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Sample records for mouse metallothionein gene

  1. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  2. Characterization of a polypurine/polypyrimidine sequence upstream of the mouse metallothionein-I gene.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, N A; Maher, L J

    1998-01-01

    A 128 base pair long homopurine/homopyrimidine (R/Y) element is located approximately 1.2 kb upstream of the transcription start point of the mouse metallothionein-I ( MT-I ) gene. We present a detailed in vitro structural characterization of the MT-I R/Y sequence as determined by enzymatic and chemical probes. An approximately 190 bp fragment containing the MT-I R/Y sequence was subcloned into a recombinant vector. Low resolution analysis with S1 nuclease indicates that DNA in this region was unpaired in supercoiled plasmids treated at low pH. High resolution mapping with chemical probes selective for non-B DNA structures provides evidence that the MT-I R/Y sequence adopts one or more H-DNA structures. We also investigated this sequence to determine if it can influence transcriptional regulation. Promoter/reporter constructs were prepared in which the MT-I R/Y sequence was positioned in either orientation upstream of either the MT-I or HSV-TK promoters. Promoter/reporter activities were evaluated by transient transfection assays using mouse NIH3T3 cells. The MT-I R/Y sequence displayed no detectable activity as a cis -acting transcriptional regulatory element. These results demonstrate that although the MT-I R/Y sequence is able to adopt a non-B DNA structure under certain in vitro conditions, there is no evidence that this sequence plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation. PMID:9518488

  3. A zinc-responsive factor interacts with a metal-regulated enhancer element (MRE) of the mouse metallothionein-I gene.

    PubMed Central

    Westin, G; Schaffner, W

    1988-01-01

    Heavy metal ions are effective inducers of metallothionein gene transcription. The metal response is dependent on short DNA motifs, so-called MREs (metal responsive elements) that occur in multiple copies in the promoter region of these genes. We have analysed an MRE of the mouse metallothionein-I gene (MREd) and we demonstrate that this can function over long distances as a bona fide metal ion-inducible enhancer. The transcription factor Sp1 and a zinc-inducible factor, designated MTF-1, bind to the MREd enhancer in vitro. The combined use of MREd mutants in a transient assay in HeLa cells and a competition band shift assay show that the zinc-inducible formation of the MTF-1/DNA complex in vitro correlates with zinc-inducible transcription in vivo. A chemical methylation interference assay revealed remarkably similar but non-identical guanine interference patterns for the MTF-1 and Sp1 complexes, which may mean that MTF-1 is related to the Sp1 factor. Images PMID:3208749

  4. Human metallothionein genes are clustered on chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Karin, M; Eddy, R L; Henry, W M; Haley, L L; Byers, M G; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    The metallothioneins are a family of heavy-metal binding proteins of low molecular weight. They function in the regulation of trace metal metabolism and in the protection against toxic heavy metal ions. In man, the metallothioneins are encoded by at least 10-12 genes separated into two groups, MT-I and MT-II. To understand the genomic organization of these genes and their involvement in hereditary disorders of trace metal metabolism, we have determined their chromosomal location. Using human-mouse cell hybrids and hybridization probes derived from cloned and functional human MT1 and MT2 genes, we show that the functional human genes are clustered on human chromosome 16. Analysis of RNA from somatic cell hybrids indicated that hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 expressed both human MT1 and MT2 mRNA, and this expression is regulated by both heavy metal ions and glucocorticoid hormones. Images PMID:6089206

  5. Expression of mammalian metallothionein genes in Escherichia coli and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    1986-08-01

    The metallothionein genes of mouse and human were expressed in Escherichia coli and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. The mammalian metallothionein genes code for a group of proteins that are low molecular weight, rich in cysteine and capable of binding heavy metal ions such as cadmium (Cd/sup +2/) and zinc (Zn/sup +2/). Expression of a metallothionein gene renders bacteria and yeast more resistant to heavy metal ions under a variety of growth conditions. This effect is specific for metallothionein because of gene expression is inactivated, bacteria and yeast become sensitive to metals. In addition, bacteria show a preferential incorporation of Cd/sup +2/ ions upon gene expression and contain a protein species that is readily labelled by (/sup 35/S)cysteine. Yeast also contain a protein of a similar molecular weight as the mammalian species but show characteristics that indicate the cells are under stress. Expression of metallothionein has a toxic effect on the microorganism, especially for yeast. The amounts of metallothionein detectable in both bacteria and yeast lysates are low. Several experiments suggest that metallothionein is quickly degraded in the presence of cell lysate. The low level of gene expression and/or the degradation of the gene product make it difficult to detect the expressed metallothionein in the bacterial or yeast lysate. 133 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Transcriptional induction of the mouse metallothionein-I gene in hydrogen peroxide-treated Hepa cells involves a composite major late transcription factor/antioxidant response element and metal response promoter elements.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, T; Palmiter, R D; Andrews, G K

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of metallothionein-I (MT-I) and heme oxygenase mRNAs is rapidly and transiently induced by H2O2 in mouse hepatoma cells (Hepa) and this effect is blocked by catalase. Menadione, which generates free radicals, also induces these mRNAs. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that a region between -42 and -153 in the mouse MT-I promoter was essential for induction of a CAT reporter gene. A multimer of a 16 bp sequence (-101 to -86) that includes an antioxidant response element and overlapping adenovirus major late transcription factor binding site elevated basal expression and allowed induction by H2O2 when inserted upstream of a minimal promoter. However, deletion of this region (-100 to -89) from the intact MT-I promoter (-153) did not completely eliminate response. Multiple copies of a metal response element also permitted response to H2O2. These results suggest that induction of MT-I gene transcription by H2O2 is mediated by at least two different elements within the proximal MT-I gene promoter and suggest a previously undescribed function of the MRE. Induction of MT gene transcription by ROS and the subsequent scavenging of ROS by the MT peptide is reminiscent of the metal regulatory loop and is consistent with the hypothesized protective functions of MT. Images PMID:7800494

  7. Molecular evolution of Drosophila metallothionein genes.

    PubMed

    Lange, B W; Langley, C H; Stephan, W

    1990-12-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy metal detoxification. Several different tandem duplications of Mtn have been shown to increase cadmium and copper tolerance, as well as Mtn expression. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, we compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Georgia. Restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications and a subset (327) of these lines for Mto duplications. The frequency of pooled Mtn duplications found ranged from 0% to 20%, and was not significantly higher at the contaminated sites. No Mto duplications were identified. Estimates of sequence diversity at the Mtn locus among a subsample (92) of the duplication survey were obtained using four-cutter analysis. This analysis revealed a low level of polymorphism, consistent with both selection at the Mtn locus, and a fairly recent origin for the duplications. To further examine this hypothesis, we sequenced an Mtn allele of Drosophila simulans and measured the amount of nucleotide sequence divergence between D. simulans and its sibling species D. melanogaster. The levels of silent nucleotide polymorphism and divergence in the Mtn region were compared with those in the Adh region, using the neutrality test of R.R. Hudson, M. Kreitman and M. Aguadé. PMID:1981765

  8. Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein genes: Selection for duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy-metal detoxification. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, I compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Georgia. Contaminated of collection sites and of local flies was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrosphotometry. Six-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications. A subset (327) of these lines was screened for Mto duplications: none were found. Cadmium tolerance test performed on F{sub 2} progeny of wild females failed to detect a difference in tolerance levels between flies from contaminated orchards and flies from control orchards. Estimates of sequence diversity among a subsample (92) of the chromosomes used in the duplication survey, including all 27 Mtn duplication chromosomes, were obtained using four-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis.

  9. Increased metallothionein in mouse liver, kidneys, and duodenum during lactation.

    PubMed

    Solaiman, D; Jonah, M M; Miyazaki, W; Ho, G; Bhattacharyya, M H

    2001-03-01

    Lactation-induced increases in cadmium absorption and retention have been demonstrated in mid-lactating mice, but no systematic measurements of endogenous metal-binding protein concentrations during lactation have been reported. Using Cd/hemoglobin radioassay, this study detected significant increases in metallothionein (MT) concentrations in liver (4-fold), kidneys (2-fold), and duodenum (2-fold), but not jejunum, of mouse dams on days 13 and 20 of lactation. These increases occurred in the absence of cadmium exposure and were specific to the lactation period; dams 5 days after weaning showed MT levels that were similar to those of nonpregnant (NP) mice. Similarly, Northern blot analyses of livers from lactating mice demonstrated that MT mRNA concentrations in maternal liver during mid-lactation were 6-fold higher than those observed 5 days after pups were weaned. Gel filtration of final supernatants from the Cd/hemoglobin assay confirmed that the Cd-binding molecule induced during lactation was indeed metallothionein. In addition, chromatographic analyses of cytosols from tissues taken from dams administered small amounts of Cd (66 ng/mouse) showed that the trace amounts of Cd absorbed through the maternal gastrointestinal tract during mid-lactation were also bound to the MT. These results indicate MT induction in mouse dams occurs as a physiological consequence of lactation, requiring no external stimulus. This induced MT participates in binding low levels of dietary cadmium consumed by the dam. During lactation, elevated maternal MT may affect pathways for essential trace metals as well as sequester toxic metals harmful to the neonate. Multiparous humans may have increased risk of accumulating environmental Cd. PMID:11222885

  10. Metal-dependent SV40 viruses containing inducible enhancers from the upstream region of metallothionein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Serfling, E; Lübbe, A; Dorsch-Häsler, K; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated SV40 recombinant viruses which are dependent on heavy metal ions for efficient propagation. They were obtained after-co-transfection of enhancerless SV40 DNA (the so-called enhancer trap) with sonicated DNA from the mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) or human metallothionein-IIA (hMT-IIA) upstream regions. To substitute for the SV40 enhancer, these viruses have incorporated a segment of the immediate upstream region of the metallothionein genes. Two recombinant viruses of the SVMT-I type carry segments of the mMT-I gene from positions -73 to -187 and -39 to -194 inverted with respect to their natural configuration. The overlapping segment contains two of the four metal-responsive elements involved in the induction of the mMT-I gene by heavy metal ions. The SVMT-II recombinant virus contains a segment of the hMT-IIA gene from position -39 to -366 which harbors the metal- and hormone-responsive elements of the hMT-IIA gene. Insertion of the mMT-I segment downstream of a rabbit beta-globin test gene enhances beta-globin transcription upon metal ion stimulation. This shows that the immediate upstream region of the mouse metalliothionein-I gene, when detached from its TATA box, can act as an inducible enhancer. It may be generally true that the enhancer/promoters of inducible genes are composed of several regulatory sequence elements which are interspersed with constitutive elements. The number and spatial arrangement of these elements probably determines the basal versus induced level of expression. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2419129

  11. Positive and negative regulators of the metallothionein gene (review).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shinichiro

    2015-07-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-binding proteins involved in diverse processes, including metal homeostasis and detoxification, the oxidative stress response and cell proliferation. Aberrant expression and silencing of these genes are important in a number of diseases. Several positive regulators of MT genes, including metal-responsive element-binding transcription factor (MTF)-1 and upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1, have been identified and mechanisms of induction have been well described. However, the negative regulators of MT genes remain to be elucidated. Previous studies from the group of the present review have revealed that the hematopoietic master transcription factor, PU.1, directly represses the expression levels of MT genes through its epigenetic activities, and upregulation of MT results in the potent inhibition of myeloid differentiation. The present review focuses on PU.1 and several other negative regulators of this gene, including PZ120, DNA methyltransferase 3a with Mbd3 and Brg1 complex, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α and Ku protein, and describes the suppression of the MT genes through these transcription factors. PMID:25760317

  12. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus)

    PubMed Central

    Höckner, M.; Dallinger, R.; Stürzenbaum, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs. PMID:25797623

  13. Functional homologs of fungal metallothionein genes from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J; Goldsbrough, P B

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins required for heavy metal tolerance in animals and fungi. Two cDNAs encoding proteins with homology to animal and fungal MTs have been isolated from Arabidopsis. The genes represented by these cDNAs are referred to as MT1 and MT2. When expressed in an MT-deficient (cup1 delta) mutant of yeast, both MT1 and MT2 complemented the cup1 delta mutation, providing a high level of resistance to CuSO4 and moderate resistance to CdSO4. Although the MT-deficient yeast was not viable in the presence of either 300 microM CuSO4 or 5 microM CdSO4, cells expressing MT1 were able to grow in medium supplemented with 3 mM CuSO4 and 10 microM CdSO4, and those expressing MT2 grew in the presence of 3 mM CuSO4 and 100 microM CdSO4. In plants, MT1 mRNA was more abundant in roots and dark-grown seedlings than in leaves. In contrast, MT2 mRNA accumulated more in leaves than in either roots or darkgrown seedlings. MT2 mRNA was strongly induced in seedlings by CuSO4, but only slightly by CdSO4 or ZnSO4. However, MT1 mRNA was induced by CuSO4 in excised leaves that were submerged in medium. These results indicated that Arabidopsis MT genes are involved in copper tolerance. Plants also synthesized metal binding phytochelatins (poly[gamma-glutamylcysteine]glycine) when exposed to heavy metals. The results presented here argue against the hypothesis that phytochelatins are the sole molecules involved in heavy metal tolerance in plants. We conclude that Arabidopsis MT1 and MT2 are functional homologs of yeast MT. PMID:8061521

  14. Metallothionein gene expression differs in earthworm populations with different exposure history.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, M; Haimi, J; Väisänen, A; Knott, K E

    2014-11-01

    Metals are persistent pollutants in soils that can harm soil organisms and decrease species diversity. Animals can cope with metal contamination with the help of metallothioneins, small metal-binding proteins involved in homeostasis and detoxification of metals. We studied the expression of metallothionein with qPCR in a small, epigeic earthworm, Dendrobaena octaedra. We compared expression patterns and metal body content in earthworms collected from two sites with different metal contamination histories: Harjavalta, contaminated by a Cu-Ni smelter operational for over 50 years, and Jyväskylä, an uncontaminated site. Earthworms from both sites were also experimentally exposed to different concentrations of Cu (control, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) or Zn (control, 75, 150 or 300 mg/kg) for 7, 14 or 28 days to determine if there is a time related dose-response in gene expression. Population comparison showed that metallothionein expression was higher in earthworms from the contaminated site. In the exposure experiment, exposure time affected expression, but only in the earthworms from the uncontaminated site, suggesting that there is a delay in the metallothionein response of earthworms in this population. In contrast, earthworms from the contaminated site showed higher and constant levels of metallothionein expression at all exposure concentrations and durations. The constant metallothionein expression in earthworms from the contaminated site suggests that inducibility of metallothionein response could be lost in earthworms with metal exposure history. Adaptation of D. octaedra to metal exposure could explain the differences between the populations and explain the persistence of this species in contaminated forest soils. PMID:25179588

  15. Regulation of expression of a sheep metallothionein 1a-sheep growth hormone fusion gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, C M; Rigby, N W; Murray, J D; Marshall, J T; Townrow, C A; Nancarrow, C D; Ward, K A

    1989-01-01

    Transgenic mice containing a sheep metallothionein 1a-sheep growth hormone fusion gene exhibited low, tissue-specific basal levels of transgene mRNA expression, resulting in slightly elevated levels of circulating growth hormone that did not lead to a detectable increase in growth. After zinc stimulation, high levels of transgene mRNA expression were induced in a number of tissues; these levels correlated with increased levels of circulating growth hormone, resulting in growth increases of up to 1.5 times the levels of controls and unstimulated transgenic mice. After removal of the zinc stimulus, transgene expression and circulating growth hormone concentrations returned to basal levels. Additional evidence from the pattern of developmental expression of the transgene suggests that zinc is the main regulator of this promoter in mice. The demonstrated regulation and low basal level of expression of the sheep metallothionein 1a promoter make it a candidate for use in other mouse transgenic studies and for use in transgenic livestock, in which regulation of expression is essential. Images PMID:2479830

  16. Tissue-specific metallothionein gene expression in liver and intestine by dexamethasone, interleukin-1. alpha. and elevated zinc status

    SciTech Connect

    Hempe, J.M.; Carlson, J.M.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Intestinal metallothionein has been implicated in the regulation of zinc absorption. Glucocorticoids and cytokines mediate hepatic metallothionein gene expression but the effects of these hormones in the small intestine are unclear. In this experiment, rats were injected ip with dexamethasone (DEX), recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (ILK-1), or ZnSO{sub 4}. Data collected 0. 3, 6,9, or 12 hour post-injection showed tissue specific regulation of metallothionein gene expression. Liver metallothionein mRNA (determined by hybridization analysis) were increased by DEX, IL-1 and ZnSO{sub 4}. In contrast, the intestine was completely refractory to IL-1. DEX did not affect intestinal metallothionein but did enhance mucosal accumulation of {sup 65}Zn by ligated duodenal loops. Absorption of {sup 65}Zn was not affected by IL-1 or DEX but was inversely related to elevated intestinal metallothionein protein induced in response to ZnSO. Plasma zinc was depressed by DEX and IL-1 and elevated in rats injected with ZnSO{sub 4} but was not related to {sup 54}Zn absorption. Tissue-specific induction of metallothionein may constitute a mechanism for independently regulating both tissue zinc distribution and zinc absorption.

  17. Association between metallothionein genes polymorphisms and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Hashizume, Tatsuma; Wakida, Kenji; Satoh, Masahiko; Uchida, Yoko; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Matsuyama, Zenjiro; Kimura, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi; Hozumi, Isao

    2006-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, lethal neurodegenerative disease that selectively affects motor neurons. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are assumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. Metallothioneins (MTs) are self-protective, multifunctional proteins that scavenge ROS. In particular, metallothionein-III (MT-III) has a strong scavenging effect on hydroxyl radicals. MTs have been suggested to have important roles in the pathophysiology of ALS. Therefore we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MT-III and the metallothionein-IIA (MT-IIA) promoter region in 37 Japanese SALS cases and 206 sex-matched healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-direct sequencing or PCR-temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). We detected no SNPs of the MT-III gene in SALS cases and controls, and no detectable association between SALS phenotypes and a SNP of the MT-IIA promoter region. We conclude that gene polymorphisms of MT-IIA promoter region and MT-III gene are not associated with SALS phenotypes in a Japanese population. PMID:16546755

  18. Sensitivity to cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat testicular cells is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Hochadel, J F; Coogan, T P; Koropatnick, J; Waalkes, M P

    1995-02-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal. Although the mechanism of tumor induction is unknown, DNA/metal interactions may be involved. Metallothionein can protect against cadmium toxicity in our previous work it was shown to reduce cadmium genotoxicity in cultured cells. To extend these results, the genotoxicity of cadmium was studied in R2C cells, a rat testicular Leydig cell line. The R2C cells were very sensitive to cadmium-induced single-strand DNA damage (SSD), as measured by alkaline elution. SSD occurred in R2C cells after treatment with 25 and 50 microM CdCl2 for 2 hr. Prior work showed other cells required much higher levels of cadmium (approximately 500 microM) to induce genotoxicity. The genotoxic levels of cadmium (25-50 microM) were not cytotoxic in R2C cells as assessed by a metabolic activity (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of R2C cells with a low cadmium dose (2 microM, 24 hr) had no effect on cadmium-induced SSD, in contrast to prior work in other cells where such pretreatments reduced SSD through metallothionein gene activation. In fact, cadmium or zinc treatments resulted in little or no increase in metallothionein gene expression in R2C cells as determined by Northern blot analysis for metallothionein mRNA using cDNA or oligonucleotide probes and radioimmunoassay for metallothionein protein production. Basal metallothionein mRNA was essentially nondetectable. Induction of a cadmium-binding protein in R2C cells did occur, as determined by Cd-heme assay, but did not induce tolerance to SSD. In vivo, the Leydig cell is a target for cadmium carcinogenicity and its cadmium-binding protein is thought not to be a true metallothionein. These results indicate that R2C cells are sensitive to cadmium-induced genotoxicity and that this sensitivity is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene. PMID:7871536

  19. Expression response of duplicated metallothionein 3 gene to copper stress in Silene vulgaris ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Nevrtalova, Eva; Baloun, Jiri; Hudzieczek, Vojtech; Cegan, Radim; Vyskot, Boris; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Safar, Jan; Milde, David; Hobza, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) were identified as important players in metal metabolism. MT3 gene presents a key metallothionein controlling copper homeostasis in plants. We have selected one cupricolous and one non-cupricolous ecotype to isolate and analyse the MT3 gene in Silene vulgaris. For expression data comparison, we have also included other metal-tolerant ecotypes. Based on a S. vulgaris BAC library screening, we have identified and sequenced a genomic clone containing MT3 gene (SvMT3). We found that SvMT3 gene has been locally duplicated in a tandem arrangement. Expression analysis and complementation studies using yeast mutants showed that both copies of the SvMT3 gene were functional. Moreover, we examined the expression of MT3 gene(s) in selected ecotypes under different copper treatments to show the tissue-specific expression response to copper stress. We demonstrated that higher copper concentrations specifically affected MT3 expression among ecotypes. Our analysis shows that MT3a has similar expression pattern in cupricolous ecotypes while MT3b has common expression features shared by all metallophyte S. vulgaris ecotypes. Our data indicate that down-regulation of MT3b root expression in higher copper concentrations is associated with copper stress. We propose that there might be a specific regulation of SvMT3s transcription depending on the type of heavy metal tolerance. PMID:24748066

  20. CYTOKININ AND METALS REGULATE A TOBACCO METALLOTHIONEIN-LIKE GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To isolate cytokinin responsive genes, Nicotiana plumbaginifolia shoots/rosettes containing the heat shock inducible isopentenyl transferase (ipt) gene (HS-ipt) were heat shocked and used to prepare a cDNA library that was screened with a HS-induced subtractive probe. The cDNA clone pCkn16A1 (Access...

  1. Molecular cloning and expression of the canine metallothionein-III gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, S; Shimada, A; Kodan, A; Kobayashi, K; Morita, T; Yamano, Y; Umemura, T

    1998-01-01

    We have isolated and determined the complete nucleotide sequence of canine metallothionein-III (MT-III) cDNA. The predicted amino acid sequence of the canine MT-III showed a high homology (93%, 87% identity) to that of human and mouse MT-III. The canine MT-III had 2 insertions relative to known mammalian MT-I and MT-II: a threonine after the 4th amino acid and a block of 6 amino acids near the carboxyl terminus. Expression of the canine MT-III mRNA was found exclusively in the central nervous system, where neurons in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus and cerebral cortex showed predominant signals. Images Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:9553716

  2. The Metallothionein Gene, TaMT3, from Tamarix androssowii Confers Cd2+ Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Boru; Yao, Wenjing; Wang, Shengji; Wang, Xinwang; Jiang, Tingbo

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential microelement and low concentration Cd2+ has strong toxicity to plant growth. Plant metallothioneins, a class of low molecular, cystein(Cys)-rich and heavy-metal binding proteins, play an important role in both metal chaperoning and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with their large number of cysteine residues and therefore, protect plants from oxidative damage. In this study, a metallothionein gene, TaMT3, isolated from Tamarix androssowii was transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum) through Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc method, and correctly expressed under the control of 35S promoter. Under Cd2+ stress, the transgenic tobacco showed significant increases of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and chlorophyll concentration, but decreases of peroxidase (POD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation when compared to the non-transgenic tobacco. Vigorous growth of transgenic tobacco was observed at the early development stages, resulting in plant height and fresh weight were significantly larger than those of the non-transgenic tobacco under Cd2+ stress. These results demonstrated that the expression of the exogenous TaMT3 gene increased the ability of ROS cleaning-up, indicating a stronger tolerance to Cd2+ stress. PMID:24918294

  3. Physiological, Diurnal and Stress-Related Variability of Cadmium-Metallothionein Gene Expression in Land Snails

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini-Martha, Veronika; Niederwanger, Michael; Kopp, Renate; Schnegg, Raimund; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial Roman snail Helix pomatia has successfully adapted to strongly fluctuating conditions in its natural soil habitat. Part of the snail’s stress defense strategy is its ability to express Metallothioneins (MTs). These are multifunctional, cysteine-rich proteins that bind and inactivate transition metal ions (Cd2+, Zn2+, Cu+) with high affinity. In Helix pomatia a Cadmium (Cd)-selective, inducible Metallothionein Isoform (CdMT) is mainly involved in detoxification of this harmful metal. In addition, the snail CdMT has been shown to also respond to certain physiological stressors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological and diurnal variability of CdMT gene expression in snails exposed to Cd and non-metallic stressors such as desiccation and oxygen depletion. CdMT gene expression was upregulated by Cd exposure and desiccation, whereas no significant impact on the expression of CdMT was measured due to oxygen depletion. Overall, Cd was clearly more effective as an inducer of the CdMT gene expression compared to the applied non-metallic stressors. In unexposed snails, diurnal rhythmicity of CdMT gene expression was observed with higher mRNA concentrations at night compared to daytime. This rhythmicity was severely disrupted in Cd-exposed snails which exhibited highest CdMT gene transcription rates in the morning. Apart from diurnal rhythmicity, feeding activity also had a strong impact on CdMT gene expression. Although underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, it is clear that factors increasing MT expression variability have to be considered when using MT mRNA quantification as a biomarker for environmental stressors. PMID:26935042

  4. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bryś, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  5. A copper-induced metallothionein gene from Exopalaemon carinicauda and its response to heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Jing; Gui, Tianshu; Sun, Zheng; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-09-01

    A full-length copper-induced metallothionein (EcMT-Cu) cDNA was obtained from Exopalaemon carinicauda (Holthuis) and it contained a 198 bp open reading frame that encoded a peptide with 65 amino acid residues. Twenty-one cysteines were found in deduced amino acid sequence and the cysteine (Cys)-rich characteristic was also reported in different types of metallothioneins from other species. EcMT-Cu mRNA expression profile showed that it is the hepatopancreas specific gene. The expression of EcMT-Cu was extremely different when shrimp were exposed to seawater containing 50 μM CuSO4 or 2.5 μM CdCl2. The expression of EcMT-Cu in shrimp was significantly up-regulated at 12 and 24 h after exposure to CuSO4, however, its expression was not induced compared to that of pretreatment (p>0.05) when shrimp were exposed to CdCl2. The transcript of EcMT-Cu was found to be extremely low at gastrula and nauplius stage and expression of EcMT-Cu could be detected from egg protozoa stage. PMID:24971556

  6. Functional characterization of four metallothionein genes in Daphnia pulex exposed to environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, J.; Glaholt, S.P.; Smith, Z.; Smagghe, G.; Janssen, C.R.; Colbourne, J.K.; Shaw, J.R.; De Schamphelaere, K.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the metallothionein genes (Mt1, Mt2, Mt3, and Mt4) in Daphnia pulex on both molecular and ecotoxicological level. We therefore conducted a bioinformatical analysis of the gene location and predicted protein sequence, and screened the upstream flanking region for regulatory elements. The number of these elements and their positions relative to the start codon varied strongly among the four genes and even among two gene duplicates (Mt1A and Mt1B), suggesting different roles of the four proteins in the organisms’ response to stress. We subsequently conducted a chronic 16-day exposure of D. pulex to different environmental stressors (at sublethal levels causing approximately 50% reduction in reproduction). Based on prior knowledge, we exposed them to the metals Cd, Cu, and Ni, the moulting hormone hydroxyecdysone (20E), and the oxidative stressors cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), and paraquat (Pq). We then compared mRNA expression levels of the four Mt genes under these stress conditions with control conditions in “The Chosen One” clone (TCO), for which the full genome was sequenced and annotated. All together, the mRNA expression results under the different stress regimes indicate that different Mt genes may play different and various roles in the response of D. pulex to stress and that some (but not all) of the differences among the four genes could be related to the pattern of regulatory elements in their upstream flanking region. PMID:22266576

  7. Gene response profiles for Daphnia pulex exposed to the environmental stressor cadmium reveals novel crustacean metallothioneins

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Joseph R; Colbourne, John K; Davey, Jennifer C; Glaholt, Stephen P; Hampton, Thomas H; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic research tools such as microarrays are proving to be important resources to study the complex regulation of genes that respond to environmental perturbations. A first generation cDNA microarray was developed for the environmental indicator species Daphnia pulex, to identify genes whose regulation is modulated following exposure to the metal stressor cadmium. Our experiments revealed interesting changes in gene transcription that suggest their biological roles and their potentially toxicological features in responding to this important environmental contaminant. Results Our microarray identified genes reported in the literature to be regulated in response to cadmium exposure, suggested functional attributes for genes that share no sequence similarity to proteins in the public databases, and pointed to genes that are likely members of expanded gene families in the Daphnia genome. Genes identified on the microarray also were associated with cadmium induced phenotypes and population-level outcomes that we experimentally determined. A subset of genes regulated in response to cadmium exposure was independently validated using quantitative-realtime (Q-RT)-PCR. These microarray studies led to the discovery of three genes coding for the metal detoxication protein metallothionein (MT). The gene structures and predicted translated sequences of D. pulex MTs clearly place them in this gene family. Yet, they share little homology with previously characterized MTs. Conclusion The genomic information obtained from this study represents an important first step in characterizing microarray patterns that may be diagnostic to specific environmental contaminants and give insights into their toxicological mechanisms, while also providing a practical tool for evolutionary, ecological, and toxicological functional gene discovery studies. Advances in Daphnia genomics will enable the further development of this species as a model organism for the environmental sciences

  8. Structure and origin of a tandem duplication of a Drosophila metallothionein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, E.; Maroni, G.

    1987-01-01

    A strain of cadmium-resistant Drosophila was isolated that contained a chromosomal duplication of the metallothionein gene, Mtn. This duplication was a direct, tandem repeat of 2.2 kilobases of DNA: 228 bases of 5' flanking DNA, the entire transcription unit, and 1.4 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA. The entire duplication was cloned and DNA sequences of the regions relevant to the duplication process were determined. Comparison of the sequences of the 5' and 3' boundaries revealed no extensive regions of similarity, thus indicating that this duplication was formed by nonhomologous breakage and reunion. Recently, results of similar analyses by other investigators have suggested that this process was involved in the origin of three other eukaryotic duplications. The authors have observed a chi-like sequence near one of the boundaries of each duplication, and therefore suggest that this sequence may be important in generating one of the breaks required for duplication formation.

  9. METALLOTHIONEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION AS AN INDICATOR OF METAL EXPOSURE IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metallothionein is a cysteine rich, low molecular weight, metal binding protein. Basal levels of endogenous metallothioneins (MT) have been reported in all eucaryotes. MT has been shown to play an essential role in regulating physiological requirements of essential metals such a...

  10. Cloning metallothionein gene in Zacco platypus and its potential as an exposure biomarker against cadmium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Cheolmin; Kim, Jungkon; Kim, Woo-Keun; Shin, Hyun Suk; Lim, Eun-Suk; Lee, Jin Wuk; Kim, Sunmi; Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Sung-Kyu; Choi, Cheol Young; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-07-01

    Zacco platypus, pale chub, is an indigenous freshwater fish of East Asia including Korea and has many useful characteristics as indicator species for water pollution. While utility of Z. platypus as an experimental species has been recognized, genetic-level information is very limited and warrants extensive research. Metallothionein (MT) is widely used and well-known biomarker for heavy metal exposure in many experimental species. In the present study, we cloned MT in Z. platypus and evaluated its utility as a biomarker for metal exposure. For this purpose, we sequenced complete complementary DNA (cDNA) of MT in Z. platypus and carried out phylogenetic analysis with its sequences. The transcription-level responses of MT gene following the exposure to CdCl2 were also assessed to validate the utility of this gene as an exposure biomarker. Analysis of cDNA sequence of MT gene demonstrated high conformity with those of other fish. MT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and enzymatic MT content significantly increased following CdCl2 exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. The level of CdCl2 that resulted in significant MT changes in Z. platypus was within the range that was reported from other fish. The MT gene of Z. platypus sequenced in the present study can be used as a useful biomarker for heavy metal exposure in the aquatic environment of Korea and other countries where this freshwater fish species represents the ecosystem. PMID:26092240

  11. Molecular Characterization of a Copper Metallothionein Gene From a Ciliate Tetrahymena farahensis.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad Tariq; Shakoori, Farah Rauf; Zulifqar, Soumble; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Al-Ghanim, Khalid; Mehboob, Shahid; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2016-08-01

    A new copper metallothionein (TfCuMT) gene has been identified from a locally isolated ciliate Tetrahymena farahensis. It contains 327 nucleotides encoding a peptide chain of 108 amino acids and belongs to class MTT2 and subfamily 7b. Amplification from both gDNA and mRNA confirmed the intronless nature of this gene. Like most of the metallohtioneins, cysteine residues contribute nearly 30% content with the specific CKC motifs. Structural repeats present in peptide sequence of TfCuMT indicate internal duplication of gene at some stage of gene evolution. The predicted model of copper metallothionein protein showed that copper ions are mainly chelated by thiol sulfur of cysteine residues and are embedded in the folds of polypeptide chain. For in vivo expression of TfCuMT in Escherichia coli host cells the classical stop codons, which coded for glutamine in the ciliate were mutated to CAA and CAG through site directed mutagenesis. The mutated gene showed higher expression in pET28a expression vector compared with pET21a. Optimum expression was obtained after 6-8 h of 0.1 mM IPTG induction. Stability of His tagged TfCuMT in 5% SDS was low, with half-life of about 104 min. Presence of 1.0 μM copper increased the expression level by 1.65-fold. Presence of 100 μM Cysteine in culture medium caused 2.4-fold increase in expression level. His tagged TfCuMT was purified through affinity chromatography using NTN-His binding resin in the presence of 0.1 M imidazole and NaCl. The modeled structure of the TfCuMT showed a cleft for Cu binding with correct orientation of Cys residues in the motif CKC. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1843-1854, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754785

  12. Three-dimensional solution structure of mouse [Cd7]-metallothionein-1 by homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, K.; Oz, G.; Otvos, J. D.; Armitage, I. M.

    1999-01-01

    Sequential 1H-NMR assignments of mouse [Cd7]-metallothionein-1 (MT1) have been carried out by standard homonuclear NMR methods and the use of an accordion-heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (HMQC) experiment for establishing the metal, 113Cd2+, to cysteine connectivities. The three-dimensional structure was then calculated using the distance constraints from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectroscopy spectra and the Cys-Cd connectivities as input for a distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing protocol in X-PLOR 3.851. Similar to the mammalian MT2 isoforms, the homologous primary structure of MT1 suggested two separate domains, each containing one metal cluster. Because there were no interdomain constraints, the structure calculation for the N-terminal beta- and the C-terminal alpha-domain were carried out separately. The structures are based on 409 NMR constraints, consisting of 381 NOEs and 28 cysteine-metal connectivities. The only elements of regular secondary structure found were two short stretches of 3(10) helices along with some half-turns in the alpha-domain. Structural comparison with rat liver MT2 showed high similarity, with the beta-domain structure in mouse MT1 showing evidence of increased flexibility compared to the same domain in MT2. The latter was reflected by the presence of fewer interresidue NOEs, no slowly exchanging backbone amide protons, and enhanced cadmium-cadmium exchange rates found in the beta-domain of MT1. PMID:10631978

  13. Cloning and characterization of a new multi-stress inducible metallothionein gene in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chengjie; Miao, Wei

    2006-06-01

    A new multi-stress-inducible metallothionein (MT) gene isoform has been cloned and characterized from the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Both the 5'- and 3'-UT regions of the Tp-MT2 gene are very different from the previously reported Tp-MT1 isoform in this organism and from other described MT genes in Tetrahymena pigmentosa and Tetrahymena thermophila. The putative protein sequence of Tp-MT2 contains cysteine clusters with characteristics of the typical Tetrahymena Cd-inducible MT genes. However, the sequence has a special feature of four intragenic tandem repeats within its first half, with a conserved structural pattern x(5/8)CCCx(6)CCx(6)CxCxNCxCCK. To investigate the transcriptional activities of both Tp-MT2 and Tp-MT1 genes toward heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn) and H(2)O(2), the mRNA levels of these two isoforms were evaluated by means of real-time quantitative PCR. Results showed that Tp-MT2 had a higher basal expression level than Tp-MT1 and both genes were induced by Cd, Hg, Cu, and Zn ions after short exposure (1h), although to different extents. Cd was the most effective metal inducer of both two isoforms, but the relative expression level of Tp-MT2 was much lower than that of Tp-MT1. Different expression patterns were also shown between the two genes when treated with Cd over a period of 24h. We suggest that TpMT-1 plays the role of a multi-inducible stress gene, while TpMT-2 may have a more specific function in basal metal homeostasis although it may have undergone a functional differentiation process. The putative functional significance and evolutionary mode of the TpMT-2 isoform are discussed. PMID:16621695

  14. Gene expression analysis of metallothionein and mineral elements uptake in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Kısa, Dursun; Öztürk, Lokman; Tekin, Şaban

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metals such as Cd are considered to be the most important pollutants in soil contamination. Cd is a non-essential element adversely affecting plant growth and development, and it has caused some physiological and molecular changes. Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, and metal binding proteins. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the MT gene expression levels and minerals uptake in the tissues of Solanum lycopersicum exposed to Cd. The transcriptional expression of the MT genes was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. The MT genes were regulated by the Cd and the mineral elements uptake changed tissue type and applied doses. The MT1 and MT2 transcript levels increased in the roots, the leaves and the fruits of the tomato. The MT3 and MT4 transcript pattern changed according to the tissue types. The Cd treatment on the growth medium increased the Mg, Ca, and Fe content in both the leaves and fruits of the tomato. However, the Cd affected the mineral levels in the roots depending on the mineral types and doses. Also, the Cd content increased in the roots, the leaves, and the fruits of the tomato, respectively. The results presented in this study show that Cd has synergistic and/or antagonistic effects on minerals depending on the tissue types. These results indicate that the MT1 and MT2 expression pattern increased together with the Mg, Ca, and Fe content in both the leaves and the fruits of the tomato. PMID:27363704

  15. Comparison of metallothionein gene expression and nonprotein thiols in ten Arabidopsis ecotypes. Correlation with copper tolerance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A; Taiz, L

    1995-11-01

    Seedlings of 10 Arabidopsis ecotypes were compared with respect to copper tolerance, expression of two metallothionein genes (MT1 and MT2), and nonprotein thiol levels. MT1 was uniformly expressed in all treatments, and MT2 was copper inducible in all 10 ecotypes. MT1 and MT2 mRNA levels were compared with various growth parameters for the 10 ecotypes in the presence of 40 microM Cu2+. The best correlation (R = 0.99) was obtained between MT2 mRNA and the rate of root extension. MT2 mRNA levels also paralleled the recovery phase following inhibition by copper. Induction of MT2 mRNA was initiated at copper concentrations below the threshold for growth inhibition. In cross-induction experiments, Ag+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, and heat shock all induced significant levels of MT2 gene expression, whereas Al3+ and salicylic acid did not. The correlation between copper tolerance and nonprotein thiol levels in the 10 ecotypes was not statistically significant. However, 2 ecotypes, Ws and Enkheim, previously shown to exhibit an acclimation response, had the highest levels of nonprotein thiols. We conclude that MT2 gene expression may be the primary determinant of ecotypic differences in the copper tolerance of nonpretreated Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:8552721

  16. Impact of metallothionein gene polymorphisms on the risk of lung cancer in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Hideo; Hirano, Minoru; Ito, Hidemi; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins that act as antioxidants. A case-control study was conducted to assess the effects of gene polymorphisms in the MT region on the risk of lung cancer in Japanese subjects: 769 lung cancer cases and 939 non-cancer controls. Associations were evaluated using logistic regression models with adjustment for potential confounders (age, sex, and lifestyle factors including smoking, drinking, and green-yellow vegetable intake). We found five polymorphisms in the MT-1 gene region that showed statistically significant associations with lung cancer. Of these polymorphisms, rs7196890 showed the strongest association (odds ratio: 1.30, P = 0.004, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-1.55). The impact of the polymorphism decreased with the increase of smoking, and virtually no association with lung cancer was observed among heavy smokers whose pack-year values were 30 or more (odds ratio: 1.02, P = 0.93, 95% confidence interval: 0.67-1.55). These results suggest that polymorphisms in the MT gene are moderately associated with the risk of lung cancer and that the associations are modified by lifestyle factors. PMID:25174824

  17. Stress to cadmium monitored by metallothionein gene induction in Paracentrotus lividus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Zito, Francesca; Schröder, Heinz-C.; Müller, Isabel; Müller, Werner E. G.; Matranga, Valeria

    2003-01-01

    We used sea urchin embryos as bioindicators to study the effects of exposure to sublethal cadmium concentrations on the expression of the metallothionein (MT) gene stress marker. For this purpose, the complete complementary deoxyribonucleic acid of the species Paracentrotus lividus (Pl) was cloned and sequenced. Northern blot analysis showed that basal levels of Pl-MT messenger ribonucleic acid, having an apparent size of 700 bases, are expressed in all developmental stages analyzed, from early cleavage to pluteus. However, when embryos were continuously cultured in sublethal CdCl2 concentrations and harvested at cleavage, swimming blastula, late gastrula, and pluteus stages (6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after fertilization, respectively), a time- and dose-dependent increase in the transcription levels of the Pl-MT gene was observed. Interestingly, although microscopical inspection revealed the occurrence of abnormalities only after 24 hours of exposure to the pollutant, Northern blot and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed significant increases in Pl-MT expression levels already after 12 and 6 hours of exposure, respectively. Therefore, this study confirms the validity of MT as marker of exposure and provides evidence that Pl-MT and sea urchin embryos can be a potentially valuable and sensitive model for testing in very short periods of time seawaters heavily contaminated with cadmium. PMID:14984056

  18. Gains, Losses and Changes of Function after Gene Duplication: Study of the Metallothionein Family

    PubMed Central

    Moleirinho, Ana; Carneiro, João; Matthiesen, Rune; Silva, Raquel M.; Amorim, António; Azevedo, Luísa

    2011-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are small proteins involved in heavy metal detoxification and protection against oxidative stress and cancer. The mammalian MT family originated through a series of duplication events which generated four major genes (MT1 to MT4). MT1 and MT2 encode for ubiquitous proteins, while MT3 and MT4 evolved to accomplish specific roles in brain and epithelium, respectively. Herein, phylogenetic, transcriptional and polymorphic analyses are carried out to expose gains, losses and diversification of functions that characterize the evolutionary history of the MT family. The phylogenetic analyses show that all four major genes originated through a single duplication event prior to the radiation of mammals. Further expansion of the MT1 gene has occurred in the primate lineage reaching in humans a total of 13 paralogs, five of which are pseudogenes. In humans, the reading frame of all five MT1 pseudogenes is reconstructed by sequence homology with a functional duplicate revealing that loss of invariant cysteines is the most frequent event accounting for pseudogeneisation. Expression analyses based on EST counts and RT-PCR experiments show that, as for MT1 and MT2, human MT3 is also ubiquitously expressed while MT4 transcripts are present in brain, testes, esophagus and mainly in thymus. Polymorphic variation reveals two deleterious mutations (Cys30Tyr and Arg31Trp) in MT4 with frequencies reaching about 30% in African and Asian populations suggesting the gene is inactive in some individuals and physiological compensation for its loss must arise from a functional equivalent. Altogether our findings provide novel data on the evolution and diversification of MT gene duplicates, a valuable resource for understanding the vast set of biological processes in which these proteins are involved. PMID:21541013

  19. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog-dependent.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R; Glaholt, Stephen P; Colbourne, John K; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2013-10-15

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1-mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  20. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog- dependent

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R.; Glaholt, Stephen P.; Colbourne, John K.; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC.

    2013-01-01

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1–mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  1. Occurrence of metallothionein gene smtA in synechococcus Tx-20 and other blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.J.; Gupta, A.; Huckle, J.W.; Jackson, P.; Whitton, B.A. )

    1990-06-01

    Blue-green algae are often abundant at Zn- and Cd-contaminated sites. In order to understand the mechanisms associated with Zn- and Cd-tolerance, we have isolated a metallothionein gene, designated smtA, in Synechococcus Tx-20 (- Pcc 6301 - Anacystis nidulans), a strain apparently obtained from an unpolluted site. The gene was cloned and sequenced, and its expression investigated in a range of heavy-metal-tolerant strains of the same organism obtained by stepwise adaptation. The polymerase chain reaction was used to probe for the possible presence of the homologous gene in a range of other strains (especially Synechococcus) isolated from sites without and with heavy metal contamination.

  2. Cloning, characterization, and expression of cadmium-induced metallothionein-2 gene from earthworm Pheretima aspergillum (E. Perrier).

    PubMed

    Gong, L; Li, W; Li, J; Li, W E; Wu, W R; Yu, L W

    2015-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous metal-binding, cysteine-rich proteins, associated with metal accumulation and thus providing protection against toxic heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd). To investigate the mechanisms of enrichment of Cd in the earthworm Pheretima aspergillum, we isolated and cloned metallothionein-2 (MT-2) cDNA (538 bp) from P. aspergillum, analyzed its sequence, and examined MT-2 transcription levels by relative quantitative real-time PCR under different concentrations of Cd. The sequence of P. aspergillum MT-2 cDNA and its putative amino acid sequence were highly similar to sequences from other earthworms. The induction with Cd increased the MT-2 gene transcription level in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, earthworm recombinant MT-2 exhibited high Cd bioaccumulation ability in vitro. These results suggested that MT-2 plays an important role in tolerance and accumulation of Cd in P. aspergillum. PMID:26681024

  3. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of technetium-99-metallothionein-conjugated mouse monoclonal antibody B72. 3 in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Burchiel, S.W.; Hadjian, R.A.; Hladik, W.B.; Drozynski, C.A.; Tolman, G.L.; Haber, S.B.; Gallagher, B.M. )

    1989-08-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of ({sup 99m}Tc)metallothionein-conjugated B72.3 ((Tc)MT-B72.3) in Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that were performed as part of the preclinical evaluation of (Tc)MT-B72.3. The B72.3-MT conjugate was studied at three doses of B72.3 ranging from 0.03 mg/kg to 1 mg/kg to determine whether a relationship existed between the dose of total antibody administered intravenously and the biodistribution and clearance of the radiolabeled protein. Results indicated that (Tc)MT-B72.3 distributes rapidly to central body cavity organs and that there was no difference in the rate of blood elimination for the three doses of B72.3 studied. The terminal phase of blood elimination was found to be 26.2 +/- 6.1 hr for the combined groups of monkeys. Approximately one-half of injected {sup 99m}Tc activity was recovered in the urine within 24 hr. A second purpose of these studies was to evaluate the overall immunogenicity of the mouse monoclonal B72.3 IgG1 antibody in Rhesus monkeys. These results demonstrated that a single i.v. exposure to mouse monoclonal B72.3 at doses of 0.3 mg/kg or greater elicited antibody production to B72.3 in Rhesus monkeys within 3 wk. Analysis of (Tc)MT-B72.3 biodistribution and clearance in monkeys with circulating levels of antibodies to B72.3 (immunized monkeys) revealed that the liver was the primary site of clearance of the presumed immune complex and that blood elimination was greatly accelerated.

  4. Enhancement of metallothionein gene expression in male Wistar (WF/NCr) rats by treatment with calmodulin inhibitors: potential role of calcium regulatory pathways in metallothionein induction.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Waalkes, M P

    1994-03-01

    Recent reports indicate that calmodulin inhibitors (CIs) can modify cadmium toxicity in rodents. For instance, pretreatment with CIs prevents cadmium-induced testicular damage in mice and substantially reduces such damage in rats, the latter effect coinciding with significant alterations in cadmium distribution. Although the basis of these effects is unclear, it is frequently observed that metal-binding proteins such as metallothionein (MT) are involved in acquired tolerance to cadmium and this could be true of tolerance induced by CIs. Thus, we examined the effects of various CIs on MT gene expression. Treatment of WF/NCr rats with known CIs, including trifluoperazine (TPZ), N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), calmidazolium (CMZ), chlorpromazine (CPZ), and the calcium ionophore, A23187, increased hepatic MT gene expression, as assessed by mRNA levels, in all cases. Furthermore, hepatic MT protein levels were 40 to 180 micrograms MT/g wet wt (g ww) in rats treated with CIs or A23187 compared to control levels of 10 micrograms MT/g ww. Treatment with CPZ and CMZ did not increase renal MT protein after exposure, although increases in renal MT mRNA were observed. However, the CIs TPZ and W7 and the calcium ionophore increased both renal MT protein and MT mRNA levels. In contrast, no increases in testicular MT mRNA or the testicular cadmium binding protein (TCBP) levels were seen with any of the treatments. Treatment with CIs or A23187 produced increases in zinc levels in the liver, but not in the kidneys or testes. These results indicate that CIs, such as TPZ, W7, CMZ, and CPZ, as well as the calcium ionophore A23187, have a marked stimulatory effect on hepatic and renal MT gene expression and that calcium regulatory pathways may play an important role in this induction of MT. PMID:8128501

  5. Characterization of three distinct metallothionein genes of the Ag-hyperaccumulating ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita strobiliformis.

    PubMed

    Hložková, Kateřina; Matěnová, Michaela; Žáčková, Petra; Strnad, Hynek; Hršelová, Hana; Hroudová, Miluše; Kotrba, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms evolved in eukaryotes to handle heavy metals involve cytosolic, metal-binding metallothioneins (MTs). We have previously documented that the sequestration of silver (Ag) in the Ag-hyperaccumulating Amanita strobiliformis is dominated by 34-amino-acid (AA) AsMT1a, 1b, and 1c isoforms. Here we show that in addition to AsMT1a, 1b, and 1c isogenes, the fungus has two other MT genes: AsMT2 encoding a 34-AA AsMT2 similar to MTs known from other species, but unrelated to AsMT1s; AsMT3 coding for a 62-AA AsMT3 that shares substantial identity with as-yet-uncharacterized conserved peptides predicted in agaricomycetes. Transcription of AsMT1s and AsMT3 in the A. strobiliformis mycelium was specifically inducible by treatments with Ag or copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) or cadmium (Cd), respectively; AsMT2 showed a moderate upregulation in the presence of Cd. Expression of AsMTs in the metal-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that all AsMTs confer increased Cd tolerance (AsMT3 proved the most effective) and that, unlike AsMT1 and AsMT2, AsMT3 can protect the yeasts against Zn toxicity. The highest level of Cu tolerance was observed with yeasts expressing AsMT1a. Our data indicate that A. strobiliformis can specifically employ different MT genes for functions in the cellular handling of Ag and Cu (AsMT1s) and Zn (AsMT3). PMID:26895864

  6. Evidence for co-regulation of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and metallothionein gene expression in yeast through transcriptional control by copper via the ACE 1 factor.

    PubMed

    Carri, M T; Galiazzo, F; Ciriolo, M R; Rotilio, G

    1991-01-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain DTY26, lacking ACE1, the protein mediator for the induction of metallothionein gene expression, is unable to increase Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase mRNA in response to copper. In the wild-type strain DTY22 transcription of both Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and metallothionein genes is induced by copper and silver, as expected on the basis of previous results indicating that ACE1 binds only Ag(I) besides Cu(I). We conclude that at the transcriptional level Cu,ZnSOD is co-regulated with metallothionein. Furthermore, structural similarities between the two promoters were found, which could explain the co-regulation effect and the quantitative differences in the response of the two genes to copper. PMID:1991520

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of novel metallothionein (MT) gene in the polychaete Perinereis nuntia exposed to metals.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Ra, Kongtae; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Au, Doris W T; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2011-08-01

    To report a novel metallothionein (MT) gene and evaluate its potency as a biomarker, we clone this MT gene and measured the expression levels in the metal-exposed polychaete Perinereis nuntia. Accumulated metal contents and metallothionein-like proteins (MTLPs), which have been recognized as potential biomarkers, were compared with the relative mRNA expressions of the MT gene of P. nuntia (Pn-MT). In addition, the metal-binding affinity was estimated by recombinant Pn-MT protein. Pn-MT having high cysteine residues with three metal response elements in the promoter region closely clusters with those of other invertebrates. The accumulation patterns of metals were dependent on the exposure times in lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and copper (Cu) exposure. Particularly, both MTLP levels and relative mRNA expressions of MT were increased with accumulated metal contents and exposure time in P. nuntia exposed to Pb and Cd. There was no significant modulation of the Pn-MT gene in polychaetes exposed to Zn and As. However, the metal-binding ability of the recombinant Pn-MT protein provides a clear evidence for a high affinity of MT to several metal elements. These results suggest that Pn-MT would play an important role in the detoxification and/or sequestration of specific metals (e.g., Pb and Cd) in P. nuntia and have potential as a molecular biomarker in the monitoring of the marine environment using a polychaete. PMID:22828888

  8. Coordinated responses of phytochelatin synthase and metallothionein genes in black mangrove, Avicennia germinans, exposed to cadmium and copper.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mendoza, Daniel; Moreno, Adriana Quiroz; Zapata-Perez, Omar

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the role of phytochelatins and metallothioneins in heavy metal tolerance of black mangrove Avicennia germinans, 3-month-old seedlings were exposed to cadmium or copper for 30 h, under hydroponic conditions. Degenerate Mt2 and PCS primers were synthesized based on amino acid and nucleotide alignment sequences reported for Mt2 and PCS in other plant species found in GenBank. Total RNA was isolated from A. germinans leaves and two partial fragments of metallothionein and phytochelatin synthase genes were isolated. Gene expression was evaluated with reverse transcripatase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification technique. Temporal analysis showed that low Cd2+ and Cu2+ concentrations caused a slight (but not significant) increase in AvMt2 expression after a 16 h exposure time, while AvPCS expression showed a significant increase under the same conditions but only after 4h. Results strongly suggest that the rapid increase in AvPCS expression may contribute to Cd2+ and Cu2+ detoxification. Moreover, we found that A. germinans has the capacity to over-express both genes (AvMt2 and AvPCS), which may constitute a coordinated detoxification response mechanism targeting non-essential metals. Nonetheless, our results confirm that AvPCS was the most active gene involved in the regulation of essential metals (e.g., Cu2+) in A. germinans leaves. PMID:17582515

  9. Two Metallothionein Genes in Oxya chinensis: Molecular Characteristics, Expression Patterns and Roles in Heavy Metal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Kou, Lihua; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich, heavy metal-binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. In the present study, we cloned two MT genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) from Oxya chinensis, analyzed the expression patterns of the OcMT transcripts in different tissues and at varying developmental stages using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), evaluated the functions of these two MTs using RNAi and recombinant proteins in an E. coli expression system. The full-length cDNAs of OcMT1 and OcMT2 encoded 40 and 64 amino acid residues, respectively. We found Cys-Cys, Cys-X-Cys and Cys-X-Y-Z-Cys motifs in OcMT1 and OcMT2. These motifs might serve as primary chelating sites, as in other organisms. These characteristics suggest that OcMT1 and OcMT2 may be involved in heavy metal detoxification by capturing the metals. Two OcMT were expressed at all developmental stages, and the highest levels were found in the eggs. Both transcripts were expressed in all eleven tissues examined, with the highest levels observed in the brain and optic lobes, followed by the fat body. The expression of OcMT2 was also relatively high in the ovaries. The functions of OcMT1 and OcMT2 were explored using RNA interference (RNAi) and different concentrations and treatment times for the three heavy metals. Our results indicated that mortality increased significantly from 8.5% to 16.7%, and this increase was both time- and dose-dependent. To evaluate the abilities of these two MT proteins to confer heavy metal tolerance to E. coli, the bacterial cells were transformed with pET-28a plasmids containing the OcMT genes. The optical densities of both the MT-expressing and control cells decreased with increasing concentrations of CdCl2. Nevertheless, the survival rates of the MT-overexpressing cells were higher than those of the controls. Our results suggest that these two genes play important roles in heavy metal detoxification in O. chinensis. PMID:25391131

  10. Two metallothionein genes in Oxya chinensis: molecular characteristics, expression patterns and roles in heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Kou, Lihua; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich, heavy metal-binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. In the present study, we cloned two MT genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) from Oxya chinensis, analyzed the expression patterns of the OcMT transcripts in different tissues and at varying developmental stages using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), evaluated the functions of these two MTs using RNAi and recombinant proteins in an E. coli expression system. The full-length cDNAs of OcMT1 and OcMT2 encoded 40 and 64 amino acid residues, respectively. We found Cys-Cys, Cys-X-Cys and Cys-X-Y-Z-Cys motifs in OcMT1 and OcMT2. These motifs might serve as primary chelating sites, as in other organisms. These characteristics suggest that OcMT1 and OcMT2 may be involved in heavy metal detoxification by capturing the metals. Two OcMT were expressed at all developmental stages, and the highest levels were found in the eggs. Both transcripts were expressed in all eleven tissues examined, with the highest levels observed in the brain and optic lobes, followed by the fat body. The expression of OcMT2 was also relatively high in the ovaries. The functions of OcMT1 and OcMT2 were explored using RNA interference (RNAi) and different concentrations and treatment times for the three heavy metals. Our results indicated that mortality increased significantly from 8.5% to 16.7%, and this increase was both time- and dose-dependent. To evaluate the abilities of these two MT proteins to confer heavy metal tolerance to E. coli, the bacterial cells were transformed with pET-28a plasmids containing the OcMT genes. The optical densities of both the MT-expressing and control cells decreased with increasing concentrations of CdCl2. Nevertheless, the survival rates of the MT-overexpressing cells were higher than those of the controls. Our results suggest that these two genes play important roles in heavy metal detoxification in O. chinensis. PMID:25391131

  11. The Fungus Tremella mesenterica Encodes the Longest Metallothionein Currently Known: Gene, Protein and Metal Binding Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiyu; Calatayud, Sara; Palacios, Òscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2016-01-01

    Fungal Cu-thioneins, and among them, the paradigmatic Neurospora crassa metallothionein (MT) (26 residues), were once considered as the shortest MTs -the ubiquitous, versatile metal-binding proteins- among all organisms, and thus representatives of their primeval forms. Nowadays, fungal MTs of diverse lengths and sequence features are known, following the huge heterogeneity of the Kingdom of Fungi. At the opposite end of N. crassa MT, the recently reported Cryptococcus neoformans CnMT1 and CnMT2 (122 and 186 aa) constitute the longest reported fungal MTs, having been identified as virulence factors of this pathogen. CnMTs are high-capacity Cu-thioneins that appear to be built by tandem amplification of a basic unit, a 7-Cys segment homologous to N. crassa MT. Here, we report the in silico, in vivo and in vitro study of a still longer fungal MT, belonging to Tremella mesenterica (TmMT), a saprophytic ascomycete. The TmMT gene has 10 exons, and it yields a 779-bp mature transcript that encodes a 257 residue-long protein. This MT is also built by repeated fragments, but of variable number of Cys: six units of the 7-Cys building blocks-CXCX3CSCPPGXCXCAXCP-, two fragments of six Cys, plus three Cys at the N-terminus. TmMT metal binding abilities have been analyzed through the spectrophotometric and spectrometric characterization of its recombinant Zn-, Cd- and Cu-complexes. Results allow it to be unambiguous classified as a Cu-thionein, also of extraordinary coordinating capacity. According to this feature, when the TmMT cDNA is expressed in MT-devoid yeast cells, it is capable of restoring a high Cu tolerance level. Since it is not obvious that T. mesenterica shares the same physiological needs for a high capacity Cu-binding protein with C. neoformans, the existence of this peculiar MT might be better explained on the basis of a possible role in Cu-handling for the Cu-enzymes responsible in lignin degradation pathways. PMID:26882011

  12. Transgenic Brassica napus and tobacco plants harboring human metallothionein gene are resistant to toxic levels of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, S. )

    1989-04-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned human metallothionein-II (MT-II) processed gene was introduced into Brassica napus and tobacco cells on a disarmed Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transformants expressed MT protein as a nuclear trait, and in a constitutive manner. Seeds from self-fertilized transgenic plants were germinated on media containing toxic levels of cadmium and scored for tolerance/susceptibility to this heavy metal. The growth of root and shoot of transformed seedlings was unaffected by up to 100{mu}M CdCl{sub 2}, whereas, control seedlings showed severe inhibition of root and shoot growth and chlorosis of leaves. The results of these experiments indicate that agriculturally important plants such a B. napus can be genetically engineered for heavy metals tolerance/sequestration and eventually for partitioning of heavy metals in non-consumed plant tissues.

  13. Identification, cloning and sequencing of a novel stress inducible metallothionein gene from locally isolated Tetrahymena tropicalis lahorensis.

    PubMed

    Shuja, Rukhsana N; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2007-12-15

    A novel cadmium inducible metallothionein (TMCd1) gene has been identified and sequenced from the locally isolated ciliate, Tetrahymena tropicalis lahorensis from industrial effluents. The TMCd1 gene encodes 471 nucleotides, with TGA as the stop codon and TAA coding for glutamine. This new gene is quite different from the previously reported MT genes in Tetrahymena pyriformis and Tetrahymena pigmentosa. However, it shows 78% homology with four different Cd-MT genes reported from Tetrahymena thermophila. A TATA box is located in the 5' flanking region at nucleotide 34-38 upstream region of ATG. The TMCd1 gene is intronless like many other genes isolated from Tetrahymena species. The amino acids sequence of TMCd1 has a special feature of three CCCX(6)CCX(6)CCCX(6)CC and two CCX(6)CXCX(2)CXCC intragenic tandem repeats with a conserved structural pattern of cysteine. The translated protein of TMCd1 contains 30.12% cysteine residues, which is a characteristic of a typical Tetrahymena Cd inducible MT genes. On the basis of 78% homology of nucleotide sequence of genomic DNA and its cDNA, TMCd1 has been considered as a new gene being reported from Tetrahymena tropicalis from this part of the world. PMID:17949926

  14. A cadmium metallothionein gene of ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda (Holthuis, 1950) and its expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Jing; Xiang, Jianhai

    2013-11-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a group of low molecular weight cysteine-rich proteins capable of binding heavy metal ions. A cadmium metallothionein ( EcMT — Cd) cDNA with a 189 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 62 amino acid protein was obtained from Exopalaemon carinicauda. Seventeen cysteines were in the deduced amino acid sequence, and the cysteine (Cys)-rich characteristic was revealed in different metallothioneins in other species. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence did not contain any aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp), and phenylalanine (Phe). EcMT—Cd mRNA was expressed in all tested tissues (the ovary, muscle, stomach, and hepatopancreas), and its expression profiles in the hepatopancreas were very different when shrimps were exposed to seawater containing either 50 μmol/L CuSO4 or 2.5 μmol/L CdCl 2. The expression of EcMT-Cd was significantly up-regulated in shrimp exposed to CuSO4 for 12 h and down-regulated in shrimps exposed to CdCl2 for 12 h. After 24 h exposure to both metals, its expression was down-regulated. By contrast, at 48 h the EcMT-Cd was up-regulated in test shrimps exposed to CdCl2. The transcript of EcMT-Cd was very low or even absent before the zoea stage, and the expression of EcMT-Cd was detected from mysis larvae-I, then its expression began to rise. In conclusion, a cadmium MT exists in E. carinicauda that is expressed in different tissues and during different developmental stages, and responds to the challenge with heavy metal ions, which provides a clue to understanding the function of cadmium MT.

  15. Metallothionein gene expression is regulated by serum factors and activators of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Imbra, R J; Karin, M

    1987-01-01

    The exact physiological role of metallothionein (MT) is not clear. It has been suggested that these low-molecular-weight, highly inducible, heavy-metal-binding proteins serve in the regulation of intracellular Zn metabolism. Among the Zn-requiring systems are several enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Therefore, during periods of active DNA synthesis there is likely to be an increased demand for Zn, which could be met by elevated MT synthesis. For that reason, we examined whether stimulation of cellular proliferation leads to increased expression of MT. We report here that treatment of cultured mammalian cells with serum growth factors and activators of protein kinase C, all of which are known to have growth stimulatory activity, led to induction of MT mRNA. One of the required steps in the signal transduction pathways triggered by these agents, ending in MT induction, appears to be the activation of protein kinase C. Images PMID:3600629

  16. Cancer gene discovery in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Jenny; van der Weyden, Louise; Hubbard, Tim; Adams, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The elucidation of the human and mouse genome sequence and developments in high-throughput genome analysis, and in computational tools, have made it possible to profile entire cancer genomes. In parallel with these advances mouse models of cancer have evolved into a powerful tool for cancer gene discovery. Here we discuss the approaches that may be used for cancer gene identification in both human and mouse and discuss how a cross-species ‘oncogenomics’ approach to cancer gene discovery represents a powerful strategy for finding genes that drive tumourigenesis. PMID:19285540

  17. Cloning and characterization of metallothionein gene (HcMT) from Halostachys caspica and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Meng, Hongen; Abdulla, Hasiyatihan; Zhang, Fuchun; Mao, Xinfang

    2016-07-10

    Halostachys caspica is a short shrub distributed in the semi-arid and saline-alkali area, which evolved various mechanisms for modulating salt and metal level. In the present study, a Type 2 metallothionein (HcMT) gene was cloned from the salt induced suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of H.caspica. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that HcMT gene was up-regulated under the stress of Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+), and the tolerance of E. coli strain harboring with the recombinant HcMT (pET-32a-HcMT) to Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was enhanced compared to strain with control vector (pET-32a). Moreover, the purified TrxA-HcMT fusion protein from E. coli cells grown in the presence of 0.3mM CuSO4, 0.3mM ZnSO4, or 0.1mM CdCl2 could bind more metal ions than TrxA alone. The predicted 3D structure showed that HcMT could form a single metal-thiolate cluster, which confers the ability to bind five divalent metal ions through fourteen cysteine residues. These data indicate that HcMT may be involved in processes of metal tolerance in H. caspica and could be employed as a potential candidate for heavy metal phytoremediation. PMID:27032460

  18. CiMT-1, an unusual chordate metallothionein gene in Ciona intestinalis genome: structure and expression studies.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Nicola; Boldrin, Francesco; Ballarin, Loriano; Piccinni, Ester

    2011-02-01

    The present article reports on the characterization of the urochordate metallothionein (MT) gene, CiMT-1, from the solitary ascidian Ciona intestinalis. The predicted protein is shorter than other known deuterostome MTs, having only 39 amino acids. The gene has the same tripartite structure as vertebrate MTs, with some features resembling those of echinoderm MTs. The promoter region shows the canonical cis-acting elements recognized by transcription factors that respond to metal, ROS, and cytokines. Unusual sequences, described in fish and echinoderms, are also present. In situ hybridization suggests that only a population of hemocytes involved in immune responses, i.e. granular amebocytes, express CiMT-1 mRNA. These observations support the idea that urochordates perform detoxification through hemocytes, and that MTs may play important roles in inflammatory humoral responses in tunicates. The reported data offer new clues for better understanding the evolution of these multivalent proteins from non-vertebrate to vertebrate chordates and reinforce their functions in detoxification and immunity. PMID:21328559

  19. Spatiotemporal changes in metallothionein gene expression during embryogenesis in the wall lizard Podarcis sicula.

    PubMed

    Simoniello, Palma; Motta, Chiara Maria; Scudiero, Rosaria; Trinchella, Francesca; Filosa, Silvana

    2010-08-01

    Lizard embryos are nutritionally independent from their environment. During the early phases of oogenesis, the egg prepares for development by storing reserve organelles, proteins, and RNAs sufficient to allow the zygote to transform into a juvenile. This preparation also includes the storage of metallothionein (MT) transcripts. This study investigated the localization of these transcripts by in situ hybridization throughout Podarcis sicula developmental stages. Our data show that MT expression undergoes shifts in both regional and cellular localization. MT transcripts were detected early in the central nervous system, later in tissues implicated in metabolic processes. Results are discussed highlighting differences in lizard embryonic spatial and temporal MT expression compared with piscine, amphibian, and mammalian embryos. We hypothesize that, under natural conditions, the nutritionally closed system represented by the lizard egg protects the developing embryo from an unwanted excess of metals. This mechanism would make MT expression and accumulation in detoxifying organs in developing animals unnecessary until hatching and food intake begins. Conversely, the presence of MT transcripts during brain development may ensure the correct final architecture of this organ. PMID:20623798

  20. Apparent quiescence of the metallothionein gene in the rat ventral prostate: association with cadmium-induced prostate tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Coogan, T P; Shiraishi, N; Waalkes, M P

    1994-09-01

    Several chronic studies in rats indicating that cadmium exposure can induce tumors of the ventral prostate have recently been completed in our laboratory. In one such study, a single dose of cadmium, s.c., increased prostatic tumor incidence only at doses below 5.0 mumol/kg, the approximate threshold for cadmium-induced testicular damage. In a further study, prostatic tumors were elevated with higher doses of cadmium (30 mumol/kg, s.c.) if testicular damage was prevented by zinc pretreatment. Most recently, we found that dietary cadmium (25 to 200 micrograms/g) also can increase prostatic neoplastic lesions, but these were reduced by zinc-deficient diets. Thus it appears that cadmium produces prostatic tumors only if testicular function is maintained. Furthermore, we find that metallothionein (MT), a protein associated with cadmium tolerance, may be deficient in the rat prostate, and the prostatic MT gene, at least in the ventral lobe, is unresponsive to metal stimuli. In liver, MT gene expression, as assessed by MT-1 mRNA, was quite apparent in control tissue and was induced in a dose-dependent manner 24 hr following cadmium exposure (1 to 10 mumol/kg, s.c.). However, in the ventral prostate very low constitutive levels of MT-1 mRNA were detected and increases did not occur with cadmium exposure. Cadmium concentrations in the ventral prostate were in excess of those that cause significant induction in the liver. In sharp contrast to the gene in the ventral prostate, in the dorsal prostate the MT gene was quite active. The dorsal prostate is not susceptible to cadmium carcinogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843088

  1. Effect of cadmium on glutathione S-transferase and metallothionein gene expression in coho salmon liver, gill and olfactory tissues

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Herbert M.; Williams, Chase R.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multifunctional family of phase II enzymes that detoxify a variety of environmental chemicals, reactive intermediates, and secondary products of oxidative damage. GST mRNA expression and catalytic activity have been used as biomarkers of exposure to environmental chemicals. However, factors such as species differences in induction, partial analyses of multiple GST isoforms, and lack of understanding of fish GST gene regulation, have confounded the use of GST as markers of pollutant exposure. In the present study, we examined the effect of exposure to cadmium (Cd), a prototypical environmental contaminant and inducer of mammalian GST, on GST mRNA expression in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) liver, gill, and olfactory tissues. GST expression data were compared to those for metallothionein (MT), a prototypical biomarker of metal exposure. Data mining of genomic databases led to the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for salmon GST isoforms encompassing 9 subfamilies, including alpha, mu, pi, theta, omega, kappa, rho, zeta and microsomal GST. In vivo acute (8-48 hr) exposures to low (3.7 ppb) and high (347 ppb) levels of Cd relevant to environmental scenarios elicited a variety of transient, albeit minor changes (<2.5-fold) in tissue GST profiles, including some reductions in GST mRNA expression. In general, olfactory GSTs were the earliest to respond to cadmium, whereas, more pronounced effects in olfactory and gill GST expression were observed at 48 hr relative to earlier time points. Although evaluation of GSTs reflected a cadmium-associated oxidative stress response, there was no clear GST isoform in any tissue that could serve as a reliable biomarker of acute cadmium exposure. By contrast, metallothionein (MT) mRNA was consistently and markedly induced in all three tissues by cadmium, and among the tissues examined, olfactory MT was the most sensitive marker of cadmium exposures. In summary, coho

  2. Ultraviolet irradiation increases the sensitivity of cultured human skin cells to cadmium probably through the inhibition of metallothionein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hirotomo; Murata, Mie; Suzuki, Kaoru; Koizumi, Shinji

    2004-11-01

    We previously developed an apparatus that can irradiate cultured cells with monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) rays to exactly assess the biological effects of UV components on mammalian cells. Using this device, we studied the effects of UV in and near the UVB region on the general as well as specific protein synthesis of the human skin-derived NB1RGB cells. We found that Cd-induced synthesis of metallothioneins (MTs), which are the proteins involved in the protection against heavy metals and oxidative stress, is inhibited by UV at 280 nm more extensively than total protein synthesis. Such an inhibition was observed when MTs were induced by different inducers such as Cd, Zn, and dexamethasone in three human cell lines, indicating that it is not an event specific to a certain inducer or a certain cell type. By contrast, UV at 300 or 320 nm showed only a marginal effect. UV at 280 nm was likely to block MT gene transcription because Cd-induced increase of MT mRNA was strongly inhibited by irradiation. Cd induction of 70-kDa heat shock protein mRNA was also inhibited by UV irradiation, suggesting that the expression of inducible genes are commonly sensitive to UV. Furthermore, we observed that the irradiation of UV at 280 nm renders NB1RGB cells extremely susceptible to Cd, probably due to the reduced MT synthesis. These observations strongly suggest that UV at 280 nm severely damages cellular inducible protective functions, warning us of a new risk of UV exposure. PMID:15504461

  3. Partial structure of the mouse glucokinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura-Oka, Kazumi; Chu, Mei-Jin; Sullivan, M.; Oka, Kazuhiro

    1995-10-10

    A complementary DNA for glucokinase (GK) was cloned from mouse liver total RNA by a combination of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mouse liver cDNA library screening. Liver- and {beta}-cell-specific exons 1 were isolated by PCR using mouse and rat genomic DNAs. These clones were then used to screen a mouse genomic library; three genomic clones were isolated and characterized. The mouse GK gene spans over 20 kb, containing 11 exons including a liver- or {beta}-cell-specific exon 1, which encodes a tissue-specific 15-aa peptide at the N-terminus of the protein. Both types of GK contain 465 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of mouse {beta}-cell-specific GK showed 98 and 96% identity to the rat and human enzymes, respectively; the corresponding values are 98 and 95% respectively, for the liver-specific GK. Several transcription factor-binding consensus sequences are identified in the 5{prime} flanking region of the mouse GK gene. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Superinduction of metallothionein I by inhibition of protein synthesis: role of a labile repressor in MTF-1 mediated gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yongyi; Lin, Gary X; Millecchia, Lyndell; Ma, Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Induction of metallothioneins (MTs) through the metal-activated transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) provides a model response for analyzing transcriptional gene regulation by heavy metals. Here, we report inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (CHX) increases induction of Mt1 by approximately five-fold, a phenomenon designated as "superinduction." Characterization of superinduction revealed it is time- and concentration-dependent of CHX, requires the presence of an MTF-1 activator, and occurs at a transcriptional level, suggesting a labile repressor in the control of Mt1 induction. Genetic analyses using Mtf1 null cells and a metal response element (MRE)-driven reporter construct showed that superinduction of Mt1 is mediated through MTF-1 and MRE-dependent transcription. Analyses of intracellular zinc content by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging demonstrated that treatment with CHX alone or CHX plus an inducer does not increase the total zinc accumulation or the concentration of free zinc in cells under the conditions in which superinduction occurs. Moreover, superinduction was observed in cells cultured in a zinc-depleted medium, suggesting that superinduction does not involve elevation of intracellular zinc concentration. Northern blotting showed that Cd, CHX, or Cd + CHX does not affect the expression of the mRNA of MTF-1. Immunoblotting using antibodies specific for MTF-1 demonstrated that Cd induces a down-regulation of the MTF-1 protein, whereas cotreatment with Cd and CHX blocked the Cd-induced degradation of MTF-1. The findings reveal a new mechanistic aspect of the superinduction of Mt1, in which a labile repressor negatively controls agonist-induced turnover of the MTF-1 protein. PMID:16615093

  5. Organization of amplified metallothionein (MT) genes in cadmium-resistant Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, C.; Grady, D.; Meincke, L.; Clark, L.; Qui, X.; Fehrenbach, S.; Brown, N.; Jones, M.; Longmire, J.; Moyzis, R.

    1987-05-01

    In the parental, cadmium-sensitive, CHO cells, two MT genes (MT-I and II) have been cloned and shown to encompass approx.9 Kb of DNA. Both genes demonstrate the canonical intron-exon organization observed for other mammalian MT genes. Chromosome walking has been employed to study the organization of the MT genes in amplified cell lines. Using DNA from a highly-amplified cell line, Cd/sup r/ 200 T1, a genomic library was constructed in lambda Ch35 by standard procedures. Recombinants containing sequences complementary to a MT-II cDNA probe were isolated and characterized. Restriction enzyme analyses of these recombinants have extended the map of the MT-I and II gene region to encompass approx.35 Kb of DNA and indicate stability of the amplified genome over this region. A single SacII restriction site has been identified at the extreme 3' end of the cloned region. Since SacII is an infrequently-cutting restriction enzyme, accelerated long-range restriction mapping of the amplified MT gene region will be possible by combining chromosome walking in the MT gene region with large fragment separation using field-in-version gel electrophoresis.

  6. Characterization of the mouse thrombospondin 2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tetsuji Shingu; Bornstein, P. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have characterized the exon/intron organization, complete 3[prime] untranslated region (3[prime]-UTR), and approximately 2.5 kb of the promoter/5[prime] flanking region of the mouse thrombospondin 2 (TSP2) gene. The sizes of exons and the pattern of interruption of the reading frame by introns are highly conserved in mouse TSP2 in comparison with mouse or human TSP1, a finding that suggests a close evolutionary relationship between the two genes. The TSP2 and TSP1 genes are also similar in that the 3[prime]-UTRs of both genes contain multiple TATT and ATTT(A) motifs that might function as mediators of mRNA stability. However, the sequences of the promoter regions in TSP1 and TSP2 are very different; in particular, the TSP2 gene lacks the serum response element and the NF-Y binding site that have been implicated in the serum response of the human TSP1 gene. The structure of the TSP2 gene is consistent with emerging evidence supporting the view that TSP1 and TSP2 perform overlapping but distinct functions. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Breaking-off tissue specific activity of the oil palm metallothionein-like gene promoter in T(1) seedlings of tomato exposed to metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kamaladini, Hossein; Nor Akmar Abdullah, Siti; Aziz, Maheran Abdul; Ismail, Ismanizan Bin; Haddadi, Fatemeh

    2013-02-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich metal-binding proteins that are involved in cell growth regulation, transportation of metal ions and detoxification of heavy metals. A mesocarp-specific metallothionein-like gene (MT3-A) promoter was isolated from the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq). A vector construct containing the MT3-A promoter fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene in the pCAMBIA 1304 vector was produced and used in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomato. Histochemical GUS assay of different tissues of transgenic tomato showed that the MT3-A promoter only drove GUS expression in the reproductive tissues and organs, including the anther, fruit and seed coat. Competitive RT-PCR and GUS fluorometric assay showed changes in the level of GUS mRNA and enzyme activity in the transgenic tomato (T(0)). No GUS mRNA was found in roots and leaves of transgenic tomato. In contrast, the leaves of transgenic tomato seedlings (T(1)) produced the highest GUS activity when treated with 150 μM Cu(2+) compared to the control (without Cu(2+)). However, Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) treatments did not show GUS expression in the leaves of the transgenic tomato seedlings. Interestingly, the results showed a breaking-off tissue-specific activity of the oil palm MT3-A promoter in T(1) seedlings of tomato when subjected to Cu(2+) ions. PMID:23290536

  8. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  9. Upregulations of metallothionein gene expressions and tolerance to heavy metal toxicity by three dimensional cultivation of HepG2 cells on VECELL 3-D inserts.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takashi; Kuroda, Yukie; Horiuchi, Shinichiro; Kim, Su-Ryang; Sekino, Yuko; Ishida, Seiichi

    2016-02-01

    The VECELL 3-D insert is a new culture scaffold consisting of collagen-coated ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) mesh. We analyzed the effects of VECELL 3-D inserts on the functionality of HepG2, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. HepG2 cells cultured on VECELL 3-D inserts maintained a round shape, while those cultured on a standard culture plate or collagen-coated cell culture plate showed a flattened and cubic epithelial-like shape. HepG2 cells cultured on VECELL 3-D inserts had showed upregulated expression of metallothionein genes and in turn a higher tolerance to toxicity induced by heavy metals. These results suggest that HepG2 cell functions were changed by the cell morphology that is induced by culturing on a VECELL 3-D insert. PMID:26763402

  10. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. In silico and experimental analyses predict the therapeutic value of an EZH2 inhibitor GSK343 against hepatocellular carcinoma through the induction of metallothionein genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsang-Pai; Hong, Yi-Han; Tung, Kwang-Yi; Yang, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no effective molecular targeted therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27)-specific methyltransferase, has been emerged as novel anticancer target. Our previous study has demonstrated that GSK343, an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-competitive inhibitor of EZH2, induces autophagy and enhances drug sensitivity in cancer cells including HCC. In this study, an in silico study was performed and found that EZH2 was overexpressed in cancerous tissues of HCC patients at both gene and protein levels. Microarray analysis and in vitro experiments indicated that the anti-HCC activity of GSK343 was associated with the induction of metallothionein (MT) genes. In addition, the negative association of EZH2 and MT1/MT2A genes in cancer cell lines and tissues was found in public gene expression database. Taken together, our findings suggest that EZH2 inhibitors could be a good therapeutic option for HCC, and induction of MT genes was associated with the anti-HCC activity of EZH2 inhibitors. PMID:26973856

  12. Genomic organization of mouse gene zfp162.

    PubMed

    Wrehlke, C; Wiedemeyer, W R; Schmitt-Wrede, H P; Mincheva, A; Lichter, P; Wunderlich, F

    1999-05-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of the alternatively spliced mouse gene zfp162, formerly termed mzfm, the homolog of the human ZFM1 gene encoding the splicing factor SF1 and a putative signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) protein. The zfp162 gene is about 14 kb long and consists of 14 exons and 13 introns. Comparison of zfp162 with the genomic sequences of ZFM1/SF1 revealed that the exon-intron structure and exon sequences are well conserved between the genes, whereas the introns differ in length and sequence composition. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, the zfp162 gene was assigned to chromosome 19, region B. Screening of a genomic library integrated in lambda DASH II resulted in the identification of the 5'-flanking region of zfp162. Sequence analysis of this region showed that zfp162 is a TATA-less gene containing an initiator control element and two CCAAT boxes. The promoter exhibits the following motifs: AP-2, CRE, Ets, GRE, HNF5, MRE, SP-1, TRE, TCF1, and PU.1. The core promoter, from position -331 to -157, contains the motifs CRE, SP-1, MRE, and AP-2, as determined in transfected CHO-K1 cells and IC-21 cells by reporter gene assay using a secreted form of human placental alkaline phosphatase. The occurrence of PU.1/GRE supports the view that the zfp162 gene encodes a protein involved not only in nuclear RNA metabolism, as the human ZFM1/SF1, but also in as yet unknown macrophage-inherent functions. PMID:10360842

  13. Cloning and characterization of HbMT2a, a metallothionein gene from Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg differently responds to abiotic stress and heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yue Yi; Yang, Shu Guang; Tian, Wei Min

    2015-05-22

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are of low molecular mass, cysteine-rich proteins. They play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals and homeostasis of intracellular metal ions, and protecting against intracellular oxidative damages. In this study a full-length cDNA of type 2 plant metallothioneins, HbMT2a, was isolated from 25 mM Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) stressed leaves of Hevea brasiliensis by RACE. The HbMT2a was 372 bp in length and had a 237 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding for a protein of 78 amino acid residues with molecular mass of 7.772 kDa. The expression of HbMT2a in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone RY7-33-97 was up-regulated by Me-JA, ABA, PEG, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}, but down-regulated by water. The role of HbMT2a protein in protecting against metal toxicity was demonstrated in vitro. PET-28a-HbMT2-beared Escherichia coli. Differential expression of HbMT2a upon treatment with 10 °C was observed in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone 93-114 which is cold-resistant and Reken501 which is cold-sensitive. The expression patterns of HbMT2a in the two rubber tree clones may be ascribed to a change in the level of endogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Cloning an HbMT2a gene from rubber tree. • Analyzing expression patterns of HbMT2a upon abiotic stress and heavy metal stress. • Finding different expression patterns of HbMT2a among two Hevea germplasm. • The expressed protein of HbMT2a enhances copper and zinc tolerance in Escherichia coli.

  14. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D.; Pedersen, R.; Mold, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  15. Cytosolic expression of synthetic phytochelatin and bacterial metallothionein genes in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for enhanced tolerance and bioaccumulation of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ruchi; Archana, G

    2014-06-01

    Due to its exemplary resistance to ionising radiation, oxidative stress, desiccation and several DNA damaging agents, Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (DR1) is considered as one of the most appropriate candidates for the bioremediation of the nuclear waste sites. However, the high sensitivity of this bacterium to heavy metals, which are usually preponderant at nuclear waste dump sites, precludes its application for bioremediation. This study deals with the expression two metal binding peptides in DR1 as an attractive strategy for developing metal tolerance in this bacterium. A synthetic gene (EC20) encoding a phytochelatin analogue with twenty repeating units of glutamate and cysteine was constructed by overlap extension and expressed in DR1. The cyanobacterial metallothionein (MT) gene, smtA was cloned for intracellular expression in DR1. Both the genes were expressed under the native groESL promoter. DR1 strain carrying the recombinant EC20 demonstrated 2.5-fold higher tolerance to Cd(2+) and accumulated 1.21-fold greater Cd(2+) as opposed to the control while the heterologous expression of MT SmtA in DR1 imparted the transformant superior tolerance to Cd(2+) amassing 2.5-fold greater Cd(2+) than DR1 expressing EC20. PMID:24578153

  16. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  17. Expression analysis of Type 1 and 2 Metallothionein genes in Rape (Brassica napus L.) during short-term stress using sqRT-PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdelmigid, Hala M

    2016-03-01

    With the extent of contamination in water and soil today, possibility of presence of toxic heavy metals in plants in everyday life can not be ruled out. In this context, understanding the influence of exogenenous factors on such plants gains importance. Here, we investigated expression of metallothioneins genes MT1 and MT2 in Rape Brassica napus L. as representatives of MT gene type 1, type 2 (BnMT1 and BnMT2), respectively to explore such influence, if there any. Seedlings of 7-day-old were exposed to various exogenous factors including plant hormones, heavy metals, abiotic and biotic stresses. The basal expression levels of two BnMT genes were determined using water-treated samples (control). Each treatment was replicated 3 times for statistical validity. SPSS computer software was used for statistical analyses. Expression profiles of BnMT1 and BnMT2 were generated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR (sqRT-PCR) to monitor stress-response gene expression of both genes. The BnMT1 and BnMT2 genes were expressed at the same level in control samples. In general, BnMT1 gene was better expressed in most treatments compared to BnMT2 throughout the 48 h experimental period. Moreover, BnMT2 expression was not affected by heavy metal stress. The results provide considerable insights into the molecular mechanism of MTs responses to environmental stress in B. napus which can be utilized for future plant manipulations to improve its ability to accumulate higher metal concentration from the soil. PMID:27145635

  18. Cloning and characterization of a tilapia (Oreochromis aureus) metallothionein gene promoter in Hepa-T1 cells following the administration of various heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Chan, William Wai Lun; Chan, King Ming

    2008-01-20

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved intracellular metal-binding proteins that contribute to the homeostasis of essential metals and the detoxification of non-essential heavy metals. MT gene expression is induced by various heavy metal ions, and Zn(2+) is able to bind and activate a transcription factor associated with the MT gene that is known as the metal responsive element (MRE) binding transcription factor-1 (MTF-1). Heavy metals other than Zn(2+), such as Cd(2+) and Cu(2+), fail to activate the binding of MTF-1 to MREs despite their ability to induce the transcription of the MT gene. To study how different metal ions regulate MT gene expression, a tilapia (ti)-MT gene promoter was cloned and its responses to activation by various metal ions measured using a Hepa T1 cell culture model. The tiMT gene promoter contains six functional MREs within 2118bp 5' of the translational start site. A transient gene expression study showed the tiMT gene promoter fragment to be responsive to Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), and Zn(2+). Deletions from the 5' end and the site-directed mutagenesis of individual MREs in the tiMT gene promoter confirmed that both proximal and distal clusters of MREs were required for the maximal metal induction of the tiMT gene. The distal cluster of MREs greatly enhanced the induction of tiMT gene expression by several of the heavy metal ions, and especially the non-Zn(2+) ions. Individual MREs showed a different responsiveness to metal ions, with MREe being the most potent, MREb being responsive to Zn(2+) but not to other metal ions, and MREa being mainly for the basal expression of the tiMT gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) identified a transcription factor that was able to bind most of the MREs, with the exception of MREd, but the binding was only activated by the in vivo administration of Zn(2+), not the administration of Cd(2+) or Cu(2+). In conclusion, the results of this study on a Hepa T1 cell model suggest that the

  19. All systems GO for understanding mouse gene function

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Chris; Brown, Steve DM

    2004-01-01

    It is widely supposed that the tissue specificity of gene expression indicates gene function. Now, an extensive analysis of gene expression in the mouse reveals that quantitative measurement of expression levels in different tissues can contribute powerfully to the prediction of gene function. PMID:15610553

  20. Basal and copper-induced expression of metallothionein isoform 1,2 and 3 genes in epithelial cancer cells: The role of tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, E A; Song, Y P; Cherian, M G

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a ubiquitous low-molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins with a high affinity for metal ions. The expression and induction of MTs have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Our past research had shown that p53 is an important factor in metal regulation of MTs. The present study was undertaken to explore further the interrelationship between p53 and MTs. We investigated whether silencing of p53 could affect expression pattern of basal and copper induced metallothioneins. The silencing of wild-type p53 (wt-p53) in epithelial breast cancer MCF7 cells affected the basal level of MT-2A RNA, whereas the levels of MT-1A and MT-1X RNA remained largely unchanged. The expression of MT-3 was undetectable in MCF7 with either functional or silenced p53. MCF7 cells with silenced wt-p53 failed to upregulate MT-2A in response to copper and showed a reduced sensitivity toward copper induced cell apoptotic death. Similarly in MCF7-E6 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the presence of inactive/mutated p53 halted MT-1A and MT-2A gene expression in response to copper. Constitutive expression of MT-3 RNA was detectable in the presence of mutated p53 (mtp53). Transient transfection of MDA-MB-231 cells with wt-p53 enabled copper induced upregulation of both MT-1A and MT-2A but not basal level of MT-2A, MT-1E, MT-1X and MT-3. Inactivation of p53 in HepG2 cells amplified the basal expression of studied MT isoforms, including MT-3, as well as copper-induced mRNA expression of MTs except MT-1H and MT-3. Presented data demonstrate a direct relation between p53 and MT-1A and MT-2A and they also indicate that wt-p53 might be a negative regulator of MT-3 in epithelial cancer cells. PMID:27049123

  1. Transcriptional response of two metallothionein genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) and histological changes in Oxya chinensis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) exposed to three trace metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Yu, Zhitao; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the transcriptional responses of two metallothionein (MT) genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) in various tissues (brain, optic lobe, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, foregut, gastric caeca, midgut and hindgut) of Oxya chinensis (Thunberg) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) after exposed to the trace metals cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) for 48h. The study revealed that the exposure of O. chinensis to each of the three metals at the median lethal concentration (LC50) or lower concentration(s) up-regulated the transcriptions of both OcMT1 and OCMT2 in the eight tissues except for OcMT1 and OcMT2 with Cd in brain and gastric caeca, respectively, and OcMT2 with Cu in gastric caeca. These results suggested that the exposure of O. chinensis to the metals may enhance MT biosynthesis that protects tissues by binding these metals in various tissues. To examine possible histopathological effect of the metals, we examined the histological changes in the fat bodies after O. chinensis was exposed to each of these metals at LC50. The exposure of Cd significantly reduced the size and number of adipocytes as compared with the control. However, such an effect was not observed in O. chinensis exposed to either Cu or Zn. These results suggested that fat bodies might be either significantly affected by Cd or play a crucial role in detoxification of excessive trace metals. PMID:26159299

  2. Copper-induced hydrogen peroxide upregulation of a metallothionein gene, OsMT2c, from Oryza sativa L. confers copper tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shi, Xiaoting; Qian, Meng; Zheng, Luqing; Lian, Chunlan; Xia, Yan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2015-08-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich metal-binding proteins found in numerous genera and species, but their functions in abiotic stress tolerance remain unclear. Here, a MT gene from Oryza sativa, OsMT2c, was isolated and characterized, encoding a type 2 MT, and observed expression in the roots, leaf sheathes, and leaves, but only weak expression in seeds. OsMT2c was upregulated by copper (Cu) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. Excessive Cu elicited a rapid and sustained production and release of H2O2 in rice, and exogenous H2O2 scavengers N,N'-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and ascorbic acid (Asc) decreased H2O2 production and OsMT2c expression. Furthermore, the expression of OsMT2c increased in the osapx2 mutant in which the H2O2 levels were higher than in wild-type (WT) plants. These results showed that Cu increased MT2c expression through the production and accumulation of Cu-induced H2O2 in O. sativa. In addition, the transgenic OsMT2c-overexpressing Arabidopsis displayed improved tolerance to Cu stress and exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability compared to WT and empty-vector (Ev) seedlings. PMID:25867584

  3. Promotion of radioresistance by metallothionein induction prior to irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, J.; Tajima, Y.; Karasawa, M.

    1987-06-01

    A striking radioresistance has been found in mice which were subjected to various pretreatments to induce metallothionein synthesis in the liver prior to irradiation. The tolerance to lethal damage from an LD50 level of radiation during a 30-day postirradiation period was demonstrated by a highly significant difference (P less than 0.01) in mortality rate between mice given subcutaneously manganese, cadmium, or zinc injection or surgical skin excision of mice and the control mice (no pretreatment). A typical loss in body weight that generally reached a peak 2 weeks after irradiation was observed in the control mice, but mice given a dose of 10 mg manganese per kilogram body weight showed a steady weight increase even a few days after irradiation. The normal level of metallothionein in mouse liver is 20 micrograms/g tissue. This level increased up to 70 micrograms/g tissue following irradiation at 6.3 Gy. Among irradiated mice, metallothionein levels in the liver increased approximately 200-800% after cadmium, manganese, or zinc injection compared to levels of irradiated mice without pretreatment. Mice undergoing 2 X 2-cm/sup 2/ dermal excision also demonstrated a similar reduction of mortality and high metallothionein contents in liver, i.e., 150-400 micrograms/g. The present results, together with our previous findings suggest that the body's protective mechanism against radiation strongly correlates with the biosynthesis of metallothionein or metallothionein itself acting as a scavenger of radiation-induced peroxides.

  4. Activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors Upregulates Metallothioneins, Thereby Increasing Intracellular Accumulation of Zinc, Autophagy, and Bacterial Clearance by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Amit; Abraham, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Continuous stimulation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) (variants in NOD2 have been associated with Crohn's disease), alters the phenotype of myeloid-derived cells, reducing production of inflammatory cytokines and increasing clearance of microbes. We investigated the mechanisms by which microbial clearance increases in macrophages under these conditions. METHODS Monocytes were purified from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and differentiated to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). We also isolated human intestinal macrophages. Bacterial clearance by MDMs was assessed in gentamicin protection assays. Effects of intracellular zinc and autophagy were measured by flow cytometry, immunoblot, reverse transcription PCR, and microscopy experiments. Small interfering RNAs were used to knock down specific proteins in MDMs. NOD2–/– and C57BL/6J mice, maintained in a specific pathogen-free facility, were given antibiotics, muramyl dipeptide (to stimulate NOD2), or dextran sodium sulfate; intestinal lamina propria cells were collected and analyzed. RESULTS Chronic stimulation of human MDMs through NOD2 upregulated the expression of multiple genes encoding metallothioneins, which bind and regulate levels of intracellular zinc. Intestinal myeloid-derived cells are continually stimulated through PRRs; metallothionein expression was upregulated in human and mouse intestinal myeloid-derived cells. Continuous stimulation of NOD2 increased levels of intracellular zinc, thereby increasing autophagy and bacterial clearance. The metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) was required for regulation of metallothionein genes in human MDMs. Knockdown of MTF-1 did not affect baseline clearance of bacteria by MDMs. However, the increase in intracellular zinc, autophagy, and bacterial clearance observed with continuous NOD2 stimulation was impaired in MDMs upon MTF-1 knockdown. Addition of

  5. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence. PMID:26412852

  6. A reanalysis of mouse ENCODE comparative gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Mizrahi-Man, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium reported that comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster more by species rather than by tissue. This observation was surprising, as it contradicted much of the comparative gene regulatory data collected previously, as well as the common notion that major developmental pathways are highly conserved across a wide range of species, in particular across mammals. Here we show that the Mouse ENCODE gene expression data were collected using a flawed study design, which confounded sequencing batch (namely, the assignment of samples to sequencing flowcells and lanes) with species. When we account for the batch effect, the corrected comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster by tissue, not by species. PMID:26236466

  7. Tissue- and cell-specific expression of metallothionein genes in cadmium- and copper-exposed mussels analyzed by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Zorita, I.; Bilbao, E.; Schad, A.; Cancio, I.; Soto, M.; Cajaraville, M.P. . E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es

    2007-04-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-inducible proteins that can be used as biomarkers of metal exposure. In mussels two families of MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20) have been characterized. In this study, mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to 200 ppb Cd and 40 ppb Cu for 2 and 9 days to characterize the tissue and isoform specificity of metal-induced MT expression. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization demonstrated that both MT isoforms were mainly transcribed in digestive tubule epithelial cells, especially in basophilic cells. Weaker MT expression was detected in non-ciliated duct cells, stomach and gill epithelial cells, haemocytes, adipogranular cells, spermatic follicles and oocytes. RT-PCR resulted in cloning of a novel M. galloprovincialis isoform homologous to recently cloned Mytilus edulis intron-less MT10B isoform. In gills, Cd only affected MT10 gene expression after 2 days of exposure while increases in MT protein levels occurred at day 9. In the digestive gland, a marked increase of both isoforms, but especially of MT20, was accompanied by increased levels of MT proteins and basophilic cell volume density (Vv{sub BAS}) after 2 and 9 days and of intralysosomal metal accumulation in digestive cells after 9 days. Conversely, although metal was accumulated in digestive cells lysosomes and the Vv{sub BAS} increased in Cu-exposed mussels, Cu exposure did not produce an increase of MT gene expression or MT protein levels. These data suggest that MTs are expressed in a tissue-, cell- and isoform-specific way in response to different metals.

  8. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Improved human disease candidate gene prioritization using mouse phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Huan; Aronow, Bruce J; Jegga, Anil G

    2007-01-01

    Background The majority of common diseases are multi-factorial and modified by genetically and mechanistically complex polygenic interactions and environmental factors. High-throughput genome-wide studies like linkage analysis and gene expression profiling, tend to be most useful for classification and characterization but do not provide sufficient information to identify or prioritize specific disease causal genes. Results Extending on an earlier hypothesis that the majority of genes that impact or cause disease share membership in any of several functional relationships we, for the first time, show the utility of mouse phenotype data in human disease gene prioritization. We study the effect of different data integration methods, and based on the validation studies, we show that our approach, ToppGene , outperforms two of the existing candidate gene prioritization methods, SUSPECTS and ENDEAVOUR. Conclusion The incorporation of phenotype information for mouse orthologs of human genes greatly improves the human disease candidate gene analysis and prioritization. PMID:17939863

  10. Web-based digital gene expression atlases for the mouse.

    PubMed

    Geffers, Lars; Herrmann, Bernhard; Eichele, Gregor

    2012-10-01

    Over the past 15 years the publicly available mouse gene expression data determined by in situ hybridization have dramatically increased in scope and spatiotemporal resolution. As a consequence of resources and tools available in the post-genomic era, full transcriptomes in the mouse brain and in the mouse embryo can be studied. Here we introduce and discuss seven current databases (MAMEP, EMBRYS, GenePaint, EURExpress, EuReGene, BGEM, and GENSAT) that grant access to large collections of expression data in mouse. We review the experimental focus, coverage, data assessment, and annotation for each of these databases and the implementation of analytic tools and links to other relevant databases. We provide a user-oriented summary of how to interrogate each database. PMID:22936000

  11. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  12. Dermal exposure of Eisenia andrei earthworms: Effects of heavy metals on metallothionein and phytochelatin synthase gene expressions in coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Homa, Joanna; Rorat, Agnieszka; Kruk, Jerzy; Cocquerelle, Claude; Plytycz, Barbara; Vandenbulcke, Franck

    2015-06-01

    Parameters such as total number of coelomocytes, riboflavin content in coelomocytes, expression of genes implied in metal homeostasis, and detoxification mechanisms can be used as biomarkers to assess the impact of metals on annelids. Defense biomarkers (detoxification gene expressions and coelomocyte parameters) were investigated in the ecotoxicologically important species Eisenia andrei following in vivo exposure to 5 different metals (zinc, copper, nickel, lead, and cadmium) at known concentrations. Coelomocyte numbers and riboflavin content were not affected by metallic exposure, but metal-specific gene expression variations were evidenced. PMID:25693738

  13. cDNA cloning and cadmium-induced expression of metallothionein mRNA in the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Engelken, J; Hildebrandt, A

    1999-01-01

    Using pooled degenerate oligonucleotides inferred from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of Dreissena polymorpha metallothionein and a Cys-X-Cys motif characteristic for known metallothioneins, a 150-bp metallothionein-specific reverse transcription PCR product was generated. The PCR product was used to screen a Dreissena polymorpha cDNA library, and a complete metallothionein cDNA sequence from Dreissena was identified. Four clones with the identical sequence were detected, supporting the idea of a single metallothionein gene in Dreissena. The sequence contains a 141-bp 5' untranslated region and a 572-bp 3' untranslated region with two polyadenylation signals. The coding region spans 219 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 21 cysteine residues present in the metallothionein-typical motifs. Induction studies were performed with 50 microg Cd2+/L for up to 16 days. The exposed mussels show a sevenfold higher metallothionein mRNA level compared with uninduced control mussels. PMID:10505795

  14. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ALFALFA (MEDICAGO VARIA L.) GENETICLALY ENGINEERED TO EXPRESS A HUMAN METALLOTHIONEIN (HMT) GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of these studies were two-fold: (1) to determine efficacy of low and high expression hMT gene constructs by assessing accumulation of Cu in shoots of parental and transgenic plants of alfalfa (Medicago varia L.) exposed to different concentrations of CuSO4 by addit...

  15. Metallothionein III (MT3) is a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by promoter hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second most common form of leukemia in children. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are a characteristic feature in various tumors, including AML. Metallothionein III (MT3) is a tumor suppresser reported to show promoter hypermethylated in various cancers. However, the expression and molecular function of MT3 in pediatric AML is unclear. Methods Eleven human leukemia cell lines and 41 pediatric AML samples and 20 NBM/ITP (Norma bone marrow/Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) control samples were analyzed. Transcription levels of MT3 were evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. MT3 methylation status was determined by methylation specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite genomic sequencing (BSG). The molecular mechanism of MT3 was investigated by apoptosis assays and PCR array analysis. Results The MT3 promoter was hypermethylated in leukemia cell lines. More CpG’s methylated of MT3 was observed 39.0% pediatric AML samples compared to 10.0% NBM controls. Transcription of MT3 was also significantly decreased in AML samples compared to NBM/ITP controls (P < 0.001); patients with methylated MT3 exhibited lower levels of MT3 expression compared to those with unmethylated MT3 (P = 0.049). After transfection with MT3 lentivirus, proliferation was significantly inhibited in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Annexin V assay showed that apoptosis was significantly upregulated MT3-overexpressing AML cells compared to controls. Real-time PCR array analysis revealed 34 dysregulated genes that may be implicated in MT3 overexpression and apoptosis in AML, including FOXO1. Conclusion MT3 may be a putative tumor suppressor gene in pediatric AML. Epigenetic inactivation of MT3 via promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples. Overexpression of MT3 may inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in AML cells. FOXO1 was dysregulated in MT3-overexpressing cells

  16. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  17. Increased metallothionein gene expression, zinc, and zinc-dependent resistance to apoptosis in circulating monocytes during HIV viremia

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Andrea D.; Gekonge, Bethsebah; Giri, Malavika S.; Hancock, Aidan; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Chehimi, Jihed; Kossevkov, Andrew V.; Nicols, Calen; Yousef, Malik; Mounzer, Karam; Shull, Jane; Kostman, Jay; Showe, Louise; Montaner, Luis J.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating monocytes exhibit an apoptotic resistance phenotype during HIV viremia in association with increased MT expression. MTs are known to play an important role in zinc metabolism and immune function. We now show, in a cross-sectional study using peripheral monocytes, that expression of MT1 isoforms E, G, H, and X is increased significantly in circulating monocyte cells from HIV+ subjects during chronic viremic episodes as compared with uninfected subjects. This increase in expression is also observed during acute viremia following interruption of suppressive ART. Circulating monocytes from HIV+ donors were also found to have elevated zinc importer gene Zip8 expression in conjunction with elevated intracellular zinc levels in contrast to CD4+T-lymphocytes. In vitro HIV-1 infection studies with elutriated MDM confirm a direct relation between HIV-1 infection and increased MDM MT1 (isoform G) gene expression and increased intracellular zinc levels. A direct link between elevated zinc levels and apoptosis resistance was established using a cell-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, which reversed apoptosis resistance effectively in monocytes from HIV-infected to levels comparable with uninfected controls. Taken together, increases in MT gene expression and intracellular zinc levels may contribute directly to maintenance of an immune-activated monocyte by mediating an increased resistance to apoptosis during active HIV-1 viremia. PMID:20551211

  18. Structure of the mouse calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide alpha and beta genes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P M; Nasonkin, I; Zhang, H; Gagel, R F; Cote, G J

    2001-01-01

    We report the cloning, genomic organization and sequence of the mouse alpha-CALC and beta-CALC genes. The two genes share extensive sequence homology. The transcription units of both genes contain 6 exons. Transcripts of the alpha-CALC gene were found to alternatively include exon 4 or exons 5 and 6. For the beta-CALC gene exon 4 was not detected in transcripts derived from this gene. The predicted mouse alpha-CGRP was found to be identical to rat alpha-CGRP, however, beta-CGRP predicted amino acid sequences revealed three amino acid differences suggesting these residues are not critical to CGRP function. PMID:11761712

  19. Estrogen-Dependent Gene Expression in the Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Seng H.; Sarraj, Mai A.; Drummond, Ann E.; Findlay, Jock K.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen (E) plays a pivotal role in regulating the female reproductive system, particularly the ovary. However, the number and type of ovarian genes influenced by estrogen remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have utilized wild-type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO; estrogen free) mouse ovaries as an in vivo model to profile estrogen dependent genes. RNA from each individual ovary (n = 3) was analyzed by a microarray-based screen using Illumina Sentrix Mouse WG-6 BeadChip (45,281 transcripts). Comparative analysis (GeneSpring) showed differential expression profiles of 450 genes influenced by E, with 291 genes up-regulated and 159 down-regulated by 2-fold or greater in the ArKO ovary compared to WT. Genes previously reported to be E regulated in ArKO ovaries were confirmed, in addition to novel genes not previously reported to be expressed or regulated by E in the ovary. Of genes involved in 5 diverse functional processes (hormonal processes, reproduction, sex differentiation and determination, apoptosis and cellular processes) 78 had estrogen-responsive elements (ERE). These analyses define the transcriptome regulated by E in the mouse ovary. Further analysis and investigation will increase our knowledge pertaining to how E influences follicular development and other ovarian functions. PMID:21347412

  20. Molecular cloning and characterisation of metallothionein type 2a gene from Jatropha curcas L., a promising biofuel plant.

    PubMed

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Golla, Ramesh; Sengupta, Debashree; Ghatty, Sreenivas; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have cloned a gene encoding JcMT2a protein from Jatropha curcas L., a promising biofuel tree species. Full length sequence of JcMT2a gene was isolated using RACE PCR. Heterologous expression of JcMT2a in Escherichia coli and its purification has shown distinct bands corresponding to the GST and GST-fused JcMT2a protein. Significant tolerance was observed in E. coli cells expressing recombinant GST-JcMT2a for zinc, copper and cadmium metals compared to cells expressing GST alone. JcMT2a also restored Cu and Cd tolerance in the metal sensitive yeast mutants. Quantitative real time PCR showed a significant increase in JcMT2a transcripts with Cu and Cd in the leaf compared to root tissue. Our Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis clearly demonstrates that J. curcas L. could be a potential candidate for phytoremediation to clean heavy metals from the environment, in addition to its non-edible oil seed yields for biodiesel production. PMID:24190491

  1. A Provisional Gene Regulatory Atlas for Mouse Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hailin; VanBuren, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS) motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD. PMID:24421884

  2. Structure of mammalian metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Kaegi, J.H.R.; Vasak, M.; Lerch, K.; Gilg, D.E.O.; Hunziker, P.; Bernhard, W.R.; Good, M.

    1984-03-01

    All mammalian metallothioneins characterized contain a single polypeptide chain of 61 amino acid residues, among them 20 cysteines providing the ligands for seven metal-binding sites. Native metallothioneins are usually heterogeneous in metal composition, with Zn, Cd, and Cu occurring in varying proportions. However, forms containing only a single metal species, i.e., Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Hg, Pb, Bi, have now been prepared by in vitro reconstitution from the metal-free apoprotein. By spectroscopic analysis of such derivatives it was established that all cysteine residues participate in metal binding, that each metal ion is bound to four thiolate ligands, and that the symmetry of each complex is close to that of a tetrahedron. To satisfy the requirements of the overall Me/sub 7/(Cys/sup -/)/sub 20/ stoichiometry, the complexes must be combined to form metal-thiolate cluster structures. The actual spatial organization of the clusters and the polypeptide chain remains to be established. An attractive possibility is the arrangement of the tetrahedral metal-thiolates in adamantane-like structures surrounded by properly folded segments of the chain providing the ligands. /sup 1/H-NMR data and infrared absorption measurements are consistent with a tightly folded structure rich in ..beta..-type conformation. 79 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Promotion of radioresistance by metallothionein induction prior to irradiation.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, J; Tajima, Y; Karasawa, M

    1987-06-01

    A striking radioresistance has been found in mice which were subjected to various pretreatments to induce metallothionein synthesis in the liver prior to irradiation. The tolerance to lethal damage from an LD50 level of radiation during a 30-day postirradiation period was demonstrated by a highly significant difference (P less than 0.01) in mortality rate between mice given subcutaneously manganese, cadmium, or zinc injection or surgical skin excision of mice and the control mice (no pretreatment). A typical loss in body weight that generally reached a peak 2 weeks after irradiation was observed in the control mice, but mice given a dose of 10 mg manganese per kilogram body weight showed a steady weight increase even a few days after irradiation. The normal level of metallothionein in mouse liver is 20 micrograms/g tissue. This level increased up to 70 micrograms/g tissue following irradiation at 6.3 Gy. Among irradiated mice, metallothionein levels in the liver increased approximately 200-800% after cadmium, manganese, or zinc injection compared to levels of irradiated mice without pretreatment. Mice undergoing 2 X 2-cm2 dermal excision also demonstrated a similar reduction of mortality and high metallothionein contents in liver, i.e., 150-400 micrograms/g. The present results, together with our previous findings (Matsubara et al., 1982, 1983, 1984; Matsubara, 1986), suggest that the body's protective mechanism against radiation strongly correlates with the biosynthesis of metallothionein or metallothionein itself acting as a scavenger of radiation-induced peroxides. PMID:3556159

  4. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  5. MouseNet v2: a database of gene networks for studying the laboratory mouse and eight other model vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eiru; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Hyojin; Shim, Hongseok; Kang, Byunghee; Yang, Sunmo; Shim, Jae Ho; Shin, Seung Yeon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, is one of the most important animal tools in biomedical research. Functional characterization of the mouse genes, hence, has been a long-standing goal in mammalian and human genetics. Although large-scale knockout phenotyping is under progress by international collaborative efforts, a large portion of mouse genome is still poorly characterized for cellular functions and associations with disease phenotypes. A genome-scale functional network of mouse genes, MouseNet, was previously developed in context of MouseFunc competition, which allowed only limited input data for network inferences. Here, we present an improved mouse co-functional network, MouseNet v2 (available at http://www.inetbio.org/mousenet), which covers 17 714 genes (>88% of coding genome) with 788 080 links, along with a companion web server for network-assisted functional hypothesis generation. The network database has been substantially improved by large expansion of genomics data. For example, MouseNet v2 database contains 183 co-expression networks inferred from 8154 public microarray samples. We demonstrated that MouseNet v2 is predictive for mammalian phenotypes as well as human diseases, which suggests its usefulness in discovery of novel disease genes and dissection of disease pathways. Furthermore, MouseNet v2 database provides functional networks for eight other vertebrate models used in various research fields. PMID:26527726

  6. Mouse chromosome 17 candidate modifier genes for thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Qila; Hart, Erika; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Two overlapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for clot stability, Hmtb8 and Hmtb9, were identified on mouse chromosome 17 in an F2 intercross derived from C57BL/6J (B6) and B6-Chr17A/J (B6-Chr17) mouse strains. The intervals were in synteny with a QTL for thrombotic susceptibility on chromosome 18 in a human study, and there were 23 homologs between mouse and human. The objective of this study was to determine whether any of these genes in the syntenic region are likely candidates as modifiers for clot stability. Seven genes, Twsg1, Zfp161, Dlgap1, Ralbp1, Myom1, Rab31, and Emilin2, of the 23 genes with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mRNA-UTR had differential expression in B6 and A/J mice. Dlgap1, Ralbp1, Myom1, and Emilin2 also had nonsynonymous SNPs. In addition, two other genes had nonsynonymous SNPs, Lama1 and Ndc80. Of these nine candidate genes, Emilin2 was selected for further analysis since other EMILIN (Elastin Microfibril Interface Located Protein) proteins have known functions in vascular structure and coagulation. Differences were found between B6 and A/J mice in vessel wall architecture and EMILIN2 protein in plasma, carotid vessel wall, and thrombi formed after ferric chloride injury. In B6-Chr17A/J mice both clot stability and Emilin2 mRNA expression were higher compared to those in B6 and A/J mice, suggesting the exposure of epistatic interactions. Although other homologous genes in the QTL region cannot be ruled out as causative genes, further investigation of Emilin2 as a candidate gene for thrombosis susceptibility is warranted. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00335-010-9274-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20700597

  7. Monitoring metal ion flux in reactions of metallothionein and drug-modified metallothionein by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, J.; Fabris, D.; Wei, D.; Karpel, R. L.; Fenselau, C.

    1998-01-01

    The capabilities of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry are demonstrated for monitoring the flux of metal ions out of and into the metalloprotein rabbit liver metallothionein and, in one example, chlorambucil-alkylated metallothionein. Metal ion transfers may be followed as the reactions proceed in situ to provide kinetic information. More uniquely to this technique, metal ion stoichiometries may be determined for reaction intermediates and products. Partners used in these studies include EDTA, carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bound hexamer of insulin, and the core domain of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein, a binding protein for single-stranded DNA. PMID:9828006

  8. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Moss, Julie; Graham, Liz; Burton, Nicholas; Hill, Bill; Rao, Jianguo; Baldock, Richard A; Armit, Chris

    2014-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage/) is a freely available database of in situ gene expression patterns that allows users to perform online queries of mouse developmental gene expression. EMAGE is unique in providing both text-based descriptions of gene expression plus spatial maps of gene expression patterns. This mapping allows spatial queries to be accomplished alongside more traditional text-based queries. Here, we describe our recent progress in spatial mapping and data integration. EMAGE has developed a method of spatially mapping 3D embryo images captured using optical projection tomography, and through the use of an IIP3D viewer allows users to view arbitrary sections of raw and mapped 3D image data in the context of a web browser. EMAGE now includes enhancer data, and we have spatially mapped images from a comprehensive screen of transgenic reporter mice that detail the expression of mouse non-coding genomic DNA fragments with enhancer activity. We have integrated the eMouseAtlas anatomical atlas and the EMAGE database so that a user of the atlas can query the EMAGE database easily. In addition, we have extended the atlas framework to enable EMAGE to spatially cross-index EMBRYS whole mount in situ hybridization data. We additionally report on recent developments to the EMAGE web interface, including new query and analysis capabilities. PMID:24265223

  9. Nucleotide sequence and expression of a Drosophila metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Lastowski-Perry, D; Otto, E; Maroni, G

    1985-02-10

    A Drosophila melanogaster cDNA clone was isolated based on its more intense hybridization to RNA sequences from copper-fed larvae than from control larval RNA. This clone showed strong hybridization to mouse metallothionein I cDNA at reduced stringency. Its nucleotide sequence includes an open reading segment which codes for a 40-amino acid protein; this protein is identified as metallothionein based on its similarity to the amino-terminal portion of mammalian and crab metalloproteins. The 10 cysteine residues present occur in five pairs of near vicinal cysteines (Cys-X-Cys). This cDNA sequence hybridized to a 400-nucleotide polyadenylated RNA whose presence in the cells of the alimentary canal of larvae was stimulated by ingestion of cadmium or copper; in other tissues this RNA was present at much lower levels. Mercury, silver, and zinc induced metallothionein to a lesser extent. The level of metallothionein RNA increased very soon after the initiation of metal treatment and reached a maximum after approximately 36 h. PMID:2578462

  10. The mouse Engrailed genes: a window into Autism

    PubMed Central

    Kuemerle, Barbara; Gulden, Forrest; Cherosky, Natalie; Williams, Elizabeth; Herrup, Karl

    2009-01-01

    The complex behavioral symptoms and neuroanatomical abnormalities observed in autistic individuals strongly suggest a multi-factorial basis for this perplexing disease. Although not the perfect model, we believe the Engrailed genes provide an invaluable “window” into the elusive etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder. The Engrailed-2 gene has been associated with autism in genetic linkage studies. The En2 knock-out mouse harbors cerebellar abnormalities that are similar to those found in autistic individuals and, as we report here, has a distinct anterior shift in the position of the amygdala in the cerebral cortex. Our initial analysis of background effects in the En1 mouse knock-out provides insight as to possible molecular mechanisms and gender differences associated with autism. These findings further the connection between Engrailed and autism and provide new avenues to explore in the ongoing study of the biological basis of this multifaceted disease. PMID:17055592

  11. Isolation and chromosomal mapping of a mouse homolog of the Batten disease gene CLN3

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Johnson, K.R.; Lerner, T.J. |

    1996-08-01

    We describe the isolation and chromosomal mapping of a mouse homology of the Batten disease gene, CLN3. Like its human counterpart, the mouse cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1314 bp encoding a predicted protein product of 438 amino acids. The mouse and human coding regions are 82 and 85% identical at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels, and respectively. The mouse gene maps to distal Chromosome 7, in a region containing genes whose homologs are on human chromosome 16p12, where CLN3 maps. Isolation of a mouse CLN3 homolog will facilitate the creation of a mouse model of Batten disease. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  12. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  13. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  14. Metallothionein expression in chloroplasts enhances mercury accumulation and phytoremediation capability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Oscar N.; Alvarez, Derry; Torres, Cesar; Roman, Laura; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetic engineering to enhance mercury phytoremediation has been accomplished by expression of the merAB genes that protects the cell by converting Hg[II] into Hg[0] which volatilizes from the cell. A drawback of this approach is that toxic Hg is released back into the environment. A better phytoremediation strategy would be to accumulate mercury inside plants for subsequent retrieval. We report here the development of a transplastomic approach to express the mouse metallothionein gene (mt1) and accumulate mercury in high concentrations within plant cells. Real-time PCR analysis showed that up to 1284 copies of the mt1 gene were found per cell when compared with 1326 copies of the 16S rrn gene, thereby attaining homoplasmy. Past studies in chloroplast transformation used qualitative Southern blots to evaluate indirectly transgene copy number, whereas we used real-time PCR for the first time to establish homoplasmy and estimate transgene copy number and transcript levels. The mt1 transcript levels were very high with 183 000 copies per ng of RNA or 41% the abundance of the 16S rrn transcripts. The transplastomic lines were resistant up to 20 μm mercury and maintained high chlorophyll content and biomass. Although the transgenic plants accumulated high concentrations of mercury in all tissues, leaves accumulated up to 106 ng, indicating active phytoremediation and translocation of mercury. Such accumulation of mercury in plant tissues facilitates proper disposal or recycling. This study reports, for the first time, the use of metallothioniens in plants for mercury phytoremediation. Chloroplast genetic engineering approach is useful to express metal-scavenging proteins for phytoremediation. PMID:21518240

  15. Update of the human and mouse SERPIN gene superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The serpin family comprises a structurally similar, yet functionally diverse, set of proteins. Named originally for their function as serine proteinase inhibitors, many of its members are not inhibitors but rather chaperones, involved in storage, transport, and other roles. Serpins are found in genomes of all kingdoms, with 36 human protein-coding genes and five pseudogenes. The mouse has 60 Serpin functional genes, many of which are orthologous to human SERPIN genes and some of which have expanded into multiple paralogous genes. Serpins are found in tissues throughout the body; whereas most are extracellular, there is a class of intracellular serpins. Serpins appear to have roles in inflammation, immune function, tumorigenesis, blood clotting, dementia, and cancer metastasis. Further characterization of these proteins will likely reveal potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for disease. PMID:24172014

  16. Update of the human and mouse SERPIN gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Heit, Claire; Jackson, Brian C; McAndrews, Monica; Wright, Mathew W; Thompson, David C; Silverman, Gary A; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    The serpin family comprises a structurally similar, yet functionally diverse, set of proteins. Named originally for their function as serine proteinase inhibitors, many of its members are not inhibitors but rather chaperones, involved in storage, transport, and other roles. Serpins are found in genomes of all kingdoms, with 36 human protein-coding genes and five pseudogenes. The mouse has 60 Serpin functional genes, many of which are orthologous to human SERPIN genes and some of which have expanded into multiple paralogous genes. Serpins are found in tissues throughout the body; whereas most are extracellular, there is a class of intracellular serpins. Serpins appear to have roles in inflammation, immune function, tumorigenesis, blood clotting, dementia, and cancer metastasis. Further characterization of these proteins will likely reveal potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for disease. PMID:24172014

  17. Developmental expression profiles of Celsr (Flamingo) genes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tissir, F; De-Backer, O; Goffinet, A M; Lambert de Rouvroit, C

    2002-03-01

    Celsr, also called Flamingo (Fmi) genes encode proteins of the cadherin superfamily. Celsr cadherins are seven-pass transmembrane proteins with nine cadherin repeats in the extracellular domain, and an anonymous intracellular C-terminus. The Drosophila Fmi gene regulates epithelial planar cell polarity and dendritic field deployment. The three Flamingo gene orthologs in man and rodents are named, respectively, CELSR1-3 and Celsr1-3. Celsr1 and 2 are expressed during early development, in the brain and epithelia. In this report, we characterized further Celsr genes in the mouse, and examined their developmental pattern of expression. Each Celsr is expressed prominently in the developing brain following a specific pattern, suggesting that they serve distinct functions. PMID:11850187

  18. Mouse lysozyme M gene: isolation, characterization, and expression studies.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Wedel, A; Renkawitz, R

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized both cDNA and genomic DNA of the mouse lysozyme M gene. Derivation of the amino acid sequence from the nucleotide sequences revealed six positions in the carboxyl terminus that differ from partial sequences previously published. The differential detection of specific mRNAs from the closely related lysozyme M and P genes has revealed different but overlapping tissue specificities of expression. The M gene is expressed weakly in myeloblasts, moderately in immature macrophages, and strongly in both mature macrophages and macrophage-rich tissues, while high levels of P transcripts are present only in small intestine. Sites of protein accumulation, rather than gene expression, have been identified by comparative quantitation of mRNA and enzyme levels. Images PMID:3413093

  19. GXD: a community resource of mouse Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Hayamizu, Terry F; McCright, Ingeborg J; Xu, Jingxia; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is an extensive, easily searchable, and freely available database of mouse gene expression information (www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml). GXD was developed to foster progress toward understanding the molecular basis of human development and disease. GXD contains information about when and where genes are expressed in different tissues in the mouse, especially during the embryonic period. GXD collects different types of expression data from wild-type and mutant mice, including RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and northern and western blot results. The GXD curators read the scientific literature and enter the expression data from those papers into the database. GXD also acquires expression data directly from researchers, including groups doing large-scale expression studies. GXD currently contains nearly 1.5 million expression results for over 13,900 genes. In addition, it has over 265,000 images of expression data, allowing users to retrieve the primary data and interpret it themselves. By being an integral part of the larger Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource, GXD's expression data are combined with other genetic, functional, phenotypic, and disease-oriented data. This allows GXD to provide tools for researchers to evaluate expression data in the larger context, search by a wide variety of biologically and biomedically relevant parameters, and discover new data connections to help in the design of new experiments. Thus, GXD can provide researchers with critical insights into the functions of genes and the molecular mechanisms of development, differentiation, and disease. PMID:25939429

  20. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  1. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse immunoglobulin epsilon gene: comparison with the human epsilon gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, N; Ueda, S; Hayashida, H; Miyata, T; Honjo, T

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the immunoglobulin epsilon gene cloned from newborn mouse DNA. The epsilon gene sequence allows prediction of the amino acid sequence of the constant region of the epsilon chain and comparison of it with sequences of the human epsilon and other mouse immunoglobulin genes. The epsilon gene was shown to be under the weakest selection pressure at the protein level among the immunoglobulin genes although the divergence at the synonymous position is similar. Our results suggest that the epsilon gene may be dispensable, which is in accord with the fact that IgE has only obscure roles in the immune defense system but has an undesirable role as a mediator of hypersensitivity. The sequence data suggest that the human and murine epsilon genes were derived from different ancestors duplicated a long time ago. The amino acid sequence of the epsilon chain is more homologous to those of the gamma chains than the other mouse heavy chains. Two membrane exons, separated by an 80-base intron, were identified 1.7 kb 3' to the CH4 domain of the epsilon gene and shown to conserve a hydrophobic portion similar to those of other heavy chain genes. RNA blot hybridization showed that the epsilon membrane exons are transcribed into two species of mRNA in an IgE hybridoma. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6329728

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF EPILEPSY GENES IN HUMAN AND MOUSE*

    PubMed Central

    Meisler, Miriam H.; Kearney, Jennifer; Ottman, Ruth; Escayg, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The development of molecular markers and genomic resources has facilitated the isolation of genes responsible for rare monogenic epilepsies in human and mouse. Many of the identified genes encode ion channels or other components of neuronal signaling. The electrophysiological properties of mutant alleles indicate that neuronal hyperexcitability is one cellular mechanism underlying seizures. Genetic heterogeneity and allelic variability are hallmarks of human epilepsy. For example, mutations in three different sodium channel genes can produce the same syndrome, GEFS+, while individuals with the same allele can experience different types of seizures. Haploinsufficiency for the sodium channel SCN1A has been demonstrated by the severe infantile epilepsy and cognitive deficits in heterozygotes for de novo null mutations. Large-scale patient screening is in progress to determine whether less severe alleles of the genes responsible for monogenic epilepsy may contribute to the common types of epilepsy in the human population. The development of pharmaceuticals directed towards specific epilepsy genotypes can be anticipated, and the introduction of patient mutations into the mouse genome will provide models for testing these targeted therapies. PMID:11700294

  3. Genetic mapping of tumor susceptibility genes involved in mouse plasmacytomagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.A.; Krall, M.M.; Dosik, J.K. )

    1993-10-15

    Plasmacytomas (PCTs) were induced in 47% of BALB/cAnPt mice by the intraperitoneal injection of pristane, in 2% of (BALB/c [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1], and in 11% of 773 BALB/cAnPt [times] (BALB/cAnPt [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1]N[sub 2] backcross mice. This result indicates a multigenic mode of inheritance for PCT susceptibility. To locate genes controlling this complex genetic trait, tumor susceptibility in backcross progeny generated from BALB/c and DBA/2N (resistant) mice was correlated with alleles of 83 marker loci. The genotypes of the PCT-susceptible progeny displayed an excess homozygosity for BALB/c alleles with a 32-centimorgan stretch of mouse chromosome 4 (>95% probability of linkage) with minimal recombination (12%) near Gt10. Another susceptibility gene on mouse chromosome 1 may be linked to Fcgr2 (90% probability of linkage); there were excess heterozygotes for Fcgr2 among the susceptible progeny and excess homozygotes among the resistant progeny. Regions of mouse chromosomes 4 and 1 that are correlated with PCT susceptibility share extensive linkage homology with regions of human chromosome 1 that have been associated with cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma and lymphoid, breast, and endocrine tumors. 68 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The three mouse multidrug resistance (mdr) genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner in normal mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Croop, J.M.; Arceci, R.J. ); Raymond, M.; Gros, P.; Devault, A. . Dept. of Chemistry); Haber, D. ); Housman, D.E. )

    1989-03-01

    The gene responsible for multidrug resistance (mdr), which encodes the P-glycoprotein, is a member of a multigene family. The authors have identified distinct mdr gene transcripts encoded by three separate mdr genes in the mouse. Expression levels of each mdr gene are dramatically different in various mouse tissues. Specific mdr RNA transcripts of approximately 4.5, 5 and 6 kilobases have been detected. Each of the mdr genes has a specific RNA transcript pattern. These results should be considered in relation to understanding the normal physiological function of the mdr multigene family.

  5. Rapid cloning of any rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dattamajumdar, A.K.; Jacobson, D.P.; Hood, L.E.; Osman, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) have been the focus of extensive study for several decades and have become an important research area for immunologists and molecular biologists. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has accelerated the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of genes of the immune system. However, cloning and sequencing the Ig variable (V) genes using the PCR technology has been a challenging task, primarily due to the very diverse nature of Ig V region genes. We have developed a simple, rapid, and reproducible PCR-based technique to clone any rearranged mouse Ig heavy or light chain genes. A close examination of all Ig heavy and light chain V gene families has resulted in the design of 5{prime} and 3{prime} universal primers from regions that are highly conserved across all heavy or light chain V gene families, and the joining or constant regions, respectively. We present our strategy for designing universal primers for Ig V gene families. These primers were able to rapidly amplify the rearranged Ig V genes, belonging to diverse Ig V gene families from very different cell lines, i.e., J558, MOPC-21, 36-60, and a chicken ovalbumin specific B-cell hybridoma. In addition, the present study provides the complete alignment of nucleotide sequences of all heavy and light chain variable gene families. This powerful method of cloning Ig V genes, therefore, allows rapid and precise analysis of B-cell hybridomas, B-cell repertoire, and B-cell ontogeny. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Epigenetic interplay between mouse endogenous retroviruses and host genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transposable elements are often the targets of repressive epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation that, in theory, have the potential to spread toward nearby genes and induce epigenetic silencing. To better understand the role of DNA methylation in the relationship between transposable elements and genes, we assessed the methylation state of mouse endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) located near genes. Results We found that ERVs of the ETn/MusD family show decreased DNA methylation when near transcription start sites in tissues where the nearby gene is expressed. ERVs belonging to the IAP family, however, are generally heavily methylated, regardless of the genomic environment and the tissue studied. Furthermore, we found full-length ETn and IAP copies that display differential DNA methylation between their two long terminal repeats (LTRs), suggesting that the environment surrounding gene promoters can prevent methylation of the nearby LTR. Spreading from methylated ERV copies to nearby genes was rarely observed, with the regions between the ERVs and genes apparently acting as a boundary, enriched in H3K4me3 and CTCF, which possibly protects the unmethylated gene promoter. Furthermore, the flanking regions of unmethylated ERV copies harbor H3K4me3, consistent with spreading of euchromatin from the host gene toward ERV insertions. Conclusions We have shown that spreading of DNA methylation from ERV copies toward active gene promoters is rare. We provide evidence that genes can be protected from ERV-induced heterochromatin spreading by either blocking the invasion of repressive marks or by spreading euchromatin toward the ERV copy. PMID:23034137

  7. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  8. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  9. Mouse nerve growth factor gene: structure and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Selby, M J; Edwards, R; Sharp, F; Rutter, W J

    1987-01-01

    The organization and biologically significant sequences of the entire mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) gene have been determined. The gene spans 45 kilobases and contains several small 5' exons. Transcription of the gene results in four different mRNA species, which can be accounted for by alternative splicing and independent initiation from two promoters. These transcripts encode proteins which have divergent N termini and the NGF moiety at their C termini. The levels of the various NGF transcripts have been determined in different tissues and throughout postnatal development. We have also examined the expression of these transcripts in the brain in response to specific early sensory deprivation. The results suggest that the expression of NGF mRNA during postnatal development is regulated independently of the formation of complex neural networks. Images PMID:3670305

  10. AAV-mediated gene transfer to the mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Ahmed, Seemin S.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV) vectors are great tools for gene transfer due to their ability to mediate long-term gene expression. Recombinant AAVs have been used at various ages of development with no apparent toxicity. There are multiple ways of delivering AAV vectors to the CNS, depending on the stage of development of the mouse. In neonates, intravascular injections into the facial vein are often used. In adults, direct injections into target regions of the brain are achieved with great spatiotemporal control through stereotaxic surgeries. Recently, discoveries of new AAV vectors with the ability to cross the blood brain barrier have made it possible to also target the adult CNS by intravascular injections. rAAVs have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles in multiple animal models of CNS disorders, and several clinical trials are currently underway. PMID:23686825

  11. Cloning and characterization of HbMT2a, a metallothionein gene from Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg differently responds to abiotic stress and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yue Yi; Yang, Shu Guang; Tian, Wei Min

    2015-05-22

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are of low molecular mass, cysteine-rich proteins. They play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals and homeostasis of intracellular metal ions, and protecting against intracellular oxidative damages. In this study a full-length cDNA of type 2 plant metallothioneins, HbMT2a, was isolated from 25 mM Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) stressed leaves of Hevea brasiliensis by RACE. The HbMT2a was 372bp in length and had a 237bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding for a protein of 78 amino acid residues with molecular mass of 7.772 kDa. The expression of HbMT2a in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone RY7-33-97 was up-regulated by Me-JA, ABA, PEG, H2O2, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), but down-regulated by water. The role of HbMT2a protein in protecting against metal toxicity was demonstrated in vitro. PET-28a-HbMT2-beared Escherichia coli. Differential expression of HbMT2a upon treatment with 10 °C was observed in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone 93-114 which is cold-resistant and Reken501 which is cold-sensitive. The expression patterns of HbMT2a in the two rubber tree clones may be ascribed to a change in the level of endogenous H2O2. PMID:25858315

  12. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Hayamizu, Terry F; McCright, Ingeborg J; Xu, Jingxia; Berghout, Joanne; Campbell, Jeff; Corbani, Lori E; Forthofer, Kim L; Frost, Pete J; Miers, Dave; Shaw, David R; Stone, Kevin R; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD; http://www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml) is an extensive and well-curated community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD collects different types of expression data from studies of wild-type and mutant mice, covering all developmental stages and including data from RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments. The data are acquired from the scientific literature and from researchers, including groups doing large-scale expression studies. Integration with the other data in Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) and interconnections with other databases places GXD's gene expression information in the larger biological and biomedical context. Since the last report, the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by the addition of new data and by the implementation of more powerful and versatile search and display features. Web interface enhancements include the capability to search for expression data for genes associated with specific phenotypes and/or human diseases; new, more interactive data summaries; easy downloading of data; direct searches of expression images via associated metadata; and new displays that combine image data and their associated annotations. At present, GXD includes >1.4 million expression results and 250,000 images that are accessible to our search tools. PMID:24163257

  13. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Constance M.; Finger, Jacqueline H.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Xu, Jingxia; Berghout, Joanne; Campbell, Jeff; Corbani, Lori E.; Forthofer, Kim L.; Frost, Pete J.; Miers, Dave; Shaw, David R.; Stone, Kevin R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD; http://www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml) is an extensive and well-curated community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD collects different types of expression data from studies of wild-type and mutant mice, covering all developmental stages and including data from RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments. The data are acquired from the scientific literature and from researchers, including groups doing large-scale expression studies. Integration with the other data in Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) and interconnections with other databases places GXD’s gene expression information in the larger biological and biomedical context. Since the last report, the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by the addition of new data and by the implementation of more powerful and versatile search and display features. Web interface enhancements include the capability to search for expression data for genes associated with specific phenotypes and/or human diseases; new, more interactive data summaries; easy downloading of data; direct searches of expression images via associated metadata; and new displays that combine image data and their associated annotations. At present, GXD includes >1.4 million expression results and 250 000 images that are accessible to our search tools. PMID:24163257

  14. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2010 update.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Burton, Nicholas; Rao, Jianguo; Fisher, Malcolm; Baldock, Richard A; Davidson, Duncan R; Christiansen, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage) is a freely available online database of in situ gene expression patterns in the developing mouse embryo. Gene expression domains from raw images are extracted and integrated spatially into a set of standard 3D virtual mouse embryos at different stages of development, which allows data interrogation by spatial methods. An anatomy ontology is also used to describe sites of expression, which allows data to be queried using text-based methods. Here, we describe recent enhancements to EMAGE including: the release of a completely re-designed website, which offers integration of many different search functions in HTML web pages, improved user feedback and the ability to find similar expression patterns at the click of a button; back-end refactoring from an object oriented to relational architecture, allowing associated SQL access; and the provision of further access by standard formatted URLs and a Java API. We have also increased data coverage by sourcing from a greater selection of journals and developed automated methods for spatial data annotation that are being applied to spatially incorporate the genome-wide (approximately 19,000 gene) 'EURExpress' dataset into EMAGE. PMID:19767607

  15. BodyMap: a human and mouse gene expression database.

    PubMed

    Hishiki, T; Kawamoto, S; Morishita, S; Okubo, K

    2000-01-01

    BodyMap is a human and mouse gene expression database that has been maintained since 1993. It is based on site-directed 3'-ESTs collected from non-biased cDNA libraries constructed at Osaka University and contains >270 000 sequences from 60 human and 38 mouse tissues. The site-directed nature of the sequence tags allows unequivocal grouping of tags representing the same transcript and provides abundance information for each transcript in different parts of the body. Our collection of ESTs was compared periodically with other public databases for cross referencing. The histological resolution of source tissues and unique cloning strategy that minimized cloning bias enabled BodyMap to support three unique mRNA based experiments in silico. First, the recurrence information for clones in each library provides a rough estimate of the mRNA composition of each source tissue. Second, a user can search the entire data set with nucleotide sequences or keywords to assess expression patterns of particular genes. Third, and most important, BodyMap allows a user to select genes that have a desired expression pattern in humans and mice. BodyMap is accessible through the WWW at http://bodymap.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp PMID:10592203

  16. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2010 update

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Burton, Nicholas; Rao, Jianguo; Fisher, Malcolm; Baldock, Richard A.; Davidson, Duncan R.; Christiansen, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage) is a freely available online database of in situ gene expression patterns in the developing mouse embryo. Gene expression domains from raw images are extracted and integrated spatially into a set of standard 3D virtual mouse embryos at different stages of development, which allows data interrogation by spatial methods. An anatomy ontology is also used to describe sites of expression, which allows data to be queried using text-based methods. Here, we describe recent enhancements to EMAGE including: the release of a completely re-designed website, which offers integration of many different search functions in HTML web pages, improved user feedback and the ability to find similar expression patterns at the click of a button; back-end refactoring from an object oriented to relational architecture, allowing associated SQL access; and the provision of further access by standard formatted URLs and a Java API. We have also increased data coverage by sourcing from a greater selection of journals and developed automated methods for spatial data annotation that are being applied to spatially incorporate the genome-wide (∼19 000 gene) ‘EURExpress’ dataset into EMAGE. PMID:19767607

  17. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2007 update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Constance M.; Finger, Jacqueline H.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) provides the scientific community with an extensive and easily searchable database of gene expression information about the mouse. Its primary emphasis is on developmental studies. By integrating different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide comprehensive information about expression patterns of transcripts and proteins in wild-type and mutant mice. Integration with the other Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) databases places the gene expression information in the context of genetic, sequence, functional and phenotypic information, enabling valuable insights into the molecular biology that underlies developmental and disease processes. In recent years the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by a large increase in data content, obtained from the literature and provided by researchers doing large-scale in situ and cDNA screens. In addition, we have continued to refine our query and display features to make it easier for users to interrogate the data. GXD is available through the MGI web site at or directly at . PMID:17130151

  18. ATM localization and gene expression in the adult mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Leemput, Julia; Masson, Christel; Bigot, Karine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Dansault, Anouk; Provost, Alexandra; Gadin, Stéphanie; Aoufouchi, Said; Menasche, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Purpose High levels of metabolism and oxygen consumption in most adult murine ocular compartments, combined with exposure to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are major sources of oxidative stress, causing DNA damage in ocular cells. Of all mammalian body cells, photoreceptor cells consume the largest amount of oxygen and generate the highest levels of oxidative damage. The accumulation of such damage throughout life is a major factor of aging tissues. Several multiprotein complexes have recently been identified as the major sensors and mediators involved in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The activity of these complexes initially seemed to be restricted to dividing cells, given their ultimate role in major cell cycle checkpoints. However, it was later established that they are also active in post-mitotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate that the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for the development, maintenance, and normal functioning of the adult central nervous system. One major molecular factor in the DDR is the protein, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). It is required for the rapid induction of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks. These cytotoxic DNA lesions may be caused by oxidative damage. To understand how ATM prevents oxidative stress and participates in the maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability of the adult retina, we determined the ATM expression patterns and studied its localization in the adult mouse eye. Methods Atm gene expression was analyzed by RT–PCR experiments and its localization by in situ hybridization on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. ATM protein expression was determined by western blot analysis of proteins homogenates extracted from several mouse tissues and its localization by immunohistochemistry experiments performed on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. In addition, subcellular localization was realized by confocal microscopy imaging of ocular tissue

  19. Mouse Genetic Nomenclature: Standardization of Strain, Gene, and Protein Symbols

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Schofield, Paul N

    2011-01-01

    The use of standard nomenclatures for describing the strains, genes, and proteins of species is vital for the interpretation, archiving, analysis, and recovery of experimental data on the laboratory mouse. At a time when sharing of data and meta- analysis of experimental results is becoming a dominant mode of scientific investigation, failure to respect formal nomenclatures can cause confusion, errors, and in some cases contribute to poor science. Here we present the basic nomenclature rules for laboratory mice and explain how these rules should be applied to complex genetic manipulations and crosses. PMID:20685919

  20. A Crystallin Gene Network in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Justin P.; Wang, XiangDi; Freeman, Natalie E.; Ma, Zhiwei; Lu, Anna; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the regulation of crystallin genes and protein in the mouse retina using the BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains. Illumina Sentrix BeadChip Arrays (MouseWG-6v2) were used to analyze mRNA levels in 75 BXD RI strains along with the parental strains (C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J), and the reciprocal crosses in the Hamilton Eye Institute (HEI) Retina Dataset (www.genenetwork.org). Protein levels were investigated using immunoblots to quantify levels of proteins and indirect immunohistochemistry to define the distribution of protein. Algorithms in the Genomatix program were used to identify transcription factor binding sites common to the regulatory sequences in the 5′ regions of co-regulated set of crystallin and other genes as compared to a set of control genes. As subset of genes, including many encoding lens crystallins is part of a tightly co-regulated network that is active in the retina. Expression of this crystallin network appears to be binary in nature, being expressed either at relatively low levels or being highly upregulated. Relative to a control set of genes, the 5′ regulatory sequences of the crystallin network genes show an increased frequency of a set of common transcription factor-binding sites, the most common being those of the Maf family. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of human lens epithelial cells (HLEC) and rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC) confirmed the functionality of these sites, showing that MafA binds the predicted sites of CRYGA and CRYGD in HLE and CRYAB, CRYGA, CRYBA1, and CRYBB3 in RGC cells. In the retina there is a highly correlated group of genes containing many members of the α- β- and γ-crystallin families. These genes can be dramatically upregulated in the retina. One transcription factor that appears to be involved in this coordinated expression is the MAF family transcription of factors associated with both lens and extralenticular expression of crystallin genes. PMID:23978599

  1. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2011 update

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Constance M.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD integrates different types of expression data at the transcript and protein level and captures expression information from many different mouse strains and mutants. GXD places these data in the larger biological context through integration with other Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resources and interconnections with many other databases. Web-based query forms support simple or complex searches that take advantage of all these integrated data. The data in GXD are obtained from the literature, from individual laboratories, and from large-scale data providers. All data are annotated and reviewed by GXD curators. Since the last report, the GXD data content has increased significantly, the interface and data displays have been improved, new querying capabilities were implemented, and links to other expression resources were added. GXD is available through the MGI web site (www.informatics.jax.org), or directly at www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml. PMID:21062809

  2. Characterization of the p16 gene in the mouse: Evidence for a large gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.W.; Giendening, J.M.; Flores, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene product is an inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)/cyclin D complex. When uninhibited, the CDK4/cyclin D complex participates in the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and renders it inactive. Upon inactivation of the RB protein, transition from the G{sub 1} to the S phase of mitosis occurs and results in cellular proliferation. Thus, p16 is presumed to act as a negative regulator of cell growth by preventing the phosphorylation, and thereby subsequent inactivation, of RB by CDK4/cyclin D. Recently, the p16 gene (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene) has been mapped to chromosome 9p21 and found to be deleted or mutated in a number of tumor cell lines. These findings support the role of p16 as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor gene and suggest that the mutation of this gene may have global implications in carcinogenesis. We have chosen to test the functional significance of p16 mutations in vivo through the generation of a mouse mutant for p16. In preparation for this undertaking, eight apparently independent (as judged by restriction enzyme digestion and differential hybridization) mouse genomic embryonic stem cell clones have been identified using exon 2 from the human p16 gene as a probe. The identification of these multiple nonoverlapping clones was not entirely surprising since the reduced stringency hybridization of a zoo blot with the same probe also revealed 10-15 positive EcoRI fragments in all species tested, including human, monkey, cow, dog, cat, rabbit, hamster, mouse, chicken and D. melanogaster. Taken together, these findings suggest that the p16 gene is a member of a large gene family. The location of these genomic clones, as well as their potential expression in the mouse, is currently under investigation.

  3. Screening Helicobacter pylori genes induced during infection of mouse stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aparna; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Yan, Ming; Joo, Jungsoo; Gu, Lei; Sang, Hong; Gregory-Bryson, Emmalena; Wood, William G; Ni, Yisheng; Smith, Kimberly; Jackson, Sharon H; Coleman, William G

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of in vivo environment on gene expression in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) as it relates to its survival in the host. METHODS: In vivo expression technology (IVET) systems are used to identify microbial virulence genes. We modified the IVET-transcriptional fusion vector, pIVET8, which uses antibiotic resistance as the basis for selection of candidate genes in host tissues to develop two unique IVET-promoter-screening vectors, pIVET11 and pIVET12. Our novel IVET systems were developed by the fusion of random Sau3A DNA fragments of H. pylori and a tandem-reporter system of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and beta-galactosidase. Additionally, each vector contains a kanamycin resistance gene. We used a mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 and mice, as selective media to identify specific genes that H. pylori expresses in vivo. Gene expression studies were conducted by infecting RAW 264.7 cells with H. pylori. This was followed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to determine the relative expression levels of in vivo induced genes. RESULTS: In this study, we have identified 31 in vivo induced (ivi) genes in the initial screens. These 31 genes belong to several functional gene families, including several well-known virulence factors that are expressed by the bacterium in infected mouse stomachs. Virulence factors, vacA and cagA, were found in this screen and are known to play important roles in H. pylori infection, colonization and pathogenesis. Their detection validates the efficacy of these screening systems. Some of the identified ivi genes have already been implicated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori and other bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae. Transcription profiles of all ivi genes were confirmed by real time PCR analysis of H. pylori RNA isolated from H. pylori infected RAW 264.7 macrophages. We compared the expression profile of H. pylori and RAW 264

  4. The Role of Zic Genes in Inner Ear Development in the Mouse: Exploring Mutant Mouse Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chervenak, Andrew P.; Bank, Lisa M.; Thomsen, Nicole; Glanville-Jones, Hannah C; Skibo, Jonathan; Millen, Kathleen J.; Arkell, Ruth M.; Barald, Kate F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Murine Zic genes (Zic1-5) are expressed in the dorsal hindbrain and in periotic mesenchyme (POM) adjacent to the developing inner ear. Zic genes are involved in developmental signaling pathways in many organ systems, including the ear, although their exact roles haven't been fully elucidated. This report examines the role of Zic1, Zic2, and Zic4 during inner ear development in mouse mutants in which these Zic genes are affected Results Zic1/Zic4 double mutants don't exhibit any apparent defects in inner ear morphology. By contrast, inner ears from Zic2kd/kd and Zic2Ku/Ku mutants have severe but variable morphological defects in endolymphatic duct/sac and semicircular canal formation and in cochlear extension in the inner ear. Analysis of otocyst patterning in the Zic2Ku/Ku mutants by in situ hybridization showed changes in the expression patterns of Gbx2 and Pax2. Conclusions The experiments provide the first genetic evidence that the Zic genes are required for morphogenesis of the inner ear. Zic2 loss-of-function doesn't prevent initial otocyst patterning but leads to molecular abnormalities concomitant with morphogenesis of the endolymphatic duct. Functional hearing deficits often accompany inner ear dysmorphologies, making Zic2 a novel candidate gene for ongoing efforts to identify the genetic basis of human hearing loss. PMID:25178196

  5. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC. PMID:26811627

  6. Gene Targeting of Mouse Tardbp Negatively Affects Masp2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Samar; Xiao, Shangxi; Miletic, Denise; Robertson, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. TDP-43, encoded by the TARDBP gene, was identified as a component of motor neuron cytoplasmic inclusions in both familial and sporadic ALS and has become a pathological signature of the disease. TDP-43 is a nuclear protein involved in RNA metabolism, however in ALS, TDP-43 is mislocalized to the cytoplasm of affected motor neurons, suggesting that disease might be caused by TDP-43 loss of function. To investigate this hypothesis, we attempted to generate a mouse conditional knockout of the Tardbp gene using the classical Cre-loxP technology. Even though heterozygote mice for the targeted allele were successfully generated, we were unable to obtain homozygotes. Here we show that although the targeting vector was specifically designed to not overlap with Tardbp adjacent genes, the homologous recombination event affected the expression of a downstream gene, Masp2. This may explain the inability to obtain homozygote mice with targeted Tardbp. PMID:24740308

  7. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  8. Lysosomal Dysfunctions Associated with Mutations at Mouse Pigment Genes

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Edward K.; Swank, Richard T.

    1979-01-01

    Melanosomes and lysosomes share several structural and biosynthetic properties. Therefore, a large number of mouse pigment mutants were tested to determine whether genes affecting melanosome structure or function might also affect the lysosome. Among 31 mouse pigment mutants, six had 1.5- to 2.5- fold increased concentrations of kidney β-glucuronidase. Three mutants, pale ear, pearl and pallid, had a generalized effect on lysosomal enzymes since there were coordinate increases in kidney β-galactosidase and α-mannosidase. The effects of these three mutations are lysosome specific since rates of kidney protein synthesis and activities of three nonlysosomal kidney enzymes were normal. Also, the mutants are relatively tissue specific in that all had normal liver lysomal enzyme concentrations.—A common dysfunction in all three mutants was a lowered rate of lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney into urine. While normal C57BL/6J mice daily secreted 27 to 30% of total kidney β-glucuronidase and β-galactosidase, secretion of these two enzymes was coordinately depressed to 1 to 2%, 8 to 9% and 4 to 5% of total kidney enzyme in the pale-ear, pearl and pallid mutants, respectively. Although depressed lysosomal enzyme secretion is the major pigment mutant alteration, the higher lysomal enzyme concentrations in pearl and pallid may be partly due to an increase in lysosomal enzyme synthesis. In these mutants kidney glucuronidase synthetic rate was increased 1.4- to 1.5-fold.—These results suggest that there are several critical genes in mammals that control the biogenesis, processing and/or function of related classes of subcellular organelles. The mechanism of action of these genes is amenable to further analysis since they have been incorporated into congenic inbred strains of mice. PMID:115747

  9. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human and Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Sarah F.; van der Spek, Sophie J. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly implicated in disorders like Alzheimer disease, hydrocephalus or glaucoma. To study human genetic diseases and potential new therapies, mouse models are widely used. This requires a detailed knowledge of similarities and differences in gene expression and functional annotation between the species. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare gene expression and functional annotation of healthy human and mouse CPE. Methods We performed 44k Agilent microarray hybridizations with RNA derived from laser dissected healthy human and mouse CPE cells. We functionally annotated and compared the gene expression data of human and mouse CPE using the knowledge database Ingenuity. We searched for common and species specific gene expression patterns and function between human and mouse CPE. We also made a comparison with previously published CPE human and mouse gene expression data. Results Overall, the human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar. Their major functionalities included epithelial junctions, transport, energy production, neuro-endocrine signaling, as well as immunological, neurological and hematological functions and disorders. The mouse CPE presented two additional functions not found in the human CPE: carbohydrate metabolism and a more extensive list of (neural) developmental functions. We found three genes specifically expressed in the mouse CPE compared to human CPE, being ACE, PON1 and TRIM3 and no human specifically expressed CPE genes compared to mouse CPE. Conclusion Human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar, and display many common functionalities. Nonetheless, we also identified a few genes and pathways which suggest that the CPE between mouse and

  10. Genomic organization of the mouse dystrobrevin gene: Comparative analysis with the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, H.J.; Blake, D.J.; Nawrotzki, R.A.; Davies, K.E.

    1997-02-01

    Dystrobrevin, the mammalian orthologue of the Torpedo 87-kDa postsynaptic protein, is a member of the dystrophin gene family with homology to the cysteine-rich carboxy-terminal domain of dystrophin. Torpedo dystrobrevin copurifies with the acetylcholine receptors and is thought to form a complex with dystrophin and syntrophin. This complex is also found at the sarcolemma in vertebrates and defines the cytoplasmic component of the dystrophin-associated protein complex. Previously we have cloned several dystrobrevin isoforms from mouse brain and muscle. Here we show that these transcripts are the products of a single gene located on proximal mouse chromosome 18. To investigate the diversity of dystrobrevin transcripts we have determined that the mouse dystrobrevin gene is organized into 24 coding exons that span between 130 and 170 kb at the genomic level. The gene encodes at least three distinct protein isoforms that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Interestingly, although there is only 27% amino acid identity between the homologous regions of dystrobrevin and dystrophin, the positions of 8 of the 15 exon-intron junctions are identical. 47 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi restore normal growth in a white poplar clone grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil, and this is associated with upregulation of foliar metallothionein and polyamine biosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Cicatelli, Angela; Lingua, Guido; Todeschini, Valeria; Biondi, Stefania; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims It is increasingly evident that plant tolerance to stress is improved by mycorrhiza. Thus, suitable plant–fungus combinations may also contribute to the success of phytoremediation of heavy metal (HM)-polluted soil. Metallothioneins (MTs) and polyamines (PAs) are implicated in the response to HM stress in several plant species, but whether the response is modulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to check whether colonization by AMF could modify growth, metal uptake/translocation, and MT and PA gene expression levels in white poplar cuttings grown on HM-contaminated soil, and to compare this with plants grown on non-contaminated soil. Methods In this greenhouse study, plants of a Populus alba clone were pre-inoculated, or not, with either Glomus mosseae or G. intraradices and then grown in pots containing either soil collected from a multimetal- (Cu and Zn) polluted site or non-polluted soil. The expression of MT and PA biosynthetic genes was analysed in leaves using quantitative reverse transcription–PCR. Free and conjugated foliar PA concentrations were determined in parallel. Results On polluted soil, AMF restored plant biomass despite higher Cu and Zn accumulation in plant organs, especially roots. Inoculation with the AMF caused an overall induction of PaMT1, PaMT2, PaMT3, PaSPDS1, PaSPDS2 and PaADC gene expression, together with increased free and conjugated PA levels, in plants grown on polluted soil, but not in those grown on non-polluted soil. Conclusions Mycorrhizal plants of P. alba clone AL35 exhibit increased capacity for stabilization of soil HMs, together with improved growth. Their enhanced stress tolerance may derive from the transcriptional upregulation of several stress-related genes, and the protective role of PAs. PMID:20810743

  12. Identification of a mouse synaptic glycoprotein gene in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Sun, Chun Xiao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Hua Dong; Wang, Chen Ran; Zhao, Guo Ping; Jin, Meilei; Lau, Lok Ting; Fung, Yin-Wan Wendy; Liu, Shuang

    2005-10-01

    Neuronal differentiation and aging are known to involve many genes, which may also be differentially expressed during these developmental processes. From primary cultured cerebral cortical neurons, we have previously identified various differentially expressed gene transcripts from cultured cortical neurons using the technique of arbitrarily primed PCR (RAP-PCR). Among these transcripts, clone 0-2 was found to have high homology to rat and human synaptic glycoprotein. By in silico analysis using an EST database and the FACTURA software, the full-length sequence of 0-2 was assembled and the clone was named as mouse synaptic glycoprotein homolog 2 (mSC2). DNA sequencing revealed transcript size of mSC2 being smaller than the human and rat homologs. RT-PCR indicated that mSC2 was expressed differentially at various culture days. The mSC2 gene was located in various tissues with higher expression in brain, lung, and liver. Functions of mSC2 in neurons and other tissues remain elusive and will require more investigation. PMID:16341590

  13. Assignment of the lactotransferrin gene to human chromosome 3 and to mouse chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Teng, C T; Pentecost, B T; Marshall, A; Solomon, A; Bowman, B H; Lalley, P A; Naylor, S L

    1987-11-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family of genes, is the major iron-binding protein in milk and body secretions. The amino acid sequence of LTF consists of two homologous domains homologous to proteins in the transferrin family. Recent isolation of cDNA encoding mouse LTF has expedited the mapping of both mouse and human LTF genes. Southern blot analysis of DNA from mouse-Chinese hamster and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids maps the LTF gene to mouse chromosome 9 and to human chromosome 3, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of cell hybrids containing defined segments of human chromosome 3 demonstrates that the gene is located in the 3q21-qter region. These results suggest that LTF and associated genes of the transferrin family have existed together on the same chromosomal region for 300-500 million years. PMID:3478818

  14. Bioaccumulation, morphological changes, and induction of metallothionein gene expression in the digestive system of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense after exposure to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Li, Yingjun; Lang, Xingping; Wang, Lan

    2015-08-01

    To study the responses of digestive system of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense to the exposure with cadmium (Cd), crabs were acutely exposed to 7.25, 14.50, and 29.00 mg/l Cd for 96 h and subchronically exposed to 0.725, 1.450, and 2.900 mg/l for 21 days. Cd bioaccumulation in the hepatopancreas and digestive tract (esophagus and intestine) was examined. Furthermore, histopathological alterations of the esophagus, midgut, hindgut, and hepatopancreas were assessed in animals from the 29.0 and 2.90 mg/l Cd treatment groups, and expression of metallothionein messenger RNA (MT mRNA) in the hepatopancreas and intestine was measured in all treatment groups. The results showed difference in the middle and high concentrations between acute and subchronic treatment groups. Cd content in digestive tract after acute 14.5 and 29.0 mg/l Cd exposure was significantly higher than that at subchronic 1.45 and 2.90 mg/l exposure, but Cd levels in hepatopancreas were not significantly different under the same condition. Acute exposure to Cd induced greater morphological damage than subchronic exposure: large areas of epithelial cells were necrotic in hepatopancreas and midgut, which detached from the basal lamina. Vacuolated muscle cells were observed in the hindgut of animals from the acute exposure group, but the changes of esophageal morphology were not obvious after acute or subchronic treatments. The expression of MT mRNA increased with increasing Cd concentration, and MT mRNA level in acute exposure groups was significantly lower when compared to the subchronic exposure groups. Higher Cd content and lower MT mRNA expression in the acutely exposed groups may be responsible for more severe damage of digestive system in these exposure groups. PMID:25843825

  15. Targeted disruption of the mouse Lipoma Preferred Partner gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vervenne, Hilke B.V.K.; Crombez, Koen R.M.O.; Delvaux, Els L.; Janssens, Veerle; Ven, Wim J.M. van de Petit, Marleen M.R.

    2009-02-06

    LPP (Lipoma Preferred Partner) is a zyxin-related cell adhesion protein that is involved in the regulation of cell migration. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Lpp gene and analysed the importance of Lpp for embryonic development and adult functions. Aberrant Mendelian inheritance in heterozygous crosses suggested partial embryonic lethality of Lpp{sup -/-} females. Fertility of Lpp{sup -/-} males was proven to be normal, however, females from Lpp{sup -/-} x Lpp{sup -/-} crosses produced a strongly reduced number of offspring, probably due to a combination of female embryonic lethality and aberrant pregnancies. Apart from these developmental and reproductive abnormalities, Lpp{sup -/-} mice that were born reached adulthood without displaying any additional macroscopic defects. On the other hand, Lpp{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited reduced migration capacity, reduced viability, and reduced expression of some Lpp interaction partners. Finally, we discovered a short nuclear form of Lpp, expressed mainly in testis via an alternative promoter.

  16. Conditional Gene Targeting in Mouse High Endothelial Venules

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Tobisawa, Yuki; Fukuda, Minoru; Saga, Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEVs) are specialized blood vessels of secondary lymphoid organs composed of endothelial cells with a characteristic cuboidal morphology. Lymphocytes selectively adhere to and migrate across HEVs to initiate immune responses. In this study, we established a novel transgenic mouse line expressing Cre recombinase under the transcriptional control of the gene encoding HEV-expressed sulfotransferase, N-acetylglucosamine-6-O-sulfotransferase 2 (GlcNAc6ST-2), using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering. Crossing these transgenic mice with the ROSA26 reporter strain, which expresses lacZ following Cre-mediated recombination, and staining the resulting progeny with 5-bromo-4-chloro-5-indolyl-β-D-galactoside indicated that Cre recombinase was specifically expressed in mAb MECA79-reactive HEVs in secondary lymphoid organs but not in any other blood vessels of the transgenic mice. The expression of Cre recombinase correlated with a developmental switch, from immature, mAb MECA367-reactive HEVs to mature, mAb MECA79-reactive HEVs in neonatal lymph nodes. In addition to the HEVs, Cre recombinase was also strongly expressed in the colonic villi, which recapitulated the intrinsic expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 as confirmed in GlcNAc6ST-2GFP/GFP knock-in mice and by RT-PCR. Furthermore, treatment with an antimicrobial agent revealed that the colonic expression of Cre recombinase in the transgenic mice was regulated by commensal bacteria in the colon. In addition, Cre recombinase was expressed in a small subset of cells in the brain, testis, stomach, small intestine, and lung. In view of the restricted expression of Cre recombinase, this transgenic mouse line should be useful for elucidating tissue-specific gene functions using the Cre/loxP system. PMID:19380794

  17. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  18. The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease gene (Pkd1) is a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.G.; Loehning, C.; Frischauf, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene (PKD1) was mapped to chromosome 17 using somatic cell hybrid, BXD recombinant inbred strains, and FISH. The gene is located within a previously defined conserved synteny group that includes the mouse homologue of tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and is linked to the {alpha} globin pseudogene Hba-ps4. Although the human genome contains multiple copies of genes related to PKD1, there is no evidence for more than one copy in the mouse genome. Like their human counterparts, the mouse Tsc2 and Pkd1 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation with a distance of only 63 bp between the polyadenylation signals of the two genes. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  20. Fluconazole alters CYP26 gene expression in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Marotta, Francesca; Carletti, Erminia

    2009-04-01

    Disruption of embryonal retinoic acid homeostasis has been postulated to represent an etiological factor involved in the onset of fluconazole-induced teratogenesis. In the present study the impact of a teratogenic pulse of fluconazole on the gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 isoforms, which plays a central role in maintaining proper retinoic acid levels by mediating its degradation, was investigated. ICR pregnant mice were orally administered with 0 (vehicle) or 700mg/kg of fluconazole on gestation day 8. Embryos were collected 12, 24 and 48h after treatment. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (quantitative real-time RT-PCR) assay was used to quantify the mRNA expression of CYP26a1, CYP26b1 and CYP26c1 in embryos. As result, fluconazole exposure was associated to an up-regulation of CYP26a1, CYP26b1, whereas no significant change was identified for the CYP26c1 isoform. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluconazole to alter CYP26 gene expression in mouse embryos. PMID:19429397

  1. TRP channel gene expression in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Jared C; Wensel, Theodore G

    2011-12-01

    In order to identify candidate cation channels important for retinal physiology, 28 TRP channel genes were surveyed for expression in the mouse retina. Transcripts for all TRP channels were detected by RT-PCR and sequencing. Northern blotting revealed that mRNAs for 12 TRP channel genes are enriched in the retina. The strongest signals were observed for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPM1, TRPM3, and TRPML1, and clear signals were obtained for TRPC4, TRPM7, TRPP2, TRPV2, and TRPV4. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence revealed widespread expression throughout multiple retinal layers for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPML1, PKD1, and TRPP2. Striking localization of enhanced mRNA expression was observed for TRPC1 in the photoreceptor inner segment layer, for TRPM1 in the inner nuclear layer (INL), for TRPM3 in the INL, and for TRPML1 in the outer plexiform and nuclear layers. Strong immunofluorescence signal in cone outer segments was observed for TRPM7 and TRPP2. TRPC5 immunostaining was largely confined to INL cells immediately adjacent to the inner plexiform layer. TRPV2 antibodies stained photoreceptor axons in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of TRPM1 splice variants was strong in the ciliary body, whereas TRPM3 was strongly expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium. PMID:22037305

  2. DNA sequence of a gene encoding a BALB/c mouse Ld transplantation antigen.

    PubMed

    Moore, K W; Sher, B T; Sun, Y H; Eakle, K A; Hood, L

    1982-02-01

    The sequence of a gene, denoted 27.5, encoding a transplantation antigen for the BALB/c mouse has been determined. Gene transfer studies and comparison of the translated sequence with the partial amino acid sequence of the Ld transplantation antigen establish that gene 27.5 encodes an Ld polypeptide. A comparison of the gene 27.5 sequence with several complementary DNA sequences suggests that the BALB/c mouse may contain a number of closely related L-like genes. Gene 27.5 has eight exons that correlate with the structural domains of the transplantation antigen. PMID:7058332

  3. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090961

  4. GXD: a Gene Expression Database for the laboratory mouse: current status and recent enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; the Gene Expression Database Group

    2000-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. The database is designed as an open-ended system that can integrate different types of expression data. New expression data are made available on a daily basis. Thus, GXD provides increasingly complete information about what transcripts and proteins are produced by what genes; where, when and in what amounts these gene products are expressed; and how their expression varies in different mouse strains and mutants. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Continuously refined interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species place the gene expression information in the larger biological and analytical context. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics Web site at http://www. informatics.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics. jax.org/menus/expression_menu.shtml PMID:10592197

  5. Gene expression profiling of the developing mouse kidney and embryo.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lisa; Johnson, Penny A; Kimber, Susan J

    2010-02-01

    The metanephros is formed from the reciprocal inductive interaction of two precursor tissues, the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and the ureteric bud (UB). The UB induces MM to condense and differentiate forming the glomerulus and renal tubules, whilst the MM induces the UB to differentiate into the collecting tubules of the mature nephron. Uninduced MM is considered the progenitor cell population of the developing metanephros because of its potential to differentiate into more renal cell types than the UB. Previous studies have identified the phenotype of renal precursor cells; however, expression of candidate marker genes have not been analysed in other tissues of the murine embryo. We have assayed up to 19 candidate genes in eight embryonic tissues at five gestation stages of the mouse embryo to identify markers definitively expressed by renal cells during metanephric induction and markers developmentally regulated during kidney maturation. We then analysed their expression in other developing tissues. Results show Dcn, Hoxc9, Mest, Wt1 and Ywhaq were expressed at moderate to high levels during the window of metanephric specification and early differentiation (E10.5-E12.5 dpc), and Hoxc9, Ren1 and Wt1 expression was characteristic of mature renal cells. We demonstrated Cd24a, Cdh11, Mest, Scd2 and Sim2 were regulated during brain development, and Scd2, Cd24a and Sip1 expression was enriched in developing liver. These markers may be useful negative markers of kidney development. Use of a combination of highly expressed and negative markers may aid in the identification and removal of non-renal cells from heterogeneous populations of differentiating stem cells. PMID:19998061

  6. In vivo selection for metastasis promoting genes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Sun, Fangxian; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Saunders, Aleister J; Schultz, Peter G; Huang, Qihong

    2007-04-17

    Here, we report the identification of a metastasis promoting factor by a forward genetic screen in mice. A retroviral cDNA library was introduced into the nonmetastatic cancer cell line 168FARN, which was then orthotopically transplanted into mouse mammary fat pads, followed by selection for cells that metastasize to the lung. The genes encoding the disulfide isomerase ERp5 and beta-catenin were found to promote breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Disulfide isomerases (thiol isomerases), which catalyze disulfide bond formation, reduction, and isomerization, have not previously been implicated in cancer cell signaling and tumor metastasis. Overexpression of ERp5 promotes both in vitro migration and invasion and in vivo metastasis of breast cancer cells. These effects were shown to involve activation of ErbB2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways through dimerization of ErbB2. Activation of ErbB2 and PI3K subsequently stimulates RhoA and beta-catenin, which mediate the migration and invasion of tumor cells. Inhibition of ErbB2 and PI3K reverses the phenotypes induced by ERp5. Finally, ERp5 was shown to be up-regulated in human surgical samples of invasive breast cancers. These data identify a link between disulfide isomerases and tumor development, and provide a mechanism that modulates ErbB2 and PI3K signaling in the promotion of cancer progression. PMID:17420453

  7. In vivo selection for metastasis promoting genes in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Sun, Fangxian; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Saunders, Aleister J.; Schultz, Peter G.; Huang, Qihong

    2007-01-01

    Here, we report the identification of a metastasis promoting factor by a forward genetic screen in mice. A retroviral cDNA library was introduced into the nonmetastatic cancer cell line 168FARN, which was then orthotopically transplanted into mouse mammary fat pads, followed by selection for cells that metastasize to the lung. The genes encoding the disulfide isomerase ERp5 and β-catenin were found to promote breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Disulfide isomerases (thiol isomerases), which catalyze disulfide bond formation, reduction, and isomerization, have not previously been implicated in cancer cell signaling and tumor metastasis. Overexpression of ERp5 promotes both in vitro migration and invasion and in vivo metastasis of breast cancer cells. These effects were shown to involve activation of ErbB2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways through dimerization of ErbB2. Activation of ErbB2 and PI3K subsequently stimulates RhoA and β-catenin, which mediate the migration and invasion of tumor cells. Inhibition of ErbB2 and PI3K reverses the phenotypes induced by ERp5. Finally, ERp5 was shown to be up-regulated in human surgical samples of invasive breast cancers. These data identify a link between disulfide isomerases and tumor development, and provide a mechanism that modulates ErbB2 and PI3K signaling in the promotion of cancer progression. PMID:17420453

  8. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  9. Metallothionein cDNA, promoter, and genomic sequences of the tropical green mussel, Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, H W; Patel, K H

    1999-09-01

    The primary structure of the cDNA and metallothionein (MT) genomic sequences of the tropical green mussel (Perna viridis) was determined. The complete cDNA sequences were obtained using degenerate primers designed from known metallothionein consensus amino acid sequences from the temperate species Mytilus edulis. The amino acid sequences of P. viridis metallothionein deduced from the coding region consisted of 72 amino acids with 21 cysteine residues and 9 Cys-X-Cys motifs corresponding to Type I MT class of other species. Two different genomic sequences coding for the same mRNA were obtained. Each putative gene contained a unique 5'UTR and two unique introns located at the same splice sites. The promoters for both genes were different in length and both contained metal responsive elements and active protein-binding sites. The structures of the genomic clones were compared with those of other species. J. Exp. Zool. 284:445-453, 1999. PMID:10451422

  10. Mouse models of Down syndrome: how useful can they be? Comparison of the gene content of human chromosome 21 with orthologous mouse genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Fortna, Andrew; Bechtel, Lawrence; Davisson, Muriel T

    2003-10-30

    With an incidence of approximately 1 in 700 live births, Down syndrome (DS) remains the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. The phenotype is assumed to be due to overexpression of some number of the >300 genes encoded by human chromosome 21. Mouse models, in particular the chromosome 16 segmental trisomies, Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje, are indispensable for DS-related studies of gene-phenotype correlations. Here we compare the updated gene content of the finished sequence of human chromosome 21 (364 genes and putative genes) with the gene content of the homologous mouse genomic regions (291 genes and putative genes) obtained from annotation of the public sector C57Bl/6 draft sequence. Annotated genes fall into one of three classes. First, there are 170 highly conserved, human/mouse orthologues. Second, there are 83 minimally conserved, possible orthologues. Included among the conserved and minimally conserved genes are 31 antisense transcripts. Third, there are species-specific genes: 111 spliced human transcripts show no orthologues in the syntenic mouse regions although 13 have homologous sequences elsewhere in the mouse genomic sequence, and 38 spliced mouse transcripts show no identifiable human orthologues. While these species-specific genes are largely based solely on spliced EST data, a majority can be verified in RNA expression experiments. In addition, preliminary data suggest that many human-specific transcripts may represent a novel class of primate-specific genes. Lastly, updated functional annotation of orthologous genes indicates genes encoding components of several cellular pathways are dispersed throughout the orthologous mouse chromosomal regions and are not completely represented in the Down syndrome segmental mouse models. Together, these data point out the potential for existing mouse models to produce extraneous phenotypes and to fail to produce DS-relevant phenotypes. PMID:14585506

  11. Copper-induced overexpression of genes encoding antioxidant system enzymes and metallothioneins involve the activation of CaMs, CDPKs and MEK1/2 in the marine alga Ulva compressa.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Daniel; Valdés, Natalia; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A; Zúñiga, Antonio; Navarrete, Axel; Meneses, Claudio; Moenne, Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Transcriptomic analyses were performed in the green macroalga Ulva compressa cultivated with 10μM copper for 24h. Nucleotide sequences encoding antioxidant enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (ap), dehydroascorbate reductase (dhar) and glutathione reductase (gr), enzymes involved in ascorbate (ASC) synthesis l-galactose dehydrogenase (l-gdh) and l-galactono lactone dehydrogenase (l-gldh), in glutathione (GSH) synthesis, γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase (γ-gcl) and glutathione synthase (gs), and metal-chelating proteins metallothioneins (mt) were identified. Amino acid sequences encoded by transcripts identified in U. compressa corresponding to antioxidant system enzymes showed homology mainly to plant and green alga enzymes but those corresponding to MTs displayed homology to animal and plant MTs. Level of transcripts encoding the latter proteins were quantified in the alga cultivated with 10μM copper for 0-12 days. Transcripts encoding enzymes of the antioxidant system increased with maximal levels at day 7, 9 or 12, and for MTs at day 3, 7 or 12. In addition, the involvement of calmodulins (CaMs), calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1/2) in the increase of the level of the latter transcripts was analyzed using inhibitors. Transcript levels decreased with inhibitors of CaMs, CDPKs and MEK1/2. Thus, copper induces overexpression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes, enzymes involved in ASC and GSH syntheses and MTs. The increase in transcript levels may involve the activation of CaMs, CDPKs and MEK1/2 in U. compressa. PMID:27395803

  12. Genomic distribution of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in mouse kidney and its relationship with gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Huang, Ning; Liu, Yuqi; Cang, Jing; Xue, Zhanggang

    2016-07-01

    Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytonsie (5hmC). Our recent work found a decline in global 5hmC level in mouse kidney insulted by ischemia reperfusion (IR). However, the genomic distribution of 5hmC in mouse kidney and its relationship with gene expression remain elusive. Here, we profiled the DNA hydroxymethylome of mouse kidney by hMeDIP-seq and revealed that 5hmC is enriched in genic regions but depleted from intergenic regions. Correlation analyses showed that 5hmC enrichment in gene body is positively associated with gene expression level in mouse kidney. Moreover, IR injury-associated genes (both up- and down-regulated genes during renal IR injury) in mouse kidney exhibit significantly higher 5hmC enrichment in their gene body regions when compared to those un-changed genes. Collectively, our study not only provides the first DNA hydroxymethylome of kidney tissues but also suggests that DNA hyper-hydroxymethylation in gene body may be a novel epigenetic marker of IR injury-associated genes. PMID:27097670

  13. Identification and Applications of Repetitive Probes for Gene Mapping in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, L. D.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    Interspecific mouse hybrids that are viable and fertile provide a wealth of genetic variation that is useful for gene mapping. We are using this genetic variation to develop multilocus linkage maps of the mouse genome. As an outgrowth of this work, we have identified three repetitive probes that collectively identify 28 loci dispersed on 16 of the 19 mouse autosomes and the X chromosome. These loci establish a skeleton linkage map that can be used to detect linkage over much of the mouse genome. The molecular probes are derived from the mouse mammary tumor virus envelope gene, the ornithine decarboxylase gene, and the triose phosphate isomerase gene. The ability to scan the mouse genome quickly and efficiently in an interspecific cross using these three repetitive probes makes this system a powerful tool for identifying the chromosomal location of mutations that have yet to be cloned, mapping multigenic traits, and identifying recessive protooncogene loci associated with murine neoplastic disease. Ultimately, interspecific hybrids in conjunction with repetitive and single-copy probes will provide a rapid means to access virtually any gene of interest in the mouse genome at the molecular level. PMID:1673105

  14. Persistent Gene Expression in Mouse Nasal Epithelia following Feline Immunodeficiency Virus-Based Vector Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Burnight, Erin R.; Hickey, Melissa A.; Blissard, Gary W.; McCray, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 106 transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 107 to 109 TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (∼109 TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for ∼1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity. PMID:16188984

  15. Cloning, analysis, and chromosomal localization of myoxin (MYH12), the human homologue to the mouse dilute gene

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, L.J.; Kennett, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    The mouse dilute gene encodes a novel type of non-muscle myosin that structurally combines elements from both nonmuscle myosin type I and nonmuscle myosin type II. Phenotypically, mutations in the mouse dilute gene result not only in the lightening of coat color, but also in the onset of severe neurological defects shortly after birth. This may indicate that the mouse dilute gene is important in maintaining the normal neuronal function in the mouse. The authors report the isolation and sequencing of [open quotes]myoxin[close quotes] (MYH12), the human homologue of the mouse dilute gene, and its assignment to human chromosome 15. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Effects of Methylmercury Contained in a Diet Mimicking the Wayana Amerindians Contamination through Fish Consumption: Mercury Accumulation, Metallothionein Induction, Gene Expression Variations, and Role of the Chemokine CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Laclau, Muriel; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Gonzalez, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Fujimura, Masatake; Marighetto, Aline; Godefroy, David; Rostène, William; Brèthes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. We addressed the question of whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Wayanas Amerindians from French Guiana could result in observable adverse effects in mice. Wayanas adult men are subjected to a mean mercurial dose of 7 g Hg/week/kg of body weight. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mice diet with 0.1% of lyophilized Hoplias aimara fish, which Wayanas are fond of and equivalent to the same dose as that afflicting the Wayanas Amerindians. Total mercury contents were 1.4 ± 0.2 and 5.4 ± 0.5 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control and aimara diets, respectively. After 14 months of exposure, the body parts and tissues displaying the highest mercury concentration on a dry weight (dw) basis were hair (733 ng/g) and kidney (511 ng/g), followed by the liver (77 ng/g). Surprisingly, despite the fact that MeHg is a neurotoxic compound, the brain accumulated low levels of mercury (35 ng/g in the cortex). The metallothionein (MT) protein concentration only increased in those tissues (kidney, muscles) in which MeHg demethylation had occurred. This can be taken as a molecular sign of divalent mercurial contamination since only Hg2+ has been reported yet to induce MT accumulation in contaminated tissues. The suppression of the synthesis of the chemokine CCL2 in the corresponding knockout (KO) mice resulted in important changes in gene expression patterns in the liver and brain. After three months of exposure to an aimara-containing diet, eight of 10 genes selected (Sdhb, Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mt2, Mdr1a and Bax) were repressed in wild-type mice liver whereas none presented a differential expression in KO Ccl2−/− mice. In the wild-type mice brain, six of 12 genes selected (Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mdr1a and Bax) presented a stimulated expression, whereas all remained at the basal level of expression in KO Ccl2−/− mice. In the

  17. Effects of methylmercury contained in a diet mimicking the Wayana Amerindians contamination through fish consumption: mercury accumulation, metallothionein induction, gene expression variations, and role of the chemokine CCL2.

    PubMed

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Laclau, Muriel; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Gonzalez, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Fujimura, Masatake; Marighetto, Aline; Godefroy, David; Rostène, William; Brèthes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. We addressed the question of whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Wayanas Amerindians from French Guiana could result in observable adverse effects in mice. Wayanas adult men are subjected to a mean mercurial dose of 7 g Hg/week/kg of body weight. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mice diet with 0.1% of lyophilized Hoplias aimara fish, which Wayanas are fond of and equivalent to the same dose as that afflicting the Wayanas Amerindians. Total mercury contents were 1.4 ± 0.2 and 5.4 ± 0.5 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control and aimara diets, respectively. After 14 months of exposure, the body parts and tissues displaying the highest mercury concentration on a dry weight (dw) basis were hair (733 ng/g) and kidney (511 ng/g), followed by the liver (77 ng/g). Surprisingly, despite the fact that MeHg is a neurotoxic compound, the brain accumulated low levels of mercury (35 ng/g in the cortex). The metallothionein (MT) protein concentration only increased in those tissues (kidney, muscles) in which MeHg demethylation had occurred. This can be taken as a molecular sign of divalent mercurial contamination since only Hg(2+) has been reported yet to induce MT accumulation in contaminated tissues. The suppression of the synthesis of the chemokine CCL2 in the corresponding knockout (KO) mice resulted in important changes in gene expression patterns in the liver and brain. After three months of exposure to an aimara-containing diet, eight of 10 genes selected (Sdhb, Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mt2, Mdr1a and Bax) were repressed in wild-type mice liver whereas none presented a differential expression in KO Ccl2(-/-) mice. In the wild-type mice brain, six of 12 genes selected (Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mdr1a and Bax) presented a stimulated expression, whereas all remained at the basal level of expression in KO Ccl2(-/-) mice. In the

  18. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Comparison of human and mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment subfamilies

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.P.; Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Like the immunoglobulin Igh-V and Igk-V gene families, the human or mouse TCRV gene families may be grouped into subfamilies displaying {ge} 75% nucleic acid sequence similarity among their members. Systematic interspecies sequence comparisons reveal that most mouse Tcr-V subfamilies exhibit clear homology to human TCRV subfamilies ({ge}60% amino acid sequence similarity). Homologous paris of TCRV genes in mice and humans show higher sequence similarity than TCRV genes from different subfamilies within either species, indicating trans-species evolution of TCRV genes. Mouse and human homologues show conservation of their relative map order, particularly in the 3{prime} region and a similar sequential and developmentally programmed expression. When the V regions from both species were analyzed together, local length differences and conserved residues in the loop regions were revealed, characteristic of each of the four TCRV families. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Distribution of the mammalian Stat gene family in mouse chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-09-01

    Studies of transcriptional activation by interferons and a variety of cytokines have led to the identification of a family of proteins that serve as signal transducers and activators of transcription, Stats. Here, we report that the seven mouse Stat loci map in three clusters, with each cluster located on a different mouse autosome. The data suggest that the family has arisen via a tandem duplication of the ancestral locus, followed by dispersion of the linked loci to different mouse chromosomes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Identification of the class I genes of the mouse major histocompatibility complex by DNA-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Goodenow, R S; McMillan, M; Nicolson, M; Sher, B T; Eakle, K; Davidson, N; Hood, L

    1982-11-18

    DNA-mediated gene transfer was used to identify cloned class I genes from the major histocompatibility complex of the BALB/c mouse. Three genes encoding the transplantation antigens H-2 Kd, Dd and Ld were identified as well as genes encoding the Qa-2,3 and two TL differentiation antigens. As many as 10 putative novel class I genes were detected by the association of their gene products with beta 2-microglobulin. Alloantiserum prepared to one of the novel antigens was used to demonstrate the expression of the previously undetected antigen on spleen cells of various inbred, congeneic, and recombinant congeneic strains of mice. PMID:6815535

  2. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  3. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  4. Metallothioneins in the lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Werynska, Bozena; Pula, Bartosz; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna

    2015-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low weight proteins involved in several key cellular processes such as metal ions homeostasis, detoxification and scavenging of free radicals. Four groups of MTs are distinguished: MT-1, MT-2, MT-3 and MT-4. Regardless of the type, MTs are characterized by high content of cysteine, responsible for their biological properties such as binding of relevant zinc and copper ions, as well as toxic ions such as lead and cadmium. MTs were additionally shown to protect cells against oxidative stress damage and participate in differentiation, proliferation and/or apoptosis of normal and cancer cells. Many studies of different neoplasms showed association of elevated MTs levels with occurrence of chemo- and radiotherapy resistance and poor patients' outcome. In this review, we summarize and discuss the potential mechanism of action of metallotioneins in lung physiology and pathology. PMID:25815626

  5. Duplications in ADHD patients harbour neurobehavioural genes that are co‐expressed with genes associated with hyperactivity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Avigail; Steinberg, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a childhood onset disorder, prevalent in 5.3% of children and 1–4% of adults. ADHD is highly heritable, with a burden of large (>500 Kb) copy number variants (CNVs) identified among individuals with ADHD. However, how such CNVs exert their effects is poorly understood. We examined the genes affected by 71 large, rare, and predominantly inherited CNVs identified among 902 individuals with ADHD. We applied both mouse‐knockout functional enrichment analyses, exploiting behavioral phenotypes arising from the determined disruption of 1:1 mouse orthologues, and human brain‐specific spatio‐temporal expression data to uncover molecular pathways common among genes contributing to enriched phenotypes. Twenty‐two percent of genes duplicated in individuals with ADHD that had mouse phenotypic information were associated with abnormal learning/memory/conditioning (“l/m/c”) phenotypes. Although not observed in a second ADHD‐cohort, we identified a similar enrichment among genes duplicated by eight de novo CNVs present in eight individuals with Hyperactivity and/or Short attention span (“Hyperactivity/SAS”, the ontologically‐derived phenotypic components of ADHD). In the brain, genes duplicated in patients with ADHD and Hyperactivity/SAS and whose orthologues’ disruption yields l/m/c phenotypes in mouse (“candidate‐genes”), were co‐expressed with one another and with genes whose orthologues’ mouse models exhibit hyperactivity. Moreover, genes associated with hyperactivity in the mouse were significantly more co‐expressed with ADHD candidate‐genes than with similarly identified genes from individuals with intellectual disability. Our findings support an etiology for ADHD distinct from intellectual disability, and mechanistically related to genes associated with hyperactivity phenotypes in other mammalian species. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B

  6. Cutaneous metallothionein induction by ultraviolet B irradiation in interleukin-6 null mice.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Reeve, V E; Nishimura, H; Satoh, M; Tohyama, C

    2000-02-01

    The mediators of cutaneous metallothionein induction by ultraviolet radiation have not been defined. In this study we sought to identify cytokines that might be involved. We examined the role of interleukin-6, using the IL-6 null (IL-6-/-) mouse, which has been observed to be highly sensitive to ultraviolet radiation damage. Whereas cutaneous metallothionein concentration, measured by radioimmunoassay, began to rise in wild-type (IL-6+/+) mice by 12 h after ultraviolet irradiation, there was a significant delay in the IL-6-/- mice until 48 h after UV irradiation. Immunohistologically, metallothionein appeared in IL-6+/+ mice at 24 h in dermal fibroblasts, and then by 48 h in epidermal basal keratinocytes, with intensity increasing until 72 h, and was coincident with proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive staining. Corresponding metallothionein expression in IL-6-/- mouse skin was significantly delayed. Serum interleukin-6 was elevated in IL-6+/+ mice following ultraviolet irradiation, with peak concentration at 4 h, but no increase in serum interleukin-1beta was found in either IL-6+/+ or IL-6-/- mice. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor alpha concentration in serum was elevated at 12 h postirradiation in IL-6+/+ mice, but there was an earlier (at 4 and 8 h) time-dependent increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha in serum of the IL-6-/- mice. Skin zinc and copper concentrations were not altered by ultraviolet irradiation in either IL-6+/+ or IL-6-/- mice. The results suggest that interleukin-6 may be a very early mediator of cutaneous metallothionein induction by ultraviolet radiation, but that this role is possibly assumed by alternative cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha when interleukin-6 is deficient. PMID:10651996

  7. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  8. Metallothionein induction: a measure of radioprotective action.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, J

    1988-08-01

    Mice treated to induce metallothionein (MT) synthesis in the liver prior to irradiation were resistant to radiation; this also was true of mice that had a portion of skin surgically removed or an immunomodulator administered. Mice given Mn, Cd or Zn subcutaneously prior to irradiation showed increased tolerance to an LD50 level (6-8 Gy) of x rays compared with controls that received no pretreatments (p less than 0.01). All the mice were evaluated during a 30-d postirradiation period. Weight loss in control mice peaked two weeks after irradiation, whereas body weight in mice pretreated with Mn continued to increase after irradiation with x rays. The normal level of MT in mouse liver (25 micrograms g-1 tissue) increased to 70 micrograms g-1 liver tissue in mice irradiated with 6.3-Gy x rays. However, following subcutaneous injection of Cd, Mn or Zn, or intraperitoneal injection of OK-432 (Picibanil, a killed streptococcal preparation, obtained from Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan), MT levels in liver increased by a factor of 2-8 compared to irradiated that were not treated with the reagents listed above. The mortality rate of mice with a surgically excised 2 X 2-cm2 portion of dorsal skin or of those administered OK-432 was lower than that of controls, and MT levels in liver (150-400 micrograms g-1 tissue) were higher than those of irradiated mice that were not surgically treated. These results suggest that the body's protective action against radiation correlates with the biosynthesis of MT, or that MT acts as a scavenger of radiation-induced peroxides. PMID:3410715

  9. Metallothionein induction: a measure of radioprotective action

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, J.

    1988-08-01

    Mice treated to induce metallothionein (MT) synthesis in the liver prior to irradiation were resistant to radiation; this also was true of mice that had a portion of skin surgically removed or an immunomodulator administered. Mice given Mn, Cd or Zn subcutaneously prior to irradiation showed increased tolerance to an LD50 level (6-8 Gy) of x rays compared with controls that received no pretreatments (p less than 0.01). All the mice were evaluated during a 30-d postirradiation period. Weight loss in control mice peaked two weeks after irradiation, whereas body weight in mice pretreated with Mn continued to increase after irradiation with x rays. The normal level of MT in mouse liver (25 micrograms g-1 tissue) increased to 70 micrograms g-1 liver tissue in mice irradiated with 6.3-Gy x rays. However, following subcutaneous injection of Cd, Mn or Zn, or intraperitoneal injection of OK-432 (Picibanil, a killed streptococcal preparation, MT levels in liver increased by a factor of 2-8 compared to irradiated that were not treated with the reagents listed above. The mortality rate of mice with a surgically excised 2 X 2-cm2 portion of dorsal skin or of those administered OK-432 was lower than that of controls, and MT levels in liver (150-400 micrograms g-1 tissue) were higher than those of irradiated mice that were not surgically treated. These results suggest that the body's protective action against radiation correlates with the biosynthesis of MT, or that MT acts as a scavenger of radiation-induced peroxides.

  10. Structure and evolution of the mouse pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) gene locus

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Andrew S; Fischer, Beate; Dveksler, Gabriela; Hori, Tomomi; Wynne, Freda; Ball, Melanie; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Moore, Tom; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Background The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) genes encode proteins of unknown function, and are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (Cea) gene family, which is a member of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) superfamily. In rodents and primates, but not in artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates / hoofed mammals), there have been independent expansions of the Psg gene family, with all members expressed exclusively in placental trophoblast cells. For the mouse Psg genes, we sought to determine the genomic organisation of the locus, the expression profiles of the various family members, and the evolution of exon structure, to attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary history of this locus, and to determine whether expansion of the gene family has been driven by selection for increased gene dosage, or diversification of function. Results We collated the mouse Psg gene sequences currently in the public genome and expressed-sequence tag (EST) databases and used systematic BLAST searches to generate complete sequences for all known mouse Psg genes. We identified a novel family member, Psg31, which is similar to Psg30 but, uniquely amongst mouse Psg genes, has a duplicated N1 domain. We also identified a novel splice variant of Psg16 (bCEA). We show that Psg24 and Psg30 / Psg31 have independently undergone expansion of N-domain number. By mapping BAC, YAC and cosmid clones we described two clusters of Psg genes, which we linked and oriented using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH). Comparison of our Psg locus map with the public mouse genome database indicates good agreement in overall structure and further elucidates gene order. Expression levels of Psg genes in placentas of different developmental stages revealed dramatic differences in the developmental expression profile of individual family members. Conclusion We have combined existing information, and provide new information concerning the evolution of mouse Psg exon organization, the mouse Psg genomic locus

  11. LOCALIZATION OF THE MOUSE THYMIDINE KINASE GENE TO THE DISTAL PORTION OF CHROMOSOME 11

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the regional mapping of the thymidine kinase (tk-1) gene in the mouse using two complementary analyses: 1) investigation of chromosome aberrations associated with tx-1 gene inactivation in the L5178Y TX+/-3.7.2c cell line and (2) in situ molecular hybridization of a clo...

  12. Increased levels of metallothionein in placenta of smokers.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Ana Maria; Arguello, Graciela; Suazo, Myriam; Llanos, Miguel N

    2005-03-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate and compare metallothionein (MT), zinc and cadmium levels in human placentas of smoking and non-smoking women. Smoking was assessed by self-reported cigarette consumption and urine cotinine levels before delivery. Smoking pregnant women with urine cotinine levels higher than 130 ng/ml were included in the smoking group. Determination of placental MT was performed by western blot analysis after tissue homogenization and saturation with cadmium chloride (1000 ppm). Metallothionein was analyzed with a monoclonal antibody raised against MT-1 and MT-2 and with a second anti mouse antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Zinc and cadmium were determined by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry respectively. Smokers showed higher placental MT and cadmium levels, together with decreased newborn birth weights, as compared to non-smokers. The semi-quantitative analysis of western blots by band densitometry indicated that darker bands corresponded to MT present in smokers' samples. This study confirms that cigarette smoking increases cadmium accumulation in placental tissue and suggests that this element has a stimulatory effect on placental MT production. PMID:15664440

  13. The Core Mouse Response to Infection by Neospora Caninum Defined by Gene Set Enrichment Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, John; Goodswen, Stephen; Kennedy, Paul J; Bush, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the BALB/c and Qs mouse responses to infection by the parasite Neospora caninum were investigated in order to identify host response mechanisms. Investigation was done using gene set (enrichment) analyses of microarray data. GSEA, MANOVA, Romer, subGSE and SAM-GS were used to study the contrasts Neospora strain type, Mouse type (BALB/c and Qs) and time post infection (6 hours post infection and 10 days post infection). The analyses show that the major signal in the core mouse response to infection is from time post infection and can be defined by gene ontology terms Protein Kinase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Transcription Initiation. Several terms linked to signaling, morphogenesis, response and fat metabolism were also identified. At 10 days post infection, genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were identified as up regulated in expression. The value of gene set (enrichment) analyses in the analysis of microarray data is discussed. PMID:23012496

  14. Characterization and expression analysis of the Spink5 gene, the mouse ortholog of the defective gene in Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galliano, Marie Florence; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Descargues, Pascal; Micheloni, Alessia; Levy, Elaine; Zambruno, Giovanna; D'Alessio, Marina; Hovnanian, Alain

    2005-04-01

    The human SPINK5 gene, encoding the putative 15-domain serine protease inhibitor LEKTI, was identified as the defective gene in the severe autosomal recessive ichthyosiform skin disorder known as Netherton syndrome and as a candidate susceptibility gene for atopic disease. Here we report mapping of the murine Spink5 gene to chromosome 18 and its characterization. We show that, unlike in humans, transcription of the mouse Spink5 gene generates two mRNAs that differ in the 3' untranslated region. The encoded protein, which is detected in differentiated primary cultured keratinocytes and mouse skin as an approximately 130-kDa glycosylated precursor, displays approximately 60% identity with its human counterpart but lacks the human LEKTI domain 6. As in the human, mouse Lekti represents a marker of epithelial differentiation, strongly expressed in the granular layer of the epidermis, in suprabasal layers of stratified epithelia, and in thymic Hassall's bodies. Our data indicate that mouse Spink5/Lekti, like its human counterpart, is involved in the control of epithelial tissue homeostasis, but also highlight specific features of the murine gene and protein. PMID:15780751

  15. Expression of Growth Hormone Genes in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Palmiter, Richard D.; Hammer, Robert E.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2016-01-01

    OVERVIEW Human or rat growth hormone (GH) genes have been introduced into all cells of a mouse by microinjection of fertilized eggs but they were not expressed under their own promoters. However, substitution of a mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter allowed expression and regulation comparable to that of the endogenous MT genes. These fusion genes have been used to stimulate the growth of both normal mice and dwarf mice that lack sufficient GH. Substitution of a rat elastase-I promoter directed expression of GH exclusively to the acinar cells of the pancreas. Progress has been made towards developing the hGH gene into a vector that is not expressed in vivo unless an enhancer element is inserted. Recombination between overlapping DNA fragments derived from a MThGH gene, each of which is nonfunctional, has been observed when they are coinjected into mouse eggs. In some cases, functional hGH was produced as evidenced by enhanced growth of the mice.

  16. Accumulation of copper in the kidney of pigs fed high dietary zinc is due to metallothionein expression with minor effects on genes involved in copper metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zetzsche, A; Schunter, N; Zentek, J; Pieper, R

    2016-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of high dietary zinc (Zn) oxide on trace element accumulation in various organs with special emphasis on the kidney. A total of 40 weaned piglets were allocated into two groups with 16 and 24 piglets each receiving a diet containing normal (NZn; 100mg Zn/kg) or high (HZn; 2,100mg Zn/kg) Zn concentration, respectively. After two weeks, eight piglets from each treatment were killed and organ samples were taken. Eight piglets from the remaining 16 pigs fed HZn diets were changed to NZn diets (CZn). All remaining piglets were killed after another two weeks for organ sampling. Trace element concentration was determined in the jejunum, liver, kidney, pancreas, bone (metacarpal IV), spleen, lung, thymus, tonsils and lymph nodes of jejunum, ileum and colon. Kidney mRNA expression of Zn transporter ZnT1 and ZIP4, genes involved in Cu metabolism (Ctr1, Atox1, SOD1, ATP7A, CCS, CP) and divalent metal ion transport (DMT1) and binding (MT-1a, MT-2b, MT-3) were determined. The Zn concentration in jejunum, liver, pancreas tissue and metacarpal IV was higher (P<0.05) in HZn group compared with NZn and CZn groups. Trace element concentration in organs of CZn pigs was similar to those fed NZn diets. Zn concentration in muscle, lung and lymphatic organs as thymus, tonsils, spleen and lymph nodes of jejunum, ileum and colon did not differ between the groups. Zn and Cu were positively correlated (R=0.67; P<0.05) in the kidney. No significant differences for Cu chaperones, Cu transporters and Cu-dependent factors were determined despite decreased expression of Atox1 after two weeks and increased Ctr1 expression over time in the HZn group. Expression of MT-1a, MT-2b and MT-3 were significantly higher in HZn fed pigs with most pronounced effects for MT-1a > MT-2b > MT-3. Gene expression of MTs in pigs fed CZn diets did not differ from pigs fed NZn diets. The data suggest that high dietary Zn feeding in pigs leads to Cu co-accumulation in the

  17. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  18. A Survey of Imprinted Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J. Mauro; Starmer, Joshua; Schertzer, Megan D.; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Several hundred mammalian genes are expressed preferentially from one parental allele as the result of a process called genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is prevalent in extra-embryonic tissue, where it plays an essential role during development. Here, we profiled imprinted gene expression via RNA-Seq in a panel of six mouse trophoblast stem lines, which are ex vivo derivatives of a progenitor population that gives rise to the placental tissue of the mouse. We found evidence of imprinted expression for 48 genes, 31 of which had been described previously as imprinted and 17 of which we suggest as candidate imprinted genes. An equal number of maternally and paternally biased genes were detected. On average, candidate imprinted genes were more lowly expressed and had weaker parent-of-origin biases than known imprinted genes. Several known and candidate imprinted genes showed variability in parent-of-origin expression bias between the six trophoblast stem cell lines. Sixteen of the 48 known and candidate imprinted genes were previously or newly annotated noncoding RNAs and six encoded for a total of 60 annotated microRNAs. Pyrosequencing across our panel of trophoblast stem cell lines returned levels of imprinted expression that were concordant with RNA-Seq measurements for all eight genes examined. Our results solidify trophoblast stem cells as a cell culture-based experimental model to study genomic imprinting, and provide a quantitative foundation upon which to delineate mechanisms by which the process is maintained in the mouse. PMID:25711832

  19. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  20. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y.Q. Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G.; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L.; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E.; Murphy, William J.; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sequenced the MSY (Male-Specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only two percent of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 50 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs, but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  1. Surface-based mapping of gene expression and probabilistic expression maps in the mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Lau, Chris; Sunkin, Susan M; Bernard, Amy; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2010-02-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas (ABA, www.brain-map.org) is a genome wide, spatially registered collection of cellular resolution in situ hybridization gene expression image data of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Derived from the ABA, the Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA, http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea) has demonstrated both laminar and areal spatial gene expression correlations in the mouse cortex. While the mouse cortex is lissencephalic, its curvature and substantial bending in boundary areas renders it difficult to visualize and analyze laminar versus areal effects in a rectilinear coordinate framework. In context of human and non-human primate cortex, surface-based representation has proven useful for understanding relative locations of laminar, columnar, and areal features. In this paper, we describe a methodology for constructing surface-based flatmaps of the mouse cortex that enables mapping of gene expression data from individual genes in the ABA, or probabilistic expression maps from the AGEA, to identify and visualize genetic relationships between layers and areas. PMID:19818854

  2. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-01

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  3. Cellular Genes in the Mouse Regulate IN TRANS the Expression of Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, Vicki L.; Carr, Jean K.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Elston, Robert C.; Taylor, Benjamin A.; Cohen, J. Craig

    1985-01-01

    The transcriptional activities of the eleven mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviruses endogenous to two sets of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains, BXD and BXH, were characterized. Comparison of the levels of virus-specific RNA quantitated in each strain showed no direct relationship between the presence of a particular endogenous provirus or with increasing numbers of proviruses. Association of specific genetic markers with the level of MMTV-specific RNA was examined by using multiple regression analysis. Several cellular loci as well as proviral loci were identified that were significantly associated with viral expression. Importantly, these cellular loci associated with MMTV expression segregated independently of viral sequences. PMID:2996982

  4. Mouse Oocytes Transcribe Injected Xenopus 5S RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, Ralph L.; Chen, Howard Y.; Trumbauer, Myrna E.

    2016-01-01

    Transcripts produced after injection of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene into oocyte germinal vesicles of mice migrate electrophoretically with the 5S RNA marker, an indication that the gene is transcribed and processed with considerable accuracy, Approximately two 5S RNA molecules are transcribed per gene per hour. This system may be useful in studying DNA processing and gene regulation by the mammalian ovum and might be modified to allow permanent incorporation of specific genes into mice. PMID:7194505

  5. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  6. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  7. Assessment of orthologous splicing isoforms in human and mouse orthologous genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent discoveries have highlighted the fact that alternative splicing and alternative transcripts are the rule, rather than the exception, in metazoan genes. Since multiple transcript and protein variants expressed by the same gene are, by definition, structurally distinct and need not to be functionally equivalent, the concept of gene orthology should be extended to the transcript level in order to describe evolutionary relationships between structurally similar transcript variants. In other words, the identification of true orthology relationships between gene products now should progress beyond primary sequence and "splicing orthology", consisting in ancestrally shared exon-intron structures, is required to define orthologous isoforms at transcript level. Results As a starting step in this direction, in this work we performed a large scale human- mouse gene comparison with a twofold goal: first, to assess if and to which extent traditional gene annotations such as RefSeq capture genuine splicing orthology; second, to provide a more detailed annotation and quantification of true human-mouse orthologous transcripts defined as transcripts of orthologous genes exhibiting the same splicing patterns. Conclusions We observed an identical exon/intron structure for 32% of human and mouse orthologous genes. This figure increases to 87% using less stringent criteria for gene structure similarity, thus implying that for about 13% of the human RefSeq annotated genes (and about 25% of the corresponding transcripts) we could not identify any mouse transcript showing sufficient similarity to be confidently assigned as a splicing ortholog. Our data suggest that current gene and transcript data may still be rather incomplete - with several splicing variants still unknown. The observation that alternative splicing produces large numbers of alternative transcripts and proteins, some of them conserved across species and others truly species-specific, suggests that, still

  8. Comparative gene expression profiling in two congenic mouse strains following Bordetella pertussis infection

    PubMed Central

    Banus, Sander; Vandebriel, Rob J; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Gremmer, Eric R; Wester, Piet W; van Kranen, Henk J; Breit, Timo M; Demant, Peter; Mooi, Frits R; Hoebee, Barbara; Kimman, Tjeerd G

    2007-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to Bordetella pertussis infection varies widely. These differences can partly be explained by genetic host factors. HcB-28 mice are more resistant to B. pertussis infection than C3H mice, which could partially be ascribed to the B. pertussis susceptibility locus-1 (Bps1) on chromosome 12. The presence of C57BL/10 genome on this locus instead of C3H genome resulted in a decreased number of bacteria in the lung. To further elucidate the role of host genetic factors, in particular in the Bps1 locus, in B. pertussis infection, and to identify candidate genes within in this region, we compared expression profiles in the lungs of the C3H and HcB-28 mouse strains following B. pertussis inoculation. Twelve and a half percent of the genomes of these mice are from a different genetic background. Results Upon B. pertussis inoculation 2,353 genes were differentially expressed in the lungs of both mouse strains. Two hundred and six genes were differentially expressed between the two mouse strains, but, remarkably, none of these were up- or down-regulated upon B. pertussis infection. Of these 206 genes, 17 were located in the Bps1 region. Eight of these genes, which showed a strong difference in gene expression between the two mouse strains, map to the immunoglobulin heavy chain complex (Igh). Conclusion Gene expression changes upon B. pertussis infection are highly identical between the two mouse strains despite the differences in the course of B. pertussis infection. Because the genes that were differentially regulated between the mouse strains only showed differences in expression before infection, it appears likely that such intrinsic differences in gene regulation are involved in determining differences in susceptibility to B. pertussis infection. Alternatively, such genetic differences in susceptibility may be explained by genes that are not differentially regulated between these two mouse strains. Genes in the Igh complex, among which Igh-1a

  9. Chronic toxicity of pesticides to the mRNA expression levels of metallothioneins and cytochrome P450 1A genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ceyhun, Saltuk Bugrahan; Aksakal, Ercüment; Kirim, Birsen; Atabeyoglu, Kübra; Erdogan, Orhan

    2012-03-01

    The hazardous effects of pesticides on various metabolic pathways are a great problem for environmental health and should be well determined. In the present study, the authors treated rainbow trout with 0.6 μg/L deltamethrin for 28 days and 1.6 mg/L 2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate for 21 days. After this time period, the authors observed alterations in mRNA expression levels of MT-A, MT-B and CYP-1A. Chronic exposure to low levels of pesticides may have a more significant effect on fish populations than acute poisoning. While both pesticides caused a significant increase on mRNA levels of MT-A and CYP-1A, MT-B mRNA levels were increased significantly only upon deltamethin administration. The significant increase in mRNA levels of the corresponding genes may be considered as a defence mechanism in addition to the antioxidants against oxidative stress, as well as a detoxification mechanism against adverse effects of pesticides. PMID:21665904

  10. The mouse lysosomal membrane protein 1 gene as a candidate for the motorneuron degeneration (mnd) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, N.A.; Martin, J.E.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-03-01

    The motorneuron degeneration (mnd) mutation causes one of the few late-onset progressive neurodegenerations in mice; therefore, the mnd mouse is a valuable paradigm for studying neurodegenerative biology. The mnd mutation may also model human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) or Batten disease. Mnd maps to the centromeric region of mouse chromosome 8, which likely corresponds to portions of human chromosomes 13,8, or 19; we note that the chromosome 13 portion maps close to a region thought to contain the human Type V NCL locus. We have identified candidate genes for the mnd locus from human chromosomes 13, 8, and 19, and we are mapping these genes in the mouse to determine their proximity to the mutated locus and to refine the comparative human-mouse map in this area. A candidate gene from human chromosome 13 is LAMP1, which encodes lysosomal membrane protein 1. We found that Lamp1 in the mouse lies within the region of the mnd mutation. Therefore, we sequenced Lamp1 cDNAs from homozygous mnd mice and unrelated wildtype C57BL/6 mice. We find no differences between the two cDNA species in the regions examined, and expression analysis shows a similar LAMP1 protein distribution in wildtype and mutant mice, suggesting that an abnormal accumulation of material within normal lysosome structures is unlikely to be the pathogenetic mechanism in the mnd mouse. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Pi, Jingbo; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The role of metallothionein (MT) in mitigation of oxidative DNA damage (ODD) induced either by cadmium (Cd) or the direct oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was systematically examined by using MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or MT-competent wild-type (WT) cells. Both toxicants were much more lethal to MT-null cells (Cd LC50 = 6.6 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 550 μM) than WT cells (Cd LC50 = 16.5 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 930 μM). Cd induced concentration-related MT increases in WT cells, while the basal levels were undetectable and not increased by Cd in MT-null cells. ODD, measured by the immuno-spin trapping method, was minimally induced by sub-toxic Cd levels (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) in WT cells, but markedly increased in MT-null cells (> 430%). Similarly, ODD was induced to higher levels by lower concentrations of H2O2 in MT-null cells than WT cells. Transfection of MT-I into MT-null cells reduced both Cd- and H2O2-induced cytolethality and ODD. Cd increased expression of the oxidant defense genes, HO-1 and GSTa2 to a much greater extent in MT-null cells than WT. Cd or H2O2 exposure increased expression of key transport genes, Mrp1 and Mrp2, in WT cells but not in MT-null cells. MT protects against Cd- and H2O2-induced ODD in MT competent cells possibly by multiple mechanisms, potentially including direct metal ion sequestration and sequestration of oxidant radicals by MT. MT-deficient cells appear to adapt to Cd primarily by turning on oxidant response systems, while MT-competent cells activate MT and transport systems. PMID:22914987

  12. Cadmium, metallothionein and renal tubular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, M; Jin, T; Nordberg, G F

    1992-01-01

    Cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity develops at cadmium concentrations in the renal cortex of 10-300 micrograms/g wet weight. The actual concentration at which it develops depends on a number of factors, e.g., exposure route, chemical species of cadmium administered, rate of administration and simultaneous exposure to other metals. The role of these factors can be explained by a mechanism of cadmium nephrotoxicity in which both extracellular and intracellular metallothionein binding play an essential role. In reindeer used for human food, cadmium was shown to be bound to metallothionein-like proteins. If cadmium bound to such proteins enters the blood plasma via the gastrointestinal tract, this is of special toxicological significance. Metallothionein-bound cadmium in the plasma of experimental animals is efficiently transported to the kidney. Tubular dysfunction in the kidney following a normally tubulotoxic dose of cadmium bound to metallothionein was prevented by preinduction of metallothionein synthesis by small non-toxic doses of cadmium. PMID:1303954

  13. Areal and laminar differentiation in the mouse neocortex using large scale gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Hawrylycz, Mike; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Sunkin, Susan M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Ng, Lydia

    2010-02-01

    Although cytoarchitectonic organization of the mammalian cortex into different lamina has been well-studied, identifying the architectural differences that distinguish cortical areas from one another is more challenging. Localization of large anatomical structures is possible using magnetic resonance imaging or invasive techniques (such as anterograde or retrograde tracing), but identifying patterns in gene expression architecture is limited as gene products do not necessarily identify an immediate functional consequence of a specialized area. Expression of specific genes in the mouse and human cortex is most often identified across entire lamina, and areal patterning of expression (when it exists) is most easily differentiated on a layer-by-layer basis. Since cortical organization is defined by the expression of large sets of genes, the task of identifying individual (or groups of structures) cannot be done using individual areal markers. In this manuscript we describe a methodology for clustering gene expression correlation profiles in the C57Bl/6J mouse cortex to identify large-scale genetic relationships between layers and areas. By using the Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea/) derived from in situ hybridization data in the Allen Brain Atlas, we show that a consistent expression based organization of areal patterning in the mouse cortex exists when clustered on a laminar basis. Surface-based mapping and visualization techniques are used as a representation to clarify these relationships. PMID:19800006

  14. eMouseAtlas informatics: embryo atlas and gene expression database.

    PubMed

    Armit, Chris; Richardson, Lorna; Hill, Bill; Yang, Yiya; Baldock, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of developmental biology data is presented in the form of images at morphologically diverse stages of development. The curation of these datasets presents different challenges to that of sequence/text-based data. Towards this end, the eMouseAtlas project created a digital atlas of mouse embryo development as a means of understanding developmental anatomy and exploring the relationship between genes and development in a spatial context. Using the morphological staging system pioneered by Karl Theiler, the project has generated 3D models of post-implantation mouse development and used them as a spatial framework for the delineation of anatomical components and for archiving in situ gene expression data in the EMAGE database. This has allowed us to develop a unique online resource for mouse developmental biology. We describe here the underlying structure of the resource, as well as some of the tools that have been developed to allow users to mine the curated image data. These tools include our IIP3D/X3DOM viewer that allows 3D visualisation of anatomy and/or gene expression in the context of a web browser, and the eHistology resource that extends this functionality to allow visualisation of high-resolution cellular level images of histology sections. Furthermore, we review some of the informatics aspects of eMouseAtlas to provide a deeper insight into the use of the atlas and gene expression database. PMID:26296321

  15. Analysis of the effects of overexpression of metallothionein-I in transgenic mice on the reproductive toxicology of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Dalton, T; Fu, K; Enders, G C; Palmiter, R D; Andrews, G K

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to low levels of cadmium reduces fertility. In male mice spermatogenesis is highly sensitive to cadmium, whereas in females the peri-implantation period of pregnancy is sensitive. To examine the potential roles of the cadmium-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), in the reproductive toxicology of cadmium, we examined a transgenic mouse strain that overexpresses metallothionein-I (MT-I). These mice had dramatically increased steady-state levels of MT-I mRNA and MT in the testes and in the female reproductive tract during the peri-implantation period of pregnancy, and this overexpression occurred in a cell-specific and temporally regulated manner similar to that of the endogenous MT-I gene. Transgenic and control males were injected with cadmium, and the histology of the testes was examined. An injection of 7.5 mumol Cd/kg had no effect on histology of the testes in either transgenic or control mice. In contrast, an injection of 10 mumol Cd/kg caused rapid changes in the histology of the testes and resulted in pronounced testicular necrosis in both control and transgenic mice. Female transgenic and control mice were mated and then injected with cadmium (30-45 mumol Cd/kg) on the day of blastocyst implantation (day 4). In both of these groups, injection of cadmium reduced pregnancy rate, and no dramatic protection was afforded by maternal and/or embryonic overexpression of MT. Thus, overexpression of MT-I does not significantly protect against either of these cadmium-induced effects on fertility. PMID:8834864

  16. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  17. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  18. The tumor suppressor, p53 regulates the γA-crystallin gene during mouse lens development.

    PubMed

    Hu, X-H; Nie, Q; Yi, M; Li, T-T; Wang, Z-F; Huang, Z-X; Gong, X-D; Zhou, L; Ji, W-K; Hu, W-F; Liu, J-F; Wang, L; Woodward, Z; Zhu, J; Liu, W-B; Nguyen, Q D; Li, D W-C

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, p53 regulates a large number of target genes to control cell proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it is also implicated in the regulation of cell differentiation in muscle, the circulatory system and various carcinoma tissues. We have recently shown that p53 also controls lens differentiation. Regarding the mechanism, we reveal that p53 directly regulates several genes including c-Maf and Prox1, two important transcription factors for lens differentiation, and αA and βA3/A1, the lens differentiation markers. In the present study, we present evidence to show that the γA-crystallin gene distal promoter and the first intron also contain p53 binding sites and are capable of mediating p53 control during mouse lens development. First, gel mobility shifting assays revealed that the p53 protein in nuclear extracts from human lens epithelial cells (HLE) directly binds to the p53 binding sites present in the γA-crystallin gene. Second, the exogenous wild type p53 induces the dose-dependent expression of the luciferase reporter gene driven by the basic promoter containing the γA-crystallin gene p53 binding site. In contrast, the exogenous dominant negative mutant p53 causes a dose-dependent inhibition of the same promoter. Third, ChIP assays revealed that p53 binds to the γA-crystallin gene promoter in vivo. Finally, in the p53 knockout mouse lenses, the expression level of the γAcrystallin gene was found attenuated in comparison with that in the wild type mouse lenses. Together, our results reveal that p53 regulates γA-crystallin gene expression during mouse lens development. Thus, p53 directly regulates all 3 types of crystallin genes to control lens differentiation. PMID:25336329

  19. The Rab protein family: Genetic mapping of six Rab genes in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, M.D.F.S.; Gutierrez, M.J.; Kingsmore, S.F.

    1995-12-10

    Rab proteins constitute a family of GTP-binding proteins that are located in distinct intracellular compartments and play a role in the regulation of vesicular trafficking. Yeast mutations in Rab gene homologs cause defects in vesicular transport similar to those observed in beige (bg) mice. To investigate Rab genes as candidates for mouse mutations characterized by defects in vesicular trafficking, we utilized an intersubspecific backcross [C57BL/6J-bg{sup J} X (C57BL/6J-bg{sup J} X CAST/Ei)F{sub 1}] segregating for the bg locus. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were obtained through Southern hybridization of F{sub 1} and C57BL/6J chromosomal DNA with the coding sequences of Rab genes. These RFLPs and 12 polymorphic microsatellites were used to determine the segregation of the Rab genes in 93 backcross mice. Rab4a, Rab4b, Rab7, Rab10, Rab22, and Rab24 were localized on mouse chromosomes 8, 7, 9, 12, 2, and 13, respectively. Although the results exclude these loci as candidates for bg, they demonstrate a wide dispersion of Rab genes throughout the mouse genome and reveal that Rab4b and Rab24 are possible candidates for the mouse mutations reduced pigmentation (rp) and purkinje cell degeneration (pcd), respectively. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, David G; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  1. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  2. Shared changes in gene expression in frontal cortex of four genetically modified mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, D; Juhasz, G; Aso, E; Chase, D; del Rio, J; Fabre, V; Hamon, M; Lanfumey, L; Lesch, K-P; Maldonado, R; Serra, M-A; Sharp, T; Tordera, R; Toro, C; Deakin, J F W

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify whether genetic manipulation of four systems implicated in the pathogenesis of depression converge on shared molecular processes underpinning depression-like behaviour in mice. Altered 5HT function was modelled using the 5-HT transporter knock out mouse, impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function using an antisense-induced knock down mouse, disrupted glutamate function using a heterozygous KO of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 gene, and impaired cannabinoid signalling using the cannabinoid 1 receptor KO mouse. All 4 four genetically modified mice were previously shown to show exaggerated helpless behaviour compared to wild-type controls and variable degrees of anxiety and anhedonic behaviour. mRNA was extracted from frontal cortex and hybridised to Illumina microarrays. Combined contrast analysis was used to identify genes showing different patterns of up- and down-regulation across the 4 models. 1823 genes were differentially regulated. They were over-represented in gene ontology categories of metabolism, protein handling and synapse. In each model compared to wild-type mice of the same genetic background, a number of genes showed increased expression changes of >10%, other genes showed decreases in each model. Most of the genes showed mixed effects. Several previous array findings were replicated. The results point to cellular stress and changes in post-synaptic remodelling as final common mechanisms of depression and resilience. PMID:21030216

  3. Exploring novel candidate genes from the Mouse Genome Informatics database: Potential implications for avian migration research.

    PubMed

    Contina, Andrea; Bridge, Eli S; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2016-07-01

    To search for genes associated with migratory phenotypes in songbirds, we selected candidate genes through annotations from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and assembled an extensive candidate-gene library. Then, we implemented a next-generation sequencing approach to obtain DNA sequences from the Painted Bunting genome. We focused on those sequences that were conserved across avian species and that aligned with candidate genes in our mouse library. We genotyped short sequence repeats from the following candidate genes: ADRA1d, ANKRD17, CISH and MYH7. We studied the possible correlations between allelic variations occurring in these novel candidate migration genes and avian migratory phenotypes available from the published literature. We found that allele variation at MYH7 correlated with a calculated index of speed of migration (km/day) across 11 species of songbirds. We highlight the potential of the Mouse Genome Informatics database in providing new candidate genes that might play a crucial role in regulating migration in birds and possibly in other taxa. Our research effort shows the benefits and limitations of working with extensive genomic datasets and offers a snapshot of the challenges related to cross-species validation in behavioral and molecular ecology studies. PMID:27061206

  4. Expression of homeobox genes in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; Chang, Isabelle; Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; Omura, Masayo

    2016-10-01

    Homeobox genes constitute a large family of genes widely studied because of their role in the establishment of the body pattern. However, they are also involved in many other events during development and adulthood. The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) is an excellent model to study neurogenesis in the adult nervous system. Analyses of homeobox genes during development show that some of these genes are involved in the formation and establishment of cell diversity in the MOE. Moreover, the mechanisms of expression of odorant receptors (ORs) constitute one of the biggest enigmas in the field. Analyses of OR promoters revealed the presence of homeodomain binding sites in their sequences. Here we characterize the expression patterns of a set of 49 homeobox genes in the MOE with in situ hybridization. We found that seven of them (Dlx3, Dlx5, Dlx6, Msx1, Meis1, Isl1, and Pitx1) are zonally expressed. The homeobox gene Emx1 is expressed in three guanylate cyclase(+) populations, two located in the MOE and the third one in an olfactory subsystem known as Grüneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nasal cavity. The homeobox gene Tshz1 is expressed in a unique patchy pattern across the MOE. Our findings provide new insights to guide functional studies that aim to understand the complexity of transcription factor expression and gene regulation in the MOE. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2713-2739, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27243442

  5. Gene Delivery to the Retina: From Mouse to Man

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jean; Chung, Daniel C.; Maguire, Albert

    2013-01-01

    With the recent progress in identifying disease-causing genes in humans and in animal models, there are more and more opportunities for using retinal gene transfer to learn more about retinal physiology and also to develop therapies for blinding disorders. Success in preclinical studies for one form of inherited blindness have led to testing in human clinical trials. This paves the way to consider a number of other retinal diseases as ultimate gene therapy targets in human studies. The information presented here is designed to assist scientists and clinicians to use gene transfer to probe the biology of the retina and/or to move appropriate gene-based treatment studies from the bench to the clinic. PMID:22365778

  6. Metallothionein protection of cadmium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, Curtis D. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of the cadmium (Cd)-binding protein from horse kidney in 1957 marked the birth of research on this low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich protein called metallothionein (MT) in Cd toxicology. MT plays minimal roles in the gastrointestinal absorption of Cd, but MT plays important roles in Cd retention in tissues and dramatically decreases biliary excretion of Cd. Cd-bound to MT is responsible for Cd accumulation in tissues and the long biological half-life of Cd in the body. Induction of MT protects against acute Cd-induced lethality, as well as acute toxicity to the liver and lung. Intracellular MT also plays important roles in ameliorating Cd toxicity following prolonged exposures, particularly chronic Cd-induced nephrotoxicity, osteotoxicity, and toxicity to the lung, liver, and immune system. There is an association between human and rodent Cd exposure and prostate cancers, especially in the portions where MT is poorly expressed. MT expression in Cd-induced tumors varies depending on the type and the stage of tumor development. For instance, high levels of MT are detected in Cd-induced sarcomas at the injection site, whereas the sarcoma metastases are devoid of MT. The use of MT-transgenic and MT-null mice has greatly helped define the role of MT in Cd toxicology, with the MT-null mice being hypersensitive and MT-transgenic mice resistant to Cd toxicity. Thus, MT is critical for protecting human health from Cd toxicity. There are large individual variations in MT expression, which might in turn predispose some people to Cd toxicity.

  7. Expression Profiling of the Solute Carrier Gene Family in the Mouse BrainS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Amber; Royall, Josh; Hohmann, John G.; Wang, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    The solute carrier (Slc) superfamily is a major group of membrane transport proteins present in mammalian cells. Although Slc transporters play essential and diverse roles in the central nervous system, the localization and function of the vast majority of Slc genes in the mammalian brain are largely unknown. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization data generated by the Allen Brain Atlas, we systematically and quantitatively analyzed the spatial and cellular distribution of 307 Slc genes, which represent nearly 90% of presently known mouse Slc genes, in the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain. Our analysis showed that 252 (82%) of the 307 Slc genes are present in the brain, and a large proportion of these genes were detected at low to moderate expression levels. Evaluation of 20 anatomical brain subdivisions demonstrated a comparable level of Slc gene complexity but significant difference in transcript enrichment. The distribution of the expressed Slc genes was diverse, ranging from near-ubiquitous to highly localized. Functional annotation in 20 brain regions, including the blood-brain and blood-cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) barriers, suggests major roles of Slc transporters in supporting brain energy utilization, neurotransmission, nutrient supply, and CSF production. Furthermore, hierarchical cluster analysis revealed intricate Slc expression patterns associated with neuroanatomical organization. Our studies also revealed Slc genes present within defined brain microstructures and described the putative cell types expressing individual Slc genes. These results provide a useful resource for investigators to explore the roles of Slc genes in neurophysiological and pathological processes. PMID:19179540

  8. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  9. Genomic organization and genetic mapping of the neuroimmune gene 12rf5 to mouse chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Autieri, M.V.; Kozak, C.A.; Cohen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems share many functional and molecular similarities, including shared surface antigens, secretions of soluble factors, and cross-modulatory effects. We have identified previously a novel mRNA termed F5, which is expressed only in activated T lymphocytes and mature, postmitotic neurons. Tissue specificity and sequence conservation suggest an important function for F5 in T-lymphocyte proliferation and neuronal maturation. The F5 gene product is an evolutionarily conserved, cytoskeletal-associated phosphoprotein. A full-length mouse genomic clone has been isolated. The protein coding region of the F5 gene is approximately 16 kb in length and is composed of 13 coding exons. The gene encoding F5, termed I2rf5, was mapped using interspecies mouse crosses in close proximity to a number of genes associated with neuronal defects on distal chromosome 4. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Creating reference gene annotation for the mouse C57BL6/J genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Jonathan M; Harrow, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Annotation on the reference genome of the C57BL6/J mouse has been an ongoing project ever since the draft genome was first published. Initially, the principle focus was on the identification of all protein-coding genes, although today the importance of describing long non-coding RNAs, small RNAs, and pseudogenes is recognized. Here, we describe the progress of the GENCODE mouse annotation project, which combines manual annotation from the HAVANA group with Ensembl computational annotation, alongside experimental and in silico validation pipelines from other members of the consortium. We discuss the more recent incorporation of next-generation sequencing datasets into this workflow, including the usage of mass-spectrometry data to potentially identify novel protein-coding genes. Finally, we will outline how the C57BL6/J genebuild can be used to gain insights into the variant sites that distinguish different mouse strains and species. PMID:26187010

  11. Four paralogous protein 4.1 genes map to distinct chromosomes in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Peters, L L; Weier, H U; Walensky, L D; Snyder, S H; Parra, M; Mohandas, N; Conboy, J G

    1998-12-01

    Four highly conserved members of the skeletal protein 4.1 gene family encode a diverse array of protein isoforms via tissue-specific transcription and developmentally regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing. In addition to the prototypical red blood cell 4.1R (human gene symbol EPB41,) these include two homologues that are strongly expressed in the brain (4.1N, EPB41L1; and 4.1B, EPB41L3) and another that is widely expressed in many tissues (4.1G, EPB41L2). As part of a study on the structure and evolution of the 4.1 genes in human and mouse, we have now completed the chromosomal mapping of their respective loci by reporting the localization of mouse 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B, as well as human 4.1B. For the mouse 4.1 genes, Southern blot analysis of RFLPs in The Jackson Laboratory BSS interspecific backcross yielded the following assignments: 4.1N (Epb4.1l1,) chromosome 2; 4.1G (Epb4.1l2,) chromosome 10; and 4.1B (Epb4.1l3,) mouse chromosome 17. Human 4.1B was physically mapped to chromosome 18p11 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. All of the mouse genes mapped within or adjacent to regions of conserved synteny with corresponding human chromosomes. We conclude that a set of four paralogous 4.1 genes has been evolutionarily conserved in rodents and primates. PMID:9828140

  12. The mouse protein synthesis initiation factor 4A gene family includes two related functional genes which are differentially expressed.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Trachsel, H

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a family of mouse genomic sequences hybridizing to mouse cDNA probes coding for eIF-4A, one of the protein synthesis initiation factors involved in the binding of mRNA to the ribosome. We estimate that there is a total of approximately 9-13 eIF-4A pseudogenes. We also found an eIF-4A intronless retroposon which, when compared to the cDNA, contains a single nucleotide difference. This possibly functional gene contains a mouse repetitive B1 element integrated in the promoter region. Furthermore, we have cloned two intron-containing eIF-4A genes (termed eIF-4AI and eIF-4AII). The eIF-4AII gene codes for a previously unknown form of eIF-4A. Northern blot hybridization with RNA from several mouse organs shows a variation in eIF-4AI expression within a factor of 7. In contrast, relative to liver, eIF-4AII expression is 20- to 30-times higher in brain and kidney, 10- to 17-fold higher in lung and heart, and is about equally abundant in liver, spleen and thymus. These data suggest that the relative efficiency of protein synthesis initiation for different mRNAs, as reflected by discrimination in messenger 5'-terminal cap recognition and binding to ribosomes, varies in different tissues. Images PMID:3046931

  13. Characterization of the genomic structure of the mouse APLP1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Sue; Wu, Kuo; Black, I.B.; Schaar, D.G.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the organization of the mouse APLP1 gene, an evolutionarily conserved amyloid precursor-like protein. The amyloid beta protein, important in Alzheimer diseases, is derived from these precursor proteins. By investigating the expression and structure of this murine gene, it is hoped that more will be learned about the function and regulation of the human homologue. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Fetal gene therapy of α-thalassemia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Chin; Chang, Judy; Sadelain, Michel; Kan, Y. W.

    2007-01-01

    Fetuses with homozygous α-thalassemia usually die at the third trimester of pregnancy or soon after birth. Hence, the disease could potentially be a target for fetal gene therapy. We have previously established a mouse model of α-thalassemia. These mice mimic the human α-thalassemic conditions and can be used as preclinical models for fetal gene therapy. We tested a lentiviral vector containing the HS 2, 3, and 4 of the β-LCR, a central polypurine tract element, and the β-globin gene promoter directing either the EGFP or the human α-globin gene. We showed that the GFP expression was erythroid-specific and detected in BFU-E colonies and the erythroid progenies of CFU-GEMM. For in utero gene delivery, we did yolk sac vessel injection at midgestation of mouse embryos. The recipient mice were analyzed after birth for human α-globin gene expression. In the newborn, human α-globin gene expression was detected in the liver, spleen, and peripheral blood. The human α-globin gene expression was at the peak at 3–4 months, when it reached 20% in some recipients. However, the expression declined at 7 months. Colony-forming assays in these mice showed low abundance of the transduced human α-globin gene in their BFU-E and CFU-GEMM and the lack of its transcript. Thus, lentiviral vectors can be an effective vehicle for delivering the human α-globin gene into erythroid cells in utero, but, in the mouse model, delivery at late midgestation could not transduce hematopoietic stem cells adequately to sustain gene expression. PMID:17496141

  15. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  16. Chromosomal localization and genomic characterization of the mouse melastatin gene (Mlsn1).

    PubMed

    Hunter, J J; Shao, J; Smutko, J S; Dussault, B J; Nagle, D L; Woolf, E A; Holmgren, L M; Moore, K J; Shyjan, A W

    1998-11-15

    We recently described a novel gene, melastatin, whose expression is inversely correlated with melanoma aggressiveness. Chromosomal localization of this gene places it on mouse chromosome 7 and in the 15q13-q14 region of the human genome. Although expression patterns and chromosomal localization in the mouse are consistent with involvement of melastatin mutations in the mouse ruby-eye-2 defect, congenic analysis showed genetic segregation of the two loci. Cloning of the full-length human cDNA revealed a much larger transcript than we had previously identified, corresponding to a 1533-amino-acid protein product with homology to members of the transient receptor potential (Trp) family of calcium channels. The mouse melastatin gene contains 27 exons and spans at least 58 kb of genomic DNA. The promoter region of Mlsn1 contains four potential microphthalmia binding sites including an M box, a transcriptional regulatory element unique to genes with a restricted melanocytic expression pattern. A 1-kb PvuII fragment from this region was capable of driving high levels of luciferase expression in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:9806836

  17. Isolation, characterization, and chromosomal localization of mouse and human COUP-TF I and II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y.; Krishnan, V.; Zeng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs) are orphan members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. COUP-TF homologues have been cloned in many species, from Drosophila to human. The protein sequences of COUP-TFs are highly homologous across species, suggesting functional conservation. Two COUP-TF genes have been cloned from human, and their genomic organizations have been characterized. To determine whether the genomic organization is conserved between human and mouse, we isolated two mouse COUP-TF genes (I and II) and characterized their genomic structures. Both genes have relatively simple structures that are similar to those of their human counterparts. In addition, we mapped mouse COUP-TF I to the distal region of chromosome 13 and COUP-TF II to the central region of chromosome 7. Furthermore, we mapped human COUP-TF I to 5q14 of chromosome 5 and COUP-TF II to 15q26 of chromosome 15. The results demonstrate that COUP-TF genes are located in chromosomal regions that are syntenic between mouse and human. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  18. BioGPS and GXD: mouse gene expression data - the benefits and challenges of data integration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    Mouse gene expression data are complex and voluminous. To maximize the utility of these data, they must be made readily accessible through databases, and those resources need to place the expression data in the larger biological context. Here we describe two community resources that approach these problems in different but complementary ways: BioGPS and the Mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD). BioGPS connects its large and homogenous microarray gene expression reference data sets via plugins with a heterogeneous collection of external gene centric resources, thus casting a wide but loose net. GXD acquires different types of expression data from many sources and integrates these data tightly with other types of data in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource, with a strong emphasis on consistency checks and manual curation. We describe and contrast the “loose” and “tight” data integration strategies employed by BioGPS and GXD, respectively, and discuss the challenges and benefits of data integration. BioGPS is freely available at http://biogps.org. GXD is freely available through the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) web site (www.informatics.jax.org), or directly at www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml. PMID:22847375

  19. Chromosome localizations of genes for five cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. ); Bolger, G.; Michaeli, T. )

    1994-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important second messengers that mediate a number of cellular responses to external signals. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases play a role in signal transduction by regulating the cellular concentrations of these messengers. Here, the authors have applied Southern analyses of somatic cell hybrid lines and of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains as well as fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomally localize five cAMP-specific nucleotide phosphodiesterase genes in human and mouse. Genes DPDE1, DPDE2, DPDE3, and DPDE4 that share sequence homology with the Drosophila dunce gene were assigned to human chromosomes 19 (DPDE1 and DPDE2), ga12 (DPDE3), and 1p31 (DPDE4) and to mouse chromosomes 8, 9, 13, and 4, respectively. The high-affinity cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene (HCP1) was mapped to human chromosome 8q13-q22. Since these genes are potential candidates for involvement in psychiatric or behavioral disorders, knowledge of their chromosomal localizations will facilitate the discovery of their association with disease genes as they are being mapped by linkage studies.

  20. The mouse gene expression database: New features and how to use them effectively.

    PubMed

    Finger, Jacqueline H; Smith, Constance M; Hayamizu, Terry F; McCright, Ingeborg J; Xu, Jingxia; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is an extensive and freely available community resource of mouse developmental expression data. GXD curates and integrates expression data from the literature, via electronic data submissions, and by collaborations with large-scale projects. As an integral component of the Mouse Genome Informatics Resource, GXD combines expression data with genetic, functional, phenotypic, and disease-related data, and provides tools for the research community to search for and analyze expression data in this larger context. Recent enhancements include: an interactive browser to navigate the mouse developmental anatomy and find expression data for specific anatomical structures; the capability to search for expression data of genes located in specific genomic regions, supporting the identification of disease candidate genes; a summary displaying all the expression images that meet specified search criteria; interactive matrix views that provide overviews of spatio-temporal expression patterns (Tissue × Stage Matrix) and enable the comparison of expression patterns between genes (Tissue × Gene Matrix); data zoom and filter utilities to iteratively refine summary displays and data sets; and gene-based links to expression data from other model organisms, such as chicken, Xenopus, and zebrafish, fostering comparative expression analysis for species that are highly relevant for developmental research. PMID:26045019

  1. Chromosomal location of three spectrin genes: relationship to the inherited hemolytic anemias of mouse and man.

    PubMed Central

    Birkenmeier, C S; McFarland-Starr, E C; Barker, J E

    1988-01-01

    Three genetic loci in the mouse affect the synthesis and assembly of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. The spherocytosis and jaundiced loci affect the membrane skeletal protein known as spectrin. The normoblastosis locus affects the spectrin binding protein called ankyrin. We have obtained genetic data that define the linkage relationships among three spectrin genes and the spherocytosis and jaundiced loci. The erythroid alpha-spectrin gene is tightly linked to the spherocytosis locus on chromosome 1 and the jaundiced locus is on chromosome 12, tightly linked to the erythroid beta-spectrin gene. The brain alpha-spectrin (alpha-fodrin) gene is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 2 and is not closely linked to any previously mapped erythroid or neurological mutation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that defects in the alpha- and beta-spectrin genes cause the spherocytosis and jaundiced hemolytic anemias in mice. All five loci studied are located within chromosomal segments that are conserved between mouse and man. Analysis of the data from the chromosome 12 study defines a new order for the genes on that chromosome and delineates the largest mouse/human conserved chromosomal segment yet known. Images PMID:3186715

  2. Multiple bacteria encode metallothioneins and SmtA-like zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Blindauer, Claudia A; Harrison, Mark D; Robinson, Andrea K; Parkinson, John A; Bowness, Peter W; Sadler, Peter J; Robinson, Nigel J

    2002-09-01

    Zinc is essential but toxic in excess. Bacterial metallothionein, SmtA from Synechococcus PCC 7942, sequesters and detoxifies four zinc ions per molecule and contains a zinc finger structurally similar to eukaryotic GATA. The dearth of other reported bacterial metallothioneins has been surprising. Here we describe related bacterial metallothioneins (BmtA) from Anabaena PCC 7120, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida that bind multiple zinc ions with high stability towards protons. Thiol modification demonstrates that cysteine coordinates zinc in all of these proteins. Additionally, (111)Cd-NMR, and (111)Cd-edited (1)H-NMR, identified histidine ligands in Anabaena PCC 7120 BmtA, analogous to SmtA. A related Escherichia coli protein bound only a single zinc ion, via four cysteine residues, with low stability towards protons; (111)Cd-NMR and (111)Cd-edited (1)H-NMR confirmed exclusive cysteine-coordination, and these cysteine residues reacted rapidly with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). (1)H-NMR of proteins from P. aeruginosa, Anabaena PCC 7120 and E. coli generated fingerprints diagnostic for the GATA-like zinc finger fold of SmtA. These studies reveal first the existence of multiple bacterial metallothioneins, and second proteins with SmtA-like lone zinc fingers, devoid of a cluster,and designated GatA. We have identified 12 smtA-like genes in sequence databases including four of the gatA type. PMID:12207707

  3. Methylation of the mouse hprt gene differs on the active and inactive X chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, L F; Melton, D W; Caskey, C T; Martin, G R

    1986-01-01

    It has been proposed that DNA methylation is involved in the mechanism of X inactivation, the process by which equivalence of levels of X-linked gene products is achieved in female (XX) and male (XY) mammals. In this study, Southern blots of female and male DNA digested with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and hybridized to various portions of the cloned mouse hprt gene were compared, and sites within the mouse hprt gene were identified that are differentially methylated in female and male cells. The extent to which these sites are methylated when carried on the active and inactive X chromosomes was directly determined in a similar analysis of DNA from clonal cell lines established from a female embryo derived from a mating of two species of mouse, Mus musculus and Mus caroli. The results revealed two regions of differential methylation in the mouse hprt gene. One region, in the first intron of the gene, includes four sites that are completely unmethylated when carried on the active X and extensively methylated when carried on the inactive X. These same sites are extensively demethylated in hprt genes reactivated either spontaneously or after 5-azacytidine treatment. The second region includes several sites in the 3' 20kilobases of the gene extending from exon 3 to exon 9 that show the converse pattern; i.e., they are completely methylated when carried on the active X and completely unmethylated when carried on the inactive X. At least one of these sites does not become methylated after reactivation of the gene. The results of this study, together with the results of previous studies by others of the human hprt gene, indicate that these regions of differential methylation on the active and inactive X are conserved between mammalian species. Furthermore, the data described here are consistent with the idea that at least the sites in the 5' region of the gene play a role in the X inactivation phenomenon and regulation of expression of the mouse hprt

  4. Sheep have an unusual variant of the brain-specific metallothionein, metallothionein-III.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Roger S; Holloway, Adele F; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Harris, Julie A; Vickers, James C; Chuah, Meng Inn; West, Adrian K

    2002-01-01

    Sheep metallothionein-III (MT-III) cDNA was isolated from a brain cDNA library and characterized. In contrast with MT-III from other species, sheep MT-III cDNA is predicted to encode a protein with significantly different metal-binding properties, owing to the loss of three of its cysteine residues. RT-PCR from other sheep confirmed that this aberrant structure is ubiquitous in this species. MT-III was successfully isolated from sheep brain, demonstrating that the cDNA does give rise to a protein product of the predicted structure. Sheep MT-III is similar to other mammalian MT-IIIs in that it retains the Cys-Pro-Cys-Pro motif which is thought to encode growth-inhibitory activity, and we show that it is likewise able to inhibit neuron survival in vitro. This is the first naturally occurring variant of MT-III (or any other major mammalian MT gene) which gives rise to a protein product. These findings are discussed in light of proposed roles of MT in the mammalian brain. PMID:11931634

  5. Congenic mapping and candidate sequencing of susceptibility genes for Type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Makino, Susumu; Ogihara, Toshio

    2003-11-01

    Inheritance of type 1 diabetes is polygenic with a major susceptibility gene located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In addition to MHC-linked susceptibility, a number of susceptibility genes have been mapped outside the MHC in both humans and animal models. In order to localize and identify susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes, we have developed a series of congenic strains in which either susceptibility intervals from the NOD mouse, a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, were introgressed onto control background genes or protective intervals from control strains were introgressed onto NOD background genes. NOD. CTS-H-2 congenic mice, which possess recombinant MHC with NOD alleles at class II A and E genes, which are candidates for Idd1, revealed that Idd1 consists of multiple components, one in class II (Idd1) and the other adjacent to, but distinct from, Idd1 (Idd16). Phenotypes of NOD. IIS-Idd3 congenic mice, which share the same alleles at both Il2 and Il21 as the NOD mouse, were indistinguishable from the NOD parental strain, indicating that both Il2 and Il21 are candidates for Idd3. In contrast, NOD. IIS-Idd10 congenic mice, which share the same alleles at Fcgr1, a previous candidate for Idd10, as the NOD mouse, were protected from type 1 diabetes, suggesting that Fcgr1 may not be responsible for the Idd10 effect. These data suggest that the use of strain colony closely related to a disease model to find the same candidate mutation on different haplotypes and make congenic strains with this recombinant chromosome, termed ancestral haplotype congenic mapping, is an effective strategy for fine mapping and identification of genes responsible for complex traits. PMID:14679059

  6. Structural characterization and chromosomal location of the mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, M.; Gerard, C.; Kolakowski, L.F. Jr.

    1995-06-10

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, is a cytokine released by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and the pituitary gland that serves to integrate peripheral and central inflammatory responses. Ubiquitous expression and developmental regulation suggest that MIF may have additional roles outside of the immune system. Here we report the structure and chromosomal location of the mouse Mif gene and the partial characterization of five Mif pseudogenes. The mouse Mif gene spans less than 0.7 kb of chromosomal DNA and is composed of three exons. A comparison between the mouse and the human genes shows a similar gene structure and common regulatory elements in both promoter regions. The mouse Mif gene maps to the middle region of chromosome 10, between Bcr and S100b, which have been mapped to human chromosomes 22q11 and 21q22.3, respectively. The entire sequence of two pseudogenes demonstrates the absence of introns, the presence of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the cDNA, a 3{prime} poly(A) tail, and the lack of sequence similarity with untranscribed regions of the gene. The five pseudogenes are highly homologous to the cDNA, but contain a variable number of mutations that would produce mutated or truncated MIF-like proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of MIF genes and pseudogenes indicate several independent genetic events that can account for multiple genomic integrations. Three of the Mif pseudogenes were also mapped by interspecific backcross to chromosomes 1, 9, and 17. These results suggest that Mif pseudogenes originated by retrotransposition. 46 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Trio gene is required for mouse learning ability.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wen; Liu, Shuoyang; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ziyi; Wang, Dongdong; Zhang, Aizhen; Zhu, Minsheng; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-05-22

    Trio is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with multiple guanine nucleotide exchange factor domains. Trio regulates cytoskeleton dynamics and actin remodeling and is involved in cell migration and axonal guidance in neuronal development. The null allele of the Trio gene led to embryonic lethality, and Trio null embryos displayed aberrant organization in several regions of the brain at E18.5, including hippocampus. Nestin-Trio-/- mice, in which the Trio gene was deleted specifically in the neuronal system by the Nestin-Cre system, displayed severe phenotypes, including low survival rate, ataxia and multiple developmental defects of the cerebellum. All Nestin-Trio-/- mice died before reaching adulthood, which hinders research on Trio gene function in adult mice. Thus, we generated EMX1-Trio-/- mice by crossing Trio-floxed mice with EMX1-Cre mice in which Cre is expressed in the brain cortex and hippocampus. EMX1-Trio-/- mice can survive to adulthood. Trio gene deletion results in smaller brains, an abnormal hippocampus and disordered granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA). Behavior tests showed that Trio deletion interfered with the hippocampal-dependent spatial learning in the mice, suggesting that Trio plays critical roles in the learning ability of adult mice. We conclude that the Trio gene regulates the neuronal development of the hippocampus and that it affects the intelligence of adult mice. PMID:25727174

  8. Cadmium-binding protein (metallothionein) in carp.

    PubMed Central

    Kito, H; Ose, Y; Sato, T

    1986-01-01

    When carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to 5 and 30 ppm Cd in the water, the contents of Cd-binding protein, which has low molecular weight, increased in the hepatopancreas, kidney, gills and gastrointestinal tract with the duration of exposure. This Cd-binding protein was purified from hepatopancreas, kidney, gills, and spleen of carp administered 2 mg/kg Cd (as CdCl2), intraperitoneally for 6 days. Two Cd-binding proteins were separated by DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column chromatography. These proteins had Cd-mercaptide bond, high cysteine contents (ca. 29-34%), but no aromatic amino acids or histidine. From these characteristics the Cd-binding proteins were identified as metallothionein. By using antiserum obtained from a rabbit to which carp hepatopancreas MT-II had been administered, immunological characteristics between hepatopancreas MT-I, II and kidney MT-II were studied, and a slight difference in antigenic determinant was observed among them. By immunological staining techniques with horseradish peroxidase, the localization of metallothionein was investigated. In the nontreated group, metallothionein was present in the acinar cells of hepatopancreas and renal convoluted tubules. In the Cd-treated group (2 mg/kg IP daily for 3 days), metallothionein was present in the nuclei, sinusoids, and extracellular space of hepatopancreas, in addition to the acinar cells. Carp were bred in 1 ppm Cd, 5 ppm Zn solution, and tap water for 14 days, following transfer to 15 ppm Cd solution, respectively. The survival ratio was the highest in the Zn group followed by Cd-treated and control groups. The metallothionein contents increased in hepatopancreas and kidney in the order: Zn greater than Cd greater than control group. Images FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. PMID:3519201

  9. Gene repressive mechanisms in the mouse brain involved in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nam-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-04-01

    Gene regulation in the brain is essential for long-term plasticity and memory formation. Despite this established notion, the quantitative translational map in the brain during memory formation has not been reported. To systematically probe the changes in protein synthesis during memory formation, our recent study exploited ribosome profiling using the mouse hippocampal tissues at multiple time points after a learning event. Analysis of the resulting database revealed novel types of gene regulation after learning. First, the translation of a group of genes was rapidly suppressed without change in mRNA levels. At later time points, the expression of another group of genes was downregulated through reduction in mRNA levels. This reduction was predicted to be downstream of inhibition of ESR1 (Estrogen Receptor 1) signaling. Overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the genes whose translation was suppressed, or activating ESR1 by injecting an agonist interfered with memory formation, suggesting the functional importance of these findings. Moreover, the translation of genes encoding the translational machineries was found to be suppressed, among other genes in the mouse hippocampus. Together, this unbiased approach has revealed previously unidentified characteristics of gene regulation in the brain and highlighted the importance of repressive controls. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 199-200]. PMID:26949020

  10. Gene repressive mechanisms in the mouse brain involved in memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nam-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in the brain is essential for long-term plasticity and memory formation. Despite this established notion, the quantitative translational map in the brain during memory formation has not been reported. To systematically probe the changes in protein synthesis during memory formation, our recent study exploited ribosome profiling using the mouse hippocampal tissues at multiple time points after a learning event. Analysis of the resulting database revealed novel types of gene regulation after learning. First, the translation of a group of genes was rapidly suppressed without change in mRNA levels. At later time points, the expression of another group of genes was downregulated through reduction in mRNA levels. This reduction was predicted to be downstream of inhibition of ESR1 (Estrogen Receptor 1) signaling. Overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the genes whose translation was suppressed, or activating ESR1 by injecting an agonist interfered with memory formation, suggesting the functional importance of these findings. Moreover, the translation of genes encoding the translational machineries was found to be suppressed, among other genes in the mouse hippocampus. Together, this unbiased approach has revealed previously unidentified characteristics of gene regulation in the brain and highlighted the importance of repressive controls. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 199-200] PMID:26949020