R.

    A consideration of readiness for kindergarten must take into account the kindergarten program and the teacher's expectations of the child. This digest first examines kindergarten teachers' expectations for children's social, behavioral, sensory-motor, cognitive, and language abilities upon entrance to kindergarten. The issue of kindergarten…

  5. Teaching about Ecosystems. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haury, David L.

    Ecosystems are available to educators as interactive units and as such the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and the Excellence in Environmental Education: Guidelines for Learning (EEE) put considerable emphasis on ecosystems. This ERIC Digest describes the NSES and EEE guidelines for grades 5-8 and 9-12 to provide a basic ecosystem…

  6. Multiple Regression Assumptions. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.; Waters, Elaine

    This Digest presents a discussion of the assumptions of multiple regression that is tailored to the practicing researcher. The focus is on the assumptions of multiple regression that are not robust to violation, and that researchers can deal with if violated. Assumptions of normality, linearity, reliability of measurement, and homoscedasticity are…

  7. Tropical Rainforest Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    This digest provides four guideposts for tropical rainforest education: (1) structure; (2) location and climate; (3) importance; and (4) conservation of resources. Research is cited and background information provided about the layers of life and the adaptations of life within the tropical rain forest. Aspects of life within and near rain forests…

  8. FEU Technology Digest No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This digest contains four articles about technology and education in Britain. "The Development of an 'Additional Skills' Training Programme" (Peter Riley) details the organization and progress of a collaborative effort between Blackpool Processing Company and Flyde College's Additional Skills training program, a solution to achieving the flexible…

  9. Rural School Busing. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Aimee; Howley, Craig

    This digest summarizes information suggesting that long bus rides are part of the hidden costs of school and district consolidation. Rural school districts spend more than twice per pupil what urban districts spend on transportation. A review of studies shows that rural school children were more likely than suburban school children to have bus…

  10. Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates are the major dietary sources of energy for humans. While most dietary carbohydrates are derived from multiple botanical sources, lactose and trehalose are the only animal-derived carbohydrates. Digestion of starch, the carbohydrate most abundantly consumed by humans, depends on the c...

  11. Commercialism in Schools. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kirstin

    Businesses are increasingly making inroads into the classroom, particularly in underfunded schools. The dramatic rise in commercial activities in schools has sparked intense public debate, triggering a U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) report and various regulatory attempts at district, state, and federal levels. This digest offers an overview…

  12. Teaching about Oceans. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.

    This ERIC Digest is designed for teachers in grades K-12 to share a rationale for teaching about oceans and briefly introduce the kinds of resources available to assist with such efforts. Topics include: (1) Why teach about oceans?; (2) Where can I get resources for teaching about the ocean?; (3) Who is doing marine education in my area?; (4) What…

  13. Digestion of Raw and Roasted Almonds in Simulated Gastric Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fanbin

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of digestion kinetics of solid foods in human stomach, as affected by food processing methods, is critical in establishing processing conditions at the manufacturing stage to achieve desirable release of nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to investigate how roasting affected disintegration and solid release properties of almond in simulated gastric environment. In vitro trials were performed for raw and roasted almonds by using static soaking method and a model stomach system. The changes in sample weight, dry mass, and moisture during the trials were determined. Both compression and penetration tests were used to investigate the texture of almonds with a focus on the influence of absorption of gastric juice. Light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy were used to study the change in microstructure of the raw and roasted almonds after simulated digestion. The results suggested that the slow disintegration rate and the high amount of swelling of the almonds in the stomach may contribute to their high satiety property. Roasting significantly improved the disintegration rates of almonds and increased loss of solids during simulated digestion, which is well correlated with the decrease in the rigidity of almond samples after absorbing gastric juice. Microstructure of digested almonds showed breakage and breach of cell walls due to acid hydrolysis. Intercellular and intracellular channels formed in almonds during roasting are important for penetration of gastric juice that may facilitate an effective digestion.

  14. Digest of Russian Space Life Sciences, issue 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1993-01-01

    This is the thirty-third issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 55 papers published in Russian journals. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to the following areas of space biology and medicine: biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal system, genetics, hematology, human performance, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, psychology, radiobiology, and reproductive system.

  15. Of Mice, Birds, and Men: The Mouse Ultrasonic Song System Has Some Features Similar to Humans and Song-Learning Birds

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Zhou, Eric P.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and song-learning birds communicate acoustically using learned vocalizations. The characteristic features of this social communication behavior include vocal control by forebrain motor areas, a direct cortical projection to brainstem vocal motor neurons, and dependence on auditory feedback to develop and maintain learned vocalizations. These features have so far not been found in closely related primate and avian species that do not learn vocalizations. Male mice produce courtship ultrasonic vocalizations with acoustic features similar to songs of song-learning birds. However, it is assumed that mice lack a forebrain system for vocal modification and that their ultrasonic vocalizations are innate. Here we investigated the mouse song system and discovered that it includes a motor cortex region active during singing, that projects directly to brainstem vocal motor neurons and is necessary for keeping song more stereotyped and on pitch. We also discovered that male mice depend on auditory feedback to maintain some ultrasonic song features, and that sub-strains with differences in their songs can match each other's pitch when cross-housed under competitive social conditions. We conclude that male mice have some limited vocal modification abilities with at least some neuroanatomical features thought to be unique to humans and song-learning birds. To explain our findings, we propose a continuum hypothesis of vocal learning. PMID:23071596

  16. Systems level approach reveals the correlation of endoderm differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells with specific microstructural cues of fibrin gels

    PubMed Central

    Task, Keith; D'Amore, Antonio; Singh, Satish; Candiello, Joe; Jaramillo, Maria; Wagner, William R.; Kumta, Prashant; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells receive numerous cues from their associated substrate that help to govern their behaviour. However, identification of influential substrate characteristics poses difficulties because of their complex nature. In this study, we developed an integrated experimental and systems level modelling approach to investigate and identify specific substrate features influencing differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) on a model fibrous substrate, fibrin. We synthesized a range of fibrin gels by varying fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations, which led to a range of substrate stiffness and microstructure. mESCs were cultured on each of these gels, and characterization of the differentiated cells revealed a strong influence of substrate modulation on gene expression patterning. To identify specific substrate features influencing differentiation, the substrate microstructure was quantified by image analysis and correlated with stem cell gene expression patterns using a statistical model. Significant correlations were observed between differentiation and microstructure features, specifically fibre alignment. Furthermore, this relationship occurred in a lineage-specific manner towards endoderm. This systems level approach allows for identification of specific substrate features from a complex material which are influential to cellular behaviour. Such analysis may be effective in guiding the design of scaffolds with specific properties for tissue engineering applications. PMID:24718448

  17. "In-Gel" Trypsin Digestion Protocol for Proteins in SDS-PAGE Gel Slices ABRF Internal Protein Sequence Research Committee (11/97)

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    98 "In-Gel" Trypsin Digestion Protocol for Proteins in SDS-PAGE Gel Slices ABRF Internal Protein Sequence Research Committee (11/97) Samples to be digested in the gel are run in as few lanes as possible and alkylated prior to electrophoresis. Note that an alternate buffer system is also provided for LysC digestion

  18. Osteoblasts isolated from mouse calvaria initiate matrix mineralization in culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for isolating osteoblasts from newborn mouse calvaria without the use of digestive enzymes. The procedure is based on the ability of osteoblasts to migrate from bone onto small glass fragments (Jones, S.J., and A. Boyde, 1977, Cell Tissue Res., 184:179- 193). The isolated cells were cultured for up to 14 d in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and 50 micrograms/ml of ascorbic acid. 7-d cultures were incubated for 24 h with [3H]proline. High levels of collagen synthesis relative to total protein were found, as measured by collagenase digestion of medium and cell layer proteins. Analysis of pepsin-digested proteins from the same cultures by SDS PAGE showed that type I collagen was predominantly produced with small amounts of type III and V (alpha 1 chains) collagens. Osteoblasts grown in the presence of beta-glycerophosphate were able to initiate mineral deposition in culture. Electron microscopic analysis of the cultures revealed the presence of needle- shaped apatite-like crystals associated with collagen fibrils and vesicles in the extracellular space. Mouse skin fibroblasts cultured under identical conditions failed to initiate mineralization. Electron histochemical studies revealed the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, associated with osteoblast membranes, matrix vesicles and on or near collagen fibrils. Thus these isolated osteoblasts retained in culture their unique property of initiating mineralization and therefore represent a model of value for studying the mineralization process in vitro. PMID:6833375

  19. Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: influence of aggregate formation on process stability.

    PubMed

    Kleyböcker, A; Liebrich, M; Kasina, M; Kraume, M; Wittmaier, M; Würdemann, H

    2012-06-01

    Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH>7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4) the degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. Furthermore, this mechanism enabled a stable process performance after re-activation of biogas production. In contrast, during the counter measure with NaOH aggregate formation was only minor resulting in a rapid process failure subsequent the increase of the organic loading rate. PMID:22405750

  20. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple multilayer random crosslinking of the trypsin molecules onto magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while the conventional immobilization of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. A single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome were digested at atmospheric pressure and 37 °C for 12 h or in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, EC-TR/NPs performed equally to or better than free trypsin in terms of both identified peptide/protein number and the digestion reproducibility. In addition, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very rapid (~1 min) and efficient digestions with more reproducible digestion results. PMID:21204257

  1. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R. (editor); Radtke, M. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor); Rowe, J. E. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    This is the sixth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 54 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of 10 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include a table of Soviet EVAs and information about English translations of Soviet materials available to readers. The topics covered in this issue have been identified as relevant to 26 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, genetics, habitability and environment effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism., microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, and space medicine.

  2. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, Issue 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Radtke, Mike; Teeter, Ronald; Garshnek, Victoria; Rowe, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    The USSR Space Life Sciences Digest contains abstracts of 37 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of five new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include the translation of a book chapter concerning use of biological rhythms as a basis for cosmonaut selection, excerpts from the diary of a participant in a long-term isolation experiment, and a picture and description of the Mir space station. The abstracts included in this issue were identified as relevant to 25 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculosketal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, personnel selection, psychology, and radiobiology.

  3. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Garshnek, Victoria (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the 15th issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 59 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of two new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. An additional feature is a review of a conference devoted to the physiology of extreme states. The abstracts included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 29 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, genetics, habitability and environment effects, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception. personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, and space biology and medicine.

  4. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    This is the seventh issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 29 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of 8 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include two interviews with the Soviet Union's cosmonaut physicians and others knowledgable of the Soviet space program. The topics discussed at a Soviet conference on problems in space psychology are summarized. Information about English translations of Soviet materials available to readers is provided. The topics covered in this issue have been identified as relevant to 29 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, genetics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space medicine.

  5. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R. (editor); Radtke, M. (editor); Garshnek, V. (editor); Rowe, J. E. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. Abstracts are included for 46 Soviet periodical articles in 20 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the second third of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. In addition, translated introductions and tables of contents for seven Russian books on six topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, exobiology, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system; neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space physiology. Two book reviews translated from the Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available in English with pertinent ordering information are given.

  6. Newer Technologies for School Security. ERIC Digest Number 145.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tod

    This digest describes several technologies that can be used to control access to, and improve surveillance of, school grounds. Access can be controlled by using "smart" cards to control keyed entries. Many schools have problems with multiple copies of keys, and these card systems are integrated with computer software that allows for specific…

  7. AUTOTHERMAL THERMOPHILIC AEROBIC DIGESTION IN THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The status of Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) of Wastewater Sludges in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) was evaluated via site visits to operating facilities. In the FRG, three variations of ATAD systems have been constructed on a full scale. These include ...

  8. Aerobic Digestion. Biological Treatment Process Control. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This unit on aerobic sludge digestion covers the theory of the process, system components, factors that affect the process performance, standard operational concerns, indicators of steady-state operations, and operational problems. The instructor's guide includes: (1) an overview of the unit; (2) lesson plan; (3) lecture outline (keyed to a set of…

  9. Digestion, Excretion and Metabolism, Science (Experimental): 5346.03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Alan; And Others

    This unit of instruction deals with a study of human physiology with emphasis on the process of digestion. The urinary system and urinary disorders are also discussed. The course is for the interested student and requires credit or background in previous biology programs. It is, in part, a second course in biology, but it is well within the range…

  10. Insights into Digestion and Absorption of Major Nutrients in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient digestion and absorption is necessary for the survival of living organisms and has evolved into the complex and specific task of the gastrointestinal (GI) system. While most people simply assume that their GI tract will work properly to use nutrients, provide energy, and release wastes, few nonscientists know the details about how various…

  11. AUTOHEATED, AEROBIC, THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION OF MUNICIPAL SLUDGE WITH AIR AERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full-scale aerobic digestion system demonstrated that a simple self-aspirating aerator, that used ambient air, could achieve high oxygen transfer efficiencies and thereby allow conservation of heat. Continuous feed operation utilizing primary and waste activated sludges resulte...

  12. Interactive Videodisc: An Emerging Technology for Educators. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara L.

    Interactive video can be a very complex learning system, or it can be a simple tool for teachers to use to enhance their instruction. The term has been used broadly in the literature and includes three major aspects: (1) interactive video as storage; (2) interactive video as hardware; and (3) interactive video as learning concept. This digest

  13. SALE OF SURPLUS DIGESTER AND LANDFILL GAS TO PUBLIC UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane gas produced by anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge can be upgraded to pipeline quality and sold to a public utility for injection into a natural gas distribution system. Upgrading the gas typically involves treatment for removal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfid...

  14. Three digestive movements in Hydra regulated by the diffuse nerve net in the body column.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Osamu; Fujisawa, Toshitaka

    2004-08-01

    The mammalian digestive tract undergoes various digestive movements such as peristalsis and segmentation movement. How those digestive movements and the underlying mechanisms appeared in evolution remains unraveled. A widely accepted view has been that, early in evolution, the digestive process was static based upon diffusion, and later it became dynamic involving digestive movements. Here, we report digestive movements which occur in Hydra, a member of the phylum Cnidaria. We find that the body column of Hydra undergoes a series of movements when fed with Artemia. Comparison of the movements to those in mammals showed similarities in appearance to esophageal reflex, segmentation movement, and defecation reflex. When nerve cells were eliminated, polyps showed only a weak segmentation movement, demonstrating that the diffuse nerve net in the body column of Hydra primarily regulates the movements just as the netlike enteric nervous system does in mammals. Elimination of both secretory gland cells and nerve cells resulted in the complete loss of movement, suggesting that the gland cells are involved in the weak movement. Overall, these observations suggest that the digestive process in Hydra is dynamic and that the diffuse nerve net regulates the digestive movements as a primitive form of enteric nervous system. PMID:15168068

  15. Gill bacteria enable a novel digestive strategy in a wood-feeding mollusk

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roberta M.; Fung, Jennifer M.; Sharp, Koty H.; Benner, Jack S.; McClung, Colleen; Cushing, Shelley; Lamkin, Elizabeth R.; Fomenkov, Alexey I.; Henrissat, Bernard; Londer, Yuri Y.; Scholz, Matthew B.; Posfai, Janos; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Altamia, Marvin A.; Dedrick, Sandra; Kaluziak, Stefan T.; Haygood, Margo G.; Distel, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria play many important roles in animal digestive systems, including the provision of enzymes critical to digestion. Typically, complex communities of bacteria reside in the gut lumen in direct contact with the ingested materials they help to digest. Here, we demonstrate a previously undescribed digestive strategy in the wood-eating marine bivalve Bankia setacea, wherein digestive bacteria are housed in a location remote from the gut. These bivalves, commonly known as shipworms, lack a resident microbiota in the gut compartment where wood is digested but harbor endosymbiotic bacteria within specialized cells in their gills. We show that this comparatively simple bacterial community produces wood-degrading enzymes that are selectively translocated from gill to gut. These enzymes, which include just a small subset of the predicted wood-degrading enzymes encoded in the endosymbiont genomes, accumulate in the gut to the near exclusion of other endosymbiont-made proteins. This strategy of remote enzyme production provides the shipworm with a mechanism to capture liberated sugars from wood without competition from an endogenous gut microbiota. Because only those proteins required for wood digestion are translocated to the gut, this newly described system reveals which of many possible enzymes and enzyme combinations are minimally required for wood degradation. Thus, although it has historically had negative impacts on human welfare, the shipworm digestive process now has the potential to have a positive impact on industries that convert wood and other plant biomass to renewable fuels, fine chemicals, food, feeds, textiles, and paper products. PMID:25385629

  16. Investigation of Poultry Waste for Anaerobic Digestion: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Christopher R.

    Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological conversion technology which is being used to produce bioenergy all over the world. This energy is created from biological feedstocks, and can often use waste products from various food and agricultural processors. Biogas from AD can be used as a fuel for heating or for co-generation of electricity and heat and is a renewable substitute to using fossil fuels. Nutrient recycling and waste reduction are additional benefits, creating a final product that can be used as a fertilizer in addition to energy benefits. This project was conducted to investigate the viability of three turkey production wastes as AD feedstock: two turkey litters and a material separated from the turkey processing wastewater using dissolved air flotation (DAF) process. The DAF waste contained greases, oils and other non-commodity portions of the turkey. Using a variety of different process methods, types of bacteria, loading rates and food-to-microorganism ratios, optimal loading rates for the digestion of these three materials were obtained. In addition, the co-digestion of these materials revealed additional energy benefits. In this study, batch digestion tests were carried out to treat these three feedstocks, using mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, using loading rates of 3 and 6 gVS/L They were tested separately and also as a mixture for co-digestion. The batch reactor used in this study had total and working volumes of 1130 mL and 500 mL, respectively. The initial organic loading was set to be 3 gVS/L, and the food to microorganism ratio was either 0.6 or 1.0 for different treatments based on the characteristics of each material. Only thermophilic (50 +/- 2ºC) temperatures were tested for the litter and DAF wastes in continuous digestion, but mesophilic and thermophilic batch digestion experiments were conducted. The optimum digestion time for all experiments was 14 days. The biogas yields of top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste under mesophilic batch conditions all at 3 gVS/L loading were determined to be 148.6 +/- 7.82, 176.5 +/- 11.1 and 542.0 +/- 37.9 mL/ gVS, respectively and were 201.9 +/- 10.0, 210.4 +/- 29.3, and 419.3 +/- 12.1 mL/gVS, respectively, for initial loading of 6 gVS/L. Under thermophilic batch conditions, the top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste had the biogas yields of 255.3 +/- 7.9, 313.4 +/- 30.1and 297.4 +/- 33.8 mL/gVS for loading rate of 3 gVS/L and 233.8 +/- 45.3, 306.5 +/- 11.8 and 185.1 +/- 0.85 mL/gVS for loading rate of 6 gVS/L. The biogas yields from co-digestion of the mixed litter and DAF waste at 3 gVS/L were 461.8 +/- 41.3 mL/gVS under thermophilic conditions. The results from batch anaerobic digestion tests were then used for designing continuous digestion experiments. All the continuous digestion experiments were conducted by using an Anaerobic Phase Solids (APS) digester system operated at a thermophilic temperature. The total volume of the continuous digester system was 4.8 L and the working volume was around 4.4 L. The APS digester system had two hydrolysis reactors and one biogasification reactor. Feedstock was loaded into the hydrolysis reactors in batches. The feedstock digestion time was 14 days and the average organic loading rate (OLR) of the system was 3 gVS/L/day. The experiment has three distinct feedstock stages, first with turkey litter waste, a co-digestion of DAF and turkey litter waste, followed by DAF waste. The biogas yields were determined to be 305.2 +/- 70.6 mL/gVS/d for turkey mixed litter, 455.8 +/- 77.2 mL/gVS/d during the mixture of mixed litter and DAF waste, and 382.0 +/- 39.6 mL/gVS for DAF waste. The biogas yields from the thermophilic batch test yields compare with that of the continuous digester yields. For experiments utilizing turkey litter, batch tests yielded 313.4 +/- 30.1mL/gVS biogas and 305.2 +/- 70.6 mL/gVS/d for continuous experiments. For experiments using codigestion of turkey litter and DAF waste, batches yielded 461.8 +/- 41.3 mL/gVS biogas comparing well to continuous digester operation that yielded 455.8 +/- 77.

  17. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  18. Androgen regulates development of the sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide neuron system in the lumbar spinal cord: evidence from a mouse line lacking androgen receptor in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Marie-Luce, Clarisse; Raskin, Kalina; Oti, Takumi; Satoh, Keita; Tamura, Kei; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2014-01-13

    Androgens including testosterone, organize the nervous system as well as masculine external and internal genitalia during the perinatal period. Androgen organization involves promotion of masculine body features, usually by acting through androgen receptors (ARs). We have recently demonstrated that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbar spinal cord also mediates spinal centers promoting penile reflexes during male sexual behavior in rats. Testosterone may induce sexual differentiation of this spinal GRP system during development and maintain its activation in adulthood. In the present study, we examined the role of ARs in the nervous system regulating the development of the sexually dimorphic GRP system. For this purpose, we used a conditional mouse line selectively lacking the AR gene in the nervous system. AR floxed males carrying (mutants) or not (controls) the nestin-Cre transgene were castrated in adulthood and supplemented with physiological amounts of testosterone. Loss of AR expression in the nervous system resulted in a significant decrease in the number of GRP neurons compared to control littermates. Consequently, the intensity of GRP axonal projections onto the lower lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord was greater in control males than in mutant males. These results suggest that ARs expressed in the nervous system play a significant role in the development of the GRP system in the male lumbar spinal cord. The AR-deletion mutation may attenuate sexual behavior and activity of mutant males via spinal GRP system-mediated neural mechanisms. PMID:24211692

  19. Retinofugal projections in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P; Studholme, Keith M

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species' visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 ?m free-floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to ~46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat, and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition. PMID:24889098

  20. Retinofugal Projections in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species’ visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 Am free floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to approximately 46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition. PMID:24889098

  1. Orthology for comparative genomics in the mouse genome database.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Mary E; Baldarelli, Richard M; Bello, Susan M; Ni, Li; McAndrews, Monica S; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A

    2015-08-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD) is the model organism database component of the mouse genome informatics system at The Jackson Laboratory. MGD is the international data resource for the laboratory mouse and facilitates the use of mice in the study of human health and disease. Since its beginnings, MGD has included comparative genomics data with a particular focus on human-mouse orthology, an essential component of the use of mouse as a model organism. Over the past 25 years, novel algorithms and addition of orthologs from other model organisms have enriched comparative genomics in MGD data, extending the use of orthology data to support the laboratory mouse as a model of human biology. Here, we describe current comparative data in MGD and review the history and refinement of orthology representation in this resource. PMID:26223881

  2. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  3. JB6 Mouse Model

    Cancer.gov

    JB6 References 1978 Colburn NH, Vorder Bruegge WF, Bates JR, Gray RH, Rossen JD, Kelsey WH, & Shimada T. Correlation of anchorage independent growth with tumorigenicity of chemically transformed mouse epidermal cells. Cancer Res 38: 624-634, 1978.  Abstra

  4. JB6 Mouse Model

    Cancer.gov

    JB6 References 1993 Chang PL & Prince CW: 1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances 12-O- tetradecanoylphorbol-13- acetate- induced tumorigenic transformation and osteopontin expression in mouse JB6 epidermal cells. Cancer Res 53: 2217-2220, 1993.  Abstract

  5. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Kovalchuk AL, Qi CF, Torrey TA, Taddesse-Heath L, Feigenbaum L, Park SS, Gerbitrz A, Klobeck G, Hoertnagel K, Polack A, Bornkamm GW, Janz S, Morse III HC. 2000. Burkitt lymphoma in the mouse. J. Exp. Med.

  6. Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: Influence of aggregate formation on process stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyboecker, A.; Liebrich, M.; Kasina, M.; Kraume, M.; Wittmaier, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of process recovery with calcium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids and phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of VFAs by the precipitates resulting in the formation of aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid uptake and phosphate release by the phosphate-accumulating organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. - Abstract: Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH > 7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4) the degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. Furthermore, this mechanism enabled a stable process performance after re-activation of biogas production. In contrast, during the counter measure with NaOH aggregate formation was only minor resulting in a rapid process failure subsequent the increase of the organic loading rate.

  7. Parasite ova in anaerobically digested sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Arther, R.G.; Fitzgerald, P.R.; Fox, J.C.

    1981-08-01

    The Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago produces anaerobically digested wastewater sludge from a 14-day continuous-flow process maintained at 35 degrees Celcius. Some of the sludge is ultimately applied to strip-mined lands in Central Illinois (Fulton County) as a soil conditioner and fertilizer. Parasitic nematode ova were isolated from freshly processed samples, as well as from samples collected from storage lagoons, using a system of continuous sucrose solution gradients. The mean number of ova per 100 g of dry sludge was 203 Ascaris spp., 173 Toxocara spp., 48 Toxascaris leonina, and 36 Trichuris spp. An assessment of the viability of these ova was determined by subjecting the ova to conditions favorable for embryonation. Recovered ova were placed in 1.5% formalin and aerated at 22 degrees Celcius for 21 to 28 days. Development of ova isolated from freshly digested sludge occurred in 64% of the Ascaris spp., 53% of the Toxocara, 63% of the Toxascaris leonina, and 20% of the Trichuris spp. Viability was also demonstrated in ova recovered from sludge samples held in storage lagoons for a period of up to 5 years; embryonation occurred in 24% of the Ascaris spp., 10% of the Toxocara spp., 43% of the Toxascaris leonina, and 6% of the Trichuris spp. (Refs. 24).

  8. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Mouse c-Myc was inserted into the mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus, Igh, just 5' of the intronic enhancer, Eó, to mimic the MYC-activating chromosomal t(8;14)(q24;q32) translocation most commonly observed in human endemic Burkitt lymphoma. Heterozygous iMycEó mice develop a spectrum of B-cell tumors, including Burkitt-like lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and plasmacytoma.

  9. Permanent acceptance of mouse cardiac allografts with CD40 siRNA to induce regulatory myeloid cells by use of a novel polysaccharide siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Ichimaru, N; Higuchi, S; Cai, S; Hou, J; Fujino, M; Nonomura, N; Kobayashi, M; Ando, H; Uno, A; Sakurai, K; Mochizuki, S; Adachi, Y; Ohno, N; Zou, H; Xu, J; Li, X-K; Takahara, S

    2015-03-01

    The CD40/CD154 co-stimulatory pathway is crucial in alloimmune response. We developed a novel small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system with a poly-dA extension at the 5'-end of the siRNA sense strand that was stably incorporated into 1,3-?-glucan (schizophyllan, SPG). This was captured and incorporated into dendritic cells (DCs) through its receptor, Dectin-1, specifically silencing CD40 genes (siCD40) to exert immunoregulatory activity. siCD40/SPG-treated CBA mice permanently accepted B10 fully mismatched cardiac allografts. Consistent with graft survival, the infiltration of CD4(+), CD8(+) T cells into the graft was lower, and that the numbers of CD40(low)CD11c(+) DCs cells and CD4(+)Foxp3(+)cells were increased in both the graft and in the recipient spleen. In addition, naive CBA recipients given an adoptive transfer of splenocytes from the primary recipients with siCD40/SPG accepted a heart graft from donor-type B10, but not third-party Balb/c mice. In conclusion, the treatment with siCD40/SPG targeting DCs could generate antigen-specific Tregs, resulting in the permanent acceptance of mouse cardiac allografts. These findings have important implications for clarifying the mechanism underlying the induction of tolerance in DCs, and also highlight the potential of immunomodulation and the feasibility of siRNA-based clinical therapy in the transplantation field. PMID:25567536

  10. Anaerobic digestion of woody biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Jerger, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Woody biomass without pretreatment is generally considered to be refractive to anaerobic decomposition. This refractory property is attributed to its low moisture content, crystalline nature of the cellulose, and complex association of the component carbohydrates with lignin. This study investigated the methane fermentation (anaerobic digestion) of various wood species using conventional anaerobic digestion and batch anaerobic biogasification potential assays. Most experiments were conducted at 35/sup 0/C with a particle size in the range of 1 to 2 mm, and with a full complement of inorganic nutrient supplements. Conventional CSTR semicontinuous feed anaerobic digestion resulted in low methane yields and low conversion (less than 5% organic reduction). Significantly higher conversion (as high as 54%) and higher methane yields (as high as 5.4 SCF/lb VS added) were observed for several hardwood species in ABP assays employing low loading and long residence times (60 days). One softwood (loblolly pine) and eucalyptus were refractory under these conditions. Pretreatments, including particle size reduction and NaOH, increased rates but not total conversion. These results demonstrate that woody biomass can be decomposed by the methane fermentation and support the potential for development of this process for commercial wood conversion applications. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Interleukin-1 interaction with neuroregulatory systems: selective enhancement by recombinant human and mouse interleukin-1 of in vitro opioid peptide receptor binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedermann, C.J.

    1989-02-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a wide variety of biological effects on various cell types and may be regarded as a pleiotropic peptide hormone. Biological evidence suggests that IL-1 participates in the modulation of central nervous system physiology and behavior in a fashion characteristic of neuroendocrine hormones. In this investigation, recombinant (r) human (h) IL-1 and r mouse (m) IL-1 were examined for their modulation of opioid peptide receptor binding in vitro. Experiments were performed on frozen sections of rat brain. Receptor binding of radiolabeled substance P and of radiolabeled neurotensin were not significantly affected by the presence of rIL-1s. Recombinant IL-1s, however, significantly enhanced specific binding of 125I-beta-endorphin (125I-beta-END) and of D-ala2-(tyrosyl-3,5-3H)enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (3H-D-ALA), equipotently and in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal activity occurring at a concentration of 10 LAF units/ml. The increased binding of 125I-beta-END and 3H-D-ALA was blocked steroselectively by (-)-naloxone and by etorphine, suggesting detection of opiate receptors. In addition, brain distribution patterns of receptors labeled in the presence of rIL-1s corresponded to patterns previously published for opiate receptors. Autoradiographic visualization of receptors revealed that rIL-1s in the different areas of the brain exert their effect on opioid binding with comparable potencies. The data suggest that certain central nervous system effects of IL-1s may be mediated by their selective interaction with opiatergic systems at the receptor level.

  12. Effect of GDNF on depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and key genes of the brain dopamine system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Ilchibaeva, Tatyana V; Khotskin, Nikita V; Semenova, Alina A; Popova, Nina K

    2014-11-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and brain dopamine system in predisposed to depressive-like behavior ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics) mice in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA mice was studied. In 7days after administration (800ng, i.c.v.) GDNF decreased escape latency time and the path traveled to reach hidden platform in Morris water maze in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavioral traits in both "nondepressive" CBA and "depressive" ASC mice. In CBA mice, GDNF decreased functional response to agonists of D1 (chloro-APB hydrobromide) and D2 (sumanirole maleate) receptors in tail suspension test, reduced D2 receptor gene expression in the substantia nigra and increased monoamine oxydase A (MAO A) gene expression in the striatum. GDNF increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in the nucleus accumbens of ASC mice but failed to alter expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, MAO B and tyrosine hydroxylase genes in both investigated mouse strains. Thus, GDNF produced long-term genotype-dependent effect on behavior and the brain dopamine system. GDNF pretreatment (1) reduced D1 and D2 receptors functional responses and D2 receptor gene expression in s. nigra of CBA mice; (2) increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in n. accumbens of ASC mice and (3) improved spatial learning in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavior both in CBA and ASC mice. The data suggest that genetically defined variance in the cross-talk between GDNF and brain dopamine system contributes to the variability of GDNF-induced responses and might be responsible for controversial GDNF effects. PMID:25101543

  13. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R. (editor); Radtke, M. (editor); Garshnek, V. (editor); Teeter, R. (editor); Rowe, J. E. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    The fourth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Science Digest includes abstracts for 42 Soviet periodical articles in 20 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the last third of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. In addition, translated introductions and tables of contents for 17 Russian books on 12 topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are: adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, exobiology, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, histology, human performance, immunology, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, and radiobiology. Two book reviews translated from the Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available in English with pertinent ordering information are given.

  14. USSR space life sciences digest, issue 27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (editor); Teeter, Ronald (editor); Garshnek, Victoria (editor); Rowe, Joseph (editor)

    1990-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth issue of NASA's Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 30 journal papers or book chapters published in Russian and of 2 Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 18 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas include: adaptation, aviation medicine, biological rhythms, biospherics, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, immunology, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, radiobiology, and space medicine. A Soviet book review of a British handbook of aviation medicine and a description of the work of the division on aviation and space medicine of the Moscow Physiological Society are also included.

  15. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Maddatu, Terry P.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2009-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; http://www.jax.org/phenome) is an open source, web-based repository of phenotypic and genotypic data on commonly used and genetically diverse inbred strains of mice and their derivatives. MPD is also a facility for query, analysis and in silico hypothesis testing. Currently MPD contains about 1400 phenotypic measurements contributed by research teams worldwide, including phenotypes relevant to human health such as cancer susceptibility, aging, obesity, susceptibility to infectious diseases, atherosclerosis, blood disorders and neurosensory disorders. Electronic access to centralized strain data enables investigators to select optimal strains for many systems-based research applications, including physiological studies, drug and toxicology testing, modeling disease processes and complex trait analysis. The ability to select strains for specific research applications by accessing existing phenotype data can bypass the need to (re)characterize strains, precluding major investments of time and resources. This functionality, in turn, accelerates research and leverages existing community resources. Since our last NAR reporting in 2007, MPD has added more community-contributed data covering more phenotypic domains and implemented several new tools and features, including a new interactive Tool Demo available through the MPD homepage (quick link: http://phenome.jax.org/phenome/trytools). PMID:18987003

  16. Laboratory Exercise: Study of Digestive and Regulatory Processes through the Exploration of Fasted and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Mari K.; Maurer, Luke W.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology laboratory exercises often explore the regulation of enzyme action rather than systems physiology. This laboratory exercise provides a systems approach to digestive and regulatory processes through the exploration of postprandial blood glucose levels. In the present exercise, students enrolled in an undergraduate animal…

  17. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis and total glucose metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digestion of starch requires four mucosal maltases; sucrase and isomaltase (Si) and maltase and glucoamylase (Mgam). We ablated Mgam to study its roles. The in vitro effect was a slowing of null mucosal activity to 10% of WT. Here we report in vivo effects of Mgam KO on mouse glucose metabolism. alp...

  18. Targeting the nNOS/peroxynitrite/calpain system to confer neuroprotection and aid functional recovery in a mouse model of TBI.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mushfiquddin; Dhammu, Tajinder S; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Dhindsa, Tejbir Singh; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar K

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) derails nitric oxide (NO)-based anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxicity mechanisms. NO is consumed by superoxide to form peroxynitrite, leading to decreased NO bioavailability for S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) synthesis and regulation of neuroprotective pathways. Neuronal peroxynitrite is implicated in neuronal loss and functional deficits following TBI. Using a contusion mouse model of TBI, we investigated mechanisms for the opposed roles of GSNO versus peroxynitrite for neuroprotection and functional recovery. TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult male mice. GSNO treatment at 2h after CCI decreased the expression levels of phospho neuronal nitric oxide synthase (pnNOS), alpha II spectrin degraded products, and 3-NT, while also decreasing the activities of nNOS and calpains. Treatment of TBI with FeTPPS, a peroxynitrite scavenger, had effects similar to GSNO treatment. GSNO treatment of TBI also reduced neuronal degeneration and improved neurobehavioral function in a two-week TBI study. In a cell free system, SIN-1 (a peroxynitrite donor and 3-nitrotyrosinating agent) increased whereas GSNO (an S-nitrosylating agent) decreased calpain activity, and these activities were reversed by, respectively, FeTPPS and mercuric chloride, a cysteine-NO bond cleaving agent. These data indicate that peroxynitrite-mediated activation and GSNO-mediated inhibition of the deleterious nNOS/calpain system play critical roles in the pathobiology of neuronal protection and functional recovery in TBI disease. Given GSNO?s safety record in other diseases, its neuroprotective efficacy and promotion of functional recovery in this TBI study make low-dose GSNO a potential candidate for preclinical evaluation. PMID:26596859

  19. Immunomodulatory effects of H.P. Acthar Gel on B cell development in the NZB/W F1 mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Decker, D A; Grant, C; Oh, L; Becker, P M; Young, D; Jordan, S

    2014-07-01

    H.P. Acthar Gel® (Acthar) is a highly purified repository gel preparation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH1-39), a melanocortin peptide that can bind and activate specific receptors expressed on a range of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-relevant target cells and tissues. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of Acthar in a mouse model of SLE, using an F1 hybrid of the New Zealand Black and New Zealand White strains (NZB/W F1). Twenty-eight week old NZB/W F1 mice with established autoimmune disease were treated with Acthar, Placebo Gel (Placebo), or prednisolone and monitored for 19 weeks. Outcomes assessed included disease severity (severe proteinuria,???20% body weight loss, or prostration), measurement of serial serum autoantibody titers, terminal spleen immunophenotyping, and evaluation of renal histopathology. Acthar treatment was linked with evidence of altered B cell differentiation and development, manifested by a significant reduction in splenic B cell follicular and germinal center cells, and decreased levels of circulating total and anti-double-stranded DNA (IgM, IgG, and IgG2a) autoantibodies as compared with Placebo. Additionally, Acthar treatment resulted in a significant decrease of proteinuria, reduced renal lymphocyte infiltration, and attenuation of glomerular immune complex deposition. These data suggest that Acthar diminished pathogenic autoimmune responses in the spleen, peripheral blood, and kidney of NZB/W F1 mice. This is the first preclinical evidence demonstrating Acthar's potential immunomodulatory activity and efficacy in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24759631

  20. KR33426, [2-(2,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyloxazol-4yl]carbonylguanidine, is a novel compound to be effective on mouse systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geun-Hee; Oh, Jin-Mi; Kim, Hyun-Sun; Yoon, Won-Kee; Yi, Kyu Yang; Yang, Young; Han, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sunkyung; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2011-10-15

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key regulator of B lymphocyte development. Signals from BAFF are transmitted through binding to a specific BAFF receptor (BAFF-R). Here, we established screening method to find a specific inhibitor for the interference of BAFF-BAFF-R interactions. We screened oxazole-4-carbonylguanidine derivatives and selected KR33426, [2-(2,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyloxazol-4yl]carbonylguanidine, as a candidate to interfere BAFF-BAFF-R interactions. KR33426 inhibited BAFF-mediated anti-apoptotic effect on splenocytes as judged by hypodiploid cell formation. KR33426 also increased the degradation of procaspase-3 that was inhibited by BAFF protein. In addition, we examined whether KR33426 was effective on the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus-like symptom in MRL(lpr/lpr) mouse. When 5 or 10mg/kg KR33426 was intraperitoneally administered to MRL(lpr/lpr) mice for 4 weeks, histopathological changes were ameliorated in the narrowed space between renal glomerulus and glomerulus capsule. KR33426 reduced B220(+) B cell population and B cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation in splenocytes. KR33426 attenuated an increase in CD43(-)IgM(+) immature pro-B and a decrease in CD21(+) IgM(+) T2-B and IgD(+) IgM(-)recirculating-B cells on B cell development. Data show that KR33426 inhibits BAFF-BAFF-R interactions and it is effective on the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus-like symptom in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice. Thus, it suggests that KR33426 is a novel candidate to develop anti-autoimmune therapeutics by the interference of BAFF-BAFF-R interactions, specifically. PMID:21827747