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Sample records for mouse model induced

  1. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  2. A mouse model for juvenile doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wuqiang; Shou, Weinian; Payne, R Mark; Caldwell, Randall; Field, Loren J

    2008-11-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent antitumor agent. DOX can also induce cardiotoxicity, and high cumulative doses are associated with recalcitrant heart failure. Children are particularly sensitive to DOX-induced heart failure. The ability to genetically modify mice makes them an ideal experimental system to study the molecular basis of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. However, most mouse DOX studies rely on acute drug administration in adult animals, which typically are analyzed within 1 wk. Here, we describe a juvenile mouse model of chronic DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction. DOX treatment was initiated at 2 wk of age and continued for a period of 5 wk (25 mg/kg cumulative dose). This resulted in a decline in cardiac systolic function, which was accompanied by marked atrophy of the heart, low levels of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and decreased growth velocity. Other animals were allowed to recover for 13 wk after the final DOX injection. Cardiac systolic function improved during this recovery period but remained depressed compared with the saline injected controls, despite the reversal of cardiac atrophy. Interestingly, increased levels of cardiomyocyte apoptosis and concomitant myocardial fibrosis were observed after DOX withdrawal. These data suggest that different mechanisms contribute to cardiac dysfunction during the treatment and recovery phases. PMID:18614963

  3. Revisiting the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford B; D'Amore, Patricia A; Connor, Kip M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration. Numerous refinements to the model have been made since its inception in the 1950s, and technological advancements have expanded the use of the model across multiple scientific fields. In this review, we explore the historical developments that have led to the mouse OIR model utilized today, essential concepts of OIR, limitations of the model, and a representative selection of key findings from OIR, with particular emphasis on current research progress. PMID:27499653

  4. Distraction induced Enterogenesis: A unique mouse model using polyethylene glycol

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Maria, Haytham Mustafa; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Purpose Recent studies have demonstrated that the small intestine can be lengthened by applying mechanical forces to the bowel lumen – distraction-induced enterogenesis. However, the mechanisms which account for this growth are unknown, and might be best examined using a mouse model. The purpose of this study is to establish the feasibility of developing distractive-induced small bowel growth in mouse. Methods 12-week old C57BL/6J mice had a jejunal segment taken out of continuity, and distended with polyethylene glycol (PEG: 3350 KDa); this group was compared to a control group without stretching. Segment length and diameter were measured intra-operatively and after 5 days. Villus height, crypt depth, muscle thickness in the isolated segment were assessed. Rate of epithelial cell proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine: BrdU incorporation) in crypt was also examined. The mucosal mRNA expression of targeted factors were performed to investigate potential mechanisms of which might lead to distraction-induced enterogenesis. Results At harvest, the PEG-stretch group showed a significant increase in length and diameter versus controls. Villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness increased in the PEG group. The PEG group also showed significantly increased rates of epithelial cell proliferation versus controls. Real-time PCR showed a trend toward higher β-catenin and c-myc mRNA expression in the PEG stretched group; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Radial distraction-induced enterogenesis with PEG is a viable method for increasing small intestinal length and diameter. This model may provide a new method for studying the mechanisms leading to distraction-induced enterogenesis. PMID:21605872

  5. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Janke, Laura J.; Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Ramsey, Laura B.; Cai, Xiangjun; Mattano, Leonard A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Funk, Amy J.; Relling, Mary V.

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006). Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007). As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001). This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027) and asparaginase (P = 0.036). We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids. PMID:26967741

  6. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Janke, Laura J; Kawedia, Jitesh D; Ramsey, Laura B; Cai, Xiangjun; Mattano, Leonard A; Boyd, Kelli L; Funk, Amy J; Relling, Mary V

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006). Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007). As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001). This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027) and asparaginase (P = 0.036). We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids. PMID:26967741

  7. Single-Dose Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Syme, Alasdair; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a self-resolved radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) mouse model using the highest possibly tolerable single ionizing radiation (RT) dose was needed in order to study RIOM management solutions. We used 10-week-old male BALB/c mice with average weight of 23 g for model production. Mice were treated with an orthovoltage X-ray irradiator to induce the RIOM ulceration at the intermolar eminence of the animal tongue. General anesthesia was injected intraperitoneally for proper animal immobilization during the procedure. Ten days after irradiation, a single RT dose of 10, 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy generated a RIOM ulcer at the intermolar eminence (posterior upper tongue surface) with mean ulcer floor (posterior epithelium) heights of 190, 150, 25, 10, and 10 μm, respectively, compared to 200 μm in non-irradiated animals. The mean RIOM ulcer size % of the total epithelialized upper surface of the animal tongue was RT dose dependent. At day 10, the ulcer size % was 2, 5, 27, and 31% for 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy RT, respectively. The mean relative surface area of the total epithelialized upper surface of the tongue was RT dose dependent, since it was significantly decreased to 97, 95, 88, and 38% with 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy doses, respectively, at day 10 after RT. Subcutaneous injection of 1 mL of 0.9% saline/6 h for 24 h yielded a 100% survival only with 18 Gy self-resolved RIOM, which had 5.6 ± 0.3 days ulcer duration. In conclusion, we have generated a 100% survival self-resolved single-dose RIOM male mouse model with long enough duration for application in RIOM management research. Oral mucositis ulceration was radiation dose dependent. Sufficient hydration of animals after radiation exposure significantly improved their survival. PMID:27446800

  8. Novel thromboxane A2 analog-induced IUGR mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fung, C; Brown, A; Cox, J; Callaway, C; McKnight, R; Lane, R

    2011-10-01

    Rodents, particularly rats, are used in the majority of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) research. An important tool that is lacking in this field is the ability to impose IUGR on transgenic mice. We therefore developed a novel mouse model of chronic IUGR using U-46619, a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) analog, infusion. TXA2 overproduction is prevalent in human pregnancies complicated by cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia. In this model, U-46619 micro-osmotic pump infusion in the last week of C57BL/6J mouse gestation caused maternal hypertension. IUGR pups weighed 15% less, had lighter brain, lung, liver and kidney weights, but had similar nose-to-anus lengths compared with sham pups at birth. Metabolically, IUGR pups showed increased essential branched-chain amino acids. They were normoglycemic yet hypoinsulinemic. They showed decreased hepatic mRNA levels of total insulin-like growth factor-1 and its variants, but increased level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 alpha. IUGR offspring were growth restricted from birth (P1) through postnatal day 21 (P21). IUGR males caught up with sham males in weight by P28, whereas IUGR females caught up with sham females by P77. IUGR males surpassed sham males in weight by P238. In summary, we have a non-brain sparing IUGR mouse model that has a relative ease of surgical IUGR induction and exhibits features similar to the chronic IUGR offspring of humans and other animal models. As transgenic technology predominates in mice, this model now permits the imposition of IUGR on transgenic mice to interrogate mechanisms of fetal origins of adult disease. PMID:25141265

  9. UV-induced skin cancer in a hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, F R; Forbes, P D

    1995-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a very common carcinogen in our environment, but epidemiological data on the relationship between skin cancers and ambient solar UV radiation are very restricted. In hairless mice the process of UV carcinogenesis can be studied in depth. Experiments with this animal model have yielded quantitative data on how tumor development depends on dose, time and wavelength of the UV radiation. In combination with epidemiological data, these experimental results can be transposed to humans. Comparative studies on molecular, cellular and physiological changes in mouse and man can further our fundamental understanding of UV carcinogenesis in man. This is likely to improve risk assessments such as those related to stratospheric ozone depletion, and to yield well-targeted intervention schemes, e.g. prescribing a specific drug or diet, for high-risk individuals. PMID:7646487

  10. Mouse Model of Respiratory Tract Infection Induced by Waddlia chondrophila

    PubMed Central

    Pilloux, Ludovic; LeRoy, Didier; Brunel, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an emerging pathogen. Some clinical studies highlighted a possible role of W. chondrophila in bronchiolitis, pneumonia and miscarriage. This pathogenic potential is further supported by the ability of W. chondrophila to infect and replicate within human pneumocytes, macrophages and endometrial cells. Considering that W. chondrophila might be a causative agent of respiratory tract infection, we developed a mouse model of respiratory tract infection to get insight into the pathogenesis of W. chondrophila. Following intranasal inoculation of 2 x 108 W. chondrophila, mice lost up to 40% of their body weight, and succumbed rapidly from infection with a death rate reaching 50% at day 4 post-inoculation. Bacterial loads, estimated by qPCR, increased from day 0 to day 3 post-infection and decreased thereafter in surviving mice. Bacterial growth was confirmed by detecting dividing bacteria using electron microscopy, and living bacteria were isolated from lungs 14 days post-infection. Immunohistochemistry and histopathology of infected lungs revealed the presence of bacteria associated with pneumonia characterized by an important multifocal inflammation. The high inflammatory score in the lungs was associated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both serum and lungs at day 3 post-infection. This animal model supports the role of W. chondrophila as an agent of respiratory tract infection, and will help understanding the pathogenesis of this strict intracellular bacterium. PMID:26950066

  11. Mouse models for induced genetic instability at endogenous loci.

    PubMed

    Reliene, Ramune; Schiestl, Robert H

    2003-10-13

    Exposure to environmental factors and genetic predisposition of an individual may lead individually or in combination to various genetic diseases including cancer. These diseases may be a consequence of genetic instability resulting in large-scale genomic rearrangements, such as DNA deletions, duplications, and translocations. This review focuses on mouse assays detecting genetic instability at endogenous loci. The frequency of DNA deletions by homologous recombination at the pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) locus is elevated in mice with mutations in ATM, Trp53, Gadd45, and WRN genes and after exposure to carcinogens. Other quantitative in vivo assays detecting loss of heterozygosity events, such as the mammalian spot assay, Dlb-1 mouse and Aprt mouse assays, are also reviewed. These in vivo test systems may predict hazardous effects of an environmental agent and/or genetic predisposition to cancer. PMID:14557804

  12. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Buonanno, M.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Kleiman, N. J.; Young, E.; Ponnayia, B.; Brenner, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/µm) with a range in skin of about 135 µm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 µm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 µm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 µm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism. PMID:26207682

  13. A mouse model of mitochondrial complex III dysfunction induced by myxothiazol

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudi, Mina; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Marjavaara, Sanna; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Levéen, Per; Fellman, Vineta

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Reversible chemical inhibition of complex III in wild type mouse. • Myxothiazol causes decreased complex III activity in mouse liver. • The model is useful for therapeutic trials to improve mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Myxothiazol is a respiratory chain complex III (CIII) inhibitor that binds to the ubiquinol oxidation site Qo of CIII. It blocks electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome b and thus inhibits CIII activity. It has been utilized as a tool in studies of respiratory chain function in in vitro and cell culture models. We developed a mouse model of biochemically induced and reversible CIII inhibition using myxothiazol. We administered myxothiazol intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg to C57Bl/J6 mice every 24 h and assessed CIII activity, histology, lipid content, supercomplex formation, and gene expression in the livers of the mice. A reversible CIII activity decrease to 50% of control value occurred at 2 h post-injection. At 74 h only minor histological changes in the liver were found, supercomplex formation was preserved and no significant changes in the expression of genes indicating hepatotoxicity or inflammation were found. Thus, myxothiazol-induced CIII inhibition can be induced in mice for four days in a row without overt hepatotoxicity or lethality. This model could be utilized in further studies of respiratory chain function and pharmacological approaches to mitochondrial hepatopathies.

  14. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. PMID:27345200

  15. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  16. A transgenic mouse model of neuroepithelial cell specific inducible overexpression of dopamine D1-receptor.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K; Araki, K; McCarthy, D M; Sims, J R; Ren, J Q; Zhang, X; Bhide, P G

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine and its receptors appear in the brain during early embryonic period suggesting a role for dopamine in brain development. In fact, dopamine receptor imbalance resulting from impaired physiological balance between D1- and D2-receptor activities can perturb brain development and lead to persisting changes in brain structure and function. Dopamine receptor imbalance can be produced experimentally using pharmacological or genetic methods. Pharmacological methods tend to activate or antagonize the receptors in all cell types. In the traditional gene knockout models the receptor imbalance occurs during development and also at maturity. Therefore, assaying the effects of dopamine imbalance on specific cell types (e.g. precursor versus postmitotic cells) or at specific periods of brain development (e.g. pre- or postnatal periods) is not feasible in these models. We describe a novel transgenic mouse model based on the tetracycline dependent inducible gene expression system in which dopamine D1-receptor transgene expression is induced selectively in neuroepithelial cells of the embryonic brain at experimenter-chosen intervals of brain development. In this model, doxycycline-induced expression of the transgene causes significant overexpression of the D1-receptor and significant reductions in the incorporation of the S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine into neuroepithelial cells of the basal and dorsal telencephalon indicating marked effects on telencephalic neurogenesis. The D1-receptor overexpression occurs at higher levels in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) than the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) or cerebral wall (CW). Moreover, although the transgene is induced selectively in the neuroepithelium, D1-receptor protein overexpression appears to persist in postmitotic cells. The mouse model can be modified for neuroepithelial cell-specific inducible expression of other transgenes or induction of the D1-receptor transgene in other cells in specific brain regions by

  17. Inhibition of Inflammation-Associated Olfactory Loss by Etanercept in an Inducible Olfactory Inflammation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong Gi; Lane, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a soluble human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) receptor blocker (Etanercept) on an inducible olfactory inflammation (IOI) mouse model Study Design An in vivo study using a transgenic mouse model Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods To study the impact of chronic inflammation on the olfactory system, a transgenic mouse model of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)-associated olfactory loss was utilized (IOI mouse), expressing TNF-α in a temporally-controlled fashion specifically within the olfactory epithelium. In one group of mice (n=4), Etanercept was injected intraperitoneally (100 µg/dose, 3 times/week) concurrent with a 2-week period of TNF-α expression. A second group of mice (n=2) underwent induction of TNF-α expression for 8 weeks, with Etanercept treatment administered during the final 2 weeks of inflammation. Olfactory function was assayed by elecro-olfactogram (EOG), and olfactory tissue was processed for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Each group was compared with equal number of control group. Results Compared to non-treated IOI mice, Etanercept -treated IOI mice showed significantly improved EOG responses after 2 weeks (p<0.001). After 8 weeks of induced inflammation, there was massive loss of olfactory epithelium and no EOG response in non-treated IOI mice. However, in Etanercept - treated mice, regeneration of olfactory epithelium was observed. Conclusion Concomitant administration of Etanercept in IOI mice results in interruption of TNF-α-induced olfactory loss and induction of neuroepithelial regeneration. This demonstrates that Etanercept has potential utility as a tool for elucidating the role of TNF-α in other olfactory inflammation models. PMID:26932943

  18. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Scott T.; Skarra, Danalea V.; Rivera, Alissa J.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  19. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott T; Skarra, Danalea V; Rivera, Alissa J; Thackray, Varykina G

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  20. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)—the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality—is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  1. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)-the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality-is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  2. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-11-14

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  3. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  4. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Smilenov, L B; Kleiman, N J; Young, E; Ponnayia, B; Brenner, D J

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/μm) with a range in skin of about 135 μm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 μm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 μm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 μm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism. PMID:26207682

  5. High-resolution optical coherence tomography in mouse models of genetic and induced retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimalla, Peter; Carido, Madalena; Pran Babu, Sheik; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Gaertner, Maria; Kordowich, Simon; Wittig, Dierk; Ader, Marius; Karl, Mike; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    For the study of disease mechanisms and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for retinal pathologies in human, rodent models play an important role. Nowadays, optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows three-dimensional investigation of retinal events over time. However, a detailed analysis of how different retinal degenerations are reflected in OCT images is still lacking in the biomedical field. Therefore, we use OCT to visualize retinal degeneration in specific mouse models in order to study disease progression in vivo and improve image interpretation of this noninvasive modality. We use a self-developed spectral domain OCT system for simultaneous dual-band imaging in the 0.8 μm- and 1.3 μm-wavelength range - the two most common spectral bands in biomedical OCT. A fiber-coupled ophthalmic scanning unit allows flexible imaging of the eye with a high axial resolution of 3 - 4 μm in tissue. Four different mouse models consisting of one genetic (rhodopsin-deficient and three induced retinal degenerations (sodium iodate-induced damage, light-induced photoreceptor damage and Kainate neurotoxin damage) were investigated. OCT imaging was performed daily or weekly, depending on the specific degeneration model, over a time period of up to 9 weeks. Individual retinal layers that were affected by the specific degeneration could successfully be identified and monitored over the observation time period. Therefore, longitudinal OCT studies deliver reliable information about the retinal microstructure and the time course of retinal degeneration processes in vivo.

  6. Generation of a novel mouse model for the inducible depletion of macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gheryani, Nabeia; Coffelt, Seth B; Gartland, Alison; Rumney, Robin M H; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Lewis, Claire E; Tozer, Gillian M; Greaves, David R; Dear, T Neil; Miller, Gaynor

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in tissue homeostasis, innate immunity, inflammation, and wound repair. Macrophages are also essential during development, severely limiting the use of mouse models in which these cells have been constitutively deleted. Consequently, we have developed a transgenic model of inducible macrophage depletion in which macrophage-specific induction of the cytotoxic diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) is achieved by administration of doxycycline. Induction of the DTA protein in transgenic animals resulted in a significant 50% reduction in CD68+ macrophages of the liver, spleen, and bone over a period of 6 weeks. Pertinently, the macrophages remaining after doxycycline treatment were substantially smaller and are functionally impaired as shown by reduced inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide. This inducible model of macrophage depletion can now be utilized to determine the role of macrophages in both development and animal models of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22927121

  7. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. PMID:23357548

  8. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  9. Romiplostim promotes platelet recovery in a mouse model of multicycle chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Patricia L; Wei, Ping; Buck, Keri; Sinclair, Angus M; Eschenberg, Michael; Sasu, Barbra; Molineux, Graham

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia can lead to chemotherapy treatment delays or dose reductions. The ability of romiplostim, a thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetic, to promote platelet recovery in a mouse model of multicycle chemotherapy/radiation therapy (CRT)-induced thrombocytopenia was examined. In humans, an inverse relationship between platelet counts and endogenous TPO (eTPO) concentration exists. In a CRT mouse model, eTPO was not elevated during the first 5 days after CRT treatment (the "eTPO gap"), then increased to a peak 10 days after each CRT treatment in an inverse relationship to platelet counts seen in humans. To bridge the eTPO gap, mice were treated with 10-1,000 μg/kg of romiplostim on day 0, 1, or 2 after CRT. In some mice, the romiplostim dose was approximately divided over 3 days. Platelet recovery occurred faster with romiplostim in most conditions tested. Romiplostim doses of ≥100 μg/kg given on day 0 significantly lessened the platelet nadir. Fractionating the dose over 3 days did not appear to confer a large advantage. These data may provide a rationale for clinical studies of romiplostim in chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:25754671

  10. Dysbiosis of the fecal microbiota in the TNBS-induced Crohn's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Chuan; Su, Lili; Xia, Zhongkui; Li, Xin; Li, Ying; Li, Lingling; Yan, Ting; Feng, Qiang; Xiao, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by chronic transmural inflammation. The symptom of the mice model induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) is closed to human under CD condition, so this kind of animal is widely used in the related researches. Although the dysbiosis of the fecal microbiota has been proved to play an important role in the patients with CD, the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota in the mouse model under disease condition is still unclear. In the current study, male 7-week BALB/c mice were anesthetized and intrarectal administrated by ethanol (ET group), TNBS in ethanol (TN group), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (CK group) as control. The symptoms of individuals under the CD condition were observed, and the changes of the bacterial taxonomic structure and functional composition were revealed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) 16S sequencing. The BALB/c mice in TN group demonstrated CD-like symptoms and the damages in the intestinal tract. The NGS 16S results exhibited that the diversity and microbial composition under CD condition are significantly different with those in ET group. The KEGG Orthology (KO) profile were generated from PICRUSt, and function modules such as methanogenesis (M00347) and microcin C transport system (M00349) were found enriched in the individuals in the TN group. This study proved that mouse model induced by TNBS could develop the similar symptom to CD patient, and we firstly showed the significant intestinal microbe changes on both taxonomic structure and functional composition in this mouse model. PMID:26795965

  11. Effects of Exendin-4 on Male Reproductive Parameters of D-Galactose Induced Aging Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of exendin-4 on reproductive alteration in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 72 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (20~25 g) were randomly divided into six groups: control, exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg), exendin-4 (10 nmol/kg), D-galactose (500 mg/kg), D-galactose+exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg), and D-galactose+exendin-4 (10 nmol/kg). The aging model animals were gavaged with D-galactose for six weeks, and exendin-4 was injected intraperitoneally in the last 10 days. At the end of treatment serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone levels were evaluated and the cauda epididymis and testis were removed to analyze the sperm count and testis morphology. Results The testis weight and volume decreased in the D-galactose group (p<0.01 and p<0.05) respectively. Exendin-4 (1, 10 nmol/kg) increased these parameters in the normal and aging mouse models. Serum LH and FSH levels increased and the sperm count decreased in the D-galactose group (p<0.05). Further, exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg) decreased LH and FSH levels and increased the serum testosterone level and sperm count in both normal and aging animals. Conclusions D-galactose can induce aging alternations in the male reproductive system such as decreased sperm count and increased serum LH and FSH levels through reactive oxygen species over production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activity. Further, co-administration of exendin-4 reduced reproductive complications of D-galactose in an aging mouse model. PMID:25606567

  12. Imiquimod Increases Cutaneous VEGF Expression in Imiquimod-induced Psoriatic Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Hui; Xie, Wen-Lin; Zhao, Yu-Kun; Liu, Juan-Hua; Luo, Di-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease of unknown aetiology but increasing evidence suggests that cutaneous angiogenesis plays an important role. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the pro-angiogenic cytokines which is related to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Our study evaluated the influence of imiquimod (IMQ) on VEGF in IMQ-induced mouse model. Balb/c female mice (n=16) 8-12 weeks of age were randomly divided into an experimental group (5% IMQ cream) and the control group (Vaseline cream). Serum levels of circulating VEGF-A were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. VEGF protein expression in tested skin was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. The tested skin in the experimental group expressed higher levels of VEGF protein than in the control group (p=0.012); immunohistochemical staining revealed that the cells over-expressing VEGF localized predominantly in the epidermis and vascular endothelium. Circulating VEGF-A levels showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups (p=0.445). The IMQ-induced mouse psoriatic model showed an upregulation of VEGF in the skin lesions mimicking human psoriasis but the circulating VEGF-A levels showed no difference. This model may be useful to investigate the role of angiogenesis in psoriasis. PMID:26733387

  13. Functional neuroimaging of amphetamine-induced striatal neurotoxicity in the pleiotrophin knockout mouse model.

    PubMed

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-García, Carmen; Gramage, Esther; Desco, Manuel; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2015-03-30

    Amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects have traditionally been studied using immunohistochemistry and other post-mortem techniques, which have proven invaluable for the definition of amphetamine-induced dopaminergic damage in the nigrostriatal pathway. However, these approaches are limited in that they require large numbers of animals and do not provide the temporal data that can be collected in longitudinal studies using functional neuroimaging techniques. Unfortunately, functional imaging studies in rodent models of drug-induced neurotoxicity are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the changes in brain glucose metabolism caused by amphetamine in the pleiotrophin knockout mouse (PTN-/-), a genetic model with increased vulnerability to amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects. We showed that administration of amphetamine causes a significantly greater loss of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase content in PTN-/- mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, [(18)F]-FDG-PET shows that amphetamine produces a significant decrease in glucose metabolism in the striatum and prefrontal cortex in the PTN-/- mice, compared to WT mice. These findings suggest that [(18)F]-FDG uptake measured by PET is useful for detecting amphetamine-induced changes in glucose metabolism in vivo in specific brain areas, including the striatum, a key feature of amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25703219

  14. A Mouse Model for Pathogen-induced Chronic Inflammation at Local and Systemic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Slocum, Connie S.; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Hua, Ning; Gudino, Cynthia V.; Hamilton, James A.; Genco, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a major driver of pathological tissue damage and a unifying characteristic of many chronic diseases in humans including neoplastic, autoimmune, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Emerging evidence implicates pathogen-induced chronic inflammation in the development and progression of chronic diseases with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Due to the complex and multifactorial etiology of chronic disease, designing experiments for proof of causality and the establishment of mechanistic links is nearly impossible in humans. An advantage of using animal models is that both genetic and environmental factors that may influence the course of a particular disease can be controlled. Thus, designing relevant animal models of infection represents a key step in identifying host and pathogen specific mechanisms that contribute to chronic inflammation. Here we describe a mouse model of pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites following infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium closely associated with human periodontal disease. Oral infection of specific-pathogen free mice induces a local inflammatory response resulting in destruction of tooth supporting alveolar bone, a hallmark of periodontal disease. In an established mouse model of atherosclerosis, infection with P. gingivalis accelerates inflammatory plaque deposition within the aortic sinus and innominate artery, accompanied by activation of the vascular endothelium, an increased immune cell infiltrate, and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators within lesions. We detail methodologies for the assessment of inflammation at local and systemic sites. The use of transgenic mice and defined bacterial mutants makes this model particularly suitable for identifying both host and microbial factors involved in the initiation, progression, and outcome of disease. Additionally, the model can be used to screen for novel therapeutic strategies

  15. Disrupted Tryptophan Metabolism Induced Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Sepsis-associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rong; Kan, Ming-qiang; Wang, Shi-gang; Yang, Run-hua; Zhang, Shao-gang

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common complication in critically ill patients and is associated with a poor prognosis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying sepsis-induced cognitive impairment remain largely to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) activation-mediated neurotoxicity is involved in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced cognitive impairment. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation/perforation (CLP). The animals were randomly divided into the following five groups: Sham + vehicle group; Sham + 1-methyl-D, L-tryptophan group; Sham + L-Kynurenine group; CLP + vehicle group; or CLP + 1-methyl-D, L-tryptophan group. The survival rate was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Behavioral tests were performed by the open field and fear conditioning tests at days 13 and 14 after operation. In the present study, we demonstrated that sepsis induced a deficit in hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairment in a mouse model of SAE. Furthermore, a single peripheral kynurenine administration, the metabolic product of IDO, induced a deficit in the cognitive impairment in the sham mice. However, mice treated with IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-D, L-tryptophan were protected from sepsis-induced cognitive impairment. In conclusion, our study implicates IDO-dependent neurotoxic kynurenine metabolism as a critical factor responsible for the sepsis-induced cognitive impairment and a potential novel target for the treatment of SAE. PMID:26508338

  16. Effects of oxidative stress on hyperglycaemia-induced brain malformations in a diabetes mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Wang, Guang; Han, Sha-Sha; He, Mei-Yao; Cheng, Xin; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Wu, Xia; Yang, Xuesong; Liu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-09-10

    Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) enhances the risk of fetal neurodevelopmental defects. However, the mechanism of hyperglycaemia-induced neurodevelopmental defects is not fully understood. In this study, several typical neurodevelopmental defects were identified in the streptozotocin-induced diabetes mouse model. The neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin/forkhead box P1-labelled neuronal differentiation was suppressed and glial fibrillary acidic protein-labelled glial cell lineage differentiation was slightly promoted in pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) mice. Various concentrations of glucose did not change the U87 cell viability, but glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression was altered with varying glucose concentrations. Mouse maternal hyperglycaemia significantly increased Tunel(+) apoptosis but did not dramatically affect PCNA(+) cell proliferation in the process. To determine the cause of increased apoptosis, we determined the SOD activity, the expression of Nrf2 as well as its downstream anti-oxidative factors NQO1 and HO1, and found that all of them significantly increased in PGDM fetal brains compared with controls. However, Nrf2 expression in U87 cells was not significantly changed by different glucose concentrations. In mouse telencephalon, we observed the co-localization of Tuj-1 and Nrf2 expression in neurons, and down-regulating of Nrf2 in SH-SY5Y cells altered the viability of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to high glucose concentrations. Taken together, the data suggest that Nrf2-modulated antioxidant stress plays a crucial role in maternal hyperglycaemia-induced neurodevelopmental defects. PMID:27497668

  17. Impaired Neural Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated from a Mouse Model of Sandhoff Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Tanabe, Miho; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Fukushige, Tomoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Oishi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a glycosphingolipid storage disease that arises from mutations in the Hexb gene and the resultant deficiency in β-hexosaminidase activity. This deficiency results in aberrant lysosomal accumulation of the ganglioside GM2 and related glycolipids, and progressive deterioration of the central nervous system. Dysfunctional glycolipid storage causes severe neurodegeneration through a poorly understood pathogenic mechanism. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology offers new opportunities for both elucidation of the pathogenesis of diseases and the development of stem cell-based therapies. Here, we report the generation of disease-specific iPSCs from a mouse model of SD. These mouse model-derived iPSCs (SD-iPSCs) exhibited pluripotent stem cell properties and significant accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. In lineage-directed differentiation studies using the stromal cell-derived inducing activity method, SD-iPSCs showed an impaired ability to differentiate into early stage neural precursors. Moreover, fewer neurons differentiated from neural precursors in SD-iPSCs than in the case of the wild type. Recovery of the Hexb gene in SD-iPSCs improved this impairment of neuronal differentiation. These results provide new insights as to understanding the complex pathogenic mechanisms of SD. PMID:23383290

  18. Genetic Dissection of Cardiac Remodeling in an Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jessica Jen-Chu; Rau, Christoph; Avetisyan, Rozeta; Ren, Shuxun; Romay, Milagros C.; Gong, Ke Wei; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand the genetic control of cardiac remodeling using an isoproterenol-induced heart failure model in mice, which allowed control of confounding factors in an experimental setting. We characterized the changes in cardiac structure and function in response to chronic isoproterenol infusion using echocardiography in a panel of 104 inbred mouse strains. We showed that cardiac structure and function, whether under normal or stress conditions, has a strong genetic component, with heritability estimates of left ventricular mass between 61% and 81%. Association analyses of cardiac remodeling traits, corrected for population structure, body size and heart rate, revealed 17 genome-wide significant loci, including several loci containing previously implicated genes. Cardiac tissue gene expression profiling, expression quantitative trait loci, expression-phenotype correlation, and coding sequence variation analyses were performed to prioritize candidate genes and to generate hypotheses for downstream mechanistic studies. Using this approach, we have validated a novel gene, Myh14, as a negative regulator of ISO-induced left ventricular mass hypertrophy in an in vivo mouse model and demonstrated the up-regulation of immediate early gene Myc, fetal gene Nppb, and fibrosis gene Lgals3 in ISO-treated Myh14 deficient hearts compared to controls. PMID:27385019

  19. Ectopic expression of Zmiz1 induces cutaneous squamous cell malignancies in a mouse model of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura M.; Riordan, Jesse D.; Swick, Brian L.; Meyerholz, David K.; Dupuy, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common form of cancer in the human population, yet the underlying genetic mechanisms contributing to the disease are not well understood. We recently identified Zmiz1 as a candidate oncogene in non-melanoma skin cancer through a transposon mutagenesis screen. Here we show that transposon-induced mutations in Zmiz1 drive expression of a truncated transcript that is similar to an alternative endogenous ZMIZ1 transcript found to be overexpressed in human SCCs relative to normal skin. We also describe an original mouse model of invasive keratoacanthoma driven by skin-specific expression of the truncated Zmiz1 transcript. Unlike most mouse models, Zmiz1-induced skin tumors develop rapidly and in the absence of promoting agents such as phorbol esters. Additionally, we found that the alternative Zmiz1 isoform has greater protein stability than its full-length counterpart. Finally, we provide evidence that ZMIZ1 is overexpressed in a significant percentage of human breast, ovarian, and colon cancers in addition to human SCCs, suggesting ZMIZ1 may play a broader role in epithelial cancers. PMID:23426136

  20. Genetic Dissection of Cardiac Remodeling in an Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jessica Jen-Chu; Rau, Christoph; Avetisyan, Rozeta; Ren, Shuxun; Romay, Milagros C; Stolin, Gabriel; Gong, Ke Wei; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to understand the genetic control of cardiac remodeling using an isoproterenol-induced heart failure model in mice, which allowed control of confounding factors in an experimental setting. We characterized the changes in cardiac structure and function in response to chronic isoproterenol infusion using echocardiography in a panel of 104 inbred mouse strains. We showed that cardiac structure and function, whether under normal or stress conditions, has a strong genetic component, with heritability estimates of left ventricular mass between 61% and 81%. Association analyses of cardiac remodeling traits, corrected for population structure, body size and heart rate, revealed 17 genome-wide significant loci, including several loci containing previously implicated genes. Cardiac tissue gene expression profiling, expression quantitative trait loci, expression-phenotype correlation, and coding sequence variation analyses were performed to prioritize candidate genes and to generate hypotheses for downstream mechanistic studies. Using this approach, we have validated a novel gene, Myh14, as a negative regulator of ISO-induced left ventricular mass hypertrophy in an in vivo mouse model and demonstrated the up-regulation of immediate early gene Myc, fetal gene Nppb, and fibrosis gene Lgals3 in ISO-treated Myh14 deficient hearts compared to controls. PMID:27385019

  1. BCG Vaccine-Induced Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P.; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  2. BCG vaccine-induced neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  3. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. PMID:25016282

  4. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifeng; Kesteven, Scott; Wu, Jianxin; Aidery, Parwez; Gawaz, Meinrad; Gramlich, Michael; Feneley, Michael P; Harvey, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN) are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in heterozygous (Het) Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.05), while wild-type (WT) TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure. PMID:26504781

  5. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifeng; Kesteven, Scott; Wu, Jianxin; Aidery, Parwez; Gawaz, Meinrad; Gramlich, Michael; Feneley, Michael P.; Harvey, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN) are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in heterozygous (Het) Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.05), while wild-type (WT) TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure. PMID:26504781

  6. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilala, Divya Teja; O’Bryhim, Bliss E.; Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya; White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff; Symons, R.C. Andrew; Mukherji, Mridul

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  7. Specific MAPK inhibitors prevent hyperglycemia-induced renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhe; Hong, Zongyuan; Wu, Denglong; Nie, Hezhongrong

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play critical roles in the process of renal diseases, but their interaction has not been comprehensively discussed. In the present studies, we investigated the renoprotective effects of MPAK inhibitors on renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model, and clarify the crosstalk among MAPK signaling. Type 1 diabetic mouse model was established in male C57BL/6 J mice, and treated with or without 10 mg/kg MAPK blockers, including ERK inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203850, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 for four weeks. Hyperglycemia induced renal injuries, but treating them with MAPK inhibitors significantly decreased glomerular volume and glycogen in renal tissues. Although slightly changed body weight and fasting blood glucose levels, MAPK inhibitors attenuated blood urea nitrogen, urea protein, and microalbuminuria. Administration also reduced the diabetes-induced RAS activation, including angiotensin II converting enzyme (c) and Ang II, which contributed to its renal protective effects in the diabetic mice. In addition, the anti-RAS of MAPK inhibitor treatment markedly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, fibrotic accumulation, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in renal tissues. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors and genetic siRNA results identified the crosstalk among the three MAPK signaling, and proved JNK signaling played a critical role in MAPK-mediated ACE pathway in hyperglycemia state. Collectively, these results support the therapeutic effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, especially JNK inactivation, on hyperglycemia-induced renal damages. PMID:27389030

  8. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Characterization of Chikungunya Virus Induced Host Response in a Mouse Model of Viral Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanwani, Rekha; Khan, Mohsin; Lomash, Vinay; Rao, Putcha Venkata Lakshmana; Ly, Hinh; Parida, Manmohan

    2014-01-01

    While a number of studies have documented the persistent presence of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in muscle tissue with primary fibroblast as the preferable cell target, little is known regarding the alterations that take place in muscle tissue in response to CHIKV infection. Hence, in the present study a permissive mouse model of CHIKV infection was established and characterized in order to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The two dimensional electrophoresis of muscle proteome performed for differential analysis indicated a drastic reprogramming of the proteins from various classes like stress, inflammation, cytoskeletal, energy and lipid metabolism. The roles of the affected proteins were explained in relation to virus induced myopathy which was further supported by the histopathological and behavioural experiments proving the lack of hind limb coordination and other loco-motor abnormalities in the infected mice. Also, the level of various pro-inflammatory mediators like IL-6, MCP-1, Rantes and TNF-α was significantly elevated in muscles of infected mice. Altogether this comprehensive study of characterizing CHIKV induced mouse myopathy provides many potential targets for further evaluation and biomarker study. PMID:24667237

  10. TGN1412 Induces Lymphopenia and Human Cytokine Release in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Weißmüller, Sabrina; Kronhart, Stefanie; Kreuz, Dorothea; Schnierle, Barbara; Kalinke, Ulrich; Kirberg, Jörg; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Waibler, Zoe

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as the superagonistic, CD28-specific antibody TGN1412, or OKT3, an anti-CD3 mAb, can cause severe adverse events including cytokine release syndrome. A predictive model for mAb-mediated adverse effects, for which no previous knowledge on severe adverse events to be expected or on molecular mechanisms underlying is prerequisite, is not available yet. We used a humanized mouse model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-reconstituted NOD-RAG1-/-Aβ-/-HLADQ(tg+ or tg-)IL-2Rγc-/- mice to evaluate its predictive value for preclinical testing of mAbs. 2-6 hours after TGN1412 treatment, mice showed a loss of human CD45+ cells from the peripheral blood and loss of only human T cells after OKT3 injection, reminiscent of effects observed in mAb-treated humans. Moreover, upon OKT3 injection we detected selective CD3 downmodulation on T cells, a typical effect of OKT3. Importantly, we detected release of human cytokines in humanized mice upon both OKT3 and TGN1412 application. Finally, humanized mice showed severe signs of illness, a rapid drop of body temperature, and succumbed to antibody application 2-6 hours after administration. Hence, the humanized mouse model used here reproduces several effects and adverse events induced in humans upon application of the therapeutic mAbs OKT3 and TGN1412. PMID:26959227

  11. Development of a mouse model of infantile spasms induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Tomonoh, Yuko; Hu, Lin-Yan; Ju, Jun; Hirose, Shinichi; Zou, Li-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Using N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) injection, we attempt to develop a mouse model for infantile spasms (IS). Experiments were performed in postnatal 11- to 13-day-old C57 and Balbc mice. In the pilot experiment, mice were injected with different doses of NMDA (7, 15, and 30 mg/kg) to determine the optimal age and convulsant doses of NMDA. In further experiment optimal age mice were divided into five groups: group A, control group that received intraperitoneal injection of physiological saline; group B, convulsion group that was given intraperitoneal NMDA; group C, pretreatment group that received adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) injection (100 IU/kg) 30 min before NMDA administration; group D, electroencephalogram (EEG) group that received EEG recording, group E, performance group that received motor and learning test at different time point after NMDA administration. The behaviors of each group were observed continuously for 3h, the latency and the total numbers of spasms were recorded. Pilot experiments showed that a 15 mg/kg dose of NMDA could induce typical spasm-like seizures in P13 C57 mice, NMDA administration caused anxiety and deficits in motor and cognitive functions at early time and that large doses of ACTH reduced the number of seizures and rating scale (P<0.05). The NMDA mouse model has the following characteristics: age dependency, spasm-like seizures, cognitive impairment and response to ACTH, which fulfills the criteria of an IS model. PMID:26600368

  12. TGN1412 Induces Lymphopenia and Human Cytokine Release in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Weißmüller, Sabrina; Kronhart, Stefanie; Kreuz, Dorothea; Schnierle, Barbara; Kalinke, Ulrich; Kirberg, Jörg; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Waibler, Zoe

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as the superagonistic, CD28-specific antibody TGN1412, or OKT3, an anti-CD3 mAb, can cause severe adverse events including cytokine release syndrome. A predictive model for mAb-mediated adverse effects, for which no previous knowledge on severe adverse events to be expected or on molecular mechanisms underlying is prerequisite, is not available yet. We used a humanized mouse model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-reconstituted NOD-RAG1-/-Aβ-/-HLADQ(tg+ or tg-)IL-2Rγc-/- mice to evaluate its predictive value for preclinical testing of mAbs. 2–6 hours after TGN1412 treatment, mice showed a loss of human CD45+ cells from the peripheral blood and loss of only human T cells after OKT3 injection, reminiscent of effects observed in mAb-treated humans. Moreover, upon OKT3 injection we detected selective CD3 downmodulation on T cells, a typical effect of OKT3. Importantly, we detected release of human cytokines in humanized mice upon both OKT3 and TGN1412 application. Finally, humanized mice showed severe signs of illness, a rapid drop of body temperature, and succumbed to antibody application 2–6 hours after administration. Hence, the humanized mouse model used here reproduces several effects and adverse events induced in humans upon application of the therapeutic mAbs OKT3 and TGN1412. PMID:26959227

  13. Esculetin Attenuates Th2 and Th17 Responses in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthmatic Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hongyan, Long

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the anti-asthmatic effect of esculetin (ES) and explore its potential mechanism with a mouse model of allergic asthma. A total number of 50 mice were randomly assigned to five groups: control, model, dexamethasone (Dex, 2 mg/kg), and ES (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg). Mouse asthma model was developed with the sensitization and challenge of ovalbumin (OVA). The levels of IgE in serum, eosinophilia infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines, Th17 cell frequency, histological condition, and the protein expressions of RORγt, GATA3 were detected. Our study demonstrated that ES inhibited, OVA-induced eosinophil count, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, and IL-17A levels were recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Flow cytometry (FCM) studies revealed that ES substantially inhibited Th17 cells' percentage. Western blot study also indicated that ES downregulated RORγt and GATA3 expressions. Meanwhile, ES had beneficial effects on the histological alteration. These findings suggested that ES might effectively ameliorate the progression of asthma and could be used as a therapy for patients with allergic asthma. PMID:26797918

  14. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  15. Icariin protects against titanium particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory response in a mouse calvarial model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongguo; Shen, Ji; Wang, Mingjun; Cui, Jingfu; Wang, Yijun; Zhu, Shijun; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Geng, Dechun

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening are common in implant failure, a complication with revision surgery being the only established treatment. Wear particle-induced inflammation and extensive osteoclastogenesis play critical roles in periprosthetic osteolysis. A recent approach in limiting osteolysis is therefore focused on inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. This study aimed to investigate the potential impact of icariin, the major ingredient of Epimedium, on titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Eighty-four male C57BL/J6 mice were divided randomly into four groups. Mice in the sham group underwent sham surgery only, whereas animals in the vehicle, low- and high-concentration icariin groups received titanium particles. Mice in the low- and high-concentration icariin groups were gavage-fed with icariin at 0.1 or 0.3 mg/g/day, respectively, until sacrifice. Mice in the sham and vehicle groups received phosphate-buffered saline daily. After 2 weeks, mouse calvariae were collected for micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and molecular analysis. Icariin significantly reduced particle-induced bone resorption compared with the vehicle group. Icariin also prevented an increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio and subsequently suppressed osteoclast formation in titanium particle-charged calvariae. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed icariin significantly reduced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in the calvariae of titanium-stimulated mice. Collectively, these results suggest that icariin represents a potential treatment for titanium particle-induced osteolysis and could be developed as a new therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of aseptic loosening. PMID:25985156

  16. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Mee Ree

    2016-08-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD. PMID:27574484

  17. Characterization of PTZ-Induced Seizure Susceptibility in a Down Syndrome Mouse Model That Overexpresses CSTB

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Véronique; Martin, Benoît; Costet, Nathalie; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hérault, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a complex genetic syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, dysmorphism and variable additional physiological traits. Current research progress has begun to decipher the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment, leading to new therapeutic perspectives. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) has recently been found to have positive effects on learning and memory capacities of a DS mouse model and is foreseen to treat DS patients. But PTZ is also known to be a convulsant drug at higher dose and DS persons are more prone to epileptic seizures than the general population. This raises concerns over what long-term effects of treatment might be in the DS population. The cause of increased propensity for epilepsy in the DS population and which Hsa21 gene(s) are implicated remain unknown. Among Hsa21 candidate genes in epilepsy, CSTB, coding for the cystein protease inhibitor cystatin B, is involved in progressive myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia in both mice and human. Thus we aim to evaluate the effect of an increase in Cstb gene dosage on spontaneous epileptic activity and susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizure. To this end we generated a new mouse model trisomic for Cstb by homologous recombination. We verified that increasing copy number of Cstb from Trisomy (Ts) to Tetrasomy (Tt) was driving overexpression of the gene in the brain, we checked transgenic animals for presence of locomotor activity and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities characteristic of myoclonic epilepsy and we tested if those animals were prone to PTZ-induced seizure. Overall, the results of the analysis shows that an increase in Cstb does not induce any spontaneous epileptic activity and neither increase or decrease the propensity of Ts and Tt mice to myoclonic seizures suggesting that Ctsb dosage should not interfere with PTZ-treatment. PMID:22140471

  18. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung

    2016-01-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD. PMID:27574484

  19. Immunosuppressive CD11b+Ly6Chi monocytes in pristane-induced lupus mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijuan; Wan, Suigui; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells with immunosuppressive functions have been described to be associated with one of the mechanisms by which malignant tumors escape immune surveillance. However, little is known about the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in autoimmunity. In the current study, when we attempted to characterize the peritoneal cells in pristane-induced lupus model, as reported previously, we observed that there were markedly increased CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes. Surprisingly, this type of monocytes was almost phenotypically identical to the reported monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Further analysis on how these CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells affected T cell response showed that they strongly suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro in a manner dependent on cell-cell contact, NO, and PGE2. In addition, we found that CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes inhibited Th1 differentiation but enhanced development of forkhead box p3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells. Consistent with the in vitro experimental results, the in vivo adoptive cell transfer study showed that infusion of pristane-treated syngeneic CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes significantly suppressed the production of anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin antibodies induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunization. In addition, we found that CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes were also increased significantly in spleen and peripheral blood and showed immunosuppressive characteristics similar to their peritoneal counterparts. Our findings indicate that CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes in a pristane-induced lupus mouse model are monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells instead of inflammatory monocytes, as demonstrated previously. To our knowledge, this is the first to describe myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a pristane-induced lupus mouse model, which may lead to a better understanding of the role of CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes in this specific pristane-induced lupus model. PMID:26657791

  20. Erythronium japonicum attenuates histopathological lung abnormalities in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    SEO, JI-HYE; BANG, MI-AE; KIM, GYEYEOP; CHO, SEUNG SIK; PARK, DAE-HUN

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic lung condition that can induce mucus hypersecretion and pulmonary obstruction and may even cause death, particularly in children and older individuals. Erythronium japonicum (E. japonicum) is a traditional herb used in Korea and East Asian countries that has been found to exert free radical scavenging activity and anti-proliferative effects in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-asthmatic effects of an extract of E. japonicum in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of OVA and aluminum hydroxide hydrate on days 1 and 8 and then received the following treatments on days 21 to 25: i) control (no treatment), ii) sterilized tap water (given orally), iii) 1 mg/kg/day dexamethasone (administered orally), iv) 60 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract, and v) 600 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract. On the same days, all the mice except those in the control group were challenged 1 h later with nebulized 5% OVA for 30 min. We found that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced increase in the number of white blood cells and decreased the IgE level in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained from the mice. Histopathological analysis of the lung tissues revealed that E. japonicum attenuated the asthma-related morphological changes in the mouse lung tissue, including the increased secretion of mucus in the bronchioles, eosinophil infiltration around the bronchioles and vessels, and goblet cell and epithelial cell hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced proliferation of T helper cells (CD4+) and B cells (CD19+) in the mouse lung tissue. Furthermore, treatment with E. japonicum extract modulated the expression of both T helper 2 cell-related factors [GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5

  1. Erythronium japonicum attenuates histopathological lung abnormalities in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hye; Bang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Gyeyeop; Cho, Seung Sik; Park, Dae-Hun

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is a chronic lung condition that can induce mucus hypersecretion and pulmonary obstruction and may even cause death, particularly in children and older individuals. Erythronium japonicum (E. japonicum) is a traditional herb used in Korea and East Asian countries that has been found to exert free radical scavenging activity and anti-proliferative effects in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-asthmatic effects of an extract of E. japonicum in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)‑induced asthma. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of OVA and aluminum hydroxide hydrate on days 1 and 8 and then received the following treatments on days 21 to 25: i) control (no treatment), ii) sterilized tap water (given orally), iii) 1 mg/kg/day dexamethasone (administered orally), iv) 60 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract, and v) 600 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract. On the same days, all the mice except those in the control group were challenged 1 h later with nebulized 5% OVA for 30 min. We found that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced increase in the number of white blood cells and decreased the IgE level in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained from the mice. Histopathological analysis of the lung tissues revealed that E. japonicum attenuated the asthma-related morphological changes in the mouse lung tissue, including the increased secretion of mucus in the bronchioles, eosinophil infiltration around the bronchioles and vessels, and goblet cell and epithelial cell hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced proliferation of T helper cells (CD4+) and B cells (CD19+) in the mouse lung tissue. Furthermore, treatment with E. japonicum extract modulated the expression of both T helper 2 cell-related factors [GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3), tumor necrosis factor

  2. Oral Administration of Ginseng Ameliorates Cyclosporine-Induced Pancreatic Injury in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Jin, Long; Piao, Shang Guo; Heo, Seong Beom; Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Kyung; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate whether ginseng has a protective effect in an experimental mouse model of cyclosporine-induced pancreatic injury. Methods Mice were treated with cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and Korean red ginseng extract (0.2 or 0.4 g/kg/day, oral gavage) for 4 weeks while on a 0.01% salt diet. The effect of ginseng on cyclosporine-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction was investigated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and measurements of serum insulin level, β cell area, macrophage infiltration, and apoptosis. Using an in vitro model, we further examined the effect of ginseng on a cyclosporine-treated insulin-secreting cell line. Oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in serum, tissue sections, and culture media. Results Four weeks of cyclosporine treatment increased blood glucose levels and decreased insulin levels, but cotreatment with ginseng ameliorated the cyclosporine-induced glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Pancreatic β cell area was also greater with ginseng cotreatment compared with cyclosporine monotherapy. The production of proinflammatory molecules, such as induced nitric oxide synthase and cytokines, and the level of apoptotic cell death also decreased in pancreatic β cell with ginseng treatment. Consistent with the in vivo results, the in vitro study showed that the addition of ginseng protected against cyclosporine-induced cytotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptotic cell death. These in vivo and in vitro changes were accompanied by decreases in the levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in pancreatic β cell in tissue section, serum, and culture media during cotreatment of ginseng with cyclosporine. Conclusions The results of our in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that ginseng has a protective effect against cyclosporine-induced pancreatic β cell injury via reducing oxidative stress. PMID:24009697

  3. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  4. Bronchial responsiveness in an elastase-induced mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luiz Marcelo Oliveira; de Brito Cervilha, Daniela Aparecida; Cabral, Layla Dutra Marinho; Garcia, Érika Kristina Incerpi; Teixeira, Vanessa Pereira; Brito, Jôse Mára; Moriya, Henrique Takachi; Soncini, Roseli

    2014-04-01

    Bronchial responsiveness during methacholine (MCh) challenge was analysed in an elastase-induced mouse model of emphysema to explore the magnitude of the response in this model. Swiss mice were intratracheally instilled with saline or elastase (0.3 or 0.6 U). Twenty days afterward, mechanical ventilation data were collected from the closed and opened thorax of baseline and MCh (vehicle, 50 and 100 mg/mL) challenged mice. The lungs were prepared for morphometric analysis. In the 0.6 U group, airway resistance (Raw) and tissue elastance (H) were decreased, and hysteresivity (η) was increased (closed thorax). MCh increased Raw, G and H in all groups, but this increase was attenuated in the elastase-induced emphysema groups, the largest attenuation was observed in the 0.6 U (closed thorax condition). Elastase increased hyperinflation of the alveoli, alveolar collapse and the Lm and reduced the normal area. MCh reduced respiratory mechanics in elastase-induced emphysema, and this reduction was modulated by the collapsed and/or hyperinflated areas, which increased the heterogeneity of the lungs. PMID:24463010

  5. A mouse model of premature ovarian insufficiency induced by tripterygium glycoside via subcutaneous injection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Ying; Gu, Chao; Ma, Min; Cong, Qing; Guo, Ting; Ma, Duan; Li, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a main cause of infertility and affects nearly 1% women under 40 years old. This study was aimed to utilize the side effects of tripterygium glycoside (TG) to induce a mouse model of POI. 48 female KM mice were divided into four groups: control, oral, intraperitoneal injection and subcutaneous injection group. The mice in last three groups were treated with TG (50 mg•kg-1) daily for 35 days, while the mice in control group were treated with parallel volume of sterile water. Vaginal smears were taken to monitor the estrous cycles and estrous frequency for the last 21 days. Ovarian and uterine index and histomorphological change were determined when finished the administration. Serum levels of FSH were assessed by ELISA. Ki-67 expression in the uterus was analyzed from using immunohistochemical detection. And the apoptosis of follicle cells were detected by TUNEL assay. The results showed that mice in subcutaneous injection group presented the critical manifestations with significantly prolonged estrous cycles, decreased estrous frequency, reduced ovarian and uterine index, and increased serum FSH levels. At this dose level, TG could reduce developing follicles and corpus luteum, and increase atretic follicles, which might be induced by the increasing levels of follicle apoptosis. The proliferation index of uterus, evaluated by histomorphological changes and the expression of Ki-67, was significantly suppressed in TG treated animals. These data suggested that TG was feasible to induce a mice model via subcutaneous injection which could mimic the manifestations of POI. PMID:24427334

  6. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  7. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency Induced by Fanconi Anemia E Mutation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chun; Begum, Khurshida; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    In most cases of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), the cause of the depletion of ovarian follicles is unknown. Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins are known to play important roles in follicular development. Using random insertional mutagenesis with a lentiviral transgene, we identified a family with reduced fertility in the homozygous transgenic mice. We identified the integration site and found that the lentivirus had integrated into intron 8 of the Fanconi E gene (Fance). By RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, we found that Fance transcript levels were significantly reduced. The Fance homozygous mutant mice were assayed for changes in ovarian development, follicle numbers and estrous cycle. Ovarian dysplasias and a severe lack of follicles were seen in the mutant mice. In addition, the estrous cycle was disrupted in adult females. Our results suggest that POI has been induced by the Fance mutation in this new mouse model. PMID:26939056

  8. Sulodexide inhibits retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyoung; Jung, Sang Hoon; Kang, Jun; Yim, Hye Bin; Kang, Kui Dong

    2014-01-01

    Sulodexide is a mixed glycosaminoglycan composed of heparin and dermatan sulfate. In this study, the anti-angiogenic effect of sulodexide was investigated using an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model. The retinas of sham-injected OIR mice (P17) had a distinctive central area of nonperfusion, and this area was significantly decreased in sulodexide-injected mice. The number of neovascular tufts measured by SWIFT_NV and mean neovascular lumen number were significantly decreased in sulodexide-injected mice. Hyperbaric oxygen exposure resulted in increased levels of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9, and when mice were treated with sulodexide, a dose-dependent reduction in VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels was observed. Our results clearly demonstrate the anti-angiogenic effect of sulodexide and highlight sulodexide as a candidate supplementary substance to be used for the treatment of ocular pathologies that involve neovascularization. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(11): 637-642] PMID:24602608

  9. Generation of a Retinoblastoma (Rb)1-inducible dominant-negative (DN) mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tarang, Shikha; Doi, Songila M. S. R.; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B.; Harms, Donald; Quadros, Rolen; Rocha-Sanchez, Sonia M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma 1 (Rb1) is an essential gene regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. To exert these functions, Rb1 is recruited and physically interacts with a growing variety of signaling pathways. While Rb1 does not appear to be ubiquitously expressed, its expression has been confirmed in a variety of hematopoietic and neuronal-derived cells, including the inner ear hair cells (HCs). Studies in transgenic mice demonstrate that complete germline or conditional Rb1 deletion leads to abnormal cell proliferation, followed by massive apoptosis; making it difficult to fully address Rb1’s biochemical activities. To overcome these limitations, we developed a tetracycline-inducible TetO-CB-myc6-Rb1 (CBRb) mouse model to achieve transient and inducible dominant-negative (DN) inhibition of the endogenous RB1 protein. Our strategy involved fusing the Rb1 gene to the lysosomal protease pre-procathepsin B (CB), thus allowing for further routing of the DN-CBRb fusion protein and its interacting complexes for proteolytic degradation. Moreover, reversibility of the system is achieved upon suppression of doxycycline (Dox) administration. Preliminary characterization of DN-CBRb mice bred to a ubiquitous rtTA mouse line demonstrated a significant inhibition of the endogenous RB1 protein in the inner ear and in a number of other organs where RB1 is expressed. Examination of the postnatal (P) DN-CBRb mice inner ear at P10 and P28 showed the presence of supernumerary inner HCs (IHCs) in the lower turns of the cochleae, which corresponds to the described expression domain of the endogenous Rb1 gene. Selective and reversible suppression of gene expression is both an experimental tool for defining function and a potential means to medical therapy. Given the limitations associated with Rb1-null mice lethality, this model provides a valuable resource for understanding RB1 activity, relative contribution to HC regeneration and its potential therapeutic

  10. Cantharidin-induced inflammation in mouse ear model for translational research of novel anti-inflammatories.

    PubMed

    Ivetic Tkalcevic, Vanesa; Hrvacic, Boska; Bosnar, Martina; Cuzic, Snjezana; Bosnjak, Berislav; Erakovic Haber, Vesna; Glojnaric, Ines

    2012-08-01

    The murine model of cantharidin-induced ear inflammation was profiled in detail for its alignment with the human model and to explore the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of the macrolide antibiotics, clarithromycin and azithromycin. Ear swelling in CD1 mice persisted for 7 days, with peak intensity at 16 h after inflammation induction. As in humans, cantharidin (12.5 μg/ear) generated macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) production, as well as neutrophil accumulation in mouse ear tissue. The tested macrolides, clarithromycin and azithromycin, administered orally (2 × 150 mg/kg) 0.5 h before and 5 h after cantharidin challenge, reduced MIP-2, MCP-1, KC, and MPO concentrations and thereby decreased ear swelling. Our results suggest that cantharidin-induced acute inflammation represents an excellent model for translational research of novel anti-inflammatories. PMID:22677362

  11. Early biomarkers of doxorubicin-induced heart injury in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Varsha G.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L.; Herman, Eugene H.; Lee, Taewon; Han, Tao; Lewis, Sherry M.; Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Kerr, Susan; Fuscoe, James C.

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac troponins, which are used as myocardial injury markers, are released in plasma only after tissue damage has occurred. Therefore, there is a need for identification of biomarkers of earlier events in cardiac injury to limit the extent of damage. To accomplish this, expression profiling of 1179 unique microRNAs (miRNAs) was performed in a chronic cardiotoxicity mouse model developed in our laboratory. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were injected intravenously with 3 mg/kg doxorubicin (DOX; an anti-cancer drug), or saline once a week for 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were euthanized a week after the last dose. Cardiac injury was evidenced in mice exposed to 18 mg/kg and higher cumulative DOX dose whereas examination of hearts by light microscopy revealed cardiac lesions at 24 mg/kg DOX. Also, 24 miRNAs were differentially expressed in mouse hearts, with the expression of 1, 1, 2, 8, and 21 miRNAs altered at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg DOX, respectively. A pro-apoptotic miR-34a was the only miRNA that was up-regulated at all cumulative DOX doses and showed a significant dose-related response. Up-regulation of miR-34a at 6 mg/kg DOX may suggest apoptosis as an early molecular change in the hearts of DOX-treated mice. At 12 mg/kg DOX, up-regulation of miR-34a was associated with down-regulation of hypertrophy-related miR-150; changes observed before cardiac injury. These findings may lead to the development of biomarkers of earlier events in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity that occur before the release of cardiac troponins. - Highlights: • Upregulation of miR-34a before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury • Apoptosis might be an early event in mouse heart during doxorubicin treatment. • Expression of miR-150 declined before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury.

  12. Diet-induced obesity and kidney disease - In search of a susceptible mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Shawna E; Nguyen, Trang-Tiffany; Breaux, Chelsea; Kruger, Claudia; Stadler, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease, even without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Here, we compare two mouse models that are susceptible to diet-induced obesity: the relatively renal injury resistant C57BL/6J strain and the DBA2/J strain which is more sensitive to renal injury. Our studies focused on characterizing the effects of high fat diet feeding on renal oxidative stress, albuminuria, fibrosis and podocyte loss/insulin resistance. While the C57BL/6J strain does not develop significant pathological changes in the kidney, at least on lard based diets within the time frame investigated, it does show increased renal iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels and elevated mitochondrial respiration which may be indicative of mitochondrial lipid overfueling. Restricting the high fat diet to decrease adiposity decreased the levels of cellular oxidative stress markers, indicating that adiposity-related proinflammatory changes such as increased iNOS levels may trigger similar responses in the kidney. Mitochondrial respiration remained higher, suggesting that eating excess lipids, despite normal adiposity may still lead to renal mitochondrial overfueling. In comparison, DBA/2J mice developed albuminuria on similar diets, signs of fibrosis, oxidative stress, early signs of podocyte loss (evaluated by the markers podocin and WT-1) and podocyte insulin resistance (unable to phosphorylate their glomerular Akt when insulin was given). To summarize, while the C57BL/6J strain is not particularly susceptible to renal disease, changes in its mitochondrial lipid handling combined with the easy availability of transgenic technology may be an advantage to design new knockout models related to mitochondrial lipid metabolism. The DBA/2J model could serve as a basis for studying podocyte insulin resistance and identifying early renal markers in obesity before more severe kidney disease develops. Based on our observations, we encourage further critical

  13. Inhibitory Effects of Lanthanum Chloride on Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis in a Mouse Calvarial Model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jiang-Yin-Zi; Zhan, Ping; Jiang, Chuan; Zou, Yang; Liu, Hucheng; Zhang, Bin; Dai, Min

    2016-02-01

    Osteolysis is a bone disorder associated with progressive destruction of bone tissues. However, the effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on osteolysis remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of LaCl3 on osteolysis in vivo. In a mouse calvarial model, C57BL/6J mice were injected with wear particles with or without LaCl3. Microcomputed tomography, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were performed for the pathological characterization of calvariae, and eight calvariae per group were prepared for the assay of TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANKL secretion using quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In mice treated with high-dose LaCl3, particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory reaction were reduced compared with that in the vehicle-treated control. Moreover, treatment with high-dose LaCl3 suppressed the wear particle-induced decrease in bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and bone volume fraction. Bone destruction and resorption were higher in the LaCl3-treated group than in the saline-treated group but lower than those in the wear particle group. Finally, our results showed that treatment with a high dose of LaCl3 suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Thus, LaCl3 may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and aseptic loosening. PMID:26105543

  14. Vibrio cholerae-induced inflammation in the neonatal mouse cholera model.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne L; Patimalla, Bharathi; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the acute diarrheal disease of cholera. Innate immune responses to V. cholerae are not a major cause of cholera pathology, which is characterized by severe, watery diarrhea induced by the action of cholera toxin. Innate responses may, however, contribute to resolution of infection and must be required to initiate adaptive responses after natural infection and oral vaccination. Here we investigated whether a well-established infant mouse model of cholera can be used to observe an innate immune response. We also used a vaccination model in which immunized dams protect their pups from infection through breast milk antibodies to investigate innate immune responses after V. cholerae infection for pups suckled by an immune dam. At the peak of infection, we observed neutrophil recruitment accompanied by induction of KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), NOS-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17a. Pups suckled by an immunized dam did not mount this response. Accessory toxins RtxA and HlyA played no discernible role in neutrophil recruitment in a wild-type background. The innate response to V. cholerae deleted for cholera toxin-encoding phage (CTX) and part of rtxA was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for CTX-carried genes or for RtxA in the absence of cholera toxin (CTX). Two extracellular V. cholerae DNases were not required for neutrophil recruitment, but DNase-deficient V. cholerae caused more clouds of DNA in the intestinal lumen, which appeared to be neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), suggesting that V. cholerae DNases combat NETs. Thus, the infant mouse model has hitherto unrecognized utility for interrogating innate responses to V. cholerae infection. PMID:24686062

  15. Profile of capsaicin-induced mouse ear oedema as neurogenic inflammatory model: comparison with arachidonic acid-induced ear oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, H.; Nagata, N.; Koshihara, Y.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the mechanism of capsaicin-induced mouse ear oedema compared with that of arachidonic acid (AA)-induced ear oedema, and evaluated the possible involvement of neuropeptides in the development of capsaicin-induced oedema. 2. Topical application of capsaicin (0.1-1.0 mg per ear) to the ear of mice produced immediate vasodilatation and erythema followed by the development of oedema which was maximal at 30 min after the treatment. This oedema was of shorter duration with less swelling than AA-induced oedema (2.0 mg per ear). 3. Capsaicin-induced ear oedema was unaffected when inhibitors of arachidonate metabolites including platelet activating factor (PAF) were administered before capsaicin (250 micrograms per ear) application, while these agents significantly prevented AA-induced oedema. Dexamethasone, histamine H1 and/or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) antagonists, and substance P (SP) antagonists were effective in inhibiting both models. Furthermore, a Ca(2+)-channel blocker and the capsaicin inhibitor, ruthenium red, were effective inhibitors of capsaicin oedema but had no effect on AA-induced oedema. 4. Phosphoramidon (50 micrograms kg-1, i.v.), an endopeptidase inhibitor, markedly (P < 0.001) enhanced only capsaicin-induced ear oedema, but bestatin (0.5 mg kg-1, i.v.), an aminopeptidase, failed to enhance oedema formation. 5. Neuropeptides (1-100 pmol per site) such as rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), SP, neurokinin A (NKA), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which are released from capsaicin-sensitive neurones, caused ear oedema by intradermal injection. Furthermore, a synergistic effect of CGRP (10 fmol per site) and SP (10pmol per site) on oedema formation was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508328

  16. Delineating pathological pathways in a chemically induced mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Vardi, Ayelet; Zigdon, Hila; Meshcheriakova, Anna; Klein, Andrés D; Yaacobi, Chen; Eilam, Raya; Kenwood, Brandon M; Rahim, Ahad A; Massaro, Giulia; Merrill, Alfred H; Vitner, Einat B; Futerman, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    Great interest has been shown in understanding the pathology of Gaucher disease (GD) due to the recently discovered genetic relationship with Parkinson's disease. For such studies, suitable animal models of GD are required. Chemical induction of GD by inhibition of acid β-glucosidase (GCase) using the irreversible inhibitor conduritol B-epoxide (CBE) is particularly attractive, although few systematic studies examining the effect of CBE on the development of symptoms associated with neurological forms of GD have been performed. We now demonstrate a correlation between the amount of CBE injected into mice and levels of accumulation of the GD substrates, glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, and show that disease pathology, indicated by altered levels of pathological markers, depends on both the levels of accumulated lipids and the time at which their accumulation begins. Gene array analysis shows a remarkable similarity in the gene expression profiles of CBE-treated mice and a genetic GD mouse model, the Gba(flox/flox) ;nestin-Cre mouse, with 120 of the 144 genes up-regulated in CBE-treated mice also up-regulated in Gba(flox/flox) ;nestin-Cre mice. We also demonstrate that various aspects of neuropathology and some behavioural abnormalities can be arrested upon cessation of CBE treatment during a specific time window. Together, our data demonstrate that injection of mice with CBE provides a rapid and relatively easy way to induce symptoms typical of neuronal forms of GD. This is particularly useful when examining the role of specific biochemical pathways in GD pathology, since CBE can be injected into mice defective in components of putative pathological pathways, alleviating the need for time-consuming crossing of mice. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27234572

  17. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  18. Increased susceptibility of estrogen-induced bladder outlet obstruction in a novel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tam, Neville Ngai-Chung; Zhang, Xiang; Xiao, Hong; Song, Dan; Levin, Linda; Meller, Jarek; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2015-05-01

    Disorders of the prostate and lower urinary tract are common in elderly men. We investigated the role of metallothionein-1 (MT1) in prostate carcinogenesis by generating a prostate-specific, MT1-expressing mouse. Unexpectedly, genomic analyses revealed that a 12.1-kb genomic region harboring several conserved noncoding elements was unintentionally deleted, upstream of the transgene integration site in the mouse, which we named it 12.1ΔMT1. Male 12.1ΔMT1 mice chronically treated with testosterone (T) plus 17β-estradiol (E2) to induce prostate cancer exhibited no evidence of precancerous or cancerous lesions. Instead, most of them exhibited a bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) phenotype not observed in treated wild-type (WT) mice. Thus, we hypothesized that 12.1ΔMT1 is a novel model for studying the hormonal requirement for BOO induction. Adult male 12.1ΔMT1 and WT mice were treated with T, E2, bisphenol A (BPA), T+E2, or T+BPA for up to 6 months. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of the prostate, bladder, and urethra were performed. No significant prostate pathologies were observed in WT or 12.1ΔMT1 mice treated with any of the hormone regimens. As expected, prostatic regression occurred in all E2-treated animals (WT and 12.1ΔMT1). Of great interest, despite a small prostate, 100% of E2-treated 12.1ΔMT1 mice, but only 40% of E2-treated WT mice, developed severe BOO (P<0.01). In contrast, T+E2 treatment was less effective than E2 treatment in inducing severe BOO in 12.1ΔMT1 mice (68%, P<0.05) and was completely ineffective in WT animals. Similarly, T, BPA, and T+BPA treatments did not induce BOO in either WT or 12.1ΔMT1 mice. The BOO pathology includes a thinner detrusor wall, narrowing of bladder neck and urethral lumen, and basal cell hyperplasia in the bladder body and urethra. These findings indicate that 12.1ΔMT1 mice exhibit enhanced susceptibility to E2-induced BOO that is independent of prostate enlargement but that is attenuated by the

  19. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in

  20. Acupuncture inhibits microglial activation and inflammatory events in the MPTP-induced mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun Mo; Park, Hi Joon; Choi, Yeong Gon; Choe, Il Hwan; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yong Sik; Lim, Sabina

    2007-02-01

    Using a mouse model of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD), this study investigated on the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture by examining whether acupuncture contributed to inhibiting microglial activation and inflammatory events. C57BL/6 mice were treated with MPTP (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 5 consecutive days. Acupuncture was then applied to acupoints Yanglingquan (GB34) and Taichong (LR3) starting 2 h after the first MPTP administration and then at 48 h intervals until the mice were sacrificed for analyses at 1, 3, and 7 days after the last MPTP injection. These experiments demonstrated that acupuncture inhibited the decreased of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity (IR) and generated a neuroprotective effects in the striatum (ST) and the substantia nigra (SN) on days 1, 3, and 7 post-MPTP injections. Acupuncture attenuated the increase of macrophage antigen complex-1 (MAC-1), a marker of microglial activation, at 1 and 3 days and reduced the increases in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression on days 1, 3, and 7. In MPTP group, striatal dopamine (DA) was measured by 46% at 7 days, whereas DA in the acupuncture group was 78%. On the basis of these results, we suggest that acupuncture could be used as a neuroprotective intervention for the purpose of inhibiting microglial activation and inflammatory events in PD. PMID:17173870

  1. Lactobacillus casei Shirota protects from fructose-induced liver steatosis: a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wagnerberger, Sabine; Spruss, Astrid; Kanuri, Giridhar; Stahl, Carolin; Schröder, Markus; Vetter, Walter; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2013-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that Lactobacillus casei Shirota (Lcs) protects against the onset of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a mouse model of fructose-induced steatosis, C57BL/6J mice were either fed tap water or 30% fructose solution +/- Lcs for 8 weeks. Chronic consumption of 30% fructose solution led to a significant increase in hepatic steatosis as well as plasma alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) levels, which was attenuated by treatment with Lcs. Protein levels of the tight junction protein occludin were found to be markedly lower in both fructose treated groups in the duodenum, whereas microbiota composition in this part of the intestine was not affected. Lcs treatment markedly attenuated the activation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling cascade found in the livers of mice only treated with fructose. Moreover, in livers of fructose fed mice treated with Lcs peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activity was markedly higher than in mice only fed fructose. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the dietary intake of Lcs protects against the onset of fructose-induced NAFLD through mechanisms involving an attenuation of the TLR-4-signalling cascade in the liver. PMID:22749137

  2. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation. PMID:26617279

  3. Unaltered Prion Pathogenesis in a Mouse Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caihong; Schwarz, Petra; Abakumova, Irina; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest a strong correlation between insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, type-2 diabetes is considered an important risk factor of developing Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, impaired insulin signaling in the Alzheimer’s disease brain may promote Aβ production, impair Aβ clearance and induce tau hyperphosphorylation, thereby leading to deterioration of the disease. The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, deposits in the form of extracellular aggregates and leads to dementia, raising the question as to whether prion pathogenesis may also be affected by insulin resistance. We therefore established high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in tga20 mice, which overexpress the prion protein. We then inoculated the insulin-resistant mice with prions. We found that insulin resistance in tga20 mice did not affect prion disease progression, PrPSc deposition, astrogliosis or microglial activation, and had no effect on survival. Our study demonstrates that in a mouse model, insulin resistance does not significantly contribute to prion pathogenesis. PMID:26658276

  4. Interleukin-12 inhibits pathological neovascularization in mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yedi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Kubo, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Muneo; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nakao, Shintaro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization is a major pathological condition in many vision-threatening diseases. In the present study, we determined whether interleukin (IL)-12, a cytokine that regulates angiogenesis, plays a role in the neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). We found that the expressions of the mRNAs of both IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were significantly reduced in the OIR retinas compared to that of the room air-raised control. The sizes of the avascular areas and neovascular tufts were larger in IL-12p40 knock-out (KO) mice than that in wild type (WT) mice. In addition, an intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-12 reduced both avascular areas and neovascular tufts. IL-12 injection enhanced the expressions of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and other downstream chemokines. In an in vitro system, IL-12 had no significant effect on tube formation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Moreover, a blockade of IFN-γ suppressed the inhibitory effect of IL-12 on pathological neovascularization. These results suggest that IL-12 plays important roles in inhibiting pathological retinal neovascularization. PMID:27312090

  5. Interleukin-12 inhibits pathological neovascularization in mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yedi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Kubo, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Muneo; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nakao, Shintaro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization is a major pathological condition in many vision-threatening diseases. In the present study, we determined whether interleukin (IL)-12, a cytokine that regulates angiogenesis, plays a role in the neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). We found that the expressions of the mRNAs of both IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were significantly reduced in the OIR retinas compared to that of the room air-raised control. The sizes of the avascular areas and neovascular tufts were larger in IL-12p40 knock-out (KO) mice than that in wild type (WT) mice. In addition, an intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-12 reduced both avascular areas and neovascular tufts. IL-12 injection enhanced the expressions of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and other downstream chemokines. In an in vitro system, IL-12 had no significant effect on tube formation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Moreover, a blockade of IFN-γ suppressed the inhibitory effect of IL-12 on pathological neovascularization. These results suggest that IL-12 plays important roles in inhibiting pathological retinal neovascularization. PMID:27312090

  6. Celecoxib attenuates retinal angiogenesis in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Chen, Lei; Cai, Na

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of Celecoxib on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) in a mouse model for oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). The OIR mice were exposed to 75% oxygen from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P12, after which the mice were randomly assigned to two groups (Celecoxib and vehicle) and were brought to room air for additional five days. Celecoxib or vehicle was administered from P12 to P17. Age-matched mice maintained in room air from birth to P17 were administered vehicle from P12 to P17 (RA group). Blood vessel profiles in the retina were used to count by histologic methods. Retina protein and mRNA of VEGF and HIF-1α were assessed by immunohistochemistry, western-blot and RT-PCR. Compared with the RA group, the OIR mice exhibited over-expression in VEGF and HIF-1α mRNA and protein. In addition, they had a positive and spatial correlation. Celecoxib- treated OIR mice reduced the retinal neovascular tufts and the levels of VEGF and HIF-1α. These data suggest that Celecoxib inhibits retinal pathogenic angiogenesis through down-regulating HIF-1α expression which suppressing VEGF transcription. Celecoxib could potentially serve as a portent pharmaceutical agent to inhibit retinal angiogenesis. PMID:26191192

  7. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  8. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  9. Effects of IMOD™ and Angipars™ on mouse D-galactose-induced model of aging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two registered herbal drugs called IMOD and Angipars on mouse model. Aging was induced by D-galactose (500 mg/kg) administered to animals for 6 weeks through drinking water. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups receiving D-galactose (D-galactose, 500 mg/kg) for 6 weeks; positive control (D-galactose [500 mg/kg] for 6 weeks + Vitamin E [200 mg/kg/day] intraperitoneally for 4 weeks); IMOD (D-galactose [500 mg/kg] for 6 weeks + IMOD [20 mg/kg/day] intraperitoneally for 4 weeks), Angipars (D-galactose [500 mg/kg] for 6 weeks + Angipars [2.1 mg/kg/day] by gavage for 4 weeks); and the fifth group that was sham and not given D-galactose. At the end of treatment, pro-inflammatory markers including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interlukine-1β (IL-β), interlukine-6 (IL-6), Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-κb), total antioxidant power (TAP), lipid peroxides (LPO) and male sex hormones i.e. testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) were measured in the blood. Results showed that D-Galactose induces a significant oxidative stress and proinflammatory cascade of aging while both IMOD and Angipars recovered all of them. Interestingly, IMOD and Angipars were better than Vitamin E in improving male sex hormones in aged mice. This effect is so important and should be considered as an advantage although it cannot be explained with current knowledge. The conclusion is that IMOD and Angipars have marked anti-aging effect on D-galactose-induced model of aging. PMID:23351487

  10. Effects of IMOD™ and Angipars™ on mouse D-galactose-induced model of aging.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Samane; Yonessi, Mahsa; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Gholami, Mahdi; Baeeri, Maryam; Khorram-Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two registered herbal drugs called IMOD and Angipars on mouse model. Aging was induced by D-galactose (500 mg/kg) administered to animals for 6 weeks through drinking water. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups receiving D-galactose (D-galactose, 500 mg/kg) for 6 weeks; positive control (D-galactose [500 mg/kg] for 6 weeks + Vitamin E [200 mg/kg/day] intraperitoneally for 4 weeks); IMOD (D-galactose [500 mg/kg] for 6 weeks + IMOD [20 mg/kg/day] intraperitoneally for 4 weeks), Angipars (D-galactose [500 mg/kg] for 6 weeks + Angipars [2.1 mg/kg/day] by gavage for 4 weeks); and the fifth group that was sham and not given D-galactose. At the end of treatment, pro-inflammatory markers including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interlukine-1β (IL-β), interlukine-6 (IL-6), Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-κb), total antioxidant power (TAP), lipid peroxides (LPO) and male sex hormones i.e. testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) were measured in the blood.Results showed that D-Galactose induces a significant oxidative stress and proinflammatory cascade of aging while both IMOD and Angipars recovered all of them. Interestingly, IMOD and Angipars were better than Vitamin E in improving male sex hormones in aged mice. This effect is so important and should be considered as an advantage although it cannot be explained with current knowledge. The conclusion is that IMOD and Angipars have marked anti-aging effect on D-galactose-induced model of aging. PMID:23351487

  11. A diet-induced mouse model for glutaric aciduria type I.

    PubMed

    Zinnanti, William J; Lazovic, Jelena; Wolpert, Ellen B; Antonetti, David A; Smith, Michael B; Connor, James R; Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I; Cheng, Keith C

    2006-04-01

    In the autosomal recessive human disease, glutaric aciduria type I (GA-1), glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) deficiency disrupts the mitochondrial catabolism of lysine and tryptophan. Affected individuals accumulate glutaric acid (GA) and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3-OHGA) in the serum and often suffer acute striatal injury in childhood. Prior attempts to produce selective striatal vulnerability in an animal model have been unsuccessful. We hypothesized that acute striatal injury may be induced in GCDH-deficient (Gcdh-/-) mice by elevated dietary protein and lysine. Here, we show that high protein diets are lethal to 4-week-old and 8-week-old Gcdh-/- mice within 2-3 days and 7-8 days, respectively. High lysine alone resulted in vasogenic oedema and blood-brain barrier breakdown within the striatum, associated with serum and tissue GA accumulation, neuronal loss, haemorrhage, paralysis, seizures and death in 75% of 4-week-old Gcdh-/- mice after 3-12 days. In contrast, most 8-week-old Gcdh-/- mice survived on high lysine, but developed white matter lesions, reactive astrocytes and neuronal loss after 6 weeks. Thus, the Gcdh-/- mouse exposed to high protein or lysine may be a useful model of human GA-1 including developmentally dependent striatal vulnerability. PMID:16446282

  12. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Myczek, Kristoffer; Yeung, Stephen T; Castello, Nicholas; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease) and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury). One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A) mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery. PMID:25184527

  13. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3–V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents. PMID:25957290

  14. Effects of baicalin cream in two mouse models: 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact hypersensitivity and mouse tail test for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Li, Hong; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background:Scutellaria baicalensis is a Chinese herbal medicine that has been used for centuries to treat psoriasis. Baicalin is one of the major flavonoids and bioactive components of S. baicalensis and is responsible for the pharmacologic actions of the plant. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect and keratinocyte differentiation-inducing activity of baicalin in vivo. Methods: Baicalin was formulated into topical creams at concentrations of 1%, 3%, and 5%. The anti-inflammatory effect of baicalin cream was evaluated in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) mice, and its keratinocyte-modulating action was assessed using the mouse tail model for psoriasis. Results: During the topical application of baicalin cream, no evidence of irritant effect was observed in both tests. In the inflammation model, mice exposed to baicalin cream displayed a reduction in DNFB-induced CHS responses compared with vehicle-treated animals, showing that the topical application of baicalin cream exerted an anti-inflammatory effect. In the second model, baicalin cream dose-dependently increased the orthokeratosis of granular layers and the relative epidermal thickness of mouse tail skin, indicative of the keratinocyte differentiation-inducing activity of this topical preparation. Conclusions: Taking the in vivo findings together, the present study indicated that baicalin cream may be a promising antipsoriatic agent worthy of further investigation for psoriasis treatment. PMID:25932143

  15. Angiotensin II induces skin fibrosis: a novel mouse model of dermal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Ang II (angiotensin II), a vasoconstrictive peptide, is a well-known inducer of kidney, heart, and liver fibrosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the profibrotic potential of Ang II in the mouse skin. Methods Ang II was administered by subcutaneous osmotic mini pumps to C57BL/6 male mice. Collagen-content measurements were performed with Gomori Trichrome staining and hydroxyproline assay. The mRNA expression level of collagens, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, CTGF, αSMA, CD3, Emr1, CD45/B220, MCP1, and FSP1 were quantified with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Immunostaining was performed for markers of inflammation and fibrosis, including, phospho-Smad2, αSMA, CD3, Mac3, CD45/B220, and CD163B. Fibrocytes were identified by double staining with CD45/FSP1 and CD45/PH4. Endothelial cells undergoing endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) were identified by double staining with VE-cadherin/FSP1. Results Ang II-infused mice develop prominent dermal fibrosis in the area proximal to the pump, as shown by increased collagen and CTGF mRNA levels, increased hydroxyproline content, and more tightly packed collagen fibers. In addition, elevated mRNA levels of TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 along with increased expression of pSmad2 were observed in the skin of Ang II-treated mice. Dermal fibrosis was accompanied by an increased number of infiltrating fibrocytes, and an increased number of αSMA-positive cells, as well as CD163B+ macrophages in the upper dermis. This correlated with significantly increased mRNA levels of αSMA, Emr1, and MCP1. Infiltration of CD3-, CD45/B220-, and Mac3-positive cells was observed mainly in the hypodermis. Furthermore, an increased number of double-positive VE-cadherin/FSP1 cells were detected in the hypodermis only. Conclusions This work demonstrates that Ang II induces both

  16. Efficacy of Red or Infrared Light-Emitting Diodes in a Mouse Model of Propionibacterium acnes-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyou Chae; Kim, Min Ji; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Laser/light-based devices may provide an alternative to conventional acne therapeutics in some patients with nonresponsive acne. Objective We investigated the efficacy of red or infrared light-emitting diode (LED) devices in a mouse model of Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammation through clinical examination and histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Methods A human-derived Propionibacterium acnes suspension (109 colony-forming units /µl) was injected into the back of an HR-1 mouse. Then, a 28.9 J/cm2 650-nm red LED or 9.3 J/cm2 830-nm infrared LED was applied to the mouse with P. acnes-induced inflammation once daily for 2 weeks. Two weeks after treatment, histological findings with hematoxylin and eosin staining and expression levels of inflammatory biomarkers (integrin α6, neutrophils, interleukin [IL]-1β, and matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2/9) were evaluated in tissue specimens using immunohistochemical staining. Results Mice treated with red and infrared LED showed clinical improvement in inflammatory nodules compared to mice in the control group. Red LED was much more effective than infrared LED. Epidermal hyperplasia, comedone-like cysts, and integrin α6 expression improved to a similar extent in the red and infrared LED treatment groups and control group. Neutrophil, IL-1β, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression after treatment with red and infrared LED decreased considerably compared to expression in the control group. Conclusion In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced inflammatory nodules, red and infrared LED devices may be an alternative to conventional acne therapies. In addition, a mouse model of P. acnes-induced inflammatory nodules is helpful for laboratory research of acne. PMID:27081265

  17. Photoacoustic detection of induced melanoma in vitro using a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sagar; Bhattacharya, Kiran; Newton, Jessica R.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Viator, John A.

    2012-03-01

    Metastasis is a life threatening complex physiological phenomenon that involves the movement of cancer cells from one organ to another by means of blood and lymph. An understanding about metastasis is extremely important to device diagnostic systems to detect and monitor its spread within the body. For the first time we report rapid photoacoustic detection of the induced metastatic melanoma in mice in vitro using photoacoustic flowmetry. A new photoacoustic flow system is developed, that employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with an ultrasound transducer capable of determining the presence of individual, induced mouse melanoma cells (B16/F10) within the circulating system in vitro. Tumor was induced in mice by injecting mouse melanoma cells through tail vein into the C57BL/6 mice. A luciferase based in vivo bioluminescence imaging is performed to confirm the tumor load and multiple metastases in the tumor-induced mice. 1ml of blood obtained through cardiac puncture of the induced metastasized mice was treated to lyse the red blood cells (RBC) and enriched, leaving the induced melanoma in the peripheral blood mononuclear suspension (PBMC). A photoacoustic flowsystem coupled with an ultrasound transducer is used to detect the individual circulating metastatic melanoma cells from the enriched cell suspension.

  18. Drinking citrus fruit juice inhibits vascular remodeling in cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  19. Drinking Citrus Fruit Juice Inhibits Vascular Remodeling in Cuff-Induced Vascular Injury Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-no, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  20. Immune System Modifications Induced in a Mouse Model of Chronic Exposure to (90)Sr.

    PubMed

    Synhaeve, Nicholas; Musilli, Stefania; Stefani, Johanna; Nicolas, Nour; Delissen, Olivia; Dublineau, Isabelle; Bertho, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    Strontium 90 ((90)Sr) remains in the environment long after a major nuclear disaster occurs. As a result, populations living on contaminated land are potentially exposed to daily ingesting of low quantities of (90)Sr. The potential long-term health effects of such chronic contamination are unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to evaluate the effects of (90)Sr ingestion on the immune system, the animals were chronically exposed to (90)Sr in drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq/l, for a daily ingestion of 80-100 Bq/day. This resulted in a reduced number of CD19(+) B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in steady-state conditions. In contrast, the results from a vaccine experiment performed as a functional test of the immune system showed that in response to T-dependent antigens, there was a reduction in IgG specific to tetanus toxin (TT), a balanced Th1/Th2 response inducer antigen, but not to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), a strong Th2 response inducer antigen. This was accompanied by a reduction in Th1 cells in the spleen, consistent with the observed reduction in specific IgG concentration. The precise mechanisms by which (90)Sr acts on the immune system remain to be elucidated. However, our results suggest that (90)Sr ingestion may be responsible for some of the reported effects of internal contamination on the immune system in civilian populations exposed to the Chernobyl fallout. PMID:26930377

  1. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA. PMID:27267120

  2. Principles and mechanisms of regeneration in the mouse model for wound‐induced hair follicle neogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojie; Hsi, Tsai‐Ching; Guerrero‐Juarez, Christian Fernando; Pham, Kim; Cho, Kevin; McCusker, Catherine D.; Monuki, Edwin S.; Cho, Ken W.Y.; Gay, Denise L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Wound‐induced hair follicle neogenesis (WIHN) describes a regenerative phenomenon in adult mammalian skin wherein fully functional hair follicles regenerate de novo in the center of large excisional wounds. Originally described in rats, rabbits, sheep, and humans in 1940−1960, the WIHN phenomenon was reinvestigated in mice only recently. The process of de novo hair regeneration largely duplicates the morphological and signaling features of normal embryonic hair development. Similar to hair development, WIHN critically depends on the activation of canonical WNT signaling. However, unlike hair development, WNT activation in WIHN is dependent on fibroblast growth factor 9 signaling generated by the immune system's γδ T cells. The cellular bases of WIHN remain to be fully characterized; however, the available evidence leaves open the possibility for a blastema‐like mechanism wherein epidermal and/or dermal wound cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming toward a more plastic, embryonic‐like state. De novo hair follicles do not regenerate from preexisting hair‐fated bulge stem cells. This suggests that hair neogenesis is not driven by preexisting lineage‐restricted progenitors, as is the case for amputation‐induced mouse digit tip regeneration, but rather may require a blastema‐like mechanism. The WIHN model is characterized by several intriguing features, which await further explanation. These include (1) the minimum wound size requirement for activating neogenesis, (2) the restriction of hair neogenesis to the wound's center, and (3) imperfect patterning outcomes, both in terms of neogenic hair positioning within the wound and in terms of their orientation. Future enquiries into the WIHN process, made possible by a wide array of available skin‐specific genetic tools, will undoubtedly expand our understanding of the regeneration mechanisms in adult mammals. PMID:26504521

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Suppressive Macrophages Through Phagocytosis in a Mouse Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Braza, Faouzi; Dirou, Stéphanie; Forest, Virginie; Sauzeau, Vincent; Hassoun, Dorian; Chesné, Julie; Cheminant-Muller, Marie-Aude; Sagan, Christine; Magnan, Antoine; Lemarchand, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) immunosuppressive functions make them attractive candidates for anti-inflammatory therapy in allergic asthma. However, the mechanisms by which they ensure therapeutic effects remain to be elucidated. In an acute mouse model of house dust mite (Der f)-induced asthma, one i.v. MSC injection was sufficient to normalize and stabilize lung function in Der f-sensitized mice as compared to control mice. MSC injection decreased in vivo airway responsiveness and decreased ex vivo carbachol-induced bronchial contraction, maintaining bronchial expression of the inhibitory type 2 muscarinic receptor. To evaluate in vivo MSC survival, MSCs were labeled with PKH26 fluorescent marker prior to i.v. injection, and 1 to 10 days later total lungs were digested to obtain single-cell suspensions. 91.5 ± 2.3% and 86.6 ± 6.3% of the recovered PKH26(+) lung cells expressed specific macrophage markers in control and Der f mice, respectively, suggesting that macrophages had phagocyted in vivo the injected MSCs. Interestingly, only PKH26(+) macrophages expressed M2 phenotype, while the innate PKH26(-) macrophages expressed M1 phenotype. Finally, the remaining 0.5% PKH26(+) MSCs expressed 10- to 100-fold more COX-2 than before injection, suggesting in vivo MSC phenotype modification. Together, the results of this study indicate that MSCs attenuate asthma by being phagocyted by lung macrophages, which in turn acquire a M2 suppressive phenotype. Stem Cells 2016;34:1836-1845. PMID:26891455

  4. Reduced susceptibility to induced seizures in the Neuroligin-3(R451C) mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Hill-Yardin, Elisa L; Argyropoulos, Andrew; Hosie, Suzanne; Rind, Gil; Anderson, Paul; Hannan, Anthony J; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common comorbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and several gene mutations are associated with both of these disorders. In order to determine whether a point mutation in the gene for the synaptic protein, Neuroligin-3 (Nlgn3, R451C), identified in patients with ASD alters seizure susceptibility, we administered the proconvulsant pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) to adult male Neuroligin-3(R451C) (NL3(R451C)) and wild type (WT) mice. It has previously been reported that NL3(R451C) mice show altered inhibitory GABAergic activity in brain regions relevant to epilepsy, including the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex. PTZ administration induces absence-seizures at low dose, and generalised convulsive seizures at higher dose. Susceptibility to absence seizures was examined by analysing the frequency and duration of spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) events and accompanying motor seizure activity induced by subcutaneous administration of low dosage (20 or 30mg/kg) PTZ. Susceptibility to generalised convulsive seizures was tested by measuring the response to high dosage (60mg/kg) PTZ using a modified Racine scale. There was no change in the number of SWD events exhibited by NL3(R451C) compared to WT mice following administration of both 20mg/kg PTZ (1.17±0.31 compared to 16.0±11.16 events/30min, NL3(R451C) versus WT, respectively) and 30mg/kg PTZ (7.5±6.54 compared with 27.8±19.9 events/30min, NL3(R451C) versus WT, respectively). NL3(R451C) mice were seizure resistant to generalised convulsive seizures induced by high dose PTZ compared to WT littermates (median latency to first >3s duration clonic seizure; 14.5min versus 7.25min, 95% CI: 1.625-2.375, p=0.0009, NL3(R451C) versus WT, respectively). These results indicate that the R451C mutation in the Nlgn3 gene, associated with ASD in humans, confers resistance to induced seizures, suggesting dysfunction of PTZ-sensitive GABAergic signalling in this mouse model of ASD. PMID:25592157

  5. Thalidomide-induced limb abnormalities in a humanized CYP3A mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Akita, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Satoh, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo; Abe, Satoshi; Takehara, Shoko; Kazuki, Kanako; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogen in humans but not in rodents. It causes multiple birth defects including malformations of limbs, ears, and other organs. However, the species-specific mechanism of thalidomide teratogenicity is not completely understood. Reproduction of the human teratogenicity of thalidomide in rodents has previously failed because of the lack of a model reflecting human drug metabolism. In addition, because the maternal metabolic effect cannot be eliminated, the migration of unchanged thalidomide to embryos is suppressed, and the metabolic activation is insufficient to develop teratogenicity. Previously, we generated transchromosomic mice containing a human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A cluster in which the endogenous mouse Cyp3a genes were deleted. Here, we determined whether human CYP3A or mouse Cyp3a enzyme expression was related to the species difference in a whole embryo culture system using humanized CYP3A mouse embryos. Thalidomide-treated embryos with the human CYP3A gene cluster showed limb abnormalities, and human CYP3A was expressed in the placenta, suggesting that human CYP3A in the placenta may contribute to the teratogenicity of thalidomide. These data suggest that the humanized CYP3A mouse is a useful model to predict embryonic toxicity in humans. PMID:26903378

  6. Thalidomide-induced limb abnormalities in a humanized CYP3A mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Akita, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Satoh, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo; Abe, Satoshi; Takehara, Shoko; Kazuki, Kanako; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogen in humans but not in rodents. It causes multiple birth defects including malformations of limbs, ears, and other organs. However, the species-specific mechanism of thalidomide teratogenicity is not completely understood. Reproduction of the human teratogenicity of thalidomide in rodents has previously failed because of the lack of a model reflecting human drug metabolism. In addition, because the maternal metabolic effect cannot be eliminated, the migration of unchanged thalidomide to embryos is suppressed, and the metabolic activation is insufficient to develop teratogenicity. Previously, we generated transchromosomic mice containing a human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A cluster in which the endogenous mouse Cyp3a genes were deleted. Here, we determined whether human CYP3A or mouse Cyp3a enzyme expression was related to the species difference in a whole embryo culture system using humanized CYP3A mouse embryos. Thalidomide-treated embryos with the human CYP3A gene cluster showed limb abnormalities, and human CYP3A was expressed in the placenta, suggesting that human CYP3A in the placenta may contribute to the teratogenicity of thalidomide. These data suggest that the humanized CYP3A mouse is a useful model to predict embryonic toxicity in humans. PMID:26903378

  7. White matter injuries induced by MK-801 in a mouse model of schizophrenia based on NMDA antagonism.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Yun; Kong, Xiang-Ru; Zhang, Lei; Qiu, Xuan; Chao, Feng-Lei; Peng, Chao; Gao, Yuan; Huang, Chun-Xia; Wang, San-Rong; Tang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia (SZ) is complex and largely unknown. Neuroimaging and postmortem studies have suggested white matter disturbances in SZ. In the present study, we tested the white matter deficits hypothesis of SZ using a mouse model of SZ induced by NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. We found that mice with repeated chronic MK-801 administration showed increased locomotor activity in the open field test, less exploration of a novel environment in the hole-board test, and increased anxiety in the elevated plus maze but no impairments were observed in coordination or motor function on accelerating rota-rod. The total white matter volume and corpus callosum volume in mice treated with MK-801 were significantly decreased compared to control mice treated with saline. Myelin basic protein and 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase were also significantly decreased in the mouse model of SZ. Furthermore, we observed degenerative changes of myelin sheaths in the mouse model of SZ. These results provide further evidence of white matter deficits in SZ and indicate that the animal model of SZ induced by MK-801 is a useful model to investigate mechanisms underlying white matter abnormalities in SZ. PMID:24788877

  8. 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-Induced Malignancies in a Mouse Model of Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Samuel L; Watson, Jennifer; Sen, Nivedita; Brewer, Molly A; Barton, Jennifer K; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate because there are few symptoms in early disease development. The incidence of ovarian cancer increases in women after menopause. Understanding early events in this disease can best be achieved by using animal models. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and track the onset of ovarian tumorigenesis in mice mimicking characteristics of postmenopausal epithelial cancer in women. Female B6C3F1 mice (age, 28 d) received 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD, 160 mg/kg IV daily for 20 d) to cause ovarian failure. Four months after VCD treatment, via surgical intervention, each mouse received a single injection of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) or vehicle control (sesame oil) under the bursa of the right ovary to cause ovarian neoplasms. The experimental groups were untreated controls (Con–Con), DMBA-treatment only (Con–DMBA), VCD treatment only (VCD–Con), and VCD+DMBA-treated (VCD+DMBA) mice. At 3, 5, 7, and 9 mo after DMBA injection, ovaries were collected for histologic and immunohistochemical evaluation. No tumors developed in Con–Con mice. All VCD-treated mice (with or without DMBA) exhibited ovarian failure. Mice that received both VCD and DMBA exhibited tumors at 3 mo (50%), 5 mo (14%), 7 mo (90%), and 9 mo (57%) after DMBA treatment; 31% of the tumors were epithelial in origin. Our findings confirm that inducing ovarian tumors in mice by chemical means is an effective method for studying early stages of tumor development that may be relevant to epithelial ovarian cancers that arise in postmenopausal women. PMID:23561932

  9. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced malignancies in a mouse model of menopause.

    PubMed

    Marion, Samuel L; Watson, Jennifer; Sen, Nivedita; Brewer, Molly A; Barton, Jennifer K; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2013-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate because there are few symptoms in early disease development. The incidence of ovarian cancer increases in women after menopause. Understanding early events in this disease can best be achieved by using animal models. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and track the onset of ovarian tumorigenesis in mice mimicking characteristics of postmenopausal epithelial cancer in women. Female B6C3F1 mice (age, 28 d) received 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD, 160 mg/kg IV daily for 20 d) to cause ovarian failure. Four months after VCD treatment, via surgical intervention, each mouse received a single injection of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) or vehicle control (sesame oil) under the bursa of the right ovary to cause ovarian neoplasms. The experimental groups were untreated controls (Con-Con), DMBA-treatment only (Con-DMBA), VCD treatment only (VCD-Con), and VCD+DMBA-treated (VCD+DMBA) mice. At 3, 5, 7, and 9 mo after DMBA injection, ovaries were collected for histologic and immunohistochemical evaluation. No tumors developed in Con-Con mice. All VCD-treated mice (with or without DMBA) exhibited ovarian failure. Mice that received both VCD and DMBA exhibited tumors at 3 mo (50%), 5 mo (14%), 7 mo (90%), and 9 mo (57%) after DMBA treatment; 31% of the tumors were epithelial in origin. Our findings confirm that inducing ovarian tumors in mice by chemical means is an effective method for studying early stages of tumor development that may be relevant to epithelial ovarian cancers that arise in postmenopausal women. PMID:23561932

  10. Inflammatory mediators in a short-time mouse model of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Michela; Del Pizzo, Mariagiovanna; Marzocco, Stefania; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Ciccarelli, Michele; Iaccarino, Guido; Pinto, Aldo; Popolo, Ada

    2016-02-15

    Doxorubicin (DOXO) is commonly used to treat a wide range of malignant tumors, but its clinical use is limited by acute and chronic cardiotoxicity. The precise mechanism underlying DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity is still not completely elucidated, but cardiac inflammation seems to be involved. Effects of DOXO on proinflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cell infiltration, and necrosis have been proven only when a functional impairment has already occurred, so this study aimed to investigate the acute effect of DOXO administration in mouse heart. The results of our study demonstrated alterations in cardiac function parameters assessed by ultrasound within 24h after a single injection of DOXO, with a cumulative effect along the increase of the dose and the number of DOXO administrations. At the same time, DOXO causes a significant production of proinflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α and IL-6) with a concomitant reduction of IL-10, a well-known antiinflammatory cytokine. Furthermore, overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in heart tissue and increased levels of serum nitrite in DOXO-treated mice were detected. Notably, DOXO administration significantly increased nitrotyrosine expression in mouse heart. Our data support the hypothesis that these early events, could be responsible for the later onset of more severe deleterious remodeling leading to DOXO induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26780402

  11. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA. PMID:26066300

  12. Human Truncated Tau Induces Mature Neurofibrillary Pathology in a Mouse Model of Human Tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Ivana; Brezovakova, Veronika; Hromadka, Tomas; Weisova, Petronela; Cubinkova, Veronika; Valachova, Bernadeta; Filipcik, Peter; Jadhav, Santosh; Smolek, Tomas; Novak, Michal; Zilka, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most common neurodegenerative disorder. Several animal models have been developed in order to test pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease and to predict effects of pharmacological interventions. Here we examine the molecular and behavioral features of R3m/4 transgenic mice expressing human non-mutated truncated tau protein (3R tau, aa151-391) that were previously used for efficacy testing of passive tau vaccine. The mouse model reliably recapitulated crucial histopathological features of human AD, such as pre-tangles, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuropil threads. The pathology was predominantly located in the brain stem. Transgenic mice developed mature sarkosyl insoluble tau complexes consisting of mouse endogenous and human truncated and hyperphosphorylated forms of tau protein. The histopathological and biochemical features were accompanied by significant sensorimotor impairment and reduced lifespan. The sensorimotor impairment was monitored by a highly sensitive, fully-automated tool that allowed us to assess early deficit in gait and locomotion. We suggest that the novel transgenic mouse model can serve as a valuable tool for analysis of the therapeutic efficacy of tau vaccines for AD therapy. PMID:27567836

  13. Severe, multimodal stress exposure induces PTSD-like characteristics in a mouse model of single prolonged stress.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Eagle, Andrew L; George, Sophie A; Mulo, Kostika; Kohler, Robert J; Gerard, Justin; Harutyunyan, Arman; Hool, Steven M; Susick, Laura L; Schneider, Brandy L; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Galloway, Matthew P; Liberzon, Israel; Conti, Alana C

    2016-04-15

    Appropriate animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are needed because human studies remain limited in their ability to probe the underlying neurobiology of PTSD. Although the single prolonged stress (SPS) model is an established rat model of PTSD, the development of a similarly-validated mouse model emphasizes the benefits and cross-species utility of rodent PTSD models and offers unique methodological advantages to that of the rat. Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop and describe a SPS model for mice and to provide data that support current mechanisms relevant to PTSD. The mouse single prolonged stress (mSPS) paradigm, involves exposing C57Bl/6 mice to a series of severe, multimodal stressors, including 2h restraint, 10 min group forced swim, exposure to soiled rat bedding scent, and exposure to ether until unconsciousness. Following a 7-day undisturbed period, mice were tested for cue-induced fear behavior, effects of paroxetine on cue-induced fear behavior, extinction retention of a previously extinguished fear memory, dexamethasone suppression of corticosterone (CORT) response, dorsal hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor protein and mRNA expression, and prefrontal cortex glutamate levels. Exposure to mSPS enhanced cue-induced fear, which was attenuated by oral paroxetine treatment. mSPS also disrupted extinction retention, enhanced suppression of stress-induced CORT response, increased mRNA expression of dorsal hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors and decreased prefrontal cortex glutamate levels. These data suggest that the mSPS model is a translationally-relevant model for future PTSD research with strong face, construct, and predictive validity. In summary, mSPS models characteristics relevant to PTSD and this severe, multimodal stress modifies fear learning in mice that coincides with changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, brain glucocorticoid systems, and glutamatergic signaling in the prefrontal cortex. PMID

  14. Intact urothelial barrier function in a mouse model of ketamine-induced voiding dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Ong, Teng Aik; Razack, Azad H A; MacIver, Bryce; Zeidel, Mark; Yu, Weiqun

    2016-05-01

    Ketamine is a popular choice for young drug abusers. Ketamine abuse causes lower urinary tract symptoms, with the underlying pathophysiology poorly understood. Disruption of urothelial barrier function has been hypothesized to be a major mechanism for ketamine cystitis, yet the direct evidence of impaired urothelial barrier function is still lacking. To address this question, 8-wk-old female C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ketamine for 12 wk to induce ketamine cystitis. A spontaneous voiding spot assay showed that ketamine-treated mice had increased primary voiding spot numbers and smaller primary voiding spot sizes than control mice (P < 0.05), indicating a contracted bladder and bladder overactivity. Consistently, significantly increased voiding frequency was observed in ketamine-treated mice on cystometrograms. These functional experiments indicate that ketamine induces voiding dysfunction in mice. Surprisingly, urothelial permeability in ketamine-treated mice was not changed when measured using an Ussing chamber system with isotopic urea and water. Mouse urothelial structure was also not altered, and intact umbrella cell structure was observed by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, immunostaining and confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of a well-defined distribution of zonula occuldens-1 in tight junctions and uroplakin in umbrella cells. In conclusion, these data indicate that ketamine injection induces voiding dysfunction in mice but does not necessarily disrupt mouse bladder barrier function. Disruption of urothelial barrier function may not be the major mechanism in ketamine cystitis. PMID:26911853

  15. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  16. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  17. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ) and ob/ob-NASH mice (2.4 ± 0.3 vs 6.3 ± 0.2, P < 0.001 compared to ob/ob chow), respectively. Furthermore, fibrosis stage was significantly elevated for DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 1.2 ± 0.2, P < 0.05 compared to lean chow) and ob/ob NASH (0.1 ± 0.1 vs 3.0 ± 0.2, P < 0.001 compared to ob/ob chow). Notably, fibrosis stage was significantly (P < 0.001) increased in ob/ob-NASH mice, when compared to DIO-NASH mice. CONCLUSION: These data introduce the obese diet-induced DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mouse models with biopsy-confirmed individual disease staging as a preclinical platform for evaluation of novel NASH therapeutics. PMID:27326314

  18. Lack of effect of murine norovirus infection on a mouse model of bacteria-induced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Karen C; Drivdahl, Rolf; Seamons, Audrey; Treuting, Piper M; Brabb, Thea; Maggio-Price, Lillian

    2011-06-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is endemic in mouse research facilities in the United States and Europe, with a prevalence as high as 58% to 64%. Because of MNV's orofecal route of infection, clinically silent persistent infections in some mouse strains, and proclivity for macrophage and dendritic cells, its presence in mouse colonies has potential to alter phenotypes in experimental mouse models, particularly those involving inflammation and immunologic responses. Although MNV is subclinical, not causing overt disease in immunocompetent mice, we found that MNV infection can accelerate bacteria-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) progression in Mdr1a(-/-) mice. The studies presented here examined whether MNV infection also affects the phenotype of a bacterially driven mouse model of inflammation-associated colon cancer in genetically susceptible Smad3(-/-) mice. In vitro culture of bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was used to determine whether MNV4 influenced macrophage cytokine production. For in vivo studies, Smad3(-/-) mice were infected with MNV4 one week prior to infection with Helicobacter. Mice were monitored for 17 to 32 wk for development of IBD and colon cancer, and tissues were analyzed histopathologically. Although in vitro infection of BMDM with MNV4 led to increased inflammatory cytokine production, infection with MNV4 in vivo did not result in any statistically significant differences in survival, IBD scores, tumor incidence, or tumor phenotype in Smad3(-/-) mice. In addition, MNV infection alone did not result in IBD or colon cancer. Therefore MNV infection alone or in conjunction with Helicobacter does not alter the development or progression of IBD or colon cancer in Smad3(-/-) mice. PMID:21819691

  19. Decidual neutrophil infiltration is not required for preterm birth in a mouse model of infection-induced preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Sara F; Catalano, Rob D; Wade, Jean; Rossi, Adriano G; Norman, Jane E

    2014-03-01

    Parturition is associated with a leukocyte influx into the intrauterine tissues; however, the exact role these leukocytes play in the onset of labor remains unclear. Neutrophil infiltration of the uteroplacental tissues has been particularly associated with infection-associated preterm labor (PTL) in both women and mouse models. In this study, we investigated the role of neutrophils in a mouse model of infection-induced PTL. Intrauterine administration of LPS on day 17 of gestation resulted in a 7-fold increase in the number of decidual neutrophils compared with control mice receiving PBS (p < 0.01; n = 8-11). We hypothesized that neutrophil influx is necessary for PTL and that neutrophil depletion would abolish preterm birth. To test this hypothesis, mice were depleted of neutrophils by treatment with anti-Gr-1, anti-Ly-6G, or the appropriate IgG control Ab on day 16 of gestation prior to LPS on day 17 (n = 6-7). Successful neutrophil depletion was confirmed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Neutrophil depletion with Gr-1 resulted in reduced uterine and placental Il-1β expression (p < 0.05). Neutrophil depletion with Ly-6G reduced uterine Il-1β and Tnf-α expression (p < 0.05). However, neutrophil depletion with either Ab did not delay LPS-induced preterm birth. Collectively, these data show that decidual neutrophil infiltration is not essential for the induction of infection-induced PTL in the mouse, but that neutrophils contribute to the LPS-induced inflammatory response of the uteroplacental tissues. PMID:24501200

  20. Proteomic Characterization of Acyclovir-Induced Nephrotoxicity in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Han, Ya-Juan; Xu, Jia-Dong; Xing, Wen-Min; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an effective and widely used antiviral agent. However, its clinical application is limited by severe nephrotoxicity. We assessed ACV-induced nephrotoxicity and identified the differentially expressed proteins using mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. In total, 30 ICR mice were intraperitoneally administrated ACV (150 or 600 mg/kg per day) for 9 days. After administration of ACV, levels of serum creatinine and urea nitrogen increased significantly. In addition, mouse kidneys exhibited histopathological changes and reduced expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR2. In the proteomic analysis, more than 1,000 proteins were separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and a total of 20 proteins were up- or down-regulated in the ACV group compared with the saline group. Among these, six proteins (MHC class II antigen, glyoxalase 1, peroxiredoxin 1, αB-crystallin, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-IIIb, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit Vb) were identified in association with ACV-induced nephrotoxicity. These findings were confirmed by Western blotting analysis. The differential expression levels of α-BC, Prx1, Glo I and CcO Vb suggest that oxidative damage and mitochondrial injury may be involved in ACV-induced nephrotoxicity. Furthermore, VEGF and FGF may play a role in tissue repair and the restoration process following ACV nephrotoxicity. PMID:25055032

  1. Copper chelator induced efficient episodic memory recovery in a non-transgenic Alzheimer's mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ceccom, Johnatan; Coslédan, Frédéric; Halley, Hélène; Francès, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean Michel; Meunier, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative syndrom involving many different biological parameters, including the accumulation of copper metal ions in Aβ amyloid peptides due to a perturbation of copper circulation and homeostasis within the brain. Copper-containing amyloids activated by endogenous reductants are able to generate an oxidative stress that is involved in the toxicity of abnormal amyloids and contribute to the progressive loss of neurons in AD. Since only few drugs are currently available for the treatment of AD, we decided to design small molecules able to interact with copper and we evaluated these drug-candidates with non-transgenic mice, since AD is mainly an aging disease, not related to genetic disorders. We created a memory deficit mouse model by a single icv injection of Aβ(1-42) peptide, in order to mimic the early stage of the disease and the key role of amyloid oligomers in AD. No memory deficit was observed in the control mice with the antisense Aβ(42-1) peptide. Here we report the capacity of a new copper-specific chelating agent, a bis-8-aminoquinoline PA1637, to fully reverse the deficit of episodic memory after three weeks of treatment by oral route on non-transgenic amyloid-impaired mice. Clioquinol and memantine have been used as comparators to validate this fast and efficient mouse model. PMID:22927947

  2. An inducible knockout mouse to model the cell-autonomous role of PTEN in initiating endometrial, prostate and thyroid neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mirantes, Cristina; Eritja, Núria; Dosil, Maria Alba; Santacana, Maria; Pallares, Judit; Gatius, Sónia; Bergadà, Laura; Maiques, Oscar; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. The role of PTEN in carcinogenesis has been validated by knockout mouse models. PTEN heterozygous mice develop neoplasms in multiple organs. Unfortunately, the embryonic lethality of biallelic excision of PTEN has inhibited the study of complete PTEN deletion in the development and progression of cancer. By crossing PTEN conditional knockout mice with transgenic mice expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT under the control of a chicken actin promoter, we have generated a tamoxifen-inducible mouse model that allows temporal control of PTEN deletion. Interestingly, administration of a single dose of tamoxifen resulted in PTEN deletion mainly in epithelial cells, but not in stromal, mesenchymal or hematopoietic cells. Using the mT/mG double-fluorescent Cre reporter mice, we demonstrate that epithelial-specific PTEN excision was caused by differential Cre activity among tissues and cells types. Tamoxifen-induced deletion of PTEN resulted in extremely rapid and consistent formation of endometrial in situ adenocarcinoma, prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and thyroid hyperplasia. We also analyzed the role of PTEN ablation in other epithelial cells, such as the tubular cells of the kidney, hepatocytes, colonic epithelial cells or bronchiolar epithelium, but those tissues did not exhibit neoplastic growth. Finally, to validate this model as a tool to assay the efficacy of anti-tumor drugs in PTEN deficiency, we administered the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to mice with induced PTEN deletion. Everolimus dramatically reduced the progression of endometrial proliferations and significantly reduced thyroid hyperplasia. This model could be a valuable tool to study the cell-autonomous mechanisms involved in PTEN-loss-induced carcinogenesis and provides a good platform to study the effect of anti-neoplastic drugs on PTEN-negative tumors. PMID:23471917

  3. Subchronic Arsenic Exposure Induces Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Normal Mice and Enhances Depression-Like Behaviors in the Chemically Induced Mouse Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Guo, How-Ran; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Yang, Kai-Lin; Lin, Li-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates that subchronic arsenic exposure causes cerebral neurodegeneration leading to behavioral disturbances relevant to psychiatric disorders. However, there is still little information regarding the influence of subchronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water on mood disorders and its underlying mechanisms in the cerebral prefrontal cortex. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of subchronic arsenic exposure (10 mg/LAs2O3 in drinking water) on the anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in normal mice and in the chemically induced mouse model of depression by reserpine pretreatment. Our findings demonstrated that 4 weeks of arsenic exposure enhance anxiety-like behaviors on elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT) in normal mice, and 8 weeks of arsenic exposure augment depression-like behaviors on tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) in the reserpine pretreated mice. In summary, in this present study, we demonstrated that subchronic arsenic exposure induces only the anxiety-like behaviors in normal mice and enhances the depression-like behaviors in the reserpine induced mouse model of depression, in which the cerebral prefrontal cortex BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway is involved. We also found that eight weeks of subchronic arsenic exposure are needed to enhance the depression-like behaviors in the mouse model of depression. These findings imply that arsenic could be an enhancer of depressive symptoms for those patients who already had the attribute of depression. PMID:26114099

  4. Subchronic Arsenic Exposure Induces Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Normal Mice and Enhances Depression-Like Behaviors in the Chemically Induced Mouse Model of Depression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Guo, How-Ran; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Yang, Kai-Lin; Lin, Li-Chuan; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates that subchronic arsenic exposure causes cerebral neurodegeneration leading to behavioral disturbances relevant to psychiatric disorders. However, there is still little information regarding the influence of subchronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water on mood disorders and its underlying mechanisms in the cerebral prefrontal cortex. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of subchronic arsenic exposure (10 mg/LAs2O3 in drinking water) on the anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in normal mice and in the chemically induced mouse model of depression by reserpine pretreatment. Our findings demonstrated that 4 weeks of arsenic exposure enhance anxiety-like behaviors on elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT) in normal mice, and 8 weeks of arsenic exposure augment depression-like behaviors on tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) in the reserpine pretreated mice. In summary, in this present study, we demonstrated that subchronic arsenic exposure induces only the anxiety-like behaviors in normal mice and enhances the depression-like behaviors in the reserpine induced mouse model of depression, in which the cerebral prefrontal cortex BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway is involved. We also found that eight weeks of subchronic arsenic exposure are needed to enhance the depression-like behaviors in the mouse model of depression. These findings imply that arsenic could be an enhancer of depressive symptoms for those patients who already had the attribute of depression. PMID:26114099

  5. Time course of lewisite-induced skin lesions and inflammatory response in the SKH-1 hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Vallet, Virginie; Elbakdouri, Nacéra; Wartelle, Julien; Mouret, Stéphane; Bertoni, Marine; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Data on the toxicity of lewisite (L), a vesicant chemical warfare agent, are scarce and conflicting, and the use of the specific antidote is not without drawbacks. This study was designed to evaluate if the SKH-1 hairless mouse model was suitable to study the L-induced skin injuries. We studied the progression of lesions following exposure to L vapors for 21 days using paraclinical parameters (color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and biomechanical measurements), histological assessments, and biochemical indexes of inflammation. Some data were also obtained over 27 weeks. The development of lesions was similar to that reported in other models. The TEWL parameter appeared to be the most appropriate index to follow their progression. Histological analysis showed inflammatory cell infiltration and microvesications at day 1 and a complete wound closure by day 21. Biochemical studies indicated a deregulation of the levels of several cytokines and receptors involved in inflammation. An increase in the quantity of pro-matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 was shown as observed in other models. This suggests that the SKH-1 mouse model is relevant for the investigation of the physiopathological process of skin lesions induced by L and to screen new treatment candidates. PMID:24635178

  6. Metabolomic analysis reveals metabolic disturbances in the prefrontal cortex of the lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Fu, Yuying; Rao, Chenglong; Li, Wenwen; Liang, Zihong; Zhou, Chanjuan; Shen, Peng; Cheng, Pengfei; Zeng, Li; Zhu, Dan; Zhao, Libo; Xie, Peng

    2016-07-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating illness. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of depression remain largely unknown. Increasing evidence supports that inflammatory cytokine disturbances may be associated with the pathophysiology of depression in humans. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been used to study inflammation-associated neurobehavioral changes in rodents, but no metabonomic study has been conducted to assess differential metabolites in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a LPS-induced mouse model of depression. Here, we employed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabonomic approach in the LPS-induced mouse model of depression to investigate any significant metabolic changes in the PFC. Multivariate statistical analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA), and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), was implemented to identify differential PFC metabolites between LPS-induced depressed mice and healthy controls. A total of 20 differential metabolites were identified. Compared with control mice, LPS-treated mice were characterized by six lower level metabolites and 14 higher level metabolites. These molecular changes were closely related to perturbations in neurotransmitter metabolism, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and lipid metabolism, which might be evolved in the pathogenesis of MDD. These findings provide insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MDD and could be of valuable assistance in the clinical diagnosis of MDD. PMID:27102340

  7. Protective antitumor immunity induced by tumor cell lysates conjugated with diphtheria toxin and adjuvant epitope in mouse breast tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Yu; Xing, Yun; Liu, Bin; Lu, Lei; Huang, Xiao; Ge, Chi-Yu; Yao, Wen-Jun; Xu, Mao-Lei; Gao, Zhen-Qiu; Cao, Rong-Yue; Wu, Jie; Li, Tai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell vaccine-based immunotherapy has received increasing interest in many clinical trials involving patients with breast cancer. Combining with appropriate adjuvants can enhance the weak immunogenic properties of tumor cell lysates (TCL). In this study, diphtheria toxin (DT) and two tandem repeats of mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (mHSP70) fragment 407-426 (M2) were conjugated to TCL with glutaraldehyde, and the constructed cancer cell vaccine was named DT-TCL-M2. Subcutaneous injection of DT-TCL-M2 in mice effectively elicited tumor-specific polyclonal immune responses, including humoral and cellular immune responses. High levels of antibodies against TCL were detected in the serum of immunized mice with ELISA and verified with Western blot analyses. The splenocytes from immunized mice showed potent cytotoxicity on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. Moreover, the protective antitumor immunity induced by DT-TCL-M2 inhibited tumor growth in a mouse breast tumor model. DT-TCL-M2 also attenuated tumor-induced angiogenesis and slowed tumor growth in a mouse intradermal tumor model. These findings demonstrate that TCL conjugated with appropriate adjuvants induced effective antitumor immunity in vivo. Improvements in potency could further make cancer cell vaccines a useful and safe method for preventing cancer recurrence after resection. PMID:22464650

  8. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 Regulates VEGF-Induced Airway Angiogenesis and Inflammation in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Yu, Chen-Wei; Elmasri, Harun; Terwelp, Matthew; Lee, Chun G.; Bhandari, Vineet; Comhair, Suzy A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Elias, Jack A.; Cataltepe, Sule

    2014-01-01

    Neovascularization of the airways occurs in several inflammatory lung diseases, including asthma. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in vascular remodeling in the asthmatic airways. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 or aP2) is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a proangiogenic function in vitro, but whether it plays a role in modulation of angiogenesis in vivo is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 promotes VEGF-induced airway angiogenesis and investigated this hypothesis with the use of a transgenic mouse model with inducible overexpression of VEGF165 under a CC10 promoter [VEGF-TG (transgenic) mice]. We found a significant increase in FABP4 mRNA levels and density of FABP4-expressing vascular endothelial cells in mouse airways with VEGF overexpression. FABP4−/− mouse airways showed a significant decrease in neovessel formation and endothelial cell proliferation in response to VEGF overexpression. These alterations in airway vasculature were accompanied by attenuated expression of proinflammatory mediators. Furthermore, VEGF-TG/FABP4−/− mice showed markedly decreased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a well-known mediator of VEGF-induced responses, compared with VEGF-TG mice. Finally, the density of FABP4-immunoreactive vessels in endobronchial biopsy specimens was significantly higher in patients with asthma than in control subjects. Taken together, these data unravel FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:23391391

  9. Mouse models of Inherited Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jahid, Sohail; Lipkin, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of cancer have been instrumental in understanding the progression and therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes. The ability to alter the genome of individual mouse cell types in both constitutive and inducible approaches has led to many novel insights into their human disease counterparts. In this review, conventional, conditional and inducible knockout mouse models of inherited human cancer syndromes are presented and insights from the study of these models are highlighted. PMID:21075289

  10. Alcohol Induced Facial Dysmorphology in C57BL/6 Mouse Models of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Bruce; Vinci-Booher, Sophia; Wetherill, Leah; Ward, Richard; Goodlett, Charles; Zhou, Feng C.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), which includes a range of developmental deficits. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most severe form of FASD and can be diagnosed with pathognomonic facial features (smooth philtrum, short palpebral fissure, and thin upper vermilion). However, many children with developmental damage due to prenatal alcohol exposure exhibit no, or only a subset, of the above features, making diagnosis difficult. This study explored novel analyses to quantify the effect of a known dose of alcohol on specific facial measurements in sub-strains C57BL/B6J (B6J) and C57BL/6NHsd (B6N) mice. Mouse dams were provided alcohol (Alc) consisting of 4.8% (v/v) alcohol in a liquid diet for 16 days pre-pregnancy, chow and water diet during mating, and the alcohol liquid diet reinstated on gestational days 7(E7) to E17. Treatment controls included a pair-fed (PF) group given matched volumes of an alcohol-free liquid diet made isocalorically, and a group given ad lib access to lab chow and water (Chow). Maternal diet intake (Alc and PF), blood alcohol concentrations (BACs), embryo weights, and 15 morphometric facial measurements for E17 embryos were analyzed. B6N dams drank more alcohol during pregnancy and generated higher BAC than B6J dams. Both the Alc and PF treatments induced significant reductions in embryo weights relative to Chow in both sub-strains. Alcohol treatments produced significant changes, relative to controls, in four of the 15 facial measures for the B6N sub-strain, but only in two measures for the B6J sub-strain. Discriminant analysis demonstrated successful classification of the B6N alcohol-exposed versus non-alcohol exposed embryos with high sensitivity (86%), and specificity (80%), and overall classification (total correct 83%), while, B6J mice yielded sensitivity of 80%, specificity 78%, and overall correct classification in 79%. In addition, B6N mice showed significantly more effects of

  11. Effect of social odor context on the emission of isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model for autism

    PubMed Central

    Wöhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    An important diagnostic criterion for social communication deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are difficulties in adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts. While the BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) inbred strain of mice is one of the most commonly used mouse models for ASD, little is known about whether BTBR mice display deficits in detecting changes in social context and their ability to adjust to them. Here, it was tested therefore whether the emission of isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in BTBR mouse pups is affected by the social odor context, in comparison to the standard control strain with high sociability, C57BL/6J (B6). It is known that the presence of odors from mothers and littermates leads to a calming of the isolated mouse pup, and hence to a reduction in isolation-induced USV emission. In accordance with their behavioral phenotypes with relevance to all diagnostic core symptoms of ASD, it was predicted that BTBR mouse pups would not display a calming response when tested under soiled bedding conditions with home cage bedding material containing maternal odors, and that similar isolation-induced USV emission rates would be seen in BTBR mice tested under clean and soiled bedding conditions. Unexpectedly, however, the present findings show that BTBR mouse pups display such a calming response and emit fewer isolation-induced USV when tested under soiled as compared to clean bedding conditions, similar to B6 mouse pups. Yet, in contrast to B6 mouse pups, which emitted isolation-induced USV with shorter call durations and lower levels of frequency modulation under soiled bedding conditions, social odor context had no effect on acoustic call features in BTBR mouse pups. This indicates that the BTBR mouse model for ASD does not display deficits in detecting changes in social context, but has a limited ability and/or reduced motivation to adjust to them. PMID:25852455

  12. A two-mutation model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia using historical mouse data.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Bouffler, Simon; Ellender, Michele; Huiskamp, René; Kowalczuk, Christine; Meijne, Emmy; Sutmuller, Marjolein

    2011-03-01

    From studies of the atomic bomb survivors, it is well known that ionizing radiation causes several forms of leukemia. However, since the specific mechanism behind this process remains largely unknown, it is difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic effects at acute high-dose exposures to risk estimates for the chronic low-dose exposures that are important for radiation protection purposes. Recently, it has become clear that the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in CBA/H mice takes place through two key steps, both involving the Sfpi1 gene. A similar mechanism may play a role in human radiation-induced AML. In the present paper, a two-mutation carcinogenesis model is applied to model AML in several data sets of X-ray- and neutron-exposed CBA/H mice. The models obtained provide good fits to the data. A comparison between the predictions for neutron-induced and X-ray-induced AML yields an RBE for neutrons of approximately 3. The model used is considered to be a first step toward a model for human radiation-induced AML, which could be used to estimate risks of exposure to low doses. PMID:20842369

  13. Carrageenan-induced inflammation promotes ROS generation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation in a mouse model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Cristiane R; Funchal, Giselle A; Luft, Carolina; de Oliveira, Jarbas R; Porto, Bárbara N; Donadio, Márcio V F

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a combination of DNA fibers and granular proteins, such as neutrophil elastase (NE). NETs are released in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli. Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from Chondrus crispus, a marine algae, used for decades in research for its potential to induce inflammation in different animal models. In this study, we show for the first time that carrageenan injection can induce NET release in a mouse model of acute peritonitis. Carrageenan induced NET release by viable neutrophils with NE and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expressed on DNA fibers. Furthermore, although this polysaccharide was able to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by peritoneal neutrophils, NADPH oxidase derived ROS were dispensable for NET formation by carrageenan. In conclusion, our results show that carrageenan-induced inflammation in the peritoneum of mice can induce NET formation in an ROS-independent manner. These results may add important information to the field of inflammation and potentially lead to novel anti-inflammatory agents targeting the production of NETs. PMID:26786873

  14. Gangliosides and ceramides change in a mouse model of blast induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Woods, Amina S; Colsch, Benoit; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Baldwin, Kathrine; Roux, Aurelie; Hoffer, Barry; Cox, Brian M; Hoffer, Michael; Rubovitch, Vardit; Pick, Chaim G; Schultz, J Albert; Balaban, Carey

    2013-04-17

    Explosive detonations generate atmospheric pressure changes that produce nonpenetrating blast induced "mild" traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The structural basis for mild bTBI has been extremely controversial. The present study applies matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging to track the distribution of gangliosides in mouse brain tissue that were exposed to very low level of explosive detonations (2.5-5.5 psi peak overpressure). We observed major increases of the ganglioside GM2 in the hippocampus, thalamus, and hypothalamus after a single blast exposure. Moreover, these changes were accompanied by depletion of ceramides. No neurological or brain structural signs of injury could be inferred using standard light microscopic techniques. The first source of variability is generated by the Latency between blast and tissue sampling (peak intensity of the blast wave). These findings suggest that subtle molecular changes in intracellular membranes and plasmalemma compartments may be biomarkers for biological responses to mild bTBI. This is also the first report of a GM2 increase in the brains of mature mice from a nongenetic etiology. PMID:23590251

  15. Apolipoprotein E knockout as the basis for mouse models of dyslipidemia-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hinder, Lucy M; Vincent, Andrea M; Hayes, John M; McLean, Lisa L; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia has been identified as an important pathogenic risk factor for diabetic neuropathy, but current animal models do not adequately reproduce the lipid profile observed in human diabetics (increased triglycerides with an elevated LDL-cholesterol and reduced HDL-cholesterol). High fat feeding of mice produces hyperlipidemia, but mice are resistant to increases in the LDL to HDL ratio, reducing the potential for peripheral lipid deposits to impact neuropathy, as is postulated to occur in human subjects. Genetic manipulations provide an alternative approach to reproducing a neuropathic plasma lipid profile. Based on findings from the atherosclerosis literature, we began with knockout of ApoE. Since knockout of ApoE alone only partially mimics the human diabetic lipid profile, we examined the impact of its combination with a well-characterized model of type 2 diabetes exhibiting neuropathy, the db/db mouse. We added further gene manipulations to increase hyperlipidemia by using mice with both ApoE and ApoB48 knockout on the ob/+ (leptin mutation) mice. In all of these models, we found that either the db/db or ob/ob genotypes had increased body weight, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and evidence of neuropathy compared with the control groups (db/+ or ob/+, respectively). We found that ApoE knockout combined with leptin receptor knockout produced a lipid profile most closely modeling human dyslipidemia that promotes neuropathy. ApoE knockout combined with additional ApoB48 and leptin knockout produced similar changes of smaller magnitude, but, notably, an increase in HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that the overall effects of ApoE knockout, either directly upon nerve structure and function or indirectly on lipid metabolism, are insufficient to significantly alter the course of diabetic neuropathy. Although these models ultimately do not deliver optimal lipid profiles for translational diabetic neuropathy research, they do present glycemic and lipid profile

  16. Skin pathology induced by snake venom metalloproteinase: acute damage, revascularization, and re-epithelization in a mouse ear model.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Natalia; Escalante, Teresa; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    Viperid snakebite envenomation induces blistering and dermonecrosis. The pathological alterations induced by a snake venom metalloproteinase in the skin were investigated in a mouse ear model. Metalloproteinase BaP1, from Bothrops asper, induced rapid edema, hemorrhage, and blistering; the latter two effects were abrogated by preincubation with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat. Neutrophils did not play a role in the pathology, as depletion of these cells resulted in a similar histological picture. Blisters are likely to result from the direct proteolytic activity of BaP1 of proteins at the dermal-epidermal junction, probably at the lamina lucida, as revealed by immunostaining for type IV collagen and laminin. Widespread apoptosis of keratinocytes was detected by the TUNEL assay, whereas no apoptosis of capillary endothelial cells was observed. BaP1 induced a drastic reduction in the microvessel density, revealed by immunostaining for the endothelial marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. This was followed by a rapid angiogenic response, leading to a partial revascularization. Skin damage was followed by inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Then, a successful re-epithelization process occurred, and the skin of the ear regained its normal structure by 2 weeks. Venom metalloproteinase-induced skin damage reproduces the pathological changes described in snakebitten patients. PMID:18449209

  17. Dietary feeding of Opuntia humifusa inhibits UVB radiation-induced carcinogenesis by reducing inflammation and proliferation in hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Su-Gil; Park, Young-Seok; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2013-01-01

    It has been validated that ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation induced both squamous and basal cell carcinomas, as a tumor initiator and promoter. Opuntia humifusa is a member of the Cactaceae family which has been demonstrated in our previous study to have a chemopreventive effect in 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced skin carcinogenesis models. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the protective effects of O. humifusa against photocarcinogenesis. O. humifusa was administrated to mice as a dietary feeding, following exposure to UVB radiation (180 mJ/cm(2)) twice a week of 30 weeks for skin tumor development in hairless mice. Dietary O. humifusa inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia, infiltration of leukocytes, level of myeloperoxidase and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), in UVB exposed skin. Also, O. humifusa significantly inhibited both protein and mRNA expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D1 compared to the non-O. humifusa treated group. Collectively, these results suggest that O. humifusa could inhibit photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin and that protective effect is associated with the inhibition of not only UVB-induced inflammatory responses involving COX-2, iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines, but also the down-regulation of UVB-induced cellular proliferation. PMID:23789636

  18. MRI signature in a novel mouse model of genetically induced adult oligodendrocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Mueggler, Thomas; Pohl, Hartmut; Baltes, Christof; Riethmacher, Dieter; Suter, Ueli; Rudin, Markus

    2012-01-16

    Two general pathological processes contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS): acute inflammation and degeneration. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive in detecting abnormalities related to acute inflammation both clinically and in animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the correlation of these readouts with acute and future disabilities has been found rather weak. This illustrates the need for imaging techniques addressing neurodegenerative processes associated with MS. In the present work we evaluated the sensitivity of different MRI techniques (T(2) mapping, macrophage tracking based on labeling cells in vivo by ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIO), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI)) to detect histopathological changes in a novel animal model making use of intrinsic, temporally and spatially controlled triggering of oligodendrocyte cell death. This mouse model allows studying the MRI signature associated to neurodegenerative processes of MS in the absence of adaptive inflammatory components that appear to be foremost in the EAE models. Our results revealed pronounced T(2) hyperintensities in brain stem and cerebellar structures, which we attribute to structural alteration of white matter by pronounced vacuolation. Brain areas were found devoid of significant macrophage infiltration in line with the absence of a peripheral inflammatory response. The significant decrease in diffusion anisotropy derived from DTI measures in these structures is mainly caused by a pronounced decrease in diffusivity parallel to the fiber indicative of axonal damage. Triggering of oligodendrocyte ablation did not translate into a significant increase in radial diffusivity. Only minor decreases in MT ratio have been observed, which is attributed to inefficient removal of myelin debris. PMID:21945466

  19. Generation of Functional Neutrophils from a Mouse Model of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disorder Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayandip; Santilli, Giorgia; Blundell, Michael P.; Navarro, Susana; Bueren, Juan A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models of human genetic disorders provide a valuable tool for investigating the scope for application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Here we present a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate generation of iPSC from a mouse model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), and their successful differentiation into haematopoietic progenitors of the myeloid lineage. We further demonstrate that additive gene transfer using lentiviral vectors encoding gp91phox is capable of restoring NADPH-oxidase activity in mature neutrophils derived from X-CGD iPSC. In the longer term, correction of iPSC from human patients with CGD has therapeutic potential not only through generation of transplantable haematopoietic stem cells, but also through production of large numbers of autologous functional neutrophils. PMID:21408614

  20. Clostridium ramosum Promotes High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Gnotobiotic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Woting, Anni; Pfeiffer, Nora; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestines of obese humans and mice are enriched with Erysipelotrichi, a class within the Firmicutes. Clostridium ramosum, a member of the Erysipelotrichi, is associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome in humans. To clarify the possible obesogenic potential of this bacterial species and to unravel the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of C. ramosum in obesity development in gnotobiotic mice. Mice were associated with a simplified human intestinal (SIHUMI) microbiota of eight bacterial species, including C. ramosum, with the SIHUMI microbiota except C. ramosum (SIHUMIw/oCra), or with C. ramosum only (Cra) and fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a low-fat diet (LFD). Parameters related to the development of obesity and metabolic diseases were compared. After 4 weeks of HFD feeding, the mouse groups did not differ in energy intake, diet digestibility, gut permeability, and parameters of low-grade inflammation. However, SIHUMI and Cra mice fed the HFD gained significantly more body weight and body fat and displayed higher food efficiency than SIHUMIw/oCra mice fed the HFD. Gene expression of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) in jejunal mucosa and of fatty acid translocase (CD36) in ileal mucosa was significantly increased in the obese SIHUMI and Cra mice compared with the less obese SIHUMIw/oCra mice. The data demonstrate that the presence of C. ramosum in SIHUMI and Cra mice enhanced diet-induced obesity. Upregulation of small intestinal glucose and fat transporters in these animals may contribute to their increased body fat deposition. PMID:25271283

  1. Ibuprofen targets neuronal pentraxins expresion and improves cognitive function in mouse model of AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    JAMIL, ANUM; MAHBOOB, AAMRA; AHMED, TOUQEER

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum is known to exert neurotoxic effects associated with various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ibuprofen is a well-known non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which has demonstrated potential efficacy in the treatment of numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders, including AD. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of ibuprofen on cognitive function, and the expression levels of neuronal pentraxins (NPs) and interleukin (IL)-1β in an aluminum chloride (AlCl3)-induced mouse model of neurotoxicity. The effects of ibuprofen (100 mg/kg/day for 12 days) on learning and memory were evaluated in the AlCl3-induced neurotoxic mice using a Morris water maze and open field tests. In addition, ibuprofen was assessed for its effects on the expression levels of NPs and IL-1β in the hippocampus, cortex and amygdala of the brain. Treatment of the AlCl3-treated mice with ibuprofen decreased anxiety levels (6.90±0.34 min) compared with the AlCl3-treated group (1.80±0.29 min), as indicated by the time spent in the central area in an open field test. Furthermore, the expression levels of NP1 (1.32±0.47) and IL-1β (0.99±0.21) were significantly decreased in the hippocampus of mice following ibuprofen treatment, as compared with the AlCl3-treated mice (8.62±1.54 and 7.47±0.53, respectively). In the present study, ibuprofen was able to target novel structures in order to attenuate the inflammation associated with an AlCl3-induced mouse model of neurotoxicity; thus suggesting that ibuprofen may be considered a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. PMID:26893653

  2. Weight Loss Decreases Inherent and Allergic Methacholine Hyperresponsiveness in Mouse Models of Diet-Induced Obese Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ather, Jennifer L; Chung, Michael; Hoyt, Laura R; Randall, Matthew J; Georgsdottir, Anna; Daphtary, Nirav A; Aliyeva, Minara I; Suratt, Benjamin T; Bates, Jason H T; Irvin, Charles G; Russell, Sheila R; Forgione, Patrick M; Dixon, Anne E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-08-01

    Obese asthma presents with inherent hyperresponsiveness to methacholine or augmented allergen-driven allergic asthma, with an even greater magnitude of methacholine hyperresponsiveness. These physiologic parameters and accompanying obese asthma symptoms can be reduced by successful weight loss, yet the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We implemented mouse models of diet-induced obesity, dietary and surgical weight loss, and environmental allergen exposure to examine the mechanisms and mediators of inherent and allergic obese asthma. We report that the methacholine hyperresponsiveness in these models of inherent obese asthma and obese allergic asthma manifests in distinct anatomical compartments but that both are amenable to interventions that induce substantial weight loss. The inherent obese asthma phenotype, with characteristic increases in distal airspace tissue resistance and tissue elastance, is associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines that are reduced with dietary weight loss. Surprisingly, bariatric surgery-induced weight loss further elevates these cytokines while reducing methacholine responsiveness to levels similar to those in lean mice or in formerly obese mice rendered lean through dietary intervention. In contrast, the obese allergic asthma phenotype, with characteristic increases in central airway resistance, is not associated with increased adaptive immune responses, yet diet-induced weight loss reduces methacholine hyperresponsiveness without altering immunological variables. Diet-induced weight loss is effective in models of both inherent and allergic obese asthma, and our examination of the fecal microbiome revealed that the obesogenic Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was normalized after diet-induced weight loss. Our results suggest that structural, immunological, and microbiological factors contribute to the manifold presentations of obese asthma. PMID:27064658

  3. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia induces an exhausted T cell phenotype in the TCL1 transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gassner, Franz J; Zaborsky, Nadja; Catakovic, Kemal; Rebhandl, Stefan; Huemer, Michael; Egle, Alexander; Hartmann, Tanja N; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Although chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a B cell malignancy, earlier studies have indicated a role of T cells in tumour growth and disease progression. In particular, the functional silencing of antigen-experienced T cells, called T cell exhaustion, has become implicated in immune evasion in CLL. In this study, we tested whether T cell exhaustion is recapitulated in the TCL1(tg) mouse model for CLL. We show that T cells express high levels of the inhibitory exhaustion markers programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, also termed PD-1) and lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3), whereas CLL cells express high levels of CD274 (also termed PD-ligand 1). In addition, the fraction of exhausted T cells increases with CLL progression. Finally, we demonstrate that exhausted T cells are reinvigorated towards CLL cytotoxicity by inhibition of PDCD1/CD274 interaction in vivo. These results suggest that T cell exhaustion contributes to CLL pathogenesis and that interference with PDCD1/CD274 signalling holds high potential for therapeutic approaches. PMID:25940792

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia induces an exhausted T cell phenotype in the TCL1 transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Franz J; Zaborsky, Nadja; Catakovic, Kemal; Rebhandl, Stefan; Huemer, Michael; Egle, Alexander; Hartmann, Tanja N; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Although chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a B cell malignancy, earlier studies have indicated a role of T cells in tumour growth and disease progression. In particular, the functional silencing of antigen-experienced T cells, called T cell exhaustion, has become implicated in immune evasion in CLL. In this study, we tested whether T cell exhaustion is recapitulated in the TCL1tg mouse model for CLL. We show that T cells express high levels of the inhibitory exhaustion markers programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, also termed PD-1) and lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3), whereas CLL cells express high levels of CD274 (also termed PD-ligand 1). In addition, the fraction of exhausted T cells increases with CLL progression. Finally, we demonstrate that exhausted T cells are reinvigorated towards CLL cytotoxicity by inhibition of PDCD1/CD274 interaction in vivo. These results suggest that T cell exhaustion contributes to CLL pathogenesis and that interference with PDCD1/CD274 signalling holds high potential for therapeutic approaches. PMID:25940792

  5. Tissue Destruction Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in a Mouse Chamber Model Is Associated with Host Tumor Necrosis Factor Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuh-Yih; Huang, Jan-Hung; Lai, Yo-Yin; Huang, Han-Ching; Hu, Suh-Woan

    2005-01-01

    Intrachamber challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis strain 381 in a mouse subcutaneous chamber model results in a local infection that progresses to exfoliation of the chambers within 15 days. This study was designed to elucidate the contribution of host reactions to tissue destruction manifested by chamber exfoliation in animals infected with P. gingivalis. Chamber fluids showed increasing levels of prostaglandin E2 with infection, and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in chamber fluids peaked just before chamber exfoliation. Intraperitoneal injection of a TNF inhibitor, thalidomide (TH), reduced the number of exfoliated chambers, while indomethacin had no effect. Exogenous TNF in chambers without bacterial infection did not cause chamber exfoliation but induced neutrophil infiltration. In a dual-chamber model, two chambers were implanted in the same mouse. One chamber was infected with P. gingivalis, and 9 days later exogenous TNF was added to the other chamber. Altogether, 66.67% of uninfected chambers were exfoliated between day 11 and day 16, although no bacteria were recovered from uninfected chambers. TH treatment alleviated both infected and uninfected chamber exfoliation. In this study, tissue destruction caused by P. gingivalis 381 infection was due to the elevation of the TNF levels and not due to local bacterial activities. Our results further indicate that local infection by P. gingivalis 381, a nondisseminating strain, actually has systemic effects on the host pathological outcome. PMID:16299286

  6. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  7. KRAS Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Rónán C.; Heyer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    KRAS is a potent oncogene and is mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. However, the biological context of KRAS-dependent oncogenesis is poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models of cancer provide invaluable tools to study the oncogenic process, and insights from KRAS-driven models have significantly increased our understanding of the genetic, cellular, and tissue contexts in which KRAS is competent for oncogenesis. Moreover, variation among tumors arising in mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to therapy in KRAS-dependent cancers. Hence, it is essential that models of KRAS-driven cancers accurately reflect the genetics of human tumors and recapitulate the complex tumor-stromal intercommunication that is manifest in human cancers. Here, we highlight the progress made in modeling KRAS-dependent cancers and the impact that these models have had on our understanding of cancer biology. In particular, the development of models that recapitulate the complex biology of human cancers enables translational insights into mechanisms of therapeutic intervention in KRAS-dependent cancers. PMID:21779503

  8. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells in a thioacetamide-induced mouse model of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El-Akabawy, Gehan; El-Mehi, Abeer

    2015-06-01

    The clinical significance of enhancing endogenous circulating haematopoietic stem cells is becoming increasingly recognized, and the augmentation of circulating stem cells using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has led to promising preclinical and clinical results for several liver fibrotic conditions. However, this approach is largely limited by cost and the infeasibility of maintaining long-term administration. Preclinical studies have reported that StemEnhance, a mild haematopoietic stem cell mobilizer, promotes cardiac muscle regeneration and remedies the manifestation of diabetes. However, the effectiveness of StemEnhance in ameliorating liver cirrhosis has not been studied. This study is the first to evaluate the beneficial effect of StemEnhance administration in a thioacetamide-induced mouse model of liver fibrosis. StemEnhance augmented the number of peripheral CD34-positive cells, reduced hepatic fibrosis, improved histopathological changes, and induced endogenous liver proliferation. In addition, VEGF expression was up-regulated, while TNF-α expression was down-regulated in thioacetamide-induced fibrotic livers after StemEnhance intake. These data suggest that StemEnhance may be useful as a potential therapeutic candidate for liver fibrosis by inducing reparative effects via mobilization of haematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25857836

  9. Keratinocyte-Derived Chemokine Induces Prostate Epithelial Hyperplasia and Reactive Stroma in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Isaiah G.; Ressler, Steven J.; Rowley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is upregulated in fibrotic and malignant diseases and is a key mediator of proliferative responses. Elevated IL-8 was recently correlated with benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelium and a myofibroblast reactive stroma. Thus, we sought to determine whether overexpressed IL-8 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), the functional murine homolog of IL-8, induce prostate epithelial hyperplasia and a reactive phenotype. Methods Transgenic mice that overexpress KC within prostate epithelia and xenograft models with engineered human cells that overexpress IL-8 were developed. Results Overexpression of KC in transgenic mice produced hyperplastic prostate epithelial acini associated with a periacinar reactive stroma. KC induced an altered epithelial/stroma proliferation index ratio, increased acini diameter, epithelial infolding, and expression of prototypical reactive stroma markers. Overexpression of IL-8 in normal human prostate epithelial xenografts correlated with elevated epithelial proliferation index and altered morphology. Elevated human prostate stromal and epithelial cell proliferation, nodule-like morphology and increased xenograft survival were observed in IL-8-overexpressing orthotopic xenografts. Conclusions Together, these data demonstrate that overexpression of IL-8/KC results in a prostate epithelial hyperplasia with an associated reactive stroma phenotype. The novel transgenic mouse and human xenograft models described here may be useful in dissecting key mechanisms of IL-8 induced prostate hyperplasia and reactive stroma. PMID:19021203

  10. Conditional ablation of TGF-β signaling inhibits tumor progression and invasion in an induced mouse bladder cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Zhu, Fengyu; Zhang, Haojie; Chen, Demeng; Zhang, Xiuhong; Gao, Qian; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling in cancer progression is still under debate. To determine the function of TGF-β signaling in bladder cancer progression, we conditionally knocked out the Tgfbr2 in mouse model after a N-butyl-N-4-hydroxybutyl Nitrosamine induced bladder carcinogenesis. We found the ablation of TGF-β signaling could inhibit the cancer cell proliferation, cancer stem cell population and EMT, hence suppressed the invasive cancer progression, which is similar with the result of TGF-β receptor I inhibitor treatment. These findings recognize the roles and mechanisms of TGF-β signaling in bladder cancer progression in vivo for the first time. PMID:27378170

  11. Identification of the common regulators for hepatocellular carcinoma induced by hepatitis B virus X antigen in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsia, Yu; Yang, Wan-Yu; Lin, Yu-I; Li, Chao-Chin; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Chang, Ko-Wei; Shieh, Grace S; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wang, Horng-Dar; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X antigen plays an important role in the development of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The key regulators controlling the temporal downstream gene expression for HCC progression remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of systems biology approach and analyzed the microarray data of the HBx transgenic mouse as a screening process to identify the differentially expressed genes and applied the software Pathway Studio to identify potential pathways and regulators involved in HCC. Using subnetwork enrichment analysis, we identified five common regulator genes: EDN1, BMP7, BMP4, SPIB and SRC. Upregulation of the common regulators was validated in the other independent HBx transgenic mouse lines. Furthermore, we verified the correlation of their RNA expression levels by using the human HCC samples, and their protein levels by using the human liver disease tissue arrays. EDN1, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and BMP7 were upregulated in cirrhosis, BMP4, BMP7 and SRC were further upregulated in hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinoma samples. The trend of increasing expression of the common regulators correlates well with the progression of human liver cancer. Overexpression of the common regulators increases the cell viability, promotes migration and invasiveness and enhances the colony formation ability in Hep3B cells. Our approach allows us to identify the critical genes in hepatocarcinogenesis in an HBx-induced mouse model. The validation of the gene expressions in the liver cancer of human patients and their cellular function assays suggests that the identified common regulators may serve as useful molecular targets for the early-stage diagnosis or therapy for HCC. PMID:22021908

  12. Mangiferin Attenuates Th1/Th2 Cytokine Imbalance in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthmatic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guang-Han; Du, Jun; Huang, Xin; Lu, Yi; Keller, Evan T.; Zhang, Jian; Deng, Jia-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Mangiferin is a major bioactive ingredient in Mangifera indica Linn. (Anacardiaceae) leaves. Aqueous extract of such leaves have been used as an indigenous remedy for respiratory diseases like asthma and coughing in traditional Chinese medicine. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of mangiferin on anti-asthma remain unclear. In our present study, we investigated the anti-asthmatic effect of mangiferin on Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and explored its underlying immunoregulatory mechanism in mouse model of allergic asthma. Mangiferin significantly reduced the total inflammatory cell counts and eosinophil infiltration, decreased the production of ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum and PGD2 in BALF. The antibody array analysis showed that mangiferin down-regulated the levels of one group of cytokines/chemokines including Th2-related IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and others IL-3, IL-9, IL-17, RANTES, TNF-α, but simultaneously up-regulated Th1-related IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 and IL-12 expression in serum. Thus it attenuates the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells ratio by diminishing the abnormal mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Finally, mangiferin substantially inhibited the activation and expression of STAT-6 and GATA-3 in excised lung tissues. Our results suggest that mangiferin can exert anti-asthmatic effect. The underlying mechanism may attribute to the modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalance via inhibiting the STAT6 signaling pathway. PMID:24955743

  13. AhR modulates the IL-22-producing cell proliferation/recruitment in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cochez, Perrine M; Michiels, Camille; Hendrickx, Emilie; Van Belle, Astrid B; Lemaire, Muriel M; Dauguet, Nicolas; Warnier, Guy; de Heusch, Magali; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Coulie, Pierre G; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dumoutier, Laure

    2016-06-01

    IL-22 has a detrimental role in skin inflammatory processes, for example in psoriasis. As transcription factor, AhR controls the IL-22 production by several cell types (i.e. Th17 cells). Here, we analyzed the role of Ahr in IL-22 production by immune cells in the inflamed skin, using an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. Our results indicate that IL-22 is expressed in the ear of imiquimod-treated Ahr(-/-) mice but less than in wild-type mice. We then studied the role of AhR on three cell populations known to produce IL-22 in the skin: γδ T cells, Th17 cells, and ILC3, and a novel IL-22-producing cell type identified in this setting: CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells. We showed that AhR is required for IL-22 production by Th17, but not by the three other cell types, in the imiquimod-treated ears. Moreover, AhR has a role in the recruitment of γδ T cells, ILC3, and CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells into the inflamed skin or in their local proliferation. Taken together, AhR has a direct role in IL-22 production by Th17 cells in the mouse ear skin, but not by γδ T cells, CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells and ILCs. PMID:27000947

  14. Ursolic acid attenuates oxidative stress in nigrostriatal tissue and improves neurobehavioral activity in MPTP-induced Parkinsonian mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sachchida Nand; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Singh, Divakar; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region of brain. Oxidative stress and inflammation plays important role in the neurodegeneration and development of PD. Ursolic Acid (UA: 3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid found in various medicinal plants. Its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity is a well-established fact. In this paper, the neuroprotective efficiency of UA in MPTP induced PD mouse model has been explored. For this purpose, we divided 30 mice into 5 different groups; first was control, second was MPTP-treated, third, fourth and fifth were different doses of UA viz., 5 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg, and 50 mg/kg body weight (wt) respectively, along with MPTP. After 21 days of treatment, different behavioral parameters and biochemical assays were conducted. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining of SN dopaminergic neurons as well as HPLC quantification of dopamine and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) were also performed. Our results proved that, UA improves behavioral deficits, restored altered dopamine level and protect dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP intoxicated mouse. Among three different doses, 25 mg/kg body wt was the most effective dose for the PD. This work reveals the potential of UA as a promising drug candidate for PD treatment. PMID:26686287

  15. Increased Expression of TGF-β Signaling Components in a Mouse Model of Fibrosis Induced by Submandibular Gland Duct Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Lucas T.; Camden, Jean M.; El-Sayed, Farid G.; Khalafalla, Mahmoud G.; Petris, Michael J.; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a multi-functional cytokine with a well-described role in the regulation of tissue fibrosis and regeneration in the liver, kidney and lung. Submandibular gland (SMG) duct ligation and subsequent deligation in rodents is a classical model for studying salivary gland damage and regeneration. While previous studies suggest that TGF-β may contribute to salivary gland fibrosis, the expression of TGF-β signaling components has not been investigated in relation to mouse SMG duct ligation-induced fibrosis and regeneration following ductal deligation. Following a 7 day SMG duct ligation, TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 were significantly upregulated in the SMG, as were TGF-β receptor 1 and downstream Smad family transcription factors in salivary acinar cells, but not in ductal cells. In acinar cells, duct ligation also led to upregulation of snail, a Smad-activated E-cadherin repressor and regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, whereas in ductal cells upregulation of E-cadherin was observed while snail expression was unchanged. Upregulation of these TGF-β signaling components correlated with upregulation of fibrosis markers collagen 1 and fibronectin, responses that were inhibited by administration of the TGF-β receptor 1 inhibitors SB431542 or GW788388. After SMG regeneration following a 28 day duct deligation, TGF-β signaling components and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers returned to levels similar to non-ligated controls. The results from this study indicate that increased TGF-β signaling contributes to duct ligation-induced changes in salivary epithelium that correlate with glandular fibrosis. Furthermore, the reversibility of enhanced TGF-β signaling in acinar cells of duct-ligated mouse SMG after deligation indicates that this is an ideal model for studying TGF-β signaling mechanisms in salivary epithelium as well as mechanisms of fibrosis initiation and their resolution. PMID:25955532

  16. Therapeutic effects of LASSBio-596 in an elastase-induced mouse model of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Padilha, Gisele A.; Henriques, Isabela; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Abreu, Soraia C.; Oliveira, Milena V.; Morales, Marcelo M.; Lima, Lidia M.; Barreiro, Eliezer J.; Silva, Pedro L.; Xisto, Debora G.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Emphysema is an intractable pulmonary disease characterized by an inflammatory process of the airways and lung parenchyma and ongoing remodeling process in an attempt to restore lung structure. There is no effective drug therapy that regenerates lung tissue or prevents the progression of emphysema; current treatment is aimed at symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that LASSBio-596, a molecule with potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, might reduce pulmonary inflammation and remodeling and thus improve lung function in experimental emphysema. Emphysema was induced in BALB/c mice by intratracheal administration of porcine pancreatic elastase (0.1 IU) once weekly during 4 weeks. A control group received saline using the same protocol. After the last instillation of saline or elastase, dimethyl sulfoxide, or LASSBio-596 were administered intraperitoneally, once daily for 8 days. After 24 h, in elastase-induced emphysema animals, LASSBio-596 yielded: (1) decreased mean linear intercept, hyperinflation and collagen fiber content, (2) increased elastic fiber content, (3) reduced number of M1 macrophages, (4) decreased tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and transforming growth factor-β protein levels in lung tissue, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor. These changes resulted in increased static lung elastance. In conclusion, LASSBio-596 therapy reduced lung inflammation, airspace enlargement, and small airway wall remodeling, thus improving lung function, in this animal model of elastase-induced emphysema. PMID:26483698

  17. Therapeutic effects of LASSBio-596 in an elastase-induced mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Padilha, Gisele A; Henriques, Isabela; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Abreu, Soraia C; Oliveira, Milena V; Morales, Marcelo M; Lima, Lidia M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Silva, Pedro L; Xisto, Debora G; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2015-01-01

    Emphysema is an intractable pulmonary disease characterized by an inflammatory process of the airways and lung parenchyma and ongoing remodeling process in an attempt to restore lung structure. There is no effective drug therapy that regenerates lung tissue or prevents the progression of emphysema; current treatment is aimed at symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that LASSBio-596, a molecule with potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, might reduce pulmonary inflammation and remodeling and thus improve lung function in experimental emphysema. Emphysema was induced in BALB/c mice by intratracheal administration of porcine pancreatic elastase (0.1 IU) once weekly during 4 weeks. A control group received saline using the same protocol. After the last instillation of saline or elastase, dimethyl sulfoxide, or LASSBio-596 were administered intraperitoneally, once daily for 8 days. After 24 h, in elastase-induced emphysema animals, LASSBio-596 yielded: (1) decreased mean linear intercept, hyperinflation and collagen fiber content, (2) increased elastic fiber content, (3) reduced number of M1 macrophages, (4) decreased tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and transforming growth factor-β protein levels in lung tissue, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor. These changes resulted in increased static lung elastance. In conclusion, LASSBio-596 therapy reduced lung inflammation, airspace enlargement, and small airway wall remodeling, thus improving lung function, in this animal model of elastase-induced emphysema. PMID:26483698

  18. Resveratrol Possesses Protective Effects in a Pristane-Induced Lupus Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Zhou, Shuang; Chen, Hou-Zao; Gao, Na; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Zeng, Xiao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies. To date, no therapy has been found to satisfactorily treat SLE. SIRT1 deficiency results in the development of an autoimmune syndrome in mice, including a high titer of anti-nuclear antibody in serum, immunoglobulin deposition in the kidney, and immune complex glomerulonephritis. Resveratrol is an activator of SIRT1 and possesses anti-inflammation and immune-regulatory properties. Objective To evaluate the preventative effects of resveratrol on a pristane-induced lupus animal model and assess its putative immune modulation effects. Methods BALB/c mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 ml of pristane on day 1 and then various doses of resveratrol were given to the mice daily starting on day 2 and continuing for seven months. The autoantibodies in serum and supernatants were measured. Single cells isolated from spleen, isolated CD4+ T cells, and CD19+ B cells were cultured with or without resveratrol in vitro and assessed by flow cytometry. Results Resveratrol attenuated proteinuria, immunoglobuin depositon in kidney, and glomerulonephritis as well as IgG1 and IgG2a in serum in pristane-induced lupus mice. Resveratrol also suppressed CD69 and CD71 expression on CD4+ T cells as well as CD4+ T cell proliferation, induced CD4+ T cell apoptosis, and decreased CD4 IFNγ+ Th1 cells and the ratio of Th1/Th2 cells in vitro. In vitro antibody production and proliferation of B cells were also inhibited. Conclusion Resveratrol possesses protective effects in pristane-induced lupus mice and may represent a novel approach for the management of SLE. PMID:25501752

  19. Multimodal analysis of ocular inflammation using the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Colin J.; Gardner, Peter J.; Copland, David A.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Gonzalez-Cordero, Anai; kleine Holthaus, Sophia-Martha; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Smith, Alexander J.; Ali, Robin R.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rodents is a model of acute Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated organ inflammation, and has been used to model human anterior uveitis, examine leukocyte trafficking and test novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Wider adoption has been limited by the requirement for manual, non-specific, cell-count scoring of histological sections from each eye as a measure of disease severity. Here, we describe a comprehensive and efficient technique that uses ocular dissection and multimodal tissue analysis. This allows matched disease scoring by multicolour flow cytometric analysis of the inflammatory infiltrate, protein analysis on ocular supernatants and qPCR on remnant tissues of the same eye. Dynamic changes in cell populations could be identified and mapped to chemokine and cytokine changes over the course of the model. To validate the technique, dose-responsive suppression of leukocyte infiltration by recombinant interleukin-10 was demonstrated, as well as selective suppression of the monocyte (CD11b+Ly6C+) infiltrate, in mice deficient for either Ccl2 or Ccr2. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used for the first time in this model to allow in vivo imaging of infiltrating vitreous cells, and correlated with CD11b+Ly6G+ counts to provide another unique measure of cell populations in the ocular tissue. Multimodal tissue analysis of EIU is proposed as a new standard to improve and broaden the application of this model. PMID:26794131

  20. Multimodal analysis of ocular inflammation using the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Colin J; Gardner, Peter J; Copland, David A; Liyanage, Sidath E; Gonzalez-Cordero, Anai; Kleine Holthaus, Sophia-Martha; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Smith, Alexander J; Ali, Robin R; Dick, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rodents is a model of acute Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated organ inflammation, and has been used to model human anterior uveitis, examine leukocyte trafficking and test novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Wider adoption has been limited by the requirement for manual, non-specific, cell-count scoring of histological sections from each eye as a measure of disease severity. Here, we describe a comprehensive and efficient technique that uses ocular dissection and multimodal tissue analysis. This allows matched disease scoring by multicolour flow cytometric analysis of the inflammatory infiltrate, protein analysis on ocular supernatants and qPCR on remnant tissues of the same eye. Dynamic changes in cell populations could be identified and mapped to chemokine and cytokine changes over the course of the model. To validate the technique, dose-responsive suppression of leukocyte infiltration by recombinant interleukin-10 was demonstrated, as well as selective suppression of the monocyte (CD11b+Ly6C+) infiltrate, in mice deficient for eitherCcl2orCcr2 Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used for the first time in this model to allowin vivoimaging of infiltrating vitreous cells, and correlated with CD11b+Ly6G+ counts to provide another unique measure of cell populations in the ocular tissue. Multimodal tissue analysis of EIU is proposed as a new standard to improve and broaden the application of this model. PMID:26794131

  1. Mouse and pig models for studies of natural and vaccine-induced immunity to Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kingston H G; Gerdts, Volker

    2014-04-01

    The increasing incidence of whooping cough in many developed countries has been linked with waning immunity induced after immunization with acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines. The rational design of an improved aP vaccine requires a full understanding of the mechanism of protective immunity and preclinical studies in animal models. Infection of mice and pigs with Bordetella pertussis has many features of the infection seen in humans and has already provided valuable information on the roles of innate and adaptive immune responses in protection. Recent findings in these models have already indicated that it may be possible to develop an improved aP vaccine based on a formulation that includes a Toll-like receptor agonist as an adjuvant. PMID:24626866

  2. Proposed mechanisms for oligonucleotide IMT504 induced diabetes reversion in a mouse model of immunodependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, María S; Bianchi, Stefanía; Hernado-Insúa, Andrés; Martinez, Leandro M; Lago, Néstor; Libertun, Carlos; Chasseing, Norma A; Montaner, Alejandro D; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A

    2016-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) originates from autoimmune β-cell destruction. IMT504 is an immunomodulatory oligonucleotide that increases mesenchymal stem cell cloning capacity and reverts toxic diabetes in rats. Here, we evaluated long-term (20 doses) and short-term (2-6 doses) effects of IMT504 (20 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) sc) in an immunodependent diabetes model: multiple low-dose streptozotocin-injected BALB/c mice (40 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip for 5 consecutive days). We determined blood glucose, glucose tolerance, serum insulin, islet morphology, islet infiltration, serum cytokines, progenitor cell markers, immunomodulatory proteins, proliferation, apoptosis, and islet gene expression. IMT504 reduced glycemia, induced β-cell recovery, and impaired islet infiltration. IMT504 induced early blood glucose decrease and infiltration inhibition, increased β-cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis, increased islet indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression, and increased serum tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 (IL-6). IMT504 affected islet gene expression; preproinsulin-2, proglucagon, somatostatin, nestin, regenerating gene-1, and C-X-C motif ligand-1 cytokine (Cxcl1) increased in islets from diabetic mice and were decreased by IMT504. IMT504 downregulated platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (Pecam1) in islets from control and diabetic mice, whereas it increased regenerating gene-2 (Reg2) in islets of diabetic mice. The IMT504-induced increase in IL-6 and islet IDO expression and decreased islet Pecam1 and Cxcl1 mRNA expression could participate in keeping leukocyte infiltration at bay, whereas upregulation of Reg2 may mediate β-cell regeneration. We conclude that IMT504 effectively reversed immunodependent diabetes in mice. Corroboration of these effects in a model of autoimmune diabetes more similar to human T1D could provide promising results for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27329801

  3. A New Xenobiotic-Induced Mouse Model of Sclerosing Cholangitis and Biliary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Stöger, Ulrike; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Moustafa, Tarek; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Weiglein, Andreas H.; Tsybrovskyy, Oleksiy; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Xenobiotics and drugs may lead to cholangiopathies and biliary fibrosis, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the cause and consequences of hepatobiliary injury and biliary fibrosis in 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-fed mice as a novel model of xenobiotic-induced cholangiopathy. Liver morphology, markers of inflammation, cell proliferation, fibrosis, bile formation, biliary porphyrin secretion, and hepatobiliary transporter expression were studied longitudinally in DDC- and control diet-fed Swiss albino mice. DDC feeding led to increased biliary porphyrin secretion and induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule, osteopontin, and tumor necrosis factor-α expression in bile duct epithelial cells. This was associated with a pronounced pericholangitis with a significantly increased number of CD11b-positive cells, ductular reaction, and activation of periductal myofibroblasts, leading to large duct disease and a biliary type of liver fibrosis. After 4 weeks, we constantly observed intraductal porphyrin pigment plugs. Glutathione and phospholipid excretion significantly decreased over time. Expression of Ntcp, Oatp4, and Mrp2 was significantly reduced, whereas Bsep expression remained unchanged and adaptive Mrp3 and Mrp4 expression was significantly induced. We demonstrate that DDC feeding in mice leads to i) a reactive phenotype of cholangiocytes and bile duct injury, ii) pericholangitis, periductal fibrosis, ductular reaction, and consequently portal-portal bridging, iii) down-regulation of Mrp2 and impaired glutathione excretion, and iv) segmental bile duct obstruction. This model may be valuable to investigate the mechanisms of xenobiotic-induced chronic cholangiopathies and its sequels including biliary fibrosis. PMID:17600122

  4. Naringin Protects Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Guihua, Xiong; Shuyin, Liu; Jinliang, Gao; Wang, Shumin

    2016-04-01

    Many plant species containing flavonoids have been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. Naringin, a well-known flavanone glycoside of citrus fruits, possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-ulcer, anti-osteoporosis, and anti-carcinogenic properties. The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-asthmatic effects of naringin and the possible mechanisms. Asthma model was established by ovalbumin. A total of 50 mice were randomly assigned to five experimental groups: control, model, and dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, orally) and naringin (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, orally). Airway resistance (Raw) were measured, histological studies were evaluated by the hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, OVA-specific serum and BALF IgE levels and Th1/Th2 cytokines were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Th1/Th2 cells was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). T-bet and GABA3 in the lung were evaluated by Western blot. Our study demonstrated that naringin inhibited OVA-induced increases in Raw and eosinophil count; OVA-induced effects on interleukin (IL)-4 and INF-gamma levels were blunted with naringin administration. Histological studies demonstrated that naringin substantially inhibited OVA-induced eosinophilia in lung tissue and airway tissue. Flow cytometry studies demonstrated that naringin substantially inhibited Th2 cells and enhanced Th1 cells. Naringin substantially inhibited GABA3 and increased T-bet. These findings suggest that naringin may effectively ameliorate the progression of asthma and could be used as a therapy for patients with allergic asthma. PMID:26920847

  5. Topically applied ZnO nanoparticles suppress allergen induced skin inflammation but induce vigorous IgE production in the atopic dermatitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO are used in sunscreens as they improve their optical properties against the UV-light that causes dermal damage and skin cancer. However, the hazardous properties of the particles used as UV-filters in the sunscreens and applied to the skin have remained uncharacterized. Methods Here we investigated whether different sized ZnO particles would be able to penetrate injured skin and injured allergic skin in the mouse atopic dermatitis model after repeated topical application of ZnO particles. Nano-sized ZnO (nZnO) and bulk-sized ZnO (bZnO) were applied to mechanically damaged mouse skin with or without allergen/superantigen sensitization. Allergen/superantigen sensitization evokes local inflammation and allergy in the skin and is used as a disease model of atopic dermatitis (AD). Results Our results demonstrate that only nZnO is able to reach into the deep layers of the allergic skin whereas bZnO stays in the upper layers of both damaged and allergic skin. In addition, both types of particles diminish the local skin inflammation induced in the mouse model of AD; however, nZnO has a higher potential to suppress the local effects. In addition, especially nZnO induces systemic production of IgE antibodies, evidence of allergy promoting adjuvant properties for topically applied nZnO. Conclusions These results provide new hazard characterization data about the metal oxide nanoparticles commonly used in cosmetic products and provide new insights into the dermal exposure and hazard assessment of these materials in injured skin. PMID:25123235

  6. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILLA IN A MOUSE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a low molecular weight chemical known to cause occupational asthma. The present study was designed to determine if TMA could elicit eosinophil infiltration into the lung of a sensitized mouse similarly to previous studies with the protein allergen ...

  7. DSS colitis promotes tumorigenesis and fibrogenesis in a choline-deficient high-fat diet-induced NASH mouse model.

    PubMed

    Achiwa, Koichi; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Katano, Yoshiaki; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-29

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients progress to liver cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several lines of evidence indicate that accumulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and disruption of gut microbiota play contributory roles in HCC. Moreover, in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model in mice, a high-fat diet increases portal LPS level and promotes hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. However, this diet-induced NASH model requires at least 50 weeks for carcinogenesis. In this study, we sought to determine whether increased intestinal permeability would aggravate liver inflammation and fibrosis and accelerate tumorigenesis in a diet-induced NASH model. Mice were fed a choline-deficient high-fat (CDHF) diet for 4 or 12 weeks. The DSS group was fed CDHF and intermittently received 1% DSS in the drinking water. Exposure to DSS promoted mucosal changes such as crypt loss and increased the number of inflammatory cells in the colon. In the DSS group, portal LPS levels were elevated at 4 weeks, and the proportions of Clostridium cluster XI in the fecal microbiota were elevated. In addition, levels of serum transaminase, number of lobular inflammatory cells, F4/80 staining-positive area, and levels of inflammatory cytokines were all elevated in the DSS group. Liver histology in the DSS group revealed severe fibrosis at 12 weeks. Liver tumors were detected in the DSS group at 12 weeks, but not in the other groups. Thus, DSS administration promoted liver tumors in a CDHF diet-induced NASH mouse over the short term, suggesting that the induction of intestinal inflammation and gut disruption of microbiota in NASH promote hepatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26682925

  8. Baicalein induces CD4+Foxp3+ T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  9. Baicalein induces CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  10. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion.

    PubMed

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  11. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  12. Deregulation of arginase induces bone complications in high-fat/high-sucrose diet diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Anil; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Toque, Haroldo A; Cain, Michael; Wong, Abby; Howie, Nicole; Shinde, Rahul; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yao, Lin; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monty; Caldwell, Ruth B; Isales, Carlos; Caldwell, R William; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-02-15

    A balanced diet is crucial for healthy development and prevention of musculoskeletal related diseases. Diets high in fat content are known to cause obesity, diabetes and a number of other disease states. Our group and others have previously reported that activity of the urea cycle enzyme arginase is involved in diabetes-induced dysregulation of vascular function due to decreases in nitric oxide formation. We hypothesized that diabetes may also elevate arginase activity in bone and bone marrow, which could lead to bone-related complications. To test this we determined the effects of diabetes on expression and activity of arginase, in bone and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). We demonstrated that arginase 1 is abundantly present in the bone and BMSCs. We also demonstrated that arginase activity and expression in bone and bone marrow is up-regulated in models of diabetes induced by HFHS diet and streptozotocin (STZ). HFHS diet down-regulated expression of healthy bone metabolism markers (BMP2, COL-1, ALP, and RUNX2) and reduced bone mineral density, bone volume and trabecular thickness. However, treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH) prevented these bone-related complications of diabetes. In-vitro study of BMSCs showed that high glucose treatment increased arginase activity and decreased nitric oxide production. These effects were reversed by treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH). Our study provides evidence that deregulation of l-arginine metabolism plays a vital role in HFHS diet-induced diabetic complications and that these complications can be prevented by treatment with arginase inhibitors. The modulation of l-arginine metabolism in disease could offer a novel therapeutic approach for osteoporosis and other musculoskeletal related diseases. PMID:26704078

  13. Suppressive effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin on activated dendritic cells in an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jingxia; Zhang, Lu; Di, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Lin, Yan; Zeng, Zuping; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin, a main component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, on activated dendritic cells (DCs) in a psoriasis mouse model. Methods: BALB/c mice were used to establish the animal model for psoriasis-like skin lesion; alkannin at 10 mg/kg (high), 5 mg/kg (medium), 2.5 mg/kg (low), respectively, were intragastrically administered. Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) was used to evaluate the skin lesions. Histological changes, the thickness of epidermis, and the quantity of interleukin (IL)-23 in skin lesion were measured. In in vitro experiments, mononuclear cells in peripheral blood from healthy people were isolated, and monocytes were obtained. DCs with a mature state in differentiation and function were obtained through in vitro induction with several cytokines, and identified by flow cytometry. The influence of DCs on proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes was analyzed. The influence of alkannin on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression of pro-inflammatory factors by mature DCs was evaluated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Mice treated with alkannin at varying concentration showed obvious remission in psoriasis-like skin lesion compared to control group, with decreased PASI score, obviously reduced vertical thickness of epidermis. Besides, alkannin treatment decreased the expression of IL-23 in skin lesion. Alkannin (12.5 μg/mL) suppressed the ability of DCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes, and suppressed the expression and secretion of IL-6, IL-12 p40, IL-23, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA and proteins, respectively. Conclusions: β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin could suppress the function of activated DCs in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. PMID:26261548

  14. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  15. Apoptosis and cell proliferation in the mouse model of embryonic death induced by Tritrichomonas foetus infection.

    PubMed

    Woudwyk, Mariana A; Zanuzzi, Carolina N; Nishida, Fabián; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Soto, Pedro; Monteavaro, Cristina E; Barbeito, Claudio G

    2015-09-01

    Bovine tritrichomonosis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the protozoon Tritrichomonas foetus and characterised by embryonic-death and abortion. During pregnancy, the processes of cell proliferation and death play a crucial role for blastocyst implantation and the subsequent maintenance of early pregnancy, and their misbalance may lead to the abortion. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether cell proliferation and death may be altered during tritrichomonosis. For this purpose, we used pregnant BALB/c mice as an alternative experimental animal model that has successfully reproduced the infection. We analysed the immunohistochemical expression of active caspase-3 and proliferating cell nuclear (PCNA) antigens in the endometrium of infected mice. We found an increase in the number of caspase-3 positive cells in infected mice that were not pregnant at the necropsy. Besides, the number of positive proliferating cells increased in the uterine luminal epithelium of infected animals killed at 5-7 days post coitum (dpc). Pregnant infected mice killed at 8-11 dpc showed higher proliferation than control animals. We suggest that the cytopathic effect induced by T. foetus in the uteri of infected mice may induce the apoptosis of the epithelial cells and, as a result, promote a compensatory proliferative response. The information described here will be helpful to further study the pathogenesis of the bovine tritrichomonosis. PMID:26028409

  16. Photoacoustic microscopy of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Assessments of vascularity are important when assessing inflammation changes in tendon injuries since Achilles tendinitis is often accompanied with neovascularization or hypervascularity. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging in noninvasive monitoring of morphological and vascular changes in Achilles tendon injuries. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis model of mice was adopted here. During collagenase-induced tendinitis, a 25-MHz photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to image micro-vascular changes in Achilles tendons longitudinally up to 23 days. The positions of vessels imaged by PAM were identified by co-registration of PAM Bmode images with 25-MHz ultrasound (USM) ones. Morphological changes in Achilles tendons due to inflammation and edema were revealed by the PAM and USM images. Proliferation of new blood vessels within the tendons was also observed. Observed micro-vascular changes during tendinitis were similar to the findings in the literatures. This study demonstrates that photoacoustic imaging, owning required sensitivity and penetration, has the potential for high sensitive diagnosis and assessment of treatment performance in tendinopathy.

  17. Thiamine deficiency induces oxidative stress and exacerbates the plaque pathology in Alzheimer’s mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Xu, Hui; Shi, Qingli; Chen, Lian H.; Pedrini, Steve; Pechman, David; Baker, Harriet; Beal, M. Flint; Gandy, Sam E.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and reductions in thiamine-dependent enzymes have been implicated in multiple neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental thiamine deficiency (TD) is an established model for reducing the activities of thiamine-dependent enzymes in brain. TD diminishes thiamine dependent enzymes throughout the brain, but produces a time-dependent selective neuronal loss, glial activation, inflammation, abnormalities in oxidative metabolism and clusters of degenerating neurites in only specific thalamic regions. The present studies tested how TD alters brain pathology in Tg19959 transgenic mice over expressing a double mutant form of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). TD exacerbated amyloid plaque pathology in transgenic mice and enlarged the area occupied by plaques in cortex, hippocampus and thalamus by 50%, 200% and 200%, respectively. TD increased Aβ1–42 levels by about three-fold, β-CTF (C99) levels by 33% and β-secretase (BACE1) protein levels by 43%. TD induced inflammation in areas of plaque formation. Thus, the induction of mild impairment of oxidative metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by TD alters metabolism of APP and/or Aβ and promotes accumulation of plaques independent of neuron loss or neuritic clusters. PMID:18406011

  18. Contribution and Mobilization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Xue; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Shanshan; Zong, Chen; Jiang, Jinghua; Sun, Kai; Li, Rong; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Dong; Shi, Yufang; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is associated with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In this study, we aimed to determine what role MSCs play in the process and how they mobilize from bone marrow (BM). We employed a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis. Frozen section was used to detect MSCs recruited to mice and human fibrotic liver. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was detected to assess liver function. It was found that MSCs of both exogenous and endogenous origin could aggravate liver fibrosis and attenuate liver damage as indicated by lower serum ALT and AST levels. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α)/ CXCR4 was the most important chemotactic axis regulating MSCs migration from BM to fibrotic liver. Frozen section results showed that the migration did not start from the beginning of liver injury but occurred when the expression balance of SDF-1α between liver and BM was disrupted, where SDF-1α expression in liver was higher than that in BM. Our findings provide further evidence to show the role of BM-MSCs in liver fibrosis and to elucidate the mechanism underlying MSCs mobilization in our early liver fibrosis mice model induced by CCl4. PMID:26643997

  19. Transplantation of human induced cerebellar granular-like cells improves motor functions in a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tongming; Tang, Hailiang; Shen, Yiwen; Tang, Qisheng; Chen, Luping; Wang, Zhifu; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based reparative approaches have been applied to cerebellum-related disorders during the last two decades. Direct lineage reprogramming of human fibroblasts into functional granular neurons holds great promise for biomedical applications such as cerebellum regeneration and cellbased disease modeling. In the present study, we showed that a combination of Ascl1, Sox2 and OCT4, in a culture subsequently treated with secreted factors (BMP4, Wnt3a and FGF8b), was capable of converting human fibroblasts from the scalp tissue of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) into functional human induced cerebellar granular-like cells (hiCGCs). Morphological analysis, immunocytochemistry, gene expression and electrophysiological analysis were performed to identify the similarity of induced neuronal cells to human cerebellum granular cells. Our strategy improved the efficiency for hiCGCs induction, which gave the highest conversion efficiency 12.30±0.88%, and Ath1+/Tuj1+ double positive cells to 5.56±0.80%. We transplanted hiCGCs into the cerebellum of NmycTRE/TRE: tTS mice, a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia, and demonstrated that the hiCGCs were able to survive, migrate, proliferate and promote mild functional recovery after been grafted into cerebellum. PMID:27158363

  20. Establishment of a mouse model for amiodarone-induced liver injury and analyses of its hepatotoxic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shohei; Oda, Shingo; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent cause of post-marketing warnings and withdrawals. Amiodarone (AMD), an antiarrhythmic, presents a risk of liver injury in humans, and its metabolites, formed by cytochrome P450 3A4, are likely more toxic to hepatocytes than AMD is. However, it remains to be clarified whether the metabolic activation of AMD is involved in liver injury in vivo. In this study, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of AMD-induced liver injury, mice were administered AMD [1000 mg kg(-1), per os (p.o.)] after pretreatment with dexamethasone [DEX, 60 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneal (i.p.)], which induces P450 expression, once daily for 3 days. The plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were significantly increased by AMD administration in the DEX-pretreated mice, and the liver concentrations of desethylamiodarone (DEA), a major metabolite of AMD, were correlated with the changes in the plasma ALT levels. Cytochrome c release into the hepatic cytosol and triglyceride levels in the plasma were increased in DEX plus AMD-administered mice. Furthermore, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione disulfide in the liver significantly decreased in the DEX plus AMD-administered mice. The increase of ALT levels was suppressed by treatment with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3 ), which is an inhibitor of Kupffer cell function. From these results, it is suggested that AMD and/or DEA contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD-induced liver injury by producing mitochondrial and oxidative stress and Kupffer cell activation. This study proposes the mechanisms of AMD-induced liver injury using an in vivo mouse model. PMID:25900201

  1. Blood glucose lowering activity of aloe based composition, UP780, in alloxan induced insulin dependent mouse diabetes model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are a few nutritional approaches to address the increased needs of managing diabetic conditions. Previously it has been reported that UP780, a standardized composition of aloe chromone formulated with an aloe polysaccharide, has a significant impact in reducing HbA1C, fasting blood glucose, fructosamine and plasma insulin level in humans and improved impaired glucose and insulin resistance in high-fat diet-induced and db/db non-insulin dependent diabetic mouse models. Here we describe activity of UP780 and its constituents to improve insulin sensitivity in alloxan induced insulin dependent diabetic mouse model. Materials and method Insulin dependent diabetes was induced by administering a single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan monohydrate at a dose of 150 mg/kg to CD-1 mice. Aloesin (UP394) was formulated with an Aloe vera inner leaf gel powder polysaccharide (Qmatrix) to yield a composition designated UP780. Efficacy of oral administration of UP780 at 2000 mg/kg and its constituents (aloesin at 80 mg/kg and Qmatrix at 1920 mg/kg) were evaluated in this model. Glyburide, a sulfonylurea drug used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, was used at 5 mg/kg as a positive control. Effect of UP780 on non-diabetic normal mice was also addressed. Results Mice administered intraperitoneal alloxan monohydrate developed progressive type-1 diabetes like symptom. After 4 weeks of daily oral administration, reductions of 35.9%, 17.2% and 11.6% in fasting blood glucose levels were observed for UP780, the UP780 Aloe vera inner leaf gel polysaccharide preparation without chromone (Qmatrix), and Aloesin (UP394), treated animals respectively, compared to vehicle treated animals. UP780 has no impact on blood glucose level of non-diabetic healthy mice. UP780 showed statistically significant improvement for blood glucose clearance in oral glucose tolerance tests. Similarly, enhanced improvement in plasma insulin level and statistically significant reduction in

  2. An inducible mouse model for microvillus inclusion disease reveals a role for myosin Vb in apical and basolateral trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Kerstin; Vogel, Georg F.; Teunissen, Hans; van Ommen, Domenique D.; Begthel, Harry; El Bouazzaoui, Layla; van Vugt, Anke H. M.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Klumperman, Judith; Müller, Thomas; Janecke, Andreas; Gerner, Patrick; Huber, Lukas A.; Hess, Michael W.; Clevers, Hans; van Es, Johan H.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Middendorp, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a rare intestinal enteropathy with an onset within a few days to months after birth, resulting in persistent watery diarrhea. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene (MYO5B) have been identified in the majority of MVID patients. However, the exact pathophysiology of MVID still remains unclear. To address the specific role of MYO5B in the intestine, we generated an intestine-specific conditional Myo5b-deficient (Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2) mouse model. We analyzed intestinal tissues and cultured organoids of Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 mice by electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 mice developed severe diarrhea within 4 d after tamoxifen induction. Periodic Acid Schiff and alkaline phosphatase staining revealed subapical accumulation of intracellular vesicles in villus enterocytes. Analysis by electron microscopy confirmed an almost complete absence of apical microvilli, the appearance of microvillus inclusions, and enlarged intercellular spaces in induced Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 intestines. In addition, we determined that MYO5B is involved not only in apical but also basolateral trafficking of proteins. The analysis of the intestine during the early onset of the disease revealed that subapical accumulation of secretory granules precedes occurrence of microvillus inclusions, indicating involvement of MYO5B in early differentiation of epithelial cells. By comparing our data with a novel MVID patient, we conclude that our mouse model completely recapitulates the intestinal phenotype of human MVID. This includes severe diarrhea, loss of microvilli, occurrence of microvillus inclusions, and subapical secretory granules. Thus, loss of MYO5B disturbs both apical and basolateral trafficking of proteins and causes MVID in mice. PMID:26392529

  3. YK-4-279 effectively antagonizes EWS-FLI1 induced leukemia in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Tahereh; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Schlederer, Michaela; Saygideğer-Kont, Yasemin; Çelik, Haydar; Mueller, Kristina M.; Temel, Idil; Özdemirli, Metin; Kovar, Heinrich; Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Kenner, Lukas; Moriggl, Richard; Üren, Aykut

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive tumor of bone and soft tissue affecting predominantly children and young adults. Tumor-specific chromosomal translocations create EWS-FLI1 and similar aberrant ETS fusion proteins that drive sarcoma development in patients. ETS family fusion proteins and over-expressed ETS proteins are also found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Transgenic expression of EWS-FLI1 in mice promotes high penetrance erythroid leukemia with dense hepatic and splenic infiltrations. We identified a small molecule, YK-4-279, that directly binds to EWS-FLI1 and inhibits its oncogenic activity in Ewing sarcoma cell lines and xenograft mouse models. Herein, we tested in vivo therapeutic efficacy and potential side effects of YK-4-279 in the transgenic mouse model with EWS-FLI1 induced leukemia. A two-week course of treatment with YK-4-279 significantly reduced white blood cell count, nucleated erythroblasts in the peripheral blood, splenomegaly, and hepatomegaly of erythroleukemic mice. YK-4-279 inhibited EWS-FLI1 target gene expression in neoplastic cells. Treated animals showed significantly better overall survival compared to control mice that rapidly succumbed to leukemia. YK-4-279 treated mice did not show overt toxicity in liver, spleen, or bone marrow. In conclusion, this in vivo study highlights the efficacy of YK-4-279 to treat EWS-FLI1 expressing neoplasms and support its therapeutic potential for patients with Ewing sarcoma and other ETS-driven malignancies. PMID:26462019

  4. An inducible mouse model for microvillus inclusion disease reveals a role for myosin Vb in apical and basolateral trafficking.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Kerstin; Vogel, Georg F; Teunissen, Hans; van Ommen, Domenique D; Begthel, Harry; El Bouazzaoui, Layla; van Vugt, Anke H M; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Klumperman, Judith; Müller, Thomas; Janecke, Andreas; Gerner, Patrick; Huber, Lukas A; Hess, Michael W; Clevers, Hans; van Es, Johan H; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Middendorp, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a rare intestinal enteropathy with an onset within a few days to months after birth, resulting in persistent watery diarrhea. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene (MYO5B) have been identified in the majority of MVID patients. However, the exact pathophysiology of MVID still remains unclear. To address the specific role of MYO5B in the intestine, we generated an intestine-specific conditional Myo5b-deficient (Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2) mouse model. We analyzed intestinal tissues and cultured organoids of Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 mice by electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 mice developed severe diarrhea within 4 d after tamoxifen induction. Periodic Acid Schiff and alkaline phosphatase staining revealed subapical accumulation of intracellular vesicles in villus enterocytes. Analysis by electron microscopy confirmed an almost complete absence of apical microvilli, the appearance of microvillus inclusions, and enlarged intercellular spaces in induced Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 intestines. In addition, we determined that MYO5B is involved not only in apical but also basolateral trafficking of proteins. The analysis of the intestine during the early onset of the disease revealed that subapical accumulation of secretory granules precedes occurrence of microvillus inclusions, indicating involvement of MYO5B in early differentiation of epithelial cells. By comparing our data with a novel MVID patient, we conclude that our mouse model completely recapitulates the intestinal phenotype of human MVID. This includes severe diarrhea, loss of microvilli, occurrence of microvillus inclusions, and subapical secretory granules. Thus, loss of MYO5B disturbs both apical and basolateral trafficking of proteins and causes MVID in mice. PMID:26392529

  5. Effects of treadmill exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis in an MPTP /probenecid-induced Parkinson’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise on non-motor function, specifically long-term memory, in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-induced Parkinson’s disease mouse model. [Methods] A mouse model of Parkinson’s disease was developed by injecting 20 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 250 mg/kg of probenecid (P). We divided in into four groups: probenecid group, probenecid-exercise group, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group, and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group. Mice in the exercise groups ran on treadmill for 30 min/day, five times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] Latency in the passive avoidance test increased in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group compared with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. In addition, the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/NeuN-positive cells and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was higher in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group than that in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. These changes were associated with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that treadmill exercise may improve long-term memory in Parkinson’s disease mice by facilitating neurogenesis via increased expression of neurotrophic factors. PMID:26644675

  6. A Mouse Model of Blast-Induced mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Ten-Bosch, Meital; Zohar, Ofer; Harrison, Catherine R.; Tempel-Brami, Catherine; Stein, Elliot; Hoffer, Barry J.; Balaban, Carey D.; Schreiber, Shaul; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Pick, Chaim G.

    2011-01-01

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are one of the main causes for casualties among civilians and military personnel in the present war against terror. Mild traumatic brain injury from IEDs induces various degrees of cognitive, emotional and behavioral disturbances but knowledge of the exact brain pathophysiology following exposure to blast is poorly understood. The study was aimed at establishing a murine model for a mild BI-TBI that isolates low-level blast pressure effects to the brain without systemic injuries. An open-field explosives detonation was used to replicate, as closely as possible, low-level blast trauma in the battlefield or at a terror-attack site. No alterations in basic neurological assessment or brain gross pathology were found acutely in the blast-exposed mice. At 7 days post blast, cognitive and behavioral tests revealed significantly decreased performance at both 4 and 7 meters distance from the blast (5.5 and 2.5 PSI, respectively). At 30 days post-blast, clear differences were found in animals at both distances in the object recognition test, and in the 7 m group in the Y maze test. Using MRI, T1 weighted images showed an increased BBB permeability one month post-blast. DTI analysis showed an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) and a decrease in radial diffusivity. These changes correlated with sites of up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase 2 in neurons and CXC-motif chemokine receptor 3 around blood vessels in fiber tracts. These results may represent brain axonal and myelin abnormalities. Cellular and biochemical studies are underway in order to further correlate the blast-induced cognitive and behavioral changes and to identify possible underlying mechanisms that may help develop treatment- and neuroprotective modalities. PMID:21946269

  7. Vitamin A Inhibits Development of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis and Colon Cancer in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Okayasu, Isao; Hana, Kiyomi; Nemoto, Noriko; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Saegusa, Makoto; Yokota-Nakatsuma, Aya; Song, Si-Young; Iwata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential to mucosal immunity and cell differentiation. The fact that lack of it might involve chronic inflammation and increased risk of cancer has been reported. Little is known about the mechanism of vitamin A deficiency in the development of colitis and its influence on development of colorectal cancer. To determine the influence of vitamin A deficiency on colitis and colorectal cancer development, an experimental study using a colitis mouse model was performed. Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis was induced in vitamin A-deficient and vitamin A-supplemented mice. Further, colorectal carcinoma was induced by a combination of azoxymethane preinjection and DSS colitis. Results were compared between the two groups mainly by immunohistochemical analysis. Colitis was more severe and recovery from colitis was slower in vitamin A-deficient mice than in vitamin A-supplemented mice. Compared with vitamin A-supplemented mice, vitamin A-deficient mice had decreases in colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the ratio of mucosal IgA+/IgG+ cells, increases in CD11c+ dendritic cells, and a higher rate of development of colorectal carcinoma with colitis following azoxymethane. Vitamin A lipid droplets in subepithelial myofibroblasts were decreased in vitamin A-deficient mice, suggesting alterations in colonic crypt niche function. Thus, vitamin A inhibited colitis and the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:27298823

  8. Endothelin receptor antagonism prevents hypoxia-induced mortality and morbidity in a mouse model of sickle-cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabaa, Nathalie; de Franceschi, Lucia; Bonnin, Philippe; Castier, Yves; Malpeli, Giorgio; Debbabi, Haythem; Galaup, Ariane; Maier-Redelsperger, Micheline; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Scarpa, Aldo; Janin, Anne; Levy, Bernard; Girot, Robert; Beuzard, Yves; Leboeuf, Christophe; Henri, Annie; Germain, Stéphane; Dussaule, Jean-Claude; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2008-01-01

    Patients with sickle-cell disease (SCD) suffer from tissue damage and life-threatening complications caused by vasoocclusive crisis (VOC). Endothelin receptors (ETRs) are mediators of one of the most potent vasoconstrictor pathways in mammals, but the relationship between vasoconstriction and VOC is not well understood. We report here that pharmacological inhibition of ETRs prevented hypoxia-induced acute VOC and organ damage in a mouse model of SCD. An in vivo ultrasonographic study of renal hemodynamics showed a substantial increase in endothelin-mediated vascular resistance during hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced VOC. This increase was reversed by administration of the dual ETR antagonist (ETRA) bosentan, which had pleiotropic beneficial effects in vivo. It prevented renal and pulmonary microvascular congestion, systemic inflammation, dense rbc formation, and infiltration of activated neutrophils into tissues with subsequent nitrative stress. Bosentan also prevented death of sickle-cell mice exposed to a severe hypoxic challenge. These findings in mice suggest that ETRA could be a potential new therapy for SCD, as it may prevent acute VOC and limit organ damage in sickle-cell patients. PMID:18382768

  9. Vitamin A Inhibits Development of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis and Colon Cancer in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, Isao; Hana, Kiyomi; Nemoto, Noriko; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Saegusa, Makoto; Yokota-Nakatsuma, Aya; Song, Si-Young; Iwata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential to mucosal immunity and cell differentiation. The fact that lack of it might involve chronic inflammation and increased risk of cancer has been reported. Little is known about the mechanism of vitamin A deficiency in the development of colitis and its influence on development of colorectal cancer. To determine the influence of vitamin A deficiency on colitis and colorectal cancer development, an experimental study using a colitis mouse model was performed. Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis was induced in vitamin A-deficient and vitamin A-supplemented mice. Further, colorectal carcinoma was induced by a combination of azoxymethane preinjection and DSS colitis. Results were compared between the two groups mainly by immunohistochemical analysis. Colitis was more severe and recovery from colitis was slower in vitamin A-deficient mice than in vitamin A-supplemented mice. Compared with vitamin A-supplemented mice, vitamin A-deficient mice had decreases in colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the ratio of mucosal IgA(+)/IgG(+) cells, increases in CD11c(+) dendritic cells, and a higher rate of development of colorectal carcinoma with colitis following azoxymethane. Vitamin A lipid droplets in subepithelial myofibroblasts were decreased in vitamin A-deficient mice, suggesting alterations in colonic crypt niche function. Thus, vitamin A inhibited colitis and the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:27298823

  10. Suppression of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammatory responses in a mouse model of asthma by Mimosa pudica extract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji-Sook; Yun, Chi-Young; Ryang, Yong Suk; Kim, Jong-Bae; Kim, In Sik

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory airway disease. The pathogenic mechanisms of asthma include the infiltration of leukocytes and release of cytokines. Mimosa pudica (Mp) has been used traditionally for the treatment of insomnia, diarrhea and inflammatory diseases. Although Mp extract has various therapeutic properties, the effect of this extract on asthma has not yet been reported. This study investigated the suppressive effects of Mp extract on asthmatic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Mp extract was acquired from dried and powdered whole plants of M. pudica using 80% ethanol. BALB/c mice were used for the mouse model of asthma induced by ovalbumin. Mp extract significantly inhibited the HMC-1 cell migration induced by stem cell factor and blocked the release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in EoL-1 cells. Leukocytosis, eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion in asthmatic lung were significantly suppressed by Mp extract. The release of ovalbumin-specific IgE in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum was also decreased. Mp extract treatment resulted in no liver cytotoxicity. The Mp extract has inhibitory properties on asthma and may be used as a potent therapeutic agent for allergic lung inflammation. PMID:20623591

  11. Osmanthus fragrans Flower Extract and Acteoside Protect Against d-Galactose-Induced Aging in an ICR Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lina; Mao, Shuqin; Lu, Baiyi; Yang, Jiajia; Zhou, Fei; Hu, Yinzhou; Jiang, Yirong; Shen, Canxi; Zhao, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    Osmanthus fragrans flower extract (OFE) is an organic extract from O. fragrans flower, which exhibits neuroprotective, free radical scavenging, and antioxidant effects. Therefore, the protective effect of OFE and acteoside against aging was studied. An aging ICR mouse model was established by chronically administering d-galactose (250 mg/kg) for 8 weeks. d-galactose induced spatial learning and memory impairments that were successfully inhibited by OFE and acteoside, which could shorten escape latency, improve platform crossing times, and increase zone time. The antioxidant potential of OFE and acteoside in vivo was evaluated by estimating the following: activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase and aging-related enzyme, particularly monoamine oxidase; contents of lipid peroxidation methane dicarboxylic aldehyde, advanced glycation end products, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a DNA damage product); and levels of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2. OFE and acteoside also inhibited d-galactose-induced neurological aging by suppressing the increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurotrophin-3. Considering the dose-dependent protective effects of OFE and acteoside, we concluded that OFE, rich in acteoside, was a good source of natural antiaging compounds. PMID:26181905

  12. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients. PMID:26922998

  13. IL-12-based vaccination therapy reverses liver-induced systemic tolerance in a mouse model of hepatitis B virus carrier.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhutian; Kong, Xiaohui; Li, Fenglei; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    Liver-induced systemic immune tolerance that occurs during chronic hepadnavirus infection is the biggest obstacle for effective viral clearance. Immunotherapeutic reversal of this tolerance is a promising strategy in the clinic but remains to be explored. In this study, using a hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, we report that IL-12-based vaccination therapy can efficiently reverse systemic tolerance toward HBV. HBV-carrier mice lost responsiveness to hepatitis B surface Ag (HBsAg) vaccination, and IL-12 alone could not reverse this liver-induced immune tolerance. However, after IL-12-based vaccination therapy, the majority of treated mice became HBsAg(-) in serum; hepatitis B core Ag was also undetectable in hepatocytes. HBV clearance was dependent on HBsAg vaccine-induced anti-HBV immunity. Further results showed that IL-12-based vaccination therapy strongly enhanced hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, including proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were also restored in HBV-carrier mice, leading to the arousal of HBsAg-specific follicular Th-germinal center B cell responses and anti-hepatitis B surface Ag Ab production. Recovery of HBsAg-specific responses also correlated with both reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell frequency and an enhanced capacity of effector T cells to overcome inhibition by regulatory T cells. In conclusion, IL-12-based vaccination therapy may reverse liver-induced immune tolerance toward HBV by restoring systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, eliciting robust hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, and facilitating the generation of HBsAg-specific humoral immunity; thus, this therapy may become a viable approach to treating patients with chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24048897

  14. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals increased DOI-induced brain activity in a mouse model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Natalia V; Gallagher, Joseph J; Yu, Collin Z; Jacobs, Russell E; Patterson, Paul H

    2014-06-17

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for schizophrenia in offspring. In rodent models, maternal immune activation (MIA) yields offspring with schizophrenia-like behaviors. None of these behaviors are, however, specific to schizophrenia. The presence of hallucinations is a key diagnostic symptom of schizophrenia. In mice, this symptom can be defined as brain activation in the absence of external stimuli, which can be mimicked by administration of hallucinogens. We find that, compared with controls, adult MIA offspring display an increased stereotypical behavioral response to the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), an agonist for serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT2AR). This may be explained by increased levels of 5-HT2AR and downstream signaling molecules in unstimulated MIA prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify neuronal activation elicited by DOI administration, we find that, compared with controls, MIA offspring exhibit a greater manganese (Mn(2+)) accumulation in several brain areas, including the PFC, thalamus, and striatum. The parafascicular thalamic nucleus, which plays the role in the pathogenesis of hallucinations, is activated by DOI in MIA offspring only. Additionally, compared with controls, MIA offspring demonstrate higher DOI-induced expression of early growth response protein 1, cyclooxygenase-2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the PFC. Chronic treatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin reduces DOI-induced head twitching in MIA offspring. Thus, the MIA mouse model can be successfully used to investigate activity induced by DOI in awake, behaving mice. Moreover, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is a useful, noninvasive method for accurately measuring this type of activity. PMID:24889602

  15. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals increased DOI-induced brain activity in a mouse model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malkova, Natalia V.; Gallagher, Joseph J.; Yu, Collin Z.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for schizophrenia in offspring. In rodent models, maternal immune activation (MIA) yields offspring with schizophrenia-like behaviors. None of these behaviors are, however, specific to schizophrenia. The presence of hallucinations is a key diagnostic symptom of schizophrenia. In mice, this symptom can be defined as brain activation in the absence of external stimuli, which can be mimicked by administration of hallucinogens. We find that, compared with controls, adult MIA offspring display an increased stereotypical behavioral response to the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), an agonist for serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT2AR). This may be explained by increased levels of 5-HT2AR and downstream signaling molecules in unstimulated MIA prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify neuronal activation elicited by DOI administration, we find that, compared with controls, MIA offspring exhibit a greater manganese (Mn2+) accumulation in several brain areas, including the PFC, thalamus, and striatum. The parafascicular thalamic nucleus, which plays the role in the pathogenesis of hallucinations, is activated by DOI in MIA offspring only. Additionally, compared with controls, MIA offspring demonstrate higher DOI-induced expression of early growth response protein 1, cyclooxygenase-2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the PFC. Chronic treatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin reduces DOI-induced head twitching in MIA offspring. Thus, the MIA mouse model can be successfully used to investigate activity induced by DOI in awake, behaving mice. Moreover, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is a useful, noninvasive method for accurately measuring this type of activity. PMID:24889602

  16. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-01-01

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe. PMID:26167713

  17. Glove-derived foreign proteins induce allergen-specific IgE in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Busch, Marion; Schröder, Claudia; Baron, Jens-Malte; Ott, Hagen; Bruckner, Thomas; Diepgen, Thomas L; Mahler, Vera

    2008-04-01

    Currently, most medical gloves are produced with a low content of natural rubber latex (NRL) protein. However, they may be substituted by proteins of foreign origin to maintain specific properties of the material. The aim of this study was to investigate the allergenicity and immunogenicity of unexpected proteins (i.e., soy and casein) compared with NRL proteins in a murine model in BALB/c mice. All respective allergen sources (extracts from three brands of NRL gloves, soy, and casein) were able to induce significant allergen-specific IgE and IgG(1) responses. On average, the highest IgE induction occurred after immunization with NRL, followed by soy and casein. Certain individuals from each treatment group exhibited levels of specific IgE as high as due to NRL. To analyze further specific IgE responses on a single allergen level, we established a microarray based on recombinant allergens for allergen-specific murine IgE detection. Besides specific IgE against rHev b 3, -6, -7, -8, and -11, specific IgE against kappa-casein could be detected in mice immunized with NRL glove extract, indicating a sensitization potential of the contained foreign protein. The substitution of genuine latex proteins by proteins of foreign origin may lead to a shift and de novo increase in sensitization to the finished products. PMID:18049454

  18. Neuroprotective role of Withania somnifera root extract in maneb-paraquat induced mouse model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jay; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Chouhan, Shikha; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and these days a lot of emphasis is given on the treatment of this disease using herbal medicines. The present study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of Withania somnifera (Ws) root extract on Parkinsonian mice. The mice were divided into three groups; the first group served as control, the second group was given maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) and the last group was administered MB-PQ along with Ws root extract for 3, 6 and 9 weeks. The behavioral studies showed a significant improvement in the motor movement patterns and gripping ability of Ws root extract exposed Parkinsonian mice. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining was reduced in the substantia nigra of MB-PQ exposed mice, while Ws co-exposure restored TH immunostaining significantly. Additionally, our results also demonstrate generation of oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal region of MB-PQ exposed mice. There was a marked decline in the level of catalase and a simultaneous increase in the level of nitrite and lipid peroxidation in Parkinsonian mice. Thus, the Ws root extract have shown to counteract the pro-oxidants and their associated oxidative stress in the PD model studied here. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of Ws root extract in providing protection against MB-PQ induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and marked improvement in the behavioral, anatomical and the biochemical deformities. PMID:23430469

  19. Early stages of Ascaris suum induce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Enobe, C S; Araújo, C A; Perini, A; Martins, M A; Macedo, M S; Macedo-Soares, M F

    2006-09-01

    The inflammatory and functional changes that occur in murine lung after infection with 2500 infective Ascaris suum eggs were studied in this work. A sequential influx of neutrophils, mononuclear cells and eosinophils occurred into airways concomitantly with migration of larvae from liver to the lungs. Histological analysis of the lung showed a severe intra-alveolar haemorrhage at the peak of larval migration (day 8) and the most intense inflammatory cell infiltrate on day 14. Ascaris L3 were found in alveolar spaces and inside bronchioles on day 8. The number of eosinophils was elevated in the blood on days 8 and 14. The peak of eosinophil influx into the lung was at day 14, as indicated by the high levels of eosinophil peroxidase activity, followed by their migration into the airways. The antibody response against egg and larval antigens consisted mainly of IgG1 and IgM, and also of IgE and anaphylactic IgG1, that cross-reacted with adult worm antigens. Total IgE levels were substantially elevated during the infection. Measurement of lung mechanical parameters showed airway hyperreactivity in infected mice. In conclusion, the murine model of A. suum infection mimics the Th2-induced parameters observed in pigs and humans and can be used to analyse the immunoregulatory properties of this helminth. PMID:16916369

  20. SIX1 induces lymphangiogenesis and metastasis via upregulation of VEGF-C in mouse models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu-An; Jedlicka, Paul; Patrick, Aaron N.; Micalizzi, Douglas S.; Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Deitsch, Erin; Casás-Selves, Matias; Harrell, J. Chuck; Ford, Heide L.

    2012-01-01

    An association between lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer was observed decades ago. However, the mechanisms by which tumor cells infiltrate the lymphatic system are not completely understood. Recently, it has been proposed that the lymphatic system has an active role in metastatic dissemination and that tumor-secreted growth factors stimulate lymphangiogenesis. We therefore investigated whether SIX1, a homeodomain-containing transcription factor previously associated in breast cancer with lymph node positivity, was involved in lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. In a model in which human breast cancer cells were injected into immune-compromised mice, we found that SIX1 expression promoted peritumoral and intratumoral lymphangiogenesis, lymphatic invasion, and distant metastasis of breast cancer cells. SIX1 induced transcription of the prolymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C, and this was required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. Using a mouse mammary carcinoma model, we found that VEGF-C was not sufficient to mediate all the metastatic effects of SIX1, indicating that SIX1 acts through additional, VEGF-C–independent pathways. Finally, we verified the clinical significance of this prometastatic SIX1/VEGF-C axis by demonstrating coexpression of SIX1 and VEGF-C in human breast cancer. These data define a critical role for SIX1 in lymphatic dissemination of breast cancer cells, providing a direct mechanistic explanation for how VEGF-C expression is upregulated in breast cancer, resulting in lymphangiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:22466647

  1. Heterozygosity for Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α decreases the incidence of thymic lymphomas in a p53 mutant mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bertout, Jessica A.; Patel, Shetal A.; Fryer, Benjamin H.; Durham, Amy C.; Covello, Kelly L.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Goldschmidt, Michael H.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) are critical mediators of the cellular response to decreased oxygen tension and are overexpressed in a number of tumors. While HIF1α and HIF2α share a high degree of sequence homology, recent work has shown that the two α subunits can have contrasting and tissue-specific effects on tumor growth. To directly compare the role of each HIFα subunit in spontaneous tumorigenesis, we bred a mouse model of expanded HIF2α expression and Hif1α+/− mice to homozygotes for the R270H mutation in p53. Here we report that p53R270H/R270H mice, which have not been previously described, develop a unique tumor spectrum relative to p53R270H/− mice, including a high incidence of thymic lymphomas. Heterozygosity for Hif1α significantly reduced the incidence of thymic lymphomas observed in this model. Moreover, reduced Hif1α levels correlated with decreased stabilization of activated Notch1 and expression of the Notch target genes, Dtx1 and Nrarp. These observations uncover a novel role for HIF1α in Notch pathway activation during T-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:19293180

  2. Neuroprotective Effect of a DJ-1 Based Peptide in a Toxin Induced Mouse Model of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Glat, Micaela Johanna; Ben-Zur, Tali; Barhum, Yael; Offen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and dysautonomia, in various combinations. In MSA with parkinsonism (MSA-P), the degeneration is mainly restricted to the substantia nigra pars compacta and putamen. Studies have identified alterations in DJ-1 (PARK7), a key component of the anti-oxidative stress response, in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and MSA patients. Previously we have shown that a short DJ-1-based peptide named ND-13, protected cultured cells against neurotoxic insults and improved behavioral outcome in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this study, we used the 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced mouse model of MSA and treated the animals with ND-13 in order to evaluate its therapeutic effects. Our results show that ND-13 protects cultured cells against oxidative stress generated by the mitochondrial inhibitor, 3-NP. Moreover, we show that ND-13 attenuates nigrostriatal degeneration and improves performance in motor-related behavioral tasks in 3-NP-treated mice. Our findings suggest a rationale for using ND-13 as a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of MSA. PMID:26901405

  3. Demonstration of feasibility of in vivo gene therapy for Gaucher disease using a chemically induced mouse model.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John; McEachern, Kerry Anne; Kyros, Julie A Cavanagh; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Budzinski, Tracey; Ziegler, Robin J; Yew, Nelson S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Scaria, Abraham; van Rooijen, Nico; Barranger, John A; Cheng, Seng H

    2002-08-01

    Progress towards developing gene therapy for Gaucher disease has been hindered by the lack of an animal model. Here we describe a mouse model of Gaucher disease which has a chemically induced deficiency of glucocerebrosidase and that accumulates elevated levels of glucosylceramide (GL-1) in the lysosomes of Kupffer cells. Administration of mannose-terminated glucocerebrosidase (Cerezyme) resulted in the reduction of GL-1 levels in the livers of these animals. Gene transduction of hepatocytes with a plasmid DNA vector encoding human glucocerebrosidase (pGZB-GC) generated high-level expression and secretion of the enzyme into systemic circulation with consequent normalization of Kupffer cell GL-1 levels. This suggested that the de novo synthesized and unmodified enzyme produced by hepatocyte transduction was also capable of being delivered to the cells that are primarily affected in Gaucher disease. Immunolocalization studies also revealed that preferential transduction and expression of human glucocerebrosidase in the Kupffer cells with subsequent reduction in the GL-1 levels could be attained with a low dose of a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the human enzyme (Ad2/CMV-GC). This observation raises the possibility of gene therapy for Gaucher disease that involves directly transducing the affected histiocytes using recombinant adenoviral vectors. Together, these data demonstrate the potential for use of in vivo gene therapy vectors for treating Gaucher disease. PMID:12161184

  4. Increased Muscle Stress-Sensitivity Induced by Selenoprotein N Inactivation in Mouse: A Mammalian Model for SEPN1-Related Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Sandrine; Lainé, Jeanne; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Beuvin, Maud; Dubourg, Odile; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Krol, Alain; Allamand, Valérie; Guicheney, Pascale; Ferreiro, Ana; Lescure, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and selenoprotein N (SelN) was the first selenium-containing protein shown to be directly involved in human inherited diseases. Mutations in the SEPN1 gene, encoding SelN, cause a group of muscular disorders characterized by predominant affection of axial muscles. SelN has been shown to participate in calcium and redox homeostasis, but its pathophysiological role in skeletal muscle remains largely unknown. To address SelN function in vivo, we generated a Sepn1-null mouse model by gene targeting. The Sepn1−/− mice had normal growth and lifespan, and were macroscopically indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. Only minor defects were observed in muscle morphology and contractile properties in SelN-deficient mice in basal conditions. However, when subjected to challenging physical exercise and stress conditions (forced swimming test), Sepn1−/− mice developed an obvious phenotype, characterized by limited motility and body rigidity during the swimming session, as well as a progressive curvature of the spine and predominant alteration of paravertebral muscles. This induced phenotype recapitulates the distribution of muscle involvement in patients with SEPN1-Related Myopathy, hence positioning this new animal model as a valuable tool to dissect the role of SelN in muscle function and to characterize the pathophysiological process. PMID:21858002

  5. Fat-water MRI of a diet-induced obesity mouse model at 15.2T.

    PubMed

    Ong, Henry H; Webb, Corey D; Gruen, Marnie L; Hasty, Alyssa H; Gore, John C; Welch, E Brian

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative fat-water MRI (FWMRI) methods provide valuable information about the distribution, volume, and composition of adipose tissue (AT). Ultra high field FWMRI of animal models may have the potential to provide insights into the progression of obesity and its comorbidities. Here, we present quantitative FWMRI with all known confounder corrections on a 15.2T preclinical scanner for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of an established diet-induced obesity mouse model. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on a low-fat (LFD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Three-dimensional (3-D) multiple gradient echo MRI at 15.2T was performed at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after diet onset. A 3-D fat-water separation algorithm and additional processing were used to generate proton-density fat fraction (PDFF), local magnetic field offset, and [Formula: see text] maps. We examined these parameters in perirenal AT ROIs from LFD and HFD mice. The data suggest that PDFF, local field offset, and [Formula: see text] have different time course behaviors between LFD and HFD mice over 16 weeks. This work suggests FWMRI at 15.2T may be a useful tool for longitudinal studies of adiposity due to the advantages of ultra high field although further investigation is needed to understand the observed time course behavior. PMID:27226976

  6. An inducible mouse model for skin cancer reveals distinct roles for gain- and loss-of-function p53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Caulin, Carlos; Nguyen, Thao; Lang, Gene A.; Goepfert, Thea M.; Brinkley, Bill R.; Cai, Wei-Wen; Lozano, Guillermina; Roop, Dennis R.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in ras and p53 are the most prevalent mutations found in human nonmelanoma skin cancers. Although some p53 mutations cause a loss of function, most result in expression of altered forms of p53, which may exhibit gain-of-function properties. Therefore, understanding the consequences of acquiring p53 gain-of-function versus loss-of-function mutations is critical for the generation of effective therapies for tumors harboring p53 mutations. Here we describe an inducible mouse model in which skin tumor formation is initiated by activation of an endogenous K-rasG12D allele. Using this model we compared the consequences of activating the p53 gain-of-function mutation p53R172H and of deleting the p53 gene. Activation of the p53R172H allele resulted in increased skin tumor formation, accelerated tumor progression, and induction of metastasis compared with deletion of p53. Consistent with these observations, the p53R172H tumors exhibited aneuploidy associated with centrosome amplification, which may underlie the mechanism by which p53R172H exerts its oncogenic properties. These results clearly demonstrate that p53 gain-of-function mutations confer poorer prognosis than loss of p53 during skin carcinogenesis and have important implications for the future design of therapies for tumors that exhibit p53 gain-of-function mutations. PMID:17607363

  7. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor via upregulation of von Hippel-Lindau protein induces “angiogenic switch off” in a hepatoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Hideki; Nakamura, Toru; Koga, Hironori; Izaguirre-Carbonell, Jesus; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Iwabata, Kazuki; Ikezono, Yu; Sakaue, Takahiko; Masuda, Atsutaka; Yano, Hirohisa; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakano, Masahito; Shimose, Shigeo; Shirono, Tomotake; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    “Angiogenic switch off” is one of the ideal therapeutic concepts in the treatment of cancer. However, the specific molecules which can induce “angiogenic switch off” in tumor have not been identified yet. In this study, we focused on von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the effects of sulfoquinovosyl-acylpropanediol (SQAP), a novel synthetic sulfoglycolipid, for HCC. We examined mutation ratio of VHL gene in HCC using 30 HCC samples and we treated the HCC-implanted mice with SQAP. Thirty clinical samples showed no VHL genetic mutation in HCC. SQAP significantly inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis in a hepatoma mouse model. SQAP induced tumor “angiogenic switch off” by decreasing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, 2α protein via pVHL upregulation. pVHL upregulation decreased HIFα protein levels through different multiple mechanisms: (i) increasing pVHL-dependent HIFα protein degradation; (ii) decreasing HIFα synthesis with decrease of NF-κB expression; and (iii) decrease of tumor hypoxia by vascular normalization. We confirmed these antitumor effects of SQAP by the loss-of-function experiments. We found that SQAP directly bound to and inhibited transglutaminase 2. This study provides evidence that upregulation of tumor pVHL is a promising target, which can induce “angiogenic switch off” in HCC. PMID:27119112

  8. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue.

    PubMed

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  9. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  10. Development of doxorubicin-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Varsha G.; Herman, Eugene H.; Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S.; Lewis, Sherry M.; Davis, Kelly J.; George, Nysia I.; Lee, Taewon; Kerr, Susan; Fuscoe, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Serum levels of cardiac troponins serve as biomarkers of myocardial injury. However, troponins are released into the serum only after damage to cardiac tissue has occurred. Here, we report development of a mouse model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced chronic cardiotoxicity to aid in the identification of predictive biomarkers of early events of cardiac tissue injury. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered intravenous DOX at 3 mg/kg body weight, or an equivalent volume of saline, once a week for 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were sacrificed a week following the last dose. A significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in mice following exposure to a weekly DOX dose for 1 week and longer compared to saline-treated controls. DOX treatment also resulted in declines in red blood cell count, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit compared to saline-treated controls after the 2nd weekly dose until the 8th and 9th doses, followed by a modest recovery. All DOX-treated mice had significant elevations in cardiac troponin T concentrations in plasma compared to saline-treated controls, indicating cardiac tissue injury. Also, a dose-related increase in the severity of cardiac lesions was seen in mice exposed to 24 mg/kg DOX and higher cumulative doses. Mice treated with cumulative DOX doses of 30 mg/kg and higher showed a significant decline in heart rate, suggesting drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the development of DOX-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice. -- Highlights: ► 24 mg/kg was a cumulative cardiotoxic dose of doxorubicin in male B6C3F{sub 1} mice. ► Doxorubicin-induced hematological toxicity was in association with splenomegaly. ► Doxorubicin induced severe testicular toxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} male mice.

  11. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injury in a mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengwei; Chi, Feifei; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Chen, Yongquan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 was screened for high antioxidative activity from 55 lactobacilli. The present study attempted to explore the protective properties of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 in alcoholic liver injury. A mouse model was induced by orally feeding alcohol when simultaneously treated with L. rhamnosus CCFM1107, the drug Hu-Gan- Pian (HGP), L. rhamnosus GG (LGG), and L. plantarum CCFM1112 for 3 months. Biochemical analysis was performed for both serum and liver homogenate. Detailed intestinal flora and histological analyses were also carried out. Our results indicated that the administration of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 significantly inhibited the increase in the levels of serum aminotransferase and endotoxin, as well as the levels of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CHO) in the serum and in the liver. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were decreased. The enteric dysbiosis caused by alcohol was restored by increasing the numbers of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and decreasing the numbers of both enterococci and enterobacter. Histological analysis confirmed the protective effect of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107. Compared with the other lactobacilli and to the drug Hu-Gan-Pian, there is a high chance that L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 provides protective effects on alcoholic liver injury by reducing oxidative stress and restoring the intestinal flora. PMID:26626356

  13. The Influence of Bone Marrow-Secreted IL-10 in a Mouse Model of Cerulein-Induced Pancreatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wey-Ran; Lim, Siew-Na; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Alison, Malcolm R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the role of IL-10 secreted from bone marrow (BM) in a mouse model of pancreatic fibrosis. The severity of cerulein-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and the frequency of BM-derived myofibroblasts were evaluated in the pancreas of mice receiving either a wild-type (WT) BM or an IL-10 knockout (KO) BM transplantation. The area of collagen deposition increased significantly in the 3 weeks after cerulein cessation in mice with an IL-10 KO BM transplant (13.7 ± 0.6% and 18.4 ± 1.1%, p < 0.05), but no further increase was seen in WT BM recipients over this time. The percentage of BM-derived myofibroblasts also increased in the pancreas of the IL-10 KO BM recipients after cessation of cerulein (6.7 ± 1.1% and 11.9 ± 1.3%, p < 0.05), while this figure fell in WT BM recipients after cerulein withdrawal. Furthermore, macrophages were more numerous in the IL-10 KO BM recipients than the WT BM recipients after cerulein cessation (23.2 ± 2.3 versus 15.3 ± 1.7 per HPF, p < 0.05). In conclusion, the degree of fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and the number of BM-derived myofibroblasts were significantly different between IL-10 KO BM and WT BM transplanted mice, highlighting a likely role of IL-10 in pancreatitis. PMID:27314021

  14. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C; Liu, Stanley K

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  15. Antigen exposure in the late light period induces severe symptoms of food allergy in an OVA-allergic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Kana; Kitagawa, Eri; Wada, Misaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Orihara, Kanami; Tahara, Yu; Nakao, Atsuhito; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock controls many physiological processes that include immune responses and allergic reactions. Several studies have investigated the circadian regulation of intestinal permeability and tight junctions known to be affected by cytokines. However, the contribution of circadian clock to food allergy symptoms remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the role of the circadian clock in determining the severity of food allergies. We prepared an ovalbumin food allergy mouse model, and orally administered ovalbumin either late in the light or late in the dark period under light-dark cycle. The light period group showed higher allergic diarrhea and weight loss than the dark period group. The production of type 2 cytokines, IL-13 and IL-5, from the mesenteric lymph nodes and ovalbumin absorption was higher in the light period group than in the dark period group. Compared to the dark period group, the mRNA expression levels of the tight junction proteins were lower in the light period group. We have demonstrated that increased production of type 2 cytokines and intestinal permeability in the light period induced severe food allergy symptoms. Our results suggest that the time of food antigen intake might affect the determination of the severity of food allergy symptoms. PMID:26419283

  16. Anti-Siglec-F antibody inhibits oral egg allergen induced intestinal eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dae Jin; Cho, Jae Youn; Miller, Marina; Strangman, Wendy; Zhang, Mai; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David H

    2009-01-01

    Siglec-F is a sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-superfamily receptor that is highly expressed on eosinophils. We have used a mouse model of oral egg ovalbumin (OVA)-induced eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa associated with diarrhea and weight loss to determine whether administering an anti-Siglec-F antibody would reduce levels of intestinal mucosal eosinophilic inflammation. Mice administered the anti-Siglec-F antibody had significantly lower levels of intestinal eosinophilic inflammation, and this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. The reduced numbers of intestinal eosinophils in anti-Siglec-F antibody treated mice was associated with significantly reduced numbers of bone marrow and peripheral blood eosinophils, but was not associated with significant changes in the numbers of proliferating or apoptotic jejunal eosinophils. In addition, the anti-Siglec-F Ab reduced Th2 cytokines and IgE levels. Overall, these studies demonstrate that administration of an anti-Siglec-F antibody significantly reduces levels of eosinophilic inflammation in the intestinal mucosa and that this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. PMID:19135419

  17. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-08-15

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  18. Abrogation of STAT3 signaling cascade by zerumbone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Muthu K; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Li, Feng; Kim, Chulwon; Sikka, Sakshi; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-10-01

    Persistent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is one of the characteristic features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and often linked to its deregulated proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In the present report, we investigated whether zerumbone, a sesquiterpene, exerts its anticancer effect through modulation of STAT3 activation pathway. The pharmacological effect of zerumbone on STAT3 activation, associated protein kinases and phosphatase, and apoptosis was investigated using both RCC cell lines and xenograft mouse model. We observed that zerumbone suppressed STAT3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in RCC cells. The suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of upstream kinases c-Src, Janus-activated kinase 1, and Janus-activated kinase 2. Pervanadate treatment reversed zerumbone-induced downregulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, we found that zerumbone induced the expression of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 that correlated with its ability to inhibit STAT3 activation. Interestingly, deletion of SHP-1 gene by siRNA abolished the ability of zerumbone to inhibit STAT3 activation. The inhibition of STAT3 activation by zerumbone also caused the suppression of the gene products involved in proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Finally, when administered i.p., zerumbone inhibited STAT3 activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human RCC xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice without any side effects. Overall, our results suggest for the first time that zerumbone is a novel blocker of STAT3 signaling cascade and thus has an enormous potential for the treatment of RCC and other solid tumors. PMID:24797723

  19. Lipid droplet binding thalidomide analogs activate endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppress hepatocellular carcinoma in a chemically induced transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent and aggressive primary tumor of the liver and it has limited treatment options. Results In this study, we report the in vitro and in vivo effects of two novel amino-trifluoro-phtalimide analogs, Ac-915 and Ac-2010. Both compounds bind lipid droplets and endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and interact with several proteins with chaperone functions (HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and protein disulfide isomerase) as determined by affinity chromatography and resonant waveguide optical biosensor technology. Both compounds inhibited protein disulfide isomerase activity and induced cell death of different HCC cells at sub or low micromolar ranges detected by classical biochemical end-point assay as well as with real-time label-free measurements. Besides cell proliferation inhibiton, analogs also inhibited cell migration even at 250 nM. Relative biodistribution of the analogs was analysed in native tissue sections of different organs after administration of drugs, and by using fluorescent confocal microscopy based on the inherent blue fluorescence of the compounds. The analogs mainly accumulated in the liver. The effects of Ac-915 and Ac-2010 were also demonstrated on the advanced stages of hepatocarcinogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN)-induced HCC. Significantly less tumor development was found in the livers of the Ac-915- or Ac-2010-treated groups compared with control mice, characterized by less liver tumor incidence, fewer tumors and smaller tumor size. Conclusion These results imply that these amino-trifluoro-phthalimide analogs could serve potent clinical candidates against HCC alone or in combination with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:24268070

  20. The effect of isorhamnetin glycosides extracted from Opuntia ficus-indica in a mouse model of diet induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, César; Torres, Nimbe; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Noriega, Lilia G; Torre-Villalvazo, Iván; Leal-Díaz, Ana M; Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Márquez-Mota, Claudia; Ordaz, Guillermo; Chavez-Santoscoy, Rocío A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-03-01

    A diet rich in polyphenols can ameliorate some metabolic alterations associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) is a plant rich in isorhamnetin glycosides and is highly consumed in Mexico. The purpose of this research was to determine the metabolic effect of an OFI extract on a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and in isolated pancreatic islets. OFI extract was added to a high fat (HF) diet at a low (0.3%) or high (0.6%) dose and administered to C57BL/6 mice for 12 weeks. Mice fed the HF diet supplemented with the OFI extract gained less body weight and exhibited significantly lower circulating total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol compared to those fed the HF diet alone. The HF-OFI diet fed mice presented lower glucose and insulin concentration than the HF diet fed mice. However, the HF-OFI diet fed mice tended to have higher insulin concentration than control mice. The OFI extract stimulated insulin secretion in vitro, associated with increased glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) mRNA content. Furthermore, the OFI extract improved glucose tolerance, and additionally increased energy expenditure. These metabolic improvements were associated with reduced adipocyte size, increased hepatic IRS1 tyr-608 and S6 K thr-389 phosphorylation. OFI isorhamnetin glycosides also diminished the hepatic lipid content associated with reduced mRNA expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers and lipogenic enzymes and increased mRNA expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation. Overall, the OFI extract prevented the development of metabolic abnormalities associated with diet-induced obesity. PMID:25588195

  1. Tracheal dysplasia precedes bronchial dysplasia in mouse model of N-nitroso trischloroethylurea induced squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D; Kwon, Jennifer B; Barthel, Lea; Janssen, William J; Merrick, Daniel T; Keith, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) is the second leading cause of lung cancer death in the US and has a 5-year survival rate of only 16%. Histological changes in the bronchial epithelium termed dysplasia are precursors to invasive SCC. However, the cellular mechanisms that cause dysplasia are unknown. To fill this knowledge gap, we used topical application of N-nitroso-tris chloroethylurea (NTCU) for 32 weeks to induce squamous dysplasia and SCC in mice. At 32 weeks the predominant cell type in the dysplastic airways was Keratin (K) 5 and K14 expressing basal cells. Notably, basal cells are extremely rare in the normal mouse bronchial epithelium but are abundant in the trachea. We therefore evaluated time-dependent changes in tracheal and bronchial histopathology after NTCU exposure (4, 8, 12, 16, 25 and 32 weeks). We show that tracheal dysplasia occurs significantly earlier than that of the bronchial epithelium (12 weeks vs. 25 weeks). This was associated with increased numbers of K5+/K14+ tracheal basal cells and a complete loss of secretory (Club cell secretory protein expressing CCSP+) and ciliated cells. TUNEL staining of NTCU treated tissues confirmed that the loss of CCSP+ and ciliated cells was not due to apoptosis. However, mitotic index (measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation) showed that NTCU treatment increased proliferation of K5+ basal cells in the trachea, and altered bronchial mitotic population from CCSP+ to K5+ basal cells. Thus, we demonstrate that NTCU-induced lung epithelial dysplasia starts in the tracheal epithelium, and is followed by basal cell metaplasia of the bronchial epithelium. This analysis extends our knowledge of the NTCU-SCC model by defining the early changes in epithelial cell phenotypes in distinct airway locations, and this may assist in identifying new targets for future chemoprevention studies. PMID:25860262

  2. Torilin ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Lee, Whi Min; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Na-Mi; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Cho, Jaeyoul; Kim, Suk; Park, Seung-Chun; Yun, Bong-Sik; Ko, Dukhwan; Rhee, Manhee

    2013-06-01

    Advancements in rheumatoid-arthritis-(RA) therapies have shown considerable progresses in the comprehension of disease. However, the development of new potential agents with relative safety and efficacy continues and natural compounds have been considered as alternatives to identify new entities. Since previous in-vivo data and our in-vitro findings showed that torilin has a strong anti-inflammatory property, we further investigated its effect against collagen-induced-arthritis-(CIA) in mice. CIA-induced DBA/1J mice were treated with torilin or methotrexate (MTX) for 5-weeks. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score and joint histopathology. Draining lymph node (dLN), joint and peripheral-blood mononuclear-cell (PBMC) counts, and activation/localization of T-/B-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils were examined by FACS analysis. Serum anti-type-II-collagen-(CII) antibody levels and cultured-splenocyte and serum cytokines were also evaluated. Torilin markedly reduced CIA-induced arthritic score, histopathology and leukocyte counts. Besides, torilin suppressed CIA-activated T-cells including CD3+, CD3+/CD69+, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD25+ in dLNs or joints. It also modified CD19+ or CD20+/CD23+ (B-cells), MHCII+/CD11c+ (DCs) and Gr-1+/CD11b+ (neutrophil) subpopulations. It further depressed total anti-CII-IgG, anti-CII-IgG1 and anti-CII-IgG2a antibody productions. Moreover, while IFN-γ and IL-10 were not affected, torilin suppressed CIA-induced serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Interestingly, torilin also blocked IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines while it did not affect IL-10 but enhanced IL-4 in splenocytes. These results show that torilin attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations in dLNs or joints, and restored serum and splenocyte cytokine imbalances. Torilin may have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties with the capacity to ameliorate the inflammatory response in CIA-mice. PMID:23623942

  3. Preclinical mouse models of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Segaliny, Aude; Botter, Sander; Santiago, Janice M; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common form of primary bone tumors with high prevalence in children. Survival rates of osteosarcoma are low, especially in the case of metastases. Mouse models of this disease have been very valuable in investigation of mechanisms of tumorigenesis, metastasis, as well as testing possible therapeutic options. In this chapter, we summarize currently available mouse models for osteosarcoma and provide detailed methodology for the isolation of cell lines from genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), gene modification and tumor cell injection methods, as well as imaging techniques. PMID:25987985

  4. Mouse precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model to study idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Chen, Yixi; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Merema, Marjolijn T; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2012-09-17

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) has been the top reason for withdrawing drugs from the market or for black box warnings. IDILI may arise from the interaction of a drug's reactive metabolite with a mild inflammation that renders the liver more sensitive to injury resulting in increased toxicity (inflammatory stress hypothesis). Aiming to develop a robust ex vivo screening method to study inflammatory stress-related IDILI mechanisms and to find biomarkers that can detect or predict IDILI, mouse precision-cut liver slices (mPCLS) were coincubated for 24 h with IDILI-related drugs and lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide exacerbated ketoconazole (15 μM) and clozapine (45 μM) toxicity but not their non-IDILI-related comparators, voriconazole (1500 μM) and olanzapine (45 μM). However, the other IDILI-related drugs tested [diclofenac (200 μM), carbamazepine (400 μM), and troglitazone (30 μM)] did not cause synergistic toxicity with lipopolysaccharide after 24 h of incubation. Lipopolysaccharide further decreased the reduced glutathione levels caused by ketoconazole or clozapine in mPCLS after 24 h of incubation, which was not the case for the other drugs. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased nitric oxide (NO), cytokine, and chemokine release into the mPCLS media, while the treatment with the drugs alone did not cause any substantial change. All seven drugs drastically reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production. Interestingly, only ketoconazole and clozapine increased the lipopolysaccharide-induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release. Pilot experiments showed that diclofenac and troglitazone, but not carbamazepine, demonstrated synergistic toxicity with lipopolysaccharide after a longer incubation of 48 h in mPCLS. In conclusion, we have developed an ex vivo model to detect inflammatory stress-related liver toxicity and identified ketoconazole, clozapine

  5. Oral administration of acarbose ameliorates imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like dermatitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Yang, Deng-Ho; Chung, Ting-Wen; Li, Yi-Rong; Lin, Chi Chen

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease of undefined etiology that involves dysregulated interplay between immune cells and keratinocytes. Acarbose was found to decrease inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients in addition to its anti-diabetic effects. Here, we report that imiquimod (IMQ)-induced epidermal hyperplasia and psoriasis like-inflammation were significantly inhibited by acarbose treatment. Real-time PCR showed that mRNA levels of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β IL-17A, and IL-22 in skin were also decreased significantly by acarbose. In addition, we found that acarbose reduced infiltration of CD3(+) T cells and GR-1(+) neutrophils in lesional skin and also reduced the percentage of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells (Th17) and IL-17- and IL-22-producing γδ T cells in the spleen. In contrast, acarbose increased the frequency of IL-10-producing CD4(+) regulator Tr1 T cells in the spleen and small intestine. These results indicate that oral administration of acarbose can attenuate the severity of imiquimod-induced psoriasis with local and systemic anti-inflammatory and immune modulation effects, thus suggesting that acarbose is an effective therapeutic strategy for psoriasis regulation. PMID:26874324

  6. Role of cysteinyl leukotriene signaling in a mouse model of noise-induced cochlear injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Sub; Kang, Seo-Jun; Seo, Mi-Kyoung; Jou, Ilo; Woo, Hyun Goo; Park, Sang Myun

    2014-07-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common types of sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of leukotriene receptors and their respective changes in the cochlea after hazardous noise exposure. We found that the expression of cysteinyl leukotriene type 1 receptor (CysLTR1) was increased until 3 d after noise exposure and enhanced CysLTR1 expression was mainly observed in the spiral ligament and the organ of Corti. Expression of 5-lipoxygenase was increased similar to that of CysLTR1, and there was an accompanying elevation of CysLT concentration. Posttreatment with leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), montelukast, for 4 consecutive days after noise exposure significantly decreased the permanent threshold shift and also reduced the hair cell death in the cochlea. Using RNA-sequencing, we found that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) was up-regulated after noise exposure, and it was significantly inhibited by montelukast. Posttreatment with a MMP-3 inhibitor also protected the hair cells and reduced the permanent threshold shift. These findings suggest that acoustic injury up-regulated CysLT signaling in the cochlea and cochlear injury could be attenuated by LTRA through regulation of MMP-3 expression. This study provides mechanistic insights into the role of CysLTs signaling in noise-induced hearing loss and the therapeutic benefit of LTRA. PMID:24958862

  7. Acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid reduces retinal angiogenesis in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lulli, Matteo; Cammalleri, Maurizio; Fornaciari, Irene; Casini, Giovanni; Dal Monte, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Retinal diseases characterized by pathologic retinal angiogenesis are the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Although therapies directed toward vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) represent a significant step forward in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies, further improvements are needed. In the last few years, an intense research activity has focused around the use of herbal and traditional natural medicines as an alternative for slowing down the progression of proliferative retinopathies. In the present study, we investigated the antiangiogenic effects of acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), one of the active principles derived from the plant Boswellia serrata, used in Ayurvedic systems of medicine. We studied the antiangiogenic properties of AKBA using the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), which mimics the neovascular response seen in human retinopathy of prematurity. We first evaluated the effects of subcutaneously administered AKBA on the expression/activity of proteins which are known to play a role in the OIR model. In the retina, AKBA increased expression and activity of Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 and reduced the phosphorylation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as well as VEGF expression and VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 phosphorylation. Likely as a result of these effects, AKBA significantly reduced retinal neovascularization in OIR mice without affecting retinal cell survival and retinal function. Using retinal explants cultured in hypoxia and an activator of STAT3 phosphorylation, we showed that the AKBA-induced inhibition of VEGFR-2 phosphorylation is likely to be mediated by a mechanism depending on an SHP-1/STAT3/VEGF axis. In the OIR model, neovascularization results from the activation of retinal endothelial cells, therefore we evaluated whether AKBA affected the angiogenic response of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs

  8. Mechanisms of amiodarone and valproic acid induced liver steatosis in mouse in vivo act as a template for other hepatotoxicity models.

    PubMed

    Vitins, Alexa P; Kienhuis, Anne S; Speksnijder, Ewoud N; Roodbergen, Marianne; Luijten, Mirjam; van der Ven, Leo T M

    2014-08-01

    Liver injury is the leading cause of drug-induced toxicity. For the evaluation of a chemical compound to induce toxicity, in this case steatosis or fatty liver, it is imperative to identify markers reflective of mechanisms and processes induced upon exposure, as these will be the earliest changes reflective of disease. Therefore, an in vivo mouse toxicogenomics study was completed to identify common pathways, nuclear receptor (NR) binding sites, and genes regulated by three known human steatosis-inducing compounds, amiodarone (AMD), valproic acid (VPA), and tetracycline (TET). Over 1, 4, and 11 days of treatment, AMD induced changes in clinical chemistry parameters and histopathology consistent with steatosis. Common processes and NR binding sites involved in lipid, retinol, and drug metabolism were found for AMD and VPA, but not for TET, which showed no response. Interestingly, the pattern of enrichment of these common pathways and NR binding sites over time was unique to each compound. Eleven biomarkers of steatosis were identified as dose responsive and time sensitive to toxicity for AMD and VPA. Finally, this in vivo mouse study was compared to an AMD rat in vivo, an AMD mouse primary hepatocyte, and a VPA human primary hepatocyte study to identify concordance for steatosis. We conclude that concordance is found on the process level independent of species, model or dose*time point. PMID:24535564

  9. Increased 4R-Tau Induces Pathological Changes in a Human-Tau Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Kathleen M; DeVos, Sarah L; Miller, Rebecca L; Chun, Seung J; Norrbom, Michaela; Wozniak, David F; Dawson, Hana N; Bennett, C Frank; Rigo, Frank; Miller, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Pathological evidence for selective four-repeat (4R) tau deposition in certain dementias and exon 10-positioned MAPT mutations together suggest a 4R-specific role in causing disease. However, direct assessments of 4R toxicity have not yet been accomplished in vivo. Increasing 4R-tau expression without change to total tau in human tau-expressing mice induced more severe seizures and nesting behavior abnormality, increased tau phosphorylation, and produced a shift toward oligomeric tau. Exon 10 skipping could also be accomplished in vivo, providing support for a 4R-tau targeted approach to target 4R-tau toxicity and, in cases of primary MAPT mutation, eliminate the disease-causing mutation. PMID:27210553

  10. Exploiting Mouse Models to Study Ras-Induced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowry, William E; Flores, Aimee; White, Andrew C

    2016-08-01

    Recently developed methods have allowed for the delivery of cancer-causing genetic mutations to particular cell types in the epidermis in an inducible fashion. These methods have allowed for sophisticated explorations on the cellular and molecular origins of squamous cell carcinoma due to oncogenic mutations in Ras. These experiments have provided insights into whether cancer is initiated by stem or more specified cells under various conditions, and have highlighted the ability of particular genetic hits to serve as tumor initiators or promoters. Here we provide a summary of data from our lab and others that demonstrate the ability of hair follicle stem cells to serve as cancer cells of origin, and the ability of various molecular players to drive heterogeneity of tumor cell types. A synthesis of these studies potentially could provide unique insights into the process by which Ras can initiate squamous cell carcinoma in human patients and could eventually inform treatment strategies. PMID:27160068

  11. Hypergravity-Induced Changes in Hematological and Lymphocyte Function Parameters in a Mouse Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Miller, Glen M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify hypergravity-induced changes in hematological and lymphocyte characteristics. Mice were subjected to 1, 2, and 3G and euthanized on days 1 , 4, 7, 10, and 21. The data show that increased gravitational force resulted in persistent hypothermia. Red blood cell (RBC) counts, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were reduced by day 21, whereas hemoglobin and RBC volume were low at most times of measurement. A transient increase was noted in platelet numbers in the 3G group. Fluctuations in spontaneous blastogenesis of lymphocytes were dependent upon centrifugation time and not gravity. Changes in splenocyte responses to T and B cell mitogens due to gravity were also noted. Cytokine production was primarily affected during the first week; IL-2, IL-4 and TNF-alpha were increased, whereas IFN-gamma was decreased. These findings indicate that altered gravity can influence both hematological and functional variables that may translate into serious health consequences.

  12. The effect of doxycycline on alcohol consumption and sensitivity: consideration for inducible transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    McIver, Sally R; Muccigrosso, Megan M; Haydon, Philip G

    2012-10-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to elicit numerous changes in brain physiology and is associated with various pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, and behaviors, such as sleep and acute illness. In addition, there is accumulating evidence that the behavioral response to alcohol is affected by perturbations to the neuroimmune system. Recent studies have shown that administration of proinflammatory mediators increases alcohol consumption, while anti-inflammatory drugs, such as minocycline, decrease consumption. Doxycycline is an anti-inflammatory mediator and a tetracycline derivative, and is commonly used in the tetracycline regulatory system, a transgenic approach widely accredited for its inducible and reversible nature. Given the established link between anti-inflammatory agents and response to and consumption of alcohol, and because the tetracycline regulatory system is becoming increasingly employed for genetic manipulations and behavioral phenotyping, we investigated the effect of doxycycline administration on alcohol sensitivity and consumption. Two independent transgenic lines containing a tetracycline transactivator transgene or the tetracycline operator promoter insertion, along with wild-type littermate mice (C57Bl/6J), were used to measure changes in alcohol consumption, alcohol-induced motor impairment and sedation, and blood alcohol concentration with doxycycline administration (40 mg/kg in chow). Using repeated sessions of the drinking-in-the-dark paradigm, we found that doxycycline consistently reduced consumption of 20% alcohol during two- and four-hour access. Doxycycline also increased sensitivity to the motor-impairing effects of alcohol (2 g/kg), and the duration of loss of righting reflex after ethanol injection (3.5 g/kg), without causing a significant alteration in blood alcohol levels. Despite the many advantages of using a tetracycline-regulated transgenic approach, it is important to consider the effects of doxycycline

  13. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection. PMID:24608925

  14. Natural killer T cells are dispensable in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodelling in a mouse model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y-I; Shim, J-U; Lee, J-H; Chung, I-J; Min, J-J; Rhee, J H; Lee, H C; Chung, D H; Wi, J-O

    2010-07-01

    Natural killer T (NK T) cells have been shown to play an essential role in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and/or airway inflammation in mouse models of acute asthma. Recently, NK T cells have been reported to be required for the development of AHR in a virus induced chronic asthma model. We investigated whether NK T cells were required for the development of allergen-induced AHR, airway inflammation and airway remodelling in a mouse model of chronic asthma. CD1d-/- mice that lack NK T cells were used for the experiments. In the chronic model, AHR, eosinophilic inflammation, remodelling characteristics including mucus metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis and increased mass of the airway smooth muscle, T helper type 2 (Th2) immune response and immunoglobulin (Ig)E production were equally increased in both CD1d-/- mice and wild-type mice. However, in the acute model, AHR, eosinophilic inflammation, Th2 immune response and IgE production were significantly decreased in the CD1d-/- mice compared to wild-type. CD1d-dependent NK T cells may not be required for the development of allergen-induced AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway remodelling in chronic asthma model, although they play a role in the development of AHR and eosinophilic inflammation in acute asthma model. PMID:20456411

  15. S-SCAM, A Rare Copy Number Variation Gene, Induces Schizophrenia-Related Endophenotypes in Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M.; Liu, Qing-song

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis. PMID:25653350

  16. Cashew apple extract inhibition of fat storage and insulin resistance in the diet-induced obesity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beejmohun, Vickram; Mignon, Cyril; Mazollier, Aude; Peytavy-Izard, Marie; Pallet, Dominique; Dornier, Manuel; Chapal, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The cashew apple is an unvalued by-product from the cashew nut industry, of which millions of tonnes are simply discarded globally. Interestingly, however, cashew apple nutrients may have beneficial effects for health even if these are still poorly described. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of a hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple (cashew apple extract; CAE; Cashewin(™)) on obesity and diabetes, in two experimental designs using the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. First, in the preventive design, mice were treated orally with the CAE at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight from the first day under a high-fat diet (HFD) and during 8 weeks thereafter. Second, in the curative design, the animals were first maintained under the HFD for 4 weeks and then treated with the CAE for a further 4 weeks under the same regimen. For both experimental designs, body weight, peri-epididymal adipose tissue, liver weight, food consumption, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance were assessed. In both designs, the CAE significantly reduced body-weight gain and fat storage in both the peri-epididymal adipose tissue and the liver for mice under the HFD. This was achieved without modifying their energy consumption. Furthermore, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) of the DIO mice were significantly lowered compared with the control group. Thus, a well-designed hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple could provide an attractive nutritional food ingredient to help support the management of body weight and associated metabolic parameters such as blood glucose and insulin levels. PMID:26688724

  17. S-SCAM, a rare copy number variation gene, induces schizophrenia-related endophenotypes in transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M; Liu, Qing-song; Lee, Sang H

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis. PMID:25653350

  18. Heterozygous P53 knockout mouse model for dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced carcinogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids are a large, structurally diverse group of plant-derived protoxins that are potentially carcinogenic. With worldwide significance, these alkaloids can contaminate or be naturally present in the human food supply. To develop a small animal model that may be used to com...

  19. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal's learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity. PMID:27483466

  20. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal’s learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity. PMID:27483466

  1. Antiaging Effect of Inula britannica on Aging Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Long, Yuanyuan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The antiaging effect of Inula britannica flower total flavonoids (IBFTF) on aging mice induced by D-galactose and its mechanism was examined in this study. From the results, the biochemical indexes and histological analysis of skin tissues showed that IBFTF could effectively improve the antioxidant enzyme activity of the aging mice, enhance the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of skin tissue, and decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Besides, IBFTF could maintain the skin collagen, hydroxyproline (Hyp), dermal thickness, and moisture content. Meanwhile, IBFTF could significantly reduce the number of cells arrested in G0/G1 phase, and from the point of view of protein and mRNA expression level in skin tissue, IBFTF could significantly increase the expression of Sirt1 and CyclinD1 but decrease the expression of p16 and p21, and its effect was not less than that of the well-known vitamin E (VE). Overall, these results seem to be implying that IBFTF is a potential natural anti-skin aging agent with great antioxidant ability. PMID:27066100

  2. Antiaging Effect of Inula britannica on Aging Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Long, Yuanyuan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The antiaging effect of Inula britannica flower total flavonoids (IBFTF) on aging mice induced by D-galactose and its mechanism was examined in this study. From the results, the biochemical indexes and histological analysis of skin tissues showed that IBFTF could effectively improve the antioxidant enzyme activity of the aging mice, enhance the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of skin tissue, and decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Besides, IBFTF could maintain the skin collagen, hydroxyproline (Hyp), dermal thickness, and moisture content. Meanwhile, IBFTF could significantly reduce the number of cells arrested in G0/G1 phase, and from the point of view of protein and mRNA expression level in skin tissue, IBFTF could significantly increase the expression of Sirt1 and CyclinD1 but decrease the expression of p16 and p21, and its effect was not less than that of the well-known vitamin E (VE). Overall, these results seem to be implying that IBFTF is a potential natural anti-skin aging agent with great antioxidant ability. PMID:27066100

  3. Suppression of adipogenesis and obesity in high-fat induced mouse model by hydroxylated polymethoxyflavones.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Ho, Min-Hau; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Li, Shiming; Badmaev, Vladimir; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-10-30

    This study demonstrated that hydroxylated polymethoxyflavones (HPMFs) effectively and dose-dependently suppressed accumulation of lipid droplets in adipocytes by approximately 51-55%. Western blot analysis revealed that HPMFs markedly down-regulated adipogenesis-related transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c as well as downstream target fatty acid binding protein 2 (aP2), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). In addition, HPMFs also activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the early phase of adipogenesis, HPMF-treated preadipocytes displayed a delayed cell cycle entry into G2/M phase at 24 h (35.5% for DMI group and 4.8% for 20 μg/mL HPMFs-treated group) after initiation of adipogenesis. Furthermore, administration of HPMFs (0.25 and 1%) decreased high-fat diet (HFD) induced weight gain (15.3 ± 3.9 g for HFD group, 10.3 ± 0.3 g and 7.9 ± 0.7 g for 0.25 and 1% HPMFs groups, respectively) and relative perigonadal, retroperitoneal, mesenteric fat weight in C57BL/6 mice. Administration of HPMFs reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (GOT), alanine aminotransferase (GPT), triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol (T-cho). The results suggested that HPMFs may have a potential benefit in preventing obesity. PMID:24089698

  4. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, António M.; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available. PMID:25569625

  5. Curcumin inhibits gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santos, António M; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available. PMID:25569625

  6. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  7. Naringin treatment induces neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease in vivo, but not enough to restore the lesioned dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with naringin, a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, attenuated neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in vivo. In order to investigate whether its effects are universally applied to a different model of PD and whether its treatment induces restorative effects on the lesioned nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projection, we observed the effects of pre-treatment or post-treatment with naringin in a mouse model of PD. For neuroprotective effects, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was unilaterally injected into the striatum of mouse brains for a neurotoxin model of PD in the presence or absence of naringin by daily intraperitoneal injection. Our results showed that naringin protected the nigrostriatal DA projection from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, similar to the effects in rat brains, this treatment induced the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is well known as an important survival factor for DA neurons, and inhibited microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN) of mouse brains treated with 6-OHDA. However, there was no significant change of DA phenotypes in the SN and striatum post-treated with naringin compared with 6-OHDA-lesioned mice, despite the treatment being continued for 12 weeks. These results suggest that post-treatment with naringin alone may not be enough to restore the nigrostriatal DA projection in a mouse model of PD. However, our results apparently suggest that naringin is a beneficial natural product to prevent DA degeneration, which is involved in PD. PMID:26878791

  8. Effect of Mouse Strain in a Model of Chemical-induced Respiratory Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Risako; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Watanabe, Yuko; Kurosawa, Yoshimi; Ueda, Hideo; Kosaka, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of many types of chemicals is a leading cause of allergic respiratory diseases, and effective protocols are needed for the detection of environmental chemical–related respiratory allergies. In our previous studies, we developed a method for detecting environmental chemical–related respiratory allergens by using a long-term sensitization–challenge protocol involving BALB/c mice. In the current study, we sought to improve our model by characterizing strain-associated differences in respiratory allergic reactions to the well-known chemical respiratory allergen glutaraldehyde (GA). According to our protocol, BALB/c, NC/Nga, C3H/HeN, C57BL/6N, and CBA/J mice were sensitized dermally with GA for 3 weeks and then challenged with intratracheal or inhaled GA at 2 weeks after the last sensitization. The day after the final challenge, all mice were euthanized, and total serum IgE levels were assayed. In addition, immunocyte counts, cytokine production, and chemokine levels in the hilar lymph nodes (LNs) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) were also assessed. In conclusion, BALB/c and NC/Nga mice demonstrated markedly increased IgE reactions. Inflammatory cell counts in BALF were increased in the treated groups of all strains, especially BALB/c, NC/Nga, and CBA/J strains. Cytokine levels in LNs were increased in all treated groups except for C3H/HeN and were particularly high in BALB/c and NC/Nga mice. According to our results, we suggest that BALB/c and NC/Nga are highly susceptible to respiratory allergic responses and therefore are good candidates for use in our model for detecting environmental chemical respiratory allergens. PMID:25048268

  9. Stress-Induced Executive Dysfunction in GDNF-Deficient Mice, A Mouse Model of Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Mona; Olsen, Kaitlin; Yang, Benjamin Z; Buhusi, Catalin V

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive reactivity to stress is linked to improper decision making, impulsivity, and discounting of delayed rewards. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) alters dopaminergic function, re-shapes dopaminergic circuits in key areas involved in decision making, and impairs prefrontal-cortex dependent response inhibition and working memory. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for regulating dopamine (DA) release in the basal ganglia and for the survival of dopaminergic neurons; GDNF-deficient mice are considered an animal model for aging-related Parkinsonism. Recently, GDNF expression in the striatum has been linked to resilience to stress. Here we investigated the effects of CUS on decision making in GDNF-heterozygous (HET) mice and their wild-type littermate controls (WT). Before CUS no differences in temporal discounting (TD) were found between genotypes. However, following CUS GDNF HET mice, having a partial reduction of GDNF levels, showed increased impulsive choice indexed by a reduction in percent Larger-Later (LL) choices in the TD paradigm, and a reduction in area under the TD curve. Moreover, stressed GDNF HET mice, but not their WT controls, showed decreased neuronal activation (number of cFos positive neurons) in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), nucleus accumbens (NA) core, and NA shell, suggestive of a maladaptive response to stress. Interestingly, area under the TD curve positively correlated with cFos activation in the NA core, and NA shell, but not with orbitofrontal activity. These results provide further evidence of the differential involvement of the OFC, NA core, and NA shell in impulsive choice, and identify GDNF-deficient mice as a double-hit (gene × environment) model of stress-related executive dysfunction, particularly relevant to substance abuse and Parkinson's disease (PD). PMID:27445722

  10. Stress-Induced Executive Dysfunction in GDNF-Deficient Mice, A Mouse Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Buhusi, Mona; Olsen, Kaitlin; Yang, Benjamin Z.; Buhusi, Catalin V.

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive reactivity to stress is linked to improper decision making, impulsivity, and discounting of delayed rewards. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) alters dopaminergic function, re-shapes dopaminergic circuits in key areas involved in decision making, and impairs prefrontal-cortex dependent response inhibition and working memory. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for regulating dopamine (DA) release in the basal ganglia and for the survival of dopaminergic neurons; GDNF-deficient mice are considered an animal model for aging-related Parkinsonism. Recently, GDNF expression in the striatum has been linked to resilience to stress. Here we investigated the effects of CUS on decision making in GDNF-heterozygous (HET) mice and their wild-type littermate controls (WT). Before CUS no differences in temporal discounting (TD) were found between genotypes. However, following CUS GDNF HET mice, having a partial reduction of GDNF levels, showed increased impulsive choice indexed by a reduction in percent Larger-Later (LL) choices in the TD paradigm, and a reduction in area under the TD curve. Moreover, stressed GDNF HET mice, but not their WT controls, showed decreased neuronal activation (number of cFos positive neurons) in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), nucleus accumbens (NA) core, and NA shell, suggestive of a maladaptive response to stress. Interestingly, area under the TD curve positively correlated with cFos activation in the NA core, and NA shell, but not with orbitofrontal activity. These results provide further evidence of the differential involvement of the OFC, NA core, and NA shell in impulsive choice, and identify GDNF-deficient mice as a double-hit (gene × environment) model of stress-related executive dysfunction, particularly relevant to substance abuse and Parkinson’s disease (PD). PMID:27445722

  11. An inducible transgenic mouse breast cancer model for the analysis of tumor antigen specific CD8+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In Simian virus 40 (SV40) transgenic BALB/c WAP-T mice tumor development and progression is driven by SV40 tumor antigens encoded by inducible transgenes. WAP-T mice constitute a well characterized mouse model for breast cancer with strong similarities to the corresponding human disease. BALB/c mice mount only a weak cellular immune response against SV40 T-antigen (T-Ag). For studying tumor antigen specific CD8+ T-cell responses against transgene expressing cells, we created WAP-TNP mice, in which the transgene additionally codes for the NP118–126-epitope contained within the nucleoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), the immune-dominant T-cell epitope in BALB/c mice. We then investigated in WAP-TNP mice the immune responses against SV40 tumor antigens and the NP-epitope within the chimeric T-Ag/NP protein (T-AgNP). Analysis of the immune-reactivity against T-Ag in WAP-T and of T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice revealed that, in contrast to wild type (wt) BALB/c mice, WAP-T and WAP-TNP mice were non-reactive against T-Ag. However, like wtBALB/c mice, WAP-T as well as WAP-TNP mice were highly reactive against the immune-dominant LCMV NP-epitope, thereby allowing the analysis of NP-epitope specific cellular immune responses in WAP-TNP mice. LCMV infection of WAP-TNP mice induced a strong, LCMV NP-epitope specific CD8+ T-cell response, which was able to specifically eliminate T-AgNP expressing mammary epithelial cells both prior to tumor formation (i.e. in cells of lactating mammary glands), as well as in invasive tumors. Elimination of tumor cells, however, was only transient, even after repeated LCMV infections. Further studies showed that already non-infected WAP-TNP tumor mice contained LCMV NP-epitope specific CD8+ T-cells, albeit with strongly reduced, though measurable activity. Functional impairment of these ‘endogenous’ NP-epitope specific T-cells seems to be caused by expression of the programmed death-1 protein (PD1), as anti-PD1 treatment of

  12. Sodium Caseinate (CasNa) Induces Mobilization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in a BALB/c Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Ledesma-Martínez, Edgar; Aguiñiga-Sánchez, Itzen; Poblano-Pérez, Ignacio; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Montesinos-Montesinos, Juan José; de Lourdes Mora-García, María

    2015-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells transplantation has high clinical potential against a wide variety of hematologic, metabolic, and autoimmune diseases and solid tumors. Clinically, hematopoietic stem cells derived from peripheral blood are currently used more than those obtained from sources such as bone marrow. However, mobilizing agents used in the clinic tend to fail in high rates, making the number of mobilized cells insufficient for transplantation. We investigated whether sodium caseinate induces functional mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into peripheral blood of Balb/c mice. Material/Methods Using a mouse model, we administrated sodium caseinate or Plerixafor, a commercial mobilizing agent, and analyzed counts of hematopoietic stem cells in peripheral blood, and then cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice to restore hematopoiesis. All assays were performed at least twice. Results We found that sodium caseinate increases the number of mononuclear cells in peripheral blood with the immunophenotype of hematopoietic stem cells (0.2 to 0.5% LSK cells), allowing them to form colonies of various cell lineages in semisolid medium (p<0.05). This effect is similar to that of Plerixafor, and cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can restore hematopoiesis at higher percentages than mononuclear cells mobilized by Plerixafor (40% vs. 20%, respectively). Further, a secondary transplant rescued a separate group of irradiated mice from death, proving definitive evidence of hematopoietic reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cells transplantation. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation. To determine significant differences between the data, one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used. Conclusions Collectively these results show the utility of sodium caseinate as a mobilizer of hematopoietic stem cells and its potential clinical application in transplantation settings. PMID:26409928

  13. Fatty acid binding protein 4 regulates VEGF-induced airway angiogenesis and inflammation in a transgenic mouse model: implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Yu, Chen-Wei; Elmasri, Harun; Terwelp, Matthew; Lee, Chun G; Bhandari, Vineet; Comhair, Suzy A; Erzurum, Serpil C; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Elias, Jack A; Cataltepe, Sule

    2013-04-01

    Neovascularization of the airways occurs in several inflammatory lung diseases, including asthma. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in vascular remodeling in the asthmatic airways. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 or aP2) is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a proangiogenic function in vitro, but whether it plays a role in modulation of angiogenesis in vivo is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 promotes VEGF-induced airway angiogenesis and investigated this hypothesis with the use of a transgenic mouse model with inducible overexpression of VEGF165 under a CC10 promoter [VEGF-TG (transgenic) mice]. We found a significant increase in FABP4 mRNA levels and density of FABP4-expressing vascular endothelial cells in mouse airways with VEGF overexpression. FABP4(-/-) mouse airways showed a significant decrease in neovessel formation and endothelial cell proliferation in response to VEGF overexpression. These alterations in airway vasculature were accompanied by attenuated expression of proinflammatory mediators. Furthermore, VEGF-TG/FABP4(-/-) mice showed markedly decreased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a well-known mediator of VEGF-induced responses, compared with VEGF-TG mice. Finally, the density of FABP4-immunoreactive vessels in endobronchial biopsy specimens was significantly higher in patients with asthma than in control subjects. Taken together, these data unravel FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:23391391

  14. The role of renal proximal tubule P450 enzymes in chloroform-induced nephrotoxicity: Utility of renal specific P450 reductase knockout mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Senyan; Yao, Yunyi; Lu, Shijun; Aldous, Kenneth; Ding, Xinxin; Mei, Changlin; Gu, Jun

    2013-10-01

    The kidney is a primary target for numerous toxic compounds. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) are responsible for the metabolic activation of various chemical compounds, and in the kidney are predominantly expressed in proximal tubules. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that renal proximal tubular P450s are critical for nephrotoxicity caused by chemicals such as chloroform. We developed two new mouse models, one having proximal tubule-specific deletion of the cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) gene (the enzyme required for all microsomal P450 activities), designated proximal tubule-Cpr-null (PTCN), and the other having proximal tubule-specific rescue of CPR activity with the global suppression of CPR activity in all extra-proximal tubular tissues, designated extra-proximal tubule-Cpr-low (XPT-CL). The PTCN, XPT-CL, Cpr-low (CL), and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with a single oral dose of chloroform at 200 mg/kg. Blood, liver and kidney samples were obtained at 24 h after the treatment. Renal toxicity was assessed by measuring BUN and creatinine levels, and by pathological examination. The blood and tissue levels of chloroform were determined. The severity of toxicity was less in PTCN and CL mice, compared with that of WT and XPT-CL mice. There were no significant differences in chloroform levels in the blood, liver, or kidney, between PTCN and WT mice, or between XPT-CL and CL mice. These findings indicate that local P450-dependent activities play an important role in the nephrotoxicity induced by chloroform. Our results also demonstrate the usefulness of these novel mouse models for studies of chemical-induced kidney toxicity. - Highlights: • New mouse models were developed with varying P450 activities in the proximal tubule. • These mouse models were treated with chloroform, a nephrotoxicant. • Studies showed the importance of local P450s in chloroform-induced nephrotoxicity.

  15. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  16. The immunoprotective activity of interleukin-33 in mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Zhu, Feng-Xue; Zhao, Xiu-Juan; An, You-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    prevented apoptosis of T lymphocytes and improved survival in a mouse model of sepsis. PMID:26602156

  17. PD-1/CTLA-4 Blockade Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Lymphoma Growth in a Cord Blood Humanized-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Jones, Richard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Zumwalde, Nicholas A.; Sharma, Akshat; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes B cell lymphomas in humanized mouse models and contributes to a variety of different types of human lymphomas. T cells directed against viral antigens play a critical role in controlling EBV infection, and EBV-positive lymphomas are particularly common in immunocompromised hosts. We previously showed that EBV induces B cell lymphomas with high frequency in a cord blood-humanized mouse model in which EBV-infected human cord blood is injected intraperitoneally into NOD/LtSz-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. Since our former studies showed that it is possible for T cells to control the tumors in another NSG mouse model engrafted with both human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus and liver, here we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory receptors, PD-1 and CTLA-4, enhance the ability of cord blood T cells to control the outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas in the cord-blood humanized mouse model. We demonstrate that EBV-infected lymphoma cells in this model express both the PD-L1 and PD-L2 inhibitory ligands for the PD-1 receptor, and that T cells express the PD-1 and CTLA-4 receptors. Furthermore, we show that the combination of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade strikingly reduces the size of lymphomas induced by a lytic EBV strain (M81) in this model, and that this anti-tumor effect requires T cells. PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade markedly increases EBV-specific T cell responses, and is associated with enhanced tumor infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade decreases the number of both latently, and lytically, EBV-infected B cells. These results indicate that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade enhances the ability of cord blood T cells to control outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas, and suggest that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade might be useful for treating certain EBV-induced diseases in humans. PMID:27186886

  18. PD-1/CTLA-4 Blockade Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Lymphoma Growth in a Cord Blood Humanized-Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Jones, Richard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Zumwalde, Nicholas A; Sharma, Akshat; Gumperz, Jenny E; Kenney, Shannon C

    2016-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes B cell lymphomas in humanized mouse models and contributes to a variety of different types of human lymphomas. T cells directed against viral antigens play a critical role in controlling EBV infection, and EBV-positive lymphomas are particularly common in immunocompromised hosts. We previously showed that EBV induces B cell lymphomas with high frequency in a cord blood-humanized mouse model in which EBV-infected human cord blood is injected intraperitoneally into NOD/LtSz-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. Since our former studies showed that it is possible for T cells to control the tumors in another NSG mouse model engrafted with both human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus and liver, here we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory receptors, PD-1 and CTLA-4, enhance the ability of cord blood T cells to control the outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas in the cord-blood humanized mouse model. We demonstrate that EBV-infected lymphoma cells in this model express both the PD-L1 and PD-L2 inhibitory ligands for the PD-1 receptor, and that T cells express the PD-1 and CTLA-4 receptors. Furthermore, we show that the combination of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade strikingly reduces the size of lymphomas induced by a lytic EBV strain (M81) in this model, and that this anti-tumor effect requires T cells. PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade markedly increases EBV-specific T cell responses, and is associated with enhanced tumor infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade decreases the number of both latently, and lytically, EBV-infected B cells. These results indicate that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade enhances the ability of cord blood T cells to control outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas, and suggest that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade might be useful for treating certain EBV-induced diseases in humans. PMID:27186886

  19. Establishment and characterization of an optimized mouse model of multiple sclerosis-induced neuropathic pain using behavioral, pharmacologic, histologic and immunohistochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nemat; Woodruff, Trent M; Smith, Maree T

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that causes debilitating central neuropathic pain in many patients. Although mouse models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) have provided insight on the pathobiology of MS-induced neuropathic pain, concurrent severe motor impairments confound quantitative assessment of pain behaviors over the disease course. To address this issue, we have established and characterized an optimized EAE-mouse model of MS-induced neuropathic pain. Briefly, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with MOG35-55 (200μg) and adjuvants comprising Quil A (45μg) and pertussis toxin (2×250ng). The traditionally used Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA) was replaced with Quil A, as FCA itself induces CNS neuroinflammation. Herein, EAE-mice exhibited a mild relapsing-remitting clinical disease course with temporal development of mechanical allodynia in the bilateral hindpaws. Mechanical allodynia was fully developed by 28-30days post-immunization (p.i.) and was maintained until study completion (52-60days p.i.), in the absence of confounding motor deficits. Single bolus doses of amitriptyline (1-7mg/kg), gabapentin (10-50mg/kg) and morphine (0.1-2mg/kg) evoked dose-dependent analgesia in the bilateral hindpaws of EAE-mice; the corresponding ED50s were 1.5, 20 and 1mg/kg respectively. At day 39 p.i. in EAE-mice exhibiting mechanical allodynia in the hindpaws, there was marked demyelination and gliosis in the brain and lumbar spinal cord, mirroring these pathobiologic hallmark features of MS in humans. Our optimized EAE-mouse model of MS-associated neuropathic pain will be invaluable for future investigation of the pathobiology of MS-induced neuropathic pain and for efficacy profiling of novel molecules as potential new analgesics for improved relief of this condition. PMID:25223977

  20. PEP-1-FK506BP12 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase expression in human articular chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Park, In Young; Kim, Dae Won; Choi, Soo Young; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein (FK506BP12), an immunosuppressor, modulates T cell activation via calcineurin inhibition. In this study, we investigated the ability of PEP-1-FK506BP12, consisting of FK506BP12 fused to the protein transduction domain PEP-1 peptide, to suppress catabolic responses in primary human chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced paw arthritis model. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis showed that PEP-1-FK506BP12 efficiently penetrated chondrocytes and cartilage explants. In interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-treated chondrocytes, PEP-1-FK506BP12 significantly suppressed the expression of catabolic enzymes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -3, and -13 in addition to cyclooxygenase-2, at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas FK506BP12 alone did not. In addition, PEP-1-FK506BP12 decreased IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complex (p38, JNK, and ERK) and the inhibitor kappa B alpha. In the mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw arthritis, PEP-1-FK506BP12 suppressed both carrageenan-induced MMP-13 production and paw inflammation. PEP-1-FK506BP12 may have therapeutic potential in the alleviation of OA progression. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 407-412] PMID:25887750

  1. PEP-1-FK506BP12 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase expression in human articular chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Park, In Young; Kim, Dae Won; Choi, Soo Young; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-07-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein (FK506BP12), an immunosuppressor, modulates T cell activation via calcineurin inhibition. In this study, we investigated the ability of PEP-1-FK506BP12, consisting of FK506BP12 fused to the protein transduction domain PEP-1 peptide, to suppress catabolic responses in primary human chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced paw arthritis model. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis showed that PEP-1-FK506BP12 efficiently penetrated chondrocytes and cartilage explants. In interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-treated chondrocytes, PEP-1-FK506BP12 significantly suppressed the expression of catabolic enzymes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -3, and -13 in addition to cyclooxygenase-2, at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas FK506BP12 alone did not. In addition, PEP-1-FK506BP12 decreased IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complex (p38, JNK, and ERK) and the inhibitor kappa B alpha. In the mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw arthritis, PEP-1-FK506BP12 suppressed both carrageenan-induced MMP-13 production and paw inflammation. PEP-1-FK506BP12 may have therapeutic potential in the alleviation of OA progression. PMID:25887750

  2. Inhibition of the neuronal NFκB pathway attenuates bortezomib-induced neuropathy in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alé, Albert; Bruna, Jordi; Calls, Aina; Karamita, Maria; Haralambous, Sylva; Probert, Lesley; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor with a remarkable antitumor activity, used in the clinic as first line treatment for multiple myeloma. One hallmark of bortezomib mechanism of action in neoplastic cells is the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), a transcription factor involved in cell survival and proliferation. Bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting toxicity that often requires adjustment of treatment and affects patient's prognosis and quality of life. Since disruption of NFκB pathway can also affect neuronal survival, we assessed the role of NFκB in bortezomib-induced neuropathy by using a transgenic mouse that selectively provides blockage of the NFκB pathway in neurons. Interestingly, we observed that animals with impaired NFκB activation developed significantly less severe neuropathy than wild type animals, with particular preservation of large myelinated fibers, thus suggesting that neuronal NFκB activation plays a positive role in bortezomib induced neuropathy and that bortezomib treatment might induce neuropathy by inhibiting NFκΒ in non-neuronal cell types or by targeting other signaling pathways. Therefore, inhibition of NFκB might be a promising strategy for the cotreatment of cancer and neuropathy. PMID:27211850

  3. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:27584687

  4. Differentiation and transplantation of functional pancreatic beta cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a type 1 diabetes mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kilsoo; Lim, Hyejin; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Park, Seung Hwa; Lim, Yu-Mi; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Lee, Eung-Ryoung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2012-09-20

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a classical animal model for autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), closely mimicking features of human T1D. Thus, the NOD mouse presents an opportunity to test the effectiveness of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a therapeutic modality for T1D. Here, we demonstrate a proof of concept for cellular therapy using NOD mouse-derived iPSCs (NOD-iPSCs). We generated iPSCs from NOD mouse embryonic fibroblasts or NOD mouse pancreas-derived epithelial cells (NPEs), and applied directed differentiation protocols to differentiate the NOD-iPSCs toward functional pancreatic beta cells. Finally, we investigated whether the NPE-iPSC-derived insulin-producing cells could normalize hyperglycemia in transplanted diabetic mice. The NOD-iPSCs showed typical embryonic stem cell-like characteristics such as expression of markers for pluripotency, in vitro differentiation, teratoma formation, and generation of chimeric mice. We developed a method for stepwise differentiation of NOD-iPSCs into insulin-producing cells, and found that NPE-iPSCs differentiate more readily into insulin-producing cells. The differentiated NPE-iPSCs expressed diverse pancreatic beta cell markers and released insulin in response to glucose and KCl stimulation. Transplantation of the differentiated NPE-iPSCs into diabetic mice resulted in kidney engraftment. The engrafted cells responded to glucose by secreting insulin, thereby normalizing blood glucose levels. We propose that NOD-iPSCs will provide a useful tool for investigating genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and generating a cellular interaction model of T1D, paving the way for the potential application of patient-derived iPSCs in autologous beta cell transplantation for treating diabetes. PMID:22512788

  5. Mouse models of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Böck, Barbara C; Stein, Ulrike; Schmitt, Clemens A; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2014-09-01

    The Helmholtz Alliance Preclinical Comprehensive Cancer Center (PCCC; www.helmholtz-pccc.de) hosted the "1st International Kloster Seeon Meeting on Mouse Models of Human Cancer" in the Seeon monastery (Germany) from March 8 to 11, 2014. The meeting focused on the development and application of novel mouse models in tumor research and high-throughput technologies to overcome one of the most critical bottlenecks in translational bench-to-bedside tumor biology research. Moreover, the participants discussed basic molecular mechanisms underlying tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance, which are the prerequisite for the development of novel treatment strategies and clinical applications in cancer therapy. PMID:25136075

  6. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge; Wu, Yu'e; Jia, Huanhuan; Tang, Lu; Huang, Ren; Peng, Yucai; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα) and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC) with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb) significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases. PMID:26977076

  7. Screening for Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes Using Acetaminophen, Amiodarone, and Cyclosporin A as Model Compounds: An Omics-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G.; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H. M.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as ‘the gold standard.’ However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  8. The Role of T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domains 1 and 4 in a Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Behçet's Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ju A.

    2013-01-01

    The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) proteins regulate T cell activation and tolerance. TIM-1 plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses and the development of autoimmune diseases. TIM-4 is a natural ligand of TIM-1, and the interaction of TIM-1 and TIM-4 is involved in the regulation of T helper (Th) cell responses and modulation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, multisystemic inflammatory disorder with arthritic, intestinal, mucocutaneous, ocular, vascular, and central nervous system involvement. Tim-1 expression was lower in a herpes simplex virus-induced BD mouse model compared to that in asymptomatic BD normal (BDN) mice. Tim-4 expression was higher in BD mice than that in BDN mice. In this study, we investigated the Tim expression in a BD mouse model with BD-like symptoms. Tim-1 and Tim-4 expression was regulated by an expression vector or siRNA injected into the BD mouse model. The Tim-1 vector injected into BD mice resulted in changes in BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score. Treatment with Tim-4 siRNA also improved BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score accompanied by upregulation of regulatory T cells. We showed that regulating Tim-1 or Tim-4 affected BD-like symptoms in mice. PMID:24453431

  9. Differential changes in Neuregulin-1 signaling in major brain regions in a lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhai; Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Shuang-Xi; Hu, Cheng-Liang; Shen, Hui-Fan; Huang, Pei-Zhi; Xu, Jun-Ping; Mei, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Ben-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) is involved in multiple biological processes in the nervous system. The present study investigated changes in Nrg1 signaling in the major brain regions of mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. At 24 h post‑intraperitoneal injection of LPS, mouse brain tissues, including tissues from the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus, were collected. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of Nrg1 and its receptors, Neu and ErbB4, at the mRNA level. Western blotting was performed to determine the levels of these proteins and the protein levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)1/2 and Akt1. Immunohistochemical staining was utilized to detect the levels of pNeu and pErbB4 in these regions. LPS successfully induced sites of neuroinflammation in these regions, in which changes in Nrg1, Neu and ErbB4 at the mRNA and protein levels were identified compared with controls. LPS induced a reduction in pNeu and pErbB4 in the striatum and hypothalamus, although marginally increased pErbB4 levels were found in the hippocampus. LPS increased the overall phosphorylation of Src but this effect was reduced in the hypothalamus. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Akt1 was found in the striatum and hippocampus. These data suggest diverse roles for Nrg1 signaling in these regions during the process of neuroinflammation. PMID:27220549

  10. Differential changes in Neuregulin-1 signaling in major brain regions in a lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation mouse model

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHAI; JIANG, QIONG; CHEN, SHUANG-XI; HU, CHENG-LIANG; SHEN, HUI-FAN; HUANG, PEI-ZHI; XU, JUN-PING; MEI, JIN-PING; ZHANG, BEN-PING; ZHAO, WEI-JIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) is involved in multiple biological processes in the nervous system. The present study investigated changes in Nrg1 signaling in the major brain regions of mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. At 24 h post-intraperitoneal injection of LPS, mouse brain tissues, including tissues from the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus, were collected. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of Nrg1 and its receptors, Neu and ErbB4, at the mRNA level. Western blotting was performed to determine the levels of these proteins and the protein levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)1/2 and Akt1. Immunohistochemical staining was utilized to detect the levels of pNeu and pErbB4 in these regions. LPS successfully induced sites of neuroinflammation in these regions, in which changes in Nrg1, Neu and ErbB4 at the mRNA and protein levels were identified compared with controls. LPS induced a reduction in pNeu and pErbB4 in the striatum and hypothalamus, although marginally increased pErbB4 levels were found in the hippocampus. LPS increased the overall phosphorylation of Src but this effect was reduced in the hypothalamus. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Akt1 was found in the striatum and hippocampus. These data suggest diverse roles for Nrg1 signaling in these regions during the process of neuroinflammation. PMID:27220549

  11. MoMuLV-ts-1: A Unique Mouse Model of Retrovirus-Induced Lymphoma Transmitted by Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, J.; Okonta, H.; Bagalb, H.; Duggan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Our laboratory has developed a murine model of lymphoma via breast milk transmission of MoMuLV-ts-1 (Moloney murine leukemia virus-temperature sensitive mutant-1). Uninfected offspring suckled from infected surrogate mothers become infected and develop lymphoma. Multiple gene integration sites of ts-1 into the infected mouse genome including tacc3, aurka, ndel1, tpx2, p53, and rhamm were identified, and mRNA expressions were quantitated. These genes produce centrosomal proteins, which may be involved in abnormal chromosomal segregation leading to aneuploidy or multiploidy, thus causing lymphoma. Since there is no report to date on this retroviral model leading to centrosomal abnormality, and causing lymphoma development, this is a valuable and unique model to study the centrosomal involvement in lymphomagenesis. PMID:22312355

  12. Longitudinal study of differential protein expression in an Alzheimer’s mouse model lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Hoos, Michael D.; Richardson, Brenna M.; Foster, Matthew W.; Everhart, Angela; Thompson, J. Will; Moseley, M. Arthur; Colton, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative process that involves altered brain immune, neuronal and metabolic functions. Understanding the underlying mechanisms has relied on mouse models that mimic components of AD pathology. We used gel-free, label-free LC/MS/MS to quantify protein and phosphopeptide levels in brains of APPSwDI/NOS2−/− (CVN-AD) mice. CVN-AD mice show a full spectrum of AD-like pathology, including amyloid deposition, hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau and neuronal loss that worsens with age. Tryptic digests, with or without phosphopeptide enrichment on an automated titanium dioxide LC system, were separated by on-line two-dimensional LC and analyzed on a Waters Synapt G2 HDMS, yielding relative expression for >950 proteins and >1100 phosphopeptides. Among differentially expressed proteins were known markers found in humans with AD, including GFAP and C1Q. Phosphorylation of connexin 43, not previously described in AD, was increased at 42 weeks, consistent with dysregulation of gap junctions and activation of astrocytes. Additional alterations in phosphoproteins suggests dysregulation of mitochondria, synaptic transmission, vesicle trafficking and innate immune pathways. These data validate the CVN-AD mouse model of AD, identify novel disease and age-related changes in the brain during disease progression and demonstrate the utility of integrating unbiased and phosphoproteomics for understanding disease processes in AD. PMID:24006891

  13. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics. PMID:25777761

  14. Optimization of immune responses induced by therapeutic vaccination with cross-reactive antigens in a humanized hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bourgine, Maryline; Dion, Sarah; Godon, Ophélie; Guillen, Gerardo; Michel, Marie-Louise; Aguilar, Julio Cesar

    2012-08-15

    The absence of relevant animal models of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has hampered the evaluation and development of therapeutic HBV vaccines. In this study, we generated a novel transgenic mouse lineage that expresses human class I and II HLA molecules and the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). HBsAg and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) administered as plasmid DNAs and recombinant proteins, either alone or in combination, were evaluated as therapeutic vaccine candidates in this mouse model. Our results emphasize the importance of the route of administration in breaking HBsAg tolerance. Although immunizing the transgenic mice with DNA encoding homologous HBsAg was sufficient to induce CD8+ T-cell responses, HBsAg from a heterologous subtype was required to induce a CD4+ T-cell response. Importantly, only prime-boost immunization protocols that combined plasmid DNA injection followed by protein injection induced the production of antibodies against the HBsAg expressed by the transgenic mice. PMID:22591777

  15. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  16. The HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein Disrupts Dendritic Cell Function and Induces the Systemic Expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ Cells in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Damian-Morales, Gabriela; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M.; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Rodríguez-Uribe, Genaro; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein on dendritic cells (DCs) and CD11b+Gr1+ cells using the K14E7 transgenic mouse model. Materials and Methods. The morphology of DCs was analyzed in male mouse skin on epidermal sheets using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentages of DCs and CD11b+Gr1+ cells in different tissues and to evaluate the migration of DCs. Results. In the K14E7 mouse model, the morphology of Langerhans cells and the migratory activity of dendritic cells were abnormal. An increase in CD11b+Gr1+ cells was observed in the blood and skin of K14E7 mice, and molecules related to CD11b+Gr1+ chemoattraction (MCP1 and S100A9) were upregulated. Conclusions. These data suggest that the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein impairs the function and morphology of DCs and induces the systemic accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells. PMID:27478837

  17. The HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein Disrupts Dendritic Cell Function and Induces the Systemic Expansion of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) Cells in a Transgenic Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Damian-Morales, Gabriela; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Rodríguez-Uribe, Genaro; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Lambert, Paul F; Gariglio, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein on dendritic cells (DCs) and CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells using the K14E7 transgenic mouse model. Materials and Methods. The morphology of DCs was analyzed in male mouse skin on epidermal sheets using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentages of DCs and CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells in different tissues and to evaluate the migration of DCs. Results. In the K14E7 mouse model, the morphology of Langerhans cells and the migratory activity of dendritic cells were abnormal. An increase in CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells was observed in the blood and skin of K14E7 mice, and molecules related to CD11b(+)Gr1(+) chemoattraction (MCP1 and S100A9) were upregulated. Conclusions. These data suggest that the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein impairs the function and morphology of DCs and induces the systemic accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells. PMID:27478837

  18. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentilin, Lorena; Baj, Gabriele; Giraudi, Pablo; Bellarosa, Cristina; Giacca, Mauro; Tiribelli, Claudio; Muro, Andrés F.

    2012-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar type I (CNI) syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) deficiency. The disease is lethal due to bilirubin-induced neurological damage unless phototherapy is applied from birth. However, treatment becomes less effective during growth, and liver transplantation is required. To investigate the pathophysiology of the disease and therapeutic approaches in mice, we generated a mouse model by introducing a premature stop codon in the UGT1a1 gene, which results in an inactive enzyme. Homozygous mutant mice developed severe jaundice soon after birth and died within 11 d, showing significant cerebellar alterations. To rescue neonatal lethality, newborns were injected with a single dose of adeno-associated viral vector 9 (AAV9) expressing the human UGT1A1. Gene therapy treatment completely rescued all AAV-treated mutant mice, accompanied by lower plasma bilirubin levels and normal brain histology and motor coordination. Our mouse model of CNI reproduces genetic and phenotypic features of the human disease. We have shown, for the first time, the full recovery of the lethal effects of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We believe that, besides gene-addition-based therapies, our mice could represent a very useful model to develop and test novel technologies based on gene correction by homologous recombination.—Bortolussi, G., Zentilin, L., Baj, G., Giraudi, P., Bellarosa, C., Giacca, M., Tiribelli, C., Muro, A. F. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer. PMID:22094718

  19. CD34 Promotes Pathological Epi-Retinal Neovascularization in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siemerink, Martin J.; Dallinga, Marchien G.; Gora, Tomek; Cait, Jessica; Vogels, Ilse M. C.; Yetin-Arik, Bahar; Van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Klaassen, Ingeborg; McNagny, Kelly M.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.

    2016-01-01

    The sialomucins CD34 and podocalyxin (PODXL) are anti-adhesive molecules expressed at the luminal membrane of endothelial cells of small blood vessels and facilitate vascular lumen formation in the developing mouse aorta. CD34 transcript and protein levels are increased during human angiogenesis, its expression is particularly enriched on endothelial tip cell filopodia and CD34 is a marker for tip cells in vitro. Here, we investigated whether CD34 merely marks endothelial tip cells or has a functional role in tip cells and angiogenesis. We assessed that silencing CD34 in human microvascular endothelial cells has little effect on endothelial cell migration or invasion, but has a significant effect on vascular-endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenic sprouting activity in vitro. In vivo, the absence of CD34 reduced the density of filopodia on retinal endothelial tip cells in neonatal mice, but did not influence the overall architecture of the retinal vascular network. In oxygen-induced retinopathy, Cd34-/- mice showed normal intra-retinal regenerative angiogenesis but the number of pathological epi-retinal neovascular tufts were reduced. We conclude that CD34 is not essential for developmental vascularization in the retina, but its expression promotes the formation of pathological, invasive vessels during neovascularization. PMID:27352134

  20. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models. PMID:26165235

  1. Acute inflammation induces immunomodulatory effects on myeloid cells associated with anti-tumor responses in a tumor mouse model.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed L; Attia, Zeinab I; Galal, Sohaila M

    2016-03-01

    Given the self nature of cancer, anti-tumor immune response is weak. As such, acute inflammation induced by microbial products can induce signals that result in initiation of an inflammatory cascade that helps activation of immune cells. We aimed to compare the nature and magnitude of acute inflammation induced by toll-like receptor ligands (TLRLs) on the tumor growth and the associated inflammatory immune responses. To induce acute inflammation in tumor-bearing host, CD1 mice were inoculated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) (5 × 10(5) cells/mouse), and then treated with i.p. injection on day 1, day 7 or days 1 + 7 with: (1) polyinosinic:polycytidylic (poly(I:C)) (TLR3L); (2) Poly-ICLC (clinical grade of TLR3L); (3) Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) (coding for TLR9L); (4) Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) (coding for TLR9L); and (5) Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA). Treatment with poly(I:C), Poly-ICLC, BCG, CFA, or IFA induced anti-tumor activities as measured by 79.1%, 75.94%, 73.94%, 71.88% and 47.75% decreases, respectively in the total number of tumor cells collected 7 days after tumor challenge. Among the tested TLRLs, both poly(I:C) (TLR3L) and BCG (contain TLR9L) showed the highest anti-tumor effects as reflected by the decrease in the number of EAc cells. These effects were associated with a 2-fold increase in the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing the myeloid markers CD11b(+)Ly6G(+), CD11b(+)Ly6G(-), and CD11b(+)Ly6G(-). We concluded that Provision of the proper inflammatory signal with optimally defined magnitude and duration during tumor growth can induce inflammatory immune cells with potent anti-tumor responses without vaccination. PMID:26966565

  2. Acute inflammation induces immunomodulatory effects on myeloid cells associated with anti-tumor responses in a tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed L.; Attia, Zeinab I.; Galal, Sohaila M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the self nature of cancer, anti-tumor immune response is weak. As such, acute inflammation induced by microbial products can induce signals that result in initiation of an inflammatory cascade that helps activation of immune cells. We aimed to compare the nature and magnitude of acute inflammation induced by toll-like receptor ligands (TLRLs) on the tumor growth and the associated inflammatory immune responses. To induce acute inflammation in tumor-bearing host, CD1 mice were inoculated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) (5 × 105 cells/mouse), and then treated with i.p. injection on day 1, day 7 or days 1 + 7 with: (1) polyinosinic:polycytidylic (poly(I:C)) (TLR3L); (2) Poly-ICLC (clinical grade of TLR3L); (3) Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) (coding for TLR9L); (4) Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) (coding for TLR9L); and (5) Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA). Treatment with poly(I:C), Poly-ICLC, BCG, CFA, or IFA induced anti-tumor activities as measured by 79.1%, 75.94%, 73.94%, 71.88% and 47.75% decreases, respectively in the total number of tumor cells collected 7 days after tumor challenge. Among the tested TLRLs, both poly(I:C) (TLR3L) and BCG (contain TLR9L) showed the highest anti-tumor effects as reflected by the decrease in the number of EAc cells. These effects were associated with a 2-fold increase in the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing the myeloid markers CD11b+Ly6G+, CD11b+Ly6G−, and CD11b+Ly6G−. We concluded that Provision of the proper inflammatory signal with optimally defined magnitude and duration during tumor growth can induce inflammatory immune cells with potent anti-tumor responses without vaccination. PMID:26966565

  3. Analgesic effects of clinically used compounds in novel mouse models of polyneuropathy induced by oxaliplatin and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Lim, Yu Ling; Rodrigues de Sousa, Silmara; Lewis, Richard J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Cabot, Peter J.; Vetter, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the major dose-limiting side effect of cisplatin and oxaliplatin, and there are currently no effective treatments available. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacological mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in novel animal models based on intraplantar administration of cisplatin and oxaliplatin and to systematically evaluate the analgesic efficacy of a range of therapeutics. Methods Neuropathy was induced by a single intraplantar injection of cisplatin or oxaliplatin in C57BL/6J mice and assessed by quantification of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The pharmacological basis of cisplatin-induced neuropathy was characterized using a range of selective pharmacological inhibitors. The analgesic effects of phenytoin, amitriptyline, oxcarbazepine, mexiletine, topiramate, retigabine, gabapentin, fentanyl, and Ca2+/Mg2+ were assessed 24 hours after induction of neuropathy. Results Intraplantar administration of cisplatin led to the development of mechanical allodynia, mediated through Nav1.6-expressing sensory neurons. Unlike intraplantar injection of oxaliplatin, cold allodynia was not observed with cisplatin, consistent with clinical observations. Surprisingly, only fentanyl was effective at alleviating cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia despite a lack of efficacy in oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia. Conversely, lamotrigine, phenytoin, retigabine, and gabapentin were effective at reversing oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia but had no effect on cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Oxcarbazepine, amitriptyline, mexiletine, and topiramate lacked efficacy in both models of acute chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. Conclusion This study established a novel animal model of cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia consistent with the A-fiber neuropathy seen clinically. Systematic assessment of a range of therapeutics identified several candidates that warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:24714523

  4. Sulforaphane promotes immune responses in a WEHI‑3‑induced leukemia mouse model through enhanced phagocytosis of macrophages and natural killer cell activities in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Luen; Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Yung-Liang; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Liao, Nien-Chieh; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-05-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate, inducing cytotoxic effects in various human cancer cells, including leukemia cells through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the effect of SFN on the immune responses in a leukemia mouse model remains to be investigated. The present study investigated whether SFN has an effect on the immune responses in a WEHI‑3‑induced leukemia mouse model in vivo. Normal BALB/c mice were injected with WEHI‑3 cells to generate the leukemia mouse model, and were subsequently treated with placebo or SFN (0, 285, 570 and 1,140 mg/kg) for 3 weeks. Following treatment, all mice were weighted and blood samples were collected. In addition, liver and spleen samples were isolated to determine cell markers, phagocytosis and natural killer (NK) cell activities, and cell proliferation was examined using flow cytometry. The results indicated that SFN treatment had no significant effect on the spleen weight, however it decreased liver and body weight. Furthermore, SFN treatment increased the percentage levels of CD3 (T cells) and CD19 (B cell maker), however had no effect on the levels of CD11b (monocytes) or Mac‑3 (macrophages), compared with the WEHI‑3 control groups. The administration of SFN increased the phagocytosis of macrophages from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and peritoneal cavity, and increased the activity of NK cells from splenocytes. Administration of SFN promoted T and B cell proliferation following stimulation with concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide, respectively. PMID:27035756

  5. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste; and others

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.

  6. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), staphylococcal protein A (SPA), α-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1). Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 μg/eye to 1.0 μg/eye) increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1β. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold) and HKSA (7.3-fold), in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold) and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG) analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and α-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis. PMID:26053426

  7. Combined therapy with m-TOR-dependent and -independent autophagy inducers causes neurotoxicity in a mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Silva, S; Silva-Fernandes, A; Neves-Carvalho, A; Soares-Cunha, C; Teixeira-Castro, A; Maciel, P

    2016-01-28

    A major pathological hallmark in several neurodegenerative disorders, like polyglutamine disorders (polyQ), including Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is the formation of protein aggregates. MJD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene, resulting in an abnormal protein, which is prone to misfolding and forms cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates within neurons, ultimately inducing neurodegeneration. Treatment of proteinopathies with drugs that up-regulate autophagy has shown promising results in models of polyQ diseases. Temsirolimus (CCI-779) inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR), while lithium chloride (LiCl) acts by inhibiting inositol monophosphatase, both being able to induce autophagy. We have previously shown that chronic treatment with LiCl (10.4 mg/kg) had limited effects in a transgenic MJD mouse model. Also, others have shown that CCI-779 had mild positive effects in a different mouse model of the disease. It has been suggested that the combination of mTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy inducers could be a more effective therapeutic approach. To further explore this avenue toward therapy, we treated CMVMJD135 transgenic mice with a conjugation of CCI-779 and LiCl, both at concentrations known to induce autophagy and not to be toxic. Surprisingly, this combined treatment proved to be deleterious to both wild-type (wt) and transgenic animals, failing to rescue their neurological symptoms and actually exerting neurotoxic effects. These results highlight the possible dangers of manipulating autophagy in the nervous system and suggest that a better understanding of the potential disruption in the autophagy pathway in MJD is required before successful long-term autophagy modulating therapies can be developed. PMID:26601773

  8. Subepidermal Blistering Induced by Human Autoantibodies to BP180 Requires Innate Immune Players in a Humanized Bullous Pemphigoid Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Sui, Wen; Zhao, Minglang; Li, Zhuowei; Li, Ning; Thresher, Randy; Giudice, George J.; Fairley, Janet A.; Sitaru, Cassian; Zillikens, Detlef; Ning, Gang; Marinkovich, Peter; Diaz, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a cutaneous autoimmune inflammatory disease associated with subepidermal blistering and autoantibodies against BP180, a transmembrane collagen and major component of the hemidesmosome. Numerous inflammatory cells infiltrate the upper dermis in BP. IgG autoantibodies in BP fix complement and target multiple BP180 epitopes that are highly clustered within a non-collagen linker domain, termed NC16A. Anti-BP180 antibodies induce BP in mice. In this study, we generated a humanized mouse strain, in which the murine BP180NC14A is replaced with the homologous human BP180NC16A epitope cluster region. We show that the humanized NC16A (NC16A+/+) mice injected with anti-BP180NC16A autoantibodies develop BP-like subepidermal blisters. The F(ab′)2 fragments of pathogenic IgG fail to activate complement cascade and are no longer pathogenic. The NC16A+/+ mice pretreated with mast cell activation blocker or depleting of complement or neutrophils become resistant to BP. These findings suggest that the humoral response in BP critically depends on innate immune system players. PMID:18922680

  9. PREVENTING POLYGLUTAMINE-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF C-JUN DELAYS NEURONAL DYSFUNCTION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF SCA7 RETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Merienne, Karine; Friedman, James; Akimoto, Masayuki; Abou-Sleymane, Gretta; Weber, Chantal; Swaroop, Anand; Trottier, Yvon

    2007-01-01

    We have approached the role of cellular stress in neurodegenerative diseases caused by polyglutamine expansion (polyQ) in the context of Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) that includes retinal degeneration. Using the R7E mouse, in which polyQ-ataxin-7 is specifically over-expressed in rod photoreceptors, we previously showed that rod dysfunction correlated to moderate and prolonged activation of the JNK/c-Jun stress pathway. SCA7 retinopathy was also associated with reduced expression of rod-specific genes, including the transcription factor Nrl, which is essential for rod differentiation and function. Here, we report that R7E retinopathy is improved upon breeding with the JunAA knock-in mice, in which JNK-mediated activation of c-Jun is compromised. Expression of Nrl and its downstream targets, which are involved in phototranduction, are partially restored in the JunAA-R7E mice. We further show that c-Jun can directly repress the transcription of Nrl. Our studies suggest that polyQ-induced cellular stress leads to repression of genes necessary for neuronal fate and function. PMID:17189700

  10. Dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway is responsible for impaired embryo implantation in a Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong-Song; Gao, Fei; Qi, Qian-Rong; Qin, Fu-Niu; Zuo, Ru-Juan; Li, Zi-Long; Liu, Ji-Long; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide with the trend of patients being young and creating a significant burden on health systems, including reproductive problems, but the effects of diabetes on embryo implantation are still poorly understood. Our study was to examine effects of diabetes on mouse embryo implantation, providing experimental basis for treating diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ) was applied to induce type 1 diabetes from day 2 of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy in mice. Embryo transfer was used to analyze effects of uterine environment on embryo implantation. Our results revealed that the implantation rate is significantly reduced in diabetic mice compared to controls, and the change of uterine environment is the main reason leading to the decreased implantation rate. Compared to control, the levels of LIF and p-STAT3 are significantly decreased in diabetic mice on day 4 of pregnancy, and serum estrogen level is significantly higher. Estrogen stimulates LIF expression under physiological level, but the excessive estrogen inhibits LIF expression. LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement can rescue embryo implantation in diabetic mice. Our data indicated that the dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway caused by the high level of estrogen results in the impaired implantation in diabetic mice, which can be rescued by LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement. PMID:26002932

  11. Glutathione Supplementation Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Apoptosis in a Mouse Model of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Lu, Qing; Black, Stephen M.; Sharma, Shruti

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life threatening condition associated with hypoxemia, diffuse alveolar damage, inflammation, and loss of lung function. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a major virulence factor involved in the development of ALI. The depletion of glutathione (GSH), an essential intra- and extra-cellular protective antioxidant, by LPS is an important event that contributes to the elevation in reactive oxygen species. Whether restoring GSH homeostasis can effectively ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular apoptosis in ALI is unknown and therefore, was the focus of this study. In peripheral lung tissue of LPS-treated mice, hydrogen peroxide and protein nitration levels were significantly increased. Pre-treatment with GSH-ethyl ester (GSH-EE) prevented this increase in oxidative stress. LPS also increased the lactate/pyruvate ratio, attenuated SOD2 protein levels, and decreased ATP levels in the mouse lung indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction. Again, GSH-EE treatment preserved the mitochondrial function. Finally, our studies showed that LPS induced an increase in the mitochondrial translocation of Bax, caspase 3 activation, and nuclear DNA fragmentation and these parameters were all prevented with GSH-EE. Thus, this study suggests that GSH-EE supplementation may reduce the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with ALI. PMID:22654772

  12. STAT3 mutations identified in human hematologic neoplasms induce myeloid malignancies in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Couronné, Lucile; Scourzic, Laurianne; Pilati, Camilla; Valle, Véronique Della; Duffourd, Yannis; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Damm, Frederik; Stern, Marc-Henri; Gaulard, Philippe; Lamant, Laurence; Delabesse, Eric; Merle-Beral, Hélène; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Fontenay, Michaëla; Tilly, Hervé; Bastard, Christian; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Bernard, Olivier A.; Mercher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    STAT3 protein phosphorylation is a frequent event in various hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Acquired STAT3 mutations have been recently identified in 40% of patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia, a rare T-cell disorder. In this study, we investigated the mutational status of STAT3 in a large series of patients with lymphoid and myeloid diseases. STAT3 mutations were identified in 1.6% (4 of 258) of patients with T-cell neoplasms, in 2.5% (2 of 79) of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but in no other B-cell lymphoma patients (0 of 104) or patients with myeloid malignancies (0 of 96). Functional in vitro assays indicated that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to a constitutive phosphorylation of the protein. STA21, a STAT3 small molecule inhibitor, inhibited the proliferation of two distinct STAT3 mutated cell lines. Using a mouse bone marrow transplantation assay, we observed that STAT3Y640F expression leads to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms with expansion of either myeloid cells or megakaryocytes. Together, these data indicate that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to constitutive activation of STAT3, induces malignant hematopoiesis in vivo, and may represent a novel therapeutic target in some lymphoid malignancies. PMID:23872306

  13. Radiation-induced lung fibrosis in a tumor-bearing mouse model is associated with enhanced Type-2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yacheng; Mei, Zijie; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Jie; Li, Xin; Yao, Ye; Xie, Conghua

    2016-01-01

    Lung fibrosis may be associated with Type-2 polarized inflammation. Herein, we aim to investigate whether radiation can initiate a Type-2 immune response and contribute to the progression of pulmonary fibrosis in tumor-bearing animals. We developed a tumor-bearing mouse model with Lewis lung cancer to receive either radiation therapy alone or radiation combined with Th1 immunomodulator unmethylated cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine containing oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN). The Type-2 immune phenotype in tumors and the histological grade of lung fibrosis were evaluated in mice sacrificed three weeks after irradiation. Mouse lung tissues were analyzed for hydroxyproline and the expression of Type-1/Type-2 key transcription factors (T-bet/GATA-3). The concentration of Type-1/Type-2 cytokines in serum was measured by cytometric bead array. Lung fibrosis was observed to be more serious in tumor-bearing mice than in normal mice post-irradiation. The fibrosis score in irradiated tumor-bearing mice on Day 21 was 4.33 ± 0.82, which was higher than that of normal mice (2.00 ± 0.63; P < 0.05). Hydroxyproline and GATA-3 expression were increased in the lung tissues of tumor-bearing mice following irradiation. CpG-ODN attenuated fibrosis by markedly decreasing GATA-3 expression. Serum IL-13 and IL-5 were elevated, whereas INF-γ and IL-12 expression were decreased in irradiated tumor-bearing mice. These changes were reversed after CpG-ODN treatment. Thus, Type-2 immunity in tumors appeared to affect the outcome of radiation damage and might be of interest for future studies on developing approaches in which Type-1–related immunotherapy and radiotherapy are used in combination. PMID:26703457

  14. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS INDUCED BY DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) - EXPLORATION OF THE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based mathematical model for the induction of liver tumors in mice by dichloroacetic acid (DCA) has been developed from histopathologic analysis of the livers of exposed mice. This analysis suggests that following chronic exposure to DCA, carcinomas can arise dire...

  15. Effect of Corilagin on the miR-21/smad7/ERK signaling pathway in a schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yao; Xue, Jun; Ma, Qian; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Yun-Fei; Shang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Quan-Qiang; Zhang, Shu-Ling; Zhao, Lei

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to investigate the anti-fibrotic effect of Corilagin via interference with the miR-21/smad7/ERK signaling pathway in a schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis mouse model. Mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum cercaria to establish the mouse model of schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis. At four weeks after infection, the groups were given different medications. The living conditions were observed. Real-time PCR was employed to detect the mRNA levels of miR-21, smad7 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and western blotting was used to examine the protein levels of smad7, CTGF, smad1, p-smad1, smad2, p-smad2, ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2 and TGF-β receptor I. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of CTGF. Compared with the model group, increasing concentrations of Corilagin improved the quality of life, inhibited the mRNA expression of miR-21, promoted smad7 protein expression, and inhibited CTGF protein expression (p<0.05 or 0.01). Moreover, Corilagin significantly reduced the protein levels of p-smad1, p-smad2, p-ERK1/2, and TGF-β receptor I (p<0.05 or 0.01). CTGF staining in the cytoplasm was markedly decreased by Corilagin (p<0.05 or 0.01). In conclusion, Corilagin inhibited schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis via the miR21/smad7/ERK pathway in this animal model. PMID:26946098

  16. PDE2 is a novel target for attenuating tumor formation in a mouse model of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jamie J; Lou, You-Rong; Peng, Qing-Yun; Li, Tao; Lu, Yao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the topical application of caffeine is a potent inhibitor of UVB-induced carcinogenesis and selectively increases apoptosis in tumors but not in non-tumor areas of the epidermis in mice that are at a high risk for developing skin cancer. While this effect is mainly through a p53 independent pathway, the mechanism by which caffeine inhibits skin tumor formation has not been fully elucidated. Since caffeine is a non-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, we investigated the effects of several PDE inhibitors on the formation of sunburn cells in mouse skin after an acute exposure to ultraviolet light B (UVB). The topical application of a PDE2 inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine hydrochloride (EHNA hydrochloride), stimulated epidermal apoptosis compared to control (P<0.01) and to a greater extent than caffeine whereas a PDE4 inhibitor attenuated the epidermal apoptosis compared to control (P<0.01). Since PDE2 hydrolyzes cyclic nucleotides, mainly cGMP, the effects of EHNA hydrochloride on epidermal apoptosis following UVB exposure may be mediated, in part, by increased cGMP signaling. Data demonstrated that the topical application of dibutyryl cGMP stimulated epidermal apoptosis (P<0.01) following an acute exposure to UVB. Treating UVB-pretreated mice topically with 3.1 µmole or 0.8 µmole of EHNA hydrochloride attenuated tumor formation to a greater extent than treating with 6.2 µmole caffeine when these compounds were applied once a day, five days a week for 18 weeks. These observations suggest a novel role for PDE2 in UVB-induced tumorigenesis and that PDE2 inhibitors that mediate cGMP signaling may be useful for the prevention and treatment of skin cancer. PMID:25330380

  17. PDE2 Is a Novel Target for Attenuating Tumor Formation in a Mouse Model of UVB-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jamie J.; Lou, You-Rong; Peng, Qing-Yun; Li, Tao; Lu, Yao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the topical application of caffeine is a potent inhibitor of UVB-induced carcinogenesis and selectively increases apoptosis in tumors but not in non-tumor areas of the epidermis in mice that are at a high risk for developing skin cancer. While this effect is mainly through a p53 independent pathway, the mechanism by which caffeine inhibits skin tumor formation has not been fully elucidated. Since caffeine is a non-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, we investigated the effects of several PDE inhibitors on the formation of sunburn cells in mouse skin after an acute exposure to ultraviolet light B (UVB). The topical application of a PDE2 inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine hydrochloride (EHNA hydrochloride), stimulated epidermal apoptosis compared to control (P<0.01) and to a greater extent than caffeine whereas a PDE4 inhibitor attenuated the epidermal apoptosis compared to control (P<0.01). Since PDE2 hydrolyzes cyclic nucleotides, mainly cGMP, the effects of EHNA hydrochloride on epidermal apoptosis following UVB exposure may be mediated, in part, by increased cGMP signaling. Data demonstrated that the topical application of dibutyryl cGMP stimulated epidermal apoptosis (P<0.01) following an acute exposure to UVB. Treating UVB-pretreated mice topically with 3.1 µmole or 0.8 µmole of EHNA hydrochloride attenuated tumor formation to a greater extent than treating with 6.2 µmole caffeine when these compounds were applied once a day, five days a week for 18 weeks. These observations suggest a novel role for PDE2 in UVB-induced tumorigenesis and that PDE2 inhibitors that mediate cGMP signaling may be useful for the prevention and treatment of skin cancer. PMID:25330380

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell-based HSP70 promoter-driven VEGFA induction by resveratrol alleviates elastase-induced emphysema in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Young-Bin; Lan, Ying-Wei; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Huang, Tsung-Teng; Choo, Kong-Bung; Cheng, Winston T K; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a sustained blockage of the airways due to lung inflammation occurring with chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. Progression of emphysema may be slowed by vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), which reduces apoptotic tissue depletion. Previously, authors of the present report demonstrated that cis-resveratrol (c-RSV)-induced heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) promoter-regulated VEGFA expression promoted neovascularization of genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (HSP-VEGFA-MSC) in a mouse model of ischemic disease. Here, this same stem cell line was evaluated for its protective capacity to alleviate elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice. Results of this study showed that c-RSV-treatment of HSP-VEGFA-MSC exhibited synergy between HSP70 transcription activity and induced expression of anti-oxidant-related genes when challenged by cigarette smoke extracts. Eight weeks after jugular vein injection of HSP-VEGFA-MSC into mice with elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema followed by c-RSV treatment to induce transgene expression, significant improvement was observed in respiratory functions. Expression of VEGFA, endogenous nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf 2), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was significantly increased in the lung tissues of the c-RSV-treated mice. Histopathologic examination of treated mice revealed gradual but significant abatement of emphysema and restoration of airspace volume. In conclusion, the present investigation demonstrates that c-RSV-regulated VEGFA expression in HSP-VEGFA-MSC significantly improved the therapeutic effects on the treatment of COPD in the mouse, possibly avoiding side effects associated with constitutive VEGFA expression. PMID:26243699

  19. Neuroprotective effects of piperine on the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Chen, Yu-Hua; Liu, Hao; Qu, Hong-Dang

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease as the most common and debilitating age-associated neurodegenerative disorder. Currently, no therapy has been shown to unequivocally retard or arrest the progression of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of piperine on the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6‑tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinson's mouse model. For MPTP treatment, the animals received repeated intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of MPTP (30 mg/kg) solution for 7 days. Piperine (10 mg/kg) was administered orally for 15 days including 8 days of pretreatment. Motor behavior analysis was conducted with the rotarod test. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess the cognitive learning ability of the mice. A histological examination was subsequently conducted. The results ddemonstrate that piperine treatment attenuated MPTP-induced deficits in motor coordination and cognitive functioning. Piperine also prevented MPTP-induced decreases in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Additionally, piperine reduced the number of activated microglia, expression of cytokine IL-1β, and oxidative stress following MPTP treatment. An anti-apoptotic property of piperine was identified by maintaining the balance of Bcl-2/Bax. In conclusion, the results show that piperine exerts a protective effect on dopaminergic neurons via antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in an MPTP-induced mouse model of PD. Thus, piperine is a potential therapeutic treatment for PD. PMID:26648012

  20. Deficits in hippocampal CA1 LTP induced by TBS but not HFS in the Ts65Dn mouse: a model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto C S; Grybko, Michael J

    2005-07-15

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetically defined cause of intellectual disabilities. Both hippocampal function and volume seem to be disproportionally reduced in individuals with DS and in at least one aneuploid murine model of DS, the Ts65Dn mouse. Two previous studies by one research group have reported deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by in vitro high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of hippocampal CA1 synapses of adult Ts65Dn mice. Here, we report on the results of our own investigation on LTP in Ts65Dn mice. This study was designed to confirm the previous findings and possibly shed some light onto potential mechanisms underlying the reported deficit in this important form of long-term synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DS. LTP was induced in area CA1 with either theta burst stimulation (TBS) or HFS. Contrary to the previous reports, our results showed no significant difference in HFS-induced LTP between Ts65Dn and euploid littermate mice. We have found, however, a significant reduction of the amount of TBS-induced LTP in Ts65Dn mice compared to euploid controls. Because this specific LTP deficit can be rescued by bath application of picrotoxin (10 microM), we hypothesize that an increase in GABA(A)-mediated inhibition or in plasticity of the inhibitory circuitry in Ts65Dn mice may underlie the observed deficits. However, future experiments to examine the state of hippocampus CA1 GABAergic inhibition in Ts65Dn mice will be necessary to further explore these hypotheses. PMID:15925111

  1. Diphenyl diselenide administration enhances cortical mitochondrial number and activity by increasing hemeoxygenase type 1 content in a methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Viviane; Martins, Roberta de Paula; Vieira, Ana Julia Hoffmann; Oliveira, Eliana de Medeiros; Straliotto, Marcos Raniel; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Inés; de Bem, Andreza Fabro; Farina, Marcelo; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; De Paul, Ana Lucia; Latini, Alexandra

    2014-05-01

    Interest in biochemistry of organoselenium compound has increased in the last decades, mainly due to their chemical and biological activities. Here, we investigated the protective effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 (5 μmol/kg), in a mouse model of methylmercury (MeHg)-induced brain toxicity. Swiss male mice were divided into four experimental groups: control, (PhSe)2 (5 μmol/kg, subcutaneous administration), MeHg (40 mg/L, in tap water), and MeHg + (PhSe)2. After the treatment (21 days), the animals were killed and the cerebral cortex was analyzed. Electron microscopy indicated an enlarged and fused mitochondria leading to a reduced number of organelles, in the MeHg-exposed mice. Furthermore, cortical creatine kinase activity, a sensitive mitochondrial oxidative stress sensor, was almost abolished by MeHg. Subcutaneous (PhSe)2 co-treatment rescued from MeHg-induced mitochondrial alterations. (PhSe)2 also behaved as an enhancer of mitochondrial biogenesis, by increasing cortical mitochondria content in mouse-receiving (PhSe)2 alone. Mechanistically, (PhSe)2 (1 μM; 24 h) would trigger the cytoprotective Nrf-2 pathway for activating target genes, since astroglial cells exposed to the chalcogen showed increased content of hemeoxygenase type 1, a sensitive marker of the activation of this via. Thus, it is proposed that the (PhSe)2-neuroprotective effect might be linked to its mitoprotective activity. PMID:24623265

  2. Increased expression of SVCT2 in a new mouse model raises ascorbic acid in tissues and protects against paraquat-induced oxidative damage in lung.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Fiona Edith; Best, Jennifer Lee; Meredith, Martha Elizabeth; Gamlin, Clare Ruth; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; May, James Marion; May, James Michael

    2012-01-01

    A new transgenic mouse model for global increases in the Sodium Dependent Vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) has been generated. The SVCT2-Tg mouse shows increased SVCT2 mRNA levels in all organs tested and correspondingly increased ascorbic acid (ASC) levels in all organs except liver. The extent of the increase in transporter mRNA expression differed among mice and among organs. The increased ASC levels did not have any adverse effects on behavior in the SVCT2-Tg mice, which did not differ from wild-type mice on tests of locomotor activity, anxiety, sensorimotor or cognitive ability. High levels of SVCT2 and ASC were found in the kidneys of SVCT2-Tg mice and urinary albumin excretion was lower in these mice than in wild-types. No gross pathological changes were noted in kidneys from SVCT2-Tg mice. SVCT2 immunoreactivity was detected in both SVCT2 and wild-type mice, and a stronger signal was seen in tubules than in glomeruli. Six treatments with Paraquat (3x10 and 3x15 mg/kg i.p.) were used to induce oxidative stress in mice. SVCT2-Tg mice showed a clear attenuation of Paraquat-induced oxidative stress in lung, as measured by F(2)-isoprostanes. Paraquat also decreased SVCT2 mRNA signal in liver, lung and kidney in SVCT2-Tg mice. PMID:22558179

  3. Increased Expression of SVCT2 in a New Mouse Model Raises Ascorbic Acid in Tissues and Protects against Paraquat-Induced Oxidative Damage in Lung

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona Edith; Best, Jennifer Lee; Meredith, Martha Elizabeth; Gamlin, Clare Ruth; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; May, James Michael

    2012-01-01

    A new transgenic mouse model for global increases in the Sodium Dependent Vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) has been generated. The SVCT2-Tg mouse shows increased SVCT2 mRNA levels in all organs tested and correspondingly increased ascorbic acid (ASC) levels in all organs except liver. The extent of the increase in transporter mRNA expression differed among mice and among organs. The increased ASC levels did not have any adverse effects on behavior in the SVCT2-Tg mice, which did not differ from wild-type mice on tests of locomotor activity, anxiety, sensorimotor or cognitive ability. High levels of SVCT2 and ASC were found in the kidneys of SVCT2-Tg mice and urinary albumin excretion was lower in these mice than in wild-types. No gross pathological changes were noted in kidneys from SVCT2-Tg mice. SVCT2 immunoreactivity was detected in both SVCT2 and wild-type mice, and a stronger signal was seen in tubules than in glomeruli. Six treatments with Paraquat (3x10 and 3x15 mg/kg i.p.) were used to induce oxidative stress in mice. SVCT2-Tg mice showed a clear attenuation of Paraquat-induced oxidative stress in lung, as measured by F2-isoprostanes. Paraquat also decreased SVCT2 mRNA signal in liver, lung and kidney in SVCT2-Tg mice. PMID:22558179

  4. Quetiapine Inhibits Microglial Activation by Neutralizing Abnormal STIM1-Mediated Intercellular Calcium Homeostasis and Promotes Myelin Repair in a Cuprizone-Induced Mouse Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanzhi; Liu, Shubao; Tian, Yanping; Wu, Xiyan; He, Yangtao; Li, Chengren; Namaka, Michael; Kong, Jiming; Li, Hongli; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation has been considered as a crucial process in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and psychiatric disorders. Several antipsychotic drugs (APDs) have been shown to display inhibitory effects on microglial activation in vitro, possibly through the suppression of elevated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration. However, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of quetiapine (Que), an atypical APD, on microglial activation. We utilized a chronic cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination mouse model to determine the direct effect of Que on microglial activation. Our results showed that treatment with Que significantly reduced recruitment and activation of microglia/macrophage in the lesion of corpus callosum and promoted remyelination after CPZ withdrawal. Our in vitro studies also confirmed the direct effect of Que on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of microglial N9 cells, whereby Que significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Moreover, we demonstrated that pretreatment with Que, neutralized the up-regulation of STIM1 induced by LPS and declined both LPS and thapsigargin (Tg)-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Finally, we found that pretreatment with Que significantly reduced the translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit from cytoplasm to nuclei in LPS-activated primary microglial cells. Overall, our data suggested that Que may inhibit microglial activation by neutralization of the LPS-induced abnormal STIM1-mediated intercellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:26732345

  5. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  6. Tat-ATOX1 inhibits streptozotocin-induced cell death in pancreatic RINm5F cells and attenuates diabetes in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eun Hee; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Ryu, Eun Ji; Yong, Ji In; Chung, Seok Young; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Yeon Joo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Keunwook; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Antioxidant 1 (ATOX1) functions as an antioxidant against hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, and therefore may play a significant role in many human diseases, including diabetes mellitus (DM). In the present study, we examined the protective effects of Tat-ATOX1 protein on streptozotocin (STZ)-exposed pancreatic insulinoma cells (RINm5F) and in a mouse model of STZ-induced diabetes using western blot analysis, immunofluorescence staining and MTT assay, as well as histological and biochemical analysis. Purified Tat-ATOX1 protein was efficiently transduced into RINm5F cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, Tat-ATOX1 protein markedly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, DNA damage and the activation of Akt and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in STZ-exposed RINm5F cells. In addition, Tat-ATOX1 protein transduced into mice pancreatic tissues and significantly decreased blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels as well as the body weight changes in a model of STZ-induced diabetes. These results indicate that transduced Tat-ATOX1 protein protects pancreatic β-cells by inhibiting STZ-induced cellular toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Based on these findings, we suggest that Tat-ATOX1 protein has potential applications as a therapeutic agent for oxidative stress-induced diseases including DM. PMID:27222268

  7. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  8. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  9. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  10. Fe-Radiation-Induced Alterations in Circulating Leukocyte Populations in the ApoE Mouse Atherosclerosis Model are Temporary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Yu, Shaohua; Parks, Brian W.; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Khaled, Saman; Chang, Polly Y.; Srivastava, Roshni; Kabarowski, Janusz H. S.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2008-06-01

    Radiation is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, likely due in part to vascular inflammation. One model used to understand this is the apoE mouse, where gamma irradiation accelerates development of atherosclerosis. Less is known, though, about the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, such as 56Fe, likely to be encountered by astronauts in deep space. Radiation, however, also affects leukocyte numbers. For example, whole-body 56Fe irradiation has been shown to decrease circulating B-cells and T-cells, but whether this was due to radiation of the thymus, of the bone marrow, or both was not determined. We irradiated ApoE mice with 56Fe focused to the aorta and carotids to determine how irradiation of the thymus with 56Fe affects circulating lymphocyte number, and ultimately to determine the effect of iron ion irradiation on development of atherosclerosis. We found that only T-cells were affected at 13 weeks post-irradiation, but even these recovered at 40 weeks, suggesting that effects on the immune system are limited and temporary. Analysis of atherosclerosis development is pending sacrifice and histological analysis of irradiated mice.

  11. Voluntary Running Attenuates Memory Loss, Decreases Neuropathological Changes and Induces Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Aranguiz, Florencia; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of memory and cognitive abilities, and the appearance of amyloid plaques composed of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles formed of tau protein. It has been suggested that exercise might ameliorate the disease; here, we evaluated the effect of voluntary running on several aspects of AD including amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, inflammatory reaction, neurogenesis and spatial memory in the double transgenic APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We report that voluntary wheel running for 10 weeks decreased Aβ burden, Thioflavin-S-positive plaques and Aβ oligomers in the hippocampus. In addition, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed fewer phosphorylated tau protein and decreased astrogliosis evidenced by lower staining of GFAP. Further, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed increased number of neurons in the hippocampus and exhibited increased cell proliferation and generation of cells positive for the immature neuronal protein doublecortin, indicating that running increased neurogenesis. Finally, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed improved spatial memory performance in the Morris water maze. Altogether, our findings indicate that in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice, voluntary running reduced all the neuropathological hallmarks of AD studied, reduced neuronal loss, increased hippocampal neurogenesis and reduced spatial memory loss. These findings support that voluntary exercise might have therapeutic value on AD. PMID:25763997

  12. In vivo identification of tumor- suppressive PTEN ceRNAs in an oncogenic BRAF-induced mouse model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Karreth, Florian A; Tay, Yvonne; Perna, Daniele; Ala, Ugo; Tan, Shen Mynn; Rust, Alistair G; DeNicola, Gina; Webster, Kaitlyn A; Weiss, Dror; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Krauthammer, Michael; Halaban, Ruth; Provero, Paolo; Adams, David J; Tuveson, David A; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-10-14

    We recently proposed that competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) sequester microRNAs to regulate mRNA transcripts containing common microRNA recognition elements (MREs). However, the functional role of ceRNAs in cancer remains unknown. Loss of PTEN, a tumor suppressor regulated by ceRNA activity, frequently occurs in melanoma. Here, we report the discovery of significant enrichment of putative PTEN ceRNAs among genes whose loss accelerates tumorigenesis following Sleeping Beauty insertional mutagenesis in a mouse model of melanoma. We validated several putative PTEN ceRNAs and further characterized one, the ZEB2 transcript. We show that ZEB2 modulates PTEN protein levels in a microRNA-dependent, protein coding-independent manner. Attenuation of ZEB2 expression activates the PI3K/AKT pathway, enhances cell transformation, and commonly occurs in human melanomas and other cancers expressing low PTEN levels. Our study genetically identifies multiple putative microRNA decoys for PTEN, validates ZEB2 mRNA as a bona fide PTEN ceRNA, and demonstrates that abrogated ZEB2 expression cooperates with BRAF(V600E) to promote melanomagenesis. PMID:22000016

  13. Metabolomic identification of biochemical changes induced by fluoxetine and imipramine in a chronic mild stress mouse model of depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Jung, Yang-Hee; Jang, Choon-Gon; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics was applied to a C57BL/6N mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS). Such mice were treated with two antidepressants from different categories: fluoxetine and imipramine. Metabolic profiling of the hippocampus was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis on samples prepared under optimized conditions, followed by principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analyses. Body weight measurement and behavior tests including an open field test and the forced swimming test were completed with the mice as a measure of the phenotypes of depression and antidepressive effects. As a result, 23 metabolites that had been differentially expressed among the control, CMS, and antidepressant-treated groups demonstrated that amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, adenosine receptors, and neurotransmitters are commonly perturbed by drug treatment. Potential predictive markers for treatment effect were identified: myo-inositol for fluoxetine and lysine and oleic acid for imipramine. Collectively, the current study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effects of two widely used medications.

  14. Ion-dependent conformational switching by a DNA aptamer that induces remyelination in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Smestad, John; Maher, L. James

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that a guanosine-rich 40-mer DNA aptamer (LJM-3064) mediates remyelination in the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Here, we characterize the G-quadruplex forms of this aptamer in vitro, and demonstrate using circular dichroism spectroscopy that LJM-3064 undergoes a monovalent ion-dependent conformational switch. In the presence of sodium ions and no potassium ions, LJM-3064 adopts an antiparallel-stranded G-quadruplex structure. When presented with low concentrations of potassium ions in a buffer that mimics the composition of interstitial fluid and blood plasma, LJM-3064 rapidly switches to a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex conformation, which is presumably the physiologically active folded form. We characterize these conformational states using dimethyl sulfate reactivity studies and Bal 31 nuclease probing. Our analysis indicates that only the 5′-terminal 26 nucleotides are involved in G-quadruplex formation. Thermodynamic characterization of LJM-3064 at physiologically relevant ion concentrations reveals the G-quadruplex to be metastable at human body temperature. These data provide important structural and thermodynamic insights that may be valuable in optimizing LJM-3064 as a therapeutic remyelinating agent. PMID:23175609

  15. Metabolomic identification of biochemical changes induced by fluoxetine and imipramine in a chronic mild stress mouse model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Jung, Yang-Hee; Jang, Choon-Gon; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics was applied to a C57BL/6N mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS). Such mice were treated with two antidepressants from different categories: fluoxetine and imipramine. Metabolic profiling of the hippocampus was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis on samples prepared under optimized conditions, followed by principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analyses. Body weight measurement and behavior tests including an open field test and the forced swimming test were completed with the mice as a measure of the phenotypes of depression and antidepressive effects. As a result, 23 metabolites that had been differentially expressed among the control, CMS, and antidepressant-treated groups demonstrated that amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, adenosine receptors, and neurotransmitters are commonly perturbed by drug treatment. Potential predictive markers for treatment effect were identified: myo-inositol for fluoxetine and lysine and oleic acid for imipramine. Collectively, the current study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effects of two widely used medications. PMID:25749400

  16. Evaluation of p21 promoter for interleukin 12 radiation induced transcriptional targeting in a mouse tumor model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation induced transcriptional targeting is a gene therapy approach that takes advantage of the targeting abilities of radiotherapy by using radio inducible promoters to spatially and temporally limit the transgene expression. Cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (CDKN1A), also known as p21, is a crucial regulator of the cell cycle, mediating G1 phase arrest in response to a variety of stress stimuli, including DNA damaging agents like irradiation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the p21 promoter for radiation induced transcriptional targeting with the objective to test the therapeutic effectiveness of the combined radio-gene therapy with p21 promoter driven therapeutic gene interleukin 12. Methods To test the inducibility of the p21 promoter, three reporter gene experimental models with green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of p21 promoter were established by gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA: stably transfected cells, stably transfected tumors, and transiently transfected muscles. Induction of reporter gene expression after irradiation was determined using a fluorescence microplate reader in vitro and by non-invasive fluorescence imaging using fluorescence stereomicroscope in vivo. The antitumor effect of the plasmid encoding the p21 promoter driven interleukin 12 after radio-gene therapy was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by quantification of intratumoral and serum levels of interleukin 12 protein and intratumoral concentrations of interleukin 12 mRNA. Results Using the reporter gene experimental models, p21 promoter was proven to be inducible with radiation, the induction was not dose dependent, and it could be re-induced. Furthermore radio-gene therapy with interleukin 12 under control of the p21 promoter had a good antitumor therapeutic effect with the statistically relevant tumor growth delay, which was comparable to that of the same therapy using a constitutive promoter. Conclusions In this

  17. A mouse model to study the alterations in haemostatic and inflammatory parameters induced by Lonomia achelous caterpillar haemolymph.

    PubMed

    Barrios, M; Taylor, P; Rodríguez-Acosta, A; Sánchez, E E; Arocha-Piñango, C L; Gil, A; Salazar, A M; Carvajal, Z; Abad, M J; Guerrero, B

    2012-04-01

    A mouse model was established to reproduce the haemorrhagic syndrome which occurs in humans after accidental contact with the hairs of the caterpillar Lonomia achelous (LA) and measures the haemostatic and inflammatory alterations that occur as a result of this contact. Mice were injected intradermally with different doses (0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 mg/animal) of L. achelous haemolymph (LAH). Haematological (haemoglobin, haematocrit, platelet count, differential leukocyte count), haemostatic (fibrinogen, plasminogen, factor XIII [FXIII], fibrinolytic activity) and inflammatory parameters (tumour necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], nitric oxide [NO]) were measured at different times up to 48 h. C57BL/6 mice responded to LAH injection, in terms of these parameters, in a manner similar to that seen in humans, whereas the BALB/c mice were unresponsive. In C57BL/6 mice injected with LAH, time course measurements showed: a) a reduction in the haemoglobin, haematocrit, fibrinogen, FXIII and plasminogen levels, b) no effect on the platelet count and c) immediate leukocytosis and an increase in the fibrinolytic activity in plasma. An inflammatory response (TNF-α) was observed within 1 h post-injection, followed by a more persistent increase in serum NO. These findings suggest that C57BL/6 mice represent a useful model of the haemorrhagic syndrome observed in humans who have suffered contact with the caterpillar, permitting a deeper understanding of the role of the inflammatory response in the haematological and haemostatic manifestations of this syndrome. PMID:22310207

  18. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M.; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R.; Malik, Fady I.; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Beggs, Alan H.; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Nebulin—a giant sarcomeric protein—plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (NebΔExon55) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. NebΔExon55 mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies—a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy—in muscle fibres from NebΔExon55 mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from NebΔExon55 mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in NebΔExon55 mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in NebΔExon55 mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by thin

  19. Evaluation of recombinant SEA-TSST fusion toxoid for protection against superantigen induced toxicity in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prakash Narayana; Paul, Soumya; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become complicated owing to growing antibiotic resistance mechanisms and due to the multitude of virulence factors secreted by this organism. Failures with traditional monovalent vaccines or toxoids have brought a shift towards the use of multivalent formulas and neutralizing antibodies to combat and prevent range of staphylococcal infections. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a fusion protein (r-ET) comprising truncated regions of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1) in generating neutralizing antibodies against superantigen induced toxicity in murine model. Serum antibodies showed specific reactivity to both SEA and TSST-1 native toxins. Hyperimmune serum from immunized animals protected cultured splenocytes from non-specific superantigen induced proliferation completely. Passive antibody administration prevented tissue damage from acute inflammation associated with superantigen challenge from S. aureus cell free culture supernatants. Approximately 80% and 50% of actively and passively immunized mice respectively were protected from lethal dose against S. aureus toxin challenge. This study revealed that r-ET protein is non-toxic and a strong immunogen which generated neutralizing antibodies and memory immune response against superantigen induced toxic effects in mice model. PMID:26091873

  20. The effect of local IL-4 delivery or CCL2 blockade on implant fixation and bone structural properties in a mouse model of wear particle induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Behn, Anthony; Jiang, Xinyi; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Yao, Zhenyu; Egashira, Kensuke; Yang, Fan; Goodman, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization and prevention of CCL2-induced macrophage chemotaxis are emerging strategies to reduce wear particle induced osteolysis and aseptic total joint replacement loosening. In this study, the effect of continuous IL-4 delivery or bioactive implant coating that constitutively releases a protein inhibitor of CCL2 signaling (7ND) on particle induced osteolysis were studied in the murine continuous femoral intramedullary particle infusion model. Polyethylene particles with or without IL-4 were infused into mouse distal femurs implanted with hollow titanium rods using subcutaneous infusion pumps. In another experimental group, particles were infused into the femur through a 7ND coated rod. After 4 weeks, fixation of the implant was assessed using a pullout test. The volume of trabecular bone and the geometry of the local cortical bone were assessed by µCT and the corresponding structural properties of the cortical bone determined by torsional testing. Continuous IL-4 delivery led to increased trabecular bone volume as well as enhanced local bone geometry and structural properties, while 7ND implant coating did not have effect on these parameters. The results suggest that local IL-4 treatment is a promising strategy to mitigate wear particle induced osteolysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2255-2262, 2016. PMID:27114284

  1. Polymer-DNA Nanoparticle-Induced CXCR4 Overexpression Improves Stem Cell Engraftment and Tissue Regeneration in a Mouse Hindlimb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Deveza, Lorenzo; Choi, Jeffrey; Lee, Jerry; Huang, Ngan; Cooke, John; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease affects nearly 202 million individuals worldwide, sometimes leading to non-healing ulcers or limb amputations in severe cases. Genetically modified stem cells offer potential advantages for therapeutically inducing angiogenesis via augmented paracrine release mechanisms and tuned dynamic responses to environmental stimuli at disease sites. Here, we report the application of nanoparticle-induced CXCR4-overexpressing stem cells in a mouse hindlimb ischemia model. We found that CXCR4 overexpression improved stem cell survival, modulated inflammation in situ, and accelerated blood reperfusion. These effects, unexpectedly, led to complete limb salvage and skeletal muscle repair, markedly outperforming the efficacy of the conventional angiogenic factor control, VEGF. Importantly, assessment of CXCR4-overexpressing stem cells in vitro revealed that CXCR4 overexpression induced changes in paracrine signaling of stem cells, promoting a therapeutically desirable pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory phenotype. These results suggest that nanoparticle-induced CXCR4 overexpression may promote favorable phenotypic changes and therapeutic efficacy of stem cells in response to the ischemic environment. PMID:27279910

  2. Ginsenoside Rg1 attenuates motor impairment and neuroinflammation in the MPTP-probenecid-induced parkinsonism mouse model by targeting α-synuclein abnormalities in the substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yang; Zhang, Qiu-Shuang; Mu, Zheng; Hu, Jin-Feng; Yuan, Yu-He; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-01-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is pathologically characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the accumulation of aggregated α-synuclein in specific central nervous system (CNS) regions. Disease development is attributed to α-synuclein abnormalities, particularly aggregation and phosphorylation. The ginsenoside Rg1, an active component of ginseng, possesses neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate these activities of Rg1 in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)/probenecid (MPTP/p)-induced PD mouse model for the first time and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Oral treatment with Rg1 significantly attenuated the high MPTP-induced mortality, behavior defects, loss of dopamine neurons and abnormal ultrastructure changes in the SNpc. Other assays indicated that the protective effect of Rg1 may be mediated by its anti-neuroinflammatory properties. Rg1 regulated MPTP-induced reactive astrocytes and microglia and decreased the release of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the SNpc. Rg1 also alleviated the unusual MPTP-induced increase in oligomeric, phosphorylated and disease-related α-synuclein in the SNpc. In conclusion, Rg1 protects dopaminergic neurons, most likely by reducing aberrant α-synuclein-mediated neuroinflammation, and holds promise for PD therapeutics. PMID:26723869

  3. Immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 in the MPTP(1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) -induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting-ting; Zu, Guo; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Xiao-gang; Li, Shao; Liang, Zhan-hua; Zhao, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1, one of the biologically active ingredients of ginseng, has been considered to be a candidate neuroprotective drug. The objective of the study was to study the protective effects of Rg1 through the peripheral and central inflammation in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) mouse model. Rg1 treatment protected TH-positive cells in the SNpc region from MPTP toxicity measured with immunofluoresence. The protein expression levels of TH in the SNpc region of MPTP-induced mice following treatment with Rg1 were higher than MPTP-induced mice which were tested with Western blot. The ratio of CD3(+)CD4(+) to CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the blood increased in MPTP-induced mice following treatment with Rg1 which were detected by flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, Rg1 reduced the serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β and IL-6 which were tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, Rg1 inhibited the activation of microglia and reduced the infiltration of CD3(+) T cells into the SNpc region which were measured by immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that Rg1 may represent a promising drug for the treatment of PD via the regulation of the peripheral and central inflammation. PMID:26548343

  4. Wogonin, a plant flavone from Scutellariae radix, attenuated ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in mouse model of asthma via the suppression of IL-4/STAT6 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Kyung; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Eun Jeong; Choi, Yoon Suk; Kim, Seon Tae; Hahm, Ki Baik; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2015-09-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by a marked infiltration of eosinophils at the site of inflammation. Eotaxins are potent chemoattractants for eosinophils and play important roles in pathogenesis of asthma. In the course of screening for eotaxin-3 inhibitors, we found that wogonin showed potent inhibitory activity of interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced eotaxin-3 expression in BEAS-2B cells. In this study, we examined the effects of wogonin on IL-4/STAT6 signaling pathway and biological implication in a mouse model of asthma. Wogonin inhibited IL-4-induced activation and nuclear translocation of STAT6 which plays a key role in either the transcription of STAT6-response genes or Th2 cytokine-mediated inflammation. Oral administration of wogonin significantly reduced activation of STAT6 in the lung and the expression of eotaxin and RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Histological examination of lung tissue demonstrated that wogonin significantly inhibited allergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation. Administration of wogonin reduced the total IgE and ovalbumin-specific IgE levels compared with the ovalbumin-challenged group. All of these data demonstrated that wogonin could alleviate airway inflammation through inhibition of STAT6 activation induced by Th2 cytokines. Our finding implicates a potential therapeutic value of wogonin in the treatment of asthma through regulation of IL-4/STAT6 signaling pathway. PMID:26388667

  5. Temporal and spatial changes in VEGF, αA- and αB-crystallin expression in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Su, Chang; Wang, Jian-Tao; Du, Bei; Dong, Li-Jie; Liu, Ai-Hua; Li, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Retinal neovascularization is an iconic change in retinopathies. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and α-crystallins have been identified to mediate the pathogenesis of retinopathy. However, the special and temporal changes in their expression associated with retinal neovascularization have not yet been determined. Therefore, we examined the expression and distribution of VEGF, αA- and αB-crystallins in the retina using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Methods: 90 C57/BL mice were randomly divided into the OIR and control groups. The OIR group at postnatal day 7 (P7) were kept at high oxidation state (75 ± 5%) for 5 days before returned to normal environment. Retinal tissue was cut into sections. Oxygen induced retinal neovascularization and vascular structural changes were evaluated using retinal fluorescein angiography. The number of endothelial cell nuclei breaking through the retinal internal limiting membrane was counted after H&E staining. The mRNA expression levels of VEGF, αA- and αB-crystallins in the mouse retina were determined using real-time RT-PCR. The distribution of αA- and αB-crystallins in the retina was detected by fluorescent immunohistochemistry staining. Results: Oxygen induction triggered new blood vessel formation in the retina and impaired the structure of the retinal vascular network. The number of endothelial cell nuclei breaking through the retinal internal limiting membrane was significantly increased in the OIR group compared to the control group at P13, P17 and P21 (P < 0.01), reaching the peak on P17. The expression levels of VEGF, αA- and αB-crystalllins were also significantly different between the OIR and control groups. VEGF expression was highest on P15, αA-crystallin expression was highest on P17, whereas αB-crystallin expression kept increasing during the time frame of our study. Both αA- and αB-crystallins were expressed in the ganglion cell layer and the inner nuclear cell

  6. Renoprotective Effects of a Highly Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist in a Mouse Model of Adriamycin-induced Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Min, Hye Sook; Cha, Jin Joo; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jung Eun; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Lee, Ji Eun; Han, Jee Young; Jeong, Lak Shin; Cha, Dae Ryong; Kang, Young Sun

    2016-09-01

    The concentration of adenosine in the normal kidney increases markedly during renal hypoxia, ischemia, and inflammation. A recent study reported that an A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) antagonist attenuated the progression of renal fibrosis. The adriamycin (ADX)-induced nephropathy model induces podocyte injury, which results in severe proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a highly selective A3AR antagonist (LJ1888) in ADX-induced nephropathy. Three groups of six-week-old Balb/c mice were treated with ADX (11 mg/kg) for four weeks and LJ1888 (10 mg/kg) for two weeks as following: 1) control; 2) ADX; and 3) ADX + LJ1888. ADX treatment decreased body weight without a change in water and food intake, but this was ameliorated by LJ1888 treatment. Interestingly, LJ1888 lowered plasma creatinine level, proteinuria, and albuminuria, which had increased during ADX treatment. Furthermore, LJ1888 inhibited urinary nephrin excretion as a podocyte injury marker, and urine 8-isoprostane and kidney lipid peroxide concentration, which are markers of oxidative stress, increased after injection of ADX. ADX also induced the activation of proinflammatory and profibrotic molecules such as TGF-β1, MCP-1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, NF-κB, NOX4, TLR4, TNFα, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, but they were remarkably suppressed after LJ1888 treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that LJ1888 has a renoprotective effect in ADX-induced nephropathy, which might be associated with podocyte injury through oxidative stress. Therefore, LJ1888, a selective A3AR antagonist, could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in renal glomerular diseases which include podocyte injury and proteinuria. PMID:27510383

  7. Streptococcus uberis ST439 and ST475 induce differential inflammatory responses in a mouse intramammary infection model.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Susweta Das; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; Mani, Bhuvana; Velu, D; Banerjee, Apala; Bankar, Kiran; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Santra, Sandip; Suresh, K P; Rahman, Habibur

    2016-07-10

    Streptococcus uberis causing mastitis is a growing challenge to the dairy industry. Molecular, epidemiological and population structure studies have revealed clonal diversity among the infecting strains. In this study, mouse intramammary infection model was used to uncover the host immune response to two epidemiologically important live strains of S. uberis (SU1and SU2) obtained from subclinical case of mastitis possessing specific and unique multi locus sequence types (ST), pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pulsotypes and virulence profiles. Temporal (2h, 4h, 8h, 12h, 24h and 48h) expression of key inflammatory mediators (IL2, IL4, IL6, IL12, TNFα, IFNγ, GMCSF, TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, TLR11, TLR12, CD14, IL1β, RANTES, Lactoferrin, and CXCl1) by reverse transcription and probe-based quantitative real-time PCR showed relative mRNA levels higher (p<0.05) in response to SU2 compared with SU1 with 24h PI serving as a critical point for the deviating behavior (SU1 versus SU2). Further employing the predicted biological processes under the influence of this pool of tested genes, the delineation of gene regulatory networks suggested SU1-favoring its persistence in the host environment; in contrast, SU2-which elevated gene expression indicating towards pathogen clearance or immune surveillance. This study suggested how these unique strains could manipulate the host immune response to influence the severity of mastitis; our results expand the available information on host pathogen interaction and provide a firm foundation needing further investigations to gain control over this pathogen. PMID:27039025

  8. Characterization of cyclicity and hormonal profile with impending ovarian failure in a novel chemical-induced mouse model of perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Lohff, Jessica C; Christian, Patricia J; Marion, Samuel L; Arrandale, Anthony; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2005-12-01

    4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) causes early, gradual ovarian failure in mice because it specifically targets small pre-antral ovarian follicles. The period between loss of these follicles and ovarian failure is analogous to perimenopause in women. We sought to characterize the period of onset of ovarian failure in VCD-treated mice in regard to estrous cycle length and hormonal changes. Female C57Bl/6 mice (age, 28 days) were dosed daily for 15 days with VCD (160 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to cause early ovarian failure or with vehicle only (control animals). Cycle length was monitored by vaginal cytology. Plasma levels of 17beta-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in control and VCD-treated animals were measured during proestrus of cycles 1 through 12. Cycle length (mean, 5.8 days) did not differ between groups for cycles 1 through 4. In contrast, cycle length during cycles 5 through 12 was increased (mean length, 10.9 days; P < 0.05 versus control) in VCD-treated animals, which also showed an apparent increase in plasma FSH levels. Plasma E2 and P4 at proestrus did not differ between groups during any cycle. Ovarian failure in VCD-treated mice was confirmed by histological evaluation on day 156 after onset of dosing, whereas control animals were still cycling. Therefore, despite compromised cycle length in VCD-treated mice, peak ovarian steroid production in preovulatory follicles at proestrus is adequate. These results demonstrate that the VCD-treated mouse can serve as an appropriate model to mimic hormonal changes during the perimenopausal transition in women. PMID:16422148

  9. Do mouse models of allergic asthma mimic clinical disease?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    Experimental mouse models of allergic asthma established almost 10 years ago offered new opportunities to study disease pathogenesis and to develop new therapeutics. These models focused on the factors governing the allergic immune response, on modeling clinical behavior of allergic asthma, and led to insights into pulmonary pathophysiology. Although mouse models rarely completely reproduce all the features of human disease, after sensitization and respiratory tract challenges with antigen, wild-type mice develop a clinical syndrome that closely resembles allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), increased IgE, mucus hypersecretion, and eventually, airway remodeling. There are, however, differences between mouse and human physiology that threaten to limit the value of mouse models. Three examples of such differences relate to both clinical manifestations of disease and underlying pathogenesis. First, in contrast to patients who have increased methacholine-induced AHR even when they are symptom-free, mice exhibit only transient methacholine-induced AHR following allergen exposure. Second, chronic allergen exposure in patients leads to chronic allergic asthma, whereas repeated exposures in sensitized mice causes suppression of disease. Third, IgE and mast cells, in humans, mediate early- and late-phase allergic responses, though both are unnecessary for the generation of allergic asthma in mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that mouse models of allergic asthma are not exact replicas of human disease and thus, question the validity of these models. However, observations from mouse models of allergic asthma support many existing paradigms, although some novel discoveries in mice have yet to be verified in patients. This review presents an overview of the clinical aspects of disease in mouse models of allergic asthma emphasizing (1). the factors influencing the pathophysiological responses during

  10. ANG II-induced hypertension in the VCD mouse model of menopause is prevented by estrogen replacement during perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Pollow, Dennis P; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Sanchez, Jessica N; Konhilas, John P; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2015-12-15

    Premenopausal females are resistant to the development of hypertension, and this protection is lost after the onset of menopause, resulting in a sharp increase in disease onset and severity. However, it is unknown how a fluctuating ovarian hormone environment during the transition from perimenopause to menopause impacts the onset of hypertension, and whether interventions during perimenopause prevent disease onset after menopause. A gradual transition to menopause was induced by repeated daily injections of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD). ANG II (800 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was infused into perimenopausal and menopausal female mice for 14 days. A separate cohort of mice received 17β-estradiol replacement during perimenopause. ANG II infusion produced significantly higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in menopausal vs. cycling females, and 17β-estradiol replacement prevented this increase. In contrast, MAP was not significantly different when ANG II was infused into perimenopausal and cycling females, suggesting that female resistance to ANG II-induced hypertension is intact during perimenopause. ANG II infusion caused a significant glomerular hypertrophy, and hypertrophy was not impacted by hormonal status. Expression levels of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a collecting duct protein, have been suggested to reflect blood pressure. AQP2 protein expression was significantly downregulated in the renal cortex of the ANG II-infused menopause group, where blood pressure was increased. AQP2 expression levels were restored to control levels with 17β-estradiol replacement. This study indicates that the changing hormonal environment in the VCD model of menopause impacts the severity of ANG II-induced hypertension. These data highlight the utility of the ovary-intact VCD model of menopause as a clinically relevant model to investigate the physiological mechanisms of hypertension that occur in women during the transition into menopause. PMID:26491098

  11. Impaired Bronchoprotection Is Not Induced by Increased Smooth Muscle Mass in Chronic Treatment In Vivo with Formoterol in Asthmatic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Luo, W; Liu, C-T; Yang, Q-H; Yu, Q; Wang, T

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Inhaling β2-adrenoceptor agonist is first-line asthma treatment, which is used for both acute relief of and prevention of bronchoconstriction. However, chronic use of β-agonists results in impaired bronchoprotection and increasing occurrences of severe asthma exacerbation, even death in clinical practice. The mechanism of β-adrenoceptor hyposensitivity has not been thoroughly elucidated thus far. Bronchial smooth muscle contraction induces airway narrowing and also mediates airway inflammation. Moreover, bronchial smooth muscle mass significantly increases in asthmatics. We aim to establish an asthmatic model that demonstrated that formoterol induced impaired bronchoprotection and to see whether increased smooth muscle mass played a role in it. Methods: We combined routine allergen challenging (seven weeks) with repeated application of formoterol, formoterol plus budesonide or physiological saline in allergen-sensitized BALB/c mouse. The bronchoprotection mediated by β-agonist was measured in five consecutive weeks. Smooth muscle mass was shown by morphometric analysis, and α-actin expression was detected by western blot. Results: The trend of bronchoprotection was wavy in drug interventional groups, which initially increased and then decreased. Chronic treatment with formoterol significantly impaired bronchoprotection. According to the morphometric analysis and α-actin expression, no significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established that a chronic asthmatic mouse model, which manifested typical features of asthmatic patients, when treated chronically with formoterol, showed a loss of bronchoprotection. No significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups, which implied some subcellular signalling changes may be the key points. PMID:25803396

  12. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 activation enhances hapten sensitization in a T-helper type 2-driven fluorescein isothiocyanate-induced contact hypersensitivity mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Takahiro; Tamai, Takuma; Sahara, Yurina; Kurohane, Kohta; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    Some chemicals contribute to the development of allergies by increasing the immunogenicity of other allergens. We have demonstrated that several phthalate esters, including dibutyl phthalate (DBP), enhance skin sensitization to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in a mouse contact hypersensitivity model, in which the T-helper type 2 (Th2) response is essential. On the other hand, some phthalate esters were found to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels on sensory neurons. We then found a positive correlation between the enhancing effects of several types of phthalate esters on skin sensitization to FITC and their ability to activate TRPA1. Here we examined the involvement of TRPA1 in sensitization to FITC by using TRPA1 agonists other than phthalate esters. During skin sensitization to FITC, the TRPA1 agonists (menthol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and DBP) augmented the ear-swelling response as well as trafficking of FITC-presenting dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. We confirmed that these TRPA1 agonists induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also found that TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 inhibited DBP-induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing CHO cells. After pretreatment with this antagonist upon skin sensitization to FITC, the enhancing effect of DBP on sensitization was suppressed. These results suggest that TRPA1 activation will become a useful marker to find chemicals that facilitate sensitization in combination with other immunogenic haptens. -- Highlights: ► Role of TRPA1 activation was revealed in a mouse model of skin sensitization to FITC. ► TRPA1 agonists enhanced skin sensitization as well as dendritic cell trafficking. ► Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been shown to enhance skin sensitization to FITC. ► TRPA1 activation by DBP was inhibited by a selective antagonist, HC-030031. ► HC-030031 inhibited the enhancing effect of DBP on skin sensitization to FITC.

  13. Isolation and evaluation of anticancer efficacy of stigmasterol in a mouse model of DMBA-induced skin carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Huma; Dixit, Savita; Ali, Daoud; Alqahtani, Saeed M; Alkahtani, Saad; Alarifi, Saud

    2015-01-01

    Stigmasterol (99.9% pure) was isolated from Azadirachta indica and its chemopreventive effect on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced skin cancer was investigated in Swiss albino mice. Skin tumors were induced by topical application of DMBA and promoted by croton oil. To assess the chemopreventive potential of stigmasterol, it was orally administered at a concentration of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg three times weekly for 16 weeks. Reduction in tumor size and cumulative number of papillomas were seen as a result of treatment with stigmasterol. The average latency period was significantly increased as compared with the carcinogen-treated control. Stigmasterol induced a significant decrease in the activity of serum enzymes, such as aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and bilirubin as compared with the control. Stigmasterol significantly increased glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase as compared with the control. Elevated levels of lipid peroxide and DNA damage in the control group were significantly inhibited by administration of stigmasterol. From the present study, it can be inferred that stigmasterol has chemopreventive activity in an experimental model of cancer. This chemopreventive activity may be linked to the oxidative stress of stigmasterol. The antigenotoxic properties of stigmasterol are also likely to contribute to its chemopreventive action. PMID:26060396

  14. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:20188213

  15. Mouse models of congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Graw, J

    1999-06-01

    Mouse mutants affecting lens development are excellent models for corresponding human disorders. The mutant aphakia has been characterised by bilaterally aphakic eyes (Varnum and Stevens, J Hered 1968;59:147-50); the corresponding gene was mapped to chromosome 19 (Varnum and Stevens, Mouse News Lett 1975;53:35). Recent investigations in our laboratory refined the linkage of 0.6 cM proximal to the marker D19Mit10. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Chuk1, Fgf8, Lbp1, Npm3, Pax2, Pitx3). The Cat3 mutations are characterised by vacuolated lenses caused by alterations in the initial secondary lens fibre cell differentiation. Secondary malformations develop at the cornea and iris, but the retina remains unaffected. The mutation has been mapped to chromosome 10 close to the markers D10Mit41 and D10Mit95. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Dcn, Elk3, Ldc, Mell8, Tr2-11). The series of Cat2 mutations have been mapped close to the gamma-crystallin genes (Cryg; Löster et al., Genomics 1994;23:240-2). The Cat2nop mutation is characterised by a mutation in the third exon of Crygb leading to a truncated gamma B-crystallin and the termination of lens fibre cell differentiation. The Cat2 mutants are interesting models for human cataracts caused by mutations in the human CRYG genes at chromosome 2q32-35. PMID:10627821

  16. Mouse models for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related cell death in human and the fifth in women worldwide. The incidence of HCC is increasing despite progress in identifying risk factors, understanding disease etiology and developing anti-viral strategies. Therapeutic options are limited and survival after diagnosis is poor. Therefore, better preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic tools are urgently needed, in particular given the increased contribution from systemic metabolic disease to HCC incidence worldwide. In the last three decades, technological advances have facilitated the generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to mimic the alterations frequently observed in human cancers or to conduct intervention studies and assess the relevance of candidate gene networks in tumor establishment, progression and maintenance. Because these studies allow molecular and cellular manipulations impossible to perform in patients, GEMMs have improved our understanding of this complex disease and represent a source of great potential for mechanism-based therapy development. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of HCC modeling in the mouse, highlighting successes, current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:23428636

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals energy metabolic dysfunction and neurogenesis in the prefrontal cortex of a lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziye; Li, Wenwen; Chen, Jin; Shi, Haiyang; Zhao, Mingjun; You, Hongmin; Rao, Chenglong; Zhan, Yuan; Yang, Yongtao; Xie, Peng

    2016-02-01

    Substantial evidence from previous studies has suggested an association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and inflammation, and previous studies have associated prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction with MDD. Systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide has been used to study inflammation-associated behavioral changes in rodents. However, proteomic studies investigating PFC protein expression in an LPS-induced mouse model of depression have yet to be conducted. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry, PFC proteomes were comparatively assessed in LPS-induced acute inflammation reaction mice, LPS-induced depressive-like behavior mice (Dep), and control mice. A total of 26 differentially expressed proteins were identified, two of which were selected for western blot analysis, the results of which revealed a significant increase in the expression levels of creatine kinase B and dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 in Dep mice, suggesting that changes in energy metabolism and neuro-genesis occur in the PFC of Dep mice. Further investigation on these processes and on the proteins of the PFC are required in order to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism underlying MDD. PMID:26718926

  18. PULSED FOCUSED ULTRASOUND TREATMENT OF MUSCLE MITIGATES PARALYSIS-INDUCED BONE LOSS IN THE ADJACENT BONE: A STUDY IN A MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Poliachik, Sandra L.; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Bone loss can result from bed rest, space flight, spinal cord injury or age-related hormonal changes. Current bone loss mitigation techniques include pharmaceutical interventions, exercise, pulsed ultrasound targeted to bone and whole body vibration. In this study, we attempted to mitigate paralysis-induced bone loss by applying focused ultrasound to the midbelly of a paralyzed muscle. We employed a mouse model of disuse that uses onabotulinumtoxinA-induced paralysis, which causes rapid bone loss in 5 d. A focused 2 MHz transducer applied pulsed exposures with pulse repetition frequency mimicking that of motor neuron firing during walking (80 Hz), standing (20 Hz), or the standard pulsed ultrasound frequency used in fracture healing (1 kHz). Exposures were applied daily to calf muscle for 4 consecutive d. Trabecular bone changes were characterized using micro-computed tomography. Our results indicated that application of certain focused pulsed ultrasound parameters was able to mitigate some of the paralysis-induced bone loss. PMID:24857416

  19. A mouse model uncovers LKB1 as an UVB-induced DNA damage sensor mediating CDKN1A (p21WAF1/CIP1) degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Gil, Rosa; González-Sánchez, Elena; Bech-Serra, Joan Josep; Grueso, Judit; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Moliné, Teresa; Canals, Francesc; Ferrer, Berta; Cortés, Javier; Bastian, Boris; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana Maria; Vivancos, Ana; García-Patos, Vicenç; Recio, Juan Ángel

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight accounts for 90% of the symptoms of premature skin aging and skin cancer. The tumor suppressor serine-threonine kinase LKB1 is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in a spectrum of epithelial cancers whose etiology suggests a cooperation with environmental insults. Here we analyzed the role of LKB1 in a UV-dependent mouse skin cancer model and show that LKB1 haploinsufficiency is enough to impede UVB-induced DNA damage repair, contributing to tumor development driven by aberrant growth factor signaling. We demonstrate that LKB1 and its downstream kinase NUAK1 bind to CDKN1A. In response to UVB irradiation, LKB1 together with NUAK1 phosphorylates CDKN1A regulating the DNA damage response. Upon UVB treatment, LKB1 or NUAK1 deficiency results in CDKN1A accumulation, impaired DNA repair and resistance to apoptosis. Importantly, analysis of human tumor samples suggests that LKB1 mutational status could be a prognostic risk factor for UV-induced skin cancer. Altogether, our results identify LKB1 as a DNA damage sensor protein regulating skin UV-induced DNA damage response. PMID:25329316

  20. Mutations in nsP1 and PE2 are critical determinants of Ross River virus-induced musculoskeletal inflammatory disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jupille, Henri J; Oko, Lauren; Stoermer, Kristina A; Heise, Mark T; Mahalingam, Suresh; Gunn, Bronwyn M; Morrison, Thomas E

    2011-02-01

    The viral determinants of alphavirus-induced rheumatic disease have not been elucidated. We identified an RRV strain (DC5692) which, in contrast to the T48 strain, does not induce musculoskeletal inflammation in a mouse model of RRV disease. Substitution of the RRV T48 strain nonstructural protein 1 (nsP1) coding sequence with that from strain DC5692 generated a virus that was attenuated in vivo despite similar viral loads in tissues. In contrast, substitution of the T48 PE2 coding region with the PE2 coding region from DC5692 resulted in attenuation in vivo and reduced viral loads in tissues. In gain of virulence experiments, substitution of the DC5692 strain nsP1 and PE2 coding regions with those from the T48 strain was sufficient to restore full virulence to the DC5692 strain. These findings indicate that determinants in both nsP1 and PE2 have critical and distinct roles in the pathogenesis of RRV-induced musculoskeletal inflammatory disease in mice. PMID:21131014

  1. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  2. Outer Membrane Protein A (OmpA) of Shigella flexneri 2a, Induces Protective Immune Response in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Mahata, Nibedita; Pal, Amit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.

    2011-01-01

    Background In our earlier studies 34 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) of Shigella flexneri 2a has been identified as an efficient immunostimulant. Key Results In the present study MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the purified 34 kDa OMP of Shigella flexneri 2a shows considerable sequence homology (Identity 65%) with the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a. By using the specific primers, the gene of interest has been amplified from S. flexneri 2a (N.Y-962/92) genomic DNA, cloned in pET100/D-TOPO® vector and expressed using induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG) for the first time. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant OmpA has been evaluated in an intranasally immunized murine pulmonary model. The recombinant protein induces significantly enhanced protein specific IgG and IgA Abs in both mucosal and systemic compartments and IgA secreting cells in the systemic compartment (spleen). The mice immunized with OmpA have been protected completely from systemic challenge with a lethal dose of virulent S. flexneri 2a. Immunization with the protein causes mild polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration in the lung, without inducing the release of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results suggest that the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a can be an efficacious mucosal immunogen inducing protective immune responses. Our findings also demonstrate that antibodies and Th1 immune response may be associated with the marked protective efficacy of immunized mice after intranasal shigellae infection. PMID:21818362

  3. Early interleukin 4-dependent response can induce airway hyperreactivity before development of airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    To, Y; Dohi, M; Tanaka, R; Sato, A; Nakagome, K; Yamamoto, K

    2001-10-01

    In experimental models of bronchial asthma with mice, airway inflammation and increase in airway hyperreactivity (AHR) are induced by a combination of systemic sensitization and airway challenge with allergens. In this report, we present another possibility: that systemic antigen-specific sensitization alone can induce AHR before the development of inflammation in the airway. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) by a combination of intraperitoneal injection and aerosol inhalation, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity were sequentially analyzed. Bronchial response measured by a noninvasive method (enhanced pause) and the eosinophil count and interleukin (IL)-5 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) gradually increased following the sensitization, and significant increase was achieved after repeated OVA aerosol inhalation along with development of histologic changes of the airway. In contrast, AHR was already significantly increased by systemic sensitization alone, although airway inflammation hardly developed at that time point. BALF IL-4 concentration and the expression of IL-4 mRNA in the lung reached maximal values after the systemic sensitization, then subsequently decreased. Treatment of mice with anti-IL-4 neutralizing antibody during systemic sensitization significantly suppressed this early increase in AHR. In addition, IL-4 gene-targeted mice did not reveal this early increase in AHR by systemic sensitization. These results suggest that an immune response in the lung in an early stage of sensitization can induce airway hyperreactivity before development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice and that IL-4 plays an essential role in this process. If this early increase in AHR does occur in sensitized human infants, it could be another therapeutic target for early prevention of the future onset of asthma. PMID:11598151

  4. Bacillus Calmette Guerin Induces Fibroblast Activation Both Directly and through Macrophages in a Mouse Bladder Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Lodillinsky, Catalina; Langle, Yanina; Guionet, Ariel; Góngora, Adrián; Baldi, Alberto; Sandes, Eduardo O.; Casabé, Alberto; Eiján, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the most effective treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. However, a failure in the initial response or relapse within the first five years of treatment has been observed in 20% of patients. We have previously observed that in vivo administration of an inhibitor of nitric oxide improved the response to BCG of bladder tumor bearing mice. It was described that this effect was due to a replacement of tumor tissue by collagen depots. The aim of the present work was to clarify the mechanism involved in this process. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated that BCG induces NIH-3T3 fibroblast proliferation by activating the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways and also differentiation determined by alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression. In vivo, intratumoral inoculation of BCG also increased alpha-SMA and collagen expression. Oral administration of L-NAME enhanced the pro-fibrotic effect of BCG. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from MB49 tumor-bearing mice treated in vivo with combined treatment of BCG with L-NAME also enhanced fibroblast proliferation. We observed that FGF-2 is one of the factors released by BCG-activated macrophages that is able to induce fibroblast proliferation. The involvement of FGF-2 was evidenced using an anti-FGF2 antibody. At the same time, this macrophage population improved wound healing rate in normal mice and FGF-2 expression was also increased in these wounds. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that fibroblasts are targeted by BCG both directly and through activated macrophages in an immunotherapy context of a bladder murine model. We also described, for the first time, that FGF-2 is involved in a dialog between fibroblasts and macrophages induced after BCG treatment. The fact that L-NAME administration improves the BCG effect on fibroblasts, NO inhibition, might represent a new approach to add to the conventional BCG therapy. PMID:21042580

  5. The GAD65 knock out mouse - a model for GABAergic processes in fear- and stress-induced psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Müller, Iris; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Stork, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65 is critically involved in the activity-dependent regulation of GABAergic inhibition in the central nervous system. It is also required for the maturation of the GABAergic system during adolescence, a phase that is critical for the development of several neuropsychiatric diseases. Mice bearing a null mutation of the GAD65 gene develop hyperexcitability of the amygdala and hippocampus, and a phenotype of increased anxiety and pathological fear memory reminiscent of posttraumatic stress disorder. Although genetic association of GAD65 in human has not yet been reported, these findings are in line with observations of reduced GABAergic function in these brain regions of anxiety disorder patients. The particular value of GAD65(-/-) mice thus lies in modeling the effects of reduced GABAergic function in the mature nervous system. The expression of GAD65 and a second GAD isozyme, GAD67, are differentially regulated in response to stress in limbic brain areas suggesting that by controlling GABAergic inhibition these enzymes determine the vulnerability for the development of pathological anxiety and other stress-induced phenotypes. In fact, we could recently show that GAD65 haplodeficiency, which results in delayed postnatal increase of GABA levels, provides resilience to juvenile-stress-induced anxiety to GAD65(+/-) mice thus foiling the increased fear and anxiety in homozygous GAD65(-/-) mice. PMID:25470336

  6. Differential Expression of SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeler Subunits Brahma and Brahma-Related Gene During Drug-Induced Liver Injury and Regeneration in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sonal; Verma, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2016-08-01

    The chromatin remodeling activity of mammalian SWI/SNF complex is carried out by either Brahma (BRM) or Brahma-related gene (BRG-1). The BRG-1 regulates genes involved in cell proliferation, whereas BRM is associated with cell differentiation, and arrest of cell growth. Global modifications of histones and expression of genes of chromatin-remodeling subunits have not been studied in in vivo model systems. In the present study, we investigate epigenetic modifications of histones and the expression of genes in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury and regeneration in a mouse model. In the present study, we report that hepatocyte proliferation and H3S10 phosphorylation occur during 60 to 72 h post TAA treatment in mice. Furthermore, there was change in the H3K9 acetylation and H3K9 trimethylation pattern with respect to liver injury and regeneration phase. Looking into the expression pattern of Brg-1 and Brm, it is evident that they contribute substantially to the process of liver regeneration. The SWI/SNF remodeler might contain BRG-1 as its ATPase subunit during injury phase. Whereas, BRM-associated SWI/SNF remodeler might probably be predominant during decline of injury phase and initiation of regeneration phase. Furthermore, during the regeneration phase, BRG-1-containing remodeler again predominates. Considering all these observations, the present study depicts an interplay between chromatin interacting machineries in different phases of thioacetamide-induced liver injury and regeneration. PMID:27097303

  7. Lack of EC-SOD worsens alveolar and vascular development in a neonatal mouse model of bleomycin-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Cassidy; Wright, Rachel H.; Tang, Jen-Ruey; Woods, Crystal; Villegas, Leah; Sherlock, Laurie; Savani, Rashmin C.; Abman, Steven H.; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) worsens clinical outcomes in former preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Oxidant stress disrupts alveolar and vascular development in models of BPD. Bleomycin causes oxidative stress and induces BPD and PAH in neonatal rats. Disruption in the VEGF and nitric oxide signaling pathways contributes to BPD. We hypothesized that loss of EC-SOD would worsen PAH associated with BPD in a neonatal mouse model of bleomycin-induced BPD by disrupting the VEGF/NO signaling pathway. Methods Neonatal wild-type mice (WT), and mice lacking EC-SOD (EC-SOD KO) received intraperitoneal bleomycin (2 units/kg) or PBS three times weekly and were evaluated at week 3 or 4. Results Lack of EC-SOD impaired alveolar development and resulted in PH (elevated right ventricular systolic pressures, right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH)), decreased vessel density and an increased small vessel muscularization. Exposure to bleomycin further impaired alveolar development, worsened RVH and vascular remodeling. Lack of EC-SOD and bleomycin treatment decreased lung total and phosphorylated VEGFR2 and eNOS protein expression. Conclusion EC-SOD is critical in preserving normal lung development and loss of EC-SOD results in disrupted alveolar development, PAH and vascular remodeling at baseline, which is further worsened with bleomycin and associated with decreased activation of VEGFR2. PMID:26322414

  8. A new HCV mouse model on the block.

    PubMed

    Tawar, Rajiv G; Mailly, Laurent; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    The investigation of virus-induced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma needs small animal models modeling hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and liver disease biology. A recent study published in Cell Research reports a novel mouse model which is permissive for chronic HCV infection and shows chronic liver injury including inflammation, steatosis and fibrosis. PMID:25257465

  9. Dexamethasone as Adjuvant to Bupivacaine Prolongs the Duration of Thermal Antinociception and Prevents Bupivacaine-Induced Rebound Hyperalgesia via Regional Mechanism in a Mouse Sciatic Nerve Block Model

    PubMed Central

    An, Ke; Elkassabany, Nabil M.; Liu, Jiabin

    2015-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has been studied as an effective adjuvant to prolong the analgesia duration of local anesthetics in peripheral nerve block. However, the route of action for dexamethasone and its potential neurotoxicity are still unclear. Methods A mouse sciatic nerve block model was used. The sciatic nerve was injected with 60ul of combinations of various medications, including dexamethasone and/or bupivacaine. Neurobehavioral changes were observed for 2 days prior to injection, and then continuously for up to 7 days after injection. In addition, the sciatic nerves were harvested at either 2 days or 7 days after injection. Toluidine blue dyeing and immunohistochemistry test were performed to study the short-term and long-term histopathological changes of the sciatic nerves. There were six study groups: normal saline control, bupivacaine (10mg/kg) only, dexamethasone (0.5mg/kg) only, bupivacaine (10mg/kg) combined with low-dose (0.14mg/kg) dexamethasone, bupivacaine (10mg/kg) combined with high-dose (0.5mg/kg) dexamethasone, and bupivacaine (10mg/kg) combined with intramuscular dexamethasone (0.5mg/kg). Results High-dose perineural dexamethasone, but not systemic dexamethasone, combined with bupivacaine prolonged the duration of both sensory and motor block of mouse sciatic nerve. There was no significant difference on the onset time of the sciatic nerve block. There was “rebound hyperalgesia” to thermal stimulus after the resolution of plain bupivacaine sciatic nerve block. Interestingly, both low and high dose perineural dexamethasone prevented bupivacaine-induced hyperalgesia. There was an early phase of axon degeneration and Schwann cell response as represented by S-100 expression as well as the percentage of demyelinated axon and nucleus in the plain bupivacaine group compared with the bupivacaine plus dexamethasone groups on post-injection day 2, which resolved on post-injection day 7. Furthermore, we demonstrated that perineural dexamethasone

  10. Inactivation of CD11b in a mouse transgenic model protects against sepsis-induced lung PMN infiltration and vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Pei; Liu, Qinghui; Broman, Michael; Predescu, Dan; Frey, Randall S; Malik, Asrar B

    2005-04-14

    To inactivate chronically the beta2-integrin CD11b (Mac-1), we made a transgenic model in mice in which we expressed the CD11b antagonist polypeptide neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF). Using these mice, we determined the in vivo effects of CD11b inactivation on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) function and acute lung injury (ALI) induced by Escherichia coli septicemia. In wild-type PMNs, CD11b expression was induced within 1 h after E. coli challenge, whereas this response was significantly reduced in NIF(+/+) PMNs. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that NIF associated with CD11b in NIF(+/+) PMNs. To validate the effectiveness of CD11b blockade, we compared PMN function in NIF(+/+) and Mac-1-deficient (Mac-1(-/-)) mice. Adhesion of both Mac-1(-/-) and NIF(+/+) PMNs to endothelial cells in response to LPS was reduced in both types of PMNs and fully blocked only by the addition of anti-CD11a monoclonal antibody. This finding is indicative of intact CD11a function in the NIF(+/+) PMNs but the blockade of CD11b function. CD11b inactivation in NIF(+/+) mice interfered with lung PMN infiltration induced by E. coli and prevented the increase in lung microvessel permeability and edema formation, with most of the protection seen in the 1-h period after the E. coli. Thus our results demonstrate that CD11b plays a crucial role in mediating lung PMN sequestration and vascular injury in the early phase of gram-negative septicemia. The NIF(+/+) mouse model, in which CD11b is inactivated by binding to NIF, is a potentially useful model for in vivo assessment of the role of PMN CD11b in the mechanism of vascular inflammation. PMID:15831844

  11. Neuronal Deletion of Caspase 8 Protects against Brain Injury in Mouse Models of Controlled Cortical Impact and Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Maryla; You, Zerong; Rong, Juan; Kress, Christina; Huang, Xianshu; Yang, Jinsheng; Kyoda, Tiffany; Leyva, Ricardo; Banares, Steven; Hu, Yue; Sze, Chia-Hung; Whalen, Michael J.; Salmena, Leonardo; Hakem, Razqallah; Head, Brian P.; Reed, John C.; Krajewski, Stan

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute brain injury is an important health problem. Given the critical position of caspase 8 at the crossroads of cell death pathways, we generated a new viable mouse line (Ncasp8−/−), in which the gene encoding caspase 8 was selectively deleted in neurons by cre-lox system. Methodology/Principal Findings Caspase 8 deletion reduced rates of neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures and in whole brain organotypic coronal slice cultures prepared from 4 and 8 month old mice and cultivated up to 14 days in vitro. Treatments of cultures with recombinant murine TNFα (100 ng/ml) or TRAIL (250 ng/mL) plus cyclohexamide significantly protected neurons against cell death induced by these apoptosis-inducing ligands. A protective role of caspase 8 deletion in vivo was also demonstrated using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and seizure-induced brain injury caused by kainic acid (KA). Morphometric analyses were performed using digital imaging in conjunction with image analysis algorithms. By employing virtual images of hundreds of brain sections, we were able to perform quantitative morphometry of histological and immunohistochemical staining data in an unbiased manner. In the TBI model, homozygous deletion of caspase 8 resulted in reduced lesion volumes, improved post-injury motor performance, superior learning and memory retention, decreased apoptosis, diminished proteolytic processing of caspases and caspase substrates, and less neuronal degeneration, compared to wild type, homozygous cre, and caspase 8-floxed control mice. In the KA model, Ncasp8−/− mice demonstrated superior survival, reduced seizure severity, less apoptosis, and reduced caspase 3 processing. Uninjured aged knockout mice showed improved learning and memory, implicating a possible role for caspase 8 in cognitive decline with aging. Conclusions Neuron-specific deletion of caspase 8 reduces brain damage and improves post-traumatic functional

  12. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  13. Mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Berns, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease and a major therapeutic burden with poor survival rates. It is responsible for 30% of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, although some subtypes are also seen in non-smokers. Tumors in the latter group are mostly adenocarcinomas with many carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Survival statistics of lung cancer are grim because of its late detection and frequent local and distal metastases. Although DNA sequence information from tumors has revealed a number of frequently occurring mutations, affecting well-known tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, many of the driver mutations remain ill defined. This is likely due to the involvement of numerous rather infrequently occurring driver mutations that are difficult to distinguish from the very large number of passenger mutations detected in smoking-related lung cancers. Therefore, experimental model systems are indispensable to validate putative driver lesions and to gain insight into their mechanisms of action. Whereas a large fraction of these analyzes can be performed in cell cultures in vitro, in many cases the consequences of the mutations have to be assessed in the context of an intact organism, as this is the context in which the Mendelian selection process of the tumorigenic process took place and the advantages of particular mutations become apparent. Current mouse models for cancer are very suitable for this as they permit mimicking many of the salient features of human tumors. The capacity to swiftly re-engineer complex sets of lesions found in human tumors in mice enables us to assess the contribution of defined combinations of lesions to distinct tumor characteristics such as metastatic behavior and response to therapy. In this review we will describe mouse models of lung cancer and how they are used to better understand the disease and how they are exploited to develop better intervention strategies

  14. Conditional Inducible Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model for Rapid Real-Time Detection of HCV NS3/4A Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Haiwei; Qiao, Qinghua; Han, Peijun; Xu, Zhikai; Yin, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) frequently establishes persistent infections that can develop into severe liver disease. The HCV NS3/4A serine protease is not only essential for viral replication but also cleaves multiple cellular targets that block downstream interferon activation. Therefore, NS3/4A is an ideal target for the development of anti-HCV drugs and inhibitors. In the current study, we generated a novel NS3/4A/Lap/LC-1 triple-transgenic mouse model that can be used to evaluate and screen NS3/4A protease inhibitors. The NS3/4A protease could be conditionally inducibly expressed in the livers of the triple-transgenic mice using a dual Tet-On and Cre/loxP system. In this system, doxycycline (Dox) induction resulted in the secretion of Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) into the blood, and this secretion was dependent on NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage at the 4B5A junction. Accordingly, NS3/4A protease activity could be quickly assessed in real time simply by monitoring Gluc activity in plasma. The results from such monitoring showed a 70-fold increase in Gluc activity levels in plasma samples collected from the triple-transgenic mice after Dox induction. Additionally, this enhanced plasma Gluc activity was well correlated with the induction of NS3/4A protease expression in the liver. Following oral administration of the commercial NS3/4A-specific inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, plasma Gluc activity was reduced by 50% and 65%, respectively. Overall, our novel transgenic mouse model offers a rapid real-time method to evaluate and screen potential NS3/4A protease inhibitors. PMID:26943641

  15. Conditional Inducible Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model for Rapid Real-Time Detection of HCV NS3/4A Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Min; Lu, Xin; Lei, Yingfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Haiwei; Qiao, Qinghua; Han, Peijun; Xu, Zhikai; Yin, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) frequently establishes persistent infections that can develop into severe liver disease. The HCV NS3/4A serine protease is not only essential for viral replication but also cleaves multiple cellular targets that block downstream interferon activation. Therefore, NS3/4A is an ideal target for the development of anti-HCV drugs and inhibitors. In the current study, we generated a novel NS3/4A/Lap/LC-1 triple-transgenic mouse model that can be used to evaluate and screen NS3/4A protease inhibitors. The NS3/4A protease could be conditionally inducibly expressed in the livers of the triple-transgenic mice using a dual Tet-On and Cre/loxP system. In this system, doxycycline (Dox) induction resulted in the secretion of Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) into the blood, and this secretion was dependent on NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage at the 4B5A junction. Accordingly, NS3/4A protease activity could be quickly assessed in real time simply by monitoring Gluc activity in plasma. The results from such monitoring showed a 70-fold increase in Gluc activity levels in plasma samples collected from the triple-transgenic mice after Dox induction. Additionally, this enhanced plasma Gluc activity was well correlated with the induction of NS3/4A protease expression in the liver. Following oral administration of the commercial NS3/4A-specific inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, plasma Gluc activity was reduced by 50% and 65%, respectively. Overall, our novel transgenic mouse model offers a rapid real-time method to evaluate and screen potential NS3/4A protease inhibitors. PMID:26943641

  16. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages. PMID:25619920

  17. Low Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Does Not Induce Cell Survival or Regeneration in a Mouse Optic Nerve Crush Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Alexander D.; Makowiecki, Kalina; Bartlett, Carole; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Low intensity repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (LI-rTMS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, has been shown to induce structural and functional brain plasticity, including short distance axonal sprouting. However, the potential for LI-rTMS to promote axonal regeneration following neurotrauma has not been investigated. This study examined the effect of LI-rTMS on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival, axon regeneration and levels of BDNF in an optic nerve crush neurotrauma model. Adult C57Bl/6J mice received a unilateral intraorbital optic nerve crush. Mice received 10 minutes of sham (handling control without stimulation) (n=6) or LI-rTMS (n = 8) daily stimulation for 14 days to the operated eye. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess RGC survival (β-3 Tubulin) and axon regeneration across the injury (GAP43). Additionally, BDNF expression was quantified in a separate cohort by ELISA in the retina and optic nerve of injured (optic nerve crush) (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) and non-injured mice (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) that received daily stimulation as above for 7 days. Following 14 days of LI-rTMS there was no significant difference in mean RGC survival between sham and treated animals (p>0.05). Also, neither sham nor LI-rTMS animals showed GAP43 positive labelling in the optic nerve, indicating that regeneration did not occur. At 1 week, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels in the retina or optic nerves between sham and LI-rTMS in injured or non-injured mice (p>0.05). Although LI-rTMS has been shown to induce structural and molecular plasticity in the visual system and cerebellum, our results suggest LI-rTMS does not induce neuroprotection or regeneration following a complete optic nerve crush. These results help define the therapeutic capacity and limitations of LI-rTMS in the treatment of neurotrauma. PMID:25993112

  18. Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlang, Banrida; Song, Ming; Beier, Juliane I.; Cameron Falkner, K.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Clair, Heather B.; Prough, Russell A.; Osborne, Tanasa S.; Malarkey, David E.; Christopher States, J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatic effects of a PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, whose composition mimics human bioaccumulation patterns, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control diet or 42% high fat diet (HFD) and exposed to Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg in corn oil) for 12 weeks. A glucose tolerance test was performed; plasma/tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology, and gene expression. Aroclor 1260 exposure was associated with decreased body fat in HFD-fed mice but had no effect on blood glucose/lipid levels. Paradoxically, Aroclor 1260 + HFD co-exposed mice demonstrated increased hepatic inflammatory foci at both doses while the degree of steatosis did not change. Serum cytokines, ALT levels and hepatic expression of IL-6 and TNFα were increased only at 20 mg/kg, suggesting an inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the 200 mg/kg exposure. Aroclor 1260 induced hepatic expression of cytochrome P450s including Cyp3a11 (Pregnane-Xenobiotic Receptor target) and Cyp2b10 (constitutive androstane receptor target) but Cyp2b10 inducibility was diminished with HFD-feeding. Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon Receptor target) was induced only at 200 mg/kg. In summary, Aroclor 1260 worsened hepatic and systemic inflammation in DIO. The results indicated a bimodal response of PCB-diet interactions in the context of inflammation which could potentially be explained by xenobiotic receptor activation. Thus, PCB exposure may be a relevant “second hit” in the transformation of steatosis to steatohepatitis. - Highlights: • Aroclor 1260 exposure decreased adiposity in mice fed with high fat diet • Aroclor 1260 exposure induced steatohepatitis in diet-induced obese mice • Aroclor 1260 (20 and 200 mg/kg) induced

  19. Mouse models of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miriam R; Sweasy, Joann B

    2012-12-01

    In 1956, Arthur Kornberg discovered the mechanism of the biological synthesis of DNA and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959 for this contribution, which included the isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Now there are 15 known DNA polymerases in mammalian cells that belong to four different families. These DNA polymerases function in many different cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and damage tolerance. Several biochemical and cell biological studies have provoked a further investigation of DNA polymerase function using mouse models in which polymerase genes have been altered using gene-targeting techniques. The phenotypes of mice harboring mutant alleles reveal the prominent role of DNA polymerases in embryogenesis, prevention of premature aging, and cancer suppression. PMID:23001998

  20. Auditory neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bin Na; Kang, Tong Ho

    2008-02-01

    An investigation of the mechanism of damage to the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system in diabetes mellitus (DM) is highly important in current neurological research. Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder in which the auditory brainstem evoked potential is absent or severely abnormal. This study investigated auditory neuropathy caused by streptozotocin in mouse model. In order to assess diabetic auditory neuropathy, we evaluated auditory brainstem response (ABR) for the evaluation of sensorineural function in peripheral auditory nerve. Auditory middle latency response (AMLR) was employed to assess the middle response in the midbrain. STZ groups significantly increased the absolute latencies IV and the interpeak latencies I-III and I-IV of ABR compared with STZ 0 group. Pa latency of AMLR also significantly increased in proportion to STZ dosage. Taken together, our results demonstrate that STZ-induced DM may impair the auditory pathway from peripheral auditory nerve to midbrain in the mouse model. We suggest that the STZ-induced diabetic mouse model may be useful for the evaluation of auditory pathway impairment by using ABR and AMLR tests. PMID:18164131

  1. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-01

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  2. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  3. Metabolome Analyses Uncovered a Novel Inhibitory Effect of Acyclic Retinoid on Aberrant Lipogenesis in a Mouse Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Hepatic Tumorigenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xian-Yang; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Shirakami, Yohei; Ishibashi, Naoto; Shimizu, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kojima, Soichi

    2016-03-01

    Acyclic retinoid (ACR) is a promising drug under clinical trials for preventing recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The objective of this study was to gain insights into molecular basis of the antitumorigenic action of ACR from a metabolic point of view. To achieve this, comprehensive cationic and lipophilic liver metabolic profiling was performed in mouse diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatic tumorigenesis model using both capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. ACR significantly counteracted against acceleration of lipogenesis but not glucose metabolism in DEN-treated mice liver, suggesting an important role of lipid metabolic reprogramming in the initiation step of hepatic tumorigenesis. Knowledge-based pathway analysis suggested that inhibition of linoleic acid metabolites such as arachidonic acid, a proinflammatory precursor, played a crucial role in the prevention by ACR of DEN-induced chronic inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis of the liver. As a molecular mechanism of the ACR's effect to prevent the aberrant lipogenesis, microarray analysis identified that a key transcription regulator of both embryogenesis and tumorigenesis, COUP transcription factor 2, also known as NR2F2, was associated with the metabolic effect of ACR in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our study provided potential therapeutic targets for the chemoprevention of hepatocellular carcinoma as well as new insights into the mechanisms underlying prevention of hepatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26744170

  4. Gene Therapy Targeting LDL Cholesterol but not HDL Cholesterol Induces Regression of Advanced Atherosclerosis in a Mouse Model of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongying; Chao, Hsu; Ko, Kerry W.S.; Cormier, Shelley; Dieker, Carrie; Nour, Elie A.; Wang, Shining; Chan, Lawrence; Oka, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A reduction in low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or an increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol can reduce the risk of development of atherosclerosis through overlapping or independent mechanisms. However, the clinical outcome of combined therapy remains in debate. In this study, we first characterized effects of various constructs of helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) expressing apolipoprotein E3 or LDL receptor (LDLR) in vivo on plasma cholesterol levels. Using this information, we designed experiments and compared the effects of long-term (28 weeks) LDL cholesterol lowering or raising HDL cholesterol, or a combination of both on advanced atherosclerosis in Ldlr−/− mice, a mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia. Our major findings are: (i) various factors influence in vivo functional activity, which appear to be context dependent; (ii) apolipoprotein AI (APOAI) gene transfer, which raises HDL cholesterol, retards progression of atherosclerosis but does not induce regression; (iii) LDLR or LDLR and APOAI combination gene therapy induces lesion regression; however, LDLR gene transfer accounts for the majority of the effects of combined gene therapy; (iv) LDLR gene therapy reduces interleukin-7, which is a master regulator of T-cell homeostasis, but APOAI gene therapy does not. These results indicate that LDL cholesterol lowering is effective and sufficient in protection against atherosclerosis and induction of regression of pre-existing atherosclerosis. PMID:23106034

  5. DNA adducts induced by food mutagen PhIP in a mouse model expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1 and 1A2.

    PubMed

    Høie, Anja Hortemo; Monien, Bernhard Hans; Glatt, Hansruedi; Hjertholm, Hege; Husøy, Trine

    2016-04-25

    Food processing contaminant 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) has previously been shown to induce formation of DNA adducts in vivo. In a previous study the adduct levels were found to increase in a mouse model expressing human (h) sulfotransferases (SULTs) 1A1 and 1A2 after PhIP exposure, detected by (32)P-postlabelling. Isotope dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) is emerging as the method of choice for selective and reproducible detection of known DNA adducts. In the present study we investigated the level and distribution of PhIP induced DNA adducts in male FVB mice 9-11 weeks of age with hSULT mice or wild-type mice (wt) using UPLC-MS/MS. Mice received a single administration of 75 mg/kg bw PhIP by oral gavage, and DNA was analysed 3h after exposure. C8-(2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine- N(2)-yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (C8-PhIP-dG) adduct levels are significantly higher in PhIP exposed hSULT mice compared with PhIP exposed wt mice. The liver was the least affected organ in wild-type mice, whereas it was the most affected organ in hSULT mice with a 14-fold higher adduct level. PMID:26940682

  6. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  7. Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Song, Ming; Beier, Juliane I.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Al-Eryani, Laila; Clair, Heather B.; Prough, Russell A.; Osborne, Tanasa S.; Malarkey, David E.; States, J. Christopher; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatic effects of a PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, whose composition mimics human bioaccumulation patterns, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control diet or 42% high fat diet (HFD) and exposed to Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg in corn oil) for 12 weeks. A glucose tolerance test was performed; plasma/tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology, and gene expression. Aroclor 1260 exposure was associated with decreased body fat in HFD-fed mice but had no effect on blood glucose/lipid levels. Paradoxically, Aroclor 1260 + HFD co-exposed mice demonstrated increased hepatic inflammatory foci at both doses while the degree of steatosis did not change. Serum cytokines, ALT levels and hepatic expression of IL-6 and TNFα were increased only at 20 mg/kg, suggesting an inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the 200 mg/kg exposure. Aroclor 1260 induced hepatic expression of cytochrome P450s including Cyp3a11 (Pregnane-Xenobiotic Receptor target) and Cyp2b10 (constitutive androstane receptor target) but Cyp2b10 inducibility was diminished with HFD-feeding. Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon Receptor target) was induced only at 200 mg/kg. In summary, Aroclor 1260 worsened hepatic and systemic inflammation in DIO. The results indicated a bimodal response of PCB-diet interactions in the context of inflammation which could potentially be explained by xenobiotic receptor activation. Thus, PCB exposure may be a relevant “second hit” in the transformation of steatosis to steatohepatitis. PMID:24998970

  8. 15-epi-lipoxin A4 reduces the mortality of prematurely born pups in a mouse model of infection-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, S F; Catalano, R D; Wade, J; Rossi, A G; Norman, J E

    2015-04-01

    Preterm birth remains the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are currently few effective therapies and therefore an urgent need for novel treatments. Although there is much focus on trying to alter gestation of delivery, the primary aim of preterm birth prevention therapies should be to reduce prematurity related mortality and morbidity. Given the link between intrauterine infection and inflammation and preterm labour (PTL), we hypothesized that administration of lipoxins, key anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution mediators, could be a useful novel treatment for PTL. Using a mouse model of infection-induced PTL, we investigated whether 15-epi-lipoxin A4 could delay lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PTL and reduce pup mortality. On D17 of gestation mice (n = 9-12) were pretreated with vehicle or 15-epi-lipoxin A4 prior to intrauterine administration of LPS or PBS. Although pretreatment with 15-epi-lipoxin A4 did not delay LPS-induced PTL, there was a significant reduction in the mortality amongst prematurely delivered pups (defined as delivery within 36 h of surgery) in mice treated with 15-epi-lipoxin A4 prior to LPS treatment, compared with those receiving LPS alone (P < 0.05). Quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR analysis of utero-placental tissues harvested 6 h post-treatment demonstrated that 15-epi-lipoxin A4 treatment increased Ptgs2 expression in the uterus, placenta and fetal membranes (P < 0.05) and decreased 15-Hpgd expression (P < 0.05) in the placenta and uterus, suggesting that 15-epi-lipoxin A4 may regulate the local production and activity of prostaglandins. These data suggest that augmenting lipoxin levels could be a useful novel therapeutic option in the treatment of PTL, protecting the fetus from the adverse effects of infection-induced preterm birth. PMID:25567326

  9. Panaxydol, a component of Panax ginseng, induces apoptosis in cancer cells through EGFR activation and ER stress and inhibits tumor growth in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Suk; Lim, Jang Mi; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Yongjin; Park, Serkin; Sohn, Jeongwon

    2016-03-15

    We reported previously that panaxydol, a component of Panax ginseng roots, induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis preferentially in transformed cells. This study demonstrates that EGFR activation and the resulting ER stress mediate panaxydol-induced apoptosis, and that panaxydol suppresses in vivo tumor growth in syngeneic and xenogeneic mouse tumor models. In addition, we elucidated that CaMKII and TGF-β-activated kinase (TAK1) participate in p38/JNK activation by elevated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). In MCF-7 cells, EGFR was activated immediately after exposure to panaxydol, and this activation was necessary for induction of apoptosis, suggesting that panaxydol might be a promising anticancer candidate, especially for EGFR-addicted cancer. Activation of PLCγ followed EGFR activation, resulting in Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors. ER Ca(2+) release triggered mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake indirectly through oxidative stress and ensuing ER stress. Elevated [Ca(2+)]c triggered sequential activation of calmodulin/CaMKII, TAK1 and p38/JNK. As shown previously, p38 and JNK activate NADPH oxidase. Here, it was shown that the resulting oxidative stress triggered ER stress. Among the three signaling branches of the unfolded protein response, protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK), but not inositol-requiring enzyme 1 or activating transcription factor 6, played a role in transmitting the apoptosis signal. PERK induced C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and CHOP elevated Bim expression, initiating mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and apoptosis. In summary, we identified roles of EGFR, the CAMKII-TAK1-p38/JNK pathway, and ER stress in panaxydol-induced apoptosis and demonstrated the in vivo anticancer effect of panaxydol. PMID:26421996

  10. Late Intervention with anti-BRAFV600E Therapy Induces Tumor Regression in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nehs, Matthew A.; Nucera, Carmelo; Nagarkatti, Sushruta S.; Sadow, Peter M.; Morales-Garcia, Dieter; Hodin, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Human anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a lethal disease with an advanced clinical presentation and median survival of 3 months. The BRAFV600E oncoprotein is a potent transforming factor that causes human thyroid cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo; therefore, we sought to target this oncoprotein in a late intervention model of ATC in vivo. We used the human ATC cell line 8505c, which harbors the BRAFV600E and TP53R248G mutations. Immunocompromised mice were randomized to receive the selective anti-BRAFV600E inhibitor, PLX4720, or vehicle by oral gavage 28 d after tumor implantation, 1 wk before all animals typically die due to widespread metastatic lung disease and neck compressive symptoms in this model. Mice were euthanized weekly to evaluate tumor volume and metastases. Control mice showed progressive tumor growth and lung metastases by 35 d after tumor implantation. At that time, all control mice had large tumors, were cachectic, and were euthanized due to their tumor-related weight loss. PLX4720-treated mice, however, showed a significant decrease in tumor volume and lung metastases in addition to a reversal of tumor-related weight loss. Mouse survival was extended to 49 d in PLX4720-treated animals. PLX4720 treatment inhibited cell cycle progression from 28 d to 49 d in vivo. PLX4720 induces striking tumor regression and reversal of cachexia in an in vivo model of advanced thyroid cancer that harbors the BRAFV600E mutation. PMID:22202162

  11. Preventing and curing citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis in a humanized mouse model using a Th2-polarizing iNKT cell agonist.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kyle M; Rytelewski, Mateusz; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Meilleur, Shannon A; Mannik, Lisa A; Yue, David; Brintnell, William C; Welch, Ian; Cairns, Ewa; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2012-07-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate lymphocytes with unique reactivity to glycolipid antigens bound to non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. They are capable of rapidly releasing pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines and constitute attractive targets for immunotherapy of a wide range of diseases including autoimmune disorders. In this study, we have explored the beneficial effects of OCH, a Th2-polarizing glycolipid agonist of iNKT cells, in a humanized mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in which citrullinated human proteins are targeted by autoaggressive immune responses in mice expressing an RA susceptibility human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4 molecule. We found for the first time that treatment with OCH both prevents and cures citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis as evidenced by resolved ankle swelling and reversed histopathological changes associated with arthritis. Also importantly, OCH treatment blocked the arthritogenic capacity of citrullinated antigen-experienced splenocytes without compromising their global responsiveness or altering the proportion of splenic naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Interestingly, administering the Th1-promoting iNKT cell glycolipid ligand α-C-galactosylceramide into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice increased the incidence of arthritis in these animals and exacerbated their clinical symptoms, strongly suggesting a role for Th1 responses in the pathogenesis of citrulline-induced arthritis. Therefore, our findings indicate a role for Th1-mediated immunopathology in citrulline-induced arthritis and provide the first evidence that iNKT cell manipulation by Th2-skewing glycolipids may be of therapeutic value in this clinically relevant model, a finding that is potentially translatable to human RA. PMID:21912419

  12. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and it can influence treatment decisions. Although there is currently no therapy for alopecia, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) has shown promise in animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320, and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); and treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Mice were photographed every 3-4 days and killed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by gray scale analysis to assess hair content. Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks after waxing and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histological analysis revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by gray scale analysis, P<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to that in mice that did not receive chemotherapy. Single-dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding up recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:24710191

  13. Identification of learning-induced changes in protein networks in the hippocampi of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, E; Shaw, D M; Oddo, S

    2016-01-01

    Memory loss is the most profound clinical manifestation in Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are poorly understood. Identification of the molecular pathways involved in the onset of cognitive deficits may lead to the identification of key events in the pathogenesis of AD. Using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and proteomic methods, here we identified learning-induced changes in the hippocampal proteome of non-transgenic (NonTg) and 3 × Tg-AD mice, a widely used animal model of AD. We found that expression of 192 proteins was differentially regulated by learning in NonTg mice. Notably, of these 192 proteins, only 28 were also differentially regulated by learning in 3 × Tg-AD mice, whereas the levels of 164 proteins were uniquely changed in NonTg mice but not in 3 × Tg-AD mice. These data suggest that during learning, 3 × Tg-AD mice fail to differentially regulate 164 proteins. Gene ontology and protein interaction analyses indicated that these proteins were overrepresented in RNA processing, specifically RNA transport, splicing and mRNA translation initiation pathways. These findings suggest that mRNA-processing events that take place during learning and memory are significantly altered in 3 × Tg-AD mice. PMID:27378549

  14. Deficiency for the Cysteine Protease Cathepsin L Impairs Myc-Induced Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Nicola R.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Rostker, Fanya; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Swigart-Brown, Lamorna; Evan, Gerard; Hanahan, Douglas; Shchors, Ksenya

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent implication of cysteine protease cathepsin L as a potential target for anti-cancer drug development, we used a conditional MycERTAM;Bcl-xL model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis (PNET) to assess the role of cathepsin L in Myc-induced tumor progression. By employing a cysteine cathepsin activity probe in vivo and in vitro, we first established that cathepsin activity increases during the initial stages of MycERTAM;Bcl-xL tumor development. Among the cathepsin family members investigated, only cathepsin L was predominately produced by beta-tumor cells in neoplastic pancreata and, consistent with this, cathepsin L mRNA expression was rapidly upregulated following Myc activation in the beta cell compartment. By contrast, cathepsins B, S and C were highly enriched in tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. Genetic deletion of cathepsin L had no discernible effect on the initiation of neoplastic growth or concordant angiogenesis. However, the tumors that developed in the cathepsin L-deficient background were markedly reduced in size relative to their typical wild-type counterparts, indicative of a role for cathepsin L in enabling expansive tumor growth. Thus, genetic blockade of cathepsin L activity is inferred to retard Myc-driven tumor growth, encouraging the potential utility of pharmacological inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins in treating late stage tumors. PMID:25927437

  15. The role of inflammation induced by radiation or lipopolysaccharides in the metastatic process in a mouse model of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterer, Chantal

    Mortality from breast cancer is primarily due to metastatic disease, which often appears years after treatment of the primary tumor. Radiation as well as bacterial infection induces inflammation, which by releasing cytokines can be implicated in metastatic processes. Using in vitro and in vivo models, the ability of radiation to awaken dormant lung metastases was assessed as well as the capacity of a bacterial infection to enhance metastatic progression in already proliferating lung metastases. As models, we used the D2.0R (dormant) and D2A1 (proliferative) cell lines, which are derived from spontaneous murine mammary tumors. The ability of radiation to awaken dormant D2.0R mammary cancer cells was assessed in a 3-dimension (3D) cell culture system, which resulted in the formation of microspheres of cancer cells. The addition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2; 100ng/m1) or conditioned media from irradiated (5 Gy) CALU-3 human bronchial epithelial cells stimulated the proliferation of the dormant D2.0R cells resulting in microspheres with a larger diameter compared to the untreated cells. Regarding the proliferative D2A1 microspheres, their rate of proliferation was not further increased by adding PGE2 or the conditioned media of irradiated CALU-3 cells. In Balb/c mice bearing dormant lung D2.0R micrometastases, our data showed that a fractionated radiation dose (5x7.5 Gy) to the mammary gland resulted in a significant increase in the development of metastases, as measured 42 days post-irradiation by bioluminescent reaction. We also evaluated whether a bacterial infection could stimulate the growth of D2A1 cancer cells. Gram-negative bacteria release the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that induces an inflammatory response. In lungs of mice treated with LPS, a higher level of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) was measured supporting the induction of an inflammation. This was accompanied by an increase of cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) 5 hours after treatment. The ability

  16. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  17. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  18. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Bray, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study. PMID:23170168

  19. Bronchial lesions of mouse model of asthma are preceded by immune complex vasculitis and induced bronchial associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT).

    PubMed

    Guest, Ian C; Sell, Stewart

    2015-08-01

    We systematically examined by immune histology the lungs of some widely used mouse models of asthma. These models include sensitization by multiple intraperitoneal injections of soluble ovalbumin (OVA) or of OVA with alum, followed by three intranasal or aerosol challenges 3 days apart. Within 24 h after a single challenge there is fibrinoid necrosis of arterial walls with deposition of immunoglobulin (Ig) and OVA and infiltration of eosinophilic polymorphonuclear cells that lasts for about 3 days followed by peribronchial B-cell infiltration and slight reversible goblet cell hypertrophy (GCHT). After two challenges, severe eosinophilic vasculitis is present at 6 h, increases by 72 h, and then declines; B-cell proliferation and significant GCHT and hyperplasia (GCHTH) and bronchial smooth muscle hypertrophy recur more prominently. After three challenges, there is significantly increased induced bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) formation, GCHTH, and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Elevated levels of Th2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, are present in bronchial lavage fluids. Sensitized mice have precipitating antibody and positive Arthus skin reactions but also develop significant levels of IgE antibody to OVA but only 1 week after challenge. We conclude that the asthma like lung lesions induced in these models is preceded by immune complex-mediated eosinophilic vasculitis and iBALT formation. There are elevations of Th2 cytokines that most likely produce bronchial lesions that resemble human asthma. However, it is unlikely that mast cell-activated atopic mechanisms are responsible as we found only a few presumed mast cells by toluidine blue and metachromatic staining limited to the most proximal part of the main stem bronchus, and none in the remaining main stem bronchus or in the lung periphery. PMID:26006019

  20. Underlying mitochondrial dysfunction triggers flutamide-induced oxidative liver injury in a mouse model of idiosyncratic drug toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kashimshetty, Rohini; Desai, Varsha G.; Kale, Vijay M.; Lee, Taewon; Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S.; New, Lee S.; Chan, Eric C.Y.; Younis, Husam; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2009-07-15

    Flutamide, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-androgen, but not its bioisostere bicalutamide, has been associated with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Although the susceptibility factors are unknown, mitochondrial injury has emerged as a putative hazard of flutamide. To explore the role of mitochondrial sensitization in flutamide hepatotoxicity, we determined the effects of superimposed drug stress in a murine model of underlying mitochondrial abnormalities. Male wild-type or heterozygous Sod2{sup +/-} mice were injected intraperitoneously with flutamide (0, 30 or 100 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. A kinetic pilot study revealed that flutamide (100 mg/kg/day) caused approximately 10-fold greater exposure than the reported therapeutic mean plasma levels. Mutant (5/10), but not wild-type, mice in the high-dose group exhibited small foci of hepatocellular necrosis and an increased number of apoptotic hepatocytes. Hepatic GSSG/GSH, protein carbonyl levels, and serum lactate levels were significantly increased, suggesting oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Measurement of mitochondrial superoxide in cultured hepatocytes demonstrated that mitochondria were a significant source of flutamide-enhanced oxidant stress. Indeed, mitochondria isolated from flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited decreased aconitase activity as compared to vehicle controls. A transcriptomics analysis using MitoChips revealed that flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited a selective decrease in the expression of all complexes I and III subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA. In contrast, Sod2{sup +/-} mice receiving bicalutamide (50 mg/kg/day) did not reveal any hepatic changes. These results are compatible with our concept that flutamide targets hepatic mitochondria and exerts oxidant stress that can lead to overt hepatic injury in the presence of an underlying mitochondrial abnormality.

  1. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2, a Novel Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Inducer, Protects Dopaminergic Neurons by Modulating Neuroinflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Sook; Lee, Gihyun; Lee, Chanju; Ye, Minsook; Chung, Hwan-suck; Kim, Hyunseong; Bae, Sung-joo S; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-11-15

    Foxp3-expressing CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are vital for maintaining immune tolerance in animal models of various immune diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) is the major BV compound capable of inducing Treg expansion and promotes the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease. We associated this neuroprotective effect of bvPLA2 with microglial deactivation and reduction of CD4(+) T cell infiltration. Interestingly, bvPLA2 had no effect on mice depleted of Tregs by injecting anti-CD25 Ab. This finding indicated that Treg-mediated modulation of peripheral immune tolerance is strongly involved in the neuroprotective effects of bvPLA2. Furthermore, our results showed that bvPLA2 directly bound to CD206 on dendritic cells and consequently promoted the secretion of PGE2, which resulted in Treg differentiation via PGE2 (EP2) receptor signaling in Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells. These observations suggest that bvPLA2-CD206-PGE2-EP2 signaling promotes immune tolerance through Treg differentiation and contributes to the prevention of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. PMID:26453752

  2. Memory-enhancing effect of aspirin is mediated through opioid system modulation in an AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model

    PubMed Central

    RIZWAN, SAIMA; IDREES, AYESHA; ASHRAF, MUHAMMAD; AHMED, TOUQEER

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers disease (AD) are multifaceted and there are currently a limited number of therapeutic strategies available to treat them. Aspirin is known to act on multiple therapeutic targets and is a successful anti-inflammatory agent in various tissues. The present study aimed to ascertain the performance of aspirin when employed as a therapeutic agent to treat neurodegeneration on novel targets, including opioid system genes, in an AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. The effects of two doses of aspirin (5 and 20 mg/kg aspirin for 12 days) were investigated in an AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model (150 mg/kg AlCl3 for 12 days). Neurological improvements were assessed through different behavioral tests and the effects of aspirin on opioid system gene expression levels were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Both doses resulted in improvements in cognitive behavior. A 5 mg/kg dose of aspirin was revealed to be effective for spatial memory improvement (7.14±0.84 sec), whilst a 20 mg/kg dose was superior for improving extinction learning (7.63±4.04%). Aspirin (5 mg/kg) also significantly improved contextual memory (48.05±10.6%) when compared with the AlCl3-treated group (1.49±0.62%; P<0.001). Aspirin was also observed to significantly decrease δ-opioid receptor expression in the cortex (1.09±0.08 and 1.27±0.08, respectively) at both doses (5 and 20 mg/kg) when compared with the AlCl3-treated group (3.69±1.43; P<0.05). Furthermore, aspirin at 5 mg/kg significantly reduced expression of prodynorphin in the cortex (0.57±0.20) when compared with the AlCl3-treated group (1.95±0.84; P<0.05). Notably, the effect of aspirin was significant in the cortex but not in the hippocampus. In summary, aspirin was effective in ameliorating the AD-like symptoms via the modulation of opioid systems. However, additional studies are required to determine the long term effects of aspirin on such conditions. PMID

  3. Curcumin ameliorates the tumor-enhancing effects of a high-protein diet in an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Byun, So-Young; Kim, Dan-Bi; Kim, Eunjung

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of reports suggest that a high-protein diet (HPD) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). One of the proposed mechanisms is that an HPD increases the delivery of protein to the colon and generates various toxic metabolites that contribute to colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin was shown to exert significant preventive properties against CRC. We therefore hypothesized that curcumin can reverse the tumor-enhancing effects of an HPD. This study examined the effects of curcumin on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal tumors in HPD-fed mice. A total of 30 female Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: those fed a normal diet (20% casein), those fed an HPD (HPD; 50% casein), and those fed an HPD supplemented with curcumin (HPDC; 0.02% curcumin). The mice were subjected to an AOM-dextran sodium sulfate colon carcinogenesis protocol. Mice in the HPDC group exhibited a significant (40%) reduction in colorectal tumor multiplicity when compared with those in the HPD group. The expression of colonic inflammatory proteins (cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase), the levels of plasma inflammatory markers (nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α), fecal ammonia, short- and branched-chain fatty acid levels, and the rate of colonocyte proliferation were significantly lower in the HPDC than the HPD group. In conclusion, curcumin inhibited the development of colorectal tumors in an AOM-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis by attenuating colonic inflammation, proliferation, and toxic metabolite production. Curcumin might be useful in the chemoprevention of CRC in individuals consuming an HPD. PMID:26094212

  4. Thymocytes, Pre-B Cells, and Organ Changes in a Mouse Model of Chronic Ethanol Ingestion—Absence of Subset-Specific Glucocorticoid-Induced Immune Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Robert T.; Schlueter, Annette J.; Coleman, Ruth A.; Tygrett, Lorraine; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Jerrells, Thomas R.; Nashelsky, Marcus B.; Ray, Nancy B.; Haugen, Thomas H.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Background The well-known immune deficiency of the chronic alcoholic dictates the need for a long-term rodent ethanol administration model to evaluate the baseline immunologic effects of chronic ethanol abuse, and investigate the genetic determinants of those effects. Much published work with rodents has shown clearly that acute ethanol administration and short-term ethanol-containing liquid diets both cause elevated corticosterone and can cause significant thymocyte, pre-B cell and peripheral lymphocyte losses. Such losses may mask more subtle alterations in immune homeostasis, and in any case are generally short-lived compared with the span of chronic ethanol abuse. Thus, it is important to have a model in which long-term immune alterations can be studied free of corticosteroid-induced cell losses. Methods We have utilized chronic 20% (w / v) ethanol in water administration to several mouse strains for prolonged periods of time and evaluated serum corticosterone, immunologic stress parameters, and other organ changes by standard methods. Results We now confirm earlier reports that chronic ethanol in water administration to mice does not produce net elevations of corticosterone, although diurnal variation is altered. Importantly, there is neither selective loss of immune cell populations known to be corticosteroid sensitive, CD4+CD8+ thymocytes and pre-B cells, nor are changes observed in the histologic appearance of the thymus. Nonetheless, there are significant chronic ethanol effects in other tissues, including reduced heart weight, mild hepatic steatosis, alterations of gut flora, increased serum peptidoglycan, and as published elsewhere, immune system abnormalities. Conclusions This model of ethanol administration is convenient, sustainable for up to 1 year, demonstrably feasible in several mouse strains, permits good weight gains in most strains, and results in significant changes in a number of organs. The administration method also will permit modeling of

  5. Loss of SH3BP2 function suppresses bone destruction in TNF-driven and collagen-induced arthritis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Gallant, Richard; Ishida, Shu; Kittaka, Mizuho; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Fox, David A.; Morita, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Rottapel, Robert; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SH3BP2 in arthritis in human TNF-α transgenic (hTNFtg) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. Methods First, SH3BP2-deficient (Sh3bp2–/–) and wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were crossed with hTNFtg mice. Inflammation and bone loss were examined by clinical inspection and histological and micro-CT analyses. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated with primary bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophages (BMMs). Second, CIA was induced in Sh3bp2–/– and Sh3bp2+/+ mice, and the incidence and severity of arthritis were evaluated. Anti-mouse type II collagen (CII) antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Lymph node cell responses to CII were also determined. Results SH3BP2-deficiency did not alter the severity of joint swelling but suppressed bone erosion in the hTNFtg model. Bone loss of talus and tibia was prevented in Sh3bp2–/–/hTNFtg mice compared to Sh3bp2+/+/hTNFtg mice. RANKL- and TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis was suppressed in Sh3bp2–/– BMM cultures. NFATc1 nuclear localization in response to TNF-α was decreased in Sh3bp2–/– BMMs compared to Sh3bp2+/+ BMMs. In the CIA model, SH3BP2-deficiency suppressed the incidence of arthritis, which was associated with decreased anti-CII antibody production, while the antigen-specific T-cell responses in lymph nodes were not significantly different between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2–/– mice. Conclusion SH3BP2-deficiency prevents bone loss via impaired osteoclastogenesis in the hTNFtg model and suppresses the induction of arthritis via decreased autoantibody production in the CIA model. Therefore, SH3BP2 could be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25470448

  6. Silymarin ameliorates memory deficits and neuropathological changes in mouse model of high-fat-diet-induced experimental dementia.

    PubMed

    Neha; Kumar, Amit; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-08-01

    A huge body evidences suggest that obesity is the single great risk factor for the development of dementia. Recently, silymarin, a flavonoid, clinically in use as a hepatoprotectant, has been reported to prevent amyloid beta-induced memory impairment by reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in mice brain. However, its potential in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced dementia has not yet been investigated. Therefore, the present study is designed to explore the role of silymarin in HFD-induced experimental dementia in mice. Morris water maze test was employed to assess learning and memory. Various biochemical estimations including brain acetylcholinerstarse activity (AchE), thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) level, reduced glutathione level (GSH), nirate/nitrite, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured. Serum cholesterol level was also determined. HFD significantly impaired the cognitive abilities, along with increasing brain AchE, TBARS, MPO, nitrate/nitrite, and serum cholesterol levels. Marked reduction of brain GSH levels was observed. On the contrary, silymarin significantly reversed HFD-induced cognitive deficits and the biochemical changes. The present study indicates strong potential of silymarin in HFD-induced experimental dementia. PMID:24866499

  7. Oridonin Attenuates Synaptic Loss and Cognitive Deficits in an Aβ1-42-Induced Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sulei; Yu, Linjie; Yang, Hui; Li, Chaosheng; Hui, Zhen; Xu, Yun; Zhu, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic loss induced by beta-amyloid (Aβ) plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we found that oridonin (Ori) rescued synaptic loss induced by Aβ1-42 in vivo and in vitro and attenuated the alterations in dendritic structure and spine density observed in the hippocampus of AD mice. In addition, Ori increased the expression of PSD-95 and synaptophysin and promoted mitochondrial activity in the synaptosomes of AD mice. Ori also activated the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway in the hippocampus of AD mice. Furthermore, in the Morris water maze test, Ori reduced latency and searching distance and increased the number of platform crosses in AD mice. These data suggest that Ori might prevent synaptic loss and improve behavioral symptoms in Aβ1-42-induced AD mice. PMID:26974541

  8. High-Fat Diet-Induced IL-17A Exacerbates Psoriasiform Dermatitis in a Mouse Model of Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Philippe; Serres, Laura; Jégou, Jean-François; Pohin, Mathilde; Delwail, Adriana; Petit-Paris, Isabelle; Levillain, Pierre; Favot, Laure; Samson, Michel; Yssel, Hans; Morel, Franck; Silvain, Christine; Lecron, Jean-Claude

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that psoriasis may be more severe in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, particularly in those with the inflammatory stage of steatohepatitis [nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]. Herein, we investigated the impact of diet-induced steatohepatitis on the severity of imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis. Mice fed with a high-fat diet developed steatohepatitis reminiscent of human NASH with ballooning hepatocytes and significant liver fibrosis. Mice with steatohepatitis also displayed moderate cutaneous inflammation characterized by erythema, dermal infiltrates of CD45(+) leukocytes, and a local production of IL-17A. Moreover, steatohepatitis was associated with an epidermal activation of caspase-1 and cutaneous overexpression of IL-1β. Imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis was exacerbated in mice with steatohepatitis as compared to animals fed with a standard diet. Scale formation and acanthosis were aggravated, in correlation with increased IL-17A and IL-22 expression in inflamed skins. Finally, intradermal injection of IL-17A in standard diet-fed mice recapitulated the cutaneous pathology of mice with steatohepatitis. The results show that high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis aggravates the inflammation in psoriasiform dermatitis, via the cutaneous production of IL-17A. In agreement with clinical data, this description of a novel extrahepatic manifestation of NASH should sensitize dermatologists to the screening and the management of fatty liver in psoriatic patients. PMID:27423696

  9. Antiamnesic Effect of Actinidia arguta Extract Intake in a Mouse Model of TMT-Induced Learning and Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeong Su; Jin, Dong Eun; Park, Seon Kyeong; Park, Chang Hyeon; Seung, Tae Wan; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Dae-Ok; Heo, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The antiamnesic effects of ethyl acetate fraction from Actinidia arguta (EFAA) on trimethyltin- (TMT-) induced memory impairment were investigated to find the possibility of functional food substances. EFAA showed a potent AChE inhibitory effect (IC50 = 53 μg/mL) and efficient neuroprotection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The administration of EFAA significantly decreased TMT-induced cognitive deficit in Y-maze, passive avoidance, and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. After the behavioral tests, the antioxidant activities were confirmed using mice brain tissues. EFAA not only showed the inhibition of AChE activity and the decline of malondialdehyde (MDA) level as a sign of lipid peroxidation but also presented the increase of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) level and the decrease of the oxidized glutathione (GSSG)/total glutathione (GSH + GSSG) ratio. Finally, the phenolics in EFAA were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry, and four main phenolics, such as quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeoyl hexose, and quercetin-3-glucoside, were identified. These results suggest that EFAA containing physiological phenolics might enhance drug-induced amnesia through AChE inhibition and neuroprotection. PMID:26576196

  10. Parasitic nematode-induced modulation of body weight and associated metabolic dysfunction in mouse models of obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low grade inflammation characterized by high level of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators implicated in disrupted metabolic homeostasis. Parasitic nematode infection induces a polarized Th2 cytokine response and has been shown to modulate immune-based pathol...

  11. Comparison of the Allergic Responses Induced by PeniciIlium chrysogenum and House Dust Mite Extracts in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. We compared the ability of the fungal Penicillium chrysogenum (PCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce al...

  12. Fat-water MRI is sensitive to local adipose tissue inflammatory changes in a diet-induced obesity mouse model at 15T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Henry H.; Webb, Corey D.; Gruen, Marnie L.; Hasty, Alyssa H.; Gore, John C.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    In obesity, fat-water MRI (FWMRI) methods provide valuable information about adipose tissue (AT) distribution. AT is known to undergo complex metabolic and endocrine changes in association with chronic inflammation including iron overloading. Here, we investigate the potential for FWMRI parameters (fat signal fraction (FSF), local magnetic field offset, and T2*) to be sensitive to AT inflammatory changes in an established diet-induced obesity mouse model. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on a low fat (LFD) or a high fat diet (HFD). 3D multi- gradient-echo MRI at 15.2T was performed at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after diet onset. A 3D fat-water separation algorithm and additional processing was used to generate FSF, local field offset, and T2* maps. We examined these parameters in perirenal AT ROIs from HFD and LFD mice. Results: The data suggest that FSF, local field offset, and T2* can differentiate time course behavior between inflamed and control AT (increasing FSF, decreasing local field offset, increasing followed by decreasing T2*). The biophysical mechanisms of these observed changes are not well understood and require further study. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first evidence that FWMRI can provide biomarkers sensitive to AT inflammation, and that FWMRI has the potential for longitudinal non-invasive assessment of AT inflammation in obesity.

  13. Long term, continuous exposure to panobinostat induces terminal differentiation and long term survival in the TH-MYCN neuroblastoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Waldeck, Kelly; Cullinane, Carleen; Ardley, Kerry; Shortt, Jake; Martin, Ben; Tothill, Richard W; Li, Jason; Johnstone, Ricky W; McArthur, Grant A; Hicks, Rodney J; Wood, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial malignancy in childhood and accounts for ∼15% of childhood cancer deaths. Amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma is associated with aggressive disease and predicts for poor prognosis. Novel therapeutic approaches are therefore essential to improving patient outcomes in this setting. The histone deacetylases are known to interact with N-Myc and regulate numerous cellular processes via epigenetic modulation, including differentiation. In this study, we used the TH-MYCN mouse model of neuroblastoma to investigate the antitumor activity of the pan-HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat. In particular we sought to explore the impact of long term, continuous panobinostat exposure on the epigenetically driven differentiation process. Continuous treatment of tumor bearing TH-MYCN transgenic mice with panobinostat for nine weeks led to a significant improvement in survival as compared with mice treated with panobinostat for a three-week period. Panobinostat induced rapid tumor regression with no regrowth observed following a nine-week treatment period. Initial tumor response was associated with apoptosis mediated via upregulation of BMF and BIM. The process of terminal differentiation of neuroblastoma into benign ganglioneuroma, with a characteristic increase in S100 expression and reduction of N-Myc expression, occurred following prolonged exposure to the drug. RNA-sequencing analysis of tumors from treated animals confirmed significant upregulation of gene pathways associated with apoptosis and differentiation. Together our data demonstrate the potential of panobinostat as a novel therapeutic strategy for high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:26914605

  14. Retinol as a cofactor for PKCδ-mediated impairment of insulin sensitivity in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Shabrova, Elena; Hoyos, Beatrice; Vinogradov, Valerie; Kim, Youn-Kyung; Wassef, Lesley; Leitges, Michael; Quadro, Loredana; Hammerling, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    We previously defined that the mitochondria-localized PKCδ signaling complex stimulates the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. We demonstrated in vitro and ex vivo that retinol supplementation enhances ATP synthesis in the presence of the PKCδ signalosome. Here, we tested in vivo if a persistent oversupply of retinol would further impair glucose metabolism in a mouse model of diet-induced insulin resistance. We crossed mice overexpressing human retinol-binding protein (hRBP) under the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter (MCKhRBP) with the PKCδ(-/-) strain to generate mice with a different status of the PKCδ signalosome and retinoid levels. Mice with a functional PKCδ signalosome and elevated retinoid levels (PKCδ(+/+)hRBP) developed the most advanced stage of insulin resistance. In contrast, elevation of retinoid levels in mice with inactive PKCδ did not affect remarkably their metabolism, resulting in phenotypic similarity between PKCδ(-/-)hRBP and PKCδ(-/-) mice. Therefore, in addition to the well-defined role of PKCδ in the etiology of metabolic syndrome, we present a novel PKCδ signaling pathway that requires retinol as a metabolic cofactor and is involved in the regulation of fuel utilization in mitochondria. The distinct role in whole-body energy homeostasis establishes the PKCδ signalosome as a promising target for therapeutic intervention in metabolic disorders. PMID:26671999

  15. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  16. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  17. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Brian A; Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  18. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  19. Sirtuin1 Over-Expression Does Not Impact Retinal Vascular and Neuronal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P.; Hatton, Colman J.; Pei, Dorothy T.; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A.; Smith, Lois E. H.; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy. PMID:24416337

  20. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. This study compared the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50-150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6-12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  1. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. To compare the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50–150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6–12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  2. Chronic alcohol intake promotes tumor growth in a diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis mouse model through increased Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol (EtOH) metabolism is involved in both initiating and promoting mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma progression in chronic alcoholics. In this study, we developed a mouse model to test the hypothesis that chronic EtOH consumption promotes tumor growth irrespective of EtOH-related initiati...

  3. Chemical chaperones reduce ER stress and adipose tissue inflammation in high fat diet-induced mouse model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaqin; Wu, Zhihong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xiang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, which is characteristic by chronic inflammation, is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese state and is known to be strongly associated with chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ER stress on adipokine secretion in obese mice and explore the potential mechanisms. In this study, we found high-fat diet induced-obesity contributed to strengthened ER stress and triggered chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. Chemical chaperones, 4-PBA and TUDCA, modified metabolic disorders and decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in obese mice fed a high-fat diet. The alleviation of ER stress is in accordance with the decrease of free cholesterol in adipose tissue. Furthermore chemical chaperones suppress NF-κB activity in adipose tissue of obese mice in vivo. In vitro studies showed IKK/NF-κB may be involved in the signal transduction of adipokine secretion dysfunction induced by ER stress. The present study revealed the possibility that inhibition of ER stress may be a novel drug target for metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. Further studies are now needed to characterize the initial incentive of sustained ER stress in obese. PMID:27271106

  4. Reg3g overexpression promotes β cell regeneration and induces immune tolerance in nonobese-diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Cao, Hui; Du, Jiao; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    The regenerating islet-derived gene was first isolated in regenerated pancreas tissues, greatly contributing to β cell regeneration. It is an anti-inflammatory in response to cellular stress. This encouraged us to investigate the exact role of a novel member of Reg family, regenerating islet-derived gene γ, in type 1 diabetes of nonobese-diabetic mice. For this, Reg3g gene was overexpressed in pancreatic islets, and conferred beneficial effects on β cell regeneration through activating the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. Lentiviral vector-encoding regenerating islet-derived gene γ treatment also decreased lymphocyte infiltrates of the intra-islet and peri-islet by inducing both differentiation of regulatory T cell and immature dendritic cells of tolerogenic properties, which attenuated autoimmunity. This treatment further contributed to rebalanced levels of type 1/2 helper T cell cytokines and elevated α1-antitrypsin levels in the serum. These results were not observed in phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice or in lentivirus-control mice. We have shown, for the first time, to our knowledge, that regenerating islet-derived gene γ promotes β cell regeneration and preserves β cells from autoimmunity damage by increasing regulatory T cell differentiation and inducing tolerated dendritic cells. This regenerating islet-derived gene γ infusion could probably be developed into an optimal gene therapy for the prevention and reversal of type 1 diabetes. PMID:26667474

  5. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marsha D W; Chung, Yong Joo; Copeland, Lisa B; Doerfler, Donald L

    2011-01-01

    Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5-80 μg protein) 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 μg)). MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential. PMID:21785589

  6. Chemical chaperones reduce ER stress and adipose tissue inflammation in high fat diet-induced mouse model of obesity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaqin; Wu, Zhihong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xiang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, which is characteristic by chronic inflammation, is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese state and is known to be strongly associated with chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ER stress on adipokine secretion in obese mice and explore the potential mechanisms. In this study, we found high-fat diet induced-obesity contributed to strengthened ER stress and triggered chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. Chemical chaperones, 4-PBA and TUDCA, modified metabolic disorders and decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in obese mice fed a high-fat diet. The alleviation of ER stress is in accordance with the decrease of free cholesterol in adipose tissue. Furthermore chemical chaperones suppress NF-κB activity in adipose tissue of obese mice in vivo. In vitro studies showed IKK/NF-κB may be involved in the signal transduction of adipokine secretion dysfunction induced by ER stress. The present study revealed the possibility that inhibition of ER stress may be a novel drug target for metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. Further studies are now needed to characterize the initial incentive of sustained ER stress in obese. PMID:27271106

  7. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Marsha D. W.; Chung, Yong Joo; Copeland, Lisa B.; Doerfler, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5–80 μg protein) 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 μg)). MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential. PMID:21785589

  8. Tumor Mouse Model Confirms MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic As an Efficient Inducer of Long-Lasting Anti-Tumoral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Catherine; Baudson, Nathalie; Ory, Thierry; Louahed, Jamila

    2014-01-01

    Purpose MAGE-A3 is a potential target for immunotherapy due to its tumor-specific nature and expression in several tumor types. Clinical data on MAGE-A3 immunotherapy have raised many questions that can only be addressed by using animal models. In the present study, different aspects of the murine anti-tumor immune responses induced by a recombinant MAGE-A3 protein (recMAGE-A3) in combination with different immunostimulants (AS01, AS02, CpG7909 or AS15) were investigated. Experimental Design and Results Based on cytokine profile analyses and protection against challenge with MAGE-A3-expressing tumor, the combination recMAGE-A3+AS15 was selected for further experimental work, in particular to study the mechanisms of anti-tumor responses. By using MHC class I-, MHC class II-, perforin-, B-cell- and IFN-γ- knock-out mice and CD4+ T cell-, CD8+ T cell- and NK cell- depleted mice, we demonstrated that CD4+ T cells and NK cells are the main anti-tumor effectors, and that IFN-γ is a major effector molecule. This mouse tumor model also established the need to repeat recMAGE-A3+AS15 injections to sustain efficient anti-tumor responses. Furthermore, our results indicated that the efficacy of tumor rejection by the elicited anti-MAGE-A3 responses depends on the proportion of tumor cells expressing MAGE-A3. Conclusions The recMAGE-A3+AS15 cancer immunotherapy efficiently induced an antigen-specific, functional and long-lasting immune response able to recognize and eliminate MAGE-A3-expressing tumor cells up to several months after the last immunization in mice. The data highlighted the importance of the immunostimulant to induce a Th1-type immune response, as well as the key role played by IFN-γ, CD4+ T cells and NK cells in the anti-tumoral effect. PMID:24830315

  9. Transplacental exposure to AZT induces adverse neurochemical and behavioral effects in a mouse model: protection by L-acetylcarnitine.

    PubMed

    Zuena, Anna Rita; Giuli, Chiara; Venerosi Pesciolini, Aldina; Tramutola, Antonella; Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Cinque, Carlo; Alemà, Giovanni Sebastiano; Giovine, Angela; Peluso, Gianfranco; Minghetti, Luisa; Nicolai, Raffaella; Calamandrei, Gemma; Casolini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-fetal HIV-1 transmission can be prevented by administration of AZT, alone or in combination with other antiretroviral drugs to pregnant HIV-1-infected women and their newborns. In spite of the benefits deriving from this life-saving prophylactic therapy, there is still considerable uncertainty on the potential long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on exposed children. Clinical and experimental studies have consistently shown the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress following prenatal treatment with antiretroviral drugs, and clinical evidence suggests that the developing brain is one of the targets of the toxic action of these compounds possibly resulting in behavioral problems. We intended to verify the effects on brain and behavior of mice exposed during gestation to AZT, the backbone of antiretroviral therapy during human pregnancy. We hypothesized that glutamate, a neurotransmitter involved in excitotoxicity and behavioral plasticity, could be one of the major actors in AZT-induced neurochemical and behavioral alterations. We also assessed the antioxidant and neuroprotective effect of L-acetylcarnitine, a compound that improves mitochondrial function and is successfully used to treat antiretroviral-induced polyneuropathy in HIV-1 patients. We found that transplacental exposure to AZT given per os to pregnant mice from day 10 of pregnancy to delivery impaired in the adult offspring spatial learning and memory, enhanced corticosterone release in response to acute stress, increased brain oxidative stress also at birth and markedly reduced expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 subtypes and GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in the hippocampus. Notably, administration during the entire pregnancy of L-acetylcarnitine was effective in preventing/ameliorating the neurochemical, neuroendocrine and behavioral adverse effects induced by AZT in the offspring. The present preclinical findings provide a mechanistic hypothesis for

  10. Evaluation of OspA Vaccination-Induced Serological Correlates of Protection against Lyme Borreliosis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Schwendinger, Michael G.; O'Rourke, Maria; Traweger, Andreas; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Pilz, Andreas; Portsmouth, Daniel; Livey, Ian; Barrett, P. Noel; Crowe, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background For clinical development of a novel multivalent OspA vaccine against Lyme borreliosis, serological assays are required which can be used to establish immune correlates of protection against infection with Borrelia. Methods Four assays (an OspA IgG ELISA, a competitive inhibition (CI) ELISA, a Borrelia surface-binding (SB) assay and a Borrelia killing assay) were used to evaluate the correlation between immune responses induced by rOspA 1/2 (a chimeric immunogen containing protective epitopes from OspA serotypes 1 and 2), and protective immunity against infection by B. burgdorferi s.s. (OspA-1) and B. afzelii (OspA-2). Mice were immunized with OspA 1/2 doses ranging from 0.3 ng to 100 ng, to induce a range of OspA antibody titers, and exposed to needle challenge with B. burgdorferi s.s. or tick challenge with B. afzelii. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves were constructed for each assay, and the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity and Youden Index were calculated. Potential cutoff antibody titers which could be used as correlates of vaccine-induced protection were derived from the maximum Youden Index. Results Immunization with OspA-1/2 provided dose-dependent protection against infection with B. burgdorferi s.s. and B. afzelii. Antibody responses detected by all four assays were highly significantly correlated with protection from infection by either B. burgdorferi s.s. (p<0.0001 to 0.0062) or B. afzelii (p<0.0001). ROC analyses of the diagnostic effectiveness of each assay showed the AUC to range between 0.95 and 0.79, demonstrating that all assays distinguish well between infected and non-infected animals. Based on sensitivity, specificity and AUC, the OspA IgG ELISA and SB assays best discriminated between infected and non-infected animals. Conclusions All four assays differentiate well between Borrelia-infected and non-infected animals. The relatively simple, high throughput IgG ELISA would be suitable to establish immune

  11. Probiotic pre-administration reduces mortality in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lufang; Xu, Keying; Gui, Qifeng; Chen, Yue; Chen, Deying; Yang, Yunmei

    2016-01-01

    A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that the use of probiotics has the potential to prevent nosocomial infections. However, the mechanism underlying probiotic-induced anti-infection and sepsis remains to be investigated. In the present study, 200 µl/day of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or normal saline (control) was orally administrated to 4-week-old C57BL6 mice 4 weeks prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). A number of mice were sacrificed 24 h after CLP, and the remaining mice were used for survival studies. Ileum tissues were collected to evaluate the injury on the intestine. Blood samples were also obtained to investigate the changed metabolic pattern in mice that underwent different treatments using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). In the survival studies, the mortality of CLP-induced septic mice pretreated with LGG was significantly lower compared with untreated mice (P=0.029). Ileum mucosal damage was evident in the control septic mice. Based on the data of UPLC-QTOF-MS, phosphatidylcholines were increased and lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) that contained polyunsaturated fatty acids were decreased in septic mice, whereas saturated fatty acid LPCs reveal no significant difference between septic and sham mice. In addition, the metabolic profile in the septic mice pretreated with LGG was much closer to that of sham mice compared with control septic mice. The results of the present study suggest that probiotic pre-administration reduces the mortality in septic mice by decreasing ileum mucosal damage, increasing the gut barrier integrity and altering global serum metabolic profiles. PMID:27588102

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce obesity-induced tumor progression independent of GPR120 in a mouse model of postmenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Lee, Y S; Mayoral, R; Oh, D Y; Siu, J T; Webster, N J; Sears, D D; Olefsky, J M; Ellies, L G

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and inflammation are both risk factors for a variety of cancers, including breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) decreases the risk of breast cancer, and also reduces obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance, but whether the two effects are related is currently unknown. We tested this hypothesis in a postmenopausal breast cancer model using ovariectomized, immune-competent female mice orthotopically injected with Py230 mammary tumor cells. Obesity, whether triggered genetically or by high-fat diet (HFD) feeding, increased inflammation in the mammary fat pad and promoted mammary tumorigenesis. The presence of tumor cells in the mammary fat pad further enhanced the local inflammatory milieu. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was the most highly upregulated cytokine in the obese mammary fat pad, and we observed that TNF-α dose-dependently stimulated Py230 cell growth in vitro. An ω-3 PUFA-enriched HFD (referred to as fish oil diet, FOD) reduced inflammation in the obese mammary fat pad in the absence of tumor cells and inhibited Py230 tumor growth in vivo. Although some anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 PUFAs were previously shown to be mediated by the G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120), the FOD reduced Py230 tumor burden in GPR120-deficient mice to a similar degree as observed in wild-type mice, indicating that the effect of FOD to reduce tumor growth does not require GPR120 in the host mouse. Instead, in vitro studies demonstrated that ω-3 PUFAs act directly on tumor cells to activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase, inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis. Our results show that obesity promotes mammary tumor progression in this model of postmenopausal breast cancer and that ω-3 PUFAs, independent of GPR120, inhibit mammary tumor progression in obese mice. PMID:25220417

  13. Bone marrow stromal cells use TGF-beta to suppress allergic responses in a mouse model of ragweed-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Keane-Myers, Andrea; Brown, Jared M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gorham, James D; Gorham, Jared D; Bundoc, Virgilio G; Bundoc, Victor G; Hodges, Marcus G; Jelinek, Ivett; Madala, Satish; Karpati, Sarolta; Mezey, Eva

    2010-03-23

    Bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs; also known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)] effectively suppress inflammatory responses in acute graft-versus-host disease in humans and in a number of disease models in mice. Many of the studies concluded that BMSC-driven immunomodulation is mediated by the suppression of proinflammatory Th1 responses while rebalancing the Th1/Th2 ratio toward Th2. In this study, using a ragweed induced mouse asthma model, we studied if BMSCs could be beneficial in an allergic, Th2-dominant environment. When BMSCs were injected i.v. at the time of the antigen challenge, they protected the animals from the majority of asthma-specific pathological changes, including inhibition of eosinophil infiltration and excess mucus production in the lung, decreased levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) in bronchial lavage, and lowered serum levels of Th2 immunoglobulins (IgG1 and IgE). To explore the mechanism of the effect we used BMSCs isolated from a variety of knockout mice, performed in vivo blocking of cytokines and studied the effect of asthmatic serum and bronchoalveolar lavage from ragweed challenged animals on the BMSCs in vitro. Our results suggest that IL-4 and/or IL-13 activate the STAT6 pathway in the BMSCs resulting in an increase of their TGF-beta production, which seems to mediate the beneficial effect, either alone, or together with regulatory T cells, some of which might be recruited by the BMSCs. These data suggest that, in addition to focusing on graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, allergic conditions--specifically therapy resistant asthma--might also be a likely target of the recently discovered cellular therapy approach using BMSCs. PMID:20231466

  14. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, Birgit; Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Zhang, Kunyan; Escott, Nicholas; Mougenot, Charles

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50μl of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/μl was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5 °C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic

  15. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor

  16. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  17. MeCP2 SUMOylation rescues Mecp2-mutant-induced behavioural deficits in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Derek J. C.; Liu, Yen C.; Hsu, Wei L.; Ma, Yun L.; Cheng, Sin J.; Liu, Shau Y.; Lee, Eminy H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene, MECP2, is an X-linked gene encoding the MeCP2 protein, and mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT). However, the molecular mechanism of MECP2-mutation-caused RTT is less known. Here we find that MeCP2 could be SUMO-modified by the E3 ligase PIAS1 at Lys-412. MeCP2 phosphorylation (at Ser-421 and Thr-308) facilitates MeCP2 SUMOylation, and MeCP2 SUMOylation is induced by NMDA, IGF-1 and CRF in the rat brain. MeCP2 SUMOylation releases CREB from the repressor complex and enhances Bdnf mRNA expression. Several MECP2 mutations identified in RTT patients show decreased MeCP2 SUMOylation. Re-expression of wild-type MeCP2 or SUMO-modified MeCP2 in Mecp2-null neurons rescues the deficits of social interaction, fear memory and LTP observed in Mecp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. These results together reveal an important role of MeCP2 SUMOylation in social interaction, memory and synaptic plasticity, and that abnormal MeCP2 SUMOylation is implicated in RTT. PMID:26842955

  18. MeCP2 SUMOylation rescues Mecp2-mutant-induced behavioural deficits in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tai, Derek J C; Liu, Yen C; Hsu, Wei L; Ma, Yun L; Cheng, Sin J; Liu, Shau Y; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2016-01-01

    The methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene, MECP2, is an X-linked gene encoding the MeCP2 protein, and mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT). However, the molecular mechanism of MECP2-mutation-caused RTT is less known. Here we find that MeCP2 could be SUMO-modified by the E3 ligase PIAS1 at Lys-412. MeCP2 phosphorylation (at Ser-421 and Thr-308) facilitates MeCP2 SUMOylation, and MeCP2 SUMOylation is induced by NMDA, IGF-1 and CRF in the rat brain. MeCP2 SUMOylation releases CREB from the repressor complex and enhances Bdnf mRNA expression. Several MECP2 mutations identified in RTT patients show decreased MeCP2 SUMOylation. Re-expression of wild-type MeCP2 or SUMO-modified MeCP2 in Mecp2-null neurons rescues the deficits of social interaction, fear memory and LTP observed in Mecp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. These results together reveal an important role of MeCP2 SUMOylation in social interaction, memory and synaptic plasticity, and that abnormal MeCP2 SUMOylation is implicated in RTT. PMID:26842955

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase 12 modulates high-fat-diet induced glomerular fibrogenesis and inflammation in a mouse model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Honglin; Li, Ying; Li, Haibin; Chi, Yanqing; Zhuang, Minghui; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Maodong; Nie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-induced kidney injury contributes to albuminuria, which is characterized by a progressive decline in renal function leading to glomerulosclerosis and renal fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) modulate inflammation and fibrosis by degrading a variety of extracellular matrix and regulating the activities of effector proteins. Abnormal regulation of MMP-12 expression has been implicated in abdominal aortic aneurysm, atherosclerosis, and emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study examined the function of MMP-12 in glomerular fibrogenesis and inflammation using apo E−/− or apo E−/−MMP-12−/− mice and maintained on a high-fat-diet (HFD) for 3, 6, or 9 months. MMP-12 deletion reduced glomerular matrix accumulation, and downregulated the expression of NADPH oxidase 4 and the subunit-p67phox, indicating the inhibition of renal oxidative stress. In addition, the expression of the inflammation-associated molecule MCP-1 and macrophage marker-CD11b was decreased in glomeruli of apo E−/−MMP-12−/− mice fed HFD. MMP-12 produced by macrophages infiltrating into glomeruli contributed to the degradation of collagen type IV and fibronectin. Crescent formation due to renal oxidative stress in Bowman’s space was a major factor in the development of fibrogenesis and inflammation. These results suggest that regulating MMP-12 activity could be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of crescentic glomerulonephritis and fibrogenesis. PMID:26822129

  20. Adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by inducing regulatory T cells in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-Sup; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Shin-Ae; Park, Hee-Young; Hong, Sung-Lyong; Park, Hye-Kyung; Yu, Hak-Sun; Roh, Hwan-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (ASCs) can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation, the immunomodulatory mechanism of ASCs remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether regulatory T cells (Tregs) induction is a potential mechanism in immunomodulatory effects of ASCs on allergic airway disease and how these induced Tregs orchestrate allergic inflammation. Intravenous administration of ASCs significantly reduced allergic symptoms and inhibited eosinophilic inflammation. Airway hyperresponsiveness, total immune cell and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, mucus production, and serum allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 were significantly reduced after ASCs administration. ASCs significantly inhibited Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and enhanced Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, levels of IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 were significantly increased after ASCs administration. Interestingly, this upregulation was accompanied by increased Treg populations. In conclusion, ASCs ameliorated allergic airway inflammation and improved lung function through the induction of Treg expansion. The induction of Treg by ASCs involves the secretion of soluble factors such as IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 and Treg might be involved in the downregulation of Th2 cytokines and upregulation of Th1 cytokines production. PMID:25246732

  1. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage. PMID:24940652

  2. Interactions between the colonic transcriptome, metabolome, and microbiome in mouse models of obesity-induced intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pfalzer, Anna C; Kamanu, Frederick K; Parnell, Laurence D; Tai, Albert K; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Crott, Jimmy W

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the relative contribution of high-fat (HF) consumption and excess adiposity remains unclear. It is becoming apparent that obesity perturbs both the intestinal microbiome and metabolome, and each has the potential to induce protumorigenic changes in the epithelial transcriptome. The physiological consequences and the degree to which these different biologic systems interact remain poorly defined. To understand the mechanisms by which obesity drives colonic tumorigenesis, we profiled the colonic epithelial transcriptome of HF-fed and genetically obese (DbDb) mice with a genetic predisposition to intestinal tumorigenesis (Apc(1638N)); 266 and 584 genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of HF and DbDb mice, respectively. These genes mapped to pathways involved in immune function, and cellular proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, Akt was central within the networks of interacting genes identified in both gene sets. Regression analyses of coexpressed genes with the abundance of bacterial taxa identified three taxa, previously correlated with tumor burden, to be significantly correlated with a gene module enriched for Akt-related genes. Similarly, regression of coexpressed genes with metabolites found that adenosine, which was negatively associated with inflammatory markers and tumor burden, was also correlated with a gene module enriched with Akt regulators. Our findings provide evidence that HF consumption and excess adiposity result in changes in the colonic transcriptome that, although distinct, both appear to converge on Akt signaling. Such changes could be mediated by alterations in the colonic microbiome and metabolome. PMID:27317588

  3. A Mouse Model of Otitis Media Identifies HB-EGF as a Mediator of Inflammation-Induced Mucosal Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kwang; Chavez, Eduardo; Kurabi, Arwa; Baird, Andrew; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Otitis media is one of the most common pediatric infections. While it is usually treated without difficulty, up to 20% of children may progress to long-term complications that include hearing loss, impaired speech and language development, academic underachievement, and irreversible disease. Hyperplasia of middle ear mucosa contributes to the sequelae of acute otitis media and is of important clinical significance. Understanding the role of growth factors in the mediation of mucosal hyperplasia could lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for this disease and its sequelae. Methods From a whole genome gene array analysis of mRNA expression during acute otitis media, we identified growth factors with expression kinetics temporally related to hyperplasia. We then tested these factors for their ability to stimulate mucosal epithelial growth in vitro, and determined protein levels and histological distribution in vivo for active factors. Results From the gene array, we identified seven candidate growth factors with upregulation of mRNA expression kinetics related to mucosal hyperplasia. Of the seven, only HB-EGF (heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor) induced significant mucosal epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Subsequent quantification of HB-EGF protein expression in vivo via Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein is highly expressed from 6 hours to 24 hours after bacterial inoculation, while immunohistochemistry revealed production by middle ear epithelial cells and infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusion Our data suggest an active role for HB-EGF in the hyperplasia of the middle ear mucosal epithelium during otitis media. These results imply that therapies targeting HB-EGF could ameliorate mucosal growth during otitis media, and thereby reduce detrimental sequelae of this childhood disease. PMID:25033458

  4. Chitosan-poly(butylene succinate) scaffolds and human bone marrow stromal cells induce bone repair in a mouse calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Costa-Pinto, A R; Correlo, V M; Sol, P C; Bhattacharya, M; Srouji, S; Livne, E; Reis, R L; Neves, N M

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering sustains the need of a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to promote the regeneration of tissues in volume. Usually, scaffolds are seeded with an adequate cell population, allowing their growth and maturation upon implantation in vivo. Previous studies obtained by our group evidenced significant growth patterns and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) when seeded and cultured on melt-based porous chitosan fibre mesh scaffolds (cell constructs). Therefore, it is crucial to test the in vivo performance of these in vitro 3D cell constructs. In this study, chitosan-based scaffolds were seeded and cultured in vitro with hBMSCs for 3 weeks under osteogenic stimulation conditions and analysed for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Implantation of 2 weeks precultured cell constructs in osteogenic culture conditions was performed into critical cranial size defects in nude mice. The objective of this study was to verify the scaffold integration and new bone formation. At 8 weeks of implantation, scaffolds were harvested and prepared for micro-computed tomography (µCT) analysis. Retrieved implants showed good integration with the surrounding tissue and significant bone formation, more evident for the scaffolds cultured and implanted with human cells. The results of this work demonstrated that chitosan-based scaffolds, besides supporting in vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs, induced bone formation in vivo. Thus, their osteogenic potential in orthotopic location in immunodeficient mice was validated, evidencing good prospects for their use in bone tissue-engineering therapies. PMID:21312336

  5. Psychosine-induced alterations in peroxisomes of Twitcher Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Haq, Ehtishamul; Uto, Takuhiro; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    <