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Sample records for mouse metallothionein gene

  1. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  2. Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein genes: Selection for duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy-metal detoxification. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, I compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Georgia. Contaminated of collection sites and of local flies was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrosphotometry. Six-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications. A subset (327) of these lines was screened for Mto duplications: none were found. Cadmium tolerance test performed on F{sub 2} progeny of wild females failed to detect a difference in tolerance levels between flies from contaminated orchards and flies from control orchards. Estimates of sequence diversity among a subsample (92) of the chromosomes used in the duplication survey, including all 27 Mtn duplication chromosomes, were obtained using four-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis.

  3. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus)

    PubMed Central

    Höckner, M.; Dallinger, R.; Stürzenbaum, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs. PMID:25797623

  4. Metallothionein gene expression differs in earthworm populations with different exposure history.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, M; Haimi, J; Väisänen, A; Knott, K E

    2014-11-01

    Metals are persistent pollutants in soils that can harm soil organisms and decrease species diversity. Animals can cope with metal contamination with the help of metallothioneins, small metal-binding proteins involved in homeostasis and detoxification of metals. We studied the expression of metallothionein with qPCR in a small, epigeic earthworm, Dendrobaena octaedra. We compared expression patterns and metal body content in earthworms collected from two sites with different metal contamination histories: Harjavalta, contaminated by a Cu-Ni smelter operational for over 50 years, and Jyväskylä, an uncontaminated site. Earthworms from both sites were also experimentally exposed to different concentrations of Cu (control, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) or Zn (control, 75, 150 or 300 mg/kg) for 7, 14 or 28 days to determine if there is a time related dose-response in gene expression. Population comparison showed that metallothionein expression was higher in earthworms from the contaminated site. In the exposure experiment, exposure time affected expression, but only in the earthworms from the uncontaminated site, suggesting that there is a delay in the metallothionein response of earthworms in this population. In contrast, earthworms from the contaminated site showed higher and constant levels of metallothionein expression at all exposure concentrations and durations. The constant metallothionein expression in earthworms from the contaminated site suggests that inducibility of metallothionein response could be lost in earthworms with metal exposure history. Adaptation of D. octaedra to metal exposure could explain the differences between the populations and explain the persistence of this species in contaminated forest soils. PMID:25179588

  5. Heat shock transcription factor activates transcription of the yeast metallothionein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Silar, P; Butler, G; Thiele, D J

    1991-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of the metallothionein gene CUP1 is induced by copper and silver. Strains with a complete deletion of the ACE1 gene, the copper-dependent activator of CUP1 transcription, are hypersensitive to copper. These strains have a low but significant basal level of CUP1 transcription. To identify genes which mediate basal transcription of CUP1 or which activate CUP1 in response to other stimuli, we isolated an extragenic suppressor of an ace1 deletion. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in the heat shock transcription factor (HSF) DNA-binding domain dramatically enhances CUP1 transcription while reducing transcription of the SSA3 gene, a member of the yeast hsp70 gene family. These results indicate that yeast metallothionein transcription is under HSF control and that metallothionein biosynthesis is important in response to heat shock stress. Furthermore, our results suggest that HSF may modulate the magnitude of individual heat shock gene transcription by subtle differences in its interaction with heat shock elements and that a single-amino-acid change can dramatically alter the activity of the factor for different target genes. Images PMID:1996089

  6. Assignment of genes encoding metallothioneins I and II to Chinese hamster chromosomes 3. Evidence for the role of chromosome rearrangement in gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Stallings, R.L.; Munk, A.C.; Longmire, J.L.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Cadmium resistant (Cd/sup r/) variants with coordinately amplified metallothionein I and II (MTI and MTII) genes have been derived from both Chinese hamster ovary and near-euploid Chinese hamster cell lines. Cytogenetic analyses of Cd/sup r/ variants consistently revealed breakage and rearrangement involving chromosome 3p. In situ hybridization with Chinese hamster MT-encoding cDNA probe localized amplified MT gene sequences near the translocation breakpoint involving chromosome 3p. These observations suggested that both functionally related, isometallothionein loci are linked on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. Southern blot analyses of DNAs isolated from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids which segregate hamster chromosomes confirmed that both MTI and MTII are located on chromosome 3. The authors speculate that rearrangement of chromosome 3p could be causally involved with the amplification of MT genes in Cd/sup r/ hamster cell lines. 34 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  7. Freezing of body fluids induces metallothionein gene expression in earthworms (Dendrobaena octaedra).

    PubMed

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Holmstrup, Martin; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms activated by environmental contaminants and natural stressors such as freezing need to be investigated in order to better understand the mechanisms of interaction and potential effects that combined stressors may have on organisms. Using the freeze-tolerant earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra as model species, we exposed worms to freezing and exposure to sublethal copper in a factorial design and investigated the transcription of candidate genes for metal and cold stress. We hypothesised that both freezing and copper would induce transcription of genes coding for heat shock proteins (hsp10 and hsp70), metallothioneins (mt1 and mt2), and glutathione-S-transferase (gst), and that the combined effects of these two stressors would be additive. The gene transcripts hsp10, hsp70, and gst were significantly upregulated by freezing, but only hsp10 was upregulated by copper. We found that copper at the time of sampling had no effect on transcription of two metallothionein genes whereas transcription was strongly upregulated by freezing. Moreover, there was a significant interaction causing more than additive transcription rates of mt1 in the copper/freezing treatment suggesting that freeze-induced cellular dehydration increases the concentration of free copper ions in the cytosol. This metallothionein response to freezing is likely adaptive and possibly provides protection against freeze-induced elevated metal concentrations in the cytosol and excess ROS levels due to hypoxia during freezing. PMID:26325206

  8. Expression response of duplicated metallothionein 3 gene to copper stress in Silene vulgaris ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Nevrtalova, Eva; Baloun, Jiri; Hudzieczek, Vojtech; Cegan, Radim; Vyskot, Boris; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Safar, Jan; Milde, David; Hobza, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) were identified as important players in metal metabolism. MT3 gene presents a key metallothionein controlling copper homeostasis in plants. We have selected one cupricolous and one non-cupricolous ecotype to isolate and analyse the MT3 gene in Silene vulgaris. For expression data comparison, we have also included other metal-tolerant ecotypes. Based on a S. vulgaris BAC library screening, we have identified and sequenced a genomic clone containing MT3 gene (SvMT3). We found that SvMT3 gene has been locally duplicated in a tandem arrangement. Expression analysis and complementation studies using yeast mutants showed that both copies of the SvMT3 gene were functional. Moreover, we examined the expression of MT3 gene(s) in selected ecotypes under different copper treatments to show the tissue-specific expression response to copper stress. We demonstrated that higher copper concentrations specifically affected MT3 expression among ecotypes. Our analysis shows that MT3a has similar expression pattern in cupricolous ecotypes while MT3b has common expression features shared by all metallophyte S. vulgaris ecotypes. Our data indicate that down-regulation of MT3b root expression in higher copper concentrations is associated with copper stress. We propose that there might be a specific regulation of SvMT3s transcription depending on the type of heavy metal tolerance. PMID:24748066

  9. Metallothioneins as dynamic markers for brain disease in lysosomal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cesani, Martina; Cavalca, Eleonora; Macco, Romina; Leoncini, Giuseppe; Terreni, Maria Rosa; Lorioli, Laura; Furlan, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Doglioni, Claudio; Zacchetti, Daniele; Sessa, Maria; Scherzer, Clemens R; Biffi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To facilitate development of novel disease-modifying therapies for lysosomal storage disorder (LSDs) characterized by nervous system involvement such as metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), molecular markers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response are needed. To this end, we sought to identify blood transcripts associated with the progression of MLD. Methods Genome-wide expression analysis was performed in primary T lymphocytes of 24 patients with MLD compared to 24 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Genes associated with MLD were identified, confirmed on a quantitative polymerase chain reaction platform, and replicated in an independent patient cohort. mRNA and protein expression of the prioritized gene family of metallothioneins was evaluated in postmortem patient brains and in mouse models representing 6 other LSDs. Metallothionein expression during disease progression and in response to specific treatment was evaluated in 1 of the tested LSD mouse models. Finally, a set of in vitro studies was planned to dissect the biological functions exerted by this class of molecules. Results Metallothionein genes were significantly overexpressed in T lymphocytes and brain of patients with MLD and generally marked nervous tissue damage in the LSDs here evaluated. Overexpression of metallothioneins correlated with measures of disease progression in mice and patients, whereas their levels decreased in mice upon therapeutic treatment. In vitro studies indicated that metallothionein expression is regulated in response to oxidative stress and inflammation, which are biochemical hallmarks of lysosomal storage diseases. Interpretation Metallothioneins are potential markers of neurologic disease processes and treatment response in LSDs. PMID:24242821

  10. CYTOKININ AND METALS REGULATE A TOBACCO METALLOTHIONEIN-LIKE GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To isolate cytokinin responsive genes, Nicotiana plumbaginifolia shoots/rosettes containing the heat shock inducible isopentenyl transferase (ipt) gene (HS-ipt) were heat shocked and used to prepare a cDNA library that was screened with a HS-induced subtractive probe. The cDNA clone pCkn16A1 (Access...

  11. Coordinate amplification of metallothionein I and II genes in cadmium-resistant Chinese hamster cells: implications for mechanisms regulating metallothionein gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, B.D.; Enger, M.D.; Griffith, B.B.; Griffith, J.K.; Hanners, J.L.; Longmire, J.L.; Munk, A.C.; Stallings, R.L.; Tesmer, J.G.; Walters, R.A.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The authors describe here the derivation, characterization, and use of clonal cadmium-resistance (Cd/sup r) strains of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO which differ in their metallothionein (MT) induction capacity. By nondenaturing polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis, the authors showed that the stable Cd/sup r/ phenotype is correlated with the augmented expression of both isometallothioneins (MTI and MTII). In cells resistant to concentrations of CdCl2 exceeding 20 M, coordinate amplifications of genes encoding both isometallothioneins was demonstrated by using cDNA MT-coding sequence probes and probes specific for 3'-noncoding regions of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes. Molecular and in situ hybridization analyses supported close linkage of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes, which the authors have mapped previously to Chinese hamster chromosome 3. This suggests the existence of a functionally related MT gene cluster in this species. Amplified Cd/sup r/ variants expressing abundant MT and their corresponding Cd/sup s/ parental CHO cells should be useful for future studies directed toward elucidating the mechanisms that regulate expressions of the isometallothioneins. 59 references, 8 figures.

  12. Dual Opposing Roles of Metallothionein Overexpression in C57BL/6J Mouse Pancreatic ?-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suqin; Han, Junying; Liu, Yeqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing evidence indicates that oxidative stress (OS), a persistent state of excess amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) along with reactive nitrogen species (RNS), plays an important role in insulin resistance, diabetic complications, and dysfunction of pancreatic ?-cells. Pancreatic ?-cells contain exceptionally low levels of antioxidant enzymes, rendering them susceptible to ROS-induced damage. Induction of antioxidants has been proposed to be a way for protecting ?-cells against oxidative stress. Compared to other antioxidants that act against particular ?-cell damages, metallothionein (MT) is the most effective in protecting ?-cells from several oxidative stressors including nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and streptozotocin (STZ). We hypothesized that MT overexpression in pancreatic ?-cells would preserve ?-cell function in C57BL/6J mice, an animal model susceptible to high fat diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods The pancreatic ?-cell specific MT overexpression was transferred to C57BL/6J background by backcrossing. We studied transgenic MT (MT-tg) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates at 8 weeks and 18 weeks of age. Several tests were performed to evaluate the function of islets, including STZ in vivo treatment, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT) and plasma insulin levels during IPGTT, pancreatic and islet insulin content measurement, insulin secretion, and islet morphology assessment. Gene expression in islets was performed by quantitative real-time PCR and PCR array analysis. Protein levels in pancreatic sections were evaluated by using immunohistochemistry. Results The transgenic MT protein was highly expressed in pancreatic islets. MT-tg overexpression significantly protected mice from acute STZ-induced ROS at 8 weeks of age; unexpectedly, however, MT-tg impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and promoted the development of diabetes. Pancreatic ?-cell function was significantly impaired, and islet morphology was also abnormal in MT-tg mice, and more severe damage was detected in males. The unique gene expression pattern and abnormal protein levels were observed in MT-tg islets. Conclusions MT overexpression protected ?-cells from acute STZ-induced ROS damages at young age, whereas it impaired GSIS and promoted the development of diabetes in adult C57BL/6J mice, and more severe damage was found in males. PMID:26335571

  13. The Metallothionein Gene, TaMT3, from Tamarix androssowii Confers Cd2+ Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Boru; Yao, Wenjing; Wang, Shengji; Wang, Xinwang; Jiang, Tingbo

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential microelement and low concentration Cd2+ has strong toxicity to plant growth. Plant metallothioneins, a class of low molecular, cystein(Cys)-rich and heavy-metal binding proteins, play an important role in both metal chaperoning and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with their large number of cysteine residues and therefore, protect plants from oxidative damage. In this study, a metallothionein gene, TaMT3, isolated from Tamarix androssowii was transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum) through Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc method, and correctly expressed under the control of 35S promoter. Under Cd2+ stress, the transgenic tobacco showed significant increases of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and chlorophyll concentration, but decreases of peroxidase (POD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation when compared to the non-transgenic tobacco. Vigorous growth of transgenic tobacco was observed at the early development stages, resulting in plant height and fresh weight were significantly larger than those of the non-transgenic tobacco under Cd2+ stress. These results demonstrated that the expression of the exogenous TaMT3 gene increased the ability of ROS cleaning-up, indicating a stronger tolerance to Cd2+ stress. PMID:24918294

  14. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krze?lak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Jó?wiak, Pawe?; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bry?, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the ? 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  15. Metallothionein gene expression in peripheral lymphocytes and renal dysfunction in a population environmentally exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jian; Jin Taiyi . E-mail: tyjin@smhu.edu.cn; Nordberg, Gunnar; Nordberg, Monica . E-mail: monica.nordberg@imm.ki.se

    2005-08-07

    In order to study the validity of metallothionein (MT) gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) as a biomarker of cadmium exposure and susceptibility to renal dysfunction, MT mRNA levels were measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in PBLs from residents living in a cadmium-contaminated area. MT mRNA levels were found to increase with the increase of blood cadmium (BCd) and urinary cadmium (UCd) levels. Basal MT mRNA levels were significantly correlated with the logarithm of BCd levels and the logarithm of UCd levels confirming that MT expression in PBLs is a biomarker of cadmium exposure and internal dose. An inverse relationship was observed between in vitro induced MT-mRNA level in PBLs and urinary N-acetyl-{beta}-d-glucosaminidase (UNAG) suggesting that MT gene expression in PBLs may be used as a biomarker of susceptibility to renal toxicity of cadmium.

  16. Functional characterization of four metallothionein genes in Daphnia pulex exposed to environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, J.; Glaholt, S.P.; Smith, Z.; Smagghe, G.; Janssen, C.R.; Colbourne, J.K.; Shaw, J.R.; De Schamphelaere, K.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the metallothionein genes (Mt1, Mt2, Mt3, and Mt4) in Daphnia pulex on both molecular and ecotoxicological level. We therefore conducted a bioinformatical analysis of the gene location and predicted protein sequence, and screened the upstream flanking region for regulatory elements. The number of these elements and their positions relative to the start codon varied strongly among the four genes and even among two gene duplicates (Mt1A and Mt1B), suggesting different roles of the four proteins in the organisms’ response to stress. We subsequently conducted a chronic 16-day exposure of D. pulex to different environmental stressors (at sublethal levels causing approximately 50% reduction in reproduction). Based on prior knowledge, we exposed them to the metals Cd, Cu, and Ni, the moulting hormone hydroxyecdysone (20E), and the oxidative stressors cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), and paraquat (Pq). We then compared mRNA expression levels of the four Mt genes under these stress conditions with control conditions in “The Chosen One” clone (TCO), for which the full genome was sequenced and annotated. All together, the mRNA expression results under the different stress regimes indicate that different Mt genes may play different and various roles in the response of D. pulex to stress and that some (but not all) of the differences among the four genes could be related to the pattern of regulatory elements in their upstream flanking region. PMID:22266576

  17. Gene response profiles for Daphnia pulex exposed to the environmental stressor cadmium reveals novel crustacean metallothioneins

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Joseph R; Colbourne, John K; Davey, Jennifer C; Glaholt, Stephen P; Hampton, Thomas H; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic research tools such as microarrays are proving to be important resources to study the complex regulation of genes that respond to environmental perturbations. A first generation cDNA microarray was developed for the environmental indicator species Daphnia pulex, to identify genes whose regulation is modulated following exposure to the metal stressor cadmium. Our experiments revealed interesting changes in gene transcription that suggest their biological roles and their potentially toxicological features in responding to this important environmental contaminant. Results Our microarray identified genes reported in the literature to be regulated in response to cadmium exposure, suggested functional attributes for genes that share no sequence similarity to proteins in the public databases, and pointed to genes that are likely members of expanded gene families in the Daphnia genome. Genes identified on the microarray also were associated with cadmium induced phenotypes and population-level outcomes that we experimentally determined. A subset of genes regulated in response to cadmium exposure was independently validated using quantitative-realtime (Q-RT)-PCR. These microarray studies led to the discovery of three genes coding for the metal detoxication protein metallothionein (MT). The gene structures and predicted translated sequences of D. pulex MTs clearly place them in this gene family. Yet, they share little homology with previously characterized MTs. Conclusion The genomic information obtained from this study represents an important first step in characterizing microarray patterns that may be diagnostic to specific environmental contaminants and give insights into their toxicological mechanisms, while also providing a practical tool for evolutionary, ecological, and toxicological functional gene discovery studies. Advances in Daphnia genomics will enable the further development of this species as a model organism for the environmental sciences. PMID:18154678

  18. PCR arrays identify metallothionein-3 as a highly hypoxia-inducible gene in human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bohan; Wood, I. Stuart; Trayhurn, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-signalling pathway PCR arrays were used to examine the integrated response of human adipocytes to low O2 tension. Incubation of adipocytes in 1% O2 for 24 h resulted in no change in the expression of 63 of the 84 genes on the arrays, a reduction in expression of 9 genes (including uncoupling protein 2) and increased expression of 12 genes. Substantial increases (>10-fold) in leptin, angiopoietin-like protein 4, VEGF and GLUT-1 mRNA levels were observed. The expression of one gene, metallothionein-3 (MT-3), was dramatically (>600-fold) and rapidly (by 60 min) increased by hypoxia. MT-3 gene expression was also substantially induced by hypoxia mimetics (CoCl2, desferrioxamine, dimethyloxalylglycine), indicating transcriptional regulation through HIF-1. Hypoxia additionally induced MT-3 expression in preadipocytes, and MT-3 mRNA was detected in human (obese) subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue. MT-3 is a highly hypoxia-inducible gene in human adipocytes; the protein may protect adipocytes from hypoxic damage. PMID:18206644

  19. Structure and origin of a tandem duplication of a Drosophila metallothionein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, E.; Maroni, G.

    1987-01-01

    A strain of cadmium-resistant Drosophila was isolated that contained a chromosomal duplication of the metallothionein gene, Mtn. This duplication was a direct, tandem repeat of 2.2 kilobases of DNA: 228 bases of 5' flanking DNA, the entire transcription unit, and 1.4 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA. The entire duplication was cloned and DNA sequences of the regions relevant to the duplication process were determined. Comparison of the sequences of the 5' and 3' boundaries revealed no extensive regions of similarity, thus indicating that this duplication was formed by nonhomologous breakage and reunion. Recently, results of similar analyses by other investigators have suggested that this process was involved in the origin of three other eukaryotic duplications. The authors have observed a chi-like sequence near one of the boundaries of each duplication, and therefore suggest that this sequence may be important in generating one of the breaks required for duplication formation.

  20. Cloning metallothionein gene in Zacco platypus and its potential as an exposure biomarker against cadmium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Cheolmin; Kim, Jungkon; Kim, Woo-Keun; Shin, Hyun Suk; Lim, Eun-Suk; Lee, Jin Wuk; Kim, Sunmi; Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Sung-Kyu; Choi, Cheol Young; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-07-01

    Zacco platypus, pale chub, is an indigenous freshwater fish of East Asia including Korea and has many useful characteristics as indicator species for water pollution. While utility of Z. platypus as an experimental species has been recognized, genetic-level information is very limited and warrants extensive research. Metallothionein (MT) is widely used and well-known biomarker for heavy metal exposure in many experimental species. In the present study, we cloned MT in Z. platypus and evaluated its utility as a biomarker for metal exposure. For this purpose, we sequenced complete complementary DNA (cDNA) of MT in Z. platypus and carried out phylogenetic analysis with its sequences. The transcription-level responses of MT gene following the exposure to CdCl2 were also assessed to validate the utility of this gene as an exposure biomarker. Analysis of cDNA sequence of MT gene demonstrated high conformity with those of other fish. MT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and enzymatic MT content significantly increased following CdCl2 exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. The level of CdCl2 that resulted in significant MT changes in Z. platypus was within the range that was reported from other fish. The MT gene of Z. platypus sequenced in the present study can be used as a useful biomarker for heavy metal exposure in the aquatic environment of Korea and other countries where this freshwater fish species represents the ecosystem. PMID:26092240

  1. METALLOTHIONEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION AS AN INDICATOR OF METAL EXPOSURE IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metallothionein is a cysteine rich, low molecular weight, metal binding protein. Basal levels of endogenous metallothioneins (MT) have been reported in all eucaryotes. MT has been shown to play an essential role in regulating physiological requirements of essential metals such a...

  2. Comparison of metallothionein gene expression and nonprotein thiols in ten Arabidopsis ecotypes. Correlation with copper tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, A; Taiz, L

    1995-01-01

    Seedlings of 10 Arabidopsis ecotypes were compared with respect to copper tolerance, expression of two metallothionein genes (MT1 and MT2), and nonprotein thiol levels. MT1 was uniformly expressed in all treatments, and MT2 was copper inducible in all 10 ecotypes. MT1 and MT2 mRNA levels were compared with various growth parameters for the 10 ecotypes in the presence of 40 microM Cu2+. The best correlation (R = 0.99) was obtained between MT2 mRNA and the rate of root extension. MT2 mRNA levels also paralleled the recovery phase following inhibition by copper. Induction of MT2 mRNA was initiated at copper concentrations below the threshold for growth inhibition. In cross-induction experiments, Ag+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, and heat shock all induced significant levels of MT2 gene expression, whereas Al3+ and salicylic acid did not. The correlation between copper tolerance and nonprotein thiol levels in the 10 ecotypes was not statistically significant. However, 2 ecotypes, Ws and Enkheim, previously shown to exhibit an acclimation response, had the highest levels of nonprotein thiols. We conclude that MT2 gene expression may be the primary determinant of ecotypic differences in the copper tolerance of nonpretreated Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:8552721

  3. Cloning, characterization, and expression of cadmium-induced metallothionein-2 gene from earthworm Pheretima aspergillum (E. Perrier).

    PubMed

    Gong, L; Li, W; Li, J; Li, W E; Wu, W R; Yu, L W

    2015-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous metal-binding, cysteine-rich proteins, associated with metal accumulation and thus providing protection against toxic heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd). To investigate the mechanisms of enrichment of Cd in the earthworm Pheretima aspergillum, we isolated and cloned metallothionein-2 (MT-2) cDNA (538 bp) from P. aspergillum, analyzed its sequence, and examined MT-2 transcription levels by relative quantitative real-time PCR under different concentrations of Cd. The sequence of P. aspergillum MT-2 cDNA and its putative amino acid sequence were highly similar to sequences from other earthworms. The induction with Cd increased the MT-2 gene transcription level in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, earthworm recombinant MT-2 exhibited high Cd bioaccumulation ability in vitro. These results suggested that MT-2 plays an important role in tolerance and accumulation of Cd in P. aspergillum. PMID:26681024

  4. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of technetium-99-metallothionein-conjugated mouse monoclonal antibody B72. 3 in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Burchiel, S.W.; Hadjian, R.A.; Hladik, W.B.; Drozynski, C.A.; Tolman, G.L.; Haber, S.B.; Gallagher, B.M. )

    1989-08-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of ({sup 99m}Tc)metallothionein-conjugated B72.3 ((Tc)MT-B72.3) in Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that were performed as part of the preclinical evaluation of (Tc)MT-B72.3. The B72.3-MT conjugate was studied at three doses of B72.3 ranging from 0.03 mg/kg to 1 mg/kg to determine whether a relationship existed between the dose of total antibody administered intravenously and the biodistribution and clearance of the radiolabeled protein. Results indicated that (Tc)MT-B72.3 distributes rapidly to central body cavity organs and that there was no difference in the rate of blood elimination for the three doses of B72.3 studied. The terminal phase of blood elimination was found to be 26.2 +/- 6.1 hr for the combined groups of monkeys. Approximately one-half of injected {sup 99m}Tc activity was recovered in the urine within 24 hr. A second purpose of these studies was to evaluate the overall immunogenicity of the mouse monoclonal B72.3 IgG1 antibody in Rhesus monkeys. These results demonstrated that a single i.v. exposure to mouse monoclonal B72.3 at doses of 0.3 mg/kg or greater elicited antibody production to B72.3 in Rhesus monkeys within 3 wk. Analysis of (Tc)MT-B72.3 biodistribution and clearance in monkeys with circulating levels of antibodies to B72.3 (immunized monkeys) revealed that the liver was the primary site of clearance of the presumed immune complex and that blood elimination was greatly accelerated.

  5. Differential responses of three sweetpotato metallothionein genes to abiotic stress and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ha; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Ahn, Young Ock; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich, low molecular weight, metal-binding proteins that are widely distributed in living organisms. Plants produce metal-chelating proteins such as MTs to overcome the toxic effects of heavy metals. We cloned three MT genes from sweetpotato leaves [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.]. The three IbMT genes were classified according to their cysteine residue alignment into type 1 (IbMT1), type 2 (IbMT2), and type 3 (IbMT3). IbMT1 was the most abundantly transcribed MT. It was predominantly expressed in leaves, roots, and callus. IbMT2 transcript was detected only in stems and fibrous roots, whereas IbMT3 was strongly expressed in leaves and stems. The IbMT expression profiles were investigated in plants exposed to heavy metals and abiotic stresses. The levels of IbMT1 expression were strongly elevated in response to Cd and Fe, and moderately higher in response to Cu. The IbMT3 expression pattern in response to heavy metals was similar to that of IbMT1. Exposure to abiotic stresses such as methyl viologen (MV; paraquat), NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and H2O2 up-regulated IbMT expression; IbMT1 responded strongly to MV and NaCl, whereas IbMT3 was induced by low temperature and PEG. Transgenic Escherichia coli overexpressing IbMT1 protein exhibited results suggest that IbMT could be a useful tool for engineering plants with enhanced tolerance to environmental stresses and heavy metals. PMID:25030835

  6. Cloning, characterization and gene expression of a metallothionein isoform in the edible cockle Cerastoderma edule after cadmium or mercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Paul-Pont, Ika; Gonzalez, Patrice; Montero, Natalia; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Baudrimont, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) genes encode crucial metal-binding proteins ubiquitously expressed in living organisms and which play important roles in homeostasis of essential metals and detoxification processes. Here, the molecular organization of the first metallothionein gene of the edible cockle Cerastoderma edule and its expression after cadmium (Cd) or mercury (Hg) exposures were determined. The resulting sequence (Cemt1) exhibits unusual features. The full length cDNA encodes a protein of 73 amino acids with nine classical Cys-X((1-3))-Cys motifs, but also one Cys-Cys not generally found in molluscan MT. Moreover, characterization of the molecular organization of the Cemt1 gene revealed two different alleles (A1 and A2) with length differences due to large deletion events in their intronic sequences involving direct Short Interspersed repeated Elements (SINE), while their exonic sequences were identical. To our knowledge, such large excision mechanisms have never before been reported in a bivalve gene sequence. After 10 days of Cd exposure at environmentally relevant doses, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a strong induction of Cemt1 in gills of C. edule. Surprisingly, neither induction of the Cemt1 gene nor of MT protein was shown after Hg exposure, despite the fact that this organism is able to bioaccumulate a high amount of this trace metal which is theoretically one of the most powerful inducers of MT biosynthesis. PMID:21963253

  7. Characterization of calcineurin-dependent response element binding protein and its involvement in copper-metallothionein gene expression in Neurospora

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Kalari Satish; Ravi Kumar, B.; Siddavattam, Dayananda; Subramanyam, Chivukula . E-mail: csubramanyam@hotmail.com

    2006-07-07

    In continuation of our recent observations indicating the presence of a lone calcineurin-dependent response element (CDRE) in the -3730 bp upstream region of copper-induced metallothionein (CuMT) gene of Neurospora [K.S. Kumar, S. Dayananda, C. Subramanyam, Copper alone, but not oxidative stress, induces copper-metallothionein gene in Neurospora crassa, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 242 (2005) 45-50], we isolated and characterized the CDRE-binding protein. The cloned upstream region of CuMT gene was used as the template to specifically amplify CDRE element, which was immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B for use as the affinity matrix to purify the CDRE binding protein from nuclear extracts obtained from Neurospora cultures grown in presence of copper. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the affinity purified protein revealed the presence of a single 17 kDa protein, which was identified and characterized by MALDI-TOF. Peptide mass finger printing of tryptic digests and analysis of the 17 kDa protein matched with the regulatory {beta}-subunit of calcineurin (Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dependent protein phosphatase). Parallel identification of nuclear localization signals in this protein by in silico analysis suggests a putative role for calcineurin in the regulation of CuMT gene expression.

  8. Volume 260, number 2, 211-280 FEB 08067 January 1990 Metallothionein genes from the flowering plant A4imuZusguttatus

    E-print Network

    which encode a protein containing class I MT domains. Copper-tolerant M. guttatus plants were grown metallothioneins, gene-encoded low molecular weight cysteine-rich met- al-binding proteins. In an investigation of copper-regulated genes in the copper-tolerant flowering plant Mimulus guttutus, we have isolated a series

  9. Two Metallothionein Genes in Oxya chinensis: Molecular Characteristics, Expression Patterns and Roles in Heavy Metal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Kou, Lihua; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich, heavy metal-binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. In the present study, we cloned two MT genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) from Oxya chinensis, analyzed the expression patterns of the OcMT transcripts in different tissues and at varying developmental stages using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), evaluated the functions of these two MTs using RNAi and recombinant proteins in an E. coli expression system. The full-length cDNAs of OcMT1 and OcMT2 encoded 40 and 64 amino acid residues, respectively. We found Cys-Cys, Cys-X-Cys and Cys-X-Y-Z-Cys motifs in OcMT1 and OcMT2. These motifs might serve as primary chelating sites, as in other organisms. These characteristics suggest that OcMT1 and OcMT2 may be involved in heavy metal detoxification by capturing the metals. Two OcMT were expressed at all developmental stages, and the highest levels were found in the eggs. Both transcripts were expressed in all eleven tissues examined, with the highest levels observed in the brain and optic lobes, followed by the fat body. The expression of OcMT2 was also relatively high in the ovaries. The functions of OcMT1 and OcMT2 were explored using RNA interference (RNAi) and different concentrations and treatment times for the three heavy metals. Our results indicated that mortality increased significantly from 8.5% to 16.7%, and this increase was both time- and dose-dependent. To evaluate the abilities of these two MT proteins to confer heavy metal tolerance to E. coli, the bacterial cells were transformed with pET-28a plasmids containing the OcMT genes. The optical densities of both the MT-expressing and control cells decreased with increasing concentrations of CdCl2. Nevertheless, the survival rates of the MT-overexpressing cells were higher than those of the controls. Our results suggest that these two genes play important roles in heavy metal detoxification in O. chinensis. PMID:25391131

  10. Connectionist Approaches for Predicting Mouse Gene Function from Gene Expression

    E-print Network

    Bonner, Anthony

    Therapy. Identifying gene function based on gene expression data is much easier in prokaryotes than ways, especially in Gene Therapy [5]. Identifying gene function in prokaryotes is much easier thanConnectionist Approaches for Predicting Mouse Gene Function from Gene Expression Emad Andrews

  11. Zinc-induced upregulation of metallothionein (MT)-2A is predicted by gene expression of zinc transporters in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Chu, Anna; Foster, Meika; Ward, Sarah; Zaman, Kamrul; Hancock, Dale; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2015-11-01

    The usefulness of zinc transporter and metallothionein (MT) gene expressions to detect changes in zinc intake remains unclear. This pilot study aimed to determine the effects of zinc supplementation on zinc transporter and MT gene expressions in humans. Healthy adults (n = 39) were randomised to zinc treatment (ZT), receiving 22 mg Zn/day (n = 19), or no treatment (NT) (n = 20). Blood samples were collected on Days 0, 2, 7, 14, and 21. Plasma zinc and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were analysed. Gene expression of zinc transporters and MT in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analysed using real-time PCR. Using repeated-measures ANOVA, MT-2A gene expression and fold change were found to be higher in the ZT group (P = 0.025 and P = 0.016, respectively) compared to the NT group, specifically at Day 2 (40 ± 18 % increase from baseline, P = 0.011), despite no significant increase in plasma zinc concentration. In a multiple regression model exploring the changes in gene expressions between Days 0 and 21, the change in MT-2A gene expression was correlated with changes in all zinc transporter expressions (r (2) = 0.54, P = 0.029); the change in ZIP1 expression emerged as a univariate predictor (P = 0.003). Dietary zinc intake was predictive of zinc transporter and MT expressions (P = 0.030). Physical activity level was positively correlated with baseline ZIP7 expression (r = 0.36, P = 0.029). The present study shows that MT-2A expression is related to changing expression of zinc transporter genes, specifically ZIP1, in response to zinc supplementation. The current report adds to our understanding of MT in the coordinated nature of cellular zinc homeostasis. PMID:26446034

  12. Characterization of a Type 1 Metallothionein Gene from the Stresses-Tolerant Plant Ziziphus jujuba.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxia; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Fan; Dong, Zhigang; Cao, Qiufen; Chen, Mingchang

    2015-01-01

    Plant metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, and metal-binding proteins, which play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metal ions, osmotic stresses, and hormone treatment. Sequence analysis revealed that the open-reading frame (ORF) of ZjMT was 225 bp, which encodes a protein composed of 75 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 7.376 kDa and a predicated isoelectric point (pI) of 4.83. ZjMT belongs to the type I MT, which consists of two highly conserved cysteine-rich terminal domains linked by a cysteine free region. Our studies showed that ZjMT was primarily localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells and ZjMT expression was up-regulated by NaCl, CdCl2 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Constitutive expression of ZjMT in wild type Arabidopsis plants enhanced their tolerance to NaCl stress during the germination stage. Compared with the wild type, transgenic plants accumulate more Cd2+ in root, but less in leaf, suggesting that ZjMT may have a function in Cd2+ retension in roots and, therefore, decrease the toxicity of Cd2+. PMID:26213917

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhiza affects nickel translocation and expression of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes in Festuca arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Mostafavi Pour, Sodabeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are key microorganisms for enhancing phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study, the effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae (=Glomus mosseae) on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the nickel (Ni) tolerance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea?=?Schedonorus arundinaceus) were investigated. Nickel addition had a pronounced negative effect on tall fescue growth and photosynthetic pigment contents, as well as on AMF colonization. Phosphorus content increased markedly in mycorrhizal plants (M) compared to non-inoculated (NM) ones. However, no significant difference was observed in root carbohydrate content between AMF-inoculated and non-inoculated plants. For both M and NM plants, Ni concentrations in shoots and roots increased according to the addition of the metal into soil, but inoculation with F. mosseae led to significantly lower Ni translocation from roots to the aboveground parts compared to non-inoculated plants. ABC transporter and metallothionein transcripts accumulated to considerably higher levels in tall fescue plants colonized by F. mosseae than in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal plants. These results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal colonization in alleviating Ni-induced stress by reducing Ni transport from roots to shoots of tall fescue plants. PMID:26041568

  14. Characterization of a Type 1 Metallothionein Gene from the Stresses-Tolerant Plant Ziziphus jujuba

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingxia; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Fan; Dong, Zhigang; Cao, Qiufen; Chen, Mingchang

    2015-01-01

    Plant metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, and metal-binding proteins, which play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metal ions, osmotic stresses, and hormone treatment. Sequence analysis revealed that the open-reading frame (ORF) of ZjMT was 225 bp, which encodes a protein composed of 75 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 7.376 kDa and a predicated isoelectric point (pI) of 4.83. ZjMT belongs to the type I MT, which consists of two highly conserved cysteine-rich terminal domains linked by a cysteine free region. Our studies showed that ZjMT was primarily localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells and ZjMT expression was up-regulated by NaCl, CdCl2 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Constitutive expression of ZjMT in wild type Arabidopsis plants enhanced their tolerance to NaCl stress during the germination stage. Compared with the wild type, transgenic plants accumulate more Cd2+ in root, but less in leaf, suggesting that ZjMT may have a function in Cd2+ retension in roots and, therefore, decrease the toxicity of Cd2+. PMID:26213917

  15. Linkage between melanocytic tumor development and early burst of Ret protein expression for tolerance induction in metallothionein-I/ret transgenic mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Liu, W; Akhand, A A; Dai, Y; Ohbayashi, M; Tuzuki, T; Suzuki, H; Isobe, K; Takahashi, M; Nakashima, I

    1999-01-21

    We examined the basis of the all or none difference in inducing melanocytic tumor development among three transgenic mouse lines (304, 192 and 242) to which the same promoter-enhancer (metallothionein-I) and oncogene (ret) were introduced. We initially demonstrated that both skin melanosis and Ret protein expression in skin, thymus and brain first became detectable before or immediately after birth in the mice of the tumor developing lines (304 and 192), whereas they became detectable a few days after birth in the mice of the non-tumor developing line (242) by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Interestingly, the Ret protein expression in skin developed rapidly after birth as a burst with peak levels on 0.5-1.5 day newborns of lines 304 and 192 and on 7.0-7.5 day-old mice of line 242. The levels of autophosphorylation of Ret kinase in skin were, however, invariable among these three transgenic mouse lines. The mice of line 242, but not those of lines 192 and 304, responded to Ret protein immunization by increased antigen-dependent lymphocyte proliferation and T-cell-mediated tumor growth suppression in vitro. Furthermore, ret-transgenic mice of line 242, but not line 304, rejected the subcutaneously transplanted tumors that had originally developed in a mouse of line 304. These results suggest that whether oncogene product-specific-tolerance is established or not to antitumor immunity may be decided by the dynamics of ret oncogene expression before and after delivery and this is the primary factor determining development or non-development of melanoma. PMID:9989837

  16. Effect of cadmium on glutathione S-transferase and metallothionein gene expression in coho salmon liver, gill and olfactory tissues

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Herbert M.; Williams, Chase R.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multifunctional family of phase II enzymes that detoxify a variety of environmental chemicals, reactive intermediates, and secondary products of oxidative damage. GST mRNA expression and catalytic activity have been used as biomarkers of exposure to environmental chemicals. However, factors such as species differences in induction, partial analyses of multiple GST isoforms, and lack of understanding of fish GST gene regulation, have confounded the use of GST as markers of pollutant exposure. In the present study, we examined the effect of exposure to cadmium (Cd), a prototypical environmental contaminant and inducer of mammalian GST, on GST mRNA expression in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) liver, gill, and olfactory tissues. GST expression data were compared to those for metallothionein (MT), a prototypical biomarker of metal exposure. Data mining of genomic databases led to the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for salmon GST isoforms encompassing 9 subfamilies, including alpha, mu, pi, theta, omega, kappa, rho, zeta and microsomal GST. In vivo acute (8-48 hr) exposures to low (3.7 ppb) and high (347 ppb) levels of Cd relevant to environmental scenarios elicited a variety of transient, albeit minor changes (<2.5-fold) in tissue GST profiles, including some reductions in GST mRNA expression. In general, olfactory GSTs were the earliest to respond to cadmium, whereas, more pronounced effects in olfactory and gill GST expression were observed at 48 hr relative to earlier time points. Although evaluation of GSTs reflected a cadmium-associated oxidative stress response, there was no clear GST isoform in any tissue that could serve as a reliable biomarker of acute cadmium exposure. By contrast, metallothionein (MT) mRNA was consistently and markedly induced in all three tissues by cadmium, and among the tissues examined, olfactory MT was the most sensitive marker of cadmium exposures. In summary, coho salmon exhibit a complex GST tissue profile consisting of at least 9 isoforms, all of which are present in the peripheral olfactory system. Short-term exposure to environmental levels of Cd causes transient changes in salmon GST consistent with oxidative stress, and in some cases, includes a loss of GST. In a biomarker context, however, monitoring of tissue MT mRNA expression, especially in the peripheral olfactory system, may be of greater utility for assessing short-term environmental exposures to cadmium. PMID:22257444

  17. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and fluid obtained from metal implant sites. PMID:25594566

  19. Symbiotic and non-symbiotic expression of cgMT1, a metallothionein-like gene from the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca.

    PubMed

    Laplaze, Laurent; Gherbi, Hassen; Duhoux, Emile; Pawlowski, Katharina; Auguy, Florence; Guermache, Fathia; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier

    2002-05-01

    A clone for a type 1 metallothionein (cgMT1) was isolated from a Casuarina glauca nodule cDNA library. The corresponding gene belongs to a small family and is highly expressed in roots and nitrogen-fixing nodules, whereas low expression was observed in aerial parts of the plant. The promoter region of cgMT1 was isolated and fused to the beta-glucuronidase (gus) gene. Transgenic Casuarinaceae plants showed that the cgMT1 promoter was most active in roots and in the oldest region of the shoot. In situ hybridization indicated that in nodules cgMT1 transcript is present in mature Frankia-infected cells and in the pericycle. Possible roles for cgMT1 in symbiotic and nonsymbiotic tissues are discussed. PMID:12008901

  20. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D.; Pedersen, R.; Mold, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  1. Structure and chromosomal localization of the mouse SNAP-23 gene.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, V V; Roche, P A

    2000-04-18

    SNAP-23 plays an important role in the regulation of vesicle trafficking in mammalian cells. In this report, we have determined the exon/intron organization of the mouse SNAP-23 gene. The SNAP-23 gene spans 31kb of the mouse genome and consists of eight exons interrupted by seven introns. The exon organization of the mouse SNAP-23 gene is identical to that of the related SNAP-25 gene in both chicken and Drosophila, suggesting that SNAP-23 arose by duplication of the SNAP-25 gene. Primer extension analysis revealed a major transcription start site approximately 112bp upstream of the translation start site. Like many ubiquitously expressed housekeeping genes, the proximal promoter region for the mouse SNAP-23 gene lacks consensus TATA and CAAT boxes. The SNAP-23 gene was localized to mouse chromosome 2 at band 2E5 using both fluorescence in-situ hybridization and radiation hybrid panel mapping studies. The identification of the structure of the mouse SNAP-23 gene reveals that the overall exon organization of SNAP-25 family members is conserved throughout evolution. PMID:10773458

  2. ScMT2-1-3, a Metallothionein Gene of Sugarcane, Plays an Important Role in the Regulation of Heavy Metal Tolerance/Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinlong; Xu, Liping; Su, Yachun; Wang, Hengbo; Gao, Shiwu; Xu, Jingsheng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Plant metallothioneins (MTs), which are cysteine-rich, low-molecular-weight, and metal-binding proteins, play important roles in detoxification, metal ion homeostasis, and metal transport adjustment. In this study, a novel metallothionein gene, designated as ScMT2-1-3 (GenBank Accession number JQ627644), was identified from sugarcane. ScMT2-1-3 was 700?bp long, including a 240?bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 79 amino acid residues. A His-tagged ScMT2-1-3 protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli system which had increased the host cell's tolerance to Cd2+, Cu2+, PEG, and NaCl. The expression of ScMT2-1-3 was upregulated under Cu2+ stress but downregulated under Cd2+ stress. Real-time qPCR demonstrated that the expression levels of ScMT2-1-3 in bud and root were over 14 times higher than those in stem and leaf, respectively. Thus, both the E. coli assay and sugarcane plantlets assay suggested that ScMT2-1-3 is significantly involved in the copper detoxification and storage in the cell, but its functional mechanism in cadmium detoxification and storage in sugarcane cells needs more testification though its expressed protein could obviously increase the host E. coli cell's tolerance to Cd2+. ScMT2-1-3 constitutes thus a new interesting candidate for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of MTs-implied plant heavy metal tolerance/accumulation and for developing sugarcane phytoremediator varieties. PMID:23781509

  3. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Junqiang

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO) mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE) between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD). Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity. PMID:25110693

  4. Mapping of the mouse homologue of the Wilson disease gene to mouse chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, V.; Williamson, P.; Boyd, Y.

    1995-08-10

    ATP7B, the gene altered in Wilson disease (WD) patients, lies in a block of homology shared between human chromosome 13q14 and the central region of mouse chromosome 14. However, we have mapped the murine homologue of ATP7B (Atp7b) to mouse chromosome 8 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Analysis of 80 interspecific backcross offspring was used to position Atp7b close to D8Mit3 and another ATPase locus, Atp4b, on mouse chromosome 8. ATP4B lies in 13q34 and is separated from ATP7B by several loci whose mouse homologues map to mouse chromosome 14. The assignment of Atp7b to mouse chromosome 8 identifies a previously unrecognized region of homology between this chromosome and human chromosome 13. This assignment suggests a possible location for the toxic milk mutation in the mouse, which has been proposed as a homologue of WD. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence. PMID:26412852

  6. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  7. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dogbevia, Godwin K; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate 'when', 'where', and 'how' gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  8. Cytosolic expression of synthetic phytochelatin and bacterial metallothionein genes in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for enhanced tolerance and bioaccumulation of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ruchi; Archana, G

    2014-06-01

    Due to its exemplary resistance to ionising radiation, oxidative stress, desiccation and several DNA damaging agents, Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (DR1) is considered as one of the most appropriate candidates for the bioremediation of the nuclear waste sites. However, the high sensitivity of this bacterium to heavy metals, which are usually preponderant at nuclear waste dump sites, precludes its application for bioremediation. This study deals with the expression two metal binding peptides in DR1 as an attractive strategy for developing metal tolerance in this bacterium. A synthetic gene (EC20) encoding a phytochelatin analogue with twenty repeating units of glutamate and cysteine was constructed by overlap extension and expressed in DR1. The cyanobacterial metallothionein (MT) gene, smtA was cloned for intracellular expression in DR1. Both the genes were expressed under the native groESL promoter. DR1 strain carrying the recombinant EC20 demonstrated 2.5-fold higher tolerance to Cd(2+) and accumulated 1.21-fold greater Cd(2+) as opposed to the control while the heterologous expression of MT SmtA in DR1 imparted the transformant superior tolerance to Cd(2+) amassing 2.5-fold greater Cd(2+) than DR1 expressing EC20. PMID:24578153

  9. A reanalysis of mouse ENCODE comparative gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Mizrahi-Man, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium reported that comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster more by species rather than by tissue. This observation was surprising, as it contradicted much of the comparative gene regulatory data collected previously, as well as the common notion that major developmental pathways are highly conserved across a wide range of species, in particular across mammals. Here we show that the Mouse ENCODE gene expression data were collected using a flawed study design, which confounded sequencing batch (namely, the assignment of samples to sequencing flowcells and lanes) with species. When we account for the batch effect, the corrected comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster by tissue, not by species. PMID:26236466

  10. Metallothionein and the Biology of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a low molecular weight protein with anti-apoptotic properties that has been demonstrated to scavenge free radicals in vitro. MT has not been extensively investigated within the context of aging biology. The purpose of this review, therefore, is to discuss findings on MT that are relevant to basic aging mechanisms and to draw attention to the possible role of MT in pro-longevity interventions. MT is one of just a handful of proteins that, when overexpressed, has been demonstrated to increase mouse lifespan. MT also protects against development of obesity in mice provided a high fat diet as well as diet-induced oxidative stress damage. Abundance of MT is responsive to caloric restriction (CR) and inhibition of the insulin / insulin-like signaling (IIS) pathway, and elevated MT gene expression has been observed in tissues from fasted and CR-fed mice, long-lived dwarf mice, worms maintained under CR conditions, and long-lived daf-2 mutant worms. The dysregulation of MT in these systems is likely to have tissue-specific effects on aging outcomes. Further investigation will therefore be needed to understand how MT contributes to the response of invertebrates and mice to CR and the endocrine mutations studied by aging researchers. PMID:20933613

  11. Oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and metallothionein (MT) gene expression in juvenile rock fish Sebastes schlegelii under the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile Sebastes schlegelii were exposed for 4 weeks with the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) concentration (0, 30, 60, 120 and 200mg/kg). The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and glutathione (GSH) level of liver and gill were evaluated after 4 weeks exposure. The SOD and GST activity of liver and gill was significantly increased in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg after 4 weeks, whereas a considerable decrease in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg after 4 weeks was observed in the GSH levels of liver and gill. In neurotoxicity, AChE activity was significatly inhibited in brain in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 60mg/kg after 4 weeks and muscle in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg after 4 weeks. Metallothionein (MT) gene in liver was considerably increased over 120mg/kg after 2 weeks and at 30, 120, and 240mg/kg after 4 weeks by dietary chromium exposure. The results indicate that dietary Cr exposure over 120mg/kg can induce substantial alterations in antioxidant responses, AChE activity and MT gene expression. PMID:26680530

  12. Immunologic Applications of Conditional Gene Modification Technology in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources. PMID:24700321

  13. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  14. Activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors Upregulates Metallothioneins, Thereby Increasing Intracellular Accumulation of Zinc, Autophagy, and Bacterial Clearance by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Amit; Abraham, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Continuous stimulation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) (variants in NOD2 have been associated with Crohn's disease), alters the phenotype of myeloid-derived cells, reducing production of inflammatory cytokines and increasing clearance of microbes. We investigated the mechanisms by which microbial clearance increases in macrophages under these conditions. METHODS Monocytes were purified from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and differentiated to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). We also isolated human intestinal macrophages. Bacterial clearance by MDMs was assessed in gentamicin protection assays. Effects of intracellular zinc and autophagy were measured by flow cytometry, immunoblot, reverse transcription PCR, and microscopy experiments. Small interfering RNAs were used to knock down specific proteins in MDMs. NOD2–/– and C57BL/6J mice, maintained in a specific pathogen-free facility, were given antibiotics, muramyl dipeptide (to stimulate NOD2), or dextran sodium sulfate; intestinal lamina propria cells were collected and analyzed. RESULTS Chronic stimulation of human MDMs through NOD2 upregulated the expression of multiple genes encoding metallothioneins, which bind and regulate levels of intracellular zinc. Intestinal myeloid-derived cells are continually stimulated through PRRs; metallothionein expression was upregulated in human and mouse intestinal myeloid-derived cells. Continuous stimulation of NOD2 increased levels of intracellular zinc, thereby increasing autophagy and bacterial clearance. The metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) was required for regulation of metallothionein genes in human MDMs. Knockdown of MTF-1 did not affect baseline clearance of bacteria by MDMs. However, the increase in intracellular zinc, autophagy, and bacterial clearance observed with continuous NOD2 stimulation was impaired in MDMs upon MTF-1 knockdown. Addition of zinc or induction of autophagy restored bacterial clearance to MDMs following metallothionein knockdown. NOD2 synergized with the PRRs TLR5 and TLR9 to increase the effects of metallothioneins in MDMs. In mice, the intestinal microbiota contributed to the regulation in expression of metallothioneins, levels of zinc, autophagy, and bacterial clearance by intestinal macrophages. CONCLUSIONS In studies of human MDMs and in mice, continuous stimulation of PRRs induces expression of metallothioneins. This leads to increased levels of intracellular zinc and enhanced clearance of bacteria via autophagy in macrophages. PMID:24960189

  15. Transcriptional response of two metallothionein genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) and histological changes in Oxya chinensis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) exposed to three trace metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Yu, Zhitao; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the transcriptional responses of two metallothionein (MT) genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) in various tissues (brain, optic lobe, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, foregut, gastric caeca, midgut and hindgut) of Oxya chinensis (Thunberg) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) after exposed to the trace metals cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) for 48h. The study revealed that the exposure of O. chinensis to each of the three metals at the median lethal concentration (LC50) or lower concentration(s) up-regulated the transcriptions of both OcMT1 and OCMT2 in the eight tissues except for OcMT1 and OcMT2 with Cd in brain and gastric caeca, respectively, and OcMT2 with Cu in gastric caeca. These results suggested that the exposure of O. chinensis to the metals may enhance MT biosynthesis that protects tissues by binding these metals in various tissues. To examine possible histopathological effect of the metals, we examined the histological changes in the fat bodies after O. chinensis was exposed to each of these metals at LC50. The exposure of Cd significantly reduced the size and number of adipocytes as compared with the control. However, such an effect was not observed in O. chinensis exposed to either Cu or Zn. These results suggested that fat bodies might be either significantly affected by Cd or play a crucial role in detoxification of excessive trace metals. PMID:26159299

  16. Tissue- and cell-specific expression of metallothionein genes in cadmium- and copper-exposed mussels analyzed by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Zorita, I.; Bilbao, E.; Schad, A.; Cancio, I.; Soto, M.; Cajaraville, M.P. . E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es

    2007-04-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-inducible proteins that can be used as biomarkers of metal exposure. In mussels two families of MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20) have been characterized. In this study, mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to 200 ppb Cd and 40 ppb Cu for 2 and 9 days to characterize the tissue and isoform specificity of metal-induced MT expression. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization demonstrated that both MT isoforms were mainly transcribed in digestive tubule epithelial cells, especially in basophilic cells. Weaker MT expression was detected in non-ciliated duct cells, stomach and gill epithelial cells, haemocytes, adipogranular cells, spermatic follicles and oocytes. RT-PCR resulted in cloning of a novel M. galloprovincialis isoform homologous to recently cloned Mytilus edulis intron-less MT10B isoform. In gills, Cd only affected MT10 gene expression after 2 days of exposure while increases in MT protein levels occurred at day 9. In the digestive gland, a marked increase of both isoforms, but especially of MT20, was accompanied by increased levels of MT proteins and basophilic cell volume density (Vv{sub BAS}) after 2 and 9 days and of intralysosomal metal accumulation in digestive cells after 9 days. Conversely, although metal was accumulated in digestive cells lysosomes and the Vv{sub BAS} increased in Cu-exposed mussels, Cu exposure did not produce an increase of MT gene expression or MT protein levels. These data suggest that MTs are expressed in a tissue-, cell- and isoform-specific way in response to different metals.

  17. RADIOIMMUNOASSAY OF METALLOTHIONEIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to develop a radioimmunoassay for metallothionein. Since this protein is involved with the transport of cadmium in biological systems and may in fact protect against cadmium poisoning, the ability to monitor the levels in the human population is of th...

  18. Conservation of Regional Gene Expression in Mouse and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Andrew D; Aragaki, Aaron K; Baquet, Zachary C; Hodges, Angela; Cunningham, Philip; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Kevin R; Jones, Lesley; Kooperberg, Charles; Olson, James M

    2007-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases have a hallmark regional and cellular pathology. Gene expression analysis of healthy tissues may provide clues to the differences that distinguish resistant and sensitive tissues and cell types. Comparative analysis of gene expression in healthy mouse and human brain provides a framework to explore the ability of mice to model diseases of the human brain. It may also aid in understanding brain evolution and the basis for higher order cognitive abilities. Here we compare gene expression profiles of human motor cortex, caudate nucleus, and cerebellum to one another and identify genes that are more highly expressed in one region relative to another. We separately perform identical analysis on corresponding brain regions from mice. Within each species, we find that the different brain regions have distinctly different expression profiles. Contrasting between the two species shows that regionally enriched genes in one species are generally regionally enriched genes in the other species. Thus, even when considering thousands of genes, the expression ratios in two regions from one species are significantly correlated with expression ratios in the other species. Finally, genes whose expression is higher in one area of the brain relative to the other areas, in other words genes with patterned expression, tend to have greater conservation of nucleotide sequence than more widely expressed genes. Together these observations suggest that region-specific genes have been conserved in the mammalian brain at both the sequence and gene expression levels. Given the general similarity between patterns of gene expression in healthy human and mouse brains, we believe it is reasonable to expect a high degree of concordance between microarray phenotypes of human neurodegenerative diseases and their mouse models. Finally, these data on very divergent species provide context for studies in more closely related species that address questions such as the origins of cognitive differences. PMID:17447843

  19. Activin Regulates Estrogen Receptor Gene Expression in the Mouse Ovary*

    E-print Network

    Mayo, Kelly E.

    , inflammation, renal tubule morphogenesis, and neuroprotection. In the reproductive system, in addition to regActivin Regulates Estrogen Receptor Gene Expression in the Mouse Ovary* Received for publication of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and § Center for Reproductive Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois

  20. Genomic structure of the mouse apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Takiguchi, Y.; Chen, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    A mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (AP endonuclease) is known to have two distinct functional domains. One domain is responsible for regulating the activity of Fos/Jun proto-oncogene products to bind to DNA at specific recognition sites. The other domain, which is highly conserved from bacteria to mammals, is responsible for repairing DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation, oxidative damage, and alkylating agents. This study reports on the isolation and characterization of the genomic structure of the mouse AP endonuclease gene (Apex). The genomic sequence of the Apex gene was 2.14 kb in length and contained four exons. Exon 1 contained a 0.24-kb untranslated 5{prime} region upstream of the initiation codon. Consensus sequences for two CAAT boxes and a GC box were found upstream of the end of exon 1. A polymorphism was noted in the untranslated region of exon 1 in a comparison of a number of mouse strains. These data indicate that the 5{prime} end of the mouse gene (Apex) differs from the previously isolated human gene (Ape), which has five exons and an untranslated region between exons 1 and 2. Data are also presented that suggest the presence of two pseudogenes in the mouse.

  1. Extracellular matrix gene expression in the developing mouse aorta

    E-print Network

    Mecham, Robert

    Extracellular matrix gene expression in the developing mouse aorta Sean E. McLean,1 Brigham H., 1972; Gerrity and CliV, 1975). As the vessel wall matures, the SMCs go through multiple overlapping phenotypic transitions, character- ized broadly by cellular proliferation, matrix production

  2. Dermal exposure of Eisenia andrei earthworms: Effects of heavy metals on metallothionein and phytochelatin synthase gene expressions in coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Homa, Joanna; Rorat, Agnieszka; Kruk, Jerzy; Cocquerelle, Claude; Plytycz, Barbara; Vandenbulcke, Franck

    2015-06-01

    Parameters such as total number of coelomocytes, riboflavin content in coelomocytes, expression of genes implied in metal homeostasis, and detoxification mechanisms can be used as biomarkers to assess the impact of metals on annelids. Defense biomarkers (detoxification gene expressions and coelomocyte parameters) were investigated in the ecotoxicologically important species Eisenia andrei following in vivo exposure to 5 different metals (zinc, copper, nickel, lead, and cadmium) at known concentrations. Coelomocyte numbers and riboflavin content were not affected by metallic exposure, but metal-specific gene expression variations were evidenced. PMID:25693738

  3. MouseNet v2: a database of gene networks for studying the laboratory mouse and eight other model vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eiru; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Hyojin; Shim, Hongseok; Kang, Byunghee; Yang, Sunmo; Shim, Jae Ho; Shin, Seung Yeon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, is one of the most important animal tools in biomedical research. Functional characterization of the mouse genes, hence, has been a long-standing goal in mammalian and human genetics. Although large-scale knockout phenotyping is under progress by international collaborative efforts, a large portion of mouse genome is still poorly characterized for cellular functions and associations with disease phenotypes. A genome-scale functional network of mouse genes, MouseNet, was previously developed in context of MouseFunc competition, which allowed only limited input data for network inferences. Here, we present an improved mouse co-functional network, MouseNet v2 (available at http://www.inetbio.org/mousenet), which covers 17 714 genes (>88% of coding genome) with 788 080 links, along with a companion web server for network-assisted functional hypothesis generation. The network database has been substantially improved by large expansion of genomics data. For example, MouseNet v2 database contains 183 co-expression networks inferred from 8154 public microarray samples. We demonstrated that MouseNet v2 is predictive for mammalian phenotypes as well as human diseases, which suggests its usefulness in discovery of novel disease genes and dissection of disease pathways. Furthermore, MouseNet v2 database provides functional networks for eight other vertebrate models used in various research fields. PMID:26527726

  4. MouseNet v2: a database of gene networks for studying the laboratory mouse and eight other model vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eiru; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Hyojin; Shim, Hongseok; Kang, Byunghee; Yang, Sunmo; Shim, Jae Ho; Shin, Seung Yeon; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, is one of the most important animal tools in biomedical research. Functional characterization of the mouse genes, hence, has been a long-standing goal in mammalian and human genetics. Although large-scale knockout phenotyping is under progress by international collaborative efforts, a large portion of mouse genome is still poorly characterized for cellular functions and associations with disease phenotypes. A genome-scale functional network of mouse genes, MouseNet, was previously developed in context of MouseFunc competition, which allowed only limited input data for network inferences. Here, we present an improved mouse co-functional network, MouseNet v2 (available at http://www.inetbio.org/mousenet), which covers 17 714 genes (>88% of coding genome) with 788 080 links, along with a companion web server for network-assisted functional hypothesis generation. The network database has been substantially improved by large expansion of genomics data. For example, MouseNet v2 database contains 183 co-expression networks inferred from 8154 public microarray samples. We demonstrated that MouseNet v2 is predictive for mammalian phenotypes as well as human diseases, which suggests its usefulness in discovery of novel disease genes and dissection of disease pathways. Furthermore, MouseNet v2 database provides functional networks for eight other vertebrate models used in various research fields. PMID:26527726

  5. Comparing the evolutionary conservation between human essential genes, human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Zheng, Jiajia; Luan, Meiwei; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-01

    Human housekeeping genes are often confused with essential human genes, and several studies regard both types of genes as having the same level of evolutionary conservation. However, this is not necessarily the case. To clarify this, we compared the differences between human housekeeping genes and essential human genes with respect to four aspects: the evolutionary rate (dN/dS), protein sequence identity, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density and level of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The results showed that housekeeping genes had lower evolutionary rates, higher sequence identities, lower SNP densities and higher levels of LD compared with essential genes. Together, these findings indicate that housekeeping and essential genes are two distinct types of genes, and that housekeeping genes have a higher level of evolutionary conservation. Therefore, we suggest that researchers should pay careful attention to the distinctions between housekeeping genes and essential genes. Moreover, it is still controversial whether we should substitute human orthologs of mouse essential genes for human essential genes. Therefore, we compared the evolutionary features between human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes and we got inconsistent results in long-term and short-term evolutionary characteristics implying the irrationality of simply replacing human essential genes with human orthologs of mouse essential genes. PMID:25911641

  6. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ALFALFA (MEDICAGO VARIA L.) GENETICLALY ENGINEERED TO EXPRESS A HUMAN METALLOTHIONEIN (HMT) GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of these studies were two-fold: (1) to determine efficacy of low and high expression hMT gene constructs by assessing accumulation of Cu in shoots of parental and transgenic plants of alfalfa (Medicago varia L.) exposed to different concentrations of CuSO4 by addit...

  7. The Mouse Thymosin Beta15 Gene Family Displays Unique Complexity and Encodes A Functional

    E-print Network

    Gent, Universiteit

    The Mouse Thymosin Beta15 Gene Family Displays Unique Complexity and Encodes A Functional Thymosin report on mouse Tb15, we show that, unlike in humans, four Tb15-like isoforms are present in mouse. We within the vertebrate Tb15-clade. Intriguingly, one of these mouse beta-thymosins, Tb15r, consists of two

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A 950-GENE DNA ARRAY FOR EXAMINING GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of a 950-gene DNA array for examining gene expression patterns in mouse testis.

    Rockett JC, Christopher Luft J, Brian Garges J, Krawetz SA, Hughes MR, Hee Kirn K, Oudes AJ, Dix DJ.

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effec...

  9. Functional and evolutionary analyses on expressed intronless genes in the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect

    Sakharkar, K R; Sakharkar, M K; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Chow, V T K; Pervaiz, S

    2006-01-01

    Using computational approaches we have identified 2017 expressed intronless genes in the mouse genome. Evolutionary analysis reveals that 56 intronless genes are conserved among the three domains of life - bacteria, archea and eukaryotes. These highly conserved intronless genes were found to be involved in essential housekeeping functions. About 80% of expressed mouse intronless genes have orthologs in eukaryotic genomes only, and thus are specific to eukaryotic organisms. 608 of these genes have intronless human orthologs and 302 of these orthologs have a match in OMIM database. Investigation into these mouse genes will be important in generating mouse models for understanding human diseases.

  10. Metallothionein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Geng-Wen; Yang, Lian-Yue

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of metallothioneins (MTs), which were recently thought to have close relationship with tumors, in human hepatocellular carcinoma. METHODS: Histological specimens of 35 cases of primary human hepatocellular carcinoma with para-neoplastic liver tissue and 5 cases of normal liver were stained for MTs with monoclonal mouse anti-MTs serum (E9) by the immunohistochemical ABC technique. RESULTS: MTs were stained in the 35 cases of HCC, including 6 cases negative (17.1%), 23 weakly positive (65.7%), and 6 strongly positive (17.1%). But MTs were stained strongly positive in all the five cases of normal liver and 35 cases of para-neoplastic liver tissue. The differences of MTs expression between HCC and normal liver tissue or para-neoplastic liver tissue were highly significant (P < 0.01). The rate of MTs expression in HCC grade I was 100 percent, higher than that in grade II (81%) and grade III and IV (78%). But the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). No obvious correlations between MTs expression in HCC and tumor size, clinical stage or serum alpha fetoprotein concentration were found (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Decrease of MTs expression in HCC may play a role in carcinogenesis of HCC. MTs are stained heterogenously in HCC. We can choose the anticancer agents according to the MTs concentration in HCC, which may improve the results of chemotherapy for HCC. PMID:12174372

  11. Gene to mouse atlas registration using a landmark-based nonlinear elasticity smoother

    E-print Network

    Vese, Luminita A.

    Gene to mouse atlas registration using a landmark-based nonlinear elasticity smoother Tungyou Lina to neuroanatomical mouse atlas in two dimensions. The proposed energy (minimized in the unknown displacement u satisfactory experimental results show that gene expression data are mapped to a mouse atlas with good landmark

  12. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  13. Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Daniel M.; Zhao, Ni; Chesler, Elissa J.; Bradford, Blair U.; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Yordanova, Roumyana; Lu, Lu

    2010-01-01

    Differences in clinical phenotypes between the sexes are well documented and have their roots in differential gene expression. While sex has a major effect on gene expression, transcription is also influenced by complex interactions between individual genetic variation and environmental stimuli. In this study, we sought to understand how genetic variation affects sex-related differences in liver gene expression by performing genetic mapping of genomewide liver mRNA expression data in a genetically defined population of naive male and female mice from C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, B6D2F1, and 37 C57BL/6J × DBA/2J (BXD) recombinant inbred strains. As expected, we found that many genes important to xenobiotic metabolism and other important pathways exhibit sexually dimorphic expression. We also performed gene expression quantitative trait locus mapping in this panel and report that the most significant loci that appear to regulate a larger number of genes than expected by chance are largely sex independent. Importantly, we found that the degree of correlation within gene expression networks differs substantially between the sexes. Finally, we compare our results to a recently released human liver gene expression data set and report on important similarities in sexually dimorphic liver gene expression between mouse and human. This study enhances our understanding of sex differences at the genome level and between species, as well as increasing our knowledge of the molecular underpinnings of sex differences in responses to xenobiotics. PMID:20551147

  14. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  15. Predicting the Proportion of Essential Genes in Mouse Duplicates Based on Biased Mouse Knockout Genes

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xun

    (paralogous) gene has been thought to be an important factor in the genetic robustness (Conant and Wagner 2004 single-copy genes in both the yeast and the nematode (Gu et al. 2003; Conant and Wagner 2004; Kamath et

  16. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  17. Maternal effect genes: Findings and effects on mouse embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeoung-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Stored maternal factors in oocytes regulate oocyte differentiation into embryos during early embryonic development. Before zygotic gene activation (ZGA), these early embryos are mainly dependent on maternal factors for survival, such as macromolecules and subcellular organelles in oocytes. The genes encoding these essential maternal products are referred to as maternal effect genes (MEGs). MEGs accumulate maternal factors during oogenesis and enable ZGA, progression of early embryo development, and the initial establishment of embryonic cell lineages. Disruption of MEGs results in defective embryogenesis. Despite their important functions, only a few mammalian MEGs have been identified. In this review we summarize the roles of known MEGs in mouse fertility, with a particular emphasis on oocytes and early embryonic development. An increased knowledge of the working mechanism of MEGs could ultimately provide a means to regulate oocyte maturation and subsequent early embryonic development. PMID:25045628

  18. AAV-mediated gene transfer to the mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Ahmed, Seemin S.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV) vectors are great tools for gene transfer due to their ability to mediate long-term gene expression. Recombinant AAVs have been used at various ages of development with no apparent toxicity. There are multiple ways of delivering AAV vectors to the CNS, depending on the stage of development of the mouse. In neonates, intravascular injections into the facial vein are often used. In adults, direct injections into target regions of the brain are achieved with great spatiotemporal control through stereotaxic surgeries. Recently, discoveries of new AAV vectors with the ability to cross the blood brain barrier have made it possible to also target the adult CNS by intravascular injections. rAAVs have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles in multiple animal models of CNS disorders, and several clinical trials are currently underway. PMID:23686825

  19. Structure of mammalian metallothionein.

    PubMed Central

    Kägi, J H; Vasák, M; Lerch, K; Gilg, D E; Hunziker, P; Bernhard, W R; Good, M

    1984-01-01

    All mammalian metallothioneins characterized contain a single polypeptide chain of 61 amino acid residues, among them 20 cysteines providing the ligands for seven metal-binding sites. Native metallothioneins are usually heterogeneous in metal composition, with Zn, Cd, and Cu occurring in varying proportions. However, forms containing only a single metal species, i.e., Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Hg, Pb, Bi, have now been prepared by in vitro reconstitution from the metal-free apoprotein. By spectroscopic analysis of such derivatives it was established that all cysteine residues participate in metal binding, that each metal ion is bound to four thiolate ligands, and that the symmetry of each complex is close to that of a tetrahedron. To satisfy the requirements of the overall Me7(Cys-)20 stoichiometry, the complexes must be combined to form metal-thiolate cluster structures. Experimental proof for the occurrence of such clusters comes from the demonstration of metal-metal interactions by spectroscopic and magnetic means. Thus, in Co(II)7-metallothionein, the Co(II)-specific ESR signals are effectively suppressed by antiferromagnetic coupling of juxtaposed paramagnetic metal ions. By monitoring changes in ESR signal size occurring on stepwise incorporation of Co(II) into the protein, it is possible to follow the building up of the clusters. This process is biphasic. Up to binding of four equivalents of Co(II), the ESR amplitude increases in proportion to the metal content, indicating generation of magnetically noninteracting high-spin complexes. However, upon addition of the remaining three equivalents of Co(II), these features are progressively suppressed, signaling the formation of clusters. The same mode of cluster formation has also been documented for Cd and Hg. The actual spatial organization of the clusters and the polypeptide chain remains to be established. An attractive possibility is the arrangement of the tetrahedral metal-thiolates in adamantane-like structures surrounded by properly folded segments of the chain providing the ligands. 1H-NMR data and infrared absorption measurements are consistent with a tightly folded structure rich in beta-type conformation. PMID:6329671

  20. Monitoring metal ion flux in reactions of metallothionein and drug-modified metallothionein by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, J.; Fabris, D.; Wei, D.; Karpel, R. L.; Fenselau, C.

    1998-01-01

    The capabilities of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry are demonstrated for monitoring the flux of metal ions out of and into the metalloprotein rabbit liver metallothionein and, in one example, chlorambucil-alkylated metallothionein. Metal ion transfers may be followed as the reactions proceed in situ to provide kinetic information. More uniquely to this technique, metal ion stoichiometries may be determined for reaction intermediates and products. Partners used in these studies include EDTA, carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bound hexamer of insulin, and the core domain of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein, a binding protein for single-stranded DNA. PMID:9828006

  1. Characterization of the p16 gene in the mouse: Evidence for a large gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.W.; Giendening, J.M.; Flores, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene product is an inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)/cyclin D complex. When uninhibited, the CDK4/cyclin D complex participates in the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and renders it inactive. Upon inactivation of the RB protein, transition from the G{sub 1} to the S phase of mitosis occurs and results in cellular proliferation. Thus, p16 is presumed to act as a negative regulator of cell growth by preventing the phosphorylation, and thereby subsequent inactivation, of RB by CDK4/cyclin D. Recently, the p16 gene (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene) has been mapped to chromosome 9p21 and found to be deleted or mutated in a number of tumor cell lines. These findings support the role of p16 as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor gene and suggest that the mutation of this gene may have global implications in carcinogenesis. We have chosen to test the functional significance of p16 mutations in vivo through the generation of a mouse mutant for p16. In preparation for this undertaking, eight apparently independent (as judged by restriction enzyme digestion and differential hybridization) mouse genomic embryonic stem cell clones have been identified using exon 2 from the human p16 gene as a probe. The identification of these multiple nonoverlapping clones was not entirely surprising since the reduced stringency hybridization of a zoo blot with the same probe also revealed 10-15 positive EcoRI fragments in all species tested, including human, monkey, cow, dog, cat, rabbit, hamster, mouse, chicken and D. melanogaster. Taken together, these findings suggest that the p16 gene is a member of a large gene family. The location of these genomic clones, as well as their potential expression in the mouse, is currently under investigation.

  2. Mouse Genetic Nomenclature: Standardization of Strain, Gene, and Protein Symbols

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Schofield, Paul N

    2011-01-01

    The use of standard nomenclatures for describing the strains, genes, and proteins of species is vital for the interpretation, archiving, analysis, and recovery of experimental data on the laboratory mouse. At a time when sharing of data and meta- analysis of experimental results is becoming a dominant mode of scientific investigation, failure to respect formal nomenclatures can cause confusion, errors, and in some cases contribute to poor science. Here we present the basic nomenclature rules for laboratory mice and explain how these rules should be applied to complex genetic manipulations and crosses. PMID:20685919

  3. The mouse genome: Experimental examination of gene predictions and transcriptional start sites

    E-print Network

    The mouse genome: Experimental examination of gene predictions and transcriptional start sites, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA The completion of the mouse and other mammalian genome sequences will provide necessary, but not sufficient, knowledge for an understanding of much of mouse

  4. Update of the human and mouse Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongbin; Nebert, Daniel W; Bruford, Elspeth A; Thompson, David C; Joenje, Hans; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessively inherited disease manifesting developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancies. Whereas FA has been studied for nearly 90 years, only in the last 20 years have increasing numbers of genes been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with this genetic disease. To date, 19 genes have been identified that encode Fanconi anemia complementation group proteins, all of which are named or aliased, using the root symbol "FANC." Fanconi anemia subtype (FANC) proteins function in a common DNA repair pathway called "the FA pathway," which is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. The various FANC mutant proteins contribute to distinct steps associated with FA pathogenesis. Herein, we provide a review update of the 19 human FANC and their mouse orthologs, an evolutionary perspective on the FANC genes, and the functional significance of the FA DNA repair pathway in association with clinical disorders. This is an example of a set of genes--known to exist in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and yeast--that are grouped together on the basis of shared biochemical and physiological functions, rather than evolutionary phylogeny, and have been named on this basis by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC). PMID:26596371

  5. Cloning and characterization of HbMT2a, a metallothionein gene from Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg differently responds to abiotic stress and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yue Yi; Yang, Shu Guang; Tian, Wei Min

    2015-05-22

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are of low molecular mass, cysteine-rich proteins. They play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals and homeostasis of intracellular metal ions, and protecting against intracellular oxidative damages. In this study a full-length cDNA of type 2 plant metallothioneins, HbMT2a, was isolated from 25 mM Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) stressed leaves of Hevea brasiliensis by RACE. The HbMT2a was 372bp in length and had a 237bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding for a protein of 78 amino acid residues with molecular mass of 7.772 kDa. The expression of HbMT2a in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone RY7-33-97 was up-regulated by Me-JA, ABA, PEG, H2O2, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), but down-regulated by water. The role of HbMT2a protein in protecting against metal toxicity was demonstrated in vitro. PET-28a-HbMT2-beared Escherichia coli. Differential expression of HbMT2a upon treatment with 10 °C was observed in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone 93-114 which is cold-resistant and Reken501 which is cold-sensitive. The expression patterns of HbMT2a in the two rubber tree clones may be ascribed to a change in the level of endogenous H2O2. PMID:25858315

  6. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    E-print Network

    Xue, Wen

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation ...

  7. Gene expression profiles and transcriptional regulatory pathways underlying mouse tissue macrophage identity and diversity

    E-print Network

    Regev, Aviv

    We assessed gene expression in tissue macrophages from various mouse organs. The diversity in gene expression among different populations of macrophages was considerable. Only a few hundred mRNA transcripts were selectively ...

  8. Brain Gene Expression of a Sporadic (icv-STZ Mouse) and a Familial Mouse Model (3xTg-AD Mouse) of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhihou; Sun, Shenggang; Dai, Chun-ling; Lee, Moon H.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and may result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations of presenilins or amyloid-? (A?) precursor protein (APP). A commonly used mouse model for AD is 3xTg-AD mouse, which is generated by over-expression of mutated presenilin 1, APP and tau in the brain and thus represents a mouse model of FAD. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. Despite the wide use of these two models for AD research, differences in gene expression between them are not known. Here, we compared the expression of 84 AD-related genes in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex between icv-STZ mice and 3xTg-AD mice using a custom-designed qPCR array. These genes are involved in APP processing, tau/cytoskeleton, synapse function, apoptosis and autophagy, AD-related protein kinases, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and mTOR pathway. We found altered expression of around 20 genes in both mouse models, which affected each of above categories. Many of these gene alterations were consistent with what was observed in AD brain previously. The expression of most of these altered genes was decreased or tended to be decreased in the hippocampus of both mouse models. Significant diversity in gene expression was found in the cerebral cortex between these two AD mouse models. More genes related to synaptic function were dysregulated in the 3xTg-AD mice, whereas more genes related to insulin signaling and glucose metabolism were down-regulated in the icv-STZ mice. The present study provides important fundamental knowledge of these two AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs. PMID:23236499

  9. Genes and gene expression modules associated with caloric restriction and aging in the laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Caloric restriction (CR) counters deleterious effects of aging and, for most mouse genotypes, increases mean and maximum lifespan. Previous analyses of microarray data have identified gene expression responses to CR that are shared among multiple mouse tissues, including the activation of anti-oxidant, tumor suppressor and anti-inflammatory pathways. These analyses have provided useful research directions, but have been restricted to a limited number of tissues, and have focused on individual genes, rather than whole-genome transcriptional networks. Furthermore, CR is thought to oppose age-associated gene expression patterns, but detailed statistical investigations of this hypothesis have not been carried out. Results Systemic effects of CR and aging were identified by examining transcriptional responses to CR in 17 mouse tissue types, as well as responses to aging in 22 tissues. CR broadly induced the expression of genes known to inhibit oxidative stress (e.g., Mt1, Mt2), inflammation (e.g., Nfkbia, Timp3) and tumorigenesis (e.g., Txnip, Zbtb16). Additionally, a network-based investigation revealed that CR regulates a large co-expression module containing genes associated with the metabolism and splicing of mRNA (e.g., Cpsf6, Sfpq, Sfrs18). The effects of aging were, to a considerable degree, similar among groups of co-expressed genes. Age-related gene expression patterns characteristic of most mouse tissues were identified, including up regulation of granulin (Grn) and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1). The transcriptional association between CR and aging varied at different levels of analysis. With respect to gene subsets associated with certain biological processes (e.g., immunity and inflammation), CR opposed age-associated expression patterns. However, among all genes, global transcriptional effects of CR were only weakly related to those of aging. Conclusion The study of aging, and of interventions thought to combat aging, has much to gain from data-driven and unbiased genomic investigations. Expression patterns identified in this analysis characterize a generalized response of mammalian cells to CR and/or aging. These patterns may be of importance in determining effects of CR on overall lifespan, or as factors that underlie age-related disease. The association between CR and aging warrants further study, but most evidence indicates that CR does not induce a genome-wide "reversal" of age-associated gene expression patterns. PMID:19968875

  10. Developmental regulation of myosin gene expression in mouse cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the two isoforms of cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC), MHC alpha and MHC beta, in mammals is regulated postnatally by a variety of stimuli, including serum hormone levels. Less is known about the factors that regulate myosin gene expression in rapidly growing cardiac muscle in embryos. Using isoform-specific 35S-labeled cRNA probes corresponding to the two MHC genes and the two myosin alkali light chain (MLC) genes expressed in cardiac muscle, we have investigated the temporal and spatial pattern of expression of these different genes in the developing mouse heart by in situ hybridization. Between 7.5 and 8 d post coitum (p.c.), the newly formed cardiac tube begins to express MHC alpha, MHC beta, MLC1 atrial (MLC1A), and MLC1 ventricular (MLC1V) gene transcripts at high levels throughout the myocardium. As a distinct ventricular chamber forms between 8 and 9 d p.c., MHC beta mRNAs begin to be restricted to ventricular myocytes. This process is complete by 10.5 d p.c. During this time, MHC alpha mRNA levels decrease in ventricular muscle cells but continue to be expressed at high levels in atrial muscle cells. MHC alpha transcripts continue to decrease in ventricular myocytes until 16 d p.c., when they are detectable at low levels, but then increase, and finally replace MHC beta mRNAs in ventricular muscle by 7 d after birth. Like MHC beta, MLC1V transcripts become restricted to ventricular myocytes, but at a slower rate. MLC1V mRNAs continue to be detected at low levels in atrial cells until 15.5 d p.c. MLC1A mRNA levels gradually decrease but are still detectable in ventricular cells until a few days after birth. This dynamic pattern of changes in the myosin phenotype in the prenatal mouse heart suggests that there are different regulatory mechanisms for cell-specific expression of myosin isoforms during cardiac development. PMID:2277065

  11. Genomic structure of the mouse gene (Lmnb1) encoding nuclear lamin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, Hideki; Sugimoto, Kazunori; Nakajima, Noboru

    1995-11-20

    The mouse gene (Lmnb1) that encodes nuclear lamin B1 was isolated. Structural analyses revealed that the lamin B1 gene spans about 43 kb of the genome and consists of 11 exons and 10 introns. Exon/intron structure of the B1 gene clearly showed the conserved organization shared among the intermediate filament protein family genes. The presumptive promoter region has high GC content and contains a CAAT box and multiple SP1 sites but no classical TATA box, suggesting that the lamin B1 gene has a typical housekeeping gene promoter with a CpG island. These data reveal the gene structure of the only remaining unanalyzed mouse somatic lamin gene. Gene structures of all the mouse somatic lamins are compared. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Identification of Four Mouse Diabetes Candidate Genes Altering ?-Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kamitz, Anne; Jähnert, Markus; Vogel, Heike; Scherneck, Stephan; Schulze, Matthias; Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Beta-cell apoptosis and failure to induce beta-cell regeneration are hallmarks of type 2-like diabetes in mouse models. Here we show that islets from obese, diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice, in contrast to diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J (B6)-ob/ob mice, do not proliferate in response to an in-vivo glucose challenge but lose their beta-cells. Genome-wide RNAseq based transcriptomics indicated an induction of 22 cell cycle-associated genes in B6-ob/ob islets that did not respond in NZO islets. Of all genes differentially expressed in islets of the two strains, seven mapped to the diabesity QTL Nob3, and were hypomorphic in either NZO (Lefty1, Apoa2, Pcp4l1, Mndal, Slamf7, Pydc3) or B6 (Ifi202b). Adenoviral overexpression of Lefty1, Apoa2, and Pcp4l1 in primary islet cells increased proliferation, whereas overexpression of Ifi202b suppressed it. We conclude that the identified genes in synergy with obesity and insulin resistance participate in adaptive islet hyperplasia and prevention from severe diabetes in B6-ob/ob mice. PMID:26348837

  13. Bidirectional promoter of the mouse thymidylate synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, W C; Ash, J; Johnson, L F

    1994-01-01

    The promoter of the mouse thymidylate synthase (TS) gene lacks both a TATAA box and an initiator element and directs transcriptional initiation at multiple sites over a 90 nucleotide initiation window. Earlier studies defined an essential region near the 5' end of the initiation window that is required for promoter activity. The essential region contains possible binding sites for Sp1 and Ets transcription factors. In the present study we show that this essential region stimulates transcription with approximately equal strength in both directions. Transcription is initiated over a broad initiation window in the reverse direction. The same elements are important for the reverse promoter and for the normal TS promoter. Sequences upstream of the essential region partially suppress expression in the reverse direction. The TS 5' flanking region, in either the normal or inverted orientation, directs S phase-specific expression of a TS minigene. This raises the possibility that an upstream gene and the TS gene may be coordinately induced at the G1/S phase boundary by a common set of control elements. Images PMID:7937129

  14. Genomic cloning of mouse MIF (macrophage inhibitory factor) and genetic mapping of the human and mouse expressed gene and nine mouse pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, C.A.; Adamson, M.C.; Buckler, C.E.

    1995-06-10

    The single functional mouse gene for MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) has been cloned from a P1 library, and its exon/intron structure determined and shown to resemble that of the human gene. The gene was mapped to chromosome 10 using two multilocus crosses between laboratory strains and either Mus musculus or Mus spretus. Nine additional loci containing related sequences, apparently all processed pseudogenes, were also mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 17, and 19. While most of these pseudogenes were also found in inbred mice and M. spretus, some are species specific. This suggests that there have been active phases of pseudogene formation in Mus both before and after the separation of musculus and spretus. The human gene contains no pseudogene; we assigned the human gene to chromosome 19, consistent with the location of mouse and human functional genes for MIF in a region of conserved linkage. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Targeted disruption of the mouse Lipoma Preferred Partner gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vervenne, Hilke B.V.K.; Crombez, Koen R.M.O.; Delvaux, Els L.; Janssens, Veerle; Ven, Wim J.M. van de Petit, Marleen M.R.

    2009-02-06

    LPP (Lipoma Preferred Partner) is a zyxin-related cell adhesion protein that is involved in the regulation of cell migration. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Lpp gene and analysed the importance of Lpp for embryonic development and adult functions. Aberrant Mendelian inheritance in heterozygous crosses suggested partial embryonic lethality of Lpp{sup -/-} females. Fertility of Lpp{sup -/-} males was proven to be normal, however, females from Lpp{sup -/-} x Lpp{sup -/-} crosses produced a strongly reduced number of offspring, probably due to a combination of female embryonic lethality and aberrant pregnancies. Apart from these developmental and reproductive abnormalities, Lpp{sup -/-} mice that were born reached adulthood without displaying any additional macroscopic defects. On the other hand, Lpp{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited reduced migration capacity, reduced viability, and reduced expression of some Lpp interaction partners. Finally, we discovered a short nuclear form of Lpp, expressed mainly in testis via an alternative promoter.

  16. The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease gene (Pkd1) is a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.G.; Loehning, C.; Frischauf, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene (PKD1) was mapped to chromosome 17 using somatic cell hybrid, BXD recombinant inbred strains, and FISH. The gene is located within a previously defined conserved synteny group that includes the mouse homologue of tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and is linked to the {alpha} globin pseudogene Hba-ps4. Although the human genome contains multiple copies of genes related to PKD1, there is no evidence for more than one copy in the mouse genome. Like their human counterparts, the mouse Tsc2 and Pkd1 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation with a distance of only 63 bp between the polyadenylation signals of the two genes. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  18. Peroxynitrite in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and the neuroprotective role of metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, Manuchair; Sharma, Sushil K; Ghafourifar, Pedram; Brown-Borg, Holly; El Refaey, H

    2005-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra zona compacta and in other subcortical nuclei associated with a widespread occurrence of Lewy bodies. The causes of cell death in Parkinson's disease are still poorly understood, but a defect in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced oxidative stress has been proposed. We have examined 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1)-induced apoptosis in control and metallothionein-overexpressing dopaminergic neurons, with a primary objective to determine the neuroprotective potential of metallothionein (MT) against peroxynitrite-induced neurodegeneration in PD. SIN-1 induced lipid peroxidation and triggered plasma membrane blebbing. In addition, it caused DNA fragmentation, alpha-synuclein induction, and intramitochondrial accumulation of metal ions (copper, iron, zinc, and calcium), and it enhanced the synthesis of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. Furthermore, it downregulated the expression of Bcl-2 and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, but upregulated the expression of caspase-3 and Bax in dopaminergic (SK-N-SH) neurons. SIN-1 induced apoptosis in aging mitochondrial genome knockout cells, alpha-synuclein-transfected cells, metallothionein double-knockout cells, and caspase-3-overexpressed dopaminergic neurons. SIN-1-induced changes were attenuated with selegiline or in metallothionein-transgenic striatal fetal stem cells. SIN-1-induced oxidation of dopamine (DA) to dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DopaL) was attenuated in metallothionein-transgenic fetal stem cells and in cells transfected with a mitochondrial genome, and was enhanced in aging mitochondrial genome knockout cells, in metallothionein double-knockout cells, and caspase-3 gene-overexpressing dopaminergic neurons. Selegiline, melatonin, ubiquinone, and metallothionein suppressed SIN-1-induced downregulation of a mitochondrial genome and upregulation of caspase-3 as determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These studies provide evidence that nitric oxide synthase activation and peroxynitrite ion overproduction may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of PD, and that metallothionein gene induction may provide neuroprotection. PMID:16291239

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Transfer to Mouse Heart and Skeletal Muscles Using

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Transfer to Mouse Heart and Skeletal Muscles Using a Minicircle Expressing to be improved. A novel vector system that shows great promise is the minicircle (MC) vector being smaller than, expressing the human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF), to mouse heart and skeletal muscles

  20. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi restore normal growth in a white poplar clone grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil, and this is associated with upregulation of foliar metallothionein and polyamine biosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Cicatelli, Angela; Lingua, Guido; Todeschini, Valeria; Biondi, Stefania; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims It is increasingly evident that plant tolerance to stress is improved by mycorrhiza. Thus, suitable plant–fungus combinations may also contribute to the success of phytoremediation of heavy metal (HM)-polluted soil. Metallothioneins (MTs) and polyamines (PAs) are implicated in the response to HM stress in several plant species, but whether the response is modulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to check whether colonization by AMF could modify growth, metal uptake/translocation, and MT and PA gene expression levels in white poplar cuttings grown on HM-contaminated soil, and to compare this with plants grown on non-contaminated soil. Methods In this greenhouse study, plants of a Populus alba clone were pre-inoculated, or not, with either Glomus mosseae or G. intraradices and then grown in pots containing either soil collected from a multimetal- (Cu and Zn) polluted site or non-polluted soil. The expression of MT and PA biosynthetic genes was analysed in leaves using quantitative reverse transcription–PCR. Free and conjugated foliar PA concentrations were determined in parallel. Results On polluted soil, AMF restored plant biomass despite higher Cu and Zn accumulation in plant organs, especially roots. Inoculation with the AMF caused an overall induction of PaMT1, PaMT2, PaMT3, PaSPDS1, PaSPDS2 and PaADC gene expression, together with increased free and conjugated PA levels, in plants grown on polluted soil, but not in those grown on non-polluted soil. Conclusions Mycorrhizal plants of P. alba clone AL35 exhibit increased capacity for stabilization of soil HMs, together with improved growth. Their enhanced stress tolerance may derive from the transcriptional upregulation of several stress-related genes, and the protective role of PAs. PMID:20810743

  2. Otitis Media Impacts Hundreds of Mouse Middle and Inner Ear Genes

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Carol J.; Hausman, Fran; Kempton, J. Beth; Choi, Dongseok; Trune, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Otitis media is known to alter expression of cytokine and other genes in the mouse middle ear and inner ear. However, whole mouse genome studies of gene expression in otitis media have not previously been undertaken. Ninety-nine percent of mouse genes are shared in the human, so these studies are relevant to the human condition. Methods To assess inflammation-driven processes in the mouse ear, gene chip analyses were conducted on mice treated with trans-tympanic heat-killed Hemophilus influenza using untreated mice as controls. Middle and inner ear tissues were separately harvested at 6 hours, RNA extracted, and samples for each treatment processed on the Affymetrix 430 2.0 Gene Chip for expression of its 34,000 genes. Results Statistical analysis of gene expression compared to control mice showed significant alteration of gene expression in 2,355 genes, 11% of the genes tested and 8% of the mouse genome. Significant middle and inner ear upregulation (fold change >1.5, p<0.05) was seen in 1,081 and 599 genes respectively. Significant middle and inner ear downregulation (fold change <0.67, p<0.05) was seen in 978 and 287 genes respectively. While otitis media is widely believed to be an exclusively middle ear process with little impact on the inner ear, the inner ear changes noted in this study were numerous and discrete from the middle ear responses. This suggests that the inner ear does indeed respond to otitis media and that its response is a distinctive process. Numerous new genes, previously not studied, are found to be affected by inflammation in the ear. Conclusion Whole genome analysis via gene chip allows simultaneous examination of expression of hundreds of gene families influenced by inflammation in the middle ear. Discovery of new gene families affected by inflammation may lead to new approaches to the study and treatment of otitis media. PMID:24124478

  3. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy.

    E-print Network

    Ares Jr., Manny

    Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy. Hongqing Du1 , Melissa S. Cline1 , Robert J. Osborne2 , Daniel L. Tuttle3 , Tyson A. Clark4

  4. The effect of Vdr gene ablation on global gene expression in the mouse placenta

    PubMed Central

    Buckberry, Sam; Spronk, Fleur; Wilson, Rebecca L.; Laurence, Jessica A.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Leemaqz, Shalem; O'Leary, Sean; Anderson, Paul H.; Roberts, Claire T.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of vitamin D are mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a predominantly nuclear receptor, expressed in numerous tissues including the placenta. VDR and the retinoid X receptor (RXR) form a dimer complex which binds to genomic vitamin D responsive elements located primarily in promoter regions and recruit cell-specific transcription factor complexes which regulate the expression of numerous genes. To investigate the role of VDR on regulating placental gene expression, mice heterozygous (+/?) for an ablated Vdr allele (C57Bl6 strain B6.129S4-VDRtm1Mbd/J, Jackson Laboratory) were mated to generate Vdr+/+, Vdr+/? and Vdr ?/? fetuses and placental samples were collected at day 18.5 of pregnancy. RNA was isolated from placental tissue with global gene expression measured using Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.1 ST Arrays to assess the effects of VDR on global gene expression in the placenta. All raw array data are deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under accession GSE61583.

  5. In vivo selection for metastasis promoting genes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Sun, Fangxian; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Saunders, Aleister J; Schultz, Peter G; Huang, Qihong

    2007-04-17

    Here, we report the identification of a metastasis promoting factor by a forward genetic screen in mice. A retroviral cDNA library was introduced into the nonmetastatic cancer cell line 168FARN, which was then orthotopically transplanted into mouse mammary fat pads, followed by selection for cells that metastasize to the lung. The genes encoding the disulfide isomerase ERp5 and beta-catenin were found to promote breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Disulfide isomerases (thiol isomerases), which catalyze disulfide bond formation, reduction, and isomerization, have not previously been implicated in cancer cell signaling and tumor metastasis. Overexpression of ERp5 promotes both in vitro migration and invasion and in vivo metastasis of breast cancer cells. These effects were shown to involve activation of ErbB2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways through dimerization of ErbB2. Activation of ErbB2 and PI3K subsequently stimulates RhoA and beta-catenin, which mediate the migration and invasion of tumor cells. Inhibition of ErbB2 and PI3K reverses the phenotypes induced by ERp5. Finally, ERp5 was shown to be up-regulated in human surgical samples of invasive breast cancers. These data identify a link between disulfide isomerases and tumor development, and provide a mechanism that modulates ErbB2 and PI3K signaling in the promotion of cancer progression. PMID:17420453

  6. Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J.

    1995-04-10

    We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Concatenated Metallothionein as a Clonable Gold Label for Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mercogliano, Christopher P.; DeRosier, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Localization of proteins in cells or complexes using electron microscopy has mainly relied upon the use of heavy metal clusters, which can be difficult to direct to sites of interest. For this reason, we would like to develop a clonable tag analogous to the clonable fluorescent tags common to light microscopy. Instead of fluorescing, such a tag would initiate formation of a heavy metal cluster. To test the feasibility of such a tag, we exploited the metal-binding protein, metallothionein (MT). We created a chimeric protein by fusing one or two copies of the MT gene to the gene for maltose binding protein. These chimeric proteins bound many gold atoms, with a conservative value of 16 gold atoms per copy of metallothionein. Visualization of gold-labeled fusion proteins by scanning electron microscopy required one copy of metallothionein while transmission electron microscopy required two copies. Images of frozen-hydrated samples of simple complexes made with anti-MBP antibodies hint at the usefulness of this method. PMID:17692533

  9. Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart. Physiol sequence tags (ESTs). With these data, we test the hypothesis that exercise attenuates the gene expression

  10. SPC-Cre-ERT2 transgenic mouse for temporal gene deletion in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yao-Song; Wang, Lianmei; Tian, Xinlun; Feng, Ruie; Ma, Aiping; Cai, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongbing; Xu, Kai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although several Cre-loxP-based gene knockout mouse models have been generated for the study of gene function in alveolar epithelia in the lung, their applications are still limited. In this study, we developed a SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse model, in which a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER(T2)) is under the control of the human surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter. The specificity and efficiency of Cre-ER(T2) activity was first evaluated by crossing SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse with ROSA26R mouse, a ?-galactosidase reporter strain. We found that Cre-ER(T2) was expressed in 30.7% type II alveolar epithelial cells of SPC-Cre-ER(T2)/ROSA26R mouse lung tissues in the presence of tamoxifen. We then tested the tamoxifen-inducible recombinase activity of Cre-ER(T2) in a mouse strain bearing TSC1 conditional knockout alleles (TSC1(fx/fx)). TSC1 deletion was detected in the lungs of tamoxifen treated SPC-Cre-ER(T2)/TSC1(fx/fx) mice. Therefore this SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse model may be a valuable tool to investigate functions of genes in lung development, physiology and disease. PMID:23049940

  11. Elevated O-GlcNAc Levels Activate Epigenetically Repressed Genes and Delay Mouse ESC

    E-print Network

    van Aalten, Daan

    - cated in development, epigenetic regulation, and diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's [4]. ItsElevated O-GlcNAc Levels Activate Epigenetically Repressed Genes and Delay Mouse ESC that increased O-GlcNAcylation results in upregulation of genes normally epigenetically silenced in ESCs

  12. LOCALIZATION OF THE MOUSE THYMIDINE KINASE GENE TO THE DISTAL PORTION OF CHROMOSOME 11

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the regional mapping of the thymidine kinase (tk-1) gene in the mouse using two complementary analyses: 1) investigation of chromosome aberrations associated with tx-1 gene inactivation in the L5178Y TX+/-3.7.2c cell line and (2) in situ molecular hybridization of a clo...

  13. How close are we to implementing gene targeting in animals other than the mouse?

    E-print Network

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    of the sheep, Dolly, by nuclear transfer of a somatic cell nucleus into an enucleated sheep oocyte (2) provides. First, the desired mutation is introduced into a cloned copy of the chosen gene by stan- dard of the gene targeting strategy that has been so successful in the mouse. However, Wilmut's successful cloning

  14. Mouse. cap alpha. -globin genes and. cap alpha. -globin-like pseudogenes are not syntenic

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, R.A.; Lalley, P.A.; Whitney, J.B.; Anderson, W.F.

    1981-10-01

    A genetic polymorphism for a Bgl I endonuclease site near the ..cap alpha..-globin-like pseudogene ..cap alpha..-4 of C57BL/6 and C3H/HeN mice was used to show that ..cap alpha..-4 was not affected by three independent mutations in which the adult globin genes ..cap alpha..-1 and ..cap alpha..-2 were deleted. These results indicated that ..cap alpha..-4 might not be located adjacent to the adult ..cap alpha..-globin genes on chromosome 11. Restriction endonuclease analysis of DNA of a primary clone of a Chinese hamster-mouse somatic cell hybrid that had lost mouse chromosomes 11 and 18 showed that this clone lacked the adult murine globin genes ..cap alpha..-1 and ..cap alpha..-2 but it did contain the ..cap alpha..-globin-like pseudogenes ..cap alpha..-3 and ..cap alpha..-4. These results indicated that the adult ..cap alpha..-globin genes and ..cap alpha..-globin-like pseudogenes are not located on the same chromosome. Similar analyses of several other Chinese hamster-mouse somatic cell hybrids that had segregated other mouse chromosomes indicated that the ..cap alpha..-globin-like pseudogenes ..cap alpha..-3 and ..cap alpha..-4 are located on mouse chromosomes 15 and 17, respectively. These data explain why ..cap alpha..-3 and ..cap alpha..-4 were not affected by the three independently induced deletion-type mutations that cause ..cap alpha..-thalassemia in the mouse.

  15. Mouse lactoferrin gene: a marker for estrogen and epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Teng, C

    1995-01-01

    Lactoferrin mRNA in the 21-day-old mouse uterus can be increased several hundredfold by estrogen. The physiological role of lactoferrin in mouse uterus is unclear; however, it can be a useful marker for the estrogen action in the uterus. The structural organization and the chromosome location of the lactoferrin gene are similar to members of the transferrin gene family. At the 5' flanking region of the lactoferrin gene, we have characterized two modules that respond to estrogen and growth factor stimulation. Each module is composed of either overlapping or multiple transcription factor-binding elements. The well-characterized estrogen and growth factor response modules in the mouse lactoferrin gene could serve as the foundation to understand the intricate molecular mechanisms of estrogen action and its relationship to growth factors. Images Figure 1. Figure 1. PMID:8593866

  16. Human and Mouse Gene Structure: Comparative Analysis and

    E-print Network

    undertook a comparison of orthologous genom,c Ioc~ from human and mouse, study,ng the extent of s~mllartty m-specmes sequence comparison -- that is, by simultaneously analyzing homologous Ioc~ from two related species

  17. Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus 

    E-print Network

    Tilford, Sarah

    2008-08-24

    During pregnancy in the mouse, extensive communication takes place between the conceptus (embryo/fetus and associated extraembryonic membranes) and uterus. Our focus centers on the uterine response to the conceptus. In ruminants, the conceptus...

  18. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  19. A Survey of Imprinted Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J. Mauro; Starmer, Joshua; Schertzer, Megan D.; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Several hundred mammalian genes are expressed preferentially from one parental allele as the result of a process called genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is prevalent in extra-embryonic tissue, where it plays an essential role during development. Here, we profiled imprinted gene expression via RNA-Seq in a panel of six mouse trophoblast stem lines, which are ex vivo derivatives of a progenitor population that gives rise to the placental tissue of the mouse. We found evidence of imprinted expression for 48 genes, 31 of which had been described previously as imprinted and 17 of which we suggest as candidate imprinted genes. An equal number of maternally and paternally biased genes were detected. On average, candidate imprinted genes were more lowly expressed and had weaker parent-of-origin biases than known imprinted genes. Several known and candidate imprinted genes showed variability in parent-of-origin expression bias between the six trophoblast stem cell lines. Sixteen of the 48 known and candidate imprinted genes were previously or newly annotated noncoding RNAs and six encoded for a total of 60 annotated microRNAs. Pyrosequencing across our panel of trophoblast stem cell lines returned levels of imprinted expression that were concordant with RNA-Seq measurements for all eight genes examined. Our results solidify trophoblast stem cells as a cell culture-based experimental model to study genomic imprinting, and provide a quantitative foundation upon which to delineate mechanisms by which the process is maintained in the mouse. PMID:25711832

  20. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  1. Molecular cloning and structural analysis of mouse gene and pseudogenes for proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Hayashi, Y; Hirose, F; Matsuoka, S; Moriuchi, T; Shiroishi, T; Moriwaki, K; Matsukage, A

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated clones containing the entire mouse proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene of 3890 bp and flanking sequences using a rat PCNA cDNA as a probe. The mouse gene has 6 exons whose sequences and junction points of exons with introns are extensively homologous to the human gene while sizes and nucleotide sequences of introns are much less conserved than exons. By a transient expression assay of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, the promoter of this gene is localized within 200 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. We have also isolated two processed pseudogenes. Homology between the first one (psi PCNA-I) and the exons of the PCNA gene was 76.8% in the region so far sequenced. The second one (psi PCNA-II) consists of a region highly homologous to the entire exons of the PCNA gene, and only 9 out of total 1256 bp are different from the corresponding exon sequence of the gene. The 5'-flanking region of the psi PCNA-II did not function as an active promoter. Surveys in various wild and laboratory mice genomes suggest that the psi PCNA-II was generated through the reverse transcription process of the PCNA mRNA about 5 x 10(5) years ago in the domesticus subspecies of Mus musculus, the house mouse. The psi PCNA-II is tentatively mapped in the chromosome 17 of the C57BL mouse. Images PMID:1674997

  2. An animal model for Norrie disease (ND): gene targeting of the mouse ND gene.

    PubMed

    Berger, W; van de Pol, D; Bächner, D; Oerlemans, F; Winkens, H; Hameister, H; Wieringa, B; Hendriks, W; Ropers, H H

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the cellular and molecular processes which are involved in Norrie disease (ND), we have used gene targeting technology to generate ND mutant mice. The murine homologue of the ND gene was cloned and shown to encode a polypeptide that shares 94% of the amino acid sequence with its human counterpart. RNA in situ hybridization revealed expression in retina, brain and the olfactory bulb and epithelium of 2 week old mice. Hemizygous mice carrying a replacement mutation in exon 2 of the ND gene developed retrolental structures in the vitreous body and showed an overall disorganization of the retinal ganglion cell layer. The outer plexiform layer disappears occasionally, resulting in a juxtaposed inner and outer nuclear layer. At the same regions, the outer segments of the photoreceptor cell layer are no longer present. These ocular findings are consistent with observations in ND patients and the generated mouse line provides a faithful model for study of early pathogenic events in this severe X-linked recessive neurological disorder. PMID:8789439

  3. Assessment of orthologous splicing isoforms in human and mouse orthologous genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent discoveries have highlighted the fact that alternative splicing and alternative transcripts are the rule, rather than the exception, in metazoan genes. Since multiple transcript and protein variants expressed by the same gene are, by definition, structurally distinct and need not to be functionally equivalent, the concept of gene orthology should be extended to the transcript level in order to describe evolutionary relationships between structurally similar transcript variants. In other words, the identification of true orthology relationships between gene products now should progress beyond primary sequence and "splicing orthology", consisting in ancestrally shared exon-intron structures, is required to define orthologous isoforms at transcript level. Results As a starting step in this direction, in this work we performed a large scale human- mouse gene comparison with a twofold goal: first, to assess if and to which extent traditional gene annotations such as RefSeq capture genuine splicing orthology; second, to provide a more detailed annotation and quantification of true human-mouse orthologous transcripts defined as transcripts of orthologous genes exhibiting the same splicing patterns. Conclusions We observed an identical exon/intron structure for 32% of human and mouse orthologous genes. This figure increases to 87% using less stringent criteria for gene structure similarity, thus implying that for about 13% of the human RefSeq annotated genes (and about 25% of the corresponding transcripts) we could not identify any mouse transcript showing sufficient similarity to be confidently assigned as a splicing ortholog. Our data suggest that current gene and transcript data may still be rather incomplete - with several splicing variants still unknown. The observation that alternative splicing produces large numbers of alternative transcripts and proteins, some of them conserved across species and others truly species-specific, suggests that, still maintaining the conventional definition of gene orthology, a new concept of "splicing orthology" can be defined at transcript level. PMID:20920313

  4. The mouse lysosomal membrane protein 1 gene as a candidate for the motorneuron degeneration (mnd) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, N.A.; Martin, J.E.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-03-01

    The motorneuron degeneration (mnd) mutation causes one of the few late-onset progressive neurodegenerations in mice; therefore, the mnd mouse is a valuable paradigm for studying neurodegenerative biology. The mnd mutation may also model human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) or Batten disease. Mnd maps to the centromeric region of mouse chromosome 8, which likely corresponds to portions of human chromosomes 13,8, or 19; we note that the chromosome 13 portion maps close to a region thought to contain the human Type V NCL locus. We have identified candidate genes for the mnd locus from human chromosomes 13, 8, and 19, and we are mapping these genes in the mouse to determine their proximity to the mutated locus and to refine the comparative human-mouse map in this area. A candidate gene from human chromosome 13 is LAMP1, which encodes lysosomal membrane protein 1. We found that Lamp1 in the mouse lies within the region of the mnd mutation. Therefore, we sequenced Lamp1 cDNAs from homozygous mnd mice and unrelated wildtype C57BL/6 mice. We find no differences between the two cDNA species in the regions examined, and expression analysis shows a similar LAMP1 protein distribution in wildtype and mutant mice, suggesting that an abnormal accumulation of material within normal lysosome structures is unlikely to be the pathogenetic mechanism in the mnd mouse. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  5. eMouseAtlas informatics: embryo atlas and gene expression database.

    PubMed

    Armit, Chris; Richardson, Lorna; Hill, Bill; Yang, Yiya; Baldock, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of developmental biology data is presented in the form of images at morphologically diverse stages of development. The curation of these datasets presents different challenges to that of sequence/text-based data. Towards this end, the eMouseAtlas project created a digital atlas of mouse embryo development as a means of understanding developmental anatomy and exploring the relationship between genes and development in a spatial context. Using the morphological staging system pioneered by Karl Theiler, the project has generated 3D models of post-implantation mouse development and used them as a spatial framework for the delineation of anatomical components and for archiving in situ gene expression data in the EMAGE database. This has allowed us to develop a unique online resource for mouse developmental biology. We describe here the underlying structure of the resource, as well as some of the tools that have been developed to allow users to mine the curated image data. These tools include our IIP3D/X3DOM viewer that allows 3D visualisation of anatomy and/or gene expression in the context of a web browser, and the eHistology resource that extends this functionality to allow visualisation of high-resolution cellular level images of histology sections. Furthermore, we review some of the informatics aspects of eMouseAtlas to provide a deeper insight into the use of the atlas and gene expression database. PMID:26296321

  6. Prediction of Human Disease Genes by Human-Mouse Conserved Coexpression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Elena; Damasco, Christian; Silengo, Lorenzo; Oti, Martin; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2008-01-01

    Background Even in the post-genomic era, the identification of candidate genes within loci associated with human genetic diseases is a very demanding task, because the critical region may typically contain hundreds of positional candidates. Since genes implicated in similar phenotypes tend to share very similar expression profiles, high throughput gene expression data may represent a very important resource to identify the best candidates for sequencing. However, so far, gene coexpression has not been used very successfully to prioritize positional candidates. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that it is possible to reliably identify disease-relevant relationships among genes from massive microarray datasets by concentrating only on genes sharing similar expression profiles in both human and mouse. Moreover, we show systematically that the integration of human-mouse conserved coexpression with a phenotype similarity map allows the efficient identification of disease genes in large genomic regions. Finally, using this approach on 850 OMIM loci characterized by an unknown molecular basis, we propose high-probability candidates for 81 genetic diseases. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that conserved coexpression, even at the human-mouse phylogenetic distance, represents a very strong criterion to predict disease-relevant relationships among human genes. PMID:18369433

  7. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  8. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O’Leary, Timothy P.; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E.; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming. PMID:23123364

  9. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  10. Characterization of the genomic structure of the mouse APLP1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Sue; Wu, Kuo; Black, I.B.; Schaar, D.G.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the organization of the mouse APLP1 gene, an evolutionarily conserved amyloid precursor-like protein. The amyloid beta protein, important in Alzheimer diseases, is derived from these precursor proteins. By investigating the expression and structure of this murine gene, it is hoped that more will be learned about the function and regulation of the human homologue. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  11. A reeler mutant mouse with a new, spontaneous mutation in the reelin gene.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Tom E; Finsen, Bente; Goffinet, Andre M; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Boldyreff, Brigitte

    2002-09-30

    In one of our mouse colonies a reeler-like phenotype appeared spontaneously. The brain histology was identical to the known reeler phenotype. Northern and Western blot analysis and a complementation test showed that the defect is located to the reelin gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis together with information obtained from sequence databases revealed that this defective reelin gene had an approximately 24-kb intragenic deletion comprising exons 13-20. PMID:12399118

  12. The mouse thymosin {beta}4 gene: Structure, promoter identification, and chromosome localization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xun; Zimmerman, A.; Yin, H.L.

    1996-03-05

    Thymosin {beta}4 (T{beta}4) is an actin monomer sequestering protein that may have a critical role in modulating the dynamics of actin polymerization and depolymerization in nonmuscle cells. Its regulatory role is consistent with the many examples of transcriptional regulation of T{beta}4 and of tissue-specific expression. Furthermore, lymphocytes have a unique T{beta}4 transcript relative to the ubiquitous transcript found in many other tissues and cells. To determine how T{beta}4 gene expression is regulated and how the alternative transcripts are derived, we cloned the mouse T{beta}4 gene. We established that there is a single mouse T{beta}4 gene and found that the lymphoid-specific transcript is generated by extending the ubiquitous exon 1 with an alternate downstream splice site. The transcription start site is defined by primer extension analysis, and the 5{prime}-flanking region has many of the characteristics of a promoter. It is pyrimidine-rich and contains typical promoter elements, including a GC box, an initiator site, and consensus transcription factor binding sites. The mouse T{beta}4 gene locus (Ptmb4) is located by interspecific backcross mapping to the distal region of the mouse X chromosome, linked to Btk and Gja6. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mouse cytosolic and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotidases: cDNA cloning of the mitochondrial enzyme, gene structures, chromosomal

    E-print Network

    Bianchi, Vera

    Mouse cytosolic and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotidases: cDNA cloning of the mitochondrial enzyme, gene structures, chromosomal mapping and comparison with the human orthologsq Chiara Rampazzoa , Maria is a cytoplasmic enzyme (dNT-1), the other occurs in mitochondria (dNT-2). The human mitochondrial enzyme, recently

  14. Cationic star copolymers based on ?-cyclodextrins for efficient gene delivery to mouse embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Wu, Yun-Long

    2015-07-11

    A cationic star copolymer with a ?-cyclodextrin core was developed for nonviral gene transfer to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The copolymer comprises poly(2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate) as the cationic component and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as the non-toxic stealth component. These materials have very low toxicity and show highly efficient transfection to mESC colonies. PMID:26040469

  15. Chromosome localizations of genes for five cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. ); Bolger, G.; Michaeli, T. )

    1994-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important second messengers that mediate a number of cellular responses to external signals. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases play a role in signal transduction by regulating the cellular concentrations of these messengers. Here, the authors have applied Southern analyses of somatic cell hybrid lines and of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains as well as fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomally localize five cAMP-specific nucleotide phosphodiesterase genes in human and mouse. Genes DPDE1, DPDE2, DPDE3, and DPDE4 that share sequence homology with the Drosophila dunce gene were assigned to human chromosomes 19 (DPDE1 and DPDE2), ga12 (DPDE3), and 1p31 (DPDE4) and to mouse chromosomes 8, 9, 13, and 4, respectively. The high-affinity cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene (HCP1) was mapped to human chromosome 8q13-q22. Since these genes are potential candidates for involvement in psychiatric or behavioral disorders, knowledge of their chromosomal localizations will facilitate the discovery of their association with disease genes as they are being mapped by linkage studies.

  16. The mouse gene expression database: New features and how to use them effectively.

    PubMed

    Finger, Jacqueline H; Smith, Constance M; Hayamizu, Terry F; McCright, Ingeborg J; Xu, Jingxia; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is an extensive and freely available community resource of mouse developmental expression data. GXD curates and integrates expression data from the literature, via electronic data submissions, and by collaborations with large-scale projects. As an integral component of the Mouse Genome Informatics Resource, GXD combines expression data with genetic, functional, phenotypic, and disease-related data, and provides tools for the research community to search for and analyze expression data in this larger context. Recent enhancements include: an interactive browser to navigate the mouse developmental anatomy and find expression data for specific anatomical structures; the capability to search for expression data of genes located in specific genomic regions, supporting the identification of disease candidate genes; a summary displaying all the expression images that meet specified search criteria; interactive matrix views that provide overviews of spatio-temporal expression patterns (Tissue × Stage Matrix) and enable the comparison of expression patterns between genes (Tissue × Gene Matrix); data zoom and filter utilities to iteratively refine summary displays and data sets; and gene-based links to expression data from other model organisms, such as chicken, Xenopus, and zebrafish, fostering comparative expression analysis for species that are highly relevant for developmental research. PMID:26045019

  17. Locations of human and mouse genes encoding the RFX1 and RFX2 transcription factor proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.; Stubbs, L.; Hoffman, S.

    1996-07-01

    RFX transcription factors constitute a highly conserved family of site-specific DNA binding proteins involved in the expression of a variety of cellular and viral genes, including major histocompatibility complex class II genes and genes in human hepatitis B virus. Five members of the RFX gene family have been isolated from human and mouse, and all share a highly characteristic DNA binding domain that is distinct from other known DNA binding motifs. The human RFX1 and RFX2 genes have been assigned by in situ hybridization to chromosome 19p13.1 and 19p13.3, respectively. In this paper, we present data that localize RFX1 and RFX2 precisely within the detailed physical map of human chromosome 19 and genetic data that assign Rfx1 and Rfx2 to homologous regions of mouse chromosomes 8 and 17, respectively. These data define the established relationships between these homologous mouse and human regions in further detail and provide new tools for linking cloned genes to phenotypes in both species. 26 ref., 2 figs.

  18. Expression of Notch receptors, ligands and target genes during development of the mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Raafat, Ahmed; Goldhar, Anita S.; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Xu, Keli; Amirjazil, Idean; McCurdy, David; Lashin, Karim; Salomon, David; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Egan, Sean; Callahan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Notch genes play a critical role in mammary gland growth, development and tumorigenesis. In the present study we have quantitatively determined the levels and mRNA expression patterns of the Notch receptor genes, their ligands and target genes in the postnatal mouse mammary gland. The steady state levels of Notch3 mRNA are the highest among receptor genes, Jagged1 and Dll3 mRNA levels are the highest among ligand genes and Hey2 mRNA levels are highest among expressed Hes/Hey target genes analyzed during different stages of postnatal mammary gland development. Using an immunohistochemical approach with antibodies specific for each Notch receptor, we show that Notch proteins are temporally regulated in mammary epithelial cells during normal mammary gland development in the FVB/N mouse. The loss of ovarian hormones is associated with changes in the levels of Notch receptor mRNAs (Notch2 higher and Notch3 lower) and ligand mRNAs (Dll1 and Dll4 are higher, whereas Dll3 and Jagged1 are lower) in the mammary gland of ovariectomized mice compared to intact mice. These data define expression of the Notch ligand/receptor system throughout development of the mouse mammary gland and help set the stage for genetic analysis of Notch in this context. PMID:21506125

  19. Gene transfer to synovial fibroblast: methods and evaluation in the SCID mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Ingmar; Rutkauskaite, Edita; Cinski, Antje; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Gay, Steffen; Pap, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The use of gene transfer techniques has become of utmost importance both for the analysis of molecular pathways of rheumatic joint destruction and for the evaluation of novel therapeutic concepts to treat rheumatic diseases. However, gene transfer into synovial fibroblasts faces several challenges, which result mainly from the lack of specific surface markers and the low-proliferation rate of these cells. This chapter describes both nonviral and viral strategies of transferring gene constructs into synovial fibroblasts. It focuses on the use of lipofection for the gene transfer of siRNA to synovial fibroblasts and the use of AMAXA-nucleofection for the nonviral transfer of gene expression constructs. In addition, retro- and lentiviral strategies of gene transfer are introduced. Finally, the SCID mouse in vivo model of rheumatoid joint destruction is described as a means of evaluating the effects of gene transfer on the invasiveness of synovial fibroblasts. PMID:17951674

  20. Reference gene selection for real-time RT-PCR in regenerating mouse livers

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Ohashi, Kazuo Taminishi, Sanae; Okano, Teruo; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori

    2008-09-12

    The liver has an intrinsic ability to undergo active proliferation and recover functional liver mass in response to an injury response. This regenerative process involves a complex yet well orchestrated change in the gene expression profile. To produce accurate and reliable gene expression of target genes during various stages of liver regeneration, the determination of internal control housekeeping genes (HKGs) those are uniformly expressed is required. In the present study, the gene expression of 8 commonly used HKGs, including GAPDH, ACTB, HPRT1, GUSB, PPIA, TBP, TFRC, and RPL4, were studied using mouse livers that were quiescent and actively regenerating induced by partial hepatectomy. The amplification of the HKGs was statistically analyzed by two different mathematical algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. Using this method, PPIA and TBP gene expression found to be relatively stable regardless of the stages of liver regeneration and would be ideal for normalization to target gene expression.

  1. Automatic Summarization of Mouse Gene Information by Clustering and Sentence Extraction from MEDLINE Abstracts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianji; Cohen, Aaron M.; Hersh, William

    2007-01-01

    Tools to automatically summarize gene information from the literature have the potential to help genomics researchers better interpret gene expression data and investigate biological pathways. The task of finding information on sets of genes is common for genomic researchers, and PubMed is still the first choice because the most recent and original information can only be found in the unstructured, free text biomedical literature. However, finding information on a set of genes by manually searching and scanning the literature is a time-consuming and daunting task for scientists. We built and evaluated a query-based automatic summarizer of information on mouse genes studied in microarray experiments. The system clusters a set of genes by MeSH, GO and free text features and presents summaries for each gene by ranked sentences extracted from MEDLINE abstracts. Evaluation showed that the system seems to provide meaningful clusters and informative sentences are ranked higher by the algorithm. PMID:18693953

  2. Two acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase genes located in the t-complex region of mouse chromosome 17 partially overlap the Tcp-1 and Tcp-1x genes.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, A

    1993-11-01

    The Tcp-1 gene is located in the t-complex region of mouse chromosome 17 and on the long arm of human chromosome 6. In the mouse, a related gene, Tcp-1x, is tightly linked to Tcp-1. It is shown here that two genes located 3' to the murine Tcp-1 and Tcp-1x genes code for proteins highly homologous to acetyl-CoA acetyltransferases. These genes (Acat-1 and Acat-2) are in the opposite orientation to the Tcp-1 genes, and transcription results in mRNA species that contain the last exon of Tcp-1 or Tcp-1x within the 3' untranslated region of the respective Acat mRNA. Both Acat genes appear to be transcribed in several mouse tissues. An ACAT gene also overlaps the TCP1 gene in humans, suggesting that this close linkage may have some functional significance. PMID:7904580

  3. Metallothioneins in the lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Werynska, Bozena; Pula, Bartosz; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna

    2015-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low weight proteins involved in several key cellular processes such as metal ions homeostasis, detoxification and scavenging of free radicals. Four groups of MTs are distinguished: MT-1, MT-2, MT-3 and MT-4. Regardless of the type, MTs are characterized by high content of cysteine, responsible for their biological properties such as binding of relevant zinc and copper ions, as well as toxic ions such as lead and cadmium. MTs were additionally shown to protect cells against oxidative stress damage and participate in differentiation, proliferation and/or apoptosis of normal and cancer cells. Many studies of different neoplasms showed association of elevated MTs levels with occurrence of chemo- and radiotherapy resistance and poor patients' outcome. In this review, we summarize and discuss the potential mechanism of action of metallotioneins in lung physiology and pathology. PMID:25815626

  4. Increased levels of metallothionein in placenta of smokers.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Ana Maria; Arguello, Graciela; Suazo, Myriam; Llanos, Miguel N

    2005-03-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate and compare metallothionein (MT), zinc and cadmium levels in human placentas of smoking and non-smoking women. Smoking was assessed by self-reported cigarette consumption and urine cotinine levels before delivery. Smoking pregnant women with urine cotinine levels higher than 130 ng/ml were included in the smoking group. Determination of placental MT was performed by western blot analysis after tissue homogenization and saturation with cadmium chloride (1000 ppm). Metallothionein was analyzed with a monoclonal antibody raised against MT-1 and MT-2 and with a second anti mouse antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Zinc and cadmium were determined by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry respectively. Smokers showed higher placental MT and cadmium levels, together with decreased newborn birth weights, as compared to non-smokers. The semi-quantitative analysis of western blots by band densitometry indicated that darker bands corresponded to MT present in smokers' samples. This study confirms that cigarette smoking increases cadmium accumulation in placental tissue and suggests that this element has a stimulatory effect on placental MT production. PMID:15664440

  5. Histone Deacetylases Inhibit IFN-?-Inducible Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jason C.; Holtz, Renae; Murphy, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast cells are the first cells to differentiate from the developing mammalian embryo, and they subsequently form the blastocyst-derived component of the placenta. IFN-? plays critical roles in activating innate and adaptive immunity, as well as apoptosis. In mice, IFN-? is produced in the pregnant uterus, and is essential for formation of the decidual layer of the placenta and remodeling of the uterine vasculature. Responses of mouse trophoblast cells to IFN-? appear to be selective, for IFN-? activates MHC class I expression and enhances phagocytosis, but fails to activate either MHC class II expression or apoptosis in these cells. To investigate the molecular basis for the selective IFN-? responsiveness of mouse trophoblast cells, IFN-?-inducible gene expression was examined in the trophoblast cell lines SM9 and M-11, trophoblast stem cells, and trophoblast stem cell-derived giant cells. IFN-?-inducible expression of multiple genes, including IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), was significantly reduced in trophoblast cells compared with fibroblast cells. Decreased IRF-1 mRNA expression in trophoblast cells was due to a reduced rate of IRF-1 transcription relative to fibroblast cells. However, no impairment of STAT-1 tyrosine phosphorylation or DNA-binding capacity was observed in IFN-?-treated mouse trophoblast cells. Importantly, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors significantly enhanced IFN-?-inducible gene expression in trophoblast cells, but not fibroblasts. Our collective studies demonstrate that IFN-?-inducible gene expression is repressed in mouse trophoblast cells by HDACs. We propose that HDAC-mediated inhibition of IFN-?-inducible gene expression in mouse trophoblast cells may contribute to successful pregnancy by preventing activation of IFN-? responses that might otherwise facilitate the destruction of the placenta. PMID:19414784

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of mouse Wnt14, and structural comparison between mouse Wnt14-Wnt3a gene cluster and human WNT14-WNT3A gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-03-01

    Glycoprotein WNTs play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis. Human WNT14 and WNT3A genes are clustered in human chromosome 1q42 region with an interval of about 58 kb. Here, mouse Wnt14 was isolated to compare the structure of human WNT14-WNT3A gene cluster with that of mouse Wnt14-Wnt3a gene cluster. Mouse Wnt14 showed 98.1% total-amino-acid identity with human WNT14, and 61.9% total-amino-acid identity with human WNT14B/WNT15. Mouse Wnt14 mRNA was expressed in adult brain, lung, skeletal muscle, heart, and 17-day embryo. Mouse Wnt14 and Wnt3a genes were clustered in head-to-head manner with an interval of about 16 kb. Exon-intron structures were well conserved between human WNT14-WNT3A gene cluster and mouse Wnt14-Wnt3a gene cluster. Capicua-related sequence and AK024248-related sequence were identified in the intergenic region of human Wnt14-Wnt3a gene cluster as well as in other human chromosomal loci, but not in that of mouse Wnt14-Wnt3a gene cluster. Capicua-related sequences were pseudogenes derived from Capicua gene on human chromosome 19q13. Capicua pseudogene and AK024248-related sequence were clustered in tail-to-tail manner with interval ranging from 2.2 to 11.0 kb. AK024248-related sequences in several human genome draft sequences were truncated in the 3'-portion compared with that in the intergenic region of human WNT14-WNT3A gene cluster. This is the first report on structural comparison of WNT gene clusters in human genome and in mouse genome. PMID:11836627

  7. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding human and mouse osteoactivin.

    PubMed

    Owen, T A; Smock, S L; Prakash, S; Pinder, L; Brees, D; Krull, D; Castleberry, T A; Clancy, Y C; Marks, S C; Safadi, F F; Popoff, S N

    2003-01-01

    Osteoactivin (OA) is more highly expressed in the bones of osteopetrotic mutant rats (op/op) than in those of their normal littermates and is the homologue of human nmb, a cDNA more highly expressed in melanoma-derived cell lines of low metastatic potential, and of mouse DC-HIL, which has been implicated in endothelial cell adhesion. The human OA gene is found on chromosome 7p15.1 and consists of 11 exons spanning 28.3 kb. Murine OA is encoded by a highly similar gene of 11 exons spanning 20.2 kb on mouse chromosome 6. Human OA uses the same transcriptional initiation site in both bone and kidney as was reported for melanoma cells. OA is expressed in primary human and mouse osteoblast cultures at all stages of differentiation, with increased levels observed concurrently with the expression of osteoblast phenotype markers. OA is also expressed in a wide variety of human and mouse tissues as determined by RT-PCR analysis. Immunohistochemical investigation of OA expression in late mouse embryonic development showed very high, cell-specific expression in the nervous system, basal layer of the skin, germinal cells of hair follicles, and in the forming nephrons of the kidney. Continuing investigation of the cell-specific expression of OA in bone as well as in other tissues will lead to a better understanding of its function in the development of these cell types. PMID:14696968

  8. Impact of Cigarette Smoke on the Human and Mouse Lungs: A Gene-Expression Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Morissette, Mathieu C.; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bérubé, Jean-Christophe; Gaschler, Gordon; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole; Couture, Christian; Laviolette, Michel; Hogg, James C.; Timens, Wim; Halappanavar, Sabina; Stampfli, Martin R.; Bossé, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is well known for its adverse effects on human health, especially on the lungs. Basic research is essential to identify the mechanisms involved in the development of cigarette smoke-related diseases, but translation of new findings from pre-clinical models to the clinic remains difficult. In the present study, we aimed at comparing the gene expression signature between the lungs of human smokers and mice exposed to cigarette smoke to identify the similarities and differences. Using human and mouse whole-genome gene expression arrays, changes in gene expression, signaling pathways and biological functions were assessed. We found that genes significantly modulated by cigarette smoke in humans were enriched for genes modulated by cigarette smoke in mice, suggesting a similar response of both species. Sixteen smoking-induced genes were in common between humans and mice including six newly reported to be modulated by cigarette smoke. In addition, we identified a new conserved pulmonary response to cigarette smoke in the induction of phospholipid metabolism/degradation pathways. Finally, the majority of biological functions modulated by cigarette smoke in humans were also affected in mice. Altogether, the present study provides information on similarities and differences in lung gene expression response to cigarette smoke that exist between human and mouse. Our results foster the idea that animal models should be used to study the involvement of pathways rather than single genes in human diseases. PMID:24663285

  9. [Phenotype analysis and mutant gene location of ventral yellow mouse (VY(Slac))].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei-Lian; Xu, Ping; Yin, Xiao-Shu; Yang, Wei-Wei; Gu, Mei-Er; Yu, Li-Ping; Liu, Gui-Jie; Wu, Bao-Jin

    2012-06-01

    The ventri-yellow pigmentation mouse (temporarily named VY(Slac)) arose spontaneously in the C57BL/6J inbred mouse strain, found and bred by Shanghai SLAC Laboratory Animal Co., Ltd. VY(Slac) presented a special phenotype marked by yellow coat on the ventral surface of neck and trunk that was without melanin deposition but maintained a normal structure. The number of melanocytes in epidermis and melanin in hair follicle of the abdominal skin of the mutant mouse were less than that of their background strain, while there was no significant difference between the dorsal skins of the two strains. This mutant phenotype was inherited as single-gene dominant inheritance, confirmed by genetic experiment, and there was no significant difference between VY(Slac) and B(6) for other biological parameters such as weight, anatomic and histological structures of major organs and blood physiology. When the linkage relationship between the genomic DNA samples of F(2) 48 mice (VY(Slac)D(2)F(1)×D(2)) and mutant phenotype were evaluated, the mutant gene was confirmed on chromosome 2 near D2Mit229. New microsatellite and SNP markers were selected to amplify genomic DNA samples of 196 F(2) mice and the mutant gene was narrowed down to 5.3 Mb region between rs13476833 and rs27310903 on chromosome 2. The preliminary results of our phenotype analysis and gene location provides a solid basis for further identification of this mutant gene. PMID:22653857

  10. Structure and expression of the gene encoding mouse t-complex polypeptide (Tcp-1).

    PubMed

    Kubota, H; Willison, K; Ashworth, A; Nozaki, M; Miyamoto, H; Yamamoto, H; Matsushiro, A; Morita, T

    1992-10-21

    The nucleotide (nt) sequence of the structural gene (Tcp-1) encoding mouse t-complex polypeptide 1 (TCP-1) has been determined. The nt sequence extending to 10,043 bp shows that the Tcp-1 gene is divided into 12 exons, 11 introns and 5'- and 3'-flanking regions. The Tcp-1 gene has a tight cluster of major transcription start points (tsp). Two GC boxes, one CCAAT box and some other possible regulatory elements are located in the region upstream from the tsp, but no TATA box was found. Extending from the 5'-flanking region to the first intron, a CpG dinucleotide-rich cluster is located. In addition, Tcp-1 gene transcripts in mouse organs, embryos and cultured cells were analyzed by Northern blotting. The Tcp-1 mRNA is enriched not only in testes, but also in early post-implantation embryos and some cultured cell lines, as compared with mouse organs other than the testis. The amount of Tcp-1 mRNA in embryos decreases during development. These results suggest that the expression of the Tcp-1 gene may be regulated spatially and temporally in embryonic and adult mice by transcriptional control or by mRNA stability. PMID:1383093

  11. A high resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carol L.; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M.; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Wakeman, Wayne B.; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J.; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Mike; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, in situ hybridization data were generated for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at 7 developmental stages for ~2100 genes, processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, 7 reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore co-expression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (developingmouse.brain-map.org). PMID:24952961

  12. Chromosomal localization of a new mouse lens opacity gene (lop18)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Bo; Hawes, N.L.; Smith, R.S.

    1996-08-15

    Examination of mouse strains with a slit lamp and indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed that strain CBA/CaGnLe has a white cataract obvious at weaning age. It soon progresses to a large white nuclear cataract with mild cortical changes. Crosses with C57BL/GJ showed that this is inherited as a single recessive fully penetrant gene, which we have designated lop18 (lens opacity 18). Linkage analysis using visible marker T (brachyury), histocompatibility marker H2, and microsatellite markers D17MU21, D17MU28, D17MU38, and D17MU46 shows that the 1op18 gene is located, {approximately}16 cM from the centromere on mouse Chromosome 17. It is a likely candidate mutation for the {alpha}-crystallin (Cryal) gene. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. A high-resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carol L; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L R; Wakeman, Wayne B; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R

    2014-07-16

    To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, we generated in situ hybridization data for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at seven developmental stages for ?2,100 genes, which were processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, seven reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore coexpression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (http://developingmouse.brain-map.org). PMID:24952961

  14. Molecular Analysis of Mouse T Cell Receptor ? and ? Gene Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Levi J; Chen, Liang; Krangel, Michael S; Bassing, Craig H

    2016-01-01

    PCR on genomic DNA isolated from lymphocyte populations is an invaluable technique to analyze T cell receptor (TCR) ? and ? gene rearrangements. Although this approach is powerful, it also has limitations that must be accounted for in experimental design and data interpretation. Here, we provide background required for understanding these limitations, and then outline standard PCR methods that can be used for analysis of TCR? and ? gene rearrangements in mice. PMID:26294409

  15. Mapping of the ARIX homeodomain gene to mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 11q13

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.R.; Smith, L.; Rhodes, J.

    1996-05-01

    The recently described homeodomain protein ARIX is expressed specifically in noradreneric cell types of the sympathetic nervous system, brain, and adrenal medulla. ARIX interacts with regulatory elements of the genes encoding the noradrenergic biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase, suggesting a role for ARIX in expression of the noradrenergic phenotype. In the study described here, the mouse and human ARIX genes are mapped. Using segregation analysis of two panels of mouse backcross DNA, mouse Arix was positioned approximately 50 cM distal to the centromere of chromosome 7, near Hbb. Human ARIX was positioned through analysis of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of human metaphase chromosomes to chromosome 7, near Hbb. Human ARIX was positioned through analysis of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of human metaphase chromosomes to chromosome 11q13.3-q13.4. These map locations extend and further define regions of conserved synteny between mouse and human genomes and identify a new candidate gene for inherited developmental disorders linked to human 11q13.

  16. Gene Entropy-Fractal Dimension Informatics with Application to Mouse-Human Translational Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Dehipawala, S.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2013-01-01

    DNA informatics represented by Shannon entropy and fractal dimension have been used to form 2D maps of related genes in various mammals. The distance between points on these maps for corresponding mRNA sequences in different species is used to study evolution. By quantifying the similarity of genes between species, this distance might be indicated when studies on one species (mouse) would tend to be valid in the other (human). The hypothesis that a small distance from mouse to human could facilitate mouse to human translational medicine success is supported by the studied ESR-1, LMNA, Myc, and RNF4 sequences. ID1 and PLCZ1 have larger separation. The collinearity of displacement vectors is further analyzed with a regression model, and the ID1 result suggests a mouse-chimp-human translational medicine approach. Further inference was found in the tumor suppression gene, p53, with a new hypothesis of including the bovine PKM2 pathways for targeting the glycolysis preference in many types of cancerous cells, consistent with quantum metabolism models. The distance between mRNA and protein coding CDS is proposed as a measure of the pressure associated with noncoding processes. The Y-chromosome DYS14 in fetal micro chimerism that could offer protection from Alzheimer's disease is given as an example. PMID:23586047

  17. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3?. Mouse UBR1p (E3?) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ?120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ?50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  18. Inferring mouse gene functions from genomic-scale data using a combined functional network/classification strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan Kyu; Krumpelman, Chase; Marcotte, Edward M

    2008-01-01

    The complete set of mouse genes, as with the set of human genes, is still largely uncharacterized, with many pieces of experimental evidence accumulating regarding the activities and expression of the genes, but the majority of genes as yet still of unknown function. Within the context of the MouseFunc competition, we developed and applied two distinct large-scale data mining approaches to infer the functions (Gene Ontology annotations) of mouse genes from experimental observations from available functional genomics, proteomics, comparative genomics, and phenotypic data. The two strategies — the first using classifiers to map features to annotations, the second propagating annotations from characterized genes to uncharacterized genes along edges in a network constructed from the features — offer alternative and possibly complementary approaches to providing functional annotations. Here, we re-implement and evaluate these approaches and their combination for their ability to predict the proper functional annotations of genes in the MouseFunc data set. We show that, when controlling for the same set of input features, the network approach generally outperformed a naïve Bayesian classifier approach, while their combination offers some improvement over either independently. We make our observations of predictive performance on the MouseFunc competition hold-out set, as well as on a ten-fold cross-validation of the MouseFunc data. Across all 1,339 annotated genes in the MouseFunc test set, the median predictive power was quite strong (median area under a receiver operating characteristic plot of 0.865 and average precision of 0.195), indicating that a mining-based strategy with existing data is a promising path towards discovering mammalian gene functions. As one product of this work, a high-confidence subset of the functional mouse gene network was produced — spanning >70% of mouse genes with >1.6 million associations — that is predictive of mouse (and therefore often human) gene function and functional associations. The network should be generally useful for mammalian gene functional analyses, such as for predicting interactions, inferring functional connections between genes and pathways, and prioritizing candidate genes. The network and all predictions are available on the worldwide web. PMID:18613949

  19. Gene structure and enzymatic activity of mouse eosinophil-associated ribonuclease 2.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, A L; Deming, M S; Rosenberg, H F; Dyer, K D

    2001-04-01

    Mouse eosinophil-associated ribonuclease-2 (mEAR-2) is one of a cluster of genes identified in the genome of the mouse Mus musculus that are highly divergent orthologs of the primate ribonucleases, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). Northern analysis revealed expression of genes hybridizing to mEAR-2 in mouse lung, liver and spleen tissues. We obtained full-length cDNA by hybridization screening of mouse eosinophil and lung cDNA libraries and by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) from liver, spleen and lung RNA. Using these methods we have isolated the 195 base pair (bp) 3' untranslated region (UTR) that includes a typical polyadenylation signal preceding a poly A tail and the 5' UTR which includes 63-71 bp and three distinct transcriptional start sites. Using unidirectional PCR we isolated a 361-bp 5' promoter region and delineated the intronic / exonic boundaries which include a non-coding exon 1, a single intron, and a coding exon 2, a structure that is typical of genes of the RNase A superfamily. Consensus sites for PU.1 and EoTF, both active as intronic enhancer elements of the gene encoding EDN, are also present in the intron of the gene encoding mEAR-2. The catalytic activity of recombinant baculovirus-derived mEAR-2 is similar to that of rhEDN from this source, with catalytic constants k(cat)/K(m)=5.6x10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and 10.5x10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, against a standard yeast tRNA substrate. Sequence analysis of the non-coding regions and enzymatic characterization of the gene product provide further evidence indicating that mEAR-2 is a structural and functional ortholog of primate EDNs and ECPs. PMID:11311552

  20. Gene transfer to the developing mouse inner ear by in vivo electroporation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyan; Jiang, Han; Brigande, John V

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear has 6 distinct sensory epithelia: 3 cristae in the ampullae of the semicircular canals; maculae in the utricle and saccule; and the organ of Corti in the coiled cochlea. The cristae and maculae contain vestibular hair cells that transduce mechanical stimuli to subserve the special sense of balance, while auditory hair cells in the organ of Corti are the primary transducers for hearing. Cell fate specification in these sensory epithelia and morphogenesis of the semicircular canals and cochlea take place during the second week of gestation in the mouse and are largely completed before birth. Developmental studies of the mouse inner ear are routinely conducted by harvesting transgenic embryos at different embryonic or postnatal stages to gain insight into the molecular basis of cellular and/or morphological phenotypes. We hypothesize that gene transfer to the developing mouse inner ear in utero in the context of gain- and loss-of-function studies represents a complimentary approach to traditional mouse transgenesis for the interrogation of the genetic mechanisms underlying mammalian inner ear development(6). The experimental paradigm to conduct gene misexpression studies in the developing mouse inner ear demonstrated here resolves into three general steps: 1) ventral laparotomy; 2) transuterine microinjection; and 3) in vivo electroporation. Ventral laparotomy is a mouse survival surgical technique that permits externalization of the uterus to gain experimental access to the implanted embryos. Transuterine microinjection is the use of beveled, glass capillary micropipettes to introduce expression plasmid into the lumen of the otic vesicle or otocyst. In vivo electroporation is the application of square wave, direct current pulses to drive expression plasmid into progenitor cells. We previously described this electroporation-based gene transfer technique and included detailed notes on each step of the protocol(11). Mouse experimental embryological techniques can be difficult to learn from prose and still images alone. In the present work, we demonstrate the 3 steps in the gene transfer procedure. Most critically, we deploy digital video microscopy to show precisely how to: 1) identify embryo orientation in utero; 2) reorient embryos for targeting injections to the otocyst; 3) microinject DNA mixed with tracer dye solution into the otocyst at embryonic days 11.5 and 12.5; 4) electroporate the injected otocyst; and 5) label electroporated embryos for postnatal selection at birth. We provide representative examples of successfully transfected inner ears; a pictorial guide to the most common causes of otocyst mistargeting; discuss how to avoid common methodological errors; and present guidelines for writing an in utero gene transfer animal care protocol. PMID:22781586

  1. Trio gene is required for mouse learning ability.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wen; Liu, Shuoyang; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ziyi; Wang, Dongdong; Zhang, Aizhen; Zhu, Minsheng; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-05-22

    Trio is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with multiple guanine nucleotide exchange factor domains. Trio regulates cytoskeleton dynamics and actin remodeling and is involved in cell migration and axonal guidance in neuronal development. The null allele of the Trio gene led to embryonic lethality, and Trio null embryos displayed aberrant organization in several regions of the brain at E18.5, including hippocampus. Nestin-Trio-/- mice, in which the Trio gene was deleted specifically in the neuronal system by the Nestin-Cre system, displayed severe phenotypes, including low survival rate, ataxia and multiple developmental defects of the cerebellum. All Nestin-Trio-/- mice died before reaching adulthood, which hinders research on Trio gene function in adult mice. Thus, we generated EMX1-Trio-/- mice by crossing Trio-floxed mice with EMX1-Cre mice in which Cre is expressed in the brain cortex and hippocampus. EMX1-Trio-/- mice can survive to adulthood. Trio gene deletion results in smaller brains, an abnormal hippocampus and disordered granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA). Behavior tests showed that Trio deletion interfered with the hippocampal-dependent spatial learning in the mice, suggesting that Trio plays critical roles in the learning ability of adult mice. We conclude that the Trio gene regulates the neuronal development of the hippocampus and that it affects the intelligence of adult mice. PMID:25727174

  2. A gene expression resource generated by genome-wide lacZ profiling in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Elizabeth; Estabel, Jeanne; Oellrich, Anika; Maguire, Anna Karin; Adissu, Hibret A; Souter, Luke; Siragher, Emma; Lillistone, Charlotte; Green, Angela L; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Carragher, Damian M; Karp, Natasha A; Smedley, Damian; Adams, Niels C; Bussell, James N; Adams, David J; Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Steel, Karen P; Galli, Antonella; White, Jacqueline K

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the expression profile of a gene is a critical piece of information required to build an understanding of the normal and essential functions of that gene and any role it may play in the development or progression of disease. High-throughput, large-scale efforts are on-going internationally to characterise reporter-tagged knockout mouse lines. As part of that effort, we report an open access adult mouse expression resource, in which the expression profile of 424 genes has been assessed in up to 47 different organs, tissues and sub-structures using a lacZ reporter gene. Many specific and informative expression patterns were noted. Expression was most commonly observed in the testis and brain and was most restricted in white adipose tissue and mammary gland. Over half of the assessed genes presented with an absent or localised expression pattern (categorised as 0-10 positive structures). A link between complexity of expression profile and viability of homozygous null animals was observed; inactivation of genes expressed in ?21 structures was more likely to result in reduced viability by postnatal day 14 compared with more restricted expression profiles. For validation purposes, this mouse expression resource was compared with Bgee, a federated composite of RNA-based expression data sets. Strong agreement was observed, indicating a high degree of specificity in our data. Furthermore, there were 1207 observations of expression of a particular gene in an anatomical structure where Bgee had no data, indicating a large amount of novelty in our data set. Examples of expression data corroborating and extending genotype-phenotype associations and supporting disease gene candidacy are presented to demonstrate the potential of this powerful resource. PMID:26398943

  3. A gene expression resource generated by genome-wide lacZ profiling in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Elizabeth; Estabel, Jeanne; Oellrich, Anika; Maguire, Anna Karin; Adissu, Hibret A.; Souter, Luke; Siragher, Emma; Lillistone, Charlotte; Green, Angela L.; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Carragher, Damian M.; Karp, Natasha A.; Smedley, Damian; Adams, Niels C.; Bussell, James N.; Adams, David J.; Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Steel, Karen P.; Galli, Antonella; White, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Knowledge of the expression profile of a gene is a critical piece of information required to build an understanding of the normal and essential functions of that gene and any role it may play in the development or progression of disease. High-throughput, large-scale efforts are on-going internationally to characterise reporter-tagged knockout mouse lines. As part of that effort, we report an open access adult mouse expression resource, in which the expression profile of 424 genes has been assessed in up to 47 different organs, tissues and sub-structures using a lacZ reporter gene. Many specific and informative expression patterns were noted. Expression was most commonly observed in the testis and brain and was most restricted in white adipose tissue and mammary gland. Over half of the assessed genes presented with an absent or localised expression pattern (categorised as 0-10 positive structures). A link between complexity of expression profile and viability of homozygous null animals was observed; inactivation of genes expressed in ?21 structures was more likely to result in reduced viability by postnatal day 14 compared with more restricted expression profiles. For validation purposes, this mouse expression resource was compared with Bgee, a federated composite of RNA-based expression data sets. Strong agreement was observed, indicating a high degree of specificity in our data. Furthermore, there were 1207 observations of expression of a particular gene in an anatomical structure where Bgee had no data, indicating a large amount of novelty in our data set. Examples of expression data corroborating and extending genotype-phenotype associations and supporting disease gene candidacy are presented to demonstrate the potential of this powerful resource. PMID:26398943

  4. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the mouse homologue of rat OX40 protein.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, M L; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Barclay, A N

    1995-04-01

    The OX40 protein is expressed only on activated rat CD4+ T blasts and is a member of a superfamily of cell surface molecules which includes CD40, CD30, CD95 (Fas), CD27, 4-1BB antigens and the receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The proteins of this group are related to each other by having three to six repeats of a cysteine-rich sequence in their extracellular domains. Members of this family of receptors have also been shown to bind to ligands which are structurally related to TNF. The mouse homologue of the rat OX40 protein was cloned at the cDNA and genomic levels. The gene structure shows that there are several intron/exon borders shared between OX40 and CD27, CD40, TNF receptor type I, CD95 and 4-1BB genes. This group of genes is less closely related structurally to the gene structure of the NGF receptor. The gene encoding murine OX40 has been placed on mouse chromosome 4, in an area which contains the genes for TNF receptor type II and 4-1BB, and is syntenic with a region of human chromosome 1 which contains human TNF receptor type II, OX40, and CD30 genes. PMID:7737295

  5. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Julia V.; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  6. Effect of microgravity on gene expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Desaphy, Jean Francois; Camerino, Diana Conte; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in gravitational force such as that experienced by astronauts during space flight induce a redistribution of fluids from the caudad to the cephalad portion of the body together with an elimination of normal head-to-foot hydrostatic pressure gradients. To assess brain gene profile changes associated with microgravity and fluid shift, a large-scale analysis of mRNA expression levels was performed in the brains of 2-week control and hindlimb-unloaded (HU) mice using cDNA microarrays. Although to different extents, all functional categories displayed significantly regulated genes indicating that considerable transcriptomic alterations are induced by HU. Interestingly, the TIC class (transport of small molecules and ions into the cells) had the highest percentage of up-regulated genes, while the most down-regulated genes were those of the JAE class (cell junction, adhesion, extracellular matrix). TIC genes comprised 16% of those whose expression was altered, including sodium channel, nonvoltage-gated 1 beta (Scnn1b), glutamate receptor (Grin1), voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (Vdac1), calcium channel beta 3 subunit (Cacnb3) and others. The analysis performed by Gene-MAPP revealed several altered protein classes and functional pathways such as blood coagulation and immune response, learning and memory, ion channels and cell junction. In particular, data indicate that HU causes an alteration in hemostasis which resolves in a shift toward a more hyper-coagulative state with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Furthermore, HU treatment seems to impact on key steps of synaptic plasticity and learning processes. PMID:18704384

  7. Mapping of the Sca1 and pcd genes on mouse chromosome 13 provides evidence that they are different genes

    SciTech Connect

    Servadio, A.; McCall, A.; Zoghbi, H.; Eicher, E.M.

    1995-10-10

    It is well established that large chromosomal segments have remained intact during the evolution of different mammalian species. Thus, mapping information for a gene in mammalian species facilitates mapping the same gene in another mammalian species. In addition, phenotypically similar diseases that map to linkage conserved regions in two species may be caused by mutations in the same gene. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a dominantly inherited human disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, and dysmetria. SCA1 maps to the short arm of human chromosome (Chr) 6 in the 6p23-p22 region. SCA1 is caused by the expansion of an unstable CAG repeat located within the coding region of a novel protein, ataxin-1, Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) is a recessively inherited mouse disorder characterized by a moderate ataxia, usually noted by 3-4 weeks of age. Progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells is the underlying pathogenesis in this disorder. The pcd gene was assigned to mouse Chr 13 because it showed linkage to extra toes (Xt) and pearl (pe). Some doubt about this assignment existed, however, because the calculated genetic distance between pcd and Xt was 32 cM and that between pcd and pe was 18 cM. If pcd is located in Chr 13, its placement relative to Xt and pe suggests that it would be located in the region that shares linkage homology with the region that shares linkage homology with the region of human Chr 6 that contains SCA1. Here, we present data that confirm the assignment of pcd to Chr 13, map the mouse Sca1 gene to Chr 13, and eliminate Sca1 as a candidate gene for pcd. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Microarray analysis of metallothioneins in human diseases-A review.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Kepinska, Marta; Emri, Gabriella; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Tmejova, Katerina; Nerudova, Danuse; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs), low molecular mass cysteine-rich proteins, which are able to bind up to 20 monovalent and up to 7 divalent heavy metal ions are widely studied due to their functions in detoxification of metals, scavenging free radicals and cells protection against the oxidative stress. It was found that the loss of the protective effects of MT leads to an escalation of pathogenic processes and carcinogenesis. The most extensive area is MTs expression for oncological applications, where the information about gene patterns is helpful for the identification biological function, resistance to drugs and creating the correct chemotherapy. In other medical applications the effect of oxidative stress to cell lines exposed to heavy metals and hydrogen peroxide is studied as well as influence of drugs and cytokines on MTs expression and MTs expression in the adipose tissue. The precise detection of low metallothionein concentrations and its isoforms is necessary to understand the connection between quantity and isoforms of MTs to size, localization and type of cancer. This information is necessary for well-timed therapy and increase the chance to survival. Microarray chips appear as good possibility for finding all information about expression of MTs genes and isoforms not only in cancer, but also in other diseases, especially diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, ageing, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders and as the effects of toxic drugs and pollutants, which is discussed in this review. PMID:26454339

  9. Neural networks approaches for discovering the learnable correlation between gene function and gene expression in mouse

    E-print Network

    Morris, Quaid

    , especially in gene therapy [18]. Identifying gene function in prokaryotes is much easier than eukaryotes dueNeural networks approaches for discovering the learnable correlation between gene function and gene Keywords: Gene function prediction Self organizing maps (SOM) Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) Gene expression

  10. Linkage analysis of the whirler deafness gene on mouse chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.; Rogers, M.J.C.; Steel, K.P. ); Brown, S.D.M. )

    1994-05-01

    The whirler mouse harbors an autosomal recessive mutation on mouse chromosome 4 that causes deafness and vestibular dysfunction in the adult that is manifested as head-bobbing and circling behavior. Although there is no obvious human homologue for this mutation as yet, whirler is a potential mouse model for human autosomal recessive deafness. Many genetic markers for this region of mouse chromosome 4 are now available, and the authors have used these to construct genetic linkage maps in both inter- and intraspecific backcrosses as the first step toward the cloning of the whirler gene. A total of 19 loci were analyzed in these crosses, giving the following gene orders: Interspecific cross, centromere-(D4Mit5, D4Mit38)-D4Mit6-(Lv,Tzn,D4Mit44)-wi-Hxb-(D4Mit25, D4Nds9)-(D4Mit7, D4Ler2)-b-D4Mit45-(D4Wsm1, D4Mit27b)-(D4Rck65, D4Mit15), and intraspecific cross, centromere-(Mup-1, wi, Hxb)-b-D4Wsm1. This analysis has positioned the wi locus in the interval between the genes for [delta]-aminolevulinate dehydratase (Lv) and hexabrachion (Hxb). The human homologues of these genes, ALAD and HXB, both lie on human chromosome 9q32-q34. They therefore predict that a human homologue of the wi gene, involved in autosomal recessive deafness, lies in this region of conserved homology on 9q32-q34. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26517551

  12. Mouse model systems to study sex chromosome genes and behavior: relevance to humans

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kimberly H.; Bonthuis, Paul J.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome genes directly influence sex differences in behavior. The discovery of the Sry gene on the Y chromosome (Gubbay et al., 1990; Koopman et al., 1990) substantiated the sex chromosome mechanistic link to sex differences. Moreover, the pronounced connection between X chromosome gene mutations and mental illness produces a strong sex bias in these diseases. Yet, the dominant explanation for sex differences continues to be the gonadal hormones. Here we review progress made on behavioral differences in mouse models that uncouple sex chromosome complement from gonadal sex. We conclude that many social and cognitive behaviors are modified by sex chromosome complement, and discuss the implications for human research. Future directions need to include identification of the genes involved and interactions with these genes and gonadal hormones. PMID:24388960

  13. A synthetic small molecule for rapid induction of multiple pluripotency genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Ganesh N; Nakano, Yusuke; Sato, Shinsuke; Morinaga, Hironobu; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming involves profound alterations in genome-wide gene expression that is precisely controlled by a hypothetical epigenetic code. Small molecules have been shown to artificially induce epigenetic modifications in a sequence independent manner. Recently, we showed that specific DNA binding hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) could be conjugated with chromatin modifying histone deacetylase inhibitors like SAHA to epigenetically activate certain pluripotent genes in mouse fibroblasts. In our steadfast progress to improve the efficiency of SAHA-PIPs, we identified a novel compound termed, ? that could dramatically induce the endogenous expression of Oct-3/4 and Nanog. Genome-wide gene analysis suggests that in just 24 h and at nM concentration, ? induced multiple pluripotency-associated genes including Rex1 and Cdh1 by more than ten-fold. ? treated MEFs also rapidly overcame the rate-limiting step of epithelial transition in cellular reprogramming by switching "[Formula: see text]" the complex transcriptional gene network. PMID:22848790

  14. A synthetic small molecule for rapid induction of multiple pluripotency genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Nakano, Yusuke; Sato, Shinsuke; Morinaga, Hironobu; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    Cellular reprogramming involves profound alterations in genome-wide gene expression that is precisely controlled by a hypothetical epigenetic code. Small molecules have been shown to artificially induce epigenetic modifications in a sequence independent manner. Recently, we showed that specific DNA binding hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) could be conjugated with chromatin modifying histone deacetylase inhibitors like SAHA to epigenetically activate certain pluripotent genes in mouse fibroblasts. In our steadfast progress to improve the efficiency of SAHA-PIPs, we identified a novel compound termed, ? that could dramatically induce the endogenous expression of Oct-3/4 and Nanog. Genome-wide gene analysis suggests that in just 24 h and at nM concentration, ? induced multiple pluripotency-associated genes including Rex1 and Cdh1 by more than ten-fold. ? treated MEFs also rapidly overcame the rate-limiting step of epithelial transition in cellular reprogramming by switching ``'' the complex transcriptional gene network.

  15. Random Monoallelic Expression of Three Genes Clustered within 60 kb of Mouse t Complex Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Yuri; Shimada, Tokihiko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Nicholson, Rhonda H.; Eliason, James F.; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Mammals achieve gene dosage control by (1) random X-chromosome inactivation in females, (2) parental origin-specific imprinting of selected autosomal genes, and (3) random autosomal inactivation. Genes belonging to the third category of epigenetic phenomenon are just now emerging, with only six identified so far. Here we report three additional genes, Nubp2, Igfals, and Jsap1, that show 50%-methylated CpG sites by Southern blot analyses and primarily monoallelic expression in single-cell allele-specific RT-PCR analysis of bone marrow stromal cells and hepatocytes. Furthermore, we show that, in contrast to X inactivation, alleles can switch between active and inactive states during the formation of daughter cells. These three genes are the first in their category to exist as a tight cluster, in the proximal region of mouse chromosome 17, providing a thus far unique example of a region of autosomal random monoallelic expression. PMID:11691847

  16. Lethal thalassemia after insertional disruption of the mouse major adult beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Shehee, W R; Oliver, P; Smithies, O

    1993-04-15

    Thalassemias are hereditary anemias caused by mutations that disturb the normal 1:1 balance of alpha- and beta-globin chains that form hemoglobin. We have disrupted the major adult beta-globin gene (b1) in mouse embryonic stem cells by using homologous recombination to insert selectable sequences into the gene. Mice homozygous for this insertional disruption of the b1 gene (Hbbth-2/Hbbth-2) are severely anemic and die perinatally. In contrast, approximately 60% of mice homozygous for deletion of the same gene (Hbbth-1/Hbbth-1) survive to adulthood and are much less anemic [Skow, L. C., Burkhart, B. A., Johnson, F. M., Popp, R. A., Goldberg, S. Z., Anderson, W. F., Barnett, L. B. & Lewis, S. E. (1983) Cell 34, 1043-1052]. These different phenotypes have implications for the control of beta-globin gene expression. PMID:8475058

  17. The mouse formin (Fmn) gene: Genomic structure, novel exons, and genetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.; Chan, D.C.; Leder, P.

    1997-02-01

    Mutations in the mouse formin (Fmn) gene, formerly known as the limb deformity (ld) gene, give rise to recessively inherited limb deformities and renal malformations or aplasia. The Fmn gene encodes many differentially processed transcripts that are expressed in both adult and embryonic tissues. To study the genomic organization of the Fmn locus, we have used Fmn probes to isolate and characterize genomic clones spanning 500 kb. Our analysis of these clones shows that the Fmn gene is composed of at least 24 exons and spans 400 kb. We have identified two novel exons that are expressed in the developing embryonic limb bud as well as adult tissues such as brain and kidney. We have also used a microsatellite polymorphism from within the Fmn gene to map it genetically to a 2.2-cM interval between D2Mit58 and D2Mit103. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The gene encoding PBP74/CSA/motalin-1, a novel mouse hsp70, maps to mouse chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Manabu; Oyanagi, Mitsuru; Kominami, Ryo

    1995-11-20

    The 70-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70) function in folding of peptides and the assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. They are encoded by a multigene family comprising both heat-inducible and constitutively expressed genes. Different family members function in different organelles: hsp70 members such as hsp70 and hsc70 are present in the cytoplasm, BiP/GRP78 in the endoplasmic reticulum, and GRP75 in the mitochondria. PBP74/CSA/motalin-1 is a novel mouse hsp70 protein that was identified by three different groups. PBP74 was found to be a peptide-binding protein implicated in antigen processing. CSA is an antigen specific for the CM strain, and motalin-1 is a protein associated with cellular mortality. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. The mouse collagen X gene: complete nucleotide sequence, exon structure and expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Elima, K; Eerola, I; Rosati, R; Metsäranta, M; Garofalo, S; Perälä, M; De Crombrugghe, B; Vuorio, E

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping genomic clones covering the 7.2 kb mouse alpha 1(X) collagen gene, 0.86 kb of promoter and 1.25 kb of 3'-flanking sequences were isolated from two genomic libraries and characterized by nucleotide sequencing. Typical features of the gene include a unique three-exon structure, similar to that in the chick gene, with the entire triple-helical domain of 463 amino acids coded by a single large exon. The highest degree of amino acid and nucleotide sequence conservation was seen in the coding region for the collagenous and C-terminal non-collagenous domains between the mouse and known chick, bovine and human collagen type X sequences. More divergence between the sequences occurred in the N-terminal non-collagenous domain. Similarity between the mammalian collagen X sequences extended into the 3'-untranslated sequence, particularly near the polyadenylation site. The promoter of the mouse collagen X gene was found to contain two TATAA boxes 159 bp apart; primer extension analyses of the transcription start site revealed that both were functional. The promoter has an unusual structure with a very low G + C content of 28% between positions -220 and -1 of the upstream transcription start site. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that the expression of the alpha 1(X) collagen gene is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tissues undergoing endochondral calcification. The detailed sequence information of the gene is useful for studies on the promoter activity of the gene and for generation of transgenic mice. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8424763

  20. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Expression patterns of esophageal cancer deregulated genes in C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Gao, Fu-Lu; Zhi, Hui-Ying; Luo, Ai-Ping; Ding, Fang; Wu, Min; Liu, Zhi-Hua

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression patterns of esophageal squamous cell cancer deregulated genes in mid to late stages of C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis, and the correlation between these genes in embryonic development and tumorigenesis of esophageal squamous cell cancer. METHODS: Reverse northern screening was performed to examine the expression patterns of esophageal cancer deregulated genes in C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis. To confirm the gene expression patterns, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out for 3 of the randomly picked differentially expressed genes. RESULTS: Within these esophageal cancer deregulated genes, 4 patterns of expression were observed at 3 stages embryonic d 11.5 (E11.5), embryonic d 13.5 (E13.5) and postnatal d1 (P1). (1) Up-regulation during the E11.5 period, down- regulation during the E13.5 and P1 period (up-down-down), the 10 up-regulated genes during the E11.5 period could be classified into 6 known genes and 4 unknown genes. The known genes included differentiation related genes (S100A8), immunity related gene (IGL), translation and transcription regulation genes (RPL15, EEF1A1), cytoskeletal protein (TUBA1), cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin B). (2) Up-regulation during the E13.5 and P1 period (down-up-up), such as the SPRR2A which was down-regulated at E11.5. (3) Down-regulation during the E11.5 and E13.5 period (down-down-up), such as RHCG and keratin 4. (4) Fluctuating expression, down initially, up at E13.5, and then down again (down-up-down). EMP1 belonged to such a gene, which was highly expressed at E13.5. CONCLUSION: The results will be helpful for understanding the function of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) deregulated genes in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. S100A8 and S100A9 may play different roles in early embryonic development. IGL may be an oncofetal protein, and EMP1 relates with neurogenesis at E13.5. The genes identified pertinent to embryonic development may serve as candidate susceptibility genes for inherited esophageal cancer disorders as well as for various heritable disorders of embryonic development. PMID:15069704

  2. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Activation of Type III Interferon Genes by Pathogenic Bacteria in Infected Epithelial Cells and Mouse Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Hélène; Tailleux, Ludovic; Subtil, Agathe; Lebreton, Alice; Paliwal, Anupam; Gicquel, Brigitte; Staeheli, Peter; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-?) genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-? genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-? genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-? genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-?. We also found that IFN-? genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-?2/?3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-?2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-? may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues. PMID:22720036

  4. Lactoferrin-iCre: a new mouse line to study uterine epithelial gene function.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Takiko; Ogawa, Yuya; Terakawa, Jumpei; Ogawa, Akiyo; DeFalco, Tony; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2014-07-01

    Transgenic animal models are valuable for studying gene function in various tissue compartments. Mice with conditional deletion of genes in the uterus using the Cre-loxP system serve as powerful tools to study uterine biology. The uterus is comprised of 3 major tissue types: myometrium, stroma, and epithelium. Proliferation and differentiation in each uterine cell type are differentially regulated by ovarian hormones, resulting in spatiotemporal control of gene expression. Therefore, examining gene function in each uterine tissue type will provide more meaningful information regarding uterine biology during pregnancy and disease states. Although currently available Cre mouse lines have been very useful in exploring functions of specific genes in uterine biology, overlapping expression of these Cre lines in more than 1 tissue type and in other reproductive organs sometimes makes interpretation of results difficult. In this article, we report the generation of a new iCre knock-in mouse line, in which iCre is expressed from endogenous lactoferrin (Ltf) promoter. Ltf-iCre mice primarily direct recombination in the uterine epithelium in adult females and in immature females after estrogen treatment. These mice will allow for specific interrogation of gene function in the mature uterine epithelium, providing a helpful tool to uncover important aspects of uterine biology. PMID:24823394

  5. Cloning and chromosomal localization of a paralog and a mouse homolog of the human transaldolase gene.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, J; Hirai, M; Toyoda, A; Tanuma, R; Nomura-Kitabayashi, A; Hashimoto, K

    1998-03-16

    A sequence homologous to the transaldolase gene (TALDO) was identified in a polymorphic cosmid DNA mapped on human chromosome 11p15 by exon trapping with pSPL3. Analysis of lambda clones contiguous to the cosmid clone showed that the related gene (TALDOR) consists of 8 exons spanning approximately 19kb from the translation start site to the polyadenylation signal. The exon sequence of TALDOR was almost identical with that of TALDO localized on 1p33-34. 1, but its exons corresponding to exons 4 and 5 of TALDO were found to be split by 4 introns in TALDOR. To examine the evolutionary conservation of two genes for transaldolase, we have isolated the cDNA for its mouse homolog and determined the nucleotide sequence covering the complete coding region. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using the cDNA as a probe showed that the mouse transaldolase gene (Taldo) is localized on chromosome 7 F3-F4 as a single copy gene. This chromosomal region is known to be syntenic to human chromosome 11p15 rather than to 1p33-p34.1, suggesting that TALDOR is the ancestral form. The existence of TALDOR implies a duplication of the mammalian transaldolase gene after divergence of rodent and primate. PMID:9524206

  6. HEX: a novel homeobox gene expressed during haematopoiesis and conserved between mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Bedford, F K; Ashworth, A; Enver, T; Wiedemann, L M

    1993-03-11

    We describe the cloning of a novel homeodomain-containing gene, which is highly conserved between mouse and human. The human cDNA was initially isolated from human haematopoietic tissue and denoted HEX (haematopoietically expressed homeobox). Sequence analysis of the coding sequences from mouse and the partial cDNA from human shows that the homeodomain is most closely related to those of the HIx and HOX11 proteins. The HEX gene is present as a single copy in the human genome. Analysis of murine genomic DNA shows, in addition to an intron-containing gene homologous to HEX, the presence of a processed copy of the gene which has arisen within the last few million years. Analysis of human and murine haematopoietic cells and cell lines, revealed expression of the HEX gene in multipotential progenitors, as well as cells of the B-lymphocyte and myeloid lineages. However HEX was not expressed in T-lymphocytes or erythroid cells. This pattern of HEX gene expression suggests that it may play a role in haematopoietic differentiation. PMID:8096636

  7. Subretinal Injection of Gene Therapy Vectors and Stem Cells in the Perinatal Mouse Eye

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Davis, Richard J.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of sight affects approximately 3.4 million people in the United States and is expected to increase in the upcoming years.1 Recently, gene therapy and stem cell transplantations have become key therapeutic tools for treating blindness resulting from retinal degenerative diseases. Several forms of autologous transplantation for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), such as iris pigment epithelial cell transplantation, have generated encouraging results, and human clinical trials have begun for other forms of gene and stem cell therapies.2 These include RPE65 gene replacement therapy in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis and an RPE cell transplantation using human embryonic stem (ES) cells in Stargardt's disease.3-4 Now that there are gene therapy vectors and stem cells available for treating patients with retinal diseases, it is important to verify these potential therapies in animal models before applying them in human studies. The mouse has become an important scientific model for testing the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy vectors and stem cell transplantation in the eye.5-8 In this video article, we present a technique to inject gene therapy vectors or stem cells into the subretinal space of the mouse eye while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. PMID:23207897

  8. Positional Cloning of the Mouse Circadian Clock Gene

    PubMed Central

    King, David P.; Zhao, Yaliang; Sangoram, Ashvin M.; Wilsbacher, Lisa D.; Tanaka, Minoru; Antoch, Marina P.; Steeves, Thomas D. L.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Kornhauser, Jon M.; Lowrey, Phillip L.; Turek, Fred W.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We used positional cloning to identify the circadian Clock gene in mice. Clock is a large transcription unit with 24 exons spanning ~100,000 bp of DNA from which transcript classes of 7.5 and ~10 kb arise. Clock encodes a novel member of the bHLH–PAS family of transcription factors. In the Clock mutant allele, an A?T nucleotide transversion in a splice donor site causes exon skipping and deletion of 51 amino acids in the CLOCK protein. Clock is a unique gene with known circadian function and with features predicting DNA binding, protein dimerization, and activation domains. CLOCK represents the second example of a PAS domain–containing clock protein (besides Drosophila PERIOD), which suggests that this motif may define an evolutionarily conserved feature of the circadian clock mechanism. PMID:9160755

  9. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  10. Quantitative trait loci, genes, and polymorphisms that regulate bone mineral density in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qing; Jiao, Yan; Hasty, Karen A.; Canale, S. Terry; Stuart, John M.; Beamer, Wesley G.; Deng, Hong-Wen; Baylink, David; Gu, Weikuan

    2010-01-01

    This is an in silico analysis of data available from genome-wide scans. Through analysis of QTL, genes and polymorphisms that regulate BMD, we identified 82 BMD QTL, 191 BMD-associated (BMDA) genes, and 83 genes containing known BMD-associated polymorphisms (BMDAP). The catalogue of all BMDA/BMDAP genes and relevant literatures are provided. In total, there are substantially more BMDA/BMDAP genes in regions of the genome where QTL have been identified than in non-QTL regions. Among 191 BMDA genes and 83 BMDAP genes, 133 and 58 are localized in QTL region, respectively. The difference was still noticeable for the chromosome distribution of these genes between QTL and non-QTL regions. These results have allowed us to generate an integrative profile of QTL, genes, polymorphisms that determine BMD. These data could facilitate more rapid and comprehensive identification of causal genes underlying the determination of BMD in mouse and provide new insights into how BMD is regulated in humans. PMID:19150398

  11. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer’s vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer’s vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of ‘heart jogging’ and the direction of ‘heart looping’.  ‘Heart jogging’ is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward ‘jog’. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish ‘heart jogging orthologs’ are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  12. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  13. The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes

    E-print Network

    Kellis, Manolis

    Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

  14. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H.

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Genome-wide expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis of diurnally regulated genes in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuzhang; Wang, Kai; Valladares, Otto; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Bucan, Maja

    2007-01-01

    Background The prefrontal cortex is important in regulating sleep and mood. Diurnally regulated genes in the prefrontal cortex may be controlled by the circadian system, by sleep:wake states, or by cellular metabolism or environmental responses. Bioinformatics analysis of these genes will provide insights into a wide-range of pathways that are involved in the pathophysiology of sleep disorders and psychiatric disorders with sleep disturbances. Results We examined gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex at four time points during a 24 hour (12 hour light:12 hour dark) cycle using microarrays, and identified 3,890 transcripts corresponding to 2,927 genes with diurnally regulated expression patterns. We show that 16% of the genes identified in our study are orthologs of identified clock, clock controlled or sleep/wakefulness induced genes in the mouse liver and suprachiasmatic nucleus, rat cortex and cerebellum, or Drosophila head. The diurnal expression patterns were confirmed for 16 out of 18 genes in an independent set of RNA samples. The diurnal genes fall into eight temporal categories with distinct functional attributes, as assessed by Gene Ontology classification and analysis of enriched transcription factor binding sites. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates that approximately 10% of transcripts have diurnally regulated expression patterns in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Functional annotation of these genes will be important for the selection of candidate genes for behavioral mutants in the mouse and for genetic studies of disorders associated with anomalies in the sleep:wake cycle and circadian rhythm. PMID:18028544

  16. The Construction of Transgenic and Gene Knockout/Knockin Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alfred; McGarry, Michael P.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic and physiological similarities between mice and humans have focused considerable attention on rodents as potential models of human health and disease. Together with the wealth of resources, knowledge, and technologies surrounding the mouse as a model system, these similarities have propelled this species to the forefront of biomedical research. The advent of genomic manipulation has quickly led to the creation and use of genetically engineered mice as powerful tools for cutting edge studies of human disease research, including the discovery, refinement, and utility of many currently available therapeutic regimes. In particular, the creation of genetically modified mice as models of human disease has remarkably changed our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways underlying disease states. Moreover, the mouse models resulting from gene transfer technologies have been important components correlating an individual’s gene expression profile to the development of disease pathologies. The objective of this review is to provide physician-scientists with an expansive historical and logistical overview of the creation of mouse models of human disease through gene transfer technologies. Our expectation is that this will facilitate on-going disease research studies and may initiate new areas of translational research leading to enhanced patient care. PMID:21800101

  17. The Immunoglobulin-like Gene spe-45 Acts during Fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans like the Mouse Izumo1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tatsuya; Comstra, Heather Skye; Gleason, Elizabeth J; L'Hernault, Steven W

    2015-12-21

    The Caenorhabditis elegans spe-9 class genes, which show specific or predominant expression in the male germline, are indispensable for fertilization [1, 2]. However, due to the rapid evolution of genes involved in reproduction, we do not currently know if there are spe-9 class genes in mammals that play similar roles during fertilization to those found in C. elegans. In mice, the Izumo1 gene encodes a sperm-specific transmembrane (TM) protein with a single immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain that is absolutely required for gamete fusion [3, 4]. In this study, we hypothesized that C. elegans has a new member of the spe-9 class genes coding for an IZUMO1-like protein. We screened C. elegans microarray data [5, 6] to identify male germline-enriched genes that encode membrane proteins with Ig-like domains. A deletion (tm3715) in one such gene (F28D1.8) caused hermaphrodites to show a male germline-dependent self-sterility, so we have named it spe-45. Mutant spe-45 worms seemed to normally undergo spermatogenesis (spermatid production by meiosis) and spermiogenesis (spermatid activation into actively motile spermatozoa). spe-45 mutant spermatozoa, however, could not complete gamete fusion, which is a characteristic of all spe-9 class mutants [1, 2]. Moreover, spe-45 self-sterile worms were rescued by a transgene expressing chimeric SPE-45 protein in which its Ig-like domain was replaced by the Ig-like domain from mouse IZUMO1. Hence, C. elegans SPE-45 and mouse IZUMO1 appear to have retained a common function(s) that is required during fertilization. PMID:26671669

  18. A Comparative Study of Mouse Hepatic and Intestinal Gene Expression Profiles under PPAR? Knockout by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Kan; Wang, Qishan; Yang, Yumei; Wang, Minghui; Pan, Yuchun

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of PPAR? has been used in several studies, but fewer studies went further to identify the tissue-specific pathways or genes involved in PPAR? activation in genome-wide. Here, we employed and applied gene set enrichment analysis to two microarray datasets both PPAR? related respectively in mouse liver and intestine. We suggested that the regulatory mechanism of PPAR? activation by WY14643 in mouse small intestine is more complicated than in liver due to more involved pathways. Several pathways were cancer-related such as pancreatic cancer and small cell lung cancer, which indicated that PPAR? may have an important role in prevention of cancer development. 12 PPAR? dependent pathways and 4 PPAR? independent pathways were identified highly common in both liver and intestine of mice. Most of them were metabolism related, such as fatty acid metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, pyruvate metabolism with regard to PPAR? regulation but gluconeogenesis and propanoate metabolism independent of PPAR? regulation. Keratan sulfate biosynthesis, the pathway of regulation of actin cytoskeleton, the pathways associated with prostate cancer and small cell lung cancer were not identified as hepatic PPAR? independent but as WY14643 dependent ones in intestinal study. We also provided some novel hepatic tissue-specific marker genes. PMID:21811494

  19. Radioimmunoassay for rat metallothionein: assessment of plasma levels

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.D.; Cousins, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    Antisera directed against rat liver metallothionein I and II, have been raised in adult sheep following an 18 month immunization sequence. To prepare the antigen for injection, homogenates of rat liver were heated to 80% prior to gel filtration chromatography. The isometallothioneins were subsequently separated by ion exchange chromatography. Each form was separately conjugated to human IgG prior to immunization. /sup 125/I-Bolton Hunter Reagent was used to iodinate the rat liver metallothioneins with typical yields of approximately 8%. Antisera directed against metallothionein-I showed low cross-reactivity with metallothionein-II. Low cross-reactivity was also observed between species. Specifically, metallothionein II prepared from human liver failed to cross-react in both the rat metallothionein-I and rat metallothionein-II radioimmunoassays. Maximum binding for the assay was approximately 60% and a linear response has been observed with additions of 1-25 ng of metallothionein in both assays. Induction of metallothionein synthesis with epinephrine (20 ..mu..g/kg; ip) and dexamethasone (2 mg/kg; ip) markedly increased the plasma level of metallothionein I within 10 hr of the doses. These data suggest that specific assays for each of the major isoforms of rat metallothionein have been developed.

  20. Physical mapping, amplification, and overexpression of the mouse mdr gene family in multidrug-resistant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, M; Rose, E; Housman, D E; Gros, P

    1990-01-01

    The mouse mdr gene family consists of three distinct genes (mdr1, mdr2, and mdr3), for which we have isolated full-length cDNA clones. cDNA subfragments corresponding to discrete regions showing little sequence conservation among the three mdr genes were used as gene-specific DNA probes in hybridization experiments. Long-range mapping by pulse-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the three mdr genes are closely linked on a genomic DNA segment of approximately 625 kilobases. The gene order and direction of transcription of the three genes were determined and indicate the arrangement (5') mdr3 (3')-(5') mdr1 (3')-(3') mdr2 (5'). Southern blotting analyses of genomic DNA from a panel of independently derived multidrug-resistant cell lines identified mdr gene amplification in 10 of 12 cell lines studied. In individual cell lines showing gene amplification, the copy number of each of the three mdr genes was identical, suggesting that the three mdr genes became amplified as part of a single amplicon in these cells. Although increased expression of all three mdr genes was detected in 2 of 12 cell lines tested, multidrug resistance was associated in 10 of 12 lines with the independent overexpression of either mdr1 (7 of 12) or mdr3 (3 of 12) but not mdr2. mdr1 overexpression was consistently associated with gene amplification, while increased mdr3 expression was detected in certain cell lines that did not show gene amplification. Increased levels of mdr1 mRNA were linked to the overexpression of a P glycoprotein of apparent molecular weight 180,000 to 200,000, whereas increased mdr3 expression resulted in increased expression of a P glycoprotein of molecular weight 160,000 to 180,000. Our results suggest that at least two members of the mouse mdr gene family, mdr1 and mdr3, can independently confer multidrug resistance in the cell lines examined. Images PMID:1969609

  1. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Rust, Alistair G.; Sayadi, Ahmed; Lee, Philip; Chua, Belinda Q; New, Lee-Sun; de Jong, Johann; Ward, Jerrold M.; Chin, Christopher KY.; Chew, Valerie; Toh, Han Chong; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie; Bard, Frederic A.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Radda, George K.; Chan, Eric CY.; Wessels, Lodewyk FA.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC we performed a near saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers, and a bewildering number (2860) of candidate later stage drivers, that were enriched for genes mutated, deregulated, or that function in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1199 genes linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC. PMID:24316982

  2. High-throughput screening of mouse gene knockouts identifies established and novel skeletal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brommage, Robert; Liu, Jeff; Hansen, Gwenn M; Kirkpatrick, Laura L; Potter, David G; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian; Powell, David R; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Screening gene function in vivo is a powerful approach to discover novel drug targets. We present high-throughput screening (HTS) data for 3?762 distinct global gene knockout (KO) mouse lines with viable adult homozygous mice generated using either gene-trap or homologous recombination technologies. Bone mass was determined from DEXA scans of male and female mice at 14 weeks of age and by microCT analyses of bones from male mice at 16 weeks of age. Wild-type (WT) cagemates/littermates were examined for each gene KO. Lethality was observed in an additional 850 KO lines. Since primary HTS are susceptible to false positive findings, additional cohorts of mice from KO lines with intriguing HTS bone data were examined. Aging, ovariectomy, histomorphometry and bone strength studies were performed and possible non-skeletal phenotypes were explored. Together, these screens identified multiple genes affecting bone mass: 23 previously reported genes (Calcr, Cebpb, Crtap, Dcstamp, Dkk1, Duoxa2, Enpp1, Fgf23, Kiss1/Kiss1r, Kl (Klotho), Lrp5, Mstn, Neo1, Npr2, Ostm1, Postn, Sfrp4, Slc30a5, Slc39a13, Sost, Sumf1, Src, Wnt10b), five novel genes extensively characterized (Cldn18, Fam20c, Lrrk1, Sgpl1, Wnt16), five novel genes with preliminary characterization (Agpat2, Rassf5, Slc10a7, Slc26a7, Slc30a10) and three novel undisclosed genes coding for potential osteoporosis drug targets. PMID:26273529

  3. Stage-specific reference genes significant for quantitative PCR during mouse retinal development.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroko; Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Yuko; Yoneda, Kazuhito; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Yoshii, Kengo; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Nakano, Masakazu; Tashiro, Kei

    2015-08-01

    Developing mouse retina has been serving as an ideal model for investigating the molecular mechanism of neural development and angiogenesis, because several significant events associated with these physiological phenomena are drastically occurring in conjunction with retinal development. However, as many genes are influencing on each other to establish mature retina within 21 days from E10 to P12, we must carefully design the experiments, such as in the case of quantitating the amount of altered gene expression toward the establishment of retina by quantitative PCR. As we have seen considerable variations of quantitative results in different developmental stages of retina depending on the reference genes used for compensation, we here attempted to determine a reliable reference gene to accurately quantitate the target genes in each stage. According to the results of in silico prediction and comparison with a database of SAGE, we found that the most stable gene from early to late stages was Sdha, whereas one of the most popular housekeeping genes, Actb, was the one that could mislead the quantitative results even in the adult stage. Consequently, we pointed out the importance of selecting an appropriate reference gene, especially to quantitate the amount of gene expression in the developmental stages of a certain tissue. PMID:26059597

  4. Genetic and Molecular Basis of QTL of Diabetes in Mouse: Genes and Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Jiao, Yan; Xiong, Qing; Wang, Cong-Yi; Gerling, Ivan; Gu, Weikuan

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study has been conducted of all available reports in PubMed and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) to examine the genetic and molecular basis of quantitative genetic loci (QTL) of diabetes with the main focus on genes and polymorphisms. The major question is, What can the QTL tell us? Specifically, we want to know whether those genome regions differ from other regions in terms of genes relevant to diabetes. Which genes are within those QTL regions, and, among them, which genes have already been linked to diabetes? whether more polymorphisms have been associated with diabetes in the QTL regions than in the non-QTL regions. Our search revealed a total of 9038 genes from 26 type 1 diabetes QTL, which cover 667,096,006 bp of the mouse genomic sequence. On one hand, a large number of candidate genes are in each of these QTL; on the other hand, we found that some obvious candidate genes of QTL have not yet been investigated. Thus, the comprehensive search of candidate genes for known QTL may provide unexpected benefit for identifying QTL genes for diabetes. PMID:19471607

  5. Toward a Systems Biology of Mouse Inner Ear Organogenesis: Gene Expression Pathways, Patterns and Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sajan, Samin A.; Warchol, Mark E.; Lovett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We describe the most comprehensive study to date on gene expression during mouse inner ear (IE) organogenesis. Samples were microdissected from mouse embryos at E9–E15 in half-day intervals, a period that spans all of IE organogenesis. These included separate dissections of all discernible IE substructures such as the cochlea, utricle, and saccule. All samples were analyzed on high density expression microarrays under strict statistical filters. Extensive confirmatory tests were performed, including RNA in situ hybridizations. More than 5000 genes significantly varied in expression according to developmental stage, tissue, or both and defined 28 distinct expression patterns. For example, upregulation of 315 genes provided a clear-cut “signature” of early events in IE specification. Additional, clear-cut, gene expression signatures marked specific structures such as the cochlea, utricle, or saccule throughout late IE development. Pathway analysis identified 53 signaling cascades enriched within the 28 patterns. Many novel pathways, not previously implicated in IE development, including ?-adrenergic, amyloid, estrogen receptor, circadian rhythm, and immune system pathways, were identified. Finally, we identified positional candidate genes in 54 uncloned nonsyndromic human deafness intervals. This detailed analysis provides many new insights into the spatial and temporal genetic specification of this complex organ system. PMID:17660535

  6. Proteomics and bioinformatics analysis of mouse hypothalamic neurogenesis with or without EPHX2 gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lijun; Zhou, Juntuo; Wang, Dawei; Zou, Xiajuan; Lou, Yaxin; Liu, Dan; Yang, Bin; Zhu, Yi; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differently expressed proteins in the presence and absence of EPHX2 gene in mouse hypothalamus using proteomics profiling and bioinformatics analysis. This study was performed on 3 wild type (WT) and 3 EPHX2 gene global knockout (KO) mice (EPHX2 -/-). Using the nano- electrospray ionization (ESI)-LC-MS/MS detector, we identified 31 over-expressed proteins in WT mouse hypothalamus compared to the KO counterparts. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation in terms of the protein-protein interaction network indicated that cellular metabolic process, protein metabolic process, signaling transduction and protein post-translation biological processes involved in EPHX2 -/- regulatory network. In addition, signaling pathway enrichment analysis also highlighted chronic neurodegenerative diseases and some other signaling pathways, such as TGF-beta signaling pathway, T cell receptor signaling pathway, ErbB signaling pathway, Neurotrophin signaling pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, were strongly coupled with EPHX2 gene knockout. Further studies into the molecular functions of EPHX2 gene in hypothalamus will help to provide new perspective in neurogenesis. PMID:26722453

  7. Stable integration and expression in mouse cells of yeast artificial chromosomes harboring human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Eliceiri, B; Labella, T; Hagino, Y; Srivastava, A; Schlessinger, D; Pilia, G; Palmieri, G; D'Urso, M

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a way to fit yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) with markers that permit the selection of stably transformed mammalian cells, and have determined the fate and expression of such YACs containing the genes for human ribosomal RNA (rDNA) or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). The YACs in the yeast cell are "retrofitted" with selectable markers by homologous recombination with the URA3 gene of one vector arm. The DNA fragment introduced contains a LYS2 marker selective in yeast and a thymidine kinase (TK) marker selective in TK-deficient cells, bracketed by portions of the URA3 sequence that disrupt the endogenous gene during the recombination event. Analyses of transformed L-M TK- mouse cells showed that YACs containing rDNA or G6PD were incorporated in essentially intact form into the mammalian cell DNA. For G6PD, a single copy of the transfected YAC was found in each of two transformants analyzed and was fully expressed, producing the expected human isozyme as well as the heterodimer composed of the human gene product and the endogenous mouse gene product. Images PMID:2006154

  8. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  9. TISA: tissue-specific alternative splicing in human and mouse genes.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seung-Jae; Lee, Kyooyeol; Paik, Hyojung; Hur, Cheol-Goo

    2006-10-31

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism by which multiple transcripts are produced from a single gene and is thought to be an important mechanism for tissue-specific expression of transcript isoforms. Here, we report a novel graphing method for transcript reconstruction and statistical prediction of tissue-specific AS. We applied three selection steps to generate the splice graph and predict the transcript isoforms: (i) a custom scoring rule for exon/intron sets, (ii) binomial statistics for selecting valid alternative splicing with a frequency of at least 1% for the predominant form and (iii) evaluation of transcript structure. We obtained 97 286 and 66 022 valid transcripts from 26 143 human and 27 741 mouse genes, respectively. In addition, we discovered 33 481 AS events for nine types of AS patterns in human. The statistical significance of tissue specificity for each gene, transcript and AS event was assessed based on EST tissue information, followed by a multiple testing correction procedure. In human, 12 711 genes, 16 016 transcripts and 1035 AS events were predicted to be tissue-specific (false discovery rate <0.01). This information on genes, transcript structures, AS events and their tissue specificities in human and mouse are freely accessible on the TISA website (http://tisa.kribb.re.kr/AGC/). PMID:17107969

  10. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene (PCNT) to chromosome 21qter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Gos, A.; Morris, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Exon trapping was used to identify portions of genes from cosmid DNA of a human chromosome 21-specific library LL21NC02-Q. More than 650 potential exons have been cloned and characterized to date. Among these, 3 trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} showed strong homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse pericentrin (Pcnt) gene, indicating that these 3 exons are portions of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene. With PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis, and FISH, we have mapped this presumed human pericentrin gene (PCNT) to the long arm of chromosome 21 between marker PFKL and 21qter. Pericentrin is a conserved protein component of the filamentous matrix of the centrosome involved in the initial establishment of the organized microtubule array. No candidate hereditary disorder for pericentrin deficiency/abnormality has yet been mapped in the most distal region of 21q; in addition the role of triplication of the pericentrin gene in the pathophysiology or etiology of trisomy 21 is currently unknown. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  11. DNA methylation and regulation of the human beta-globin-like genes in mouse erythroleukemia cells containing human chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Ley, T J; Chiang, Y L; Haidaris, D; Anagnou, N P; Wilson, V L; Anderson, W F

    1984-01-01

    The human beta-globin gene is expressed--but the human fetal (gamma) and embryonic (epsilon) globin genes are not--in an induced mouse erythroleukemia cell line (M11-X) that contains most of human chromosome 11. A 24-hr exposure of M11-X cells to 5-azacytidine before induction causes "global" DNA hypomethylation but selective activation of the human gamma-globin genes. Genomic DNA is remethylated 2-3 days after exposure to 5-azacytidine, but sequences near the human and mouse globin genes remain hypomethylated, suggesting that the remethylation process is inhibited in these regions. Images PMID:6208553

  12. Polydactyly Nagoya, Pdn: A new mutant gene in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, I; Nakatsuka, T; Fujii, T; Naruse, I; Oda, S

    1980-10-01

    A new hereditary polydactyly (gene symbol Pdn) was found in the course of breeding JCL : ICR mice. The genetic analysis indicated that the polydactyly was an autosomal dominant trait. The homozygotes died within two days after birth. The homozygous fetuses or newborn had 1-3 extra-digits both in te fore- and hindlimbs on the preaxial side. They occasionally showed exencephaly, cleft palate, open eyelid, short tibia and fibula or deformed sternum. The heterozygotes had one extra-digit preaxial side. They occasionally showed exencephaly, heterozygotes had one extra-digit preaxially in the hindlimb and an enlarged first digit on the forelimb which often showed bifurcated distal phalanx. A tab on the postaxial side of the forelimb was found in all homozygotes and in some heterozygotes. PMID:7202526

  13. Identification and characterization of mouse otic sensory lineage genes

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Byron H.; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Laske, Roman D.; Losorelli, Steven; Heller, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate embryogenesis gives rise to all cell types of an organism through the development of many unique lineages derived from the three primordial germ layers. The otic sensory lineage arises from the otic vesicle, a structure formed through invagination of placodal non-neural ectoderm. This developmental lineage possesses unique differentiation potential, giving rise to otic sensory cell populations including hair cells, supporting cells, and ganglion neurons of the auditory and vestibular organs. Here we present a systematic approach to identify transcriptional features that distinguish the otic sensory lineage (from early otic progenitors to otic sensory populations) from other major lineages of vertebrate development. We used a microarray approach to analyze otic sensory lineage populations including microdissected otic vesicles (embryonic day 10.5) as well as isolated neonatal cochlear hair cells and supporting cells at postnatal day 3. Non-otic tissue samples including periotic tissues and whole embryos with otic regions removed were used as reference populations to evaluate otic specificity. Otic populations shared transcriptome-wide correlations in expression profiles that distinguish members of this lineage from non-otic populations. We further analyzed the microarray data using comparative and dimension reduction methods to identify individual genes that are specifically expressed in the otic sensory lineage. This analysis identified and ranked top otic sensory lineage-specific transcripts including Fbxo2, Col9a2, and Oc90, and additional novel otic lineage markers. To validate these results we performed expression analysis on select genes using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Fbxo2 showed the most striking pattern of specificity to the otic sensory lineage, including robust expression in the early otic vesicle and sustained expression in prosensory progenitors and auditory and vestibular hair cells and supporting cells. PMID:25852475

  14. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10?6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  15. Early Maternal Alcohol Consumption Alters Hippocampal DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Volume in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Marjonen, Heidi; Sierra, Alejandra; Nyman, Anna; Rogojin, Vladimir; Gröhn, Olli; Linden, Anni-Maija; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Kaminen-Ahola, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy are known, but the molecular events that lead to the phenotypic characteristics are unclear. To unravel the molecular mechanisms, we have used a mouse model of gestational ethanol exposure, which is based on maternal ad libitum ingestion of 10% (v/v) ethanol for the first 8 days of gestation (GD 0.5-8.5). Early neurulation takes place by the end of this period, which is equivalent to the developmental stage early in the fourth week post-fertilization in human. During this exposure period, dynamic epigenetic reprogramming takes place and the embryo is vulnerable to the effects of environmental factors. Thus, we hypothesize that early ethanol exposure disrupts the epigenetic reprogramming of the embryo, which leads to alterations in gene regulation and life-long changes in brain structure and function. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression in the mouse hippocampus revealed altered expression of 23 genes and three miRNAs in ethanol-exposed, adolescent offspring at postnatal day (P) 28. We confirmed this result by using two other tissues, where three candidate genes are known to express actively. Interestingly, we found a similar trend of upregulated gene expression in bone marrow and main olfactory epithelium. In addition, we observed altered DNA methylation in the CpG islands upstream of the candidate genes in the hippocampus. Our MRI study revealed asymmetry of brain structures in ethanol-exposed adult offspring (P60): we detected ethanol-induced enlargement of the left hippocampus and decreased volume of the left olfactory bulb. Our study indicates that ethanol exposure in early gestation can cause changes in DNA methylation, gene expression, and brain structure of offspring. Furthermore, the results support our hypothesis of early epigenetic origin of alcohol-induced disorders: changes in gene regulation may have already taken place in embryonic stem cells and therefore can be seen in different tissue types later in life. PMID:25970770

  16. Metallothionein protection of cadmium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, Curtis D. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of the cadmium (Cd)-binding protein from horse kidney in 1957 marked the birth of research on this low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich protein called metallothionein (MT) in Cd toxicology. MT plays minimal roles in the gastrointestinal absorption of Cd, but MT plays important roles in Cd retention in tissues and dramatically decreases biliary excretion of Cd. Cd-bound to MT is responsible for Cd accumulation in tissues and the long biological half-life of Cd in the body. Induction of MT protects against acute Cd-induced lethality, as well as acute toxicity to the liver and lung. Intracellular MT also plays important roles in ameliorating Cd toxicity following prolonged exposures, particularly chronic Cd-induced nephrotoxicity, osteotoxicity, and toxicity to the lung, liver, and immune system. There is an association between human and rodent Cd exposure and prostate cancers, especially in the portions where MT is poorly expressed. MT expression in Cd-induced tumors varies depending on the type and the stage of tumor development. For instance, high levels of MT are detected in Cd-induced sarcomas at the injection site, whereas the sarcoma metastases are devoid of MT. The use of MT-transgenic and MT-null mice has greatly helped define the role of MT in Cd toxicology, with the MT-null mice being hypersensitive and MT-transgenic mice resistant to Cd toxicity. Thus, MT is critical for protecting human health from Cd toxicity. There are large individual variations in MT expression, which might in turn predispose some people to Cd toxicity.

  17. Structure and mapping of the gene encoding mouse high affinity Fc[gamma]RI and chromosomal location of the human Fc[gamma]RI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, N.; McKenzie, I.F.C.; Hogarth, P.M. ); Kozak, C.A. )

    1992-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of the gene encoding the mouse high affinity Fc receptor Fc[gamma]RI. Using a mouse cDNA Fc[gamma]RI probe four unique overlapping genomic clones were isolated and were found to encode the entire 9 kb of the mouse Fc[gamma]RI gene. Sequence analysis of the gene showed that six exons account for the entire Fc[gamma]RI cDNA sequences including the 5[prime] - and 3[prime]-untranslated sequences. The first and second exons encode the signal peptide; exons 3, 4, and 5 encode the extracellular Ig binding domains; and exon 6 encodes the transmembrane domain, the cytoplasmic region, and the entire 3[prime]-untranslated sequence. This exon pattern is similar to Fc[gamma]RII gene which contains 10 exons and encodes the b1 and b2 Fc[gamma]RII. Southern blot analysis has shown that the mouse Fc[gamma]RI gene is a single copy gene with no RFLP in inbred strains of mice, but analysis of an intersubspecies backcross of mice showed that unlike other mouse FcR genes which are on mouse chromosome 1 the locus encoding Fc[gamma]RI, termed Fcg1, is located on chromosome 3. Interestingly, the Fcg1 locus is located near the end of a region with known linkage homology to human chromosome 1. Analysis of human x rodent somatic cell hybrid cell lines indicates that the human FCG1 locus encoding the human Fc[gamma]RI maps to chromosome 1 and is therefore possibly linked to other FcR genes on this chromosome. These results suggest that the linkage relationships among these genes in the human genome are not preserved in the mouse. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Integrative Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Light-Induced Regional Gene Expression Phase Shift Programs in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haisun; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Rafferty, Rachel; Gonye, Gregory E.; Weaver, David R.; Schwaber, James S.

    2012-01-01

    We use the multigenic pattern of gene expression across suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regions and time to understand the dynamics within the SCN in response to a circadian phase-resetting light pulse. Global gene expression studies of the SCN indicate that circadian functions like phase resetting are complex multigenic processes. While the molecular dynamics of phase resetting are not well understood, it is clear they involve a “functional gene expression program”, e.g., the coordinated behavior of functionally related genes in space and time. In the present study we selected a set of 89 of these functionally related genes in order to further understand this multigenic program. By use of high-throughput qPCR we studied 52 small samples taken by anatomically precise laser capture from within the core and shell SCN regions, and taken at time points with and without phase resetting light exposure. The results show striking regional differences in light response to be present in the mouse SCN. By using network-based analyses, we are able to establish a highly specific multigenic correlation between genes expressed in response to light at night and genes normally activated during the day. The light pulse triggers a complex and highly coordinated network of gene regulation. The largest differences marking neuroanatomical location are in transmitter receptors, and the largest time-dependent differences occur in clock-related genes. Nighttime phase resetting appears to recruit transcriptional regulatory processes normally active in the day. This program, or mechanism, causes the pattern of core region gene expression to transiently shift to become more like that of the shell region. PMID:22662235

  19. Mapping of the gene for high-density lipoprotein binding protein (Hdlbp) to proximal mouse Chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoeuf, R.C.; Oram, J.F.; Xia, Y.R.; Lusis, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    HDL binding protein (HBP) is a 150-kDa glycoprotein that is processed to smaller forms (105-110 kDa) that bind HDL. In vitro studies have shown that HBP protein mass and mRNA levels increase in cells overloaded with cholesterol, suggesting that this protein plays a role in HDL-mediated removal of cholesterol from cells, a process that may underlie the anti-atherogenic effects of HDL. The cDNA for human HBP has been identified and the gene (HDLBP) localized to chromosome 2q37. To test whether the HDL binding protein gene underlies any mutations in the mouse or whether it contributes to multigenic variations contributing to lipoprotein metabolism between inbred mouse strains, we report the chromosomal mapping in mouse for the mouse HBP gene (Hdlbp).

  20. A lacZ reporter gene expression atlas for 313 adult KOMP mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Pasumarthi, Ravi K.; Baridon, Brian; Djan, Esi; Trainor, Amanda; Griffey, Stephen M.; Engelhard, Eric K.; Rapp, Jared; Li, Bowen; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, K.C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) in the vector used for the Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) is driven by the endogenous promoter of the target gene. In tissues from KOMP mice, histochemical staining for LacZ enzyme activity can be used to determine gene expression patterns. With this technique, we have produced a comprehensive resource of gene expression using both whole mount (WM) and frozen section (FS) LacZ staining in 313 unique KOMP mutant mouse lines. Of these, ?80% of mutants showed specific staining in one or more tissues, while ?20% showed no specific staining, ?13% had staining in only one tissue, and ?25% had staining in >6 tissues. The highest frequency of specific staining occurred in the brain (?50%), male gonads (42%), and kidney (39%). The WM method was useful for rapidly identifying whole organ and some substructure staining, while the FS method often revealed substructure and cellular staining specificity. Both staining methods had >90% repeatability in biological replicates. Nonspecific LacZ staining occurs in some tissues due to the presence of bacteria or endogenous enzyme activity. However, this can be effectively distinguished from reporter gene activity by the combination of the WM and FS methods. After careful annotation, LacZ staining patterns in a high percentage of mutants revealed a unique structure-function not previously reported for many of these genes. The validation of methods for LacZ staining, annotation, and expression analysis reported here provides unique insights into the function of genes for which little is currently known. PMID:25591789

  1. Analysis of tumor suppressor gene on human chromosome 9 in mouse x human somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Porterfield, B.W.; Olopade, O.I.; Rowley, J.D.; Diaz, M.O.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions of the short arm of human chromosome 9 (9p) are common in human leukemia and solid tumors. The minimum region of overlap of these deletions, located between the interferon genes and the methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene, is partially synthenic with a region of mouse chromosome 4 that has tumor suppressor activity. Somatic cell hybrids between tumorigenic, MTAP-deficient, mouse L cells, and MTAP-competent human cells containing either a normal copy of 9p or a 9p with a deletion involving band 9p21 were selected in culture conditions that require MTAP activity for continued growth. Somatic cell hybrids that contained a normal copy of 9p rarely formed tumors in nude mice. Cells from the rare tumors that grew had lost the normal 9p. Hybrid cells that contained a 9p with deletions formed tumors more frequently, and cells from these tumors retained the 9p deletion chromosome. These results provide evidence that a tumor suppressor gene (or genes) is located on human chromosome 9 within the region of deletion.

  2. Restricted development of mouse triploid fetuses with disorganized expression of imprinted genes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Takahashi, Masashi; Kawahara, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic species commonly contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. The diploid state appears to be advantageous for mammals because it enables sexual reproduction and facilitates genetic recombination. Nonetheless, the effects of DNA ploidy on mammalian ontogeny have yet to be understood. The present study shows phenotypic features and expression patterns of imprinted genes in tripronucleate diandric and digynic triploid (DAT and DGT) mouse fetuses on embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). Measurement of crown-rump length revealed that the length of DGT fetuses (1.87 ± 0.13 mm; mean ± standard error of the mean) was much smaller than that of diploid fetuses (4.81 ± 0.05 mm). However, no significant difference was observed in the crown-rump length between diploid and DAT fetuses (3.86 ± 0.43 mm). In DGT fetuses, the expression level of paternally expressed genes, Igf2, Dlk1, Ndn, and Peg3, remained significantly reduced and that of maternally expressed genes, Igf2r and Grb10, increased. Additionally, in DAT fetuses, the Igf2 mRNA expression level was approximately twice that in diploid fetuses, as expected. These results provide the first demonstration that imprinted genes in mouse triploid fetuses show distinctive expression patterns independent of the number of parental-origin haploid sets. These data suggest that both DNA ploidy and asymmetrical functions of parental genomes separately influence mammalian ontogeny. PMID:25318586

  3. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72h after exposure to 0.25mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. PMID:26006729

  4. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  5. A short upstream promoter region mediates transcriptional regulation of the mouse doublecortin gene in differentiating neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Doublecortin (Dcx), a MAP (Microtubule-Associated Protein), is transiently expressed in migrating and differentiating neurons and thereby characterizes neuronal precursors and neurogenesis in developing and adult neurogenesis. In addition, reduced Dcx expression during development has been related to appearance of brain pathologies. Here, we attempt to unveil the molecular mechanisms controlling Dcx gene expression by studying its transcriptional regulation during neuronal differentiation. Results To determine and analyze important regulatory sequences of the Dcx promoter, we studied a putative regulatory region upstream from the mouse Dcx coding region (pdcx2kb) and several deletions thereof. These different fragments were used in vitro and in vivo to drive reporter gene expression. We demonstrated, using transient expression experiments, that pdcx2kb is sufficient to control specific reporter gene expression in cerebellar cells and in the developing brain (E14.5). We determined the temporal profile of Dcx promoter activity during neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) and found that transcriptional activation of the Dcx gene varies along with neuronal differentiation of mESC. Deletion experiments and sequence comparison of Dcx promoters across rodents, human and chicken revealed the importance of a highly conserved sequence in the proximal region of the promoter required for specific and strong expression in neuronal precursors and young neuronal cells. Further analyses revealed the presence in this short sequence of several conserved, putative transcription factor binding sites: LEF/TCF (Lymphoid Enhancer Factor/T-Cell Factor) which are effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway; HNF6/OC2 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6/Oncecut-2) members of the ONECUT family and NF-Y/CAAT (Nuclear Factor-Y). Conclusions Studies of Dcx gene regulatory sequences using native, deleted and mutated constructs suggest that fragments located upstream of the Dcx coding sequence are sufficient to induce specific Dcx expression in vitro: in heterogeneous differentiated neurons from mESC, in primary mouse cerebellar neurons (PND3) and in organotypic slice cultures. Furthermore, a region in the 3'-end region of the Dcx promoter is highly conserved across several species and exerts positive control on Dcx transcriptional activation. Together, these results indicate that the proximal 3'-end region of the mouse Dcx regulatory sequence is essential for Dcx gene expression during differentiation of neuronal precursors. PMID:20509865

  6. NFAT5 regulates transcription of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kotake, Yojiro; Yamashita, Makiko; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2010-12-10

    We aimed to clarify the transcription-regulation mechanisms of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (mTERT). First, we searched for the promoter region required for transcriptional activation of mTERT and identified an enhancer cis-element (named mTERT-EE) located between - 200 and - 179 bp of the mouse TERT gene (mTERT). EMSA results suggested that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) member proteins bind to mTERT-EE. We then identified NFAT5 as the factor binding to mTERT-EE and found that it activates the transcription of the mTERT core promoter. The results that siRNA directed against NFAT5 significantly reduced mTERT expression and mTERT core promoter activity and that the expressions of NFAT5 and mTERT were well correlated in various mouse tissues except liver suggest that NFAT5 dominantly and directly regulates mTERT expression. To clarify their functionality further, we investigated the effect of hypertonic stress, a known stimulus affecting the expression and transcriptional activity of NFAT5, on mTERT expression. The result indicated that hypertonic stress activates mTERT transcription via the activation and recruitment of NFAT5 to the mTERT promoter. These results provide useful information about the transcription-regulation mechanisms of mTERT.

  7. Using mouse models of autism spectrum disorders to study the neurotoxicology of gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzer, Jared J.; Koenig, Claire M.; Berman, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    To better study the role of genetics in autism, mouse models have been developed which mimic the genetics of specific autism spectrum and related disorders. These models have facilitated research on the role genetic susceptibility factors in the pathogenesis of autism in the absence of environmental factors. Inbred mouse strains have been similarly studied to assess the role of environmental agents on neurodevelopment, typically without the complications of genetic heterogeneity of the human population. What has not been as actively pursued, however, is the methodical study of the interaction between these factors (e.g., gene and environmental interactions in neurodevelopment). This review suggests that a genetic predisposition paired with exposure to environmental toxicants play an important role in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, and may contribute to the largely unexplained rise in the number of children diagnosed with autism worldwide. Specifically, descriptions of the major mouse models of autism and toxic mechanisms of prevalent environmental chemicals are provided followed by a discussion of current and future research strategies to evaluate the role of gene and environment interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23010509

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Mouse PXR Gene: An Interplay of Transregulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Tyagi, Rakesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) is an important ligand-activated nuclear receptor functioning as a ‘master regulator’ of expression of phase I, phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, and members of the drug transporters. PXR is primarily expressed in hepatic tissues and to lesser extent in other non-hepatic tissues both in human and in mice. Although its expression profile is well studied but little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that govern PXR gene expression in these cells. In the present study, we have cloned and characterized over 5 kb (?4963 to +54) region lying upstream of mouse PXR transcription start site. Promoter-reporter assays revealed that the proximal promoter region of up to 1 kb is sufficient to support the expression of PXR in the mouse liver cell lines. It was evident that the 500 bp proximal promoter region contains active binding sites for Ets, Tcf, Ikarose and nuclear factor families of transcription factors. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the minimal region of 134 bp PXR promoter was able to bind Ets-1 and ?-catenin proteins. This result was further confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In summary, the present study identified a promoter region of mouse PXR gene and the transregulatory factors responsible for PXR promoter activity. The results presented herein are expected to provide important cues to gain further insight into the regulatory mechanisms of PXR function. PMID:22952895

  9. Methylation-Associated Gene Silencing of RARB in Areca Carcinogens Induced Mouse Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Fan, Shin-Ru; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Nai-Wen; Cheng, Ju-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Regarding oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) development, chewing areca is known to be a strong risk factor in many Asian cultures. Therefore, we established an OSCC induced mouse model by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), or arecoline, or both treatments, respectively. These are the main two components of the areca nut that could increase the occurrence of OSCC. We examined the effects with the noncommercial MCGI (mouse CpG islands) microarray for genome-wide screening the DNA methylation aberrant in induced OSCC mice. The microarray results showed 34 hypermethylated genes in 4-NQO plus arecoline induced OSCC mice tongue tissues. The examinations also used methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and bisulfite sequencing to realize the methylation pattern in collected mouse tongue tissues and human OSCC cell lines of different grades, respectively. These results showed that retinoic acid receptor ? (RARB) was indicated in hypermethylation at the promoter region and the loss of expression during cancer development. According to the results of real-time PCR, it was shown that de novo DNA methyltransferases were involved in gene epigenetic alternations of OSCC. Collectively, our results showed that RARB hypermethylation was involved in the areca-associated oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25197641

  10. Construction and identification of an RNA interference lentiviral vector targeting the mouse TNF-? gene

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIBO; LIANG, HONGDA; ZHAO, YINGJIE; LIU, XIANGPING; YANG, KUN; SUI, AIHUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct RNA interference (RNAi) lentiviral vector particles targeting the mouse tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) gene. Three types of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the mouse TNF-? gene were designed, synthesized and transfected into RAW264.7 cells. Screening was performed to identify the siRNA sequence exhibiting the highest inhibition efficiency; based on this, recombinant lentiviral plasmids were constructed and co-transfected into 293T cells with packaging plasmids for the production of lentiviral particles. The screening results showed that the TNF-? mRNA expression levels of the three siRNA groups were significantly lower than those of the negative control group, with the highest inhibition rate in the siRNA2 group (83.09%). Similarly, the expression levels of TNF-? protein in the three siRNA groups were significantly lower than those of the negative control group, and the highest inhibition rate was found in the siRNA2 group (51.16%). The mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 showed no significant difference among the siRNA groups and the negative control. The recombinant lentiviral shuttle plasmid was constructed, and electrophoresis revealed the polymerase chain reaction product to be 343 bp, while that of the empty vector was 306 bp; DNA sequencing showed partial insertion. The virus titer was calculated to be 2×106 TU/µl. In conclusion, RNAi lentiviral vector particles targeting the mouse TNF-? gene were successfully obtained in the present study. This method may be used to produce lentiviral vector for the in vivo study of RNAi gene therapy targeting TNF-?. PMID:26668629

  11. Expression of human and mouse adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) isoform genes in adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Domingo, Pere; Viñas, Octavi; Mampel, Teresa

    2015-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are mitochondrial proteins encoded by nuclear DNA that catalyze the exchange of ATP generated in the mitochondria for ADP produced in cytosol. There are four ANT isoforms in humans (hANT1-4) and three in mice (mANT1, mANT2 and mANT4), all encoded by distinct genes. The aim of this study was to quantify expression of ANT isoform genes during the adipogenesis of mouse 3T3-L1 and human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS)-derived preadipocytes. We also studied the effects of the adipogenesis regulators, insulin and rosiglitazone, on ANT isoform expression in differentiated adipocytes and examined the expression of ANT isoforms in subcutaneous and visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) from mice and humans. We found that adipogenesis was associated with an increase in the expression of ANT isoforms, specifically mANT2 in mouse 3T3-L1 cells and hANT3 in human SGBS cells. These changes could be involved in the increases in oxidative metabolism and decreases in lactate production observed during differentiation. Insulin and rosiglitazone induced mANT2 gene expression in mature 3T3-L1 cells and hANT2 and hANT3 gene expression in SGBS adipocytes. Furthermore, human WAT expressed greater amounts of hANT3 than hANT2, and the expression of both of these isoforms was greater in subcutaneous WAT than in visceral WAT. Finally, inhibition of ANT activity by atractyloside or bongkrekic acid impaired proper adipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that changes in the expression of ANT isoforms may be involved in adipogenesis in both human and mouse WAT. PMID:25817039

  12. Mutations at the mouse ichthyosis locus are within the lamin B receptor gene: a single gene

    E-print Network

    Olins, Ada L.

    ichthyosis (ic) locus has been of great interest because mutations at this locus cause marked abnormalities other phenotypic abnormalities, including alopecia, variable expression of syndactyly and hydrocephalus. The ic locus on mouse chromosome 1 shares conserved synteny with the chromosomal location of the human

  13. Identification of genes escaping X inactivation by allelic expression analysis in a novel hybrid mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Berletch, Joel B.; Ma, Wenxiu; Yang, Fan; Shendure, Jay; Noble, William S.; Disteche, Christine M.; Deng, Xinxian

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a female-specific mechanism that serves to balance gene dosage between the sexes whereby one X chromosome in females is inactivated during early development. Despite this silencing, a small portion of genes escape inactivation and remain expressed from the inactive X (Xi). Little is known about the distribution of escape from XCI in different tissues in vivo and about the mechanisms that control tissue-specific differences. Using a new binomial model in conjunction with a mouse model with identifiable alleles and skewed X inactivation we are able to survey genes that escape XCI in vivo. We show that escape from X inactivation can be a common feature of some genes, whereas others escape in a tissue specific manner. Furthermore, we characterize the chromatin environment of escape genes and show that expression from the Xi correlates with factors associated with open chromatin and that CTCF co-localizes with escape genes. Here, we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and data analysis pipeline we used to assay allele-specific expression and epigenetic characteristics of genes escaping X inactivation. The data is publicly available through the GEO database under ascension numbers GSM1014171, GSE44255, and GSE59779. Interpretation and discussion of these data are included in a previously published study (Berletch et al., 2015) [1].

  14. Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Koza-Taylor, Petra H.; Holland, Ricky D.; Thibodeau, Michael S.; Beger, Richard D.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, Jose E. . E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

    2007-07-15

    Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

  15. In situ localization of mRNAs coding for mouse testicular structural genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, N.B. ); Penshow, J.D. )

    1987-11-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry has been used to localize mRNA transcripts of five nuclear and cytoplasmic structural genes in the mouse testis. The mRNAs for three nuclear structural proteins involved in chromatin transformation during spermatogenesis (the two protamine variants of the mouse and one of the testis-specific proteins) are restricted solely to postmeiotic germ cells. In contrast, mRNAs for two other structural proteins, actin and {alpha} tubulin, are detected throughout spermatogenesis. Although present in premeiotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic cell types, the mRNA levels of actin and {alpha} tubulin differ considerably during spermiogenesis, the haploid phase of spermatogenesis. Actin mRNA levels decrease markedly as the male gamete differentiates during spermiogenesis whereas {alpha}-tubulin mRNAs are equally abundant in the haploid round and elongating spermatids.

  16. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M.

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Gene Expression Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Following Levitation in an Ultrasound Standing Wave Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08–0.85 MPa) and times (5–60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. (E-mail: Bazoud@tcd.ie) PMID:21208732

  18. Stereotaxic Injection of a Viral Vector for Conditional Gene Manipulation in the Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Inquimbert, Perrine; Moll, Martin; Kohno, Tatsuro; Scholz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Intraparenchymal injection of a viral vector enables conditional gene manipulation in distinct populations of neurons or particular regions of the central nervous system. We demonstrate a stereotaxic injection technique that allows targeted gene expression or silencing in the dorsal horn of the mouse spinal cord. The surgical procedure is brief. It requires laminectomy of a single vertebra, providing for quick recovery of the animal and unimpaired motility of the spine. Controlled injection of a small vector suspension volume at low speed and use of a microsyringe with beveled glass cannula minimize the tissue lesion. The local immune response to the vector depends on the intrinsic properties of the virus employed; in our experience, it is minor and short-lived when a recombinant adeno-associated virus is used. A reporter gene such as enhanced green fluorescent protein facilitates monitoring spatial distribution of the vector, and the efficacy and cellular specificity of the transfection. PMID:23542888

  19. Identification of peroxisome-proliferator responsive element in the mouse HSL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Hiroaki . E-mail: hyajima@kirin.co.jp; Kobayashi, Yumie; Kanaya, Tomoka; Horino, Yoko

    2007-01-12

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis in adipose tissue. Several studies suggest that protein phosphorylation regulates the HSL enzymatic activity. On the other hand, the precise mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of the HSL gene remains to be elucidated. Here, we identified a functional peroxisome-proliferator responsive element (PPRE) in the mouse HSL promoter by reporter assay in CV-1 cells using serial deletion and point mutants of the 5'-flanking region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that both peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}) and retinoid X receptor (RXR{alpha}) interacted with the region. Binding of the PPAR{gamma}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to the PPRE sequence was also confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These results indicate that the HSL gene is transcriptionally regulated by PPAR{gamma}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer, and suggest that a cis-acting element regulates the HSL gene expression.

  20. Multi-stage analysis of gene expression and transcription regulation in C57/B6 mouse liver development

    E-print Network

    Multi-stage analysis of gene expression and transcription regulation in C57/B6 mouse liver history: Received 7 August 2008 Accepted 12 October 2008 Available online 10 December 2008 Keywords: Liver development Microarray Gene expression Function Transcriptional regulation The liver performs a number

  1. Inactivation of two haemolytic toxin genes in Aeromonas hydrophila attenuates virulence in a suckling mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Heuzenroeder, M W; Flower, R L

    1998-02-01

    The contribution of two unrelated Aeromonas hydrophila beta-haemolytic toxins to virulence was assessed in a suckling mouse model. The first haemolysin gene, isolated from an A. hydrophila A6 cosmid bank, encoded a potential gene product of 621 amino acids and a predicted molecular size of 69.0 kDa. The inferred amino acid sequence showed 89% identity to the AHH1 haemolysin of A. hydrophila ATCC 7966, and 51% identity to the HlyA haemolysin of Vibrio cholerae EI Tor strain O17. The second haemolysin gene (designated aerA), which encodes aerolysin, a pore-forming toxin, was partially cloned by PCR for the purpose of mutant construction. This PCR product was a 1040 bp fragment from the C-terminal region of aerA. It is proposed that the 69.0 kDa V. cholerae-HlyA-like haemolysin gene be termed hlyA to contrast with the aerA terminology for the aerolysin. A suicide vector was used to inactivate both the hlyA and aerA genes in A. hydrophila A6. When assessed in the suckling mouse model, only the hlyA aerA double mutant showed a statistically significant reduction in virulence--a 20-fold change in LD50 (Scheffe test, P < 0.05). Cytotoxicity to buffalo green monkey kidney cell monolayers and haemolysis on horse blood agar were eliminated only in the hlyA aerA double mutants. This is the first report of cloning and mutagenesis of two unrelated haemolytic toxin genes in the same strain of a mesophilic aeromonad. For A. hydrophila, a two-toxin model provides a more complete explanation of virulence. PMID:9493366

  2. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse (strain 129) embryonic stem cells after typical synthetic musk exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Jiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic musks are widely used in personal-care products and can readily accumulate in the adipose tissue, breast milk, and blood of humans. In this study, the Affymetrix Mouse Genome GeneChip was used to identify alterations in gene expression of embryonic stem cells from the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse after treatment with the synthetic musk tonalide (AHTN). Among the 45,037 transcripts in the microarray, 2,879 genes were differentially expressed. According to the microarray analysis, the potential influence of AHTN on the development to embryo should be of concern, and the toxicological effects of it and related musk compounds should be studied further. PMID:23099888

  3. Tmem79/Matt is the matted mouse gene and is a predisposing gene for atopic dermatitis in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Sean P.; Goh, Christabelle S.M.; Brown, Sara J.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Porter, Rebecca M.; Cole, Christian; Campbell, Linda E.; Gierlinski, Marek; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Schneider, Georg; Balmain, Allan; Prescott, Alan R.; Weidinger, Stephan; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Kabesch, Michael; Gieger, Christian; Lee, Young-Ae; Tavendale, Roger; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Turner, Stephen W.; Madhok, Vishnu B.; Sullivan, Frank M.; Relton, Caroline; Burn, John; Meggitt, Simon; Smith, Catherine H.; Allen, Michael A.; Barker, Jonathan N.W. N.; Reynolds, Nick J.; Cordell, Heather J.; Irvine, Alan D.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Sandilands, Aileen; Fallon, Padraic G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a major inflammatory condition of the skin caused by inherited skin barrier deficiency, with mutations in the filaggrin gene predisposing to development of AD. Support for barrier deficiency initiating AD came from flaky tail mice, which have a frameshift mutation in Flg and also carry an unknown gene, matted, causing a matted hair phenotype. Objective We sought to identify the matted mutant gene in mice and further define whether mutations in the human gene were associated with AD. Methods A mouse genetics approach was used to separate the matted and Flg mutations to produce congenic single-mutant strains for genetic and immunologic analysis. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify the matted gene. Five independently recruited AD case collections were analyzed to define associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human gene and AD. Results The matted phenotype in flaky tail mice is due to a mutation in the Tmem79/Matt gene, with no expression of the encoded protein mattrin in the skin of mutant mice. Mattft mice spontaneously have dermatitis and atopy caused by a defective skin barrier, with mutant mice having systemic sensitization after cutaneous challenge with house dust mite allergens. Meta-analysis of 4,245 AD cases and 10,558 population-matched control subjects showed that a missense SNP, rs6694514, in the human MATT gene has a small but significant association with AD. Conclusion In mice mutations in Matt cause a defective skin barrier and spontaneous dermatitis and atopy. A common SNP in MATT has an association with AD in human subjects. PMID:24084074

  4. Mapping of the NEP receptor tyrosine kinase gene to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Sweetser, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) NEP, also called Ptk-3, is widely expressed, with high levels in proliferating neuroepithelia of mouse embryos. The recently described human discoidin domain receptor (DDR) has a predicted amino acid sequence 93% identical to that of murine NEP and may be its human homologue. We have mapped the gene encoding NEP in human and mouse by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a mouse cDNA probe. The NEP/Nep gene maps to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C, respectively. This places the NEP/Nep gene at, or near, the major histocompatibility (MHC) locus-HLA in human and H2 in mouse, respectively. Based on its pattern of expression during development, NEP and Nep represent candidate genes for several MHC-linked developmental abnormalities in human and mouse. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Developmental control of transcription of the CAT reporter gene by a truncated mouse alphafetoprotein gene regulatory region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ghebranious, N; Knoll, B J; Yavorkovsky, L; Ilic, Z; Papaconstantinou, J; Lozano, G; Sell, S

    1995-09-01

    A truncated mouse alphafetoprotein (AFP) gene promoter/enhancer region was tested for its ability to regulate the expression of the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene in the livers of transgenic mice. The AFP regulatory region lacked any AFP gene structural DNA, included one enhancer sequence together with the proximal promoter sequence, and an element believed to be responsible for the postnatal repression of AFP gene transcription. The neonatal livers of AFP/CAT transgenic mice showed a high level of CAT enzyme expression, which was dramatically reduced between 7 and 14 days after birth. The staining of liver sections with anti-CAT antibodies showed that this expression was limited to hepatocytes. In one lineage, reexpression of CAT in the adult liver could be achieved by restitutive proliferation of hepatocytes following partial hepatectomy or CCl4-induced necrosis; reexpression in young animals (3-4 weeks of age) was even greater. These studies show that a truncated AFP promoter/enhancer region functions in a tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific fashion, and may be used to control the expression of other genes in the livers of transgenic mice. PMID:8562043

  6. cDNA cloning and nucleotide sequence comparison of Chinese hamster metallothionein I and II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, B B; Walters, R A; Enger, M D; Hildebrand, C E; Griffith, J K

    1983-01-01

    Polyadenylated RNA was extracted from a cadmium resistant Chinese hamster (CHO) cell line, enriched for metal-induced, abundant RNA sequences and cloned as double-stranded cDNA in the plasmid pBR322. Two cDNA clones, pCHMT1 and pCHMT2, encoding two Chinese hamster isometallothioneins were identified, and the nucleotide sequence of each insert was determined. The two Chinese hamster metallothioneins show nucleotide sequence homologies of 80% in the protein coding region and approximately 35% in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Interestingly, an 8 nucleotide sequence (TGTAAATA) has been conserved in sequence and position in the 3' untranslated regions of each metallothionein mRNA sequenced thus far. Estimated nucleotide substitution rates derived from interspecies comparisons were used to calculate a metallothionein gene duplication time of 45 to 120 million years ago. PMID:6687636

  7. Mouse aggrecan, a large cartilage proteoglycan: protein sequence, gene structure and promoter sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, H; Gao, L; Sugiyama, S; Doege, K; Kimata, K; Yamada, Y

    1995-01-01

    Seven genomic clones for mouse aggrecan core protein have been isolated including 3 kb of 5'- and 7 kb of 3'-flanking sequences. All exon sequences and their intron boundary sequences in these clones were identified and mapped by DNA sequencing. The gene spans at least 61 kb and contains 18 exons. Exon 1 encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and exon 2 contains a translation start codon, methionine. The coding sequence is 6545 bp for a 2132-amino-acid protein with calculated M(r) = 259,131 including an 18-amino-acid signal peptide. There is a strong correlation between structural domains and exons. Notably, the chondroitin sulphate domain consisting of 1161 amino acids is encoded by a single exon of 3.6 kb. Although link protein has similar structural domains and subdomains, the sequence identity and the organization of exons encoding the subdomains B and B' of G1 and G2 domains revealed a strong similarity of mouse aggrecan to both human versican and rat neurocan. Primer extension analysis identified four transcription start sites which are close together. The promoter sequence showed high G/C content (65%) and contained several consensus binding motifs for transcription factors including Sp-1 and the glucocorticoid receptor. There are stretches of sequences similar to the promoter region of both the type-II collagen and link protein genes. These sequences may be important for cartilage gene expression. Images Figure 4 PMID:7772024

  8. Delimiting the Location of the Scrapie Prion Incubation Time Gene on Chromosome 2 of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, G. A.; Ebeling, C.; Torchia, M.; Westaway, D.; Prusiner, S. B.

    1993-01-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible neurodegenerative disease caused by unusual pathogens called prions. The interval between inoculation and illness for experimental mouse scrapie is dramatically influenced by an incubation time gene (Prn-i) that is linked to Prn-p, the structural gene for prion protein (PrP). Although prion proteins from mouse strains with short and long scrapie incubation times differ by two amino acids, mice with discordant disease phenotype and Prn-p genotype occur in segregating crosses, suggesting recombination between Prn-p and a distinct incubation time locus. In addition, expression of Prn-p(b) transgenes from long incubation time mice shortened, rather than prolonged, incubation time. In this study, mice carrying chromosomes with meiotic crossovers near Prn-p were analyzed for scrapie incubation time phenotype. The results indicated that Prn-i (should it exist) must lie within an interval 0.67 cM proximal and 0.22 cM distal to Prn-p. The results also suggest that the cumulative effects of other genes, rather than meiotic recombination, were responsible for the putative recombinants of earlier studies. However, the effect of Prn-p(b) transgene expression in abbreviating scrapie incubation time was mitigated when the transgenes were transferred to mice with an endogenous long incubation time allele. Thus, Prn-p(b) transgenes and Prn-i may modulate scrapie pathogenesis by different mechanisms. PMID:8462855

  9. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding the mouse peptide transporter PEPT2.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Aliaga, I; Boll, M; Daniel, H

    2000-09-24

    Here we describe the cDNA structure, genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter analysis of the mouse peptide transporter PEPT2. The PEPT2-cDNA is 3987 bp long and encodes a protein of 729 amino acids. The functional properties, analyzed by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, showed a typical PEPT2-phenotype with electrogenic, proton-coupled transport, high substrate affinity, and a broad specificity. Immunoblotting of renal brush-border membranes revealed an apparent molecular mass of PEPT2 of 100 kDa. The murine Pept2 gene was cloned from a 129/SvevTACfBr genomic library. It is 34 kb long and comprises 22 exons and 21 introns. By radiation mapping analysis the Pept2 gene was mapped on central mouse chromosome 16. Two putative transcription start sites lying 35 and 235 bp upstream from the translation start were identified. The Pept2 gene possesses a TATA-less promoter. Functional promoter analysis revealed the core promoter to be located between 432 and 286 bp upstream from the translation start. PMID:11027540

  10. Genetic mapping of the adenine nucleotide translocase-2 gene (Ant2) to the mouse proximal X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.W.; Salido, E.C.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1996-09-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases are mitochondrial membrane proteins encoded by a small dispersed multigene family. We have previously cloned cDNAs derived from the mouse adenine nucleotide translocase-1 and -2 genes (Ant1 and Ant2) and assigned to the loci to mouse chromosomes 8 and X, respectively. Here we describe the genomic organization of the Ant2 gene and its regional map position on the X chromosome, which was determined through linkage analysis using an interspecific backcross between Mus musculus and Mus spretus inbred strains. Ant2 cosegregates with DXMit49 and DXMit50 and lies distal to Agtr2 in the proximal region of the mouse X chromosome. This map assignment further defines a region of conserved synteny between human Xq22-q25 and the mouse proximal X chromosome. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Mapping of Heavy Chain Genes for Mouse Immunoglobulins M and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Ping; Tucker, Philip W.; Mushinski, J. Frederic; Blattner, Frederick R.

    1980-09-01

    A single DNA fragment containing both ? and ? immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been cloned from normal BALB/c mouse liver DNA with a new ? phage vector Charon 28. The physical distance between the membrane terminal exon of ? and the first domain of ? is 2466 base pairs, with ? on the 3' side of ? . A single transcript could contain a variable region and both ? and ? constant regions. The dual expression of immunoglobulins M and D on spleen B cells may be due to alternate splicing of this transcript.

  12. Eleven Densely Clustered Genes, Six of them Novel, in 176 kb of Mouse t-complex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kargul, George J.; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Shimada, Tokihiko; Grahovac, Marija J.; Lim, Meng K.; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Waeltz, Paul; Ma, Peter; Chen, Ellson; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of the mouse t-complex has started with a 176-kb, gene-rich BAC localized with six PCR-based markers in inversion 2/3 of the highly duplicated region. The sequence contains 11 genes recovered primarily as cDNAs from early embryonic collections, including Igfals (previously placed on chromosome 17), Nubp2 (a fully characterized gene), Jsap1 (a JNK-binding protein), Rsp29 (the mouse homologue of the rat gene), Ndk3 (a nucleoside diphosphate kinase), and six additional putative genes of unknown function. With 50% GC content, 75% of the DNA transcribed, and one gene/16.0 kb (on average), the region may qualify as one of the most gene-dense segments in the mouse genome and provides candidates for dosage-sensitive phenotypes and mouse embryonic lethals mapped to the vicinity. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AF220294.] PMID:10899141

  13. Exposure to ionizing radiation induced persistent gene expression changes in mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast tissue is among the most sensitive tissues to the carcinogenic actions of ionizing radiation and epidemiological studies have linked radiation exposure to breast cancer. Currently, molecular understanding of radiation carcinogenesis in mammary gland is hindered due to the scarcity of in vivo long-term follow up data. We undertook this study to delineate radiation-induced persistent alterations in gene expression in mouse mammary glands 2-month after radiation exposure. Methods Six to eight week old female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy of whole body ? radiation and mammary glands were surgically removed 2-month after radiation. RNA was isolated and microarray hybridization performed for gene expression analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used for biological interpretation of microarray data. Real time quantitative PCR was performed on selected genes to confirm the microarray data. Results Compared to untreated controls, the mRNA levels of a total of 737 genes were significantly (p<0.05) perturbed above 2-fold of control. More genes (493 genes; 67%) were upregulated than the number of downregulated genes (244 genes; 33%). Functional analysis of the upregulated genes mapped to cell proliferation and cancer related canonical pathways such as ‘ERK/MAPK signaling’, ‘CDK5 signaling’, and ‘14-3-3-mediated signaling’. We also observed upregulation of breast cancer related canonical pathways such as ‘breast cancer regulation by Stathmin1’, and ‘HER-2 signaling in breast cancer’ in IPA. Interestingly, the downregulated genes mapped to fewer canonical pathways involved in cell proliferation. We also observed that a number of genes with tumor suppressor function (GPRC5A, ELF1, NAB2, Sema4D, ACPP, MAP2, RUNX1) persistently remained downregulated in response to radiation exposure. Results from qRT-PCR on five selected differentially expressed genes confirmed microarray data. The PCR data on PPP4c, ELF1, MAPK12, PLCG1, and E2F6 showed similar trend in up and downregulation as has been observed with the microarray. Conclusions Exposure to a clinically relevant radiation dose led to long-term activation of mammary gland genes involved in proliferative and metabolic pathways, which are known to have roles in carcinogenesis. When considered along with downregulation of a number of tumor suppressor genes, our study has implications for breast cancer initiation and progression after therapeutic radiation exposure. PMID:23216862

  14. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Identification and characterization of human FOXN6, mouse Foxn6, and rat Foxn6 genes in silico.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2004-07-01

    Forkhead-box (FOX) transcription factors are implicated in carcinogenesis through gene amplification, retroviral integration, or chromosomal translocation. FOXN1, FOXN2 (HTLF), FOXN3 (CHES1), FOXN4 and FOXN5 (FOXR1) constitute the FOXN family. Here, we identified and characterized human FOXN6 (FOXR2) and rodent Foxn6 (Foxr2) orthologs by using bioinformatics. Human FOXN6 gene was identified within human genome sequence RP11-167P23 (AL159987.19), mouse Foxn6 gene within mouse genome sequence RP23-180D16 (AL672293.14), and rat Foxn6 gene within rat genome sequence CH230-264B14 (AC106980.5). FOXN6, RRAGB (RAGB), and KLF8 genes were clustered at human chromosome Xp11.21. Foxn6, Rragb, and Klf8 genes were also clustered at mouse chromosome XF3 as well as at rat chromosome Xq14. Human FOXN6 mRNA was expressed in breast cancer cell line and primary breast cancer. Mouse Foxn6 mRNA was expressed in E9.5 embryo. Human FOXN6 (286 aa) showed 57.7% total-amino-acid identity with human FOXN5, 53.8% total-amino-acid identity with mouse Foxn6 (277 aa), and 52.4% total-amino-acid identity with rat Foxn6 (277 aa). Codon 167-248 of human FOXN6 was the Forkhead domain. FN56 domain (codon 1-69 of FOXN6) was identified as a novel domain conserved among FOXN6 and FOXN5 orthologs. Mammalian FOXN6 orthologs were found consisting of FN56 and FOX domains. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that FOXN family proteins are classified into three subfamilies: i) FOXN6 and FOXN5 orthologs; ii) FOXN1 and FOXN4 orthologs; iii) FOXN2 and FOXN3 orthologs. This is the first report on human FOXN6, mouse Foxn6, and rat Foxn6 genes. PMID:15202009

  16. Ducky Mouse Phenotype of Epilepsy and Ataxia Is Associated with Mutations in the Cacna2d2 Gene and Decreased Calcium Channel

    E-print Network

    Dolphin, Annette C.

    Ducky Mouse Phenotype of Epilepsy and Ataxia Is Associated with Mutations in the Cacna2d2 Gene, Virginia 22908-0735 The mouse mutant ducky, a model for absence epilepsy, is characterized by spike of ataxia and epilepsy in the mouse. Key words: epilepsy; ataxia; calcium channel; subunit; Pur- kinje cell

  17. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-01

    We report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52?THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10?THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. We propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression. PMID:23378916

  18. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-01

    We report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. We propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.

  19. Changes in liver-specific compared to common gene transcription during primary culture of mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, D F; Darnell, J E

    1983-01-01

    Liver-specific mRNA sequences were examined in primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes. After cell disaggregation by collagenase treatment and for at least 24 h in culture, little change in liver-specific mRNA concentrations was noted. Gradually over a period of 140 h, liver-specific mRNAs declined. In contrast, transcriptional assays in which liver cell nuclei were used to produce 32P-labeled nuclear RNA showed that liver-specific gene transcription was greatly diminished within 24 h, while polymerase II transcription of "common" genes and transcription of tRNA and rRNA did not decline. Thus, a prompt differential transcriptional effect seems to underlie the gradual loss of tissue specificity of the primary cultures. Images PMID:6633533

  20. Global Characterization of Differential Gene Expression Profiles in Mouse V?1+ and V?4+ ?? T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Zhang, Siya; Cai, Menghua; Kang, Ning; Hu, Yu; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral ?? T cells in mice are classified into two major subpopulations, V?1+ and V?4+, based on the composition of T cell receptors. However, their intrinsic differences remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed gene expression profiles of the two subsets using Illumina HiSeq 2000 Sequencer. We identified 1995 transcripts related to the activation of V?1+ ?? T cells, and 2158 transcripts related to the activation of V?4+ ?? T cells. We identified 24 transcripts differentially expressed between the two subsets in resting condition, and 20 after PMA/Ionomycin treatment. We found that both cell types maintained phenotypes producing IFN-?, TNF-?, TGF-? and IL-10. However, V?1+ ?? T cells produced more Th2 type cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-5, while V?4+ ?? T cells preferentially produced IL-17. Our study provides a comprehensive gene expression profile of mouse peripheral V?1+ and V?4+ ?? T cells that describes the inherent differences between them. PMID:25405356

  1. A Mutation in the Mouse Ttc26 Gene Leads to Impaired Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Swiderski, Ruth E.; Nakano, Yoko; Mullins, Robert F.; Seo, Seongjin; Bánfi, Botond

    2014-01-01

    The phenotype of the spontaneous mutant mouse hop-sterile (hop) is characterized by a hopping gait, polydactyly, hydrocephalus, and male sterility. Previous analyses of the hop mouse revealed a deficiency of inner dynein arms in motile cilia and a lack of sperm flagella, potentially accounting for the hydrocephalus and male sterility. The etiology of the other phenotypes and the location of the hop mutation remained unexplored. Here we show that the hop mutation is located in the Ttc26 gene and impairs Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Expression analysis showed that this mutation led to dramatically reduced levels of the Ttc26 protein, and protein-protein interaction assays demonstrated that wild-type Ttc26 binds directly to the Ift46 subunit of Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex B. Although IFT is required for ciliogenesis, the Ttc26 defect did not result in a decrease in the number or length of primary cilia. Nevertheless, Hh signaling was reduced in the hop mouse, as revealed by impaired activation of Gli transcription factors in embryonic fibroblasts and abnormal patterning of the neural tube. Unlike the previously characterized mutations that affect IFT complex B, hop did not interfere with Hh-induced accumulation of Gli at the tip of the primary cilium, but rather with the subsequent dissociation of Gli from its negative regulator, Sufu. Our analysis of the hop mouse line provides novel insights into Hh signaling, demonstrating that Ttc26 is necessary for efficient coupling between the accumulation of Gli at the ciliary tip and its dissociation from Sufu. PMID:25340710

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Pacurari, M.; Qian, Y.; Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M.; Wan, Y.; Luo, D.; Ding, M.; Castranova, V.; Guo, N.L.

    2011-08-15

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for the medical surveillance of workers.

  3. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2p25 and mouse chromosome 12C

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Yuichi; Onogi, Satoshi; Fujita, Teizo

    1995-02-10

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) plays a central role in thyroid gland function. The enzyme catalyzes two important reactions of thyroid hormone synthesis, i.e., the iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin and phenoxy-ester formation between pairs of iodinated tyrosines to generate the thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Previously, we isolated the cDNAs encoding human and mouse TPOs and assigned the human TPO gene to the short arm of chromosome 2 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. By a similar analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids, the human TPO gene was mapped to 2pter-p12. The mouse TPO gene was localized to chromosome 12 using a rat TPO cDNA as a probe to hybridize with mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrids. In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm the localization of human and mouse TPO genes to human chromosome 2 and mouse chromosome 12 and to assign them regionally to 2p25 and 12C, respectively. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Robust activation of the human but not mouse telomerase gene during the induction of pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Renjith; Jia, Wenwen; Sharma, Arati; Zhao, Yuanjun; Clarke, Loren E.; Cheng, Xiang; Wang, Huayan; Salli, Ugur; Vrana, Kent E.; Robertson, Gavin P.; Zhu, Jiyue; Wang, Shuwen

    2010-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) express telomerase and have unlimited proliferative potential. To study telomerase activation during reprogramming, 3 classes of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like clones were isolated from mouse fibroblasts containing a transgenic hTERT reporter. Class I expressed few pluripotency markers, whereas class II contained many, but not Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. Neither class of cells differentiated efficiently. Class III cells, the fully reprogrammed induced PSCs (iPSCs), expressed all pluripotency markers, formed teratomas indistinguishable from those of mESCs, and underwent efficient osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Interestingly, whereas the endogenous mTERT gene expression was only moderately increased during reprogramming, the hTERT promoter was strongly activated in class II cells and was further elevated in class III cells. Treatment of class II cells with chemical inhibitors of MEKs and glycogen synthase kinase 3 resulted in their further reprogramming into class III cells, accompanied by a strong activation of hTERT promoter. In reprogrammed human cells, the endogenous telomerase level, although variable among different clones, was dramatically elevated. Only in cells with the highest telomerase were telomeres restored to the lengths in hESCs. Our data, for the first time, demonstrated that the hTERT promoter was strongly activated in discrete steps, revealing a critical difference in human and mouse cell reprogramming. Because telomere elongation is crucial for self-renewal of hPSCs and replicative aging of their differentiated progeny, these findings have important implications in the generation and applications of iPSCs.—Mathew, R., Jia, W., Sharma, A., Zhao, Y., Clarke, L. E., Cheng, X., Wang, H., Salli, U., Vrana, K. E., Robertson, G. P., Zhu, J., Wang, S. Robust activation of the human but not mouse telomerase gene during the induction of pluripotency. PMID:20354136

  5. Hypertrophic Gene Expression Induced by Chronic Stretch of Excised Mouse Heart Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, Anna M.; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Swanson, Eric; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Omens, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Altered mechanical stress and strain in cardiac myocytes induce modifications in gene expression that affects cardiac remodeling and myocyte contractile function. To study the mechanisms of mechanotransduction in cardiomyocytes, probing alterations in mechanics and gene expression has been an effective strategy. However, previous studies are self-limited due to the general use of isolated neonatal rodent myocytes or intact animals. The main goal of this study was to develop a novel tissue culture chamber system for mouse myocardium that facilitates loading of cardiac tissue, while measuring tissue stress and deformation within a physiological environment. Intact mouse right ventricular papillary muscles were cultured in controlled conditions with superfusate at 95% O2/ 5% CO2, and 34°C, such that cell to extracellular matrix adhesions as well as cell to cell adhesions were undisturbed and both passive and active mechanical properties were maintained without significant changes. The system was able to measure the induction of hypertrophic markers (BNP, ANP) in tissue after 2 hrs and 5 hrs of stretch. ANP induction was highly correlated with the diastolic load of the muscle but not with developed systolic load. Load induced ANP expression was blunted in muscles from muscle-LIM protein knockout mice, in which defective mechanotransduction pathways have been predicted. PMID:19670825

  6. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian; Hou, Lichao; Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  7. Gene Expression Data to Mouse Atlas Registration Using a Nonlinear Elasticity Smoother and Landmark Points Constraints.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tungyou; Guyader, Carole Le; Dinov, Ivo; Thompson, Paul; Toga, Arthur; Vese, Luminita

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a numerical algorithm for image registration using energy minimization and nonlinear elasticity regularization. Application to the registration of gene expression data to a neuroanatomical mouse atlas in two dimensions is shown. We apply a nonlinear elasticity regularization to allow larger and smoother deformations, and further enforce optimality constraints on the landmark points distance for better feature matching. To overcome the difficulty of minimizing the nonlinear elasticity functional due to the nonlinearity in the derivatives of the displacement vector field, we introduce a matrix variable to approximate the Jacobian matrix and solve for the simplified Euler-Lagrange equations. By comparison with image registration using linear regularization, experimental results show that the proposed nonlinear elasticity model also needs fewer numerical corrections such as regridding steps for binary image registration, it renders better ground truth, and produces larger mutual information; most importantly, the landmark points distance and L (2) dissimilarity measure between the gene expression data and corresponding mouse atlas are smaller compared with the registration model with biharmonic regularization. PMID:24273381

  8. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated. PMID:20649983

  9. Anti-metallothionein IgG and levels of metallothionein in autistic families.

    PubMed

    Russo, Anthony F

    2008-02-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of small proteins containing 61-68 amino acids with an unusually high concentration of cysteine. MT-1, the most functional and active MT in humans, has the ability to react with and enhance the detoxification of a number of metals including zinc, mercury, copper and cadmium. MT dysfunction may result, then, in many of the aetiological syndromes observed in autistic children, such as the leaky gut. It has been proposed that allergic autoimmune reactions occurring after exposure to heavy metals, may contribute to some symptoms associated with autism. Therefore abnormalities in MT concentration and/or structure, as well as the presence of anti-MT antibodies, may be associated with autism. We used direct ELISAs to quantitate the concentration of serum anti-metallothionein IgG in 66 individuals (parents and children) from 14 families with autistic children, as well as 11 controls from families with no history of autism. We measured the concentration of serum metallothionein in 39 of the above family members from 8 families. Our results indicate that a significantly high number (23 of 66) of autistic family members had high levels of anti-metallothionein IgG, when compared to controls (1 ) and the production of these antibodies correlated with levels of metallothionein, suggesting that the production of these antibodies is inherited. However, the presence of these antibodies does not correlate with autism, types of autism, including regression, or demographics such as allergies, respiratory problems or GI disease. This suggests that the presence of anti-metallothionein antibodies is not causative to autism and may be the result of other immunological pathology seen in many autistics. PMID:18365350

  10. Differential transcriptome analysis of diabetes-resistant and -sensitive mouse islets reveals significant overlap with human diabetes susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Kluth, Oliver; Matzke, Daniela; Schulze, Gunnar; Schwenk, Robert W; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes in humans and in obese mice is polygenic. In recent genome-wide association studies, genetic markers explaining a small portion of the genetic contribution to the disease were discovered. However, functional evidence linking these genes with the pathogenesis of diabetes is scarce. We performed RNA sequencing-based transcriptomics of islets from two obese mouse strains, a diabetes-susceptible (NZO) and a diabetes-resistant (B6-ob/ob) mouse, after a short glucose challenge and compared these results with human data. Alignment of 2,328 differentially expressed genes to 106 human diabetes candidate genes revealed an overlap of 20 genes, including TCF7L2, IGFBP2, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, GRB10, and PRC1. The data provide a functional validation of human diabetes candidate genes, including those involved in regulating islet cell recovery and proliferation, and identify additional candidates that could be involved in human ?-cell failure. PMID:25053586

  11. Anx7 is required for nutritional control of gene expression in mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meera; Eidelman, Ofer; Leighton, Ximena; Glasman, Mirta; Goping, Gertrude; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression in islets of Langerhans is profoundly sensitive to glucose and other nutrients. Islets of Langerhans in the Anx7(+/-) knockout mouse exhibit a profound reduction in ITPR3 protein expression, defective intracellular calcium signaling, and defective insulin secretion. Additional data presented here also show that mRNA for ITPR3 is virtually undetectable in isolated Anx7(+/-) islets. IP3Receptor type 3 (ITPR3) expression in islets of Langerhans is closely regulated by secretory stimuli, and it has been suggested that the level of the ITPR3 expression controls the ability of the islets to respond to nutritional signals. We report that although control islets respond to glucose in vitro by a transient increment in ITPR3 mRNA, the islets from the Anx7(+/-) mouse remain low. We therefore hypothesized that the Anx7/IP3 Receptor(3)/Ca(2+) signaling pathway plays a role in beta cell responses to glucose, and that in the absence of the Anx7/ITPR3 signaling system, the islets would be unable to discriminate between fed or fasted states in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we subjected Anx7(+/-) and control mice to either food and water ad libidum or to an overnight fast with access to water only. We then isolated the respective islets and compared nutrient-dependent changes in global gene expression under the four conditions using genome-based microarray technology. RESULTS: Anx7 protein expression in these islets is only about 50% of control levels in normal littermate controls, and IPTR3 message and protein are virtually zero. cDNA microarray analyses show that in control animals gene expression is significantly affected by the fasting state. Many of the affected genes have historical relevance to development and differentiation of islets. These include preproglucagon, APOJ, cadherin2, phosphoglucoisomerase, oncostatin M, PAX6, HGF, and cytokeratin 18. However, there are also many other nutritionally sensitive genes in control islets that are principally associated with cell division and DNA repair. The latter genes have not specifically been associated with islet physiology in the past. By contrast, Anx7(+/-) mouse islets exhibit a greatly reduced ability to discriminate genomically between fed and fasted states for all classes of identified genes. Many of the validated genes are specific to islets in comparison to liver tissue examined. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of islets from Anx7 heterozygous mice and littermate controls revealed remarkable down-regulation in PTEN, Glut-2, PDX-1, IGF-1, and Neuro D1 expression, but not in liver. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that reduced gene dosage in the Anx7(+/-) islet, with concomitant loss of ITPR3 expression and consequent defects in Ca(2+) signaling, may substantially contribute to the mechanism of the loss of genomic discrimination, in vivo, between the fed and fasted states. We believe that the requirement for complete Anx7 gene dosage and IPTR3 expression in islets of Langerhans will prove to be of fundamental importance for understanding the mechanism of nutritional sensing in health and disease. PMID:12606813

  12. A revision of the human XIST gene organization and structural comparison with mouse Xist.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y K; Ontiveros, S D; Strauss, W M

    2000-03-01

    The XIST gene plays an essential role in X Chromosome (Chr) inactivation during the early development of female humans. It is believed that the XIST gene, not encoding a protein, functions as an RNA. The XIST cDNA is unusually long, as its full length is reported to be 16.5 kilobase pairs (kb). Here, comparison of sequences from the genomic interval downstream to the 3' end of the human XIST gene against the human EST database brought to light a number of human EST sequences that are mapped to the region. Furthermore, PCR amplification of human cDNA libraries and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) demonstrate that the human XIST gene has additional 2.8 kb downstream sequences which have not been documented as a part of the gene. These data show that the full-length XIST cDNA is, in fact, 19.3 kb, not 16.5 kb as previously reported. The newly defined region contains an intron that may be alternatively spliced and seven polyadenylation signal sequences. Sequences in the newly defined region show overall sequence similarity with the 3' terminal region of mouse Xist, and three subregions exhibit quite high sequence conservation. Interestingly, the new intron spans the first two sub-regions that are absent in one of the two isoforms of mouse Xist. Taken together, we revise the structure of human XIST cDNA and compare cDNA structures between human and mouse XIST/Xist. al. 1992). This gene, called XIST/Xist (X inactive specific transcript), shows several interesting features. First, both human and mouse XIST/Xist cDNA are unusually long, reportedly 16.5 kb and 17.8 kb, respectively (Brown et al. 1992; Hong et al. 1999). Second, the transcript does not seem to encode a protein, on the basis of the lack of a significant open reading frame, absence of the Xist RNA from polysomes, and localization of the transcript in the nucleus (Brockdorff et al. 1992; Brown et al. 1992). Third, the XIST/Xist RNA physically associates with, or 'coats,' the inactive X Chr (Brown et al. 1992; Clemson et al. 1996). Fourth, XIST/Xist transcripts can be observed as early as the four-cell stage, and upon the initiation of X-inactivation, the steady-state level of the transcript rises dramatically, apparently by stabilization of the RNA (Panning et al. 1997; Sheardown et al. 1997). Although the function of XIST/Xist is not known, deletion of the gene leads to failure of X-inactivation, and knock-out mice die around the gastrulation stage (Marahrens et al. 1997; Penny et al. 1996). In this report, we revise the structure of the human XIST cDNA and discuss structural features of the newly defined region. PMID:10723727

  13. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the ?-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of ?-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  14. Gene expression profiling in mouse lung following polymeric hexamethylene diisocyanate exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-T.; Ylostalo, Joni; Friedman, Mitchell; Hoyle, Gary W. . E-mail: ghoyle@tulane.edu

    2005-05-15

    Isocyanates are a common cause of occupational lung disease. Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), a component of polyurethane spray paints, can induce respiratory symptoms, inflammation, lung function impairment, and isocyanate asthma. The predominant form of HDI in polyurethane paints is a nonvolatile polyisocyanate known as HDI biuret trimer (HDI-BT). Exposure of mice to aerosolized HDI-BT results in pathological effects, including pulmonary edema, lung inflammation, cellular proliferation, and fibrotic lesions, which occur with distinct time courses following exposure. To identify genes that mediate lung pathology in the distinct temporal phases after exposure, gene expression profiles in HDI-BT-exposed C57BL/6J mouse lungs were analyzed. RNase protection assay (RPA) of genes involved in apoptosis, cell survival, and inflammation revealed increased expression of I{kappa}B{alpha}, Fas, Bcl-X{sub L}, TNF{alpha}, KC, MIP-2, IL-6, and GM-CSF following HDI-BT exposure. Microarray analysis of approximately 10 000 genes was performed on lung RNA collected from mice 6, 18, and 90 h after HDI-BT exposure and from unexposed mice. Classes of genes whose expression was increased 6 h after exposure included those involved in stress responses (particularly oxidative stress and thiol redox balance), growth arrest, apoptosis, signal transduction, and inflammation. Types of genes whose expression was increased at 18 h included proteinases, anti-proteinases, cytoskeletal molecules, and inflammatory mediators. Transcripts increased at 90 h included extracellular matrix components, transcription factors, inflammatory mediators, and cell cycle regulators. This characterization of the gene expression profile in lungs exposed to HDI-BT will provide a basis for investigating injury and repair pathways that are operative during isocyanate-induced lung disease.

  15. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells1. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas system in vivo in wild-type mice. We have used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs)2–4 to the liver and directly target the tumor suppressor genes Pten5 and p536, alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology7, 8. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumors that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumor tissue revealed insertion or deletion (indel) mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumors. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harboring sgRNAs targeting the ?-Catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of ?-Catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  16. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  17. Structure of the mouse Saa4 gene and its linkage to the serum amyloid A gene family

    SciTech Connect

    De Beer, M.C.; Goodson, M.L.; Kindy, M.S.

    1996-05-15

    The serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are a polymorphic family of apolipoproteins associated with high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Three distinct subfamilies have been identified: (i) a cytokine-induced acute phase subfamily that is hepatically produced and can become the major apolipoprotein on HDL (SAA1, SAA2); (ii) a peripherally produced acute phase SAA3 that is only a monor HDL apolipoprotein; and (iii) a constitutive subfamily (SAA4) that is a minor normal HDL apolipoprotein comprising more than 90% of the SAA during homeostasis. Here we define the structure of the Saa4 gene. Similar to other Saa family members, it has four exons and three introns. It is 4588 bp long from the transcription start site to the end of the 3{prime}-untranslated region and is approximately 20% larger than other Saa genes. We have located Saa4 11 kb upstream from Saa3 and 5 kb downstream from Saa1, with the pseudogene approximately 1 kb from the 5{prime} end of Saa4. Saa4 has the same orientation as most other Saa family members, with only Saa2 having an opposing orientation. These data promote our understanding of the evolution of the Saa family. They enhance our ability to develop the mouse as a transgenic and gene deletion model to advance the understanding of the function of these apolipoproteins. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Dzip3 regulates developmental genes in mouse embryonic stem cells by reorganizing 3D chromatin conformation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daishi; Aihara, Hitoshi; Sato, Tatsuharu; Mizusaki, Hirofumi; Doiguchi, Masamichi; Higashi, Miki; Imamura, Yuko; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Miyanishi, Takayuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Okuda, Akihiko; Nakagawa, Takeya; Ito, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    In mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, ubiquitylation of histone H2A lysine 119 represses a large number of developmental genes and maintains mES cell pluripotency. It has been suggested that a number of H2A ubiquitin ligases as well as deubiquitylases and related peptide fragments contribute to a delicate balance between self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation in mES cells. Here, we tested whether known H2A ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitylases are involved in mES cell regulation and discovered that Dzip3, the E3 ligase of H2AK119, represses differentiation-inducible genes, as does Ring1B. The two sets of target genes partially overlapped but had different spectra. We found that Dzip3 represses gene expression by orchestrating changes in 3D organization, in addition to regulating ubiquitylation of H2A. Our results shed light on the epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional regulation, which depends on 3D chromatin reorganization to regulate mES cell differentiation. PMID:26568260

  19. Conservative Intrachromosomal Recombination between Inverted Repeats in Mouse Cells: Association between Reciprocal Exchange and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Bollag, R. J.; Liskay, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recombination in mammalian cells is thought to involve both reciprocal and nonreciprocal modes of exchange, although rigorous proof is lacking due to the inability to recover all products of an exchange. To investigate further the relationship between these modes of exchange, we have analyzed intrachromosomal recombination between duplicated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV tk) mutant alleles arranged as inverted repeats in cultured mouse L cells. In crosses between inverted repeats, a single intrachromatid reciprocal exchange leads to inversion of the sequence between the crossover sites and recovery of both genes involved in the event. The majority of recombinant products do not display such inversion and are thus consistent with a nonreciprocal mode of recombination (gene conversion). The remaining products display the sequence inversion predicted for intrachromatid reciprocal exchange. In light of the fact that intrachromatid exchanges occur, the rarity of intrachromatid double reciprocal exchanges strengthens the interpretation that the majority of events in this and previous investigations involve gene conversion. Furthermore, in accord with prediction, one-third of the reciprocal recombinants (inversions) display associated gene conversion. This association suggests that reciprocal and nonreciprocal modes of exchange are mechanistically related in mammalian cells. Finally, the occurrence of inversion recombinants suggests that intrachromosomal recombination can be a conservative (nondestructive) process. PMID:3396860

  20. Efficient gene delivery to photoreceptors using AAV2/rh10 and rescue of the Rho–/– mouse

    PubMed Central

    Palfi, Arpad; Chadderton, Naomi; O’Reilly, Mary; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bennett, Jean; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Farrar, Jane

    2015-01-01

    As gene therapies for various forms of retinal degeneration progress toward human clinical trial, it will be essential to have a repertoire of safe and efficient vectors for gene delivery to the target cells. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2/2 has been shown to be well tolerated in the human retina and has provided efficacy in human patients for some inherited retinal degenerations. In this study, the AAV2/8 and AAV2/rh10 serotypes have been compared as a means of gene delivery to mammalian photoreceptor cells using a photoreceptor specific promoter for transgene expression. Both AAV2/8 and AAV2/rh10 provided rescue of the retinal degeneration present in the rhodopsin knockout mouse, with similar levels of benefit as evaluated by molecular, histological, and functional readouts. Transgene expression levels were significantly higher (fivefold) 1 week postsubretinal injection when employing AAV2/8 for rhodopsin gene delivery compared to AAV2/rh10, and were indistinguishable by 6 weeks postadministration of vector. This study reports the use of the AAV2/rh10 serotype to provide rescue in a degenerating retina and provides a comparative evaluation of AAV2/rh10 with respect to AAV2/8, a serotype regarded as providing efficient delivery to photoreceptors. PMID:26029727

  1. Alternative splicing of the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene in human and mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lin; Sterner, C.; Maheshwar, M.M.

    1995-06-10

    The recently isolated gene for tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) encodes a 5.5.kb transcript that is widely expressed. The TSC2 gene product, named tuberin, is a 1784-amino-acid protein that shows a small stretch of homology to the GTPase activating protein rap1GAP. We have detected a novel variant of the TSC2 mRNA lacking 129 nucleotides, predicting an in-frame deletion of 43 amino acids spanning codons 946-988 of tuberin. This 129-bp deletion precisely corresponds to exon 25 of the TSC2 gene suggesting that alternative splicing leads to production of two forms of transcripts designated isoforms 1 and 2. Further molecular analysis revealed a third isoform exhibiting a deletion of 44 amino acids spanning codons 946-989 of tuberin. Amino acid 989 is a Ser residue encoded by the first codon of exon 26. The two isoforms also exist in newborn and adult mouse tissues, reinforcing the potential functional importance of these alternatively spliced products. These alternative isoforms should have implications for efforts aimed at identifying mutations in TSC patients. The distinct polypeptides encoded by the TSC2 gene may have different targets as well as functions involved in the regulation of cell growth. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Human balanced translocation and mouse gene inactivation implicate Basonuclin 2 in distal urethral development

    PubMed Central

    Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Ramos, Purita; Baker, Linda A; Cost, Nicholas; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Elder, Frederick F; Bleyl, Steven B; Bowles, Neil E; Arrington, Cammon B; Delhomme, Brigitte; Vanhoutteghem, Amandine; Djian, Philippe; Zinn, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    We studied a man with distal hypospadias, partial anomalous pulmonary venous return, mild limb-length inequality and a balanced translocation involving chromosomes 9 and 13. To gain insight into the etiology of his birth defects, we mapped the translocation breakpoints by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), using chromosome 9- and 13-specific tiling arrays to analyze genetic material from a spontaneously aborted fetus with unbalanced segregation of the translocation. The chromosome 13 breakpoint was ?400?kb away from the nearest gene, but the chromosome 9 breakpoint fell within an intron of Basonuclin 2 (BNC2), a gene that encodes an evolutionarily conserved nuclear zinc-finger protein. The BNC2/Bnc2 gene is abundantly expressed in developing mouse and human periurethral tissues. In all, 6 of 48 unrelated subjects with distal hypospadias had nine novel nonsynonymous substitutions in BNC2, five of which were computationally predicted to be deleterious. In comparison, two of 23 controls with normal penile urethra morphology, each had a novel nonsynonymous substitution in BNC2, one of which was predicted to be deleterious. Bnc2?/? mice of both sexes displayed a high frequency of distal urethral defects; heterozygotes showed similar defects with reduced penetrance. The association of BNC2 disruption with distal urethral defects and the gene's expression pattern indicate that it functions in urethral development. PMID:21368915

  3. Human balanced translocation and mouse gene inactivation implicate Basonuclin 2 in distal urethral development.

    PubMed

    Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Ramos, Purita; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu; Cost, Nicholas; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Elder, Frederick F; Bleyl, Steven B; Bowles, Neil E; Arrington, Cammon B; Delhomme, Brigitte; Vanhoutteghem, Amandine; Djian, Philippe; Zinn, Andrew R

    2011-05-01

    We studied a man with distal hypospadias, partial anomalous pulmonary venous return, mild limb-length inequality and a balanced translocation involving chromosomes 9 and 13. To gain insight into the etiology of his birth defects, we mapped the translocation breakpoints by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), using chromosome 9- and 13-specific tiling arrays to analyze genetic material from a spontaneously aborted fetus with unbalanced segregation of the translocation. The chromosome 13 breakpoint was ?400 ?kb away from the nearest gene, but the chromosome 9 breakpoint fell within an intron of Basonuclin 2 (BNC2), a gene that encodes an evolutionarily conserved nuclear zinc-finger protein. The BNC2/Bnc2 gene is abundantly expressed in developing mouse and human periurethral tissues. In all, 6 of 48 unrelated subjects with distal hypospadias had nine novel nonsynonymous substitutions in BNC2, five of which were computationally predicted to be deleterious. In comparison, two of 23 controls with normal penile urethra morphology, each had a novel nonsynonymous substitution in BNC2, one of which was predicted to be deleterious. Bnc2(-/-) mice of both sexes displayed a high frequency of distal urethral defects; heterozygotes showed similar defects with reduced penetrance. The association of BNC2 disruption with distal urethral defects and the gene's expression pattern indicate that it functions in urethral development. PMID:21368915

  4. Manipulating gene expression and signaling activity in cultured mouse limb bud cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Jordan P.; Pursell, Taylor A.; Rabinowitz, Adam H.; Vokes, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The vertebrate limb bud is a well-established system for studying the mechanisms driving growth and patterning of an embryonic tissue. However, approaches for manipulating gene expression are currently limited to time-consuming methods. Culturing primary limb bud cells could potentially be used as a quicker assay. However, limb cells in culture quickly differentiate into cartilage under normal conditions, and approaches delivering DNA and siRNA into primary limb cells in culture are limited. These technical limitations have restricted the utility of limb buds for investigating problems that require higher-throughput approaches. Results In this report we describe adaptations to a method for culturing primary limb bud cells in a pre-chondrogenic state, and generate a population of mouse primary limb cells that are responsive to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Hh-stimulated cells upregulate Hh target genes as well as an exogenous Hh-responsive reporter. We then describe a method for highly efficient delivery of plasmids and siRNAs into cultured primary limb bud cells in a 96-well format. Conclusion Cultures of primary limb bud cells are amenable to gene manipulation under conditions that maintain the limb cells in a Hh-responsive, undifferentiated state. This approach provides a medium-throughput system to manipulate gene expression, and test DNA regulatory elements. PMID:24633820

  5. Recent Progress in Mouse Models for Tumor Suppressor Genes and its Implications in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.; Taneja, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) lead to cancer. In most human cancers, these mutations occur in somatic tissues. However, hereditary forms of cancer exist for which individuals are heterozygous for a germline mutation in a TSG locus at birth. The second allele is frequently inactivated by gene deletion, point mutation, or promoter methylation in classical TSGs that meet Knudson’s two-hit hypothesis. Conversely, the second allele remains as wild-type, even in tumors in which the gene is haplo-insufficient for tumor suppression. This article highlights the importance of PTEN, APC, and other tumor suppressors for counteracting aberrant PI3K, ?-catenin, and other oncogenic signaling pathways. We discuss the use of gene-engineered mouse models (GEMM) of human cancer focusing on Pten and Apc knockout mice that recapitulate key genetic events involved in initiation and progression of human neoplasia. Finally, the therapeutic potential of targeting these tumor suppressor and oncogene signaling networks is discussed. PMID:23843721

  6. Structure of the mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein gene: implications for the evolution of the intermediate filament multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Balcarek, J M; Cowan, N J

    1985-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of the gene encoding mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the intermediate filament (IF) protein specific to astrocytes. The 9.8 kb gene includes nine exons separated by introns ranging in size from 0.2 to 2.5 kb. A comparison of the organization of the GFAP gene with that of genes encoding other IF proteins reveals that the structure of IF genes is highly conserved in spite of considerable divergence at the amino acid level. Thus, most of the evolutionary events leading to the placement of introns in IF genes must have occurred prior to the duplication and subsequent divergence of IF genes from a presumptive common ancestral sequence. The conserved gene organization is unrelated to structural features of IF proteins. A curious feature of the GFAP gene is the large number of repeated sequences found in the introns. Six tracts of reiterated di- or trinucleotides are present, plus tandem repeats of two different novel sequences. One repeat is unique to the GFAP gene; the other occurs elsewhere in the mouse genome, although at relatively low frequency. Images PMID:2994002

  7. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay for Tissue-specific Genes using Early-stage Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ok Hyun; Rivera-Pérez, Jaime A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a powerful tool to identify protein:chromatin interactions that occur in the context of living cells 1-3. This technique has been widely exploited in tissue culture cells, and to a lesser extent, in primary tissue. The application of ChIP to rodent embryonic tissue, especially at early times of development, is complicated by the limited amount of tissue and the heterogeneity of cell and tissue types in the embryo. Here we present a method to perform ChIP using a dissociated embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) embryo. Sheared chromatin from a single E8.5 embryo can be divided into up to five aliquots, which allows the investigator sufficient material for controls and for investigation of specific protein:chromatin interactions. We have utilized this technique to begin to document protein:chromatin interactions during the specification of tissue-specific gene expression programs. The heterogeneity of cell types in an embryo necessarily restricts the application of this technique because the result is the detection of protein:chromatin interactions without distinguishing whether the interactions occur in all, a subset of, or a single cell type(s). However, examination of tissue-specific genes during or following the onset of tissue-specific gene expression is feasible for two reasons. First, immunoprecipitation of tissue specific factors necessarily isolates chromatin from the cell type where the factor is expressed. Second, immunoprecipitation of coactivators and histones containing post-translational modifications that are associated with gene activation should only be found at genes and gene regulatory sequences in the cell type where the gene is being or has been activated. The technique should be applicable to the study of most tissue-specific gene activation events. In the example described below, we utilized E8.5 and E9.5 mouse embryos to examine factor binding at a skeletal muscle specific gene promoter. Somites, which are the precursor tissues from which the skeletal muscles of the trunk and limbs will form, are present at E8.5-9.54,5. Myogenin is a regulatory factor required for skeletal muscle differentiation 6-9. The data demonstrate that myogenin is associated with its own promoter in E8.5 and E9.5 embryos. Because myogenin is only expressed in somites at this stage of development 6,10, the data indicate that myogenin interactions with its own promoter have already occurred in skeletal muscle precursor cells in E8.5 embryos. PMID:21559006

  8. The use of carboxymethylcellulose gel to increase non-viral gene transfer in mouse airways

    PubMed Central

    Griesenbach, Uta; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Wasowicz, Marguerite; Munkonge, Felix M; Chan, Mario; Stoneham, Charlotte; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie; Pringle, Ian A.; Gill, Deborah R.; Hyde, Stephen C.; Stevenson, Barbara; Holder, Emma; Ban, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Cheng, Seng H; Scheule, Ronald K; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray, Paul B; Alton, Eric WFW

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed whether viscoelastic gels known to inhibit mucociliary clearance can increase lipid-mediated gene transfer. Methylcellulose or carboxymethylcellulose (0.25 to 1.5%) were mixed with complexes of the cationic lipid GL67A and plasmids encoding luciferase and perfused onto the nasal epithelium of mice. Survival after perfusion with 1% CMC or1% MC was 90 and 100%, respectively. In contrast 1.5% CMC was uniformly lethal likely due to the viscous solution blocking the airways. Perfusion with 0.5% CMC containing lipid/DNA complexes reproducibly increased gene expression by approximately 3-fold (n= 16, p<0.05). Given this benefit, likely related to increased duration of contact, we also assessed the effect of prolonging contact time of the liposome/DNA complexes by delivering our standard 80 ?g DNA dose over either approximately 22 or 60 min of perfusion. This independently increased gene transfer by 6-fold (n=8, p<0.05) and could be further enhanced by the addition of 0.5% CMC, leading to an overall 25-fold enhancement (n=8, p<0.001) in gene expression. As a result of these interventions CFTR transgene mRNA transgene levels were increased several logs above background. Interestingly, this did not lead to correction of the ion transport defects in the nasal epithelium of cystic fibrosis mice nor for immunohistochemical quantification of CFTR expression. To assess if 0.5% CMC also increased gene transfer in the mouse lung, we used whole body nebulisation chambers. CMC was nebulised for 1 hr immediately before, or simultaneously with GL67A/pCIKLux. The former did not increase gene transfer, whereas co-administration significantly increased gene transfer by 4-fold (p<0.0001, n=18). This study suggests that contact time of non-viral gene transfer agents is a key factor for gene delivery, and suggests two methods which may be translatable for use in man. PMID:20022367

  9. Trehalose maintains vitality of mouse epididymal epithelial cells and mediates gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bin; Gu, Yihua; Shen, Jian; Qin, Jinzhou; Bao, Jianqiang; Hu, Yuan; Zeng, Wenxian; Dong, Wuzi

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, trehalose was utilized to improve primary culture of mouse epididymal epithelial cells in vitro, and to enhance naked DNA delivery in epididymis in vivo. During the six-day culture, the proliferation activity of the cells in the medium with addition of trehalose was higher than that of those cells cultured in absence of trehalose (p<0.01). To determine the optimal concentration for cell proliferation, a series of trehalose concentrations (0, 60, 120, 180 mM) were tested, and the result indicated that the cell in the medium with 120 mM trehalose showed the highest proliferation potential. The epididymis epithelial cells were cultured in the medium containing 120 mM trehalose upon 16th passage, and they continued expressing markers of epididymal epithelial cell, such as rE-RABP, AR and ER-beta. Our study also indicated that trehalose concentrations of 120-240 mM, especially 180 mM, could effectively enhance DNA delivery into the mouse epididymis epithelial cell in vitro. Moreover, trehalose could induce in vivo expression of exogenous DNA in epididymal epithelial cells and help to internalize plasmid into sperm,which did not influence motility of sperm when the mixture of trehalose (180 mM) and DNA was injected into epididymal lumen through efferent tubule. This study suggested that trehalose, as an effective and safer reagent, could be employed potentially to maintain vitality of mouse epididymal epithelial cells during long-term culture in vitro and to mediate in vitro and in vivo gene transfer. PMID:24651491

  10. Introduction of the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into pro alpha 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Schnieke, A; Dziadek, M; Bateman, J; Mascara, T; Harbers, K; Gelinas, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro alpha 2 mRNA are synthesized. We have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro alpha 2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human alpha 1 chains and one mouse alpha 2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the alpha (I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human alpha chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow us to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro alpha 1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I. Images PMID:3468512

  11. Bilateral enucleation alters gene expression and intraneocortical connections in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anatomically and functionally distinct sensory and motor neocortical areas form during mammalian development through a process called arealization. This process is believed to be reliant on both activity-dependent and activity-independent mechanisms. Although both mechanisms are thought to function concurrently during arealization, the nature of their interaction is not understood. To examine the potential interplay of extrinsic activity-dependent mechanisms, such as sensory input, and intrinsic activity-independent mechanisms, including gene expression in mouse neocortical development, we performed bilateral enucleations in newborn mice and conducted anatomical and molecular analyses 10 days later. In this study, by surgically removing the eyes of the newborn mouse, we examined whether early enucleation would impact normal gene expression and the development of basic anatomical features such as intraneocortical connections and cortical area boundaries in the first 10 days of life, before natural eye opening. We examined the acute effects of bilateral enucleation on the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus and the neocortical somatosensory-visual area boundary through detailed analyses of intraneocortical connections and gene expression of six developmentally regulated genes at postnatal day 10. Results Our results demonstrate short-term plasticity on postnatal day 10 resulting from the removal of the eyes at birth, with changes in nuclear size and gene expression within the lateral geniculate nucleus as well as a shift in intraneocortical connections and ephrin A5 expression at the somatosensory-visual boundary. In this report, we highlight the correlation between positional shifts in ephrin A5 expression and improper refinement of intraneocortical connections observed at the somatosensory-visual boundary in enucleates on postnatal day 10. Conclusions Bilateral enucleation induces a positional shift of both ephrin A5 expression and intraneocortical projections at the somatosensory-visual border in only 10 days. These changes occur prior to natural eye opening, suggesting a possible role of spontaneous retinal activity in area border formation within the neocortex. Through these analyses, we gain a deeper understanding of how extrinsic activity-dependent mechanisms, particularly input from sensory organs, are integrated with intrinsic activity-independent mechanisms to regulate neocortical arealization and plasticity. PMID:22289655

  12. Prion Infection of Mouse Brain Reveals Multiple New Upregulated Genes Involved in Neuroinflammation or Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, James F.; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gliosis is often a preclinical pathological finding in neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases, but the mechanisms facilitating gliosis and neuronal damage in these diseases are not understood. To expand our knowledge of the neuroinflammatory response in prion diseases, we assessed the expression of key genes and proteins involved in the inflammatory response and signal transduction in mouse brain at various times after scrapie infection. In brains of scrapie-infected mice at pre- and postclinical stages, we identified 15 previously unreported differentially expressed genes related to inflammation or activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Levels for the majority of differentially expressed genes increased with time postinfection. In quantitative immunoblotting experiments of STAT proteins, STAT1?, phosphorylated-STAT1? (pSTAT1?), and pSTAT3 were increased between 94 and 131 days postinfection (p.i.) in brains of mice infected with strain 22L. Furthermore, a select group of STAT-associated genes was increased preclinically during scrapie infection, suggesting early activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Comparison of inflammatory markers between mice infected with scrapie strains 22L and RML indicated that the inflammatory responses and gene expression profiles in the brains were strikingly similar, even though these scrapie strains infect different brain regions. The endogenous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an inflammatory marker, was newly identified as increasing preclinically in our model and therefore might influence scrapie pathogenesis in vivo. However, in IL-1Ra-deficient or overexpressor transgenic mice inoculated with scrapie, neither loss nor overexpression of IL-1Ra demonstrated any observable effect on gliosis, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) formation, disease tempo, pathology, or expression of the inflammatory genes analyzed. IMPORTANCE Prion infection leads to PrPres deposition, gliosis, and neuroinflammation in the central nervous system before signs of clinical illness. Using a scrapie mouse model of prion disease to assess various time points postinoculation, we identified 15 unreported genes that were increased in the brains of scrapie-infected mice and were associated with inflammation and/or JAK-STAT activation. Comparison of mice infected with two scrapie strains (22L and RML), which have dissimilar neuropathologies, indicated that the inflammatory responses and gene expression profiles in the brains were similar. Genes that increased prior to clinical signs might be involved in controlling scrapie infection or in facilitating damage to host tissues. We tested the possible role of the endogenous IL-1Ra, which was increased at 70 days p.i. In scrapie-infected mice deficient in or overexpressing IL-1Ra, there was no observable effect on gliosis, PrPres formation, disease tempo, pathology, or expression of inflammatory genes analyzed. PMID:25505076

  13. Targeted Deletion of the Mouse 2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Gene (Chrna2) Potentiates Nicotine-Modulated

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    Targeted Deletion of the Mouse 2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Gene (Chrna2) Potentiates Nicotine-Modulated Behaviors Shahrdad Lotfipour1, Janet S. Byun1, Prescott Leach2, Christie D. Fowler3, Jupiter, Florida 33458 Abstract Baseline and nicotine-modulated behaviors were assessed in mice harboring

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, homologous to Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-08-01

    WNT signaling molecules play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis. Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin) is essential for Wnt/Wingless-dependent patterning in dorsal epidermis and also for hindgut development. With Wnt signaling, Lin accumulates in the nucleus to modulate transcription of Wnt target genes through association with beta-catenin/Armadillo and TCF/Pangolin. Here, human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, encoding proteins with Drosophila Lin homologous domain, were isolated using bioinformatics and cDNA-PCR. Human WINS1 encoded 757-amino-acid protein, and mouse Wins2 encoded 498-amino-acid protein. Human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 showed 60.0% total-amino-acid identity. Lin homologous domain of WINS1 and Wins2 showed 29.4% and 27.2% amino-acid identity with that of Drosphila Lin, respectively. In the human chromosome 15q26 region, WINS1 gene was clustered with ASB7 gene encoding ankyrin repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 7. Human WINS1 mRNA of 2.8-kb in size was expressed in adult testis, prostate, spleen, thymus, skeletal muscle, fetal kidney and brain. This is the first report on molecular cloning and initial characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 PMID:12119551

  15. Long-term Skeletal Muscle Protection After Gene Transfer in a Mouse Model of LGMD-2D

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    Long-term Skeletal Muscle Protection After Gene Transfer in a Mouse Model of LGMD-2D Christina of Physiology, Biophysics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA Limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD in maintaining skeletal muscle membrane stability. LGMD type-2D is caused by mutations in alpha-sarcoglycan (sgca

  16. NK1 (TACR1) receptor gene 'knockout' mouse phenotype predicts genetic association with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Yan, T C; McQuillin, A; Thapar, A; Asherson, P; Hunt, S P; Stanford, S C; Gurling, H

    2010-01-01

    Mice with functional genetic ablation of the Tacr1 (substance P-preferring receptor) gene (NK1R-/-) are hyperactive. Here, we investigated whether this is mimicked by NK1R antagonism and whether dopaminergic transmission is disrupted in brain regions that govern motor performance. The locomotor activity of NK1R-/- and wild-type mice was compared after treatment with an NK1R antagonist and/or psychostimulant (d-amphetamine or methylphenidate). The inactivation of NK1R (by gene mutation or receptor antagonism) induced hyperactivity in mice, which was prevented by both psychostimulants. Using in vivo microdialysis, we then compared the regulation of extracellular dopamine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum in the two genotypes. A lack of functional NK1R reduced (>50%) spontaneous dopamine efflux in the prefrontal cortex and abolished the striatal dopamine response to d-amphetamine. These behavioural and neurochemical abnormalities in NK1R-/- mice, together with their atypical response to psychostimulants, echo attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in humans. These findings prompted genetic studies on the TACR1 gene (the human equivalent of NK1R) in ADHD patients in a case-control study of 450 ADHD patients and 600 screened supernormal controls. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3771829, rs3771833, rs3771856, and rs1701137) at the TACR1 gene, previously known to be associated with bipolar disorder or alcoholism, were strongly associated with ADHD. In conclusion, our proposal that NK1R-/- mice offer a mouse model of ADHD was borne out by our human studies, which suggest that DNA sequence changes in and around the TACR1 gene increase susceptibility to this disorder. PMID:19204064

  17. Feminized Behavior and Brain Gene Expression in a Novel Mouse Model of Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ngun, Tuck C.; Ghahramani, Negar M.; Creek, Michelle M.; Williams-Burris, Shayna M.; Barseghyan, Hayk; Itoh, Yuichiro; Sánchez, Francisco J.; McClusky, Rebecca; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Arnold, Arthur P.; Vilain, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter Syndrome is the most common sex chromosome aneuploidy in men and is characterized by the presence of an additional X chromosome (XXY). In some Klinefelter males, certain traits may be feminized or shifted from the male-typical pattern towards a more female-typical one. Among them might be partner choice, one of the most sexually dimorphic traits in the animal kingdom. We investigated the extent of feminization in XXY male mice (XXYM) in partner preference and gene expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis/preoptic area and the striatum in mice from the Sex Chromosome Trisomy model. We tested for partner preference using a three-chambered apparatus in which the test mouse was free to choose between stimulus animals of either sex. We found that partner preference in XXYM was feminized. These differences were likely due to interactions of the additional X chromosome with the Y. We also discovered genes that differed in expression in XXYM vs. XYM. Some of these genes are feminized in their expression pattern. Lastly, we also identified genes that differed only between XXYM vs. XYM and not XXM vs. XYM. Genes that are both feminized and unique to XXYM vs. XYM represent strong candidates for dissecting the molecular pathways responsible for phenotypes present in KS/XXYM but not XXM. In sum, our results demonstrated that investigating behavioral and molecular feminization in XXY males can provide crucial information about the pathophysiology of Klinefelter Syndrome and may aid our understanding of sex differences in brain and behavior. PMID:24923877

  18. Global Mapping of DNA Methylation in Mouse Promoters Reveals Epigenetic Reprogramming of Pluripotency Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Wendy; Hemberger, Myriam; Reik, Wolf

    2008-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are reprogrammed in primordial germ cells and in preimplantation embryos by demethylation and subsequent de novo methylation. It has been suggested that epigenetic reprogramming may be necessary for the embryonic genome to return to a pluripotent state. We have carried out a genome-wide promoter analysis of DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, embryonic germ (EG) cells, sperm, trophoblast stem (TS) cells, and primary embryonic fibroblasts (pMEFs). Global clustering analysis shows that methylation patterns of ES cells, EG cells, and sperm are surprisingly similar, suggesting that while the sperm is a highly specialized cell type, its promoter epigenome is already largely reprogrammed and resembles a pluripotent state. Comparisons between pluripotent tissues and pMEFs reveal that a number of pluripotency related genes, including Nanog, Lefty1 and Tdgf1, as well as the nucleosome remodeller Smarcd1, are hypomethylated in stem cells and hypermethylated in differentiated cells. Differences in promoter methylation are associated with significant differences in transcription levels in more than 60% of genes analysed. Our comparative approach to promoter methylation thus identifies gene candidates for the regulation of pluripotency and epigenetic reprogramming. While the sperm genome is, overall, similarly methylated to that of ES and EG cells, there are some key exceptions, including Nanog and Lefty1, that are highly methylated in sperm. Nanog promoter methylation is erased by active and passive demethylation after fertilisation before expression commences in the morula. In ES cells the normally active Nanog promoter is silenced when targeted by de novo methylation. Our study suggests that reprogramming of promoter methylation is one of the key determinants of the epigenetic regulation of pluripotency genes. Epigenetic reprogramming in the germline prior to fertilisation and the reprogramming of key pluripotency genes in the early embryo is thus crucial for transmission of pluripotency. PMID:18584034

  19. Highly efficient method for gene delivery into mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingli; Reynaud, Florie; Falk, Julien; Spencer, Ambre; Ding, Yin-Di; Baumlé, Véronique; Lu, Ruisheng; Castellani, Valérie; Yuan, Chonggang; Rudkin, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    The development of gene transfection technologies has greatly advanced our understanding of life sciences. While use of viral vectors has clear efficacy, it requires specific expertise and biological containment conditions. Electroporation has become an effective and commonly used method for introducing DNA into neurons and in intact brain tissue. The present study describes the use of the Neon® electroporation system to transfect genes into dorsal root ganglia neurons isolated from embryonic mouse Day 13.5-16. This cell type has been particularly recalcitrant and refractory to physical or chemical methods for introduction of DNA. By optimizing the culture condition and parameters including voltage and duration for this specific electroporation system, high efficiency (60-80%) and low toxicity (>60% survival) were achieved with robust differentiation in response to Nerve growth factor (NGF). Moreover, 3-50 times fewer cells are needed (6 × 10(4)) compared with other traditional electroporation methods. This approach underlines the efficacy of this type of electroporation, particularly when only limited amount of cells can be obtained, and is expected to greatly facilitate the study of gene function in dorsal root ganglia neuron cultures. PMID:25698920

  20. Using the GEMM-ESC strategy to study gene function in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Ivo J; Del Bravo, Jessica; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Braumuller, Tanya M; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Henneman, Linda; Michalak, Ewa M; Berns, Anton; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical in vivo validation of target genes for therapeutic intervention requires careful selection and characterization of the most suitable animal model in order to assess the role of these genes in a particular process or disease. To this end, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are typically used. However, the appropriate engineering of these models is often cumbersome and time consuming. Recently, we and others described a modular approach for fast-track modification of existing GEMMs by re-derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that can be modified by recombinase-mediated transgene insertion and subsequently used for the production of chimeric mice. This 'GEMM-ESC strategy' allows for rapid in vivo analysis of gene function in the chimeras and their offspring. Moreover, this strategy is compatible with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. This protocol describes when and how to use the GEMM-ESC strategy effectively, and it provides a detailed procedure for re-deriving and manipulating GEMM-ESCs under feeder- and serum-free conditions. This strategy produces transgenic mice with the desired complex genotype faster than traditional methods: generation of validated GEMM-ESC clones for controlled transgene integration takes 9-12 months, and recombinase-mediated transgene integration and chimeric cohort production takes 2-3 months. The protocol requires skills in embryology, stem cell biology and molecular biology, and it is ideally performed within, or in close collaboration with, a transgenic facility. PMID:26492136

  1. Genome-wide patterns of gene flow across a house mouse hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Teeter, Katherine C.; Payseur, Bret A.; Harris, Leslie W.; Bakewell, Margaret A.; Thibodeau, Lisa M.; O’Brien, Janelle E.; Krenz, James G.; Sans-Fuentes, Maria A.; Nachman, Michael W.; Tucker, Priscilla K.

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid zones between closely related species or subspecies provide useful settings for studying the genetic architecture of speciation. Using markers distributed throughout the mouse genome, we use a hybrid zone between two recently diverged species of house mice (Mus musculus and Mus domesticus) as a natural mapping experiment to identify genomic regions that may be involved in reproductive isolation. Using cline analysis we document a nearly 50-fold variation in level of introgression among markers. Some markers have extremely narrow cline widths; these genomic regions may contribute to reproductive isolation. Biological processes associated with these narrow clines include physiological and immune responses to the environment as well as physiological and behavioral aspects of reproduction. Other autosomal markers exhibit asymmetrically broad clines, usually with high frequencies of M. domesticus alleles on the M. musculus side of the hybrid zone. These markers identify genome regions likely housing genes with alleles that are spreading from one species to the other. Biological processes associated with these wide clines include cell signaling, olfaction, and pheromone response. These processes play important roles in survival and reproduction, and associated genes are likely targets of selection. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium in the center of the hybrid zone suggest that isolation may be caused by multiple epistatic interactions between sets of genes. These data highlight the complex genetic architecture underlying speciation even at early stages of divergence and point to some of the biological processes that may govern this architecture. PMID:18025268

  2. Rapid mapping of genomic P1 clones: The mouse L-isoaspartyl/D-aspartyl methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    MacLaren, D.C.; Clarke, S.

    1996-07-15

    We report the mapping of the gene for the murine protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.11.77) from a 129 mouse strain. This gene encodes an enzyme present in all tissues that can catalyze the first step of a repair reaction in which age-damaged proteins containing abnormal L-isoaspartyl (or D-aspartyl) residues can be converted to forms containing normal L-aspartyl residues. We first mapped the restriction sites from a genomic P1 clone using a rapid method generally applicable to all bacteriophage P1 clones containing large DNA inserts. We show that a single pulsed-field electrophoresis blot can be used to map an entire 89-kb P1 clone insert for eight restriction endonucleases with an error of no more than 2% of the length of the fragment, or 1 kb at the middle of the insert. After size separation by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and blotting, the fragments are detected by Southern hybridization with probes to the vector. This method is potentially useful for restriction mapping other large DNA clones such as artificial chromosomes. When then determined the positions of the exons of the methyltransferase gene be restriction mapping of long PCR fragments. The previously unidentified exon 8, which encodes the -DEL C-terminus of the more acidic isozyme II, was sequenced and mapped 5.3 kb from the exon of exon 7. 44 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Electroporation-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Developing Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Brigande, John V.; Gubbels, Samuel P.; Woessner, David W.; Jungwirth, Jonathan J.; Bresee, Catherine S.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear forms from a thickened patch of head ectoderm called the otic placode. The placodal ectoderm invaginates to form a cup whose edges cinch together to establish a fluid-filled sac called the otic vesicle or otocyst. The progenitor cells lining the otocyst lumen will give rise to sensory and non-sensory cells of the inner ear. These formative stages of inner ear development are initiated during the first week of postimplantation embryonic development in the mouse. The inaccessibility of the inner ear in utero has hampered efforts to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating essential developmental processes. An experimental embryological method to misexpress genes in the developing mammalian inner ear is presented. Expression plasmid encoding a gene of interest is microinjected through the uterine wall into the lumen of the otocyst and electroporated into otic epithelial progenitor cells. Downstream analysis of the transfected embryonic or postnatal inner ear is then conducted to gain insight into gene function. PMID:18839345

  4. Comparative Analysis of Temporal and Dose-Dependent TCDD-Elicited Gene Expression in Human, Mouse, and Rat Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)–elicited time- and dose-dependent differential gene expression was compared in human, mouse, and rat primary hepatocytes. Comprehensive time course (10 nM TCDD or dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control for 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48h) studies identified 495, 2305, and 711 differentially expressed orthologous genes in human, mouse, and rat hepatocytes, respectively. However, only 16 orthologs were differentially expressed across all three species, with the majority of orthologs exhibiting species-specific expression (399 human, 2097 mouse, and 533 rat), consistent with species-specific expression reported in other in vitro and in vivo comparative studies. TCDD also elicited the dose-dependent induction of 397 human, 100 mouse, and 443 rat genes at 12h and 615 human, 426 mouse, and 314 rat genes at 24h. Comparable EC50 values were obtained for AhR battery genes including Cyp1a1 (0.1 nM human, 0.05 nM mouse, 0.08 nM rat at 24h) and Tiparp (0.97 nM human, 0.63 nM mouse, 0.14 nM rat at 12h). Overrepresented functions and pathways included amino acid metabolism in humans, immune response in mice, and energy homeostasis in rats. Differentially expressed genes functionally associated with lipid transport, processing, and metabolism were overrepresented in all three species but exhibited species-specific expression consistent with the induction of hepatic steatosis in mice but not in rats following a single oral gavage of TCDD. Furthermore, human primary hepatocytes showed lipid accumulation following 48h of treatment with TCDD, suggesting that AhR-mediated steatosis in mice more closely resembles human hepatic fat accumulation compared with that in rats. Collectively, these results suggest that species-specific gene expression profiles mediate the species-specific effects of TCDD despite the conservation of the AhR and its signaling mechanism. PMID:23418086

  5. Identification of the bile acid transporter Slco1a6 as a candidate gene that broadly affects gene expression in mouse pancreatic islets

    E-print Network

    Yandell, Brian S.

    expression in mouse pancreatic islets Jianan Tian* , Mark P. Keller , Angie T. Oler , Mary E. Rabaglia on chromosome 6, specifically in pancreatic islets. By considering the first two principal components transport of TCA (and potentially other bile acids) by pancreatic islets, resulting in broad gene regulation

  6. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.; Manenti, G.; De Gregorio, L. ); Maestrini, E.; Rivella, S. ); Chatterjee, A.; Herman, G.E. ); Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R. )

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, the authors have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. They mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, they mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Assignment of the transcription factor GATA4 gene to human chromosome 8 and mouse chromosome 14: Gata4 is a candidate gene for Ds (disorganization)

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L.; Pasztgor, L.M.

    1995-05-01

    The authors report the mapping of the human and mouse genes from transcription factor GATA-4, a newly identified member of DNA-binding proteins involved in lineage determination. The human GATA4 gene was assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 8 using genomic DNAs from human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines. Southern blot analyses indicated the presence of a human-specific 7.6-kb fragment that was observed only in DNA from the hybrid cells containing human chromosome 8 or the proximal region of its short arm. The mouse Gata4 gene was mapped to chromosome 14, closely linked to Clu (clusterin), using genomic DNAs from a (:C57BL/6J x Mus spretus)F{sub 1} x M.spretus backcross. This mapping assignment places the Gata4 gene in the vicinity of the mouse Ds (disorganization) locus, a dominant gain-of-function mutation affecting embryonic development. The authors speculate that Ds is caused by a mutation in the Gata4 gene, ectopic expression of GATA-4, or a mutation in another lineage determination gene closely linked to Gata4. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    Spaceflight factors, including microgravity and space radiation, have many detrimental short-term effects on human physiology, including muscle and bone degradation, and immune system dysfunction. The long-term progression of these physiological effects is still poorly understood, and a serious concern for long duration spaceflight missions. We hypothesized that some of the degenerative effects of spaceflight may be caused in part by an inability of stem cells to proliferate and differentiate normally resulting in an impairment of tissue regenerative processes. Furthermore, we hypothesized that long-term bone tissue degeneration in space may be mediated by activation of the p53 signaling network resulting in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis in osteoprogenitors. In our analyses we found that spaceflight caused significant bone loss in the weight-bearing bones of mice with a 6.3% reduction in bone volume and 11.9% decrease in bone thickness associated with increased osteoclastic activity. Along with this rapid bone loss we also observed alterations in the cell cycle characterized by an increase in the Cdkn1a/p21 cell cycle arrest molecule independent of Trp53. Overexpression of Cdkn1a/p21 was localized to osteoblasts lining the periosteal surface of the femur and chondrocytes in the head of the femur, suggesting an inhibition of proliferation in two key regenerative cell types of the femur in response to spaceflight. Additionally we found overexpression of several matrix degradation molecules including MMP-1a, 3 and 10, of which MMP-10 was localized to osteocytes within the shaft of the femur. This, in conjunction with 40 nm resolution synchrotron nano-Computed Tomography (nano-CT) observations of an increase in osteocyte lacunae cross-sectional area, perimeter and a decrease in circularity indicates a potential role for osteocytic osteolysis in the observed bone degeneration in spaceflight. To further investigate the genetic response of bone to mechanical unloading in spaceflight, we conducted genome wide microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from the mouse pelvis. Specifically, 16 week old mice were subjected to 15 days spaceflight onboard NASA's STS-131 space shuttle mission. The pelvis of the mice was dissected, the bone marrow was flushed and the bones were briefly stored in RNAlater. The pelvii were then homogenized, and RNA was isolated using TRIzol. RNA concentration and quality was measured using a Nanodrop spectrometer, and 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. Samples of cDNA were analyzed using an Affymetrix GeneChip\\S Gene 1.0 ST (Sense Target) Array System for Mouse and GenePattern Software. We normalized the ST gene arrays using Robust Multichip Average (RMA) normalization, which summarizes perfectly matched spots on the array through the median polish algorithm, rather than normalizing according to mismatched spots. We also used Limma for statistical analysis, using the BioConductor Limma Library by Gordon Smyth, and differential expression analysis to identify genes with significant changes in expression between the two experimental conditions. Finally we used GSEApreRanked for Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), with Kolmogorov-Smirnov style statistics to identify groups of genes that are regulated together using the t-statistics derived from Limma. Preliminary results show that 6,603 genes expressed in pelvic bone had statistically significant alterations in spaceflight compared to ground controls. These prominently included cell cycle arrest molecules p21, and p18, cell survival molecule Crbp1, and cell cycle molecules cyclin D1, and Cdk1. Additionally, GSEA results indicated alterations in molecular targets of cyclin D1 and Cdk4, senescence pathways resulting from abnormal laminin maturation, cell-cell contacts via E-cadherin, and several pathways relating to protein translation and metabolism. In total 111 gene sets out of 2,488, about 4%, showed statistically significant set alterations. These alterations indicate significant impairment of normal cellular function in the mechanically unloaded envi

  9. First effects of rising amyloid-? in transgenic mouse brain: synaptic transmission and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Damian M.; Liu, Wenfei; Portelius, Erik; Bayram, Sevinç; Yasvoina, Marina; Ho, Sui-Hin; Smits, Hélène; Ali, Shabinah S.; Steinberg, Rivka; Pegasiou, Chrysia-Maria; James, Owain T.; Matarin, Mar; Richardson, Jill C.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John A.; Salih, Dervis A.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting and treating Alzheimer’s disease, before cognitive deficits occur, has become the health challenge of our time. The earliest known event in Alzheimer’s disease is rising amyloid-?. Previous studies have suggested that effects on synaptic transmission may precede plaque deposition. Here we report how relative levels of different soluble amyloid-? peptides in hippocampus, preceding plaque deposition, relate to synaptic and genomic changes. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry was used to measure the early rise of different amyloid-? peptides in a mouse model of increasing amyloid-? (‘TASTPM’, transgenic for familial Alzheimer’s disease genes APP/PSEN1). In the third postnatal week, several amyloid-? peptides were above the limit of detection, including amyloid-?40, amyloid-?38 and amyloid-?42 with an intensity ratio of 6:3:2, respectively. By 2 months amyloid-? levels had only increased by 50% and although the ratio of the different peptides remained constant, the first changes in synaptic currents, compared to wild-type mice could be detected with patch-clamp recordings. Between 2 and 4 months old, levels of amyloid-?40 rose by ?7-fold, but amyloid-?42 rose by 25-fold, increasing the amyloid-?42:amyloid-?40 ratio to 1:1. Only at 4 months did plaque deposition become detectable and only in some mice; however, synaptic changes were evident in all hippocampal fields. These changes included increased glutamate release probability (P < 0.001, n = 7–9; consistent with the proposed physiological effect of amyloid-?) and loss of spontaneous action potential-mediated activity in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus (P < 0.001, n = 7). Hence synaptic changes occur when the amyloid-? levels and amyloid-?42:amyloid-?40 ratio are still low compared to those necessary for plaque deposition. Genome-wide microarray analysis revealed changes in gene expression at 2–4 months including synaptic genes being strongly affected but often showing significant changes only by 4 months. We thus demonstrate that, in a mouse model of rising amyloid-?, the initial deposition of plaques does not occur until several months after the first amyloid-? becomes detectable but coincides with a rapid acceleration in the rise of amyloid-? levels and the amyloid-?42:amyloid-?40 ratio. Prior to acceleration, however, there is already a pronounced synaptic dysfunction, reflected as changes in synaptic transmission and altered gene expression, indicating that restoring synaptic function early in the disease progression may represent the earliest possible target for intervention in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25981962

  10. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human ?-Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Irene; Lampronti, Ilaria; Salvatori, Francesca; Fabbri, Enrica; Zuccato, Cristina; Cosenza, Lucia C.; Montagner, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Altruda, Fiorella; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Carandina, Gianni; Aiello, Vincenzo; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the ?-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece) are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-?-IVSI-6) carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human ?-globin gene. In the TG-?-IVSI-6 mouse (a) the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b) the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c) as expected, normally spliced human ?-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to ?-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin mu?-globin2/hu?-globin2 and, more importantly, (d) the aberrant ?-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-?-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 ?-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced ?-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for ?-thalassemia. PMID:26097845

  11. Tissue-specific regulation of the mouse Pkhd1 (ARPKD) gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott S.; Cobo-Stark, Patricia; Hajarnis, Sachin; Aboudehen, Karam; Shao, Xinli; Richardson, James A.; Patel, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of cysts in renal collecting ducts and biliary dysgenesis, is caused by mutations of the polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) gene. Expression of PKHD1 is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. Here, we show that a 2.0-kb genomic fragment containing the proximal promoter of mouse Pkhd1 directs tissue-specific expression of a lacZ reporter gene in transgenic mice. LacZ is expressed in renal collecting ducts beginning during embryonic development but is not expressed in extrarenal tissues. The Pkhd1 promoter contains a binding site for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1?, which is required for activity in transfected cells. Mutation of the HNF-1?-binding site abolishes the expression of the lacZ reporter gene in renal collecting ducts. Transgenes containing the 2.0-kb promoter and 2.7 kb of additional genomic sequence extending downstream to the second exon are expressed in the kidney, intrahepatic bile ducts, and male reproductive tract. This pattern overlaps with the endogenous expression of Pkhd1 and coincides with sites of expression of HNF-1?. We conclude that the proximal 2.0-kb promoter is sufficient for tissue-specific expression of Pkhd1 in renal collecting ducts in vivo and that HNF-1? is required for Pkhd1 promoter activity in collecting ducts. Additional genomic sequences located from exons 1-2 or elsewhere in the gene locus are required for expression in extrarenal tissues. PMID:24899057

  12. Cloning of the VASP (Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein) genes in human and mouse: Structure, sequence, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, M.; Fischer, L.; Hauser, W.

    1996-09-01

    The genes encoding the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in human and mouse were isolated, and major parts were sequenced. In both species the gene is composed of 13 exons with conserved exon-intron positions. The mouse VASP cDNA sequence was deduced from the genomic sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence is 89% identical to the human protein. The high nucleotide sequence homology extends not only over the coding regions but also into the 3{prime}-UTRs, indicating a possible function in mRNA targeting or regulation of translation. Prominent 5{prime} CpG islands including multiple SP1 sites indicate a housekeeping function of VASP. Using cosmid DNA as a probe for fluorescence in situ hybridization, the human VASP gene was assigned to chromosome 19q13.2-q13.3, an extended region with homology to mouse chromosome 7. A sequence overlap of the VASP 5{prime}-region with the telomeric end of a cosmid contig physically links the VASP gene with ERCC1. VASP is located about 92 kb distal to ERCC1 and about 300 kb proximal to the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Tissue distribution of the dystrophin-related gene product and expression in the mdx and dy mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Love, D.R.; Marsden, R.F.; Bloomfield, J.F.; Davies, K.E. ); Morris, G.E.; Ellis, J.M. ); Fairbrother, U.; Edwards, Y.H. ); Slater, C.P. ); Parry, D.J. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors have previously reported a dystrophin-related locus (DMDL for Duchenne muscular dystrophy-like) on human chromosome 6 that maps close to the dy mutation on mouse chromosome 10. Here they show that this gene is expressed in a wide range of tissues at varying levels. The transcript is particularly abundant in several human fetal tissues, including heart, placenta, and intestine. Studies with antisera raised against a DMDL fusion protein identify a 400,000 M{sub r} protein in all mouse tissues tested, including those of mdx and dy mice. Unlike the dystrophin gene, the DMDL gene transcript is not differentially spliced at the 3{prime} end in either fetal muscle or brain.

  14. Two novel mouse genes--Nubp2, mapped to the t-complex on chromosome 17, and Nubp1, mapped to chromosome 16--establish a new gene family of nucleotide-binding proteins in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, H; Grahovac, M J; Mazzarella, R; Fujiwara, H; Kitchen, J R; Threat, T A; Ko, M S

    1999-09-01

    Two novel mouse genes and one novel human gene that define distinctive eukaryotic nucleotide-binding proteins (NUBP) and are related to the mrp gene of prokaryotes are characterized. Phylogenetic analyses of the genes, encoding a short form (Nubp2) and a long form (Nubp1) of NUBP, clearly establish them as a new NUBP/MRP gene family that is well conserved throughout phylogeny. In addition to conserved ATP/GTP-binding motifs A (P-loop) and A', members of this family share at least two highly conserved sequence motifs, NUBP/MRP motifs alpha and beta. Only one type of NUBP/MRP gene has been observed thus far in prokaryotes, but there are two types in eukaryotes. One group includes mouse Nubp1, human NBP, yeast NBP35, and Caenorhabditis elegans F10G8.6 and is characterized by a unique N-terminal sequence with four cysteine residues that is lacking in the other group, which includes mouse Nubp2, human NUBP2, and yeast YIA3w. Northern blot analyses of the two mouse genes show distinctive patterns consistent with this classification. Mouse Nubp2 is mapped to the t-complex region of mouse Chromosome 17, whereas Nubp1 is mapped to the proximal region of mouse Chromosome 16. Interestingly, both regions are syntenic with human chromosome 16p13.1-p13.3, suggesting that a chromosomal breakage between Nubp2 and Nubp1 probably occurred during the evolution of mouse chromosomes. PMID:10486206

  15. Shaping mechanisms of metal specificity in a family of metazoan metallothioneins: evolutionary differentiation of mollusc metallothioneins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The degree of metal binding specificity in metalloproteins such as metallothioneins (MTs) can be crucial for their functional accuracy. Unlike most other animal species, pulmonate molluscs possess homometallic MT isoforms loaded with Cu+ or Cd2+. They have, so far, been obtained as native metal-MT complexes from snail tissues, where they are involved in the metabolism of the metal ion species bound to the respective isoform. However, it has not as yet been discerned if their specific metal occupation is the result of a rigid control of metal availability, or isoform expression programming in the hosting tissues or of structural differences of the respective peptides determining the coordinative options for the different metal ions. In this study, the Roman snail (Helix pomatia) Cu-loaded and Cd-loaded isoforms (HpCuMT and HpCdMT) were used as model molecules in order to elucidate the biochemical and evolutionary mechanisms permitting pulmonate MTs to achieve specificity for their cognate metal ion. Results HpCuMT and HpCdMT were recombinantly synthesized in the presence of Cd2+, Zn2+ or Cu2+ and corresponding metal complexes analysed by electrospray mass spectrometry and circular dichroism (CD) and ultra violet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry. Both MT isoforms were only able to form unique, homometallic and stable complexes (Cd6-HpCdMT and Cu12-HpCuMT) with their cognate metal ions. Yeast complementation assays demonstrated that the two isoforms assumed metal-specific functions, in agreement with their binding preferences, in heterologous eukaryotic environments. In the snail organism, the functional metal specificity of HpCdMT and HpCuMT was contributed by metal-specific transcription programming and cell-specific expression. Sequence elucidation and phylogenetic analysis of MT isoforms from a number of snail species revealed that they possess an unspecific and two metal-specific MT isoforms, whose metal specificity was achieved exclusively by evolutionary modulation of non-cysteine amino acid positions. Conclusion The Roman snail HpCdMT and HpCuMT isoforms can thus be regarded as prototypes of isoform families that evolved genuine metal-specificity within pulmonate molluscs. Diversification into these isoforms may have been initiated by gene duplication, followed by speciation and selection towards opposite needs for protecting copper-dominated metabolic pathways from nonessential cadmium. The mechanisms enabling these proteins to be metal-specific could also be relevant for other metalloproteins. PMID:21255385

  16. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  17. The gene expression database for mouse development (GXD): putting developmental expression information at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Because molecular mechanisms of development are extraordinarily complex, the understanding of these processes requires the integration of pertinent research data. Using the Gene Expression Database for Mouse Development (GXD) as an example, we illustrate the progress made toward this goal, and discuss relevant issues that apply to developmental databases and developmental research in general. Since its first release in 1998, GXD has served the scientific community by integrating multiple types of expression data from publications and electronic submissions and by making these data freely and widely available. Focusing on endogenous gene expression in wild-type and mutant mice and covering data from RNA in situ hybridization, in situ reporter (knock-in), immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, and Western blot experiments, the database has grown tremendously over the years in terms of data content and search utilities. Currently, GXD includes over 1.4 million annotated expression results and over 260,000 images. All these data and images are readily accessible to many types of database searches. Here we describe the data and search tools of GXD; explain how to use the database most effectively; discuss how we acquire, curate, and integrate developmental expression information; and describe how the research community can help in this process. PMID:24958384

  18. Maternal-Effect Gene Expression in Cultured Preantral Follicles Derived from Vitrified-Warmed Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Roya; Ebrahimi, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess survival of follicles, their oocyte maturation and fertilization potential as well as expression of early embryo developmental genes in in vitro cultured pre-antral follicles derived from vitrified-warmed mouse ovary. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, ovaries of 12-day old Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) female mice were placed into non-vitrified and vitrifiedwarmed groups. Isolated preantral follicles from experimental groups were cultured in vitro for 12 days. On the 12th day of culture, oocyte maturation was induced and then matured oocytes were in vitro fertilized. The rates of oocyte maturation and two-cell stage embryo formation were assessed. Relative expression of Mater and Zar1 was evaluated on days 1, 6, 10 and 12 of culture. Data analysis was performed by t test and two-way ANOVA (P<0.05). Results Our data showed no significant difference between the control and vitrification groups in the rate of follicular survival, oocyte maturation and two-cell stage embryo formation. The level of gene expression was higher on the 6thand 10thdays of culture for Mater and Zar1 in vitrified-warmed group compared with non-vitrified group, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion It seems that the applied vitrification method did not reveal any negative effect on maturation and developmental competence of oocytes surrounded in preantral follicles and therefore could preserve follicular reserves efficiently. PMID:26199912

  19. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned above. The most striking result preliminarily is that both strains of mice show a greater number of genes changing at the lowest dose of exposure for their respective pathways.

  20. Discrimination of tumorigenic triazole conazoles from phenobarbital by transcriptional analyses of mouse liver gene expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive and...

  1. Mitomycin C modulates the circadian oscillation of clock gene period 2 expression through attenuating the glucocorticoid signaling in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Kimoto, Kenichi; Akamine, Takahiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Kubota, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Clock gene regulates the circadian rhythm of various physiological functions. The expression of clock gene has been shown to be attenuated by certain drugs, resulting in a rhythm disorder. Mitomycin C (MMC) is often used in combination with ophthalmic surgery, especially in trabeculectomy, a glaucoma surgical procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of MMC on clock gene expression in fibroblasts, the target cells of MMC. Following MMC treatment, Bmal1 mRNA levels was significantly decreased, whereas Dbp, Per1, and Rev-erb? mRNA levels were significantly increased in the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells. Microarray analysis was performed to explore of the gene(s) responsible for MMC-induced alteration of clock gene expression, and identified Nr3c1 gene encoding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a candidate. MMC suppressed the induction of Per1 mRNA by dexamethasone (DEX), ligand of GR, in NIH3T3 cells. MMC also modulated the DEX-driven circadian oscillations of Per2::Luciferase bioluminescence in mouse-derived ocular fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown effect of MMC in GR signaling and the circadian clock system. The present findings suggest that MMC combined with trabeculectomy could increase the risk for a local circadian rhythm-disorder at the ocular surface. PMID:26403971

  2. Characterization of mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase, a Nudix hydrolase encoded by the Nudt14 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Heyen, Candy A.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin; Roach, Peter J.

    2009-12-25

    Recombinant mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase (UGPPase), encoded by the Nudt14 gene, was produced in Escherichia coli and purified close to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of [{beta}-{sup 32}P]UDP-glucose to [{sup 32}P]glucose-1-P and UMP, confirming that it hydrolyzed the pyrophosphate of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar to generate glucose-1-P and UMP. The enzyme was also active toward ADP-ribose. Activity is dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and was greatest at alkaline pH above 8. Kinetic analysis indicated a K{sub m} of {approx}4 mM for UDP-glucose and {approx}0.3 mM for ADP-ribose. Based on V{sub max}/K{sub m} values, the enzyme was {approx}20-fold more active toward ADP-ribose. UGPPase behaves as a dimer in solution and can be cross-linked to generate a species of M{sub r} 54,000 from a monomer of 30,000 as judged by SDS-PAGE. The dimerization was not affected by the presence of glucose-1-P or UDP-glucose. Using antibodies raised against the recombinant protein, Western analysis indicated that UGPPase was widely expressed in mouse tissues, including skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, heart and pancreas with a lower level in brain. It was generally present as a doublet when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, suggesting the occurrence of some form of post-translational modification. Efforts to interconvert the species by adding or inhibiting phosphatase activity were unsuccessful, leaving the nature of the modification unknown. Sequence alignments and database searches revealed related proteins in species as distant as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  3. Allele-specific gene silencing in two mouse models of autosomal dominant skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Loy, Ryan E; Lueck, John D; Mostajo-Radji, Mohammed A; Carrell, Ellie M; Dirksen, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    We explored the potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing (ASGS) in providing therapeutic benefit in two established mouse models of the autosomal dominantly-inherited muscle disorders, Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) and Central Core Disease (CCD). Candidate ASGS siRNAs were designed and validated for efficacy and specificity on ryanodine receptor (RyR1) cDNA mini-constructs expressed in HEK293 cells using RT-PCR- and confocal microscopy-based assays. In vivo delivery of the most efficacious identified siRNAs into flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles was achieved by injection/electroporation of footpads of 4-6 month old heterozygous Ryr1(Y524S/+) (YS/+) and Ryr1(I4895T/+) (IT/+) knock-in mice, established mouse models of MH with cores and CCD, respectively. Treatment of IT/+ mice resulted in a modest rescue of deficits in the maximum rate (?38% rescue) and magnitude (?78%) of ligand-induced Ca(2+) release that occurred in the absence of a change in the magnitude of electrically-evoked Ca(2+) release. Compared to the difference between the caffeine sensitivity of Ca(2+) release in FDB fibers from YS/+ and WT mice treated with SCR siRNA (EC(50): 1.1 mM versus 4.4 mM, respectively), caffeine sensitivity was normalized in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice following 2 (EC(50): 2.8 mM) and 4 week (EC(50): 6.6 mM) treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. Moreover, the temperature-dependent increase in resting Ca(2+) observed in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice was normalized to WT levels after 2 weeks of treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. As determined by quantitative real time PCR, the degree of functional rescue in YS/+ and IT/+ mice correlated well with the relative increase in fractional WT allele expression. PMID:23152933

  4. Allele-Specific Gene Silencing in Two Mouse Models of Autosomal Dominant Skeletal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Ryan E.; Lueck, John D.; Mostajo-Radji, Mohammed A.; Carrell, Ellie M.; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing (ASGS) in providing therapeutic benefit in two established mouse models of the autosomal dominantly-inherited muscle disorders, Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) and Central Core Disease (CCD). Candidate ASGS siRNAs were designed and validated for efficacy and specificity on ryanodine receptor (RyR1) cDNA mini-constructs expressed in HEK293 cells using RT-PCR- and confocal microscopy-based assays. In vivo delivery of the most efficacious identified siRNAs into flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles was achieved by injection/electroporation of footpads of 4–6 month old heterozygous Ryr1Y524S/+ (YS/+) and Ryr1I4895T/+ (IT/+) knock-in mice, established mouse models of MH with cores and CCD, respectively. Treatment of IT/+ mice resulted in a modest rescue of deficits in the maximum rate (?38% rescue) and magnitude (?78%) of ligand-induced Ca2+ release that occurred in the absence of a change in the magnitude of electrically-evoked Ca2+ release. Compared to the difference between the caffeine sensitivity of Ca2+ release in FDB fibers from YS/+ and WT mice treated with SCR siRNA (EC50: 1.1 mM versus 4.4 mM, respectively), caffeine sensitivity was normalized in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice following 2 (EC50: 2.8 mM) and 4 week (EC50: 6.6 mM) treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. Moreover, the temperature-dependent increase in resting Ca2+ observed in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice was normalized to WT levels after 2 weeks of treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. As determined by quantitative real time PCR, the degree of functional rescue in YS/+ and IT/+ mice correlated well with the relative increase in fractional WT allele expression. PMID:23152933

  5. Impaired Pulmonary Defense Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in VEGF Gene Inactivated Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Ellen C.; Malloy, Jaret L.; Tang, Kechun; Xia, Feng; Fu, Zhenxing; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Overhage, Joerg; Wagner, Peter D.; Spragg, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated bacterial and viral infections are known to contribute to worsening lung function in several respiratory diseases, including asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have reported alveolar wall cell apoptosis and parenchymal damage in adult pulmonary VEGF gene ablated mice. We hypothesized that VEGF expressed by type II cells is also necessary to provide an effective host defense against bacteria in part by maintaining surfactant homeostasis. Therefore, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) levels were evaluated in mice following lung-targeted VEGF gene inactivation, and alterations in VEGF-dependent type II cell function were evaluated by measuring surfactant homeostasis in mouse lungs and isolated type II cells. In VEGF-deficient lungs increased PAO1 levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF? and IL-6, were detected 24 hours after bacterial instillation compared to control lungs. In vivo lung-targeted VEGF gene deletion (57% decrease in total pulmonary VEGF) did not alter alveolar surfactant or tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) levels. However, sphingomyelin content, choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT) mRNA and SP-D expression were decreased. In isolated type II cells an 80% reduction of VEGF protein resulted in decreases in total phospholipids (PL), DSPC, DSPC synthesis, surfactant associated proteins (SP)-B and -D, and the lipid transporters, ABCA1 and Rab3D. TPA-induced DSPC secretion and apoptosis were elevated in VEGF-deficient type II cells. These results suggest a potential protective role for type II cell-expressed VEGF against bacterial initiated infection. PMID:22718316

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse carboxyl ester lipase gene and evidence for expression in the lactating mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lidmer, A.S.; Lundberg, L.; Kannius, M.; Bjursell, G.

    1995-09-01

    DNA hybridization was used to isolate a 2.04-kb cDNA encoding carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) from a mouse lactating mammary gland, {lambda}gt10 cDNA library. The cDNA sequence translated into a protein of 599 amino acids, including 20 amino acids of a putative signal peptide. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse CEL with CEL from five other species revealed that there is a high degree of a homology between the different species. The mouse CEL gene was also isolated and found to span approximately 7.2 kb and to include 11 exons. This organization is similar to those of the recently reported human and rat CEL genes. We have also analyzed expression of the CEL gene in the mammary glands from other species by performing a Northern blot analysis with RNA from goat and cow. The results show that the gene is expressed in both species. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Cadium pathways during gestation and lactation in control vs. metallothionein 1,2-knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Brako, E. E.; Wilson, A. K.; Jonah, M. M.; Blum, C. A.; Cerny, E. A.; Williams, K. L.; Bhattacharyya, M. H.; Winona State Univ.; Benedictine Univ.; Dominican Univ.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of metallothionein (MT) on cadmium absorption and transfer pathways during gestation and lactation in mice were investigated. Female 129/SvJ metallothionein-knockout (MT1,2KO) and metallothionein-normal (MTN) mice received drinking water containing trace amounts of {sup 109}CdCl{sub 2} (0.15 ng Cd/ml; 0.074 {mu}Ci {sup 109}Cd/ml). {sup 109}Cd and MT in maternal, fetal, and pup tissues were measured on gestation days 7, 14, and 17 and lactation day 11. In dams, MT influenced both the amount of {sup 109}Cd transferred from intestine into body (two- to three-fold higher in MT1,2KO than MTN dams) and tissue-specific {sup 109}Cd distribution (higher liver/kidney ratio in MT1,2KO dams). Placental {sup 109}Cd concentrations in MT1,2KO dams were three- and seven-fold higher on gestation days 14 and 17, respectively, than in MTN dams. Fetal {sup 109}Cd levels were low in both mouse types, but at least 10-fold lower in MTN fetuses. MT had no effect on the amount of {sup 109}Cd transferred to pups via milk; furthermore, 85--90% of total pup {sup 109}Cd was recovered in gastrointestinal tracts of both types, despite high duodenal MT only in MTN pups. A relatively large percentage of milk-derived intestinal {sup 109}Cd was transferred to other pup tissues in both MT1,2KO and MTN pups (14 and 10%, respectively). These results demonstrate that specific sequestration of cadmium by both maternal and neonatal intestinal tract does not require MT. Although MT decreased oral cadmium transfer from intestine to body tissues at low cadmium exposure levels, MT did not play a major role in restricting transfer of cadmium from dam to fetus via placenta and to neonate via milk.

  8. Generation of gene-targeted mice using embryonic stem cells derived from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ooshima, Yuki; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kunio; Watanabe, Sayuri; Maeda, Ryouta; Takahashi, Hideki; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    Gene-targeting technology using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has become the "gold standard" for analyzing gene functions and producing disease models. Recently, genetically modified mice with multiple mutations have increasingly been produced to study the interaction between proteins and polygenic diseases. However, introduction of an additional mutation into mice already harboring several mutations by conventional natural crossbreeding is an extremely time- and labor-intensive process. Moreover, to do so in mice with a complex genetic background, several years may be required if the genetic background is to be retained. Establishing ES cells from multiple-mutant mice, or disease-model mice with a complex genetic background, would offer a possible solution. Here, we report the establishment and characterization of novel ES cell lines from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD mouse, Oddo et al. in Neuron 39:409-421, 2003) harboring 3 mutated genes (APPswe, TauP301L, and PS1M146V) and a complex genetic background. Thirty blastocysts were cultured and 15 stable ES cell lines (male: 11; female: 4) obtained. By injecting these ES cells into diploid or tetraploid blastocysts, we generated germline-competent chimeras. Subsequently, we confirmed that F1 mice derived from these animals showed similar biochemical and behavioral characteristics to the original 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, we introduced a gene-targeting vector into the ES cells and successfully obtained gene-targeted ES cells, which were then used to generate knockout mice for the targeted gene. These results suggest that the present methodology is effective for introducing an additional mutation into mice already harboring multiple mutated genes and/or a complex genetic background. PMID:22961199

  9. SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK AND HPRT GENES OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemicals that are capable of inducing mutational damages. The Tk+/- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wider range of mutational events than the X-linked Hprt locus. However, chemical-induced muta...

  10. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery into the scala media of the normal and deafened adult mouse ear

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Lauren A.; Li, Qian; Yang, John; Goddard, John C; Fekete, Donna M.; Lang, Hainan

    2010-01-01

    Murine models are ideal for studying cochlear gene transfer as many hearing loss-related mutations have been discovered and mapped within the mouse genome. However, due to its small size and delicate nature, the membranous labyrinth of the mouse is a challenging target for delivery of viral vectors. To minimize injection trauma, we developed a procedure for the controlled release of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into the scala media of adult mice. This procedure poses minimal risk of injury to structures of the cochlea and middle ear and allows for near-complete preservation of low and middle frequency hearing. In the present study, transduction efficiency and cellular specificity of AAV vectors (serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6, and 8) were investigated in normal and drug-deafened ears. Using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter to drive gene expression, a variety of cell types were transduced successfully, including sensory hair cells and supporting cells, as well as cells in the auditory nerve and spiral ligament. Among all five serotypes, inner hair cells (IHCs) were the most effectively transduced cochlear cell type. All five serotypes of AAV vectors transduced cells of the auditory nerve, though serotype 8 was the most efficient vector for transduction. Our findings indicate that efficient AAV inoculation (via the scala media) can be performed in adult mouse ears, with hearing preservation a realistic goal. The procedure we describe may also have applications for intra-endolymphatic drug delivery in many mouse models of human deafness. PMID:21209625

  11. Stepwise activation of the mouse acetylcholine receptor delta- and gamma-subunit genes in clonal cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, C M; Merlie, J P

    1988-01-01

    We used the DNase I-hypersensitive sites around the mouse acetylcholine receptor delta-subunit gene as a guide toward the cloning and sequencing of delta and gamma transcriptional regulatory regions and as a means to assess chromatin structural activation of the delta- and gamma-subunit genes during myogenesis. Genomic cloning of hypersensitive sites downstream of the delta-subunit gene revealed the presence of the gamma-subunit gene approximately 5 kilobases away; the hypersensitive sites mapped to the 5' end of the gamma-subunit gene. Sequence comparison of restriction fragments containing hypersensitive sites in analogous locations at the 5' ends of the delta- and gamma-subunit genes uncovered little overall homology between the two genomic fragments; however, an 11- of 13-base-pair match between the two sequences was found. Homologs to this sequence were also found to be present in the upstream regions of the chicken alpha- and mouse beta-subunit genes. By RNase protection and primer extension analyses, the delta-subunit gene transcription start site was mapped to 56 base pairs upstream of the initiator ATG codon. Clonal cell lines with various potentials to differentiate to the skeletal muscle phenotype were examined for their hypersensitive site pattern within the delta-gamma locus. Only remote hypersensitive sites flanking the locus appear in pluripotential mesodermal cells. A cell line of determined but inducible myoblasts expressed only one more intergenic site, while in permissively differentiating myoblasts hypersensitive sites were already present at the 5' ends of the delta and gamma genes prior to differentiation. Terminal differentiation resulted in an identical pattern of hypersensitive sites in all muscle cell lines examined so far, with an intergenic site near the gamma-subunit gene being the only site specific to the differentiated muscle phenotype. Images PMID:3244354

  12. Isolation and mapping of human homologues of an imprinted mouse gene U2af1-rs1

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Kazunori; Wang, Xudong; Hatada, Izuho

    1995-11-20

    We have isolated human homologues of the imprinted mouse gene, U2af1-rs1. Two different types of cDNAs and three distinct genomic DNAs belonging to different groups were isolated. We have identified chromosomal genes corresponding to each cDNA by restriction mapping and sequencing. Using both a panel of rodent/human somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization, group 1 and group 2 genes were mapped to chromosome 5q22 and chromosome Xp22.1, respectively. We designated group 1 and group 2 genes as human U2AF1-RS1 and U2AF1-RS2, respectively, because these genes corresponded to mouse U2af1-rs1 (chromosome 11) and U2af1-rs2 (chromosome X), which we also isolated and mapped. Amino acid sequences of human U2AF1-RS1 and U2AF-RS2 showed significant homology to U2AF small subunit. The group 3 gene, designated as U2AF1-RS3, of which the cDNA has not yet been isolated, was mapped to chromosome 19p13.2. 37 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A Mouse Model for the Metabolic Effects of the Human Fat Mass and Obesity Associated FTO Gene

    PubMed Central

    Church, Chris; Deacon, Robert; Gerken, Thomas; Lee, Angela; Moir, Lee; Mecinovi?, Jasmin; Quwailid, Mohamed M.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Cox, Roger D.

    2009-01-01

    Human FTO gene variants are associated with body mass index and type 2 diabetes. Because the obesity-associated SNPs are intronic, it is unclear whether changes in FTO expression or splicing are the cause of obesity or if regulatory elements within intron 1 influence upstream or downstream genes. We tested the idea that FTO itself is involved in obesity. We show that a dominant point mutation in the mouse Fto gene results in reduced fat mass, increased energy expenditure, and unchanged physical activity. Exposure to a high-fat diet enhances lean mass and lowers fat mass relative to control mice. Biochemical studies suggest the mutation occurs in a structurally novel domain and modifies FTO function, possibly by altering its dimerisation state. Gene expression profiling revealed increased expression of some fat and carbohydrate metabolism genes and an improved inflammatory profile in white adipose tissue of mutant mice. These data provide direct functional evidence that FTO is a causal gene underlying obesity. Compared to the reported mouse FTO knockout, our model more accurately reflects the effect of human FTO variants; we observe a heterozygous as well as homozygous phenotype, a smaller difference in weight and adiposity, and our mice do not show perinatal lethality or an age-related reduction in size and length. Our model suggests that a search for human coding mutations in FTO may be informative and that inhibition of FTO activity is a possible target for the treatment of morbid obesity. PMID:19680540

  14. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  15. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse Tiam-1 gene to chromosome 21q22.1

    SciTech Connect

    Haiming Chen; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Exon trapping was applied to genomic DNA from a chromosome 21-specific cosmid library (LL21NC02-Q) to clone portions of genes from this chromosome. Among a large number of trapped exons, three showed striking homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene (Tiam-1) at both nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence levels, suggesting that these three exons are part of a human homolog of the mouse Tiam-1 gene. We mapped this presumed human TIAM1 gene to chromosome 21 by using appropriate somatic cell hybrids, YACs, and cosmids. The TIAM1 gene localizes to YAC 760H5 of the I. Chumakov et al. YAC contig between markers D21S298 and D21S404 in band 21q22.1. This human gene (which is a member of the group of guanine nucleotide-dissociation stimulators that modulate the activity of Rho-like proteins) may be important in the development or metastasis of malignancies that are associated with abnormalities on chromosome 21, including the various forms of leukemia frequent in trisomy 21. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis of Effects of the CMAH Deactivation on Mouse Lung, Kidney and Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Chang, Byung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Background N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is generated by hydroxylation of CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc, catalyzed by CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (CMAH). However, humans lack this common mammalian cell surface molecule, Neu5Gc, due to inactivation of the CMAH gene during evolution. CMAH is one of several human-specific genes whose function has been lost by disruption or deletion of the coding frame. It has been suggested that CMAH inactivation has resulted in biochemical or physiological characteristics that have resulted in human-specific diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify differential gene expression profiles associated with the loss of Neu5Gc expression, we performed microarray analysis using Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip, using the main tissues (lung, kidney, and heart) from control mice and CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah) gene knock-out mice, respectively. Out of a total of 25,697 genes, 204, 162, and 147 genes were found to be significantly modulated in the lung, kidney, and heart tissues of the Cmah null mouse, respectively. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles, using three commercial pathway analysis software packages: Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis, and Pathway Studio. The gene ontology analysis revealed that the top 6 biological processes of these genes included protein metabolism and modification, signal transduction, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, immunity and defense, and carbohydrate metabolism. Gene interaction network analysis showed a common network that was common to the different tissues of the Cmah null mouse. However, the expression of most sialytransferase mRNAs of Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen, sialy-Tn antigen, Forssman antigen, and Tn antigen was significantly down-regulated in the liver tissue of Cmah null mice. Conclusions/Significance Mice bearing a human-like deletion of the Cmah gene serve as an important model for the study of abnormal pathogenesis and/or metabolism caused by the evolutionary loss of Neu5Gc synthesis in humans. PMID:25229777

  17. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, and TNF-? by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory model provide a basis for additional hypothesis-based research on the importance of changes in gene expression in neutrophils in different conditions. PMID:25279834

  18. The expression of myosin genes in developing skeletal muscle in the mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, G.E.; Ontell, M.; Cox, R.; Sassoon, D.; Buckingham, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we have investigated the temporal sequence of myosin gene expression in the developing skeletal muscle masses of mouse embryos. The probes used were isoform-specific, 35S-labeled antisense cRNAs to the known sarcomeric myosin heavy chain and myosin alkali light chain gene transcripts. Results showed that both cardiac and skeletal myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain mRNAs were first detected between 9 and 10 d post coitum (p.c.) in the myotomes of the most rostral somites. Myosin transcripts appeared in more caudal somites at later stages in a developmental gradient. The earliest myosin heavy chain transcripts detected code for the embryonic skeletal (MHCemb) and beta-cardiac (MHC beta) isoforms. Perinatal myosin heavy chain (MHCpn) transcripts begin to accumulate at 10.5 d p.c., which is much earlier than previously reported. At this stage, MHCemb is the major MHC transcript. By 12.5 d p.c., MHCpn and MHCemb mRNAs are present to an equal extent, and by 15.5 d p.c. the MHCpn transcript is the major MHC mRNA detected. Cardiac MHC beta transcripts are always present as a minor component. In contrast, the cardiac MLC1A mRNA is initially more abundant than that encoding the skeletal MLC1F isoform. By 12.5 d p.c. the two MLC mRNAs are present at similar levels, and by 15.5 d p.c., MLC1F is the predominant MLC transcript detected. Transcripts for the ventricular/slow (MLC1V) and another fast skeletal myosin light chain (MLC3F) are not detected in skeletal muscle before 15 d p.c., which marks the beginning of the fetal stage of muscle development. This is the first stage at which we can detect differences in expression of myosin genes between developing muscle fibers. We conclude that, during the development of the myotome and body wall muscles, different myosin genes follow independent patterns of activation and acculumation.

  19. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT(-/-)) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd-MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT(+/+)) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT(-/-) mice than that of MT(+/+) mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT(-/-) mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23921151

  20. Mutation of the diamond-blackfan anemia gene Rps7 in mouse results in morphological and neuroanatomical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Watkins-Chow, Dawn E; Cooke, Joanna; Pidsley, Ruth; Edwards, Andrew; Slotkin, Rebecca; Leeds, Karen E; Mullen, Raymond; Baxter, Laura L; Campbell, Thomas G; Salzer, Marion C; Biondini, Laura; Gibney, Gretchen; Phan Dinh Tuy, Françoise; Chelly, Jamel; Morris, H Douglas; Riegler, Johannes; Lythgoe, Mark F; Arkell, Ruth M; Loreni, Fabrizio; Flint, Jonathan; Pavan, William J; Keays, David A

    2013-01-01

    The ribosome is an evolutionarily conserved organelle essential for cellular function. Ribosome construction requires assembly of approximately 80 different ribosomal proteins (RPs) and four different species of rRNA. As RPs co-assemble into one multi-subunit complex, mutation of the genes that encode RPs might be expected to give rise to phenocopies, in which the same phenotype is associated with loss-of-function of each individual gene. However, a more complex picture is emerging in which, in addition to a group of shared phenotypes, diverse RP gene-specific phenotypes are observed. Here we report the first two mouse mutations (Rps7(Mtu) and Rps7(Zma)) of ribosomal protein S7 (Rps7), a gene that has been implicated in Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rps7 disruption results in decreased body size, abnormal skeletal morphology, mid-ventral white spotting, and eye malformations. These phenotypes are reported in other murine RP mutants and, as demonstrated for some other RP mutations, are ameliorated by Trp53 deficiency. Interestingly, Rps7 mutants have additional overt malformations of the developing central nervous system and deficits in working memory, phenotypes that are not reported in murine or human RP gene mutants. Conversely, Rps7 mouse mutants show no anemia or hyperpigmentation, phenotypes associated with mutation of human RPS7 and other murine RPs, respectively. We provide two novel RP mouse models and expand the repertoire of potential phenotypes that should be examined in RP mutants to further explore the concept of RP gene-specific phenotypes. PMID:23382688

  1. Antioxidants and metallothionein levels in mercury-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Brandão, R; Santos, F W; Farina, M; Zeni, G; Bohrer, D; Rocha, J B T; Nogueira, C W

    2006-11-01

    Acute effects of mercury on mouse blood, kidneys, and liver were evaluated. Mice received a single dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 4.6 mg/kg, subcutaneously) for three consecutive days. We investigated the possible beneficial effects of antioxidant therapy (N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2) compared with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS), an effective chelating agent in HgCl2 exposure in mice. We also verified whether metallothionein (MT) induction might be involved in a possible mechanism of protection against HgCl2 poisoning and whether different treatments would modify MT levels and other toxicological parameters. The results demonstrated that HgCl2 exposure significantly inhibited delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (delta-ALA-D) activity in liver and only DMPS treatment prevented the inhibitory effect. Mercuric chloride caused an increase in renal non-protein thiol groups (NPSH) and none of the treatments modified renal NPSH levels. Urea concentration was increased after HgCl2 exposure. NAC plus (PhSe)2 was partially effective in protecting against the effects of mercury. DMPS and (PhSe)2 were effective in restoring the increment in urea concentration caused by mercury. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and ascorbic acid levels were not modified after mercury exposure. Mercuric chloride poisoning caused an increase in hepatic and renal MT levels and antioxidant treatments did not modify this parameter. Our data indicated a lack of therapeutic effect of the antioxidants tested. PMID:16964587

  2. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT-/-) and corresponding wild-type (MT+/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT-/- or MT+/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT-/- mice significantly increased than in MT+/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT-/- mice. The apoptosis rate in MT-/- mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT-/- mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT-/- mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. PMID:26148447

  3. Interactions between the otitis media gene, Fbxo11, and p53 in the mouse embryonic lung.

    PubMed

    Tateossian, Hilda; Morse, Susan; Simon, Michelle M; Dean, Charlotte H; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of hearing loss in children, and tympanostomy (ear tube insertion) to alleviate the condition remains the commonest surgical intervention in children in the developed world. Chronic and recurrent forms of otitis media (OM) are known to have a very substantial genetic component; however, until recently, little was known of the underlying genes involved. The Jeff mouse mutant carries a mutation in the Fbxo11 gene, a member of the F-box family, and develops deafness due to a chronic proliferative OM. We previously reported that Fbxo11 is involved in the regulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) signalling by regulating the levels of phospho-Smad2 in the epithelial cells of palatal shelves, eyelids and airways of the lungs. It has been proposed that FBXO11 regulates the cell's response to TGF-? through the ubiquitination of CDT2. Additional substrates for FBXO11 have been identified, including p53. Here, we have studied both the genetic and biochemical interactions between FBXO11 and p53 in order to better understand the function of FBXO11 in epithelial development and its potential role in OM. In mice, we show that p53 (also known as Tp53) homozygous mutants and double heterozygous mutants (Jf/+ p53/+) exhibit similar epithelial developmental defects to Fbxo11 homozygotes. FBXO11 and p53 interact in the embryonic lung, and mutation in Fbxo11 prevents the interaction with p53. Both p53 and double mutants show raised levels of pSMAD2, recapitulating that seen in Fbxo11 homozygotes. Overall, our results support the conclusion that FBXO11 regulates the TGF-? pathway in the embryonic lung via cross-talk with p53. PMID:26471094

  4. Development of Genetically Flexible Mouse Models of Sarcoma Using RCAS-TVA Mediated Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kabaroff, Leah; Gupta, Amar; Menezes, Serena; Babichev, Yael; Kandel, Rita C.; Swallow, Carol J.; Dickson, Brendan C.; Gladdy, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA) system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues) would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively). Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19?/?) resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19?/?xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8–40 weeks). A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19?/?xBKE mice (32%), however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks) was observed. p16/p19?/?xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks) yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed. This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research. PMID:24733554

  5. 3D dense local point descriptors for mouse brain gene expression images.

    PubMed

    Le, Yen H; Kurkure, Uday; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2014-07-01

    Anatomical landmarks play an important role in many biomedical image analysis applications (e.g., registration and segmentation). Landmark detection can be computationally very expensive, especially in 3D images, because every single voxel in a region of interest may need to be evaluated. In this paper, we introduce two 3D local image descriptors which can be computed simultaneously for every voxel in a volume. Both our proposed descriptors are extensions of the DAISY descriptor, a popular descriptor that is based on the histograms of oriented gradients and was named after its daisy-flower-like configuration. Our experiments on mouse brain gene expression images indicate that our descriptors are discriminative and are able to reduce the detection errors of landmark points more than 30% when compared with SIFT-3D, an extension in 3D of SIFT (scale-invariant feature transform). We also demonstrate that our descriptors are more computationally efficient than SIFT-3D and n-SIFT (an extension SIFT in n-dimensions) for densely sampled points. Therefore, our descriptors can be used in applications that require computation of the descriptors at densely sampled points (e.g., landmark point detection or feature-based registration). PMID:24786719

  6. Risperidone and NAP protect cognition and normalize gene expression in a schizophrenia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vaisburd, Sinaya; Shemer, Zeev; Yeheskel, Adva; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2015-01-01

    Mutated disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a microtubule regulating protein, leads to schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. It is hypothesized that microtubule stabilization may provide neuroprotection in schizophrenia. The NAP (NAPVSIPQ) sequence of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) contains the SxIP motif, microtubule end binding (EB) protein target, which is critical for microtubule dynamics leading to synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Bioinformatics prediction for FDA approved drugs mimicking SxIP-like motif which displace NAP-EB binding identified Risperidone. Risperidone or NAP effectively ameliorated object recognition deficits in the mutated DISC1 mouse model. NAP but not Risperidone, reduced anxiety in the mutated mice. Doxycycline, which blocked the expression of the mutated DISC1, did not reverse the phenotype. Transcripts of Forkhead-BOX P2 (Foxp2), a gene regulating DISC1 and associated with human ability to acquire a spoken language, were increased in the hippocampus of the DISC1 mutated mice and were significantly lowered after treatment with NAP, Risperidone, or the combination of both. Thus, the combination of NAP and standard of care Risperidone in humans may protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:26553741

  7. Risperidone and NAP protect cognition and normalize gene expression in a schizophrenia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Vaisburd, Sinaya; Shemer, Zeev; Yeheskel, Adva; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2015-01-01

    Mutated disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a microtubule regulating protein, leads to schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. It is hypothesized that microtubule stabilization may provide neuroprotection in schizophrenia. The NAP (NAPVSIPQ) sequence of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) contains the SxIP motif, microtubule end binding (EB) protein target, which is critical for microtubule dynamics leading to synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Bioinformatics prediction for FDA approved drugs mimicking SxIP-like motif which displace NAP-EB binding identified Risperidone. Risperidone or NAP effectively ameliorated object recognition deficits in the mutated DISC1 mouse model. NAP but not Risperidone, reduced anxiety in the mutated mice. Doxycycline, which blocked the expression of the mutated DISC1, did not reverse the phenotype. Transcripts of Forkhead-BOX P2 (Foxp2), a gene regulating DISC1 and associated with human ability to acquire a spoken language, were increased in the hippocampus of the DISC1 mutated mice and were significantly lowered after treatment with NAP, Risperidone, or the combination of both. Thus, the combination of NAP and standard of care Risperidone in humans may protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:26553741

  8. Therapeutic silencing of an endogenous gene by siRNA cream in an arthritis model mouse.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, M; Oikawa, K; Sudo, K; Tanaka, M; Fujita, K; Ishikawa, A; Nakae, S; Kaspar, R L; Matsuzaki, M; Kudo, M; Kuroda, M

    2009-08-01

    Recent advances of biotechnology have laid the groundwork for potent and specific molecular-targeting therapies including RNA interference. The largest remaining hurdle for widespread use of this technology in skin is an effective delivery system. Here, we demonstrate an effective topical delivery system using a cream formulation containing a small-interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets osteopontin (OPN). OPN is a validated target in numerous inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The siRNA targeting OPN was incorporated into a cream formulation GeneCream that penetrates the stratum corneum, depositing siRNA in the epidermis, dermis, and to a lesser extent, subcutaneous tissue. In addition, when the OPN siRNA cream was topically applied to the skin of a collagen antibody-induced RA mouse model, the siRNA cream prevented the occurrence of severe, irreversible damage to bone and cartilage. Thus, the siRNA cream provides effective delivery of active OPN siRNA, suggesting this formulation may represent a platform technology for delivery of siRNAs for treating various disorders including RA. PMID:19474812

  9. Interactome maps of mouse gene regulatory domains reveal basic principles of transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kyong-Rim Kieffer; Tang, Zhonghui; Mathe, Ewy; Qian, Jason; Sung, Myong-Hee; Li, Guoliang; Resch, Wolfgang; Baek, Songjoon; Pruett, Nathanael; Grøntved, Lars; Vian, Laura; Nelson, Steevenson; Zare, Hossein; Hakim, Ofir; Reyon, Deepak; Yamane, Arito; Nakahashi, Hirotaka; Kovalchuk, Alexander L.; Zou, Jizhong; Joung, J. Keith; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Xiaoan; Hager, Gordon L.; Ruan, Yijun; Casellas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    A key finding of the ENCODE project is that the enhancer landscape of mammalian cells undergoes marked alterations during ontogeny. However, the nature and extent of these changes are unclear. As part of the NIH Mouse Regulome Project, we here combined DNaseI hypersensitivity, ChIP-Seq, and ChIA-PET technologies to map the promoter-enhancer interactomes of pluripotent ES cells and differentiated B lymphocytes. We confirm that enhancer usage varies widely across tissues. Unexpectedly, we find that this feature extends to broadly-transcribed genes, including Myc and Pim1 cell cycle regulators, which associate with an entirely different set of enhancers in ES and B cells. By means of high-resolution CpG methylomes, genome editing, and digital footprinting we show that these enhancers recruit lineage-determining factors. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the turning on and off of enhancers during development correlates with promoter activity. We propose that organisms rely on a dynamic enhancer landscape to control basic cellular functions in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:24360274

  10. Phenotypic correction of a mouse model for primary hyperoxaluria with adeno-associated virus gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Salido, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Pena, Marisol; Santana, Alfredo; Beattie, Stuart G; Petry, Harald; Torres, Armando

    2011-05-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of the hepatic enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGXT or AGT) which leads to overproduction of oxalate by the liver and subsequent urolithiasis and renal failure. The current therapy largely depends on liver transplantation, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To explore an alternative treatment, we used somatic gene transfer in a mouse genetic model for PH1 (Agxt1KO). Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing the human AGXT complementary DNA (cDNA) were pseudotyped with capsids from either serotype 8 or 5, and delivered to the livers of Agxt1KO mice via the tail vein. Both AAV8-AGXT and AAV5-AGXT vectors were able to reduce oxaluria to normal levels. In addition, treated mice showed blunted increase of oxaluria after challenge with ethylene glycol (EG), a glyoxylate precursor. In mice, AGT enzyme activity in whole liver extracts were restored to normal without hepatic toxicity nor immunogenicity for the 50 day follow-up. In summary, this study demonstrates the correction of primary hyperoxaluria in mice treated with either AAV5 or AAV8 vectors. PMID:21119625

  11. FOSL2 promotes leptin gene expression in human and mouse adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wrann, Christiane D.; Eguchi, Jun; Bozec, Aline; Xu, Zhao; Mikkelsen, Tarjei; Gimble, Jeffrey; Nave, Heike; Wagner, Erwin F.; Ong, Shao-En; Rosen, Evan D.

    2012-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is a critical regulator of many physiological functions, ranging from satiety to immunity. Surprisingly, very little is known about the transcriptional pathways that regulate adipocyte-specific expression of leptin. Here, we report studies in which we pursued a strategy integrating BAC transgenic reporter mice, reporter assays, and chromatin state mapping to locate an adipocyte-specific cis-element upstream of the leptin (LEP) gene in human fat cells. Quantitative proteomics with affinity enrichment of protein-DNA complexes identified the transcription factor FOS-like antigen 2 (FOSL2) as binding specifically to the identified region, a result that was confirmed by ChIP. Knockdown of FOSL2 in human adipocytes decreased LEP expression, and overexpression of Fosl2 increased Lep expression in mouse adipocytes. Moreover, the elevated LEP expression observed in obesity correlated well with increased FOSL2 levels in mice and humans, and adipocyte-specific genetic deletion of Fosl2 in mice reduced Lep expression. Taken together, these data identify FOSL2 as a critical regulator of leptin expression in adipocytes. PMID:22326952

  12. Global Analysis of Mouse Polyomavirus Infection Reveals Dynamic Regulation of Viral and Host Gene Expression and Promiscuous Viral RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    Garren, Seth B.; Kondaveeti, Yuvabharath; Duff, Michael O.; Carmichael, Gordon G.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) lytically infects mouse cells, transforms rat cells in culture, and is highly oncogenic in rodents. We have used deep sequencing to follow MPyV infection of mouse NIH3T6 cells at various times after infection and analyzed both the viral and cellular transcriptomes. Alignment of sequencing reads to the viral genome illustrated the transcriptional profile of the early-to-late switch with both early-strand and late-strand RNAs being transcribed at all time points. A number of novel insights into viral gene expression emerged from these studies, including the demonstration of widespread RNA editing of viral transcripts at late times in infection. By late times in infection, 359 host genes were seen to be significantly upregulated and 857 were downregulated. Gene ontology analysis indicated transcripts involved in translation, metabolism, RNA processing, DNA methylation, and protein turnover were upregulated while transcripts involved in extracellular adhesion, cytoskeleton, zinc finger binding, SH3 domain, and GTPase activation were downregulated. The levels of a number of long noncoding RNAs were also altered. The long noncoding RNA MALAT1, which is involved in splicing speckles and used as a marker in many late-stage cancers, was noticeably downregulated, while several other abundant noncoding RNAs were strongly upregulated. We discuss these results in light of what is currently known about the MPyV life cycle and its effects on host cell growth and metabolism. PMID:26407100

  13. Cloning and characterization of the mouse Mcoln1 gene reveals an alternatively spliced transcript not seen in humans

    PubMed Central

    Falardeau, John L; Kennedy, John C; Acierno, James S; Sun, Mei; Stahl, Stefanie; Goldin, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2002-01-01

    Background Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Recently the MLIV gene, MCOLN1, has been identified as a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel superfamily. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue, Mcoln1, and report a novel splice variant that is not seen in humans. Results The human and mouse genes display a high degree of synteny. Mcoln1 shows 91% amino acid and 86% nucleotide identity to MCOLN1. Also, Mcoln1 maps to chromosome 8 and contains an open reading frame of 580 amino acids, with a transcript length of approximately 2 kb encoded by 14 exons, similar to its human counterpart. The transcript that results from murine specific alternative splicing encodes a 611 amino acid protein that differs at the c-terminus. Conclusions Mcoln1 is highly similar to MCOLN1, especially in the transmembrane domains and ion pore region. Also, the late endosomal/lysosomal targeting signal is conserved, supporting the hypothesis that the protein is localized to these vesicle membranes. To date, there are very few reports describing species-specific splice variants. While identification of Mcoln1 is crucial to the development of mouse models for MLIV, the fact that there are two transcripts in mice suggests an additional or alternate function of the gene that may complicate phenotypic assessment. PMID:11897010

  14. Critical Role of Klf5 in Regulating Gene Expression during Post-Eyelid Opening Maturation of Mouse Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Lathrop, Kira L.; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Klf5 plays an important role in maturation and maintenance of the mouse ocular surface. Here, we quantify WT and Klf5-conditional null (Klf5CN) corneal gene expression, identify Klf5-target genes and compare them with the previously identified Klf4-target genes to understand the molecular basis for non-redundant functions of Klf4 and Klf5 in the cornea. Methodology/Principal Findings Postnatal day-11 (PN11) and PN56 WT and Klf5CN corneal transcriptomes were quantified by microarrays to compare gene expression in maturing WT corneas, identify Klf5-target genes, and compare corneal Klf4- and Klf5-target genes. Whole-mount corneal immunofluorescent staining was employed to examine CD45+ cell influx and neovascularization. Effect of Klf5 on expression of desmosomal components was studied by immunofluorescent staining and transient co-transfection assays. Expression of 714 and 753 genes was increased, and 299 and 210 genes decreased in PN11 and PN56 Klf5CN corneas, respectively, with 366 concordant increases and 72 concordant decreases. PN56 Klf5CN corneas shared 241 increases and 98 decreases with those previously described in Klf4CN corneas. Xenobiotic metabolism related pathways were enriched among genes decreased in Klf5CN corneas. Expression of angiogenesis and immune response-related genes was elevated, consistent with neovascularization and CD45+ cell influx in Klf5CN corneas. Expression of 1574 genes was increased and 1915 genes decreased in WT PN56 compared with PN11 corneas. Expression of ECM-associated genes decreased, while that of solute carrier family members increased in WT PN56 compared with PN11 corneas. Dsg1a, Dsg1b and Dsp were down-regulated in Klf5CN corneas and their corresponding promoter activities were stimulated by Klf5 in transient co-transfection assays. Conclusions/Significance Differences between PN11 and PN56 corneal Klf5-target genes reveal dynamic changes in functions of Klf5 during corneal maturation. Klf5 contributes to corneal epithelial homeostasis by regulating the expression of desmosomal components. Klf4- and Klf5-target genes are largely distinct, consistent with their non-redundant roles in the mouse cornea. PMID:23024760

  15. Localized Gene Expression Analysis during Sprouting Angiogenesis in Mouse Embryoid Bodies Using a Double Barrel Carbon Probe.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Nashimoto, Yuji; Zhou, Yuanshu; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2016-01-01

    The mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived angiogenesis model is widely used as a 3D model, reproducing cell-cell interactions in the living body. Previously, many methods to analyze localized cellular function, including in situ hybridization and laser capture microdissection, have been reported. In this study, we achieved a collection of localized cells from the angiogenesis model in hydrogel. The gene expression profiles of the endothelial cells derived from mouse ES cells were evaluated. First, we collected localized cells from the live tissue model embedded in hydrogel using the double barrel carbon probe (DBCP) and quantified mRNA expression. Second, we found that vascular marker genes were expressed at a much higher level in sprouting vessels than in the central core of the embryoid body because the cells in sprouting vessels might significantly differentiate into endothelial linages, including tip/stalk cells. Third, the gene expression levels tended to be different between the top and middle regions in the sprouting vessel due to the difference in the degree of differentiation in these regions. At the top region of the vessel, both the tip and stalk cells were present. The cells in the middle region became more mature. Collectively, these results show that DBCP is very useful for analyzing localized gene expression in cells collected from 3D live tissues embedded in hydrogel. This technique can be applied to comprehensive gene expression analyses in the medical field. PMID:26610749

  16. Mouse alpha-fetoprotein gene 5' regulatory elements are required for postnatal regulation by raf and Rif.

    PubMed Central

    Spear, B T

    1994-01-01

    The mouse alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is expressed at high levels in the yolk sac and fetal liver and at low levels in the fetal gut. AFP synthesis decreases dramatically shortly after birth to low levels that are maintained in the adult liver and gut. AFP expression can be reactivated in the adult liver upon renewed cell proliferation such as during liver regeneration or in hepatocellular carcinomas. Previously, two unlinked genetic loci that modulate postnatal AFP levels were identified. The raf locus controls, at least in part, basal steady-state AFP mRNA levels in adult liver. Rif influences the extent of AFP mRNA induction during liver regeneration. Transgenic mice were used to examine the role of 5' AFP regulatory regions in raf- and Rif-mediated control. A fragment of the AFP 5' region containing enhancer element I, the repressor, and the promoter was linked to the mouse class I H-2Dd structural gene. We demonstrate that this hybrid AFP-Dd transgene is expressed in the appropriate tissues. In addition, it is postnatally repressed and reactivated during liver regeneration in parallel with the endogenous AFP gene. Therefore, proper transcriptional control does not require the AFP structural gene. Furthermore, the AFP 5' control region is sufficient to confer raf and Rif responsiveness to the linked H-2Dd structural gene, suggesting that raf and Rif act at the level of transcriptional initiation. Images PMID:7523852

  17. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Metallothionein Rescues against Cigarette Smoking Exposure-Induced Myocardial Contractile and Mitochondrial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Han, Xuefeng; Lane, Erin K.; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Second hand cigarette smoke is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although a tie between smoking and cardiovascular disease is well established, the underlying mechanisms still remains elusive due to the lack of adequate animal models. This study was designed to use a mouse model of exposure to cigarette smoke, a surrogate of environmental tobacco smoke, to evaluate the impact of cardiac overexpression of heavy metal scavenger metallothionein on myocardial geometry, contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties and apoptosis following side-stream smoke exposure. Methods Adult male wild-type FVB and metallothionein transgenic mice were placed in a chamber exposed to cigarette smoke for 1 hour daily for 40 days. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties, fibrosis, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage were examined. Results Our data revealed that smoke exposure enlarged ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, reduced myocardial and cardiomyocyte contractile function, disrupted intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, facilitated fibrosis, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage (cytochrome C release and aconitase activity), the effects of which were attenuated or mitigated by metallothionein. In addition, side-stream smoke expose enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3? without affecting pan protein expression in the heart, the effect of which was abolished or ameliorated by metallothionein. Cigarette smoke extract interrupted cardiomyocyte contractile function and intracellular Ca2+ properties, the effect of which was mitigated by wortmannin and NAC. Conclusions These data suggest that side-stream smoke exposure led to myocardial dysfunction, intracellular Ca2+ mishandling, apoptosis, fibrosis and mitochondrial damage, indicating the therapeutic potential of antioxidant against in second smoking-induced cardiac defects possibly via mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. PMID:23431404

  18. Molecular characterization of mouse lens epithelial cell lines and their suitability to study RNA granules and cataract associated genes.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Anne M; Anand, Deepti; Smith, Sylvie F; Dang, Christine A; Waters, Stephanie M; Pathania, Mallika; Beebe, David C; Lachke, Salil A

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of cytosolic RNA granule (RG) component proteins associated with human cataract has initiated investigations on post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene expression control in the lens. Application of established mouse lens epithelial cell lines (LECs) can provide rapid insights on RG function in lens cells, especially because mouse mutants in several RG components are not available. However, although these LECs represent potential reagents for such analyses, they are uncharacterized for lens gene expression or RG formation. Therefore, a detailed molecular and cellular characterization of three permanent mouse LECs 17EM15, 21EM15 and ?TN4 is performed in this study. Comparative analysis between microarray gene expression datasets on LEC 21EM15 and iSyTE lens tissue demonstrates that 30% of top 200 iSyTE identified lens-enriched genes are expressed in these cells. Majority of these candidates are independently validated to either have lens expression, function or linkage to cataract. Moreover, analysis of microarray data with genes described in Cat-Map, an online database of cataract associated genes and loci, demonstrates that 131 genes linked to cataract loci are expressed in 21EM15 cells. Furthermore, gene expression in LECs is compared to isolated lens epithelium or fiber cells by qRT-PCR and by comparative analyses with publically available epithelium or fiber-specific microarray and RNA-seq (sequencing) datasets. Expression of select candidate genes was validated by regular and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of lens epithelium-enriched genes Foxe3, Pax6, Anxa4 and Mcm4 is up-regulated in LEC lines, compared to isolated lens fiber cells. Moreover, similar to isolated lens epithelium, all three LECs exhibit down-regulation of fiber cell-expressed genes Crybb1, Mip and Prox1 when compared to fiber cells. These data indicate that the LEC lines exhibit greater similarity to lens epithelium than to fiber cells. Compared to non-lens cell line NIH3T3, LECs exhibit significantly enriched expression of transcription factors with important function in the lens, namely Pax6, Foxe3 and Prox1. In addition to these genes, all three LECs also express key lens- and cataract-associated genes, namely Dkk3, Epha2, Hsf4, Jag1, Mab21l1, Meis1, Pknox1, Pou2f1, Sfrp1, Sparc, Tdrd7 and Trpm3. Additionally, 21EM15 microarrays indicate expression of Chmp4b, Cryab and Tcfap2a among others important genes. Immunostaining with makers for Processing bodies (P-bodies) and Stress granules (SGs) demonstrates that these classes of RGs are robustly expressed in all three LECs. Moreover, under conditions of stress, 17EM15 and ?TN4 exhibit significantly higher numbers of P-bodies and SGs compared to NIH3T3 cells. In sum, these data indicate that mouse LECs 21EM15, 17EM15 and ?TN4 express key lens or cataract genes, are similar to lens epithelium than fiber cells, and exhibit high levels of P-bodies and SGs, indicating their suitability for investigating gene expression control and RG function in lens-derived cells. PMID:25530357

  19. Differential expression of genes in the calcium signaling pathway underlies lesion development in the LDb mouse model of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Solida; Sun, Hua; Acevedo, Frances; Shimmin, Lawrence C.; Zhao, Lei; Teng, Ba-Bie; Hixson, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is influenced by the interaction of environmental and genetic susceptibility risk factors. We used global microarray expression profiling to investigate differentially regulated genes in aorta during development of atherosclerosis in a susceptible genetically modified mouse model in response to the interaction between risk factors including hyperlipidemic genotype, shear stress, diet, and age. Methods and Results In this study we investigated transcriptional changes in lesion-prone and lesion-resistant regions of aortas in genetically modified mice lacking both genes of the LDL receptor and the apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme (LDb; Ldlr?/?Apobec1?/?). Risk factors including hyperlipidemic genotype (LDb vs. C57BL/6 wildtype), shear stress (lesion-prone vs. lesion resistant aortic regions), diet (chow vs. Western high-fat), and age (2-months vs. 8-months) were studied. We hybridized aortic RNA samples with microarray chips containing probes for 45,000 mouse genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Overall, the differentially expressed genes were components of 20 metabolic and physiological pathways. Notably, calcium signaling is the major pathway identified with differential regulation of 30 genes within this pathway. We also found differential expression of calcium signaling genes in cultured primary endothelial cells from lesion-prone and lesion-resistant arterial regions (LDb mice vs C57BL/6 controls), providing further support for involvement of calcium signaling in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, we demonstrated protein expression of genes in the calcium signaling pathway using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Conclusions Our results suggest that calcium signaling may play an important role in regulation of genes expressed in aorta during development of atherosclerosis. Calcium signaling may act via mechanistic responses to genetic, mechanical, and environmental insults that trigger an imbalance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, resulting in altered biological processes leading to lesion development. PMID:20667539

  20. A mouse strain where basal connective tissue growth factor gene expression can be switched from low to high.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Heather E; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Hiller, Sylvia; Sulik, Kathleen K; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a signaling molecule that primarily functions in extracellular matrix maintenance and repair. Increased Ctgf expression is associated with fibrosis in chronic organ injury. Studying the role of CTGF in fibrotic disease in vivo, however, has been hampered by perinatal lethality of the Ctgf null mice as well as the limited scope of previous mouse models of Ctgf overproduction. Here, we devised a new approach and engineered a single mutant mouse strain where the endogenous Ctgf-3' untranslated region (3'UTR) was replaced with a cassette containing two 3'UTR sequences arranged in tandem. The modified Ctgf allele uses a 3'UTR from the mouse FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-Fos) and produces an unstable mRNA, resulting in 60% of normal Ctgf expression (Lo allele). Upon Cre-expression, excision of the c-Fos-3'UTR creates a transcript utilizing the more stable bovine growth hormone (bGH) 3'UTR, resulting in increased Ctgf expression (Hi allele). Using the Ctgf Lo and Hi mutants, and crosses to a Ctgf knockout or Cre-expressing mice, we have generated a series of strains with a 30-fold range of Ctgf expression. Mice with the lowest Ctgf expression, 30% of normal, appear healthy, while a global nine-fold overexpression of Ctgf causes abnormalities, including developmental delay and craniofacial defects, and embryonic death at E10-12. Overexpression of Ctgf by tamoxifen-inducible Cre in the postnatal life, on the other hand, is compatible with life. The Ctgf Lo-Hi mutant mice should prove useful in further understanding the function of CTGF in fibrotic diseases. Additionally, this method can be used for the production of mouse lines with quantitative variations in other genes, particularly with genes that are broadly expressed, have distinct functions in different tissues, or where altered gene expression is not compatible with normal development. PMID:20877562

  1. Comparative gene expression profiling of adult mouse ovary-derived oogonial stem cells supports a distinct cellular identity

    PubMed Central

    Imudia, Anthony N.; Wang, Ning; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; White, Yvonne A.R.; Woods, Dori C.; Tilly, Jonathan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Perform gene expression profiling of adult mouse ovary-derived oogonial stem cells (OSCs). Design Experimental animal study. Setting Research laboratory. Animal(s) Adult C57BL/6 female mice. Intervention(s) None. Main outcome measure(s) Gene expression profiles were compared between freshly isolated and cultured OSCs, as well as between OSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), fetal primordial germ cells (PGCs) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs); OSC yield from ovaries versus meiotic gene activation during the estrous cycle was determined. Result(s) Freshly isolated OSCs, PGCs and SSCs exhibited distinct gene expression profiles. Cultured OSCs maintained their germline gene expression pattern, but gained expression of pluripotency markers found in PGCs and ESCs. Cultured OSCs also expressed the meiotic marker, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8). In vivo, OSC yield was higher from luteal versus follicular phase ovaries and this was inversely related to Stra8 expression. Conclusion(s) Freshly isolated OSCs exhibit a germline gene expression profile that overlaps with, but is distinct from, that of PGCs and SSCs. After in vitro expansion, OSCs activate expression of pluripotency genes found in freshly isolated PGCs. In vivo, OSC numbers in the ovaries fluctuate during the estrous cycle, with the highest numbers noted during the luteal phase. This is followed by activation of Stra8 expression during the follicular phase, which may signify a wave of neo-oogenesis to partially offset follicular loss through atresia and ovulation in the prior cycle. PMID:23876535

  2. A comparative transcriptional map of a region of 250 kb on the human and mouse X chromosome between the G6PD and the FLN1 genes

    SciTech Connect

    Rivella, S.; Tamanini, F.; Bione, S.; Mancini, M.

    1995-08-10

    The transcriptional organization of the region of the mouse X chromosome between the G6pd and the Fln1 genes was studied in detail, and it was compared with the syntenic region of the human chromosome. A cosmid contig of 250 kb was constructed by screening mouse cosmid libraries with probes for human genes and with whole cosmids. Overlapping cosmids were aligned by comparing EcoRI and rare-cutter restriction enzyme digestions. The gene order and the orientation of transcription were determined by hybridization with fragments from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} moieties of each cDNA. Our work demonstrates that all of the new genes identified in human are present in the mouse. The size of the region, 250 kb, is also very similar, as are gene order and gene organizations: the transcriptional organization in {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes} described in human is found to be identical in the mouse. The major difference detected is the much lower content in rare-cutter restriction sites, which is related to the lower G+C and CpG content of mouse DNA. The very high conservation that we have described suggests that a potent selective pressure has contributed to such conservation of gene organization. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Chronic methamphetamine treatment reduces the expression of synaptic plasticity genes and changes their DNA methylation status in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2015-12-10

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that may cause long-lasting synaptic dysfunction and abnormal gene expression. We aimed to explore the differential expression of synaptic plasticity genes in chronic METH-treated mouse brain. We used the RT(2) Profiler PCR Array and the real-time quantitative PCR to characterize differentially expressed synaptic plasticity genes in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus of chronic METH-treated mice compared with normal saline-treated mice. We further used pyrosequencing to assess DNA methylation changes in the CpG region of the five immediate early genes (IEGs) in chronic METH-treated mouse brain. We detected six downregulated genes in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus of chronic METH-treated mice, including five IEGs (Arc, Egr2, Fos, Klf10, and Nr4a1) and one neuronal receptor gene (Grm1), compared with normal saline-treated group, but only four genes (Arc, Egr2, Fos, and Nr4a1) were confirmed to be different. Furthermore, we found several CpG sites of the Arc and the Fos that had significant changes in DNA methylation status in the frontal cortex of chronic METH-treated mice, while the klf10 and the Nr4a1 that had significant changes in the hippocampus. Our results show that chronic administration of METH may lead to significant downregulation of the IEGs expression in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, which may partly account for the molecular mechanism of the action of METH. Furthermore, the changes in DNA methylation status of the IEGs in the brain indicate that an epigenetic mechanism-dependent transcriptional regulation may contribute to METH addiction, which warrants additional study. PMID:26496011

  4. Targeted disruption of the mouse adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene and the production of APRT-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, S.J.; Chen, J.; Tischfield, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT: EC 2.4.2.7), a ubiquitously expressed purine salvage enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate from existing adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans results in the accumulation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine leading to crystalluria and nephrolithiasis. In order to facilitate our study of this rare, autosomal recessive disorder, we applied the advances in gene targeting technology and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell culture to the production of APRT-deficient mice. A positive-negative targeting strategy was used. The tageting vector contain 5.6 kb of the mouse APRT gene, a neomycin resistance gene in exon 3 as a positive selection marker, and a HSV thymidine kinase gene at the 3{prime} end of the homology as a negative selection marker. The vector was introduced into D3 ES cells by electroporation and the cells were selected for G418 and ganciclovir (GANC) resistance. G418-GANC resistant clones were screened by Southern blot. One of several correctly targeted clones was expanded and used for blastocyst microinjection to produce chimeric mice. Chimeric animals were bred and agouti progeny heterozygous for the targeted allele were obtained. Heterozygous animals have been bred to produce APRT-deficient animals. Matings are currently underway to determine the phenotype of APRT/HPRT-deficient animals.

  5. Absence of linkage of apparently single gene mediated ADHD with the human syntenic region of the mouse mutant coloboma

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, E.J.; Rogan, P.K.; Domoto, M.

    1995-12-18

    Attention deficit disorder (ADHD) is a complex biobehavioral phenotype which affects up to 8% of the general population and often impairs social, academic, and job performance. Its origins are heterogeneous, but a significant genetic component is suggested by family and twin studies. The murine strain, coloboma, displays a spontaneously hyperactive phenotype that is responsive to dextroamphetamine and has been proposed as a genetic model for ADHD. Coloboma is a semi-dominant mutation that is caused by a hemizygous deletion of the SNAP-25 and other genes on mouse chromosome 2q. To test the possibility that the human homolog of the mouse coloboma gene(s) could be responsible for ADHD, we have carried out linkage studies with polymorphic markers in the region syntenic to coloboma (20p11-p12). Five families in which the pattern of inheritance of ADHD appears to be autosomal dominant were studied. Segregation analysis of the traits studied suggested that the best fitting model was a sex-influenced, single gene, Mendelian pattern. Several genetic models were evaluated based on estimates of penetrance, phenocopy rate, and allele frequency derived from our patient population and those of other investigators. No significant linkage was detected between the disease locus and markers spanning this chromosome 20 interval. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup ?/?}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup ?/?} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup ?/?} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  7. Responses of wild small mammals to a pollution gradient: host factors influence metal and metallothionein levels.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Clémentine; Cosson, Richard P; Coeurdassier, Michaël; Raoul, Francis; Giraudoux, Patrick; Crini, Nadia; de Vaufleury, Annette; Scheifler, Renaud

    2010-03-01

    We investigated how host factors (species, age, gender) modulated Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu concentrations, metallothionein levels (MTs) and their relationships in 7 sympatric small mammal species along a pollution gradient. Cd concentrations in liver and kidneys increased with age in all species. Age effect on other metals and MTs differs among species. Gender did not influence metal and MT levels except in the bank vole. Three patterns linking internal metal concentrations and MTs were observed along the gradient: a low metal accumulation with a (i) high (wood mouse) or (ii) low (bank vole) level of MTs accompanied by a slight or no increase of MTs with Cd accumulation; (iii) an elevated metal accumulation with a sharp increase of MTs (common and pygmy shrews). In risk assessment and biomonitoring perspectives, we conclude that measurements of MTs and metals might be associated because they cannot be interpreted properly when considered separately. PMID:19897292

  8. Expression of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene in the mouse lung after in vivo intratracheal plasmid-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, K; Rosenfeld, M A; Nakamura, H; Scherer, E M; Pavirani, A; Lecocq, J P; Crystal, R G

    1992-01-01

    As an approach to gene therapy for the respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF), in vivo plasmid-mediated direct transfer of the normal CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to the airway epithelium was investigated in mice. To evaluate the feasibility of this strategy, pRSVL, a plasmid composed of a firefly luciferase gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), along with cationic liposomes was instilled into the trachea of C57BI/6NCR mice. With administration of 200-400 micrograms plasmid DNA, luciferase expression could be detected in the mouse lung homogenates for at least 4 wk. With this background, a CFTR expression plasmid vector (pRSVCFTR) constructed by replacing the luciferase cDNA from pRSVL with the normal human CFTR cDNA was evaluated in vivo in mice. Intratracheal instillation of pRSVCFTR with cationic liposomes followed by analysis of mouse lung RNA by polymerase chain reaction amplification (after conversion of mRNA to cDNA) using a RSV-LTR specific sense primer and a human CFTR-specific antisense primer demonstrated human CFTR mRNA transcripts from one day to 4 wk after instillation. Further, in vivo evaluation of beta-galactosidase activity after intratracheal administration of an E. coli lacZ gene expression plasmid vector directed by the cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV beta) demonstrated that the airway epithelium was the major target of transfer and expression of the exogenous gene. These observations demonstrate successful plasmid-mediated gene transfer to the airway epithelium in vivo. This strategy may be feasible as a form of gene therapy to prevent the pulmonary manifestations of CF. Images PMID:1377820

  9. The mammalian single-minded (SIM) gene: Mouse cDNA structure and diencephalic expression indicate a candidate gene for Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Akiko; Kudoh, Jun; Shindoh, Nobuaki

    1996-07-01

    We have recently isolated a human homolog (hSIM) of the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene from the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21 using the exon trapping method. The Drosophila sim gene encodes a transcription factor that regulates the development of the central nervous system midline cell lineage. To elucidate the structure of the mammalian SIM protein, we have isolated cDNA clones from a mouse embryo cDNA library. The cDNA clones encode a polypeptide of 657 amino acids with a bHLH (basic-helix-loop-helix) domain, characteristic of a large family of transcription factors, and a PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain in the amino-terminal half region. Both of these domains have striking sequence homology with human SIM and Drosophila SIM proteins. In contrast, the carboxy-terminal half of the mouse SIM protein consists of a proline-rich region with no sequence homology to the Drosophila SIM provator domain of a number of transcription factors. Whole-mount embryo in situ hybridization experiments revealed that the SIM mRNA is expressed prominently in the diencephalon during embryogenesis strongly suggest that the newly isolated mammalian SIM homolog may play a critical role in the development of the mammalian central nervous system. We propose that the human SIM gene may be one of the pathogenic genes of Down syndrome. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Catalytic immunoglobulin gene delivery in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: prophylactic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Kou, Jinghong; Yang, Junling; Lim, Jeong-Eun; Pattanayak, Abhinandan; Song, Min; Planque, Stephanie; Paul, Sudhir; Fukuchi, Ken-Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid beta-peptide (A?) in the brain is hypothesized to be a causal event leading to dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A? vaccination removes A? deposits from the brain. A? immunotherapy, however, may cause T cell- and/or Fc-receptor-mediated brain inflammation and relocate parenchymal A? deposits to blood vessels leading to cerebral hemorrhages. Because catalytic antibodies do not form stable immune complexes and A? fragments produced by catalytic antibodies are less likely to form aggregates, A?-specific catalytic antibodies may have safer therapeutic profiles than reversibly-binding anti-A? antibodies. Additionally, catalytic antibodies may remove A? more efficiently than binding antibodies because a single catalytic antibody can hydrolyze thousands of A? molecules. We previously isolated A?-specific catalytic antibody, IgVL5D3, with strong A?-hydrolyzing activity. Here, we evaluated the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of brain-targeted IgVL5D3 gene delivery via recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) in an AD mouse model. One single injection of rAAV9-IgVL5D3 into the right ventricle of AD model mice yielded widespread, high expression of IgVL5D3 in the unilateral hemisphere. IgVL5D3 expression was readily detectable in the contralateral hemisphere but to a much lesser extent. IgVL5D3 expression was also confirmed in the cerebrospinal fluid. Prophylactic and therapeutic injection of rAAV9-IgVL5D3 reduced A? load in the ipsilateral hippocampus of AD model mice. No evidence of hemorrhages, increased vascular amyloid deposits, increased proinflammatory cytokines, or infiltrating T-cells in the brains was found in the experimental animals. AAV9-mediated anti-A? catalytic antibody brain delivery can be prophylactic and therapeutic options for AD. PMID:24733587

  11. Effect of melamine toxicity on Tetrahymena thermophila proliferation and metallothionein expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Hua; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Xuewen

    2015-06-01

    Melamine is a raw material in the chemical industry. Because of its high nitrogen content, melamine has been utilized by unscrupulous businessmen as a food additive to enhance the indices of protein content in food and feed testing. Tetrahymena has long been used as an excellent model organism in toxicological studies. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of melamine on Tetrahymena. In the present study, the effects of melamine on the proliferation and mating rate of Tetrahymena were examined by microscopic counting of the cell numbers. The comet assay and DAPI nuclear staining were performed to analyze the changes in the Tetrahymena genome. Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect apoptosis. Furthermore, RT-PCR was performed to determine the changes in the expression of the metallothionein gene in Tetrahymena that underwent stress treatment with varying concentrations of melamine. The results indicated that melamine affected the proliferation and sexual reproduction of Tetrahymena. High melamine concentrations damaged the Tetrahymena genome to a certain extent and induced apoptosis in the organism. Expression of the metallothionein gene was upregulated in Tetrahymena exposed to melamine stress to ameliorate melamine-induced damage. These results indicated that melamine displayed significant toxicity to Tetrahymena cells. PMID:25720813

  12. Validation of Tuba1a as Appropriate Internal Control for Normalization of Gene Expression Analysis during Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aditi; Dobersch, Stephanie; Dammann, Reinhard H.; Bellusci, Saverio; Ilinskaya, Olga N.; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The expression ratio between the analysed gene and an internal control gene is the most widely used normalization method for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression analysis. The ideal reference gene for a specific experiment is the one whose expression is not affected by the different experimental conditions tested. In this study, we validate the applicability of five commonly used reference genes during different stages of mouse lung development. The stability of expression of five different reference genes (Tuba1a, Actb Gapdh, Rn18S and Hist4h4) was calculated within five experimental groups using the statistical algorithm of geNorm software. Overall, Tuba1a showed the least variability in expression among the different stages of lung development, while Hist4h4 and Rn18S showed the maximum variability in their expression. Expression analysis of two lung specific markers, surfactant protein C (SftpC) and Clara cell-specific 10 kDA protein (Scgb1a1), normalized to each of the five reference genes tested here, confirmed our results and showed that incorrect reference gene choice can lead to artefacts. Moreover, a combination of two internal controls for normalization of expression analysis during lung development will increase the accuracy and reliability of results. PMID:25723738

  13. Changes in gene expression associated with loss of function of the NSDHL sterol dehydrogenase in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, David; Swartzlander, Daniel; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Davuluri, Ramana V; Herman, Gail E

    2005-06-01

    Seven human disorders of postsqualene cholesterol biosynthesis have been described. One of these, congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects (CHILD) syndrome, results from mutations in the X-linked gene NADH sterol dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL) encoding a sterol dehydrogenase. A series of mutant alleles of the murine Nsdhl gene are carried by bare patches (Bpa) mice, with Bpa(1H) representing a null allele. Heterozygous Bpa(1H) females display skin and skeletal abnormalities in a distribution reflecting random X inactivation, whereas hemizygous male embryos die before embryonic day 10.5. To investigate the molecular basis of defects associated with perturbations in cholesterol biosynthesis, microarray analysis was performed comparing gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts expressing the Bpa(1H) allele versus wild-type (wt) cells. Labeled cDNAs from cells grown in normal serum or lipid-depleted serum (LDS) were hybridized to microarrays containing 22,000 mouse genes. Among 44 genes that showed higher expression in the Bpa(1H) versus wt cells grown in LDS, 11 function in cholesterol biosynthesis, 7 are involved in fatty acid synthesis, 3 (Srebp2, Insig1, and Orf11) encode sterol-regulatory proteins, and 2 (Ldlr and StarD4) are lipid transporters. Of the 21 remaining genes, 16 are known genes, some of which have been implicated previously in cholesterol homeostasis or lipid-mediated signaling, and 5 are uncharacterized cDNA clones. PMID:15805545

  14. Validation of Tuba1a as appropriate internal control for normalization of gene expression analysis during mouse lung development.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Aditi; Dobersch, Stephanie; Dammann, Reinhard H; Bellusci, Saverio; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The expression ratio between the analysed gene and an internal control gene is the most widely used normalization method for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression analysis. The ideal reference gene for a specific experiment is the one whose expression is not affected by the different experimental conditions tested. In this study, we validate the applicability of five commonly used reference genes during different stages of mouse lung development. The stability of expression of five different reference genes (Tuba1a, Actb Gapdh, Rn18S and Hist4h4) was calculated within five experimental groups using the statistical algorithm of geNorm software. Overall, Tuba1a showed the least variability in expression among the different stages of lung development, while Hist4h4 and Rn18S showed the maximum variability in their expression. Expression analysis of two lung specific markers, surfactant protein C (SftpC) and Clara cell-specific 10 kDA protein (Scgb1a1), normalized to each of the five reference genes tested here, confirmed our results and showed that incorrect reference gene choice can lead to artefacts. Moreover, a combination of two internal controls for normalization of expression analysis during lung development will increase the accuracy and reliability of results. PMID:25723738

  15. Molecular mechanism of extinction of liver-specific functions in mouse hepatoma x rat fibroblast hybrids: extinction of the albumin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantinou, J.; Wong, E.; Ratrie, H.; Szpirer, C.; Szpirer, J.

    1982-01-01

    Hybrids formed by the fusion of mouse hepatoma (BWTG3) and rat fibroblast (JF1) cells exhibit the extinction of mouse albumin and ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein synthesis. Karyotype analyses suggest that all parental chromosomes are present in the hybrids. The extinction, therefore, of mouse hepatocyte genes is attributed to the inhibitory action of the rat genome. In these studies, we show that these hybrids possess and express the mouse ..beta..-glucyronidase gene (which is encoded on the same chromosome as the mouse albumin and ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein gene), and we present data of Southern blot analysis which demonstrate that such hybrids have indeed retained both mouse and rat albumin DNA sequences. In addition, using mouse albumin cDNA, we have shown by cDNA-RNA reassociation kinetics that albumin mRNA is virtually absent in these hybrids. We conclude from these studies that the extinction of albumin synthesis involves a mechanism which results in the loss of cytoplasmic albumin mRNA.

  16. Expression of the human Dp 71 (apo-dystrophin 1) gene from a 760 kb reconstructed human distal DMD YAC transferred to mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ommen, G.J.B. van; Heikoop, J.C.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.

    1994-09-01

    In a program to re-introduce and study the 2.5 mb human DMD gene in a mouse background, we have first reconstructed the gene on a single YAC by homologous recombination. We are now testing pilot gene transfer of a 760 kb YAC generated during the process and covering the 3{prime} region of the gene. This YAC contains exons 52-79 and thus includes the internal genes of Dp 71 (apo-dystrophin 1) and Dp 116 (apo-dystrophin 2). To facilitate selection in mammalian cells, the YAC was modified by recombinational insertion (retrofitting) of a neomycin-resistance gene in the right vector-arm. This YAC, yneo(18-25)C, was introduced in mouse LA-9 cells by PEG-mediated cell fusion. G418 resistant transformants were characterized by DMD-exon-PCR and Southern blotting. One of the six clones analyzed accommodated the entire intact YAC-DNA. Expression of the human DMD gene was studied by RT-PCR and revealed expression of the human Dp 71 gene but not of the Dp 116 gene in the full-length clone LA-9/3A. Remarkably, differences were observed in the 3{prime} region of the mouse and the human mRNAs, due to alternative splicing of exons 71 (absent in the human mRNA, present in the mouse mRNA) and 78 (present in the human mRNA, absent in the mouse mRNA). The splicing pattern of the human transcript mirrors that of the major product in human blood cells, suggesting that in this murine cell line processing of the human and the mouse DMD transcripts maintains the exon selectivity of the original species.

  17. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ER? in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A.; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O.

    2013-09-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p?-DDT (85%) and o,p?-DDT (15%) on CAR and ER? receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ER? recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ER? in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45?, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45?. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ER?-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ER? activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as produced by DDT in rodent livers. - Highlights: • DDT activated both CAR and ER? and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes. • DDT produced increases in cell cycle and anti-apoptosis proteins and decrease in p53. • DDT mixture was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway in mouse livers.

  19. Metallothionein and occupational exposure to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Falck, F Y; Fine, L J; Smith, R G; Garvey, J; Schork, A; England, B; McClatchey, K D; Linton, J

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between metallothionein (MT), chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd), and renal function was investigated in 53 men who were occupationally exposed to Cd. The aim was to determine if MT is a potential biological monitor for chronic exposure to Cd which would be useful for preventing Cd nephropathy. In this study MT excretion, serum MT, and serum creatinine concentrations were significantly higher in subjects with abnormal renal function who had been exposed to Cd. MT excretion was also linearly related on an individual basis to protein excretion, beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) excretion, and cumulative time weighted exposure (dose). MT excretion was also a better predictor of dose than either beta 2-M excretion or Cd excretion. The findings suggest that MT is a potential biological monitor for chronic Cd exposure that would be useful for preventing Cd-induced nephropathy. Further studies of non-specific nephropathies and MT are needed to determine if MT is a specific indicator of proximal tubule function secondary to chronic exposure to Cd. PMID:6347245

  20. Adeno-Associated Virus Gene Repair Corrects a Mouse Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    means to cure many monogenic diseases. However, traditional gene therapies are best suited to treat proteins. Even now, gene therapy efforts remain focused on gene addition strategies usingfull.7 kb), thus, this type of gene therapy is not applicable for all disorders.6 Gene repair offers

  1. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  2. Generation and Characterization of Transgenic Mice Expressing Mouse Ins1 Promoter for Pancreatic ?-Cell-Specific Gene Overexpression and Knockout.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulong; Su, Yutong; Shan, Aijing; Jiang, Xiuli; Ma, Qinyun; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Cao, Yanan

    2015-07-01

    The technologies for pancreatic ?-cell-specific gene overexpression or knockout are fundamental for investigations of functional genes in vivo. Here we generated the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mouse models, which expressed the Cre recombinase or reverse tetracycline regulatable transactivator (rtTA) without hGH minigene under the control of mouse Ins1 promoter. Our data showed that the Cre-mediated recombination and rtTA-mediated activation could be efficiently detected at embryonic day 13.5 when these models were crossed with the reporter mice (ROSA(mT/mG) or tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP). The Cre and rtTA expression was restricted to ?-cells without leakage in the brain and other tissues. Moreover, both the transgenic lines showed normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. These results suggested that the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mice could be used to knock out or overexpress target genes in embryos and adults to facilitate ?-cell researches. PMID:25885930

  3. Identification of Genes Important for Cutaneous Function Revealed by a Large Scale Reverse Genetic Screen in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K.; Cottle, Denny L.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Watt, Fiona M.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.; Sundberg, John P.; White, Jacqueline K.; Smyth, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  4. Murine Bv8 gene maps near a synteny breakpoint of mouse chromosome 6 and human 3p21.

    PubMed

    Jilek, A; Engel, E; Beier, D; Lepperdinger, G

    2000-10-01

    The genomic structure of the murine Bv8 gene was determined in 129/SvJ mouse, and the chromosomal localization was identified. Bv8 has first been characterized from skin secretion of the yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata. When injected into rat brain, this polypetide causes hyperalgesia. The murine Bv8 gene was shown to consist of four exons and was localized on chromosome 6 between the microsatellite markers D6Mit66 and D6Mit36 near the gene mem1, whereas the human counterpart was assigned to the non-syntenic region 3p21.1. Furthermore, the primary Bv8 transcript appeared to be alternatively spliced. The first variant contained all four exons yielding a product with a stretch highly enriched in basic amino acids in its central part. This domain is absent in the peptides from frog as well as in a splice variant expressed in mouse testis. A third variant gives rise to a truncated polypeptide. PMID:11054548

  5. Transcriptional Modulation of Intestinal Innate Defense/Inflammation Genes by Preterm Infant Microbiota in a Humanized Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B.; Claud, Erika C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Methods Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Results and Conclusion Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-?B activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-?B activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes. PMID:25928420

  6. A novel resource for studying function and dysfunction of ?-synuclein: mouse lines for modulation of endogenous Snca gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ninkina, Natalia; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Ustyugov, Alexey A.; Tarasova, Tatiana V.; Shelkovnikova, Tatyana A.; Buchman, Vladimir L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological modification of ?-synuclein is believed to be an important event in pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases. In normal cells this protein has been linked to many intracellular processes and pathways. However, neither normal function of ?-synuclein in neuronal and certain other types of cells nor its exact role in the disease pathogenesis is well understood, which is largely due to limitations of animal models used for studying this protein. We produced and validated several novel mouse lines for manipulating expression of the endogenous Snca gene coding for ?-synuclein. These include a line for conditional Cre-recombinase-driven inactivation of the gene; a line for conditional Flp-driven restoration of a neo-cassete-blocked ?-synuclein expression; a new line with a “clean” constituent knockout of the gene as well as a line carrying this knockout locus and Rosa26-stop-lacZ reporter locus linked at the same mouse chromosome 6. Altogether these lines represent a set of new useful tools for studies of ?-synuclein normal function and the role of this protein in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26564109

  7. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Cuprous-Thiolate Clusters in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Pickering, I.J.; Winge, D.R.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    Copper (Cu) metallothioneins are cuprous-thiolate proteins that contain multimetallic clusters, and are thought to have dual functions of Cu storage and Cu detoxification. We have used a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density-functional theory (DFT) to investigate the nature of Cu binding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae metallothionein. We found that the XAS of metallothionein prepared, containing a full complement of Cu, was quantitatively consistent with the crystal structure, and that reconstitution of the apo-metallothionein with stoichiometric Cu results in the formation of a tetracopper cluster, indicating cooperative binding of the Cu ions by the metallothionein.

  8. Phylotypic expression of the bHLH genes Neurogenin2, Neurod, and Mash1 in the mouse embryonic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Osório, Joana; Mueller, Thomas; Rétaux, Sylvie; Vernier, Philippe; Wullimann, Mario F

    2010-03-15

    In the anamniote model animals, zebrafish and Xenopus laevis, highly comparable early forebrain expression patterns of proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes relevant for neurogenesis (atonal homologs, i.e., neurogenins/NeuroD and achaete-scute homologs, i.e., Ascl/ash) were previously revealed during a particular period of development (zebrafish: 3 days; frog: stage 48). Neurogenins/NeuroD on the one hand and Ascl1/ash1 on the other hand exhibit essentially mutually exclusive spatial patterns, probably reflecting different positional information received within the neural tube, and appear to underlie glutamatergic versus GABAergic neuronal differentiation, respectively. Significant data suggest that similar complementary localizations of these proneural genes and corresponding differentiation pathways also exist in the mouse, the prominent mammalian model. The present article reports on detailed mouse brain bHLH gene expression patterns to fill existing gaps in the identification of expression domains, especially outside the telencephalon. Clearly, there are strong similarities in the complementarity of territories expressing Ascl1/Mash 1 versus neurogenins/NeuroD in the entire mouse forebrain, except for the pretectal alar plate and basal plate of prosomeres 1-3. The analysis substantiates localization of neurogenins/NeuroD in the pallium, eminentia thalami, and dorsal thalamus, and expression of Ascl1/Mash 1 in the striatal and septal subpallium, preoptic region, ventral thalamus, and hypothalamus, which is highly similar to the situation described in Xenopus and zebrafish. Thus, all three vertebrate model species display a "phylotypic stage or period" corresponding to a temporally and spatially defined control of neurogenesis during forebrain development, ultimately resulting in the differentiation of distinct populations of glutamatergic versus GABAergic neurons. PMID:20058311

  9. Effect of high-fat feeding on expression of genes controlling availability of dopamine in mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alex K.; Mojtahed-Jaberi, Marjan; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Aldecoa-Otalora Astarloa, Estibaliz; Arno, Matthew; Marshall, Nichola J.; Brain, Susan D.; O'Dell, Sandra D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hypothalamic centers integrate external signals of nutrient availability and energy status and initiate responses to maintain homeostasis. Quantifying changes in hypothalamic gene expression in the presence of nutrient excess may identify novel responsive elements. Methods Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 oligonucleotide microarrays containing 45 102 probe sets were used to interrogate differential expression of genes in dietary-induced obesity model C57BL6 inbred mice fed a high-fat (35% fat; n = 8) or standard (4% fat; n = 6) diet from 3 to 15 wk of age. Ontologies of regulated genes were examined and expression of selected genes was validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results One thousand two hundred twelve unique gene transcripts showed altered expression on the microarrays. Gene ontology analysis revealed changes in neuropeptide genes responding to leptin, Pomc, Cart, Npy, and Agrp, compatible with a homeostatic response to high-fat intake, although mean weight increased 2.3-fold compared with standard fed mice (P < 0.001). Neurotransmitter system ontologies revealed upregulation of five genes controlling availability of dopamine. Changes in Th tyrosine hydroxylase (2.1-fold) and Slc18a2 solute carrier family 18 (vesicular monoamine), member 2 (4.4-fold) controlling synthesis and release, and Slc6a3 solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter, dopamine), member 3 (4.8-fold), Snca ?-synuclein (1.3-fold), and Maoa monoamine oxidase (1.9-fold) limiting availability were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Conclusion Expression of five genes involved in availability of dopamine was increased after a high-fat diet. Failure to reduce dopamine availability sufficiently, to counter the feeding reward effect, could contribute to diet-induced obesity in these mice. PMID:19811894

  10. Modulation of Gene Expression in Key Survival Pathways During Daily Torpor in the Gray Mouse Lemur, Microcebus murinus.

    PubMed

    Biggar, Kyle K; Wu, Cheng-Wei; Tessier, Shannon N; Zhang, Jing; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-04-01

    A variety of mammals employ torpor as an energy-saving strategy in environments of marginal or severe stress either on a daily basis during their inactive period or on a seasonal basis during prolonged multi-day hibernation. Recently, a few Madagascar lemur species have been identified as the only primates that exhibit torpor; one of these is the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). To explore the regulatory mechanisms that underlie daily torpor in a primate, we analyzed the expression of 28 selected genes that represent crucial survival pathways known to be involved in squirrel and bat hibernation. Array-based real-time PCR was used to compare gene expression in control (aroused) versus torpid lemurs in five tissues including the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart, and brown adipose tissue. Significant differences in gene expression during torpor were revealed among genes involved in glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism, antioxidant defense, apoptosis, hypoxia signaling, and protein protection. The results showed upregulation of select genes primarily in liver and brown adipose tissue. For instance, both tissues showed elevated gene expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (ppargc), ferritin (fth1), and protein chaperones during torpor. Overall, the data show that the expression of only a few genes changed during lemur daily torpor, as compared with the broader expression changes reported for hibernation in ground squirrels. These results provide an indication that the alterations in gene expression required for torpor in lemurs are not as extensive as those needed for winter hibernation in squirrel models. However, identification of crucial genes with altered expression that support lemur torpor provides key targets to be explored and manipulated toward a goal of translational applications of inducible torpor as a treatment option in human biomedicine. PMID:26093281

  11. Modulation of Gene Expression in Key Survival Pathways During Daily Torpor in the Gray Mouse Lemur, Microcebus murinus

    PubMed Central

    Biggar, Kyle K.; Wu, Cheng-Wei; Tessier, Shannon N.; Zhang, Jing; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of mammals employ torpor as an energy-saving strategy in environments of marginal or severe stress either on a daily basis during their inactive period or on a seasonal basis during prolonged multi-day hibernation. Recently, a few Madagascar lemur species have been identified as the only primates that exhibit torpor; one of these is the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). To explore the regulatory mechanisms that underlie daily torpor in a primate, we analyzed the expression of 28 selected genes that represent crucial survival pathways known to be involved in squirrel and bat hibernation. Array-based real-time PCR was used to compare gene expression in control (aroused) versus torpid lemurs in five tissues including the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart, and brown adipose tissue. Significant differences in gene expression during torpor were revealed among genes involved in glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism, antioxidant defense, apoptosis, hypoxia signaling, and protein protection. The results showed upregulation of select genes primarily in liver and brown adipose tissue. For instance, both tissues showed elevated gene expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (ppargc), ferritin (fth1), and protein chaperones during torpor. Overall, the data show that the expression of only a few genes changed during lemur daily torpor, as compared with the broader expression changes reported for hibernation in ground squirrels. These results provide an indication that the alterations in gene expression required for torpor in lemurs are not as extensive as those needed for winter hibernation in squirrel models. However, identification of crucial genes with altered expression that support lemur torpor provides key targets to be explored and manipulated toward a goal of translational applications of inducible torpor as a treatment option in human biomedicine. PMID:26093281

  12. Microarray Analysis of Novel Candidate Genes Responsible for Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Mouse Pancreatic ? Cell Line MIN6

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, Eiji; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic islet ? cells is important for understanding and treating diabetes. MIN6 cells, a transformed ?-cell line derived from a mouse insulinoma, retain GSIS and are a popular in vitro model for insulin secretion. However, in long-term culture, MIN6 cells' GSIS capacity is lost. We previously isolated a subclone, MIN6 clone 4, from the parental MIN6 cells, that shows well-regulated insulin secretion in response to glucose, glybenclamide, and KCl, even after prolonged culture. To investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for preserving GSIS in this subclone, we compared four groups of MIN6 cells: Pr-LP (parental MIN6, low passage number), Pr-HP (parental MIN6, high passage number), C4-LP (MIN6 clone 4, low passage number), and C4-HP (MIN6 clone 4, high passage number). Based on their capacity for GSIS, we designated the Pr-LP, C4-LP, and C4-HP cells as “responder cells.” In a DNA microarray analysis, we identified a group of genes with high expression in responder cells (“responder genes”), but extremely low expression in the Pr-HP cells. Another group of genes (“non-responder genes”) was expressed at high levels in the Pr-HP cells, but at extremely low levels in the responder cells. Some of the responder genes were involved in secretory machinery or glucose metabolism, including Chrebp, Scgn, and Syt7. Among the non-responder genes were Car2, Maf, and Gcg, which are not normally expressed in islet ? cells. Interestingly, we found a disproportionate number of known imprinted genes among the responder genes. Our findings suggest that the global expression profiling of GSIS-competent and GSIS-incompetent MIN6 cells will help delineate the gene regulatory networks for insulin secretion. PMID:23560115

  13. Coding sequence and alternative splicing of the mouse {alpha}1(XI) collagen gene (Col11a1)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Inoguchi, Kazuhito; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi

    1995-07-20

    Several overlapping cDNA clones corresponding to the entire coding sequence of the mouse {alpha}1(XI) collagen gene (Col11a1) were isolated. The conceptual amino acid translation indicated a high degree of sequence identity (93%) with the human {alpha}1(XI) chain. The cloning experiments also revealed alternative splicing of the sequence coding for 85 residues located within the acidic region of the amino-globular domain of {alpha}1(XI). Analysis of RNA samples from different embryonic tissues suggested that alternative splicing might be confined to tissue destined to become bone. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in ?-tropomyosin: Glu ? Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  15. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gerecke, Donald R. Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  16. Purification and Transcriptomic Analysis of Mouse Fetal Leydig Cells Reveals Candidate Genes for Specification of Gonadal Steroidogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Kathryn S; Bell, Katrina; Larney, Christian; Harley, Vincent R; Sinclair, Andrew H; Oshlack, Alicia; Koopman, Peter; Bowles, Josephine

    2015-06-01

    Male sex determination hinges on the development of testes in the embryo, beginning with the differentiation of Sertoli cells under the influence of the Y-linked gene SRY. Sertoli cells then orchestrate fetal testis formation including the specification of fetal Leydig cells (FLCs) that produce steroid hormones to direct virilization of the XY embryo. As the majority of XY disorders of sex development (DSDs) remain unexplained at the molecular genetic level, we reasoned that genes involved in FLC development might represent an unappreciated source of candidate XY DSD genes. To identify these genes, and to gain a more detailed understanding of the regulatory networks underpinning the specification and differentiation of the FLC population, we developed methods for isolating fetal Sertoli, Leydig, and interstitial cell-enriched subpopulations using an Sf1-eGFP transgenic mouse line. RNA sequencing followed by rigorous bioinformatic filtering identified 84 genes upregulated in FLCs, 704 genes upregulated in nonsteroidogenic interstitial cells, and 1217 genes upregulated in the Sertoli cells at 12.5 days postcoitum. The analysis revealed a trend for expression of components of neuroactive ligand interactions in FLCs and Sertoli cells and identified factors potentially involved in signaling between the Sertoli cells, FLCs, and interstitial cells. We identified 61 genes that were not known previously to be involved in specification or differentiation of FLCs. This dataset provides a platform for exploring the biology of FLCs and understanding the role of these cells in testicular development. In addition, it provides a basis for targeted studies designed to identify causes of idiopathic XY DSD. PMID:25855264

  17. Identification of the human {beta}A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): Localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsebos, T.J.M.; Cerosaletti, K.M.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-08-10

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine {beta}A2 crystalline gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe. Regional localization to 2q34-q36 was established by hybridizing the CRYBA2 probe to microcell and radiation hybrids containing defined fragments of chromosome 2 as the only human contribution. The CRYBA2 probe was also used to localize, by interspecific backcross mapping, the mouse gene (Cryba2) to the central portion of chromosome 1 in a region of known human chromosome 2 homology. Finally, we demonstrate that in both species the {beta}A2 crystallin gene is linked but separable from the {gamma}A crystallin gene. The {beta}A2 crystallin gene is a candidate gene for human and mouse hereditary cataract. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Urban landscape genetics: canopy cover predicts gene flow between white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) populations in New York City.

    PubMed

    Munshi-South, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this study, I examine the influence of urban canopy cover on gene flow between 15 white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) populations in New York City parklands. Parks in the urban core are often highly fragmented, leading to rapid genetic differentiation of relatively nonvagile species. However, a diverse array of 'green' spaces may provide dispersal corridors through 'grey' urban infrastructure. I identify urban landscape features that promote genetic connectivity in an urban environment and compare the success of two different landscape connectivity approaches at explaining gene flow. Gene flow was associated with 'effective distances' between populations that were calculated based on per cent tree canopy cover using two different approaches: (i) isolation by effective distance (IED) that calculates the single best pathway to minimize passage through high-resistance (i.e. low canopy cover) areas, and (ii) isolation by resistance (IBR), an implementation of circuit theory that identifies all low-resistance paths through the landscape. IBR, but not IED, models were significantly associated with three measures of gene flow (Nm from F(ST) , BayesAss+ and Migrate-n) after factoring out the influence of isolation by distance using partial Mantel tests. Predicted corridors for gene flow between city parks were largely narrow, linear parklands or vegetated spaces that are not managed for wildlife, such as cemeteries and roadway medians. These results have implications for understanding the impacts of urbanization trends on native wildlife, as well as for urban reforestation efforts that aim to improve urban ecosystem processes. PMID:22320856

  19. Col2CreERT2, A MOUSE MODEL FOR A CHONDROCYTE-SPECIFIC AND INDUCIBLE GENE DELETION

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, B.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007 and 2008, we published two articles reporting a tamoxifen (TM)-inducible, chondrocyte-specific gene-targeting mouse model in which the expression of CreERT2 is driven by the type II collagen promoter (Col2CreERT2). The fusion protein is specifically expressed and translocated into the nucleus upon TM administration, which in turn triggers gene recombination. Since then, this animal model has become a powerful tool to study the molecular mechanism of skeletal development and degenerative cartilage diseases, including knee joint osteoarthritis (OA), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In this review article, we summarise the application of Col2CreERT2 mice and discuss the potential usage of this animal model in a broad spectrum of cartilage development and molecular pathology studies. PMID:25340803

  20. Mouse SCO-spondin, a gene of the thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR) superfamily expressed in the brain.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Simon-Chazottes, Dominique; Creveaux, Isabelle; Meiniel, Annie; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Meiniel, Robert

    2003-07-17

    SCO-spondin is specifically expressed in the subcommissural organ (SCO), a secretory ependymal differentiation lining the roof of the third ventricular cavity of the brain. When released into the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), SCO-spondin aggregates and forms Reissner's fiber (RF), a structure present in the central canal of the spinal cord. SCO-spondin belongs to the superfamily of proteins exhibiting conserved motifs called TSRs for 'thrombospondin type 1 repeats' and involved in axonal pathfinding during development. The mouse SCO-spondin coding sequence was searched by alignement of the coding bovine SCO-spondin sequence with the mouse whole genome shotgun (WGS) supercontig (NW 000250). Compared to the bovine, mouse SCO-spondin shows 66.8% identity of amino acids. This extracellular matrix glycoprotein has a modular arrangement of several conserved domains including 25 TSRs, 10 low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) type A repeats and cystein-rich regions in the -NH2 and -COOH ends. The spatio-temporal expression of SCO-spondin was analyzed using specific antisera and an homospecific SCO-spondin riboprobe. In the adult, the patterns obtained by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry correlated well in the SCO, while Reissner's fiber and the ampulla caudalis were immunoreactive only. In the fetus, both the immuno and ISH reactions appeared between 14 and 15 days post coïtum (dpc) in the SCO anlage. In addition, the mouse SCO-spondin gene was located at chromosome 6, between marker D6Mit352 and D6Mit119, in a conserved syntenic region. PMID:12909363

  1. Screening a mouse liver gene expression compendium identifies modulators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dioxin-like compounds (DLC) as well as some drugs and endogenous tryptophan metabolites. Short-term activation of AhR can lead to hepatocellular steatosis, and chronic activation can lead to liver cancer in mice and rats. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets in a genomic database in which AhR activity was altered. A set of 63 genes was identified (the AhR gene expression biomarker) that was dependent on AhR for regulation after exposure to TCDD or benzo[a]pyrene and includes the known AhR targets Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1. A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher's test; p-value ? 10(-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the AhR biomarker and a test set of 37 and 41 biosets positive or negative, respectively for AhR activation. The test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 95%. The rank-based test was used to identify factors that activate or suppress AhR in an annotated mouse liver/mouse primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ? 1850 comparisons. In addition to the expected activation of AhR by TCDD and DLC, AhR was activated by AP20189 and phenformin. AhR was suppressed by phenobarbital and 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) in a constitutive activated receptor (CAR)-dependent manner and pregnenolone-16?-carbonitrile in a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent manner. Inactivation of individual genes in nullizygous models led to AhR activation (Pxr, Ghrhr, Taf10) or suppression (Ahr, Ilst6st, Hnf1a). This study describes a novel screening strategy for identifying factors in mouse liver that perturb AhR in a gene expression compendium. PMID:26215100

  2. Global ablation of the mouse Rab11a gene impairs early embryogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiyan; Yehia, Ghassan; Wang, Juanfei; Stypulkowski, Ewa; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Jiang, Ping; Hernandez-Enriquez, Berenice; Tran, Tracy S; Bonder, Edward M; Guo, Wei; Gao, Nan

    2014-11-14

    Rab11a has been conceived as a prominent regulatory component of the recycling endosome, which acts as a nexus in the endo- and exocytotic networks. The precise in vivo role of Rab11a in mouse embryonic development is unknown. We globally ablated Rab11a and examined the phenotypic and molecular outcomes in Rab11a(null) blastocysts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Using multiple trafficking assays and complementation analyses, we determined, among multiple important membrane-associated and soluble cargos, the critical contribution of Rab11a vesicular traffic to the secretion of multiple soluble MMPs. Rab11a(null) embryos were able to properly form normal blastocysts but died at peri-implantation stages. Our data suggest that Rab11a critically controls mouse blastocyst development and soluble matrix metalloproteinase secretion. PMID:25271168

  3. Transcriptional control of the mouse prealbumin (transthyretin) gene: both promoter sequences and a distinct enhancer are cell specific.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, R H; Lai, E; Darnell, J E

    1986-01-01

    The mouse genomic clone for the prealbumin (transthyretin) gene was cloned, and its upstream regulatory regions were analyzed. The 200 nucleotides 5' to the cap site when placed within a recombinant plasmid were sufficient to direct transient expression in HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells, but this DNA region did not support expression in HeLa cells. The sequence of the 200-nucleotide region is highly conserved between mouse and human DNA and can be considered a cell-specific promoter. Deletions of this promoter region identified a crucial element for cell-specific expression between 151 and 110 nucleotides 5' to the RNA start site. A region situated at about 1.6 to 2.15 kilobases upstream of the RNA start site was found to stimulate expression 10-fold in HepG2 cells but not in HeLa cells. This far upstream element was invertible and increased expression from the beta-globin promoter in HepG2 cells. Unlike the simian virus 40 enhancer, the prealbumin enhancer would not stimulate beta-globin synthesis in HeLa cells, and even the simian virus 40 enhancer did not stimulate the prealbumin promoter in HeLa cells. Thus, we identified in the prealbumin gene two DNA elements that respond in a cell-specific manner: a proximal promoter including a crucial sequence between -108 and -151 nucleotides and a distant enhancer element located between 1.6 and 2.15 kilobases upstream. Images PMID:3025666

  4. Mouse ES and iPS cells can form similar definitive endoderm despite differences in imprinted genes

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Constantina; Longmire, Tyler A.; Shen, Steven S.; Bourdon, Alice; Sommer, Cesar A.; Gadue, Paul; Spira, Avrum; Gouon-Evans, Valerie; Murphy, George J.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Kotton, Darrell N.

    2011-01-01

    The directed differentiation of iPS and ES cells into definitive endoderm (DE) would allow the derivation of otherwise inaccessible progenitors for endodermal tissues. However, a global comparison of the relative equivalency of DE derived from iPS and ES populations has not been performed. Recent reports of molecular differences between iPS and ES cells have raised uncertainty as to whether iPS cells could generate autologous endodermal lineages in vitro. Here, we show that both mouse iPS and parental ES cells exhibited highly similar in vitro capacity to undergo directed differentiation into DE progenitors. With few exceptions, both cell types displayed similar surges in gene expression of specific master transcriptional regulators and global transcriptomes that define the developmental milestones of DE differentiation. Microarray analysis showed considerable overlap between the genetic programs of DE derived from ES/iPS cells in vitro and authentic DE from mouse embryos in vivo. Intriguingly, iPS cells exhibited aberrant silencing of imprinted genes known to participate in endoderm differentiation, yet retained a robust ability to differentiate into DE. Our results show that, despite some molecular differences, iPS cells can be efficiently differentiated into DE precursors, reinforcing their potential for development of cell-based therapies for diseased endoderm-derived tissues. PMID:21537085

  5. Cloning of V region fragments from mouse liver DNA and localization of repetitive DNA sequences in the vicinity of immunoglobulin gene segments.

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, M; Höchtl, J; Schnell, H; Gebhard, W; Zachau, H G

    1980-01-01

    Two different kappa light chain genes have previously been isolated from one mouse myeloma. The V (variable, abbreviations in ref. 2) gene segments of the two genes were now used to identify their germline counterparts in EcoRI digests of mouse liver DNA. In addition two sets of related V gene segments were found which hybridize with either of the two DNA probes. Five of the V region fragments of one set were cloned in a lambda phage vector and partially characterized by restriction mapping and Southern blot hybridization. Repetitive DNA sequences were found on each of the five fragments as well as on other cloned immunoglobulin gene containing fragments. Cross-hybridization between some but not all of the regions containing repetitive DNA sequences was observed. Images PMID:6253945

  6. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 gene maps to the Down syndrome region of human chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in mouse trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Pash, J.; Popescu, N.; Matocha, M.; Rapoport, S.; Bustin, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The gene for human high-mobility-group (HMG) chromosomal protein HMG-14 is located in region 21q22.3, a region associated with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, one of the most prevalent human birth defects. The expression of this gene is analyzed in mouse embryos that are trisomic in chromosome 16 and are considered to be an animal model for Down syndrome. RNA blot-hybridization analysis and detailed analysis of HMG-14 protein levels indicate that mouse trisomy 16 embryos have approximately 1.5 times more HMG-14 mRNA and protein than their normal littermates, suggesting a direct gene dosage effect. The HMG-14 gene may be an additional marker for the Down syndrome. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 is a nucleosomal binding protein that may confer distinct properties to the chromatin structure of transcriptionally active genes and therefore may be a contributing factor in the etiology of the syndrome.

  7. The product of the mouse Xist gene is a 15 kb inactive X-specific transcript containing no conserved ORF and located in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brockdorff, N; Ashworth, A; Kay, G F; McCabe, V M; Norris, D P; Cooper, P J; Swift, S; Rastan, S

    1992-10-30

    The Xist gene maps to the X inactivation center region in both mouse and human, and previous analysis of the 3' end of the gene has demonstrated inactive X-specific expression, suggesting a possible role in X inactivation. We have now analyzed the entire mouse Xist gene. The mature inactive X-specific transcript is 15 kb in length and contains no conserved ORF. The Xist sequence contains a number of regions comprised of tandem repeats. Comparison with the human XIST gene demonstrates significant conservation of sequence and gene structure. Xist RNA is not associated with the translational machinery of the cell and is located almost exclusively in the nucleus. Together with conservation of inactive X-specific expression, these findings support a role for Xist in X inactivation, possibly as a functional RNA or as a chromatin organizer region. PMID:1423610

  8. The evolution of gene expression in mouse hippocampus in response to selective breeding for increased locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Bronikowski, A M; Rhodes, J S; Garland, T; Prolla, T A; Awad, T A; Gammie, S C

    2004-09-01

    The evolution of behavior has been notoriously difficult to study at the molecular level, but mouse genetic technology offers new promise. We applied selective breeding to increase voluntary wheel running in four replicate lines of Mus domesticus (S mice) while maintaining four additional lines through random breeding to serve as controls (C mice). The goal of the study was to identify the gene expression profile of the hippocampus that may have evolved to facilitate the increased voluntary running. The hippocampus was of interest because it is known to display marked physiological responses in association with wheel running itself. We used high-density oligonucleotide arrays representing 11,904 genes. To control for the confounding influence of physical activity itself on gene expression, animals were housed individually without access to running wheels, and were sampled during the day when they are normally inactive. Two-month-old female mice in estrus were used (n = 16 total; two per line; 8 S and 8 C). After correcting for an acceptable false discovery rate (10%), 30 genes, primarily involved in transcription and translation, significantly increased expression whereas 23 genes, distributed among many categories including immune function and neuronal signaling, decreased expression in S versus C mice. These changes were relatively small in magnitude relative to the changes in gene expression that occur in the hippocampus in response to wheel running itself. A priori tests of dopamine receptor expression levels demonstrated an increase of approximately 20% in the expression of D2 and D4 receptors. These results suggest that relatively small changes in the expression patterns of hippocampal genes underlie large changes in phenotypic response to selection, and that the genetic architecture of running motivation likely involves the dopaminergic system as well as CNS signaling machinery. PMID:15521463

  9. Cadmium and copper metallothioneins in the American lobster, Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, D.W.; Brouwer, M.

    1986-03-01

    Lobsters were fed cadmium-rich oysters for 28 days, and the induction of cadmium metallothionein and its relation to concentrations of cadmium, copper, and zinc in the digestive gland and gills was determined. A portion of the tissues also was retained for determining the cytosolic distribution of these metals by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The digestive gland contained a majority of the cadmium, copper, and zinc, and both cadmium and zinc were actively accumulated from the oysters. Gel chromatography of the digestive gland cytosol showed that initially only copper was bound to a protein with a molecular weight in the range of metallothionein (i.e., 10,000-7000). However, after feeding on cadmium-laden oysters for 28 days, both cadmium and copper were bound to the metallothioneinlike protein. Further purification of the cadmium/copper protein by ion-exchange chromatography showed that a large portion of the copper and all of the cadmium did not bind to DEAE-Sephacel. The induction of cadmium metallothionein in the digestive gland is correlated with tissue cadmium concentration. Coincident with the induction of the cadmium metallothionein was a cytosolic redistribution of copper. The distribution of zinc was not affected.

  10. PPARÁ-DEPENDENT GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE MOUSE LIVER AFTER EXPOSURE TO PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferators (PP) are a large class of structurally diverse chemicals that mediate their effects in the liver mainly through the PP-activated receptor ¿ (PPAR?). Development of PP induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mouse liver is known to be dependent on PPAR&#...

  11. MouseHuman Orthology Relationships in an Olfactory Receptor Gene Cluster

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    of Molecular Genetics and the Crown Human Genome Center, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel; and Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Genetics, Ihnestrasse 73, 14195 Berlin, Germany Received; Selbie et al., 1992), mouse (Ressler et al., 1993; Sulli- van et al., 1996), dog (Issel-Tarver and Rine

  12. A cDNA from a mouse pancreatic beta cell encoding a putative transcription factor of the insulin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M D; Park, C W; Rosen, A; Aronheim, A

    1990-01-01

    Cell specific expression of the insulin gene is achieved through transcriptional mechanisms operating on multiple DNA sequence elements located in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Of particular importance in the rat insulin I gene are two closely similar 9 bp sequences (IEB1 and IEB2): mutation of either of these leads to 5-10 fold reduction in transcriptional activity. We have screened an expression cDNA library derived from mouse pancreatic endocrine beta cells with a radioactive DNA probe containing multiple copies of the IEB1 sequence. A cDNA clone (A1) isolated by this procedure encodes a protein which shows efficient binding to the IEB1 probe, but much weaker binding to either an unrelated DNA probe or to a probe bearing a single base pair insertion within the recognition sequence. DNA sequence analysis indicates a protein belonging to the helix-loop-helix family of DNA-binding proteins. The ability of the protein encoded by clone A1 to recognize a number of wild type and mutant DNA sequences correlates closely with the ability of each sequence element to support transcription in vivo in the context of the insulin 5' flanking DNA. We conclude that the isolated cDNA may encode a transcription factor that participates in control of insulin gene expression. Images PMID:2181401

  13. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin. PMID:7687426

  14. Gene therapy rescues disease phenotype in a spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Rizzo, Federica; Salani, Sabrina; Dametti, Sara; Rinchetti, Paola; Del Bo, Roberto; Foust, Kevin; Kaspar, Brian K.; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P.; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease affecting children. It is caused by mutations in the IGHMBP2 gene (11q13) and presently has no cure. Recently, adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)–mediated gene therapy has been shown to rescue the phenotype of animal models of another lower motor neuron disorder, spinal muscular atrophy 5q, and a clinical trial with this strategy is ongoing. We report rescue of the disease phenotype in a SMARD1 mouse model after therapeutic delivery via systemic injection of an AAV9 construct encoding the wild-type IGHMBP2 to replace the defective gene. AAV9-IGHMBP2 administration restored protein levels and rescued motor function, neuromuscular physiology, and life span (450% increase), ameliorating pathological features in the central nervous system, muscles, and heart. To test this strategy in a human model, we transferred wild-type IGHMBP2 into human SMARD1-induced pluripotent stem cell–derived motor neurons; these cells exhibited increased survival and axonal length in long-term culture. Our data support the translational potential of AAV-mediated gene therapies for SMARD1, opening the door for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials.

  15. A Knock-in Mouse Model of Human PHD2 Gene-associated Erythrocytosis Establishes a Haploinsufficiency Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Patrick R.; Pei, Fei; Lee, Rebecca; Kerestes, Heddy; Percy, Melanie J.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste; Lappin, Terence R. J.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lee, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The central pathway for controlling red cell mass is the PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain protein):hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF, which is negatively regulated by PHD, activates numerous genes, including ones involved in erythropoiesis, such as the ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO) gene. Recent studies have implicated PHD2 as the key PHD isoform regulating red cell mass. Studies of humans have identified erythrocytosis-associated, heterozygous point mutations in the PHD2 gene. A key question concerns the mechanism by which human mutations lead to phenotypes. In the present report, we generated and characterized a mouse line in which a P294R knock-in mutation has been introduced into the mouse Phd2 locus to model the first reported human PHD2 mutation (P317R). Phd2P294R/+ mice display a degree of erythrocytosis equivalent to that seen in Phd2+/? mice. The Phd2P294R/+-associated erythrocytosis is reversed in a Hif2a+/?, but not a Hif1a+/? background. Additional studies using various conditional knock-outs of Phd2 reveal that erythrocytosis can be induced by homozygous and heterozygous knock-out of Phd2 in renal cortical interstitial cells using a Pax3-Cre transgene or by homozygous knock-out of Phd2 in hematopoietic progenitors driven by a Vav1-Cre transgene. These studies formally prove that a missense mutation in PHD2 is the cause of the erythrocytosis, show that this occurs through haploinsufficiency, and point to multifactorial control of red cell mass by PHD2. PMID:24121508

  16. Genomic organization, promoter analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for the mouse glial high-affinity glutamate transporter Slc1a3

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kohichi; Maeno-Hikichi, Yuka

    1996-05-01

    The mouse gene encoding glial high-affinity, Na -dependent glutamate transporter Slcla3 (GluT-1/GLAST) was isolated, and its structural organization was characterized. The gene appeared to exist as a single copy in the mouse genome and comprised 10 exons spanning more than 56 kilobases. The transcription initiation sites were mapped to positions 503, which is the first transcriptional point (defined as +1), 128 (+376), and 64 (+440) basepairs upstream of the 3{prime}-end of exon 1 by primer extension. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the mouse GluT-1 gene had a typical CCAAT box and a GC box but lacked at TATA box. These features of the promoter region were characteristic of housekeeping genes. The fusion plasmids containing approximately 4 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region (-3830 to +450) and the firefly luciferase gene induced a significant luciferase activity when transfected into COS-1 cells. Distal deletion of the 5{prime}-flanking region, leaving 619 bp (-169 to +450), resulted in a marked decrease in luciferase activity in COS-1 cells, suggesting that a CCAAT box, which was positioned at -200, is necessary for the expression of this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene to mouse chromosome 15A2. These structural features will lead to a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the expression of the GluT-1 gene by ischemia and will also provide a basis for future evolutionary comparisons with other neurotransmitter transporters. 40 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Chromosomal localization of mouse and human genes encoding the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (SFRS1) and SC-35 (SFRS2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, J.R. Jr.; Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.

    1995-09-01

    The mammalian SR-type splicing factors ASF/SF2 and SC-35 play crucial roles in pre-mRNA splicing and have been shown to shift splice site choice in vitro. We have mapped the ASF/SF2 gene in mice and humans and the SC-35 gene in mice. Somatic cell hybrid mapping of the human ASF/SF2 gene (SFRS1 locus) reveals that it resides on chromosome 17, and fluorescence in situ hybridization refines this localization to 17q21.3-q22. Recombinant inbred mapping of the mouse ASF/ SF2 gene (Sfrs1 locus) and the mouse SC-35 gene (Sfrs2 locus) demonstrates that both genes are located in a part of mouse chromosome 11 that is homologous to human chromosome 17. Mapping of Sfrs1 using F{sub 1} hybrid backcross mice between the strains C57BL/6 and DDK places Sfrs1 very near the marker D11Mit38 and indicates that the ASF/SF2 gene is closely linked to the Ovum mutant locus. 59 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. High-throughput clonal selection of recombinant CHO cells using a dominant selectable and amplifiable metallothionein-GFP fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Charles G; Tait, A Sasha; Sunstrom, Noelle-Ann

    2002-12-20

    Transfected mammalian cells can be used for the production of fully processed recombinant proteins for medical and industrial purposes. However, the isolation of high-producing clones is traditionally time-consuming. Therefore, we developed a high-throughput screening method to reduce the time and effort required to isolate high-producing cells. This involved the construction of an expression vector containing the amplifiable gene metallothionein (MT), fused in-frame to green fluorescent protein (GFP). The fusion gene (MTGFP) confers metal resistance similar to that of the wild-type metallothionein and expression can be monitored using either flow cytometry or a fluorometer to measure green fluorescence. Expression of MTGFP acted as a dominant selectable marker allowing rapid and more efficient selection of clones at defined metal concentrations than with the antibiotic G418. Cells harboring MTGFP responded to increasing metal concentrations with a corresponding increase in fluorescence. There was also a corresponding increase in recombinant protein production, indicating that MTGFP could be used as a selectable and amplifiable gene for the coexpression of foreign genes. Using our expression vector encoding MTGFP, we demonstrate a high-throughput clonal selection protocol for the rapid isolation of high-producing clones from transfected CHO cells. We were able to isolate cell lines reaching specific productivities of >10 microg hGH/10(6) cells/day within 4 weeks of transfection. The advantage of this method is that it can be easily adapted for automated procedures using robotic handling systems. PMID:12378608

  19. Identification of the Bile Acid Transporter Slco1a6 as a Candidate Gene That Broadly Affects Gene Expression in Mouse Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianan; Keller, Mark P; Oler, Angie T; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathryn L; Stapleton, Donald S; Broman, Aimee Teo; Zhao, Wen; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Broman, Karl W; Attie, Alan D

    2015-11-01

    We surveyed gene expression in six tissues in an F2 intercross between mouse strains C57BL/6J (abbreviated B6) and BTBR T(+) tf/J (abbreviated BTBR) made genetically obese with the Leptin(ob) mutation. We identified a number of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) affecting the expression of numerous genes distal to the locus, called trans-eQTL hotspots. Some of these trans-eQTL hotspots showed effects in multiple tissues, whereas some were specific to a single tissue. An unusually large number of transcripts (?8% of genes) mapped in trans to a hotspot on chromosome 6, specifically in pancreatic islets. By considering the first two principal components of the expression of genes mapping to this region, we were able to convert the multivariate phenotype into a simple Mendelian trait. Fine mapping the locus by traditional methods reduced the QTL interval to a 298-kb region containing only three genes, including Slco1a6, one member of a large family of organic anion transporters. Direct genomic sequencing of all Slco1a6 exons identified a nonsynonymous coding SNP that converts a highly conserved proline residue at amino acid position 564 to serine. Molecular modeling suggests that Pro564 faces an aqueous pore within this 12-transmembrane domain-spanning protein. When transiently overexpressed in HEK293 cells, BTBR organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1A6-mediated cellular uptake of the bile acid taurocholic acid (TCA) was enhanced compared to B6 OATP1A6. Our results suggest that genetic variation in Slco1a6 leads to altered transport of TCA (and potentially other bile acids) by pancreatic islets, resulting in broad gene regulation. PMID:26385979

  20. Identification of intellectual disability genes showing circadian clock-dependent expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Renaud, J; Dumont, F; Khelfaoui, M; Foisset, S R; Letourneur, F; Bienvenu, T; Khwaja, O; Dorseuil, O; Billuart, P

    2015-11-12

    Sleep is strongly implicated in learning, especially in the reprocessing of recently acquired memory. Children with intellectual disability (ID) tend to have sleep-wake disturbances, which may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease. Given that sleep is partly controlled by the circadian clock, we decided to study the rhythmic expression of genes in the hippocampus, a brain structure which plays a key role in memory in humans and rodents. By investigating the hippocampal transcriptome of adult mice, we identified 663 circadian clock controlled (CCC) genes, which we divided into four categories based on their temporal pattern of expression. In addition to the standard core clock genes, enrichment analysis identified several transcription factors among these hippocampal CCC genes, and our findings suggest that genes from one cluster regulate the expression of those in another. Interestingly, these hippocampal CCC genes were highly enriched in sleep/wakefulness-related genes. We show here that several genes in the glucocorticoid signaling pathway, which is involved in memory, show a CCC pattern of expression. However, ID genes were not enriched among these CCC genes, suggesting that sleep or learning and memory disturbances observed in patients with ID are probably not related to the circadian clock in the hippocampus. PMID:26341910

  1. Specific and ubiquitous expression of different Zn finger protein genes in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, K; Rohdewohld, H; Gruss, P

    1988-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins (Zfp) are members of a multigene family encoding Zn mediated nucleic acid binding proteins. They have been isolated from various organisms including yeast, Drosophila, Xenopus mouse and human. All Zfp share the 28-30 amino acid long finger repeats containing conserved residues at specific positions. Some of these proteins have been identified as transcriptional regulatory factors. In this paper, we describe the isolation, DNA sequence determination and the expression pattern in developing embryos and adult tissues of 3 new members of the mouse Zfp. All of them are expressed as multiple transcripts. Unaltered level of mkr5 expression could be detected in 10-15 day whole embryo RNAs but its level started to decrease from day 16. In the adult animal, predominant expression was detected only in the ovary. In contrast, mkr3 and 4 were expressed at a constant level in all embryos and tissues tested. These data suggest the presence of both tissue specific and ubiquitious Zfp in the mouse. Images PMID:3143103

  2. Defects in cholesterol synthesis genes in mouse and in humans: lessons for drug development and safer treatments.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Simon; McWhir, Jim; Rozman, Damjana

    2011-02-01

    This review describes the mouse knockout models of cholesterol synthesis, together with human malformations and drugs that target cholesterogenic enzymes. Generally, the sooner a gene acts in cholesterol synthesis, the earlier the phenotype occurs. Humans with loss of function of early cholesterogenic enzymes have not yet been described, and in the mouse, loss of Hmgcr is preimplantation lethal. Together, these results indicate that the widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins are potentially teratogenic. The Mvk knockout is early embryonic lethal in the mouse, the absence of Fdft1 is lethal at E9.5-12.5 dpc, while the Cyp51 knockouts die at 15.0 dpc. Fungal CYP51 inhibitor azoles are teratogenic in humans, potentially leading to symptoms of Antley-Bixler syndrome. The X-linked mutations in Nsdhl and Ebp are embryonic lethal in male mice, while heterozygous females are also affected. Consequently, the anticancer drugs, tamoxifen and toremifene, inhibiting human EBP, may be harmful in early pregnancy. The Dhcr7 and Dhcr24 knockout mice die shortly after birth, while humans survive with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome or desmosterolosis. Since cholesterol is essential for hedgehog signaling, disturbance of this pathway by antipsychotics and -depressants explains some drug side effects. In conclusion, defects in cholesterol synthesis are generally lethal in mice, while humans with impaired later steps of the pathway can survive with severe malformations. Evidence shows that drugs targeting or, by coincidence, inhibiting human cholesterol synthesis are better avoided in early pregnancy. Since some drugs with teratogenic potential still stay on the market, this should be avoided in new cholesterol-related drug development. PMID:21247357

  3. Reconstructing Generalized Logical Networks of Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse Brain from Temporal Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mingzhou; Lewis, Chris K.; Lance, Eric; Chesler, Elissa J; Kirova, Roumyana; Langston, Michael A; Bergeson, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The problem of reconstructing generalized logical networks to account for temporal dependencies among genes and environmental stimuli from high-throughput transcriptomic data is addressed. A network reconstruction algorithm was developed that uses the statistical significance as a criterion for network selection to avoid false-positive interactions arising from pure chance. Using temporal gene expression data collected from the brains of alcohol-treated mice in an analysis of the molecular response to alcohol, this algorithm identified genes from a major neuronal pathway as putative components of the alcohol response mechanism. Three of these genes have known associations with alcohol in the literature. Several other potentially relevant genes, highlighted and agreeing with independent results from literature mining, may play a role in the response to alcohol. Additional, previously-unknown gene interactions were discovered that, subject to biological verification, may offer new clues in the search for the elusive molecular mechanisms of alcoholism.

  4. Up-regulation of glucocorticoid-regulated genes in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Andrew

    -linked gene MECP2. How the loss of MeCP2 function leads to RTT is currently unknown. Mice lacking the Mecp2 heightened anxiety, that resemble RTT. The MECP2 gene encodes a methyl-CpG-binding protein that can act in Mecp2-null mice. MeCP2 is bound to the Fkbp5 and Sgk genes in brain and may function as a modulator

  5. Interactions between metals in rat liver and kidney: localization of metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Irato, P; Santon, A; Ossi, E; Albergoni, V

    2001-02-01

    The interactions between two essential metals, Cu and Zn, and the localization and concentration of metallothionein have been studied in rat liver and kidney. Rats receiving daily intraperitoneal injections of Cu for 3 days, or Zn for 2 days, or Cu for 3 days followed by Zn for 2 days, were sacrificed 24, 72, 120 h after the final injection. Our data indicate that Cu and Zn are both good inductors of metallothionein synthesis in rat tissues. Synergism between Cu and Zn in metallothionein synthesis was also observed as indicated by immunocytochemical experiments and chemical analysis. Moreover, in rats injected with Cu followed by Zn, the localization of metallothionein and the concentrations of both metallothionein and metal differed over time according to the organs considered. In rat kidney, a delay in the excretory process was also observed and metallothionein was present 120 h after the last injection. PMID:11432643

  6. Arsenic downregulates gene expression at the postsynaptic density in mouse cerebellum, including genes responsible for long-term potentiation and depression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Li, Sheng; Sun, Yahui; Dong, Wei; Piao, Fengyuan; Piao, Yongjun; Liu, Shuang; Guan, Huai; Yu, Shengbo

    2014-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a neurotoxin induces dysfunction of learning and memory. Research has indicated that cerebellum may be involved in arsenic-induced impairment of learning and memory. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects remain unclear. This study screened for the differentially expressed genes related to the long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTP and LTD) at the cerebellar postsynaptic density (PSD) of mice following exposure to arsenic, and we provide evidence of the mechanism by which arsenic adversely affects the functions of learning and memory. Here, SPF mice were exposed to 1ppm, 2ppm and 4ppm As2O3 for 60 days. The ultrastructure of the synapses in cerebella of these mice was observed via transmission electron microscopy. The cerebellum global gene expression of mice exposed to 4ppm As2O3 was determined through GeneChip analysis. We used the web tool DAVID to analyze the Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways that were signi?cantly enriched among the differentially expressed genes. Our observations of synaptic ultrastructure showed that the thickness of the cerebellar PSD was reduced in mice exposed to arsenic. Go analysis revealed the PSD as a significantly altered cellular component. KEGG pathway analysis showed that LTP and LTD were affected by arsenic with highest statistical significance, and 20 differentially expressed genes were associated with them. Among these differentially expressed genes, significant decreases in the mRNA expressions of CaMKII, Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Itpr1, Grm1 and PLC?4 related to the LTP and LTD were found at the PSD of mouse cerebellum exposed to arsenic. The downregulation of these genes was further confirmed via real-time reverse transcription PCR or Western blot at 1ppm, 2ppm and 4ppm As2O3. Our results indicate that the 7 genes with in cerebellar PSDs may be involved in arsenic-induced neurotoxicity, including impairment of learning and memory. PMID:24831965

  7. Lymphocytes as cellular vehicles for gene therapy in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, K.; Cornetta, K.; Morgan, R.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Kasid, A.; Lotze, M.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Anderson, W.F.; Blaese, R.M. )

    1991-04-15

    The application of bone marrow gene therapy has been stalled by the inability to achieve stable high-level gene transfer and expression in the totipotent stem cells. The authors that retroviral vectors can stably introduce genes into antigen-specific murine and human T lymphocytes in culture. Murine helper T cells were transduced with the retroviral vector SAX to express both neomycin-resistance and human adenosine deaminase genes. To determine if cultured T cells might be used for gene therapy, their persistence and continued expression of the introduced genes was evaluated in nude mice transplanted with the SAX-transduced T cells. They studied cultured human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as a candidate cell for a trial of gene transfer in man. Gene insertion and subsequent G418 selection did not substantially alter the growth characteristics, interleukin 2 dependence, membrane phenotype, or cytotoxicity profile of the transduced T cells. These studies provided a portion of the experimental evidence supporting the feasibility of the presently ongoing clinical trials of lymphocyte gene therapy in cancer as well as in patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency.

  8. The gene for cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) maps to the subtelomeric region on human chromosome 21q and to proximal mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Münke, M; Kraus, J P; Ohura, T; Francke, U

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), the enzyme deficient in classical homocystinuria, has been assigned to the subtelomeric region of band 21q22.3 by in situ hybridization of a rat cDNA probe to structurally rearranged chromosomes 21. The homologous locus in the mouse (Cbs) was mapped to the proximal half of mouse chromosome 17 by Southern analysis of Chinese hamster X mouse somatic cell hybrid DNA. Thus, CBS/Cbs and the gene for alpha A-crystalline (CRYA1/Crya-1 or Acry-1) form a conserved linkage group on human (HSA) chromosome region 21q22.3 and mouse (MMU) chromosome 17 region A-C. Features of Down syndrome (DS) caused by three copies of these genes should not be present in mice trisomic for MMU 16 that have been proposed as animal models for DS. Mice partially trisomic for MMU 16 or MMU 17 should allow gene-specific dissection of the trisomy 21 phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2894761

  9. Phorbol diester-inducible, cyclosporine-suppressible transcription from a novel promoter within the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.F.; Pohajdak, B.; Talbot, D.J.; Shaw, J.; Paetkau, V. )

    1988-04-01

    The mouse T-cell lymphoma cell line EL4.E1 constitutively synthesizes mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcripts encoding either the entire proviral genome or segments of it. In addition to these conventional mRNAs, however, an mRNA of about 1 kilobase accumulates after induction of these cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The accumulation of this transcript is strongly inhibited by the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A. Its pattern of induction by PMA and suppression by cyclosporin A is thus the same as seen for several lymphokine mRNAs in these cells, including interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The short MMTV transcript is the most abundant PMA-induced transcript in EL4.E1 cells, but was not found in a series of other leukocyte tumor cell lines. It is initiated from a novel promoter within the env gene, and a segment of 1,161 nucleotides is then spliced out. The major part of the transcript is a copy of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of MMTV. The MMTV proviral genomes in these cells, and the short transcript, contain a 491-nucleotide deletion in the LTR compared with the normal MMTV provirus. The resulting open reading frame could encode a protein of molecular weight 22,800, which is a likely candidate for an LTR-related protein with a similar molecular weight recently described in this system.

  10. The effect of the gene for microphthalmia (mi) on the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the cinnamon mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, K. K.; Scholtz, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The dystrophic retina of the cinnamon mouse homozygous for the gene for microphthalmia (mi/mi) has a population of large ganglion cells. Unilateral enucleation and examination of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus using the Fink-Heimer technique showed that, while there was continuing degeneration argyrophilia in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus secondary to the retinopathy, there was additional degeneration attributable to enucleation. In addition, the pattern of degeneration indicated that the axon terminals were less mature than those of the cinnamon and heterozygous (mi/+) mice. Quantitative study of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus in the homozygous (mi/mi) mouse showed that the nucleus is small with fewer neurons and that the markers for protein metabolism, namely volume of nucleoli and cytoplasmic RNA, are reduced when compared to the cinnamon and heterozygous (mi/+) mice. It is concluded that the portion of the retino-geniculate pathway represented by the large ganglion cells in the retina, develops in the absence of patterned visual stimuli, but is less mature and has a more limited functional activity than controls. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2454129

  11. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor ? (PPAR?) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Rosen, Mitch; Abbott, Barbara; Lau, Christopher; Guo, Grace; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Klaassen, Curtis; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPAR? in rodents increases liver cancer incidence, whereas suppression of PPAR? activity leads to hepatocellular steatosis. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets (i.e., gene expression differences between two conditions) in a genomic database in which PPAR? activity was altered. A gene expression signature of 131 PPAR?-dependent genes was built using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and PPAR?-null mice after exposure to three structurally diverse PPAR? activators (WY-14,643, fenofibrate and perfluorohexane sulfonate). A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher’s test (p-value ? 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the PPAR? signature and a test set of 48 and 31 biosets positive or negative, respectively for PPAR? activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 98%. The signature was then used to identify factors that activate or suppress PPAR? in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1850 biosets. In addition to the expected activation of PPAR? by fibrate drugs, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and perfluorinated compounds, PPAR? was activated by benzofuran, galactosamine, and TCDD and suppressed by hepatotoxins acetaminophen, lipopolysaccharide, silicon dioxide nanoparticles, and trovafloxacin. Additional factors that activate (fasting, caloric restriction) or suppress (infections) PPAR? were also identified. This study 1) developed methods useful for future screening of environmental chemicals, 2) identified chemicals that activate or suppress PPAR?, and 3) identified factors including diets and infections that modulate PPAR? activity and would be hypothesized to affect chemical-induced PPAR? activity.

  12. A mitogenome of the Chevrier's field mouse (Apodemus chevrieri) and genetic variations inferred from the cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hao; Fan, Zhenxin; Liu, Shaoying; Liu, Yang; Song, Zhaobin; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2012-04-01

    The Chevrier's field mouse (Apodemus chevrieri) is an endemic species to China and is an important pest in agriculture and human diseases. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of this species was sequenced and its size was 16,298 bases (accession no.: HQ896683). The mitogenome structure was similar compared with other reported rodent mitochondrial genomes and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA), 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region. This was the first complete mitogenome sequenced in genus Apodemus. The phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes demonstrated that A. chevrieri clustered together with genus Mus. Additionally, extremely high haplotype and nucleotide diversities (h=0.978, ?=2.6%) were observed based on 44 mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences. This suggests adaptive divergence of this species to a variety of living habitats and potential refuges in the eastern margin of the Hengduan Mountains during the Quaternary ice ages. No population expansions or genetic bottlenecks were observed in demographic analyses. The phylogenetic analysis of cyt b sequences and haplotypes revealed a genetic differentiation between north and south populations. The divergence between north clade and south clade occurred probably in the middle Pleistocene 1.1815 million years ago (Mya) (95% highest posterior density 2.3189-0.2737 Mya), which was congruent with the periods of the most tense uplift events in the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:21870961

  13. Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Smadja, Carole M; Loire, Etienne; Caminade, Pierre; Thoma, Marios; Latour, Yasmin; Roux, Camille; Thoss, Michaela; Penn, Dustin J; Ganem, Guila; Boursot, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which prezygotic isolation is strengthened as a response to selection against hybridization. Most empirical support for reinforcement comes from the observation of its possible phenotypic signature: an accentuated degree of prezygotic isolation in the hybrid zone as compared to allopatry. Here, we implemented a novel approach to this question by seeking for the signature of reinforcement at the genetic level. In the house mouse, selection against hybrids and enhanced olfactory-based assortative mate preferences are observed in a hybrid zone between the two European subspecies Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus, suggesting a possible recent reinforcement event. To test for the genetic signature of reinforcing selection and identify genes involved in sexual isolation, we adopted a hitchhiking mapping approach targeting genomic regions containing candidate genes for assortative mating in mice. We densely scanned these genomic regions in hybrid zone and allopatric samples using a large number of fast evolving microsatellite loci that allow the detection of recent selection events. We found a handful of loci showing the expected pattern of significant reduction in variability in populations close to the hybrid zone, showing assortative odour preference in mate choice experiments as compared to populations further away and displaying no such preference. These loci lie close to genes that we pinpoint as testable candidates for further investigation. PMID:26132782

  14. Diurnal Oscillation of Amygdala Clock Gene Expression and Loss of Synchrony in a Mouse Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Savalli, Giorgia; Diao, Weifei; Schulz, Stefan; Todtova, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disturbances in circadian rhythm-related physiological and behavioral processes are frequently observed in depressed patients and several clock genes have been identified as risk factors for the development of mood disorders. However, the particular involvement of the circadian system in the pathophysiology of depression and its molecular regulatory interface is incompletely understood. Methods: A naturalistic animal model of depression based upon exposure to chronic mild stress was used to induce anhedonic behavior in mice. Micro-punch dissection was used to isolate basolateral amygdala tissue from anhedonic mice followed by quantitative real-time PCR–based analysis of gene expression. Results: Here we demonstrate that chronic mild stress-induced anhedonic behavior is associated with disturbed diurnal oscillation of the expression of Clock, Cry2, Per1, Per3, Id2, Rev-erb?, Ror-? and Ror-? in the mouse basolateral amygdala. Clock gene desynchronization was accompanied by disruption of the diurnal expressional pattern of vascular endothelial growth factor A expression in the basolateral amygdala of anhedonic mice, also reflected in alterations of circulating vascular endothelial growth factor A levels. Conclusion: We propose that aberrant control of diurnal rhythmicity related to depression may indeed directly result from the illness itself and establish an animal model for the further exploration of the molecular mechanisms mediating the involvement of the circadian system in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. PMID:25522426

  15. Targeted Mutagenesis of a Candidate T Complex Responder Gene in Mouse T Haplotypes Does Not Eliminate Transmission Ratio Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Ewulonu, U. K.; Schimenti, K.; Kuemerle, B.; Magnuson, T.; Schimenti, J.

    1996-01-01

    Transmission ratio distortion (TRD) associated with mouse t haplotypes causes +/t males to transmit the t-bearing chromosome to nearly all their offspring. Of the several genes involved in this phenomenon, the t complex responder (Tcr(t)) locus is absolutely essential for TRD to occur. A candidate Tcr(t) gene called Tcp10b(t) was previously cloned from the genetically defined Tcr(t) region. Its location, restricted expression in testis, and a unique postmeiotic alternative splicing pattern supported the idea that Tcp10b(t) was Tcr(t). To test this hypothesis in a functional assay, ES cells were derived from a viable partial t haplotype, and the Tcp10b(t) gene was mutated by homologous recombination. Mutant mice were mated to appropriate partial t haplotypes to determine whether the targeted chromosome exhibited transmission ratios characteristic of the responder. The results demonstrated that the targeted chromosome retained full responder activity. Hence, Tcp10b(t) does not appear to be Tcr(t). These and other observations necessitate a reevaluation of genetic mapping data and the actual nature of the responder. PMID:8889539

  16. Identification and analysis of house-keeping and tissue-specific genes based on RNA-seq data sets across 15 mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jingyao; Liu, Shoucheng; Zhao, Yuhui; Tan, Xinyu; Aljohi, Hasan Awad; Liu, Wanfei; Hu, Songnian

    2016-01-15

    Recently, RNA-seq has become widely used technology for transcriptome profiling due to its single-base accuracy and high-throughput speciality. In this study, we applied a computational approach on an integrated RNA-seq dataset across 15 normal mouse tissues, and consequently assigned 8408 house-keeping (HK) genes and 2581 tissue-specific (TS) genes among UCSC RefGene annotation. Apart from some basic genomic features, we also performed expression, function and pathway analysis with clustering, DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, indicating the physiological connections (tissues) and diverse biological roles of HK genes (fundamental processes) and TS genes (tissue-corresponding processes). Moreover, we used RT-PCR method to test 18 candidate HK genes and finally identified a novel list of highly stable internal control genes: Ywhae, Ddb 1, Eif4h, etc. In summary, this study provides a new HK gene and TS gene resource for further genetic and evolution research and helps us better understand morphogenesis and biological diversity in mouse. PMID:26551299

  17. Axons Mediate the Distribution of Arylsulfatase A within the Mouse Hippocampus upon Gene Delivery

    E-print Network

    Bongarzone, Ernesto R.

    insufficiency. Direct gene transfer to the CNS and transplant of neural stem cells constitute two of the most contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of distribution of lysosomal enzymes within the mammalian brain after direct gene therapy, demonstrating the use of neural processes for enzyme transport. Key

  18. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice. PMID:26474456

  19. Fetal Brain-directed AAV Gene Therapy Results in Rapid, Robust, and Persistent Transduction of Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Marie Reine; Donsante, Anthony; Zerfas, Patricia; Kaler, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Fetal brain-directed gene addition represents an under-appreciated tool for investigating novel therapeutic approaches in animal models of central nervous system diseases with early prenatal onset. Choroid plexuses (CPs) are specialized neuroectoderm-derived structures that project into the brain's ventricles, produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and regulate CSF biochemical composition. Targeting the CP may be advantageous for adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy for central nervous system disorders due to its immunoprivileged location and slow rate of epithelial turnover. Yet the capacity of AAV vectors to transduce CP has not been delineated precisely. We performed intracerebroventricular injections of recombinant AAV serotype 5-green fluorescent protein (rAAV5-GFP) or rAAV9-GFP in embryonic day 15 (E15) embryos of CD-1 and C57BL/6 pregnant mice and quantified the percentages of GFP expression in CP epithelia (CPE) from lateral and fourth ventricles on E17, postnatal day 2 (P2), and P22. AAV5 was selective for CPE and showed significantly higher transduction efficiency in C57BL/6 mice (P = 0.0128). AAV9 transduced neurons and glial cells in both the mouse strains, in addition to CPE. We documented GFP expression in CPE on E17, within just 48 hours of rAAV administration to the fetal lateral ventricle, and expression by both the serotypes persisted at P130. Our results indicate that prenatal administration of rAAV5 and rAAV9 enables rapid, robust, and sustained transduction of mouse CPE and buttress the rationale for experimental therapeutics targeting the CP. PMID:23799375

  20. From blastocyst to gastrula: gene regulatory networks of embryonic stem cells and early mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, David-Emlyn; Shen, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, many regulatory genes and signalling events coordinating mammalian development from blastocyst to gastrulation stages have been identified by mutational analyses and reverse-genetic approaches, typically on a gene-by-gene basis. More recent studies have applied bioinformatic approaches to generate regulatory network models of gene interactions on a genome-wide scale. Such models have provided insights into the gene networks regulating pluripotency in embryonic and epiblast stem cells, as well as cell-lineage determination in vivo. Here, we review how regulatory networks constructed for different stem cell types relate to corresponding networks in vivo and provide insights into understanding the molecular regulation of the blastocyst–gastrula transition. PMID:25349451

  1. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis of somatic cells in the mouse for cancer gene identification

    PubMed Central

    Largaespada, David A.

    2009-01-01

    To successfully treat cancer we will likely need a much more detailed understanding of the genes and pathways meaningfully altered in individual cancer cases. One method for achieving this goal is to derive cancers in model organisms using unbiased forward genetic screens that allow cancer gene candidate discovery. We have developed a method using a “cut-and-paste” DNA transposon system called Sleeping Beauty (SB) to perform forward genetic screens for cancer genes in mice. Although the approach is conceptually similar to the use of replication competent retroviruses for cancer gene identification, the SB system promises to allow such screens in tissues previously not amenable to forward genetic screens such as the gastrointestinal tract, brain, and liver. This article describes the strains useful for SB-based screens for cancer genes in mice and how they are deployed in an experiment. PMID:19607923

  2. Sequence conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.J.; Troelstra, C.; Kanaar, R.

    1996-09-01

    The rad21 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. The isolation of mouse and human putative homologs of rad21 is reported here. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence of Rad21 with the mammalian proteins showed that the similarity was distributed across the length of the proteins, with more highly conserved regions at both termini. The mHR21{sup sp} (mouse homolog of Rad21, S. pombe) and hHR21{sup sp} (human homolog of Rad21, S. pombe) predicted proteins were 96% identical, whereas the human and S. pombe proteins were 25% identical and 47% similar. RNA blot analysis showed that mHR21{sup sp} mRNA was abundant in all adult mouse tissues examined, with highest expression in testis and thymus. In addition to a 3.1-kb constitutive mRNA transcript, a 2.2-kb transcript was present at a high level in postmeiotic spermatids, while expression of the 3.1-kb mRNA in testis was confined to the meiotic compartment. hHR21{sup sp} mRNA was cell-cycle regulated in human cells, increasing in late S phase to a peak in G2 phase. The level of hHR21{sup sp} transcripts was not altered by exposure of normal diploid fibroblasts to 10 Gy ionizing radiation. In situ hybridization showed that mHR21{sup sp} resided on chromosome 15D3, whereas hHR21{sup sp} localized to the syntenic 8q24 region. Elevated expression of mHR21{sup sp} in testis and thymus supports a possible role for the rad21 mammalian homologs in V(D)J and meiotic recombination, respectively. Cell cycle regulation of rad21, retained from S. pombe to human, is consistent with a conservation of function between S. pombe and human rad21 genes. 62 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Using the BLT Humanized Mouse as a Stem Cell based Gene Therapy Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N.; Bristol, Gregory C.; Kim, Sohn G.; Levin, Bernard; Liu, Wei; Radu, Caius G.; Kitchen, Scott G.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    Small animal models such as mice have been extensively used to study human disease and to develop new therapeutic interventions. Despite the wealth of information gained from these studies, the unique characteristics of mouse immunity as well as the species specificity of viral diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to the development of humanized mouse models. The earlier models involved the use of C. B 17 scid/scid mice and the transplantation of human fetal thymus and fetal liver termed thy/liv (SCID-hu) 1, 2 or the adoptive transfer of human peripheral blood leukocytes (SCID-huPBL) 3. Both models were mainly utilized for the study of HIV infection. One of the main limitations of both of these models was the lack of stable reconstitution of human immune cells in the periphery to make them a more physiologically relevant model to study HIV disease. To this end, the BLT humanized mouse model was developed. BLT stands for bone marrow/liver/thymus. In this model, 6 to 8 week old NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) immunocompromised mice receive the thy/liv implant as in the SCID-hu mouse model only to be followed by a second human hematopoietic stem cell transplant 4. The advantage of this system is the full reconstitution of the human immune system in the periphery. This model has been used to study HIV infection and latency 5-8. We have generated a modified version of this model in which we use genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) to construct the thy/liv implant followed by injection of transduced autologous hHSC 7, 9. This approach results in the generation of genetically modified lineages. More importantly, we adapted this system to examine the potential of generating functional cytotoxic T cells (CTL) expressing a melanoma specific T cell receptor. Using this model we were able to assess the functionality of our transgenic CTL utilizing live positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to determine tumor regression (9). The goal of this protocol is to describe the process of generating these transgenic mice and assessing in vivo efficacy using live PET imaging. As a note, since we use human tissues and lentiviral vectors, our facilities conform to CDC NIH guidelines for Biosafety Level 2 (BSL2) with special precautions (BSL2+). In addition, the NSG mice are severely immunocompromised thus, their housing and maintenance must conform to the highest health standards (http://jaxmice.jax.org/research/immunology/005557-housing.html). PMID:23271478

  4. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Layla K.; Van der Hoek, Mark B.; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Paton, James C.; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor) activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA) as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA) as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease. PMID:26539717

  5. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors. PMID:17525704

  6. Loss and stabilization of amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes in mouse sarcoma S-180 cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, R.J.; Brown, P.C.; Schimke, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The authors studied the loss and stabilization of dihydrofolate reductase genes in clones of a methotrexate-resistant murine S-180 cell line. These cells contained multiple copies of the dihydrofolate reductase gene which were associated with double minute chromosomes. The growth rate of these cells in the absence of methotrexate was inversely related to the degree of gene amplification (number of double minute chromosomes). Cells could both gain and lose genes as a result of an unequal distribution of double minute chromosomes into daughter cells at mitosis. The loss of amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes during growth in the absence of methotrexate resulted from the continual generation of cells containing lower numbers of double minute chromosomes. Because of the growth advantage of these cells, they became dominant in the population. They also studied an unstably resistant S-180 cell line (clone) that, after 3 years of continuous growth in methotrexate, generated cells containing stably amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes. These genes were present on one or more chromosomes, and they were retained in a stable state.

  7. Functional Genomics Screening Utilizing Mutant Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Novel Radiation-Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C.; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy. PMID:25853515

  8. Differential gene expression in the perichondrium and cartilage of the neonatal mouse temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, RJ; Serrano, M; So, S

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discover genes differentially expressed in the perichondrium of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) that might enhance regenerative medicine or orthopedic therapies directed at the tissues of the temporomandibular joint Design We used targeted gene arrays (osteogenesis, stem cell) to identify genes preferentially expressed in the perichondrium (PC) and the cartilaginous (C) portions of the MCC in 2 day-old mice Results Genes with higher expression in the PC sample related to growth factor ligand-receptor interactions (FGF-13 (6.4X), FGF-18 (4X), NCAM (2X); PGDF receptors, TGF-?, and IGF-1), the Notch isoforms (especially Notch 3 and 4) and their ligands, or structural proteins/ proteoglycans (collagen XIV (21X), collagen XVIII (4X), decorin (2.5X)). Genes with higher expression in the C sample consisted mostly of known cartilage-specific genes (aggrecan (11X), procollagens X (33X), XI (14X), IX (4.5X), Sox 9 (4.4X), and Indian hedgehog (6.7X)). However, the functional or structural roles of several genes that were expressed at higher levels in the PC sample are unclear (myogenic factor 9 (9X), tooth-related genes such as tuftelin (2.5X) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (1.6X), VEGF–B (2X) and its receptors (3–4X), and sclerostin (1.7X)). Conclusions FGF, Notch, and TGF-? signaling may be important regulators of MCC proliferation and differentiation; the relatively high expression of genes such as myogenic factor 6 and VEGF–B and its receptors suggests a degree of unsuspected plasticity in PC cells. PMID:19627518

  9. Regulation of contractile protein gene expression in unloaded mouse skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading was performed on mice in an effort to study the regulation of contractile protein genes. In particular, the regulation of myosin heavy chain IIb was examined. During unloading, muscle fibers undergo a type conversion. Preliminary data from this study does not support the hypothesis that the fiber type conversion is due to an increase in promoter activity of fast isoform genes, such as myosin heavy chain IIb. The consequences of this finding are examined, with particular focus on other factors controlling gene regulation.

  10. Adeno-associated virus mediated endostatin gene therapy in combination with topoisomerase inhibitor effectively controls liver tumor in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Yi; Lee, Myun Hee; Kim, Kyung Sup; Jung, Hyun Cheol; Roh, Jae Kyung; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Choi, Seung Ho

    2004-01-01

    AIM: rAAV mediated endostatin gene therapy has been examined as a new method for treating cancer. However, a sustained and high protein delivery is required to achieve the desired therapeutic effects. We evaluated the impact of topoisomerase inhibitors in rAAV delivered endostatin gene therapy in a liver tumor model. METHODS: rAAV containing endostatin expression cassettes were transduced into hepatoma cell lines. To test whether the topoisomerase inhibitor pretreatment increased the expression of endostatin, Western blotting and ELISA were performed. The biologic activity of endostatin was confirmed by endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation assays. The anti-tumor effects of the rAAV-endostatin vector combined with a topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide, were evaluated in a mouse liver tumor model. RESULTS: Topoisomerase inhibitors, including camptothecin and etoposide, were found to increase the endostatin expression level in vitro. The over-expressed endostatin, as a result of pretreatment with a topoisomerase inhibitor, was also biologically active. In animal experiments, the combined therapy of topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide with the rAAV-endostatin vector had the best tumor-suppressive effect and tumor foci were barely observed in livers of the treated mice. Pretreatment with an etoposide increased the level of endostatin in the liver and serum of rAAV-endostatin treated mice. Finally, the mice treated with rAAV-endostatin in combination with etoposide showed the longest survival among the experimental models. CONCLUSION: rAAV delivered endostatin gene therapy in combination with a topoisomerase inhibitor pretreatment is an effective modality for anticancer gene therapy. PMID:15069724

  11. Characterization of Bglu3, a mouse fasting glucose locus, and identification of Apcs as an underlying candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lu, Zongji; Wang, Qian; Su, Zhiguang; Bao, Yongde; Shi, Weibin

    2012-03-19

    Bglu3 is a quantitative trait locus for fasting glucose on distal chromosome 1 identified in an intercross between C57BL/6 (B6) and C3H/HeJ (C3H) apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. This locus was subsequently replicated in two separate mouse intercrosses. The objective of this study was to characterize Bglu3 through construction and analysis of a congenic strain and identify underlying candidate genes. Congenic mice were constructed by introgressing a genomic region harboring Bglu3 from C3H.apoE(-/-) into B6.apoE(-/-) mice. Mice were started with a Western diet at 6 wk of age and maintained on the diet for 12 wk. Gene expression in the liver was analyzed by microarrays. Congenic mice had significantly higher fasting glucose levels and developed more significant glucose intolerance compared with B6.apoE(-/-) mice on the Western diet. Microarray analysis revealed 336 genes to be differentially expressed in the liver of congenic mice. Further pathway analysis suggested a role for acute phase response signaling in regulating glucose intolerance. Apcs, encoding an acute phase response protein serum amyloid P (SAP), is located underneath the linkage peak of Bglu3. Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms between B6 and C3H mice were detected within and surrounding Apcs. Apcs expression in the liver was significantly higher in congenic and C3H mice compared with B6 mice. The Western diet consumption led to a gradual rise in plasma SAP levels, which was accompanied by rising fasting glucose in both B6 and C3H apoE(-/-) mice. Expression of C3H Apcs in B6.apoE(-/-) mice aggravated glucose intolerance. Bglu3 is confirmed to be a locus affecting diabetes susceptibility, and Apcs is a probable candidate gene. PMID:22274563

  12. Genes methylated by DNA methyltransferase 3b are similar in mouse intestine and human colon cancer

    E-print Network

    Steine, Eveline J.

    Human cancer cells frequently have regions of their DNA hypermethylated, which results in transcriptional silencing of affected genes and promotion of tumor formation. However, it is still unknown whether cancer-associated ...

  13. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  14. Mouse autosomal homolog of DAZ, a candidate male sterility gene in humans, is expressed in male germ cells before and after puberty

    SciTech Connect

    Reijo, R.; Seligman, J.; Jaffe, T.

    1996-07-15

    Deletion of the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) region of the human Y chromosome results in spermatogenic failure. While the identity of the critical missing gene has yet to be established, a strong candidate is the putative RNA-binding protein DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia). Here we describe the mouse homolog of DAZ. Unlike human DAZ, which is Y-linked, in mouse the Dazh (DAZ homolog) gene maps to chromosome 17. Nonetheless, the predicted amino acid sequences of the gene products are quite similar, especially in their RNP/RRM (putative RNA-binding) domains, and both genes are transcribed predominantly in testes; the mouse gene is transcribed at a lower level in ovaries. Dazh transcripts were not detected in testes of mice that lack germ cells. In testes of wildtype mice, Dazh transcription is detectable 1 day after birth (when the only germ cells are prospermatogonia), increases steadily as spermatogonial stem cells appear, plateaus as the first wave of spermatogenic cells enters meiosis (10 days after birth), and is sustained at this level thereafter. This unique pattern of expression suggests the Dazh participates in differentiation, proliferation, or maintenance of germ cell founder populations before, during, and after the pubertal onset of spermatogenesis. Such functions could readily account for the diverse spermatogenic defects observed in human males with AZF deletion. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Discovery of Candidate Disease Genes in ENU–Induced Mouse Mutants by Large-Scale Sequencing, Including a Splice-Site Mutation in Nucleoredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Liu, Bin; Probst, Frank J.; Harrow, Jennifer; Grafham, Darren; Hentges, Kathryn E.; Woodward, Lanette P.; Maxwell, Andrea; Mitchell, Karen; Risley, Michael D.; Johnson, Randy; Hirschi, Karen; Lupski, James R.; Funato, Yosuke; Miki, Hiroaki; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Matthews, Lucy; Coffey, Alison J.; Parker, Anne; Hubbard, Tim J.; Rogers, Jane; Bradley, Allan; Adams, David J.; Justice, Monica J.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn), inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing. PMID:20011118

  16. Urinary metallothionein as a biological indicator of occupational cadmium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tohyama, C.; Shaikh, Z.A.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay and neutron activation data indicate that the urinary metallothionein concentration is related to the liver Cd concentration in occupational Cd exposure. It is also related to the kidney Cd content - but only before the onset of renal dysfunction. Further epidemiological studies are needed to establish a dose-response relationship, which may be useful in minimizing the hazard of Cd-induced renal dysfunction.

  17. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes with enriched expression in the mouse central Extended Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Befort, Katia; Blad, Clara; Filliol, Dominique; Ghate, Aditee; Dembele, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Koch, Muriel; Muller, Jean; Lardenois, Aurélie; Poch, Olivier; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2008-01-01

    The central Extended Amygdala (EAc) is an ensemble of highly interconnected limbic structures of the anterior brain, and forms a cellular continuum including the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis (BNST), the central nucleus of the Amygdala (CeA) and the Nucleus Accumbens shell (AcbSh). This neural network is a key site for interactions between brain reward and stress systems, and has been implicated in several aspects of drug abuse. In order to increase our understanding of EAc function at the molecular level, we undertook a genome-wide screen (Affymetrix) to identify genes whose expression is enriched in the EAc. We focused on the less-well known BNST-CeA areas of the EAc, and identified 121 genes that exhibit more than 2-fold higher expression level in the EAc compared to whole brain. Among these, forty-three genes have never been described to be expressed in the EAc. We mapped these genes throughout the brain, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization, and identified eight genes with a unique and distinct rostro-caudal expression pattern along AcbSh, BNST and CeA. Q-PCR analysis performed in brain and peripheral organ tissues indicated that, with the exception of one (Spata13), all these genes are predominantly expressed in brain. These genes encode signaling proteins (Adora2, GPR88, Arpp21 and Rem2), a transcription factor (Limh6) or proteins of unknown function (Rik130, Spata13 and Wfs1). The identification of genes with enriched expression expands our knowledge of EAc at a molecular level, and provides useful information to towards genetic manipulations within the EAc. PMID:18786617

  18. Multiplex Three-Dimensional Brain Gene Expression Mapping in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Vanessa M.; Ossadtchi, Alex; Khan, Arshad H.; Yee, Simon; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2002-01-01

    To facilitate high-throughput 3D imaging of brain gene expression, a new method called voxelation has been developed. Spatially registered voxels (cubes) are analyzed, resulting in multiple volumetric maps of gene expression analogous to the images reconstructed in biomedical imaging systems. Using microarrays, 40 voxel images for 9000 genes were acquired from brains of both normal mice and mice in which a pharmacological model of Parkinson's disease (PD) had been induced by methamphetamine. Quality-control analyses established the reproducibility of the voxelation procedure. The investigation revealed a common network of coregulated genes shared between the normal and PD brain, and allowed identification of putative control regions responsible for these networks. In addition, genes involved in cell/cell interactions were found to be prominently regulated in the PD brains. Finally, singular value decomposition (SVD), a mathematical method used to provide parsimonious explanations of complex data sets, identified gene vectors and their corresponding images that distinguished between normal and PD brain structures, most pertinently the striatum. [All study results and supplementary data are available on the web at http://www.pharmacology.ucla.edu/smithlab/genome_multiplex and at http://www.genome.org. Microarray data are also available at GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo, under the series accession no. GSE30.] PMID:12045141

  19. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV)-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18%) of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14%) of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population. PMID:21943279

  20. Identification of a novel tandemly repeated sequence present in an intron of the glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) gene in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Faik, P.; Walker, J.I.H.; Morgan, M.J. )

    1994-05-01

    Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI, glucose 6-phosphate ketol-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.9) is a housekeeping gene expressed in all tissues and organisms that utilize glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Deficiency in humans leads to a rare form of nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. The authors have isolated a 3.2-kb mouse cDNA containing glucose phosphate isomerase coding sequence and a 2.1-kb intronic sequence and a large proportion of the human gene (approaching 55 kb) in four phage [lambda] recombinants. A 4-kb intronic fragment from the human gene showing homology to the mouse intronic sequence has been isolated and sequenced. The fragment contains approximately 1.5 kb of sequence that is composited of 30 repeat units of a novel 50-kb tandemly repeated unit. The mouse intronic sequence contains 18 similar units. The human consensus sequence differs from the mouse consensus sequence at only 7 positions out of 50 (positions 16, 26, 27, 42, 43, 47, and 48). A probe containing the repeat element detects polymorphisms, specific to glucose phosphate isomerase, in human DNA. The repeat element does not appear to be present at any other loci in human DNA. The conservation of this intronic repeat element extends to pig and Chinese hamster. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Differential Expressions of the Alternatively Spliced Variant mRNAs of the µ Opioid Receptor Gene, OPRM1, in Brain Regions of Four Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C.; Kest, Benjamin; Waxman, Amanda R.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-01-01

    The µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, undergoes extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing in rodents and humans, with dozens of alternatively spliced variants of the OPRM1 gene. The present studies establish a SYBR green quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to more accurately quantify mouse OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs. Using these qPCR assays, we examined the expression of OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs in selected brain regions of four inbred mouse strains displaying differences in µ opioid-induced tolerance and physical dependence: C56BL/6J, 129P3/J, SJL/J and SWR/J. The complete mRNA expression profiles of the OPRM1 splice variants reveal marked differences of the variant mRNA expression among the brain regions in each mouse strain, suggesting region-specific alternative splicing of the OPRM1 gene. The expression of many variants was also strain-specific, implying a genetic influence on OPRM1 alternative splicing. The expression levels of a number of the variant mRNAs in certain brain regions appear to correlate with strain sensitivities to morphine analgesia, tolerance and physical dependence in four mouse strains. PMID:25343478