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Sample records for mouse neural precursor

  1. Intraspinal transplantation of mouse and human neural precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Plaisted, Warren C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the preparation and transplantation of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and mouse neural precursor cells (mNPCs) into the thoracic region of the mouse spinal cord. The techniques in this unit also describe how to prepare the mouse for surgery by performing a laminectomy to expose the spinal cord for transplantation. Here we show NPCs genetically labeled with eGFP transplanted into the spinal cord of a mouse following viralmediated demyelination can efficiently be detected via eGFP expression. Transplantation of these cells into the spinal cord is an efficacious way to determine their effects in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and spinal cord injury. PMID:24510791

  2. Clonal identification of multipotent precursors from adult mouse pancreas that generate neural and pancreatic lineages.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; Smukler, Simon R; Kieffer, Timothy J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Asghar, Zeenat; Wheeler, Michael B; Korbutt, Gregory; van der Kooy, Derek

    2004-09-01

    The clonal isolation of putative adult pancreatic precursors has been an elusive goal of researchers seeking to develop cell replacement strategies for diabetes. We report the clonal identification of multipotent precursor cells from the adult mouse pancreas. The application of a serum-free, colony-forming assay to pancreatic cells enabled the identification of precursors from pancreatic islet and ductal populations. These cells proliferate in vitro to form clonal colonies that coexpress neural and pancreatic precursor markers. Upon differentiation, individual clonal colonies produce distinct populations of neurons and glial cells, pancreatic endocrine beta-, alpha- and delta-cells, and pancreatic exocrine and stellate cells. Moreover, the newly generated beta-like cells demonstrate glucose-dependent Ca(2+) responsiveness and insulin release. Pancreas colonies do not express markers of embryonic stem cells, nor genes suggestive of mesodermal or neural crest origins. These cells represent a previously unidentified adult intrinsic pancreatic precursor population and are a promising candidate for cell-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:15322557

  3. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  4. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  5. Mechanisms of mouse neural precursor expansion after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Buono, Krista D; Goodus, Matthew T; Guardia Clausi, Mariano; Jiang, Yuhui; Loporchio, Dean; Levison, Steven W

    2015-06-10

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) is the leading cause of brain damage resulting from birth complications. Studies in neonatal rats have shown that H-I acutely expands the numbers of neural precursors (NPs) within the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of these studies was to establish which NPs expand after H-I and to determine how leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) insufficiency affects their response. During recovery from H-I, the number of Ki67(+) cells in the medial SVZ of the injured hemisphere increased. Similarly, the number and size of primary neurospheres produced from the injured SVZ increased approximately twofold versus controls, and, upon differentiation, more than twice as many neurospheres from the damaged brain were tripotential, suggesting an increase in neural stem cells (NSCs). However, multimarker flow cytometry for CD133/LeX/NG2/CD140a combined with EdU incorporation revealed that NSC frequency diminished after H-I, whereas that of two multipotential progenitors and three unique glial-restricted precursors expanded, attributable to changes in their proliferation. By quantitative PCR, interleukin-6, LIF, and CNTF mRNA increased but with significantly different time courses, with LIF expression correlating best with NP expansion. Therefore, we evaluated the NP response to H-I in LIF-haplodeficient mice. Flow cytometry revealed that one subset of multipotential and bipotential intermediate progenitors did not increase after H-I, whereas another subset was amplified. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that neonatal H-I alters the composition of the SVZ and that LIF is a key regulator for a subset of intermediate progenitors that expand during acute recovery from neonatal H-I. PMID:26063918

  6. Mechanisms of Mouse Neural Precursor Expansion after Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Krista D.; Goodus, Matthew T.; Guardia Clausi, Mariano; Jiang, Yuhui; Loporchio, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) is the leading cause of brain damage resulting from birth complications. Studies in neonatal rats have shown that H-I acutely expands the numbers of neural precursors (NPs) within the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of these studies was to establish which NPs expand after H-I and to determine how leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) insufficiency affects their response. During recovery from H-I, the number of Ki67+ cells in the medial SVZ of the injured hemisphere increased. Similarly, the number and size of primary neurospheres produced from the injured SVZ increased approximately twofold versus controls, and, upon differentiation, more than twice as many neurospheres from the damaged brain were tripotential, suggesting an increase in neural stem cells (NSCs). However, multimarker flow cytometry for CD133/LeX/NG2/CD140a combined with EdU incorporation revealed that NSC frequency diminished after H-I, whereas that of two multipotential progenitors and three unique glial-restricted precursors expanded, attributable to changes in their proliferation. By quantitative PCR, interleukin-6, LIF, and CNTF mRNA increased but with significantly different time courses, with LIF expression correlating best with NP expansion. Therefore, we evaluated the NP response to H-I in LIF-haplodeficient mice. Flow cytometry revealed that one subset of multipotential and bipotential intermediate progenitors did not increase after H-I, whereas another subset was amplified. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that neonatal H-I alters the composition of the SVZ and that LIF is a key regulator for a subset of intermediate progenitors that expand during acute recovery from neonatal H-I. PMID:26063918

  7. Characterization of Np95 expression in mouse brain from embryo to adult: A novel marker for proliferating neural stem/precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Murao, Naoya; Matsuda, Taito; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Namihira, Masakazu; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear protein 95 KDa (Np95, also known as UHRF1 or ICBP90) plays an important role in maintaining DNA methylation of newly synthesized DNA strands by recruiting DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) during cell division. In addition, Np95 participates in chromatin remodeling by interacting with histone modification enzymes such as histone deacetylases. However, its expression pattern and function in the brain have not been analyzed extensively. We here investigated the expression pattern of Np95 in the mouse brain, from developmental to adult stages. In the fetal brain, Np95 is abundantly expressed at the midgestational stage, when a large number of neural stem/precursor cells (NS/PCs) exist. Interestingly, Np95 is expressed specifically in NS/PCs but not in differentiated cells such as neurons or glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Np95 is preferentially expressed in type 2a cells, which are highly proliferative NS/PCs in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus. Moreover, the number of Np95-expressing cells increases in response to kainic acid administration or to voluntary running, which are known to enhance the proliferation of adult NS/PCs. These results suggest that Np95 participates in the process of proliferation and differentiation of NS/PCs, and that it should be a useful novel marker for proliferating NS/PCs, facilitating the analysis of the complex behavior of NS/PCs in the brain.

  8. Neural Precursor Lineages Specify Distinct Neocortical Pyramidal Neuron Types

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William A.; Medalla, Maria; Guillamon-Vivancos, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Several neural precursor populations contemporaneously generate neurons in the developing neocortex. Specifically, radial glial stem cells of the dorsal telencephalon divide asymmetrically to produce excitatory neurons, but also indirectly to produce neurons via three types of intermediate progenitor cells. Why so many precursor types are needed to produce neurons has not been established; whether different intermediate progenitor cells merely expand the output of radial glia or instead generate distinct types of neurons is unknown. Here we use a novel genetic fate mapping technique to simultaneously track multiple precursor streams in the developing mouse brain and show that layer 2 and 3 pyramidal neurons exhibit distinctive electrophysiological and structural properties depending upon their precursor cell type of origin. These data indicate that individual precursor subclasses synchronously produce functionally different neurons, even within the same lamina, and identify a primary mechanism leading to cortical neuronal diversity. PMID:25878286

  9. Amyloid precursor protein and neural development.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Maya; Hassan, Bassem A

    2014-07-01

    Interest in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) has increased in recent years due to its involvement in Alzheimer's disease. Since its molecular cloning, significant genetic and biochemical work has focused on the role of APP in the pathogenesis of this disease. Thus far, however, these studies have failed to deliver successful therapies. This suggests that understanding the basic biology of APP and its physiological role during development might be a crucial missing link for a better comprehension of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we present an overview of some of the key studies performed in various model organisms that have revealed roles for APP at different stages of neuronal development. PMID:24961795

  10. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes. PMID:10767323

  11. In vitro clonal analysis of mouse neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Morita, T; Sieber-Blum, M

    1993-06-01

    Analysis of lineage segregation during mammalian neural crest development has not been sufficiently performed due to technical difficulties. In the present study, therefore, we established a clonal culture system of mouse neural crest cells in order to analyze developmental potentials of individual neural crest cells and their patterns of lineage segregation. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and cholera toxin (CT) were applied to culture medium to trigger melanogenic differentiation of mouse neural crest cells. Three morphologically distinct types of clones were observed. (1) "Pigmented clones" consisted of melanocytes only, suggesting that the clone-forming cells were committed to the melanogenic lineage. These clones were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The proportion of this type of clone (8%) was much lower than that of the equivalent type of clone in quail trunk neural crest (40-60%; Sieber-Blum and Cohen, 1980, Dev. Biol. 80, 96-106). It therefore appears that the segregation pattern to the melanogenic lineage during mouse neural crest development in vitro differs quantitatively from that in the quail. (2) "Mixed clones" consisted of pigmented and unpigmented cells. Like pigmented clones, they were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The clones contained up to four types of cells: melanocytes, S100-positive cells (Schwann cells or melanogenic precursor cells), serotonin (5-HT)-positive autonomic neuron-like cells, and substance P (SP)-immunoreactive sensory neuron-like cells. Thus, at least some mixed clone-forming cells are pluripotent. (3) Two classes of "unpigmented clones" were observed that consisted of unpigmented cells only. These clones developed in the presence and absence of TPA and CT. Unpigmented clones in one class contained up to three types of cells as well as other, as yet unidentified cells: S100-, 5-HT-, and SP-positive cells. This observation suggests that at least some of these clones originate from cells

  12. The Snail Transcription Factor Regulates the Numbers of Neural Precursor Cells and Newborn Neurons throughout Mammalian Life

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Mark A.; Cancino, Gonzalo I.; Gridley, Thomas; Kaplan, David R.; Miller, Freda D.

    2014-01-01

    The Snail transcription factor regulates diverse aspects of stem cell biology in organisms ranging from Drosophila to mammals. Here we have asked whether it regulates the biology of neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the forebrain of postnatal and adult mice, taking advantage of a mouse containing a floxed Snail allele (Snailfl/fl mice). We show that when Snail is inducibly ablated in the embryonic cortex, this has long-term consequences for cortical organization. In particular, when Snailfl/fl mice are crossed to Nestin-cre mice that express Cre recombinase in embryonic neural precursors, this causes inducible ablation of Snail expression throughout the postnatal cortex. This loss of Snail causes a decrease in proliferation of neonatal cortical neural precursors and mislocalization and misspecification of cortical neurons. Moreover, these precursor phenotypes persist into adulthood. Adult neural precursor cell proliferation is decreased in the forebrain subventricular zone and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, and this is coincident with a decrease in the number of adult-born olfactory and hippocampal neurons. Thus, Snail is a key regulator of the numbers of neural precursors and newborn neurons throughout life. PMID:25136812

  13. microRNA regulation of neural precursor self-renewal and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hudish, Laura I; Appel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    During early stages of development of the vertebrate central nervous system, neural precursors divide symmetrically to produce new precursors, thereby expanding the precursor population. During middle stages of neural development, precursors switch to an asymmetric division pattern whereby each mitosis produces one new precursor and one cell that differentiates as a neuron or glial cell. At late stages of development, most precursors stop dividing and terminally differentiate. Par complex proteins are associated with the apical membrane of neural precursors and promote precursor self-renewal. How Par proteins are down regulated to bring precursor self-renewal to an end has not been known. Our investigations of zebrafish neural development revealed that the microRNA miR-219 negatively regulates apical Par proteins, thereby promoting cessation of neural precursor division and driving terminal differentiation.

  14. Ataxin-1 regulates proliferation of hippocampal neural precursors.

    PubMed

    Asher, M; Johnson, A; Zecevic, B; Pease, D; Cvetanovic, M

    2016-05-13

    Polyglutamine expansion in the protein ATAXIN-1 (ATXN1) causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), an inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor deficits, cognitive impairment and depression. Although ubiquitously expressed, mutant ATXN1 causes neurodegeneration primarily in the cerebellum, which is responsible for the observed motor deficits. The role of ATXN1 outside of the cerebellum and the causes of cognitive deficits and depression in SCA1 are less understood. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role of ATXN1 in the hippocampus as a regulator of adult neurogenesis. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is the process of generating new hippocampal neurons and is linked to cognition and mood. We found that loss of ATXN1 causes a decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis in ATXN1 null (Atxn1(-/-)) mice. This decrease was caused by reduced proliferation of neural precursors in the hippocampus of Atxn1(-/-) mice, and persisted even when Atxn1(-/-) hippocampal neural precursors were removed from their natural environment and grown in vitro, suggesting that ATXN1 affects proliferation in a cell-autonomous manner. Moreover, expression of ATXN1 with a pathological polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in wild-type neural precursor cells inhibited their proliferation. Our data establish a novel role for ATXN1 in the hippocampus as an intrinsic regulator of precursor cell proliferation, and suggest a mechanism by which polyQ expansion and loss of ATXN1 affect hippocampal function, potentially contributing to cognitive deficits and depression. These results indicate that while depletion of ATXN1 is a promising therapeutic approach to treat the cerebellar aspects of SCA1, this approach should be employed with caution given the potential for side effects on hippocampal function with loss of wild-type ATXN1. PMID:26876606

  15. Prolactin Stimulates Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Tara L.; Vukovic, Jana; Koudijs, Margaretha M.; Blackmore, Daniel G.; Mackay, Eirinn W.; Sykes, Alex M.; Overall, Rupert W.; Hamlin, Adam S.; Bartlett, Perry F.

    2012-01-01

    In the search for ways to combat degenerative neurological disorders, neurogenesis-stimulating factors are proving to be a promising area of research. In this study, we show that the hormonal factor prolactin (PRL) can activate a pool of latent precursor cells in the adult mouse hippocampus. Using an in vitro neurosphere assay, we found that the addition of exogenous PRL to primary adult hippocampal cells resulted in an approximate 50% increase in neurosphere number. In addition, direct infusion of PRL into the adult dentate gyrus also resulted in a significant increase in neurosphere number. Together these data indicate that exogenous PRL can increase hippocampal precursor numbers both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, PRL null mice showed a significant reduction (approximately 80%) in the number of hippocampal-derived neurospheres. Interestingly, no deficit in precursor proliferation was observed in vivo, indicating that in this situation other niche factors can compensate for a loss in PRL. The PRL loss resulted in learning and memory deficits in the PRL null mice, as indicated by significant deficits in the standard behavioral tests requiring input from the hippocampus. This behavioral deficit was rescued by direct infusion of recombinant PRL into the hippocampus, indicating that a lack of PRL in the adult mouse hippocampus can be correlated with impaired learning and memory. PMID:22973440

  16. Regulation of proliferation and histone acetylation in embryonic neural precursors by CREB/CREM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Rosanna; Mandl, Claudia; Hölzl-Wenig, Gabriele; Liss, Birgit; Tucker, Kerry L; Ciccolini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) regulates differentiation, migration, survival and activity-dependent gene expression in the developing and mature nervous system. However, its specific role in the proliferation of embryonic neural progenitors is still not completely understood. Here we investigated how CREB regulates proliferation of mouse embryonic neural progenitors by a conditional mutant lacking Creb gene in neural progenitors. In parallel, we explored possible compensatory effects by the genetic ablation of another member of the same gene family, the cAMP-responsive element modulator (Crem). We show that CREB loss differentially impaired the proliferation, clonogenic potential and self-renewal of precursors derived from the ganglionic eminence (GE), in comparison to those derived from the cortex. This phenotype was associated with a specific reduction of histone acetylation in the GE of CREB mutant mice, and this reduction was rescued in vivo by inhibition of histone deacetylation. These observations indicate that the impaired proliferation could be caused by a reduced acetyltransferase activity in Creb conditional knock-out mice. These findings support a crucial role of CREB in controlling embryonic neurogenesis and propose a novel mechanism by which CREB regulates embryonic neural development.

  17. Serotonin regulates mouse cranial neural crest migration.

    PubMed Central

    Moiseiwitsch, J R; Lauder, J M

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic agents (uptake inhibitors, receptor ligands) cause significant craniofacial malformations in cultured mouse embryos suggesting that 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT) may be an important regulator of craniofacial development. To determine whether serotonergic regulation of cell migration might underly some of these effects, cranial neural crest (NC) explants from embryonic day 9 (E9) (plug day = E1) mouse embryos or dissociated mandibular mesenchyme cells (derived from NC) from E12 embryos were placed in a modified Boyden chamber to measure effects of serotonergic agents on cell migration. A dose-dependent effect of 5-HT on the migration of highly motile cranial NC cells was demonstrated, such that low concentrations of 5-HT stimulated migration, whereas this effect was progressively lost as the dose of 5-HT was increased. In contrast, most concentrations of 5-HT inhibited migration of less motile, mandibular mesenchyme cells. To investigate the possible involvement of specific 5-HT receptors in the stimulation of NC migration, several 5-HT subtype-selective antagonists were used to block the effects of the most stimulatory dose of 5-HT (0.01 microM). Only NAN-190 (a 5-HT1A antagonist) inhibited the effect of 5-HT, suggesting involvement of this receptor. Further evidence was obtained by using immunohistochemistry with 5-HT receptor antibodies, which revealed expression of the 5-HT1A receptor but not other subtypes by migrating NC cells in both embryos and cranial NC explants. These results suggest that by activating appropriate receptors 5-HT may regulate migration of cranial NC cells and their mesenchymal derivatives in the mouse embryo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7638165

  18. Restriction of neural precursor ability to respond to Nurr1 by early regional specification.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Carucci, Nicoletta; Lupo, Giuseppe; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Saggio, Isabella; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    During neural development, spatially regulated expression of specific transcription factors is crucial for central nervous system (CNS) regionalization, generation of neural precursors (NPs) and subsequent differentiation of specific cell types within defined regions. A critical role in dopaminergic differentiation in the midbrain (MB) has been assigned to the transcription factor Nurr1. Nurr1 controls the expression of key genes involved in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the DA transporter (DAT), and promotes the dopaminergic phenotype in embryonic stem cells. We investigated whether cells derived from different areas of the mouse CNS could be directed to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro by forced expression of the transcription factor Nurr1. We show that Nurr1 overexpression can promote dopaminergic cell fate specification only in NPs obtained from E13.5 ganglionic eminence (GE) and MB, but not in NPs isolated from E13.5 cortex (CTX) and spinal cord (SC) or from the adult subventricular zone (SVZ). Confirming previous studies, we also show that Nurr1 overexpression can increase the generation of TH-positive neurons in mouse embryonic stem cells. These data show that Nurr1 ability to induce a dopaminergic phenotype becomes restricted during CNS development and is critically dependent on the region of NPs derivation. Our results suggest that the plasticity of NPs and their ability to activate a dopaminergic differentiation program in response to Nurr1 is regulated during early stages of neurogenesis, possibly through mechanisms controlling CNS regionalization. PMID:23240065

  19. Restriction of Neural Precursor Ability to Respond to Nurr1 by Early Regional Specification

    PubMed Central

    Soldati, Chiara; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Carucci, Nicoletta; Lupo, Giuseppe; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Saggio, Isabella; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    During neural development, spatially regulated expression of specific transcription factors is crucial for central nervous system (CNS) regionalization, generation of neural precursors (NPs) and subsequent differentiation of specific cell types within defined regions. A critical role in dopaminergic differentiation in the midbrain (MB) has been assigned to the transcription factor Nurr1. Nurr1 controls the expression of key genes involved in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the DA transporter (DAT), and promotes the dopaminergic phenotype in embryonic stem cells. We investigated whether cells derived from different areas of the mouse CNS could be directed to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro by forced expression of the transcription factor Nurr1. We show that Nurr1 overexpression can promote dopaminergic cell fate specification only in NPs obtained from E13.5 ganglionic eminence (GE) and MB, but not in NPs isolated from E13.5 cortex (CTX) and spinal cord (SC) or from the adult subventricular zone (SVZ). Confirming previous studies, we also show that Nurr1 overexpression can increase the generation of TH-positive neurons in mouse embryonic stem cells. These data show that Nurr1 ability to induce a dopaminergic phenotype becomes restricted during CNS development and is critically dependent on the region of NPs derivation. Our results suggest that the plasticity of NPs and their ability to activate a dopaminergic differentiation program in response to Nurr1 is regulated during early stages of neurogenesis, possibly through mechanisms controlling CNS regionalization. PMID:23240065

  20. Endogenous neural precursors influence grafted neural stem cells and contribute to neuroprotection in the Parkinsonian rat

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Sortwell, Caryl E; Collier, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotective and neurorescue effects after neural stem/precursor cell (NPC) transplantation have been reported, but the mechanisms underlying such phenomena are not well understood. Our recent findings in a rat Parkinson’s disease (PD) model indicate that transplantation of NPCs before a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) insult can result in nigrostriatal protection which is associated with endogenous NPC proliferation, migration and neurogenesis. Here, we sought to determine whether the observed endogenous NPC response (1) contributes to transplanted NPC - mediated neuroprotection and/or (2) affects graft phenotype and function. Host Fischer 344 rats were administered the antimitotic agent cytosine-β-D-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C) to eliminate actively proliferating endogenous neural precursors before being transplanted with NPCs and treated with 6-OHDA to induce nigrostriatal degeneration. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrate that the neuroprotective response observed in NPC transplanted animals which had not received Ara-C was significantly attenuated in animals which did receive pre-transplant Ara-C. Also, while grafts in Ara-C treated animals showed no decrease in cell number, they exhibited significantly reduced expression of the neural stem cell regulators nestin and sonic hedgehog. In addition, inhibition of the endogenous NPC response resulted in an exaggerated host glial reaction. Overall, the study establishes for the first time that endogenous NPCs contribute to transplanted NPC-mediated therapeutic effects by affecting both grafted and mature host cells in unique ways. Thus, both endogenous and transplanted NPCs are important in creating an environment suitable for neural protection and rescue, and harnessing their synergistic interaction may lead to the optimization of cell-based therapies for PD. PMID:22417168

  1. Timeline and distribution of melanocyte precursors in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Brito, Flavia Carneiro; Kos, Lidia

    2008-08-01

    Apart from the well-studied melanocytes of the skin, eye and inner ear, another population has recently been described in the heart. In this study, we tracked cardiac melanoblasts using in situ hybridization with a dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) probe and Dct-LacZ transgenic mice. Large numbers of melanoblasts were found in the atrioventricular (AV) endocardial cushions at embryonic day (E) 14.5 and persisted in the AV valves into adulthood. The earliest time Dct-LacZ-positive cells were observed in the AV endocardial cushions was E12.5. Prior to that, between E10.5 and E11.5, small numbers of melanoblasts traveled between the post-otic area and third somite along the anterior and common cardinal veins and branchial arch arteries with other neural crest cells expressing CRABPI. Cardiac melanocytes were not found in the spotting mutants Ednrb s-l/s-l and Kit w-v/w-v, while large numbers were observed in transgenic mice that overexpress endothelin 3. These results indicate that cardiac melanocytes depend on the same signaling molecules known to be required for proper skin melanocyte development and may originate from the same precursor population. Cardiac melanocytes were not found in zebrafish or frog but were present in quail suggesting an association between cardiac melanocytes and four-chambered hearts. PMID:18444965

  2. Generation of Dopamine Neurons from Rodent Fibroblasts through the Expandable Neural Precursor Cell Stage*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Kim, Sang-Mi; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Jung, Sung Jun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Yong-Sung; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Sang-Hun; Park, Chang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking work has demonstrated that combined expression of the transcription factors Brn2, Ascl1, and Myt1L (BAM; also known as Wernig factors) convert mouse fibroblasts into postmitotic neuronal cells. However, questions remain regarding whether trans-conversion is achieved directly or involves an intermediary precursor stage. Trans-conversion toward expandable neural precursor cells (NPCs) is more useful than direct one-step neuron formation with respect to yielding a sufficient number of cells and the feasibility of manipulating NPC differentiation toward certain neuron subtypes. Here, we show that co-expression of Wernig factors and Bcl-xL induces fibroblast conversion into NPCs (induced NPCs (iNPCs)) that are highly expandable for >100 passages. Gene expression analyses showed that the iNPCs exhibited high expression of common NPC genes but not genes specific to defined embryonic brain regions. This finding indicated that a regional identity of iNPCs was not established. Upon induction, iNPCs predominantly differentiated into astrocytes. However, the differentiation potential was not fixed and could be efficiently manipulated into general or specific subtypes of neurons by expression of additional genes. Specifically, overexpression of Nurr1 and Foxa2, transcription factors specific for midbrain dopamine neuron development, drove iNPCs to yield mature midbrain dopamine neurons equipped with presynaptic DA neuronal functions. We further assessed the therapeutic potential of iNPCs in Parkinson disease model rats. PMID:26023233

  3. Snail Coordinately Regulates Downstream Pathways to Control Multiple Aspects of Mammalian Neural Precursor Development

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Mark A.; Burns, Sarah E.; Yang, Guang; Kaplan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The Snail transcription factor plays a key role in regulating diverse developmental processes but is not thought to play a role in mammalian neural precursors. Here, we have examined radial glial precursor cells of the embryonic murine cortex and demonstrate that Snail regulates their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation into intermediate progenitors and neurons via two distinct and separable target pathways. First, Snail promotes cell survival by antagonizing a p53-dependent death pathway because coincident p53 knockdown rescues survival deficits caused by Snail knockdown. Second, we show that the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc25b is regulated by Snail in radial precursors and that Cdc25b coexpression is sufficient to rescue the decreased radial precursor proliferation and differentiation observed upon Snail knockdown. Thus, Snail acts via p53 and Cdc25b to coordinately regulate multiple aspects of mammalian embryonic neural precursor biology. PMID:24719096

  4. Regulation of mouse embryonic stem cell neural differentiation by retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mijeong; Habiba, Ayman; Doherty, Jason M.; Mills, Jason C.; Mercer, Robert W.; Huettner, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from the early blastocyst can differentiate in vitro into a variety of somatic cell types including lineages from all three embryonic germ layers. Protocols for ES cell neural differentiation typically involve induction by retinoic acid (RA), or by exposure to growth factors or medium conditioned by other cell types. A serum-free differentiation (SFD) medium completely lacking exogenous retinoids was devised that allows for efficient conversion of aggregated mouse ESCs into neural precursors and immature neurons. Neural cells produced in this medium express neuronal ion channels, establish polarity, and form functional excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Brief exposure to RA during the period of cell aggregation speeds neuronal maturation and suppresses cell proliferation. Differentiation without RA yields neurons and neural progenitors with apparent telencephalic identity, whereas cells differentiated with exposure to RA express markers of hindbrain and spinal cord. Transcriptional profiling indicates a substantial representation of transit amplifying neuroblasts in SFD cultures not exposed to RA. PMID:19217899

  5. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Zoey; Wong, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53) gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21) did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation. PMID:27331809

  6. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Zoey; Wong, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53) gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21) did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation. PMID:27331809

  7. Human embryonic stem cell differentiation toward regional specific neural precursors.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojković, Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types. This potentiality represents a promising source to overcome many human diseases by providing an unlimited supply of all cell types, including cells with neural characteristics. Therefore, this review summarizes early neural development and the potential of hESCs to differentiate under in vitro conditions, examining at the same time the potential use of differentiated hESCs for therapeutic applications for neural tissue and cell regeneration. PMID:18845761

  8. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Toward Regional Specific Neural Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojković, Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types. This potentiality represents a promising source to overcome many human diseases by providing an unlimited supply of all cell types, including cells with neural characteristics. Therefore, this review summarizes early neural development and the potential of hESCs to differentiate under in vitro conditions, examining at the same time the potential use of differentiated hESCs for therapeutic applications for neural tissue and cell regeneration. PMID:18845761

  9. Skin-derived neural precursors competitively generate functional myelin in adult demyelinated mice

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Sabah; Laterza, Cecilia; Roussel, Delphine; Bachelin, Corinne; Marteyn, Antoine; Deboux, Cyrille; Martino, Gianvito; Evercooren, Anne Baron-Van

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived (iPS-derived) neural precursor cells may represent the ideal autologous cell source for cell-based therapy to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in myelin diseases. So far, the therapeutic potential of reprogrammed cells has been evaluated in neonatal demyelinating models. However, the repair efficacy and safety of these cells has not been well addressed in the demyelinated adult CNS, which has decreased cell plasticity and scarring. Moreover, it is not clear if these induced pluripotent–derived cells have the same reparative capacity as physiologically committed CNS-derived precursors. Here, we performed a side-by-side comparison of CNS-derived and skin-derived neural precursors in culture and following engraftment in murine models of adult spinal cord demyelination. Grafted induced neural precursors exhibited a high capacity for survival, safe integration, migration, and timely differentiation into mature bona fide oligodendrocytes. Moreover, grafted skin–derived neural precursors generated compact myelin around host axons and restored nodes of Ranvier and conduction velocity as efficiently as CNS-derived precursors while outcompeting endogenous cells. Together, these results provide important insights into the biology of reprogrammed cells in adult demyelinating conditions and support use of these cells for regenerative biomedicine of myelin diseases that affect the adult CNS. PMID:26301815

  10. Impaired Neural Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated from a Mouse Model of Sandhoff Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Tanabe, Miho; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Fukushige, Tomoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Oishi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a glycosphingolipid storage disease that arises from mutations in the Hexb gene and the resultant deficiency in β-hexosaminidase activity. This deficiency results in aberrant lysosomal accumulation of the ganglioside GM2 and related glycolipids, and progressive deterioration of the central nervous system. Dysfunctional glycolipid storage causes severe neurodegeneration through a poorly understood pathogenic mechanism. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology offers new opportunities for both elucidation of the pathogenesis of diseases and the development of stem cell-based therapies. Here, we report the generation of disease-specific iPSCs from a mouse model of SD. These mouse model-derived iPSCs (SD-iPSCs) exhibited pluripotent stem cell properties and significant accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. In lineage-directed differentiation studies using the stromal cell-derived inducing activity method, SD-iPSCs showed an impaired ability to differentiate into early stage neural precursors. Moreover, fewer neurons differentiated from neural precursors in SD-iPSCs than in the case of the wild type. Recovery of the Hexb gene in SD-iPSCs improved this impairment of neuronal differentiation. These results provide new insights as to understanding the complex pathogenic mechanisms of SD. PMID:23383290

  11. MiR-3099 is Overexpressed in Differentiating 46c Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells upon Neural Induction

    PubMed Central

    ZAINAL ABIDIN, Shahidee; ABBASPOURBABAEI, Maryam; NTIMI, Carolindah Makena; SIEW, Wei-Hong; Pike-See, CHEAH; ROSLI, Rozita; NORDIN, Norshariza; LING, King-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have a crucial role in gene expression regulation and protein synthesis, especially in the central nervous system. In developing mouse embryos a novel miRNA, miR-3099, is highly expressed, particularly in the central nervous system. This study aims to determine the expression of miR-3099 during cellular differentiation of 46C mouse embryonic stem cells after neural induction with N2/B27 medium. Methods: 46C mouse embryonic stem cells were subjected to neural induction with N2/B27 medium. At 0, 3, 7, 11, 17, and 22 days after neural induction, the cells were screened for various pluripotent, progenitor, and differentiating/differentiated cells markers by immunocytochemistry and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stem-loop pulse RT-PCR was performed to determine the expression of miR-3099 at all selected time points after neural induction. Results: Our findings showed that after induction, mouse embryonic stem cells differentiated into heterogeneous pools of cells containing neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Mouse embryonic stem cells and neural progenitor/precursor cells were also present in culture up to day 22 as indicated by RT-PCR analysis. Elucidation of miR-3099 expression during in vitro neural induction revealed that this miRNA was expressed throughout the differentiation process of 46C mouse embryonic stem cells. miR-3099 was expressed at higher levels on day 11, 17, and 22 as compared to day 0, 3 and 7 after neural induction. Conclusion: The level of miR-3099 expression was higher in differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells after neural induction. This finding suggested that miR-3099 might play a role in regulating neural stem cell differentiation. However, further characterisation of miR-3099 in a better characterised or optimised differentiated neural stem cell culture would provide increased understanding of the cellular function and molecular targets of miR-3099, especially in neuron

  12. Neural Mechanisms Contributing to Dysphagia in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Hinkel, Cameron J; Sharma, Rishi; Thakkar, Mahesh M; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hopewell, Bridget L; Lever, Teresa E

    2016-08-01

    Investigative research into curative treatments for dysphagia is hindered by our incomplete understanding of the neural mechanisms of swallowing in health and disease. Development of translational research models is essential to bridge this knowledge gap by fostering innovative methodology. Toward this goal, our laboratory has developed a translational research assessment tool to investigate the neural mechanistic control of swallowing in unrestrained, self-feeding mice. Here we describe our initial development of synchronous brainstem neural recordings with a videofluoroscopic swallow study assay in healthy mice across the life span. Refinement of this combined methodology is currently underway. Ultimately, we envision that this assessment tool will permit systematic analysis of therapeutic interventions for dysphagia in preclinical trials with numerous mouse models of human conditions that cause dysphagia, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke, and advanced aging. PMID:27048676

  13. Meninges harbor cells expressing neural precursor markers during development and adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bifari, Francesco; Berton, Valeria; Pino, Annachiara; Kusalo, Marijana; Malpeli, Giorgio; Di Chio, Marzia; Bersan, Emanuela; Amato, Eliana; Scarpa, Aldo; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido; Decimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined. In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: (i) are a highly proliferating tissue; (ii) host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and (iii) are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g., fractones) known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood. PMID:26483637

  14. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) triplicated gene impairs neuronal precursor differentiation and neurite development through two different domains in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trazzi, Stefania; Fuchs, Claudia; Valli, Emanuele; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2013-07-19

    Intellectual disability in Down syndrome (DS) appears to be related to severe proliferation impairment during brain development. Recent evidence shows that it is not only cellular proliferation that is heavily compromised in DS, but also cell fate specification and dendritic maturation. The amyloid precursor protein (APP), a gene that is triplicated in DS, plays a key role in normal brain development by influencing neural precursor cell proliferation, cell fate specification, and neuronal maturation. APP influences these processes via two separate domains, the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the soluble secreted APP. We recently found that the proliferation impairment of neuronal precursors (NPCs) from the Ts65Dn mouse model for DS was caused by derangement of the Shh pathway due to overexpression of patched1(Ptch1), its inhibitory regulator. Ptch1 overexpression was related to increased levels within the APP/AICD system. The overall goal of this study was to determine whether APP contributes to neurogenesis impairment in DS by influencing in addition to proliferation, cell fate specification, and neurite development. We found that normalization of APP expression restored the reduced neuronogenesis, the increased astrogliogenesis, and the reduced neurite length of trisomic NPCs, indicating that APP overexpression underpins all aspects of neurogenesis impairment. Moreover, we found that two different domains of APP impair neuronal differentiation and maturation in trisomic NPCs. The APP/AICD system regulates neuronogenesis and neurite length through the Shh pathway, whereas the APP/secreted AP system promotes astrogliogenesis through an IL-6-associated signaling cascade. These results provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying brain development alterations in DS. PMID:23740250

  15. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  16. Enrichment of Oligodendrocyte Progenitors from Differentiated Neural Precursors by Clonal Sphere Preparations.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Daisuke; Coles, Brenda; van der Kooy, Derek

    2016-05-01

    Remyelination is the goal of potential cell transplantation therapies for demyelinating diseases and other central nervous system injuries. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can result in remyelination in the central nervous system, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are envisioned to be an autograft cell source of transplantation therapy for many cell types. However, it remains time-consuming and difficult to generate OPCs from iPSCs. Clonal sphere preparations are reliable cell culture methods for purifying select populations of proliferating cells. To make clonal neurospheres from human embryonic stem cell (ESC)/iPSC colonies, we have found that a monolayer differentiation phase helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have compared a direct isolation of neural stem cells from human ESC/iPSC colonies (protocol 1) with monolayer neural differentiation, followed by clonal neural stem cell sphere preparations (protocol 2). The two-step method combining monolayer neuralization, followed by clonal sphere preparations, is more useful than direct sphere preparations in generating mature human oligodendrocytes. The initial monolayer culture stage appears to bias cells toward the oligodendrocyte lineage. This method of deriving oligodendrocyte lineage spheres from iPSCs represents a novel strategy for generating OPCs. PMID:26972950

  17. Precursors predicted by artificial neural networks for mass balance calculations: Quantifying hydrothermal alteration in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trépanier, Sylvain; Mathieu, Lucie; Daigneault, Réal; Faure, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    This study proposes an artificial neural networks-based method for predicting the unaltered (precursor) chemical compositions of hydrothermally altered volcanic rock. The method aims at predicting precursor's major components contents (SiO2, FeOT, MgO, CaO, Na2O, and K2O). The prediction is based on ratios of elements generally immobile during alteration processes; i.e. Zr, TiO2, Al2O3, Y, Nb, Th, and Cr, which are provided as inputs to the neural networks. Multi-layer perceptron neural networks were trained on a large dataset of least-altered volcanic rock samples that document a wide range of volcanic rock types, tectonic settings and ages. The precursors thus predicted are then used to perform mass balance calculations. Various statistics were calculated to validate the predictions of precursors' major components, which indicate that, overall, the predictions are precise and accurate. For example, rank-based correlation coefficients were calculated to compare predicted and analysed values from a least-altered test dataset that had not been used to train the networks. Coefficients over 0.87 were obtained for all components, except for Na2O (0.77), indicating that predictions for alkali might be less performant. Also, predictions are performant for most volcanic rock compositions, except for ultra-K rocks. The proposed method provides an easy and rapid solution to the often difficult task of determining appropriate volcanic precursor compositions to rocks modified by hydrothermal alteration. It is intended for large volcanic rock databases and is most useful, for example, to mineral exploration performed in complex or poorly known volcanic settings. The method is implemented as a simple C++ console program.

  18. Ibuprofen slows migration and inhibits bowel colonization by enteric nervous system precursors in zebrafish, chick and mouse.

    PubMed

    Schill, Ellen Merrick; Lake, Jonathan I; Tusheva, Olga A; Nagy, Nandor; Bery, Saya K; Foster, Lynne; Avetisyan, Marina; Johnson, Stephen L; Stenson, William F; Goldstein, Allan M; Heuckeroth, Robert O

    2016-01-15

    Hirschsprung Disease (HSCR) is a potentially deadly birth defect characterized by the absence of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in distal bowel. Although HSCR has clear genetic causes, no HSCR-associated mutation is 100% penetrant, suggesting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions determine HSCR occurrence. To test the hypothesis that certain medicines might alter HSCR risk we treated zebrafish with medications commonly used during early human pregnancy and discovered that ibuprofen caused HSCR-like absence of enteric neurons in distal bowel. Using fetal CF-1 mouse gut slice cultures, we found that ibuprofen treated enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDC) had reduced migration, fewer lamellipodia and lower levels of active RAC1/CDC42. Additionally, inhibiting ROCK, a RHOA effector and known RAC1 antagonist, reversed ibuprofen effects on migrating mouse ENCDC in culture. Ibuprofen also inhibited colonization of Ret+/- mouse bowel by ENCDC in vivo and dramatically reduced bowel colonization by chick ENCDC in culture. Interestingly, ibuprofen did not affect ENCDC migration until after at least three hours of exposure. Furthermore, mice deficient in Ptgs1 (COX 1) and Ptgs2 (COX 2) had normal bowel colonization by ENCDC and normal ENCDC migration in vitro suggesting COX-independent effects. Consistent with selective and strain specific effects on ENCDC, ibuprofen did not affect migration of gut mesenchymal cells, NIH3T3, or WT C57BL/6 ENCDC, and did not affect dorsal root ganglion cell precursor migration in zebrafish. Thus, ibuprofen inhibits ENCDC migration in vitro and bowel colonization by ENCDC in vivo in zebrafish, mouse and chick, but there are cell type and strain specific responses. These data raise concern that ibuprofen may increase Hirschsprung disease risk in some genetically susceptible children. PMID:26586201

  19. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Colleoni, Silvia; Giannelli, Serena G.; Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio; Broccoli, Vania; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2010-04-15

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  20. Krabbe disease: involvement of connexin43 in the apoptotic effects of sphingolipid psychosine on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Graziano, A C E; Parenti, R; Avola, R; Cardile, V

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a genetic demyelinating syndrome characterized by deficiency of the enzyme β-galactosylceramidase, lysosomal psychosine accumulation, and loss of myelin-forming cells. In this study, some apoptotic markers such as apoptotic index (AI), DNA fragmentation, caspase-3, PTEN, Bad, and PI3K were determined in oligodendrocyte precursors from wild type or twitcher mice untreated or treated with psychosine. Twitcher is a natural mouse model of Krabbe disease containing a premature stop codon (W339X) in the β-galactosylceramidase gene. Moreover, a possible involvement of connexin (Cx)43 in cell death of oligodendrocyte precursors induced by psychosine was investigated with the final aim to provide a contribution to the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and pathophysiological events that occur in Krabbe disease. Connexins are a multigene family of structurally related trans-membrane proteins able to modulate essential cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and migration. Among these, Cx43 is the predominant isoform in many cell types, including neural progenitor cells. Our results showed an increase of AI, DNA fragmentation, caspase-3, PTEN, Bad, and Cx43 associated to a decrease of PI3K, pAKT and pBad. Taken together, these findings suggest an involvement of Cx43 in the psychosine-mediated apoptosis of primary oligodendrocyte progenitors from wild type or twitcher mice, used for the first time as cell models in comparison. It could open unexplored perspective also for other demyelinating diseases. PMID:26459425

  1. Mouse models of neural tube defects: investigating preventive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2005-05-15

    Neural tube defects (NTD), including anencephaly and spina bifida, are a group of severe congenital abnormalities in which the future brain and/or spinal cord fail to close. In mice, NTD may result from genetic mutations or knockouts, or from exposure to teratogenic agents, several of which are known risk factors in humans. Among the many mouse NTD models that have been identified to date, a number have been tested for possible primary prevention of NTD by exogenous agents, such as folic acid. In genetic NTD models such as Cart1, splotch, Cited2, and crooked tail, and NTD induced by teratogens including valproic acid and fumonisins, the incidence of defects is reduced by maternal folic acid supplementation. These folate-responsive models provide an opportunity to investigate the possible mechanisms underlying prevention of NTD by folic acid in humans. In another group of mouse models, that includes curly tail, axial defects, and the Ephrin-A5 knockout, NTD are not preventable by folic acid, reflecting the situation in humans in which a subset of NTD appear resistant to folic acid therapy. In this group of mutants alternative preventive agents, including inositol and methionine, have been shown to be effective. Overall, the data from mouse models suggests that a broad-based in utero therapy may offer scope for prevention of a greater proportion of NTD than is currently possible. PMID:15800852

  2. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. Highlights: • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X. • We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology. • Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified. PMID:27242437

  3. Lack of Motor Neuron Differentiation is an Intrinsic Property of the Mouse Secondary Neural Tube

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Alisa S.W.; Tang, Louisa S.C.; Copp, Andrew J.; Roelink, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The cranial part of the amniote neural tube is formed by folding and fusion of the ectoderm-derived neural plate (primary neurulation). After posterior neuropore closure, however, the caudal neural tube is formed by cavitation of tail bud mesenchyme (secondary neurulation). In mouse embryos, the secondary neural tube expresses several genes important in early patterning and induction, in restricted domains similar to the primary neural tube, yet it does not undergo neuronal differentiation, but subsequently degenerates. Although the secondary neural tube, isolated from surrounding tissues, is responsive to exogenous Sonic Hedgehog proteins in vitro, motor neuron differentiation is never observed. This cannot be attributed to the properties of the secondary notochord, since it is able to induce motor neuron differentiation in naïve chick neural plate explants. Taken together, these results support that the lack of motor neuron differentiation is an intrinsic property of the mouse secondary neural tube. PMID:20960561

  4. Long-term survival and integration of porcine expanded neural precursor cell grafts in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Harrower, T P; Tyers, P; Hooks, Y; Barker, R A

    2006-01-01

    Porcine fetal neural tissue has been considered as an alternative source to human allografts for transplantation in neurodegenerative disorders by virtue of the fact that it can overcome the ethical and practical difficulties using human fetal neural tissue. However, primary porcine neural xenografts are rejected while porcine expanded neural precursor neural cells (PNPCs) seem to be less immunogenic and thus survive better [Armstrong, R.J., Harrower, T.P., Hurelbrink, C.B., McLaughin, M., Ratcliffe, E.L., Tyers, P., Richards, A., Dunnett, S.B., Rosser, A.E., Barker, R.A., 2001a. Porcine neural xenografts in the immunocompetent rat: immune response following grafting of expanded neural precursor cells. Neuroscience 106, 201-216]. In this study, we extended these observations to investigate the long-term survival of such transplants in immunosuppressed rats. Unilateral 6 OHDA lesioned rats received grafts into the dopamine denervated striatum of either primary porcine fetal neural tissue dissected from the E26 cortex or cortically derived neural stem cells which had been derived from the same source but expanded in vitro for 21 days. All cortically derived neural stem cell grafts survived up to 5 months in contrast to the poor survival of primary porcine xenografts. Histological analysis demonstrated good graft integration with fibers extending into the surrounding host tissue including white matter with synapse formation, and in addition there was evidence of host vascularization and myelinated fibers within the graft area. This study has therefore shown for the first time the reliable long-term survival of grafts derived from porcine expanded neural precursors in a rat model of PD, with maturation and integration into the host brain. This demonstrates that such xenografted cells may be able to recreate the damaged circuitry in PD although strategies for dopaminergic differentiation of the porcine neural precursor cell remain to be refined. PMID:16246328

  5. Early Divergence of Central and Peripheral Neural Retina Precursors During Vertebrate Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. PMID:25329498

  6. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Tseng, Michael; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Weksberg, Rosanna; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Audet, Julie

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. CBP regulates the differentiation of interneurons from ventral forebrain neural precursors during murine development.

    PubMed

    Tsui, David; Voronova, Anastassia; Gallagher, Denis; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-15

    The mechanisms that regulate appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the developing mammalian brain are of significant interest not only because interneurons play key roles in the establishment of neural circuitry, but also because when they are deficient, this can cause epilepsy. In this regard, one genetic syndrome that is associated with deficits in neural development and epilepsy is Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), where the transcriptional activator and histone acetyltransferase CBP is mutated and haploinsufficient. Here, we have asked whether CBP is necessary for the appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the murine forebrain, since this could provide an explanation for the epilepsy that is associated with RTS. We show that CBP is expressed in neural precursors within the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), an area that generates the vast majority of interneurons for the cortex. Using primary cultures of MGE precursors, we show that knockdown of CBP causes deficits in differentiation of these precursors into interneurons and oligodendrocytes, and that overexpression of CBP is by itself sufficient to enhance interneuron genesis. Moreover, we show that levels of the neurotransmitter synthesis enzyme GAD67, which is expressed in inhibitory interneurons, are decreased in the dorsal and ventral forebrain of neonatal CBP(+/-) mice, indicating that CBP plays a role in regulating interneuron development in vivo. Thus, CBP normally acts to ensure the differentiation of appropriate numbers of forebrain interneurons, and when its levels are decreased, this causes deficits in interneuron development, providing a potential explanation for the epilepsy seen in individuals with RTS. PMID:24247009

  8. Coculture with endothelial cells reduces the population of cycling LeX neural precursors but increases that of quiescent cells with a side population phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Celine . E-mail: marc-andre.mouthon@cea.fr

    2006-04-01

    Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation are regulated by external cues from their microenvironment. As endothelial cells are closely associated with neural stem cell in brain germinal zones, we investigated whether endothelial cells may interfere with neurogenesis. Neural precursor cells (NPC) from telencephalon of EGFP mouse embryos were cocultured in direct contact with endothelial cells. Endothelial cells did not modify the overall proliferation and apoptosis of neural cells, albeit they transiently delayed spontaneous apoptosis. These effects appeared to be specific to endothelial cells since a decrease in proliferation and a raise in apoptosis were observed in cocultures with fibroblasts. Endothelial cells stimulated the differentiation of NPC into astrocytes and into neurons, whereas they reduced differentiation into oligodendrocytes in comparison to adherent cultures on polyornithine. Determination of NPC clonogenicity and quantification of LeX expression, a marker for NPC, showed that endothelial cells decreased the number of cycling NPC. On the other hand, the presence of endothelial cells increased the number of neural cells having 'side population' phenotype, another marker reported on NPC, which we have shown to contain quiescent cells. Thus, we show that endothelial cells may regulate neurogenesis by acting at different level of NPC differentiation, proliferation and quiescence.

  9. ETOH inhibits embryonic neural stem/precursor cell proliferation via PLD signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yuko; Hiroyama, Masami; Sanbe, Atsushi Yamauchi, Junji; Murase, Shoko; Tanoue, Akito

    2008-05-23

    While a mother's excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy is known to have adverse effects on fetal neural development, little is known about the underlying mechanism of these effects. In order to investigate these mechanisms, we investigated the toxic effect of ethanol (ETOH) on neural stem/precursor cell (NSC) proliferation. In cultures of NSCs, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated following stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). Exposure of NSCs to ETOH suppresses cell proliferation, while it has no effect on cell death. Phosphatidic acid (PA), which is a signaling messenger produced by PLD, reverses ETOH inhibition of NSC proliferation. Blocking the PLD signal by 1-butanol suppresses the proliferation. ETOH-induced suppression of NSC proliferation and the protective effect of PA for ETOH-induced suppression are mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. These results indicate that exposure to ETOH impairs NSC proliferation by altering the PLD signaling pathway.

  10. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gaurav; Singh, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomagnetic storms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-based model to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and related interplanetary (IP) events. IP inputs were considered within a 5-day time window after the commencement of storm. The artificial neural network (ANN) model training, testing and validation datasets were constructed based on 110 halo CMEs (both full and partial halo and their properties) observed during the ascending phase of the 24th solar cycle between 2009 and 2014. The geomagnetic storm occurrence rate from halo CMEs is estimated at a probability of 79%, by this model.

  11. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gaurav; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomagnetic storms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-based model to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and related interplanetary (IP) events. IP inputs were considered within a 5-day time window after the commencement of storm. The artificial neural network (ANN) model training, testing and validation datasets were constructed based on 110 halo CMEs (both full and partial halo and their properties) observed during the ascending phase of the 24th solar cycle between 2009 and 2014. The geomagnetic storm occurrence rate from halo CMEs is estimated at a probability of 79%, by this model.

  12. The role of neural precursor cells and self assembling peptides in nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cranial nerve injury involves loss of central neural cells in the brain stem and surrounding support matrix, leading to severe functional impairment. Therapeutically targeting cellular replacement and enhancing structural support may promote neural regeneration. We examined the combinatorial effect of neural precursor cells (NPC) and self assembling peptide (SAP) administration on nerve regeneration. Methods Nerve injury was induced by clip compression of the rodent spinal cord. SAPs were injected immediately into the injured cord and NPCs at 2 weeks post-injury. Behavioral analysis was done weekly and rats were sacrificed at 11 weeks post injury. LFB-H&E staining was done on cord tissue to assess cavitation volume. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were measured at week 11 to assess nerve conduction and Kaplan meier curves were created to compare survival estimates. Results NPCs and SAPs were distributed both caudal and rostral to the injury site. Behavioral analysis showed that SAP + NPC transplantation significantly improved locomotor score p <0.03) and enhanced survival (log rank test, p = 0.008) compared to control. SAP + NPC treatment also improved nerve conduction velocity (p = 0.008) but did not affect cavitation volume (p = 0.73). Conclusion Combinatorial NPC and SAP injection into injured nerve tissue may enhance neural repair and regeneration. PMID:24351041

  13. Rejuvenation of MPTP-induced human neural precursor cell senescence by activating autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liang; Dong, Chuanming; Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Yang, Danjing; Zhu, Hongwen; Xu, Jun

    2015-08-21

    Aging of neural stem cell, which can affect brain homeostasis, may be caused by many cellular mechanisms. Autophagy dysfunction was found in aged and neurodegenerative brains. However, little is known about the relationship between autophagy and human neural stem cell (hNSC) aging. The present study used 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to treat neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line H9 and investigate related molecular mechanisms involved in this process. MPTP-treated NPCs were found to undergo premature senescence [determined by increased senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased proliferation] and were associated with impaired autophagy. Additionally, the cellular senescence phenotypes were manifested at the molecular level by a significant increase in p21 and p53 expression, a decrease in SOD2 expression, and a decrease in expression of some key autophagy-related genes such as Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, and Beclin 1. Furthermore, we found that the senescence-like phenotype of MPTP-treated hNPCs was rejuvenated through treatment with a well-known autophagy enhancer rapamycin, which was blocked by suppression of essential autophagy gene Beclin 1. Taken together, these findings reveal the critical role of autophagy in the process of hNSC aging, and this process can be reversed by activating autophagy. - Highlights: • We successfully establish hESC-derived neural precursor cells. • MPTP treatment induced senescence-like state in hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP treatment induced impaired autophagy of hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP-induced hESC-derived NPC senescence was rejuvenated by activating autophagy.

  14. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders. PMID:27352251

  15. Pulsed DC Electric Field–Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K.; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders. PMID:27352251

  16. Signaling through three chemokine receptors triggers the migration of transplanted neural precursor cells in a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mikhal E; Fainstein, Nina; Lavon, Iris; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifocal disease, and precursor cells need to migrate into the multiple lesions in order to exert their therapeutic effects. Therefore, cell migration is a crucial element in regenerative processes in MS, dictating the route of delivery, when cell transplantation is considered. We have previously shown that inflammation triggers migration of multi-potential neural precursor cells (NPCs) into the white matter of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rodents, a widely used model of MS. Here we investigated the molecular basis of this attraction. NPCs were grown from E13 embryonic mouse brains and transplanted into the lateral cerebral ventricles of EAE mice. Transplanted NPC migration was directed by three tissue-derived chemokines. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α, monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 and hepatocyte growth factor were expressed in the EAE brain and specifically in microglia and astrocytes. Their cognate receptors, CXCR4, CCR2 or c-Met were constitutively expressed on NPCs. Selective blockage of CXCR4, CCR2 or c-Met partially inhibited NPC migration in EAE brains. Blocking all three receptors had an additive effect and resulted in profound inhibition of NPC migration, as compared to extensive migration of control NPCs. The inflammation-triggered NPC migration into white matter tracts was dependent on a motile NPC phenotype. Specifically, depriving NPCs from epidermal growth factor (EGF) prevented the induction of glial commitment and a motile phenotype (as indicated by an in vitro motility assay), hampering their response to neuroinflammation. In conclusion, signaling via three chemokine systems accounts for most of the inflammation-induced, tissue-derived attraction of transplanted NPCs into white matter tracts during EAE. PMID:25086214

  17. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors Develop Into Neurons and Integrate Into the Host Brain

    PubMed Central

    Guillaume, Daniel J.; Johnson, M. Austin; Li, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how in-vitro-produced human neural precursors mature and integrate into the brain are crucial to the utility of human embryonic stem (hES) cells in treating neurological disorders. After transplantation into the ventricles of neonatal immune-deficient mice, hES-cell-derived neural precursors stopped expressing the cell division marker Ki67, except in neurogenic areas, and differentiated into neurons and then glia in a temporal course intrinsic to that of human cells regardless of location. The human cells located in the gray matter became neurons in the olfactory bulb and striatum, whereas those in the white matter produced exclusively glia. Importantly, the grafted human cells formed synapses. Thus, the in-vitro-produced human neural precursors follow their intrinsic temporal program to produce neurons and glia and, in response to environmental signals, generate cells appropriate to their target regions and integrate into the brain. PMID:16941479

  18. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  19. Animal models for studying neural crest development: is the mouse different?

    PubMed

    Barriga, Elias H; Trainor, Paul A; Bronner, Marianne; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    The neural crest is a uniquely vertebrate cell type and has been well studied in a number of model systems. Zebrafish, Xenopus and chick embryos largely show consistent requirements for specific genes in early steps of neural crest development. By contrast, knockouts of homologous genes in the mouse often do not exhibit comparable early neural crest phenotypes. In this Spotlight article, we discuss these species-specific differences, suggest possible explanations for the divergent phenotypes in mouse and urge the community to consider these issues and the need for further research in complementary systems. PMID:25922521

  20. The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 as a novel modulator of neural precursor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Garthe, Alexander; de Almeida Sassi, Felipe; Glass, Rainer; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-12-01

    The capsaicin receptor (TRPV1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1) was first discovered in the peripheral nervous system as a detector of noxious chemical and thermal stimuli including the irritant chili pepper. Recently, there has been increasing evidence of TRPV1 expression in the central nervous system. Here, we show that TRPV1 is expressed in neural precursor cells (NPCs) during postnatal development, but not in the adult. However, expression of TRPV1 is induced in the adult in paradigms linked to an increase in neurogenesis, such as spatial learning in the Morris water maze or voluntary exercise. Loss of TRPV1 expression in knockout mice leads to an increase in NPC proliferation. Functional TRPV1 expression has been confirmed in cultured NPCs. Our results indicate that TRPV1 expression influences both postnatal and activity-induced neurogenesis in adulthood. PMID:25092424

  1. Roles of neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 in tumor-associated cellular processes (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sisen; Wu, Lihua

    2015-11-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9), a gene exclusively expressed in the brain during embryonic stages but not in brains of adult mice, is an important cytoskeletal protein and regarded as a 'router/hub' in cellular signal transduction processes connecting external stimulation signals with downstream target proteins that can directly promote tumor metastasis. Numerous studies showed that NEDD9 has an essential role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, migration and invasion. The roles of NEDD9, including the underlying mechanisms of its regulation of cell migration, its distinctive functions in various tumor stages and its association with other diseases, are required to be elucidated at large. Future studies of NEDD9 may provide a more profound understanding of the development of tumor invasiveness and NEDD9 may serve as a potential novel target for tumor therapy. The present review examined the significant roles of NEDD9 in the abovementioned processes. PMID:26324022

  2. Standardized Generation and Differentiation of Neural Precursor Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kozhich, O; Hamilton, RS; Mallon, BS

    2012-01-01

    Precise, robust and scalable directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is an important goal with respect to disease modeling or future therapies. Using the AggreWell™400 system we have standardized the differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to a neuronal fate using defined conditions. This allows reproducibility in replicate experiments and facilitates the direct comparison of cell lines. Since the starting point for EB formation is a single cell suspension, this protocol is suitable for standard and novel methods of pluripotent stem cell culture. Moreover, an intermediate population of neural precursor cells, which are routinely >95% NCAMpos and Tra-1–60neg by FACS analysis, may be expanded and frozen prior to differentiation allowing a convenient starting point for downstream experiments. PMID:22388559

  3. Learning-induced synaptic potentiation in implanted neural precursor cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungjoon; Heo, Hwon; Han, Ma Eum; Choi, Kyuhyun; Yi, Jee Hyun; Kang, Shin Jung; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Shin, Ki Soon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury and stroke results in cognitive dysfunctioning. Implantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) can improve the brain function by replacing lost neurons. Proper synaptic integration following neuronal differentiation of implanted cells is believed to be a prerequisite for the functional recovery. In the present study, we characterized the functional properties of immortalized neural progenitor HiB5 cells implanted into the rat hippocampus with chemically induced lesion. The implanted HiB5 cells migrated toward CA1 pyramidal layer and differentiated into vGluT1-positive glutamatergic neurons with morphological and electrophysiological properties of endogenous CA1 pyramidal cells. Functional synaptic integration of HiB5 cell-derived neurons was also evidenced by immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data. Lesion-caused memory deficit was significantly recovered after the implantation when assessed by inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning. Remarkably, IA learning preferentially produced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the synapses onto HiB5 cell-derived neurons, which occluded paring protocol-induced LTP ex vivo. We conclude that the implanted HiB5 cell-derived neurons actively participate in learning process through LTP formation, thereby counteracting lesion-mediated memory impairment. PMID:26634434

  4. GDNF facilitates differentiation of the adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells into astrocytes via STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Boku, Shuken; Nakagawa, Shin; Takamura, Naoki; Kato, Akiko; Takebayashi, Minoru; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Omiya, Yuki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •GDNF has no effect on ADP proliferation and apoptosis. •GDNF increases ADP differentiation into astrocyte. •A specific inhibitor of STAT3 decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •STAT3 knockdown by lentiviral shRNA vector also decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •GDNF increases the phosphorylation of STAT3. -- Abstract: While the pro-neurogenic actions of antidepressants in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are thought to be one of the mechanisms through which antidepressants exert their therapeutic actions, antidepressants do not increase proliferation of neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Because previous studies showed that antidepressants increase the expression and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in C6 glioma cells derived from rat astrocytes and GDNF increases neurogenesis in adult DG in vivo, we investigated the effects of GDNF on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cultured neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Data showed that GDNF facilitated the differentiation of neural precursor cells into astrocytes but had no effect on their proliferation or apoptosis. Moreover, GDNF increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, and both a specific inhibitor of STAT3 and lentiviral shRNA for STAT3 decreased their differentiation into astrocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that GDNF facilitates astrogliogenesis from neural precursor cells in adult DG through activating STAT3 and that this action might indirectly affect neurogenesis.

  5. Precursors to morality in development as a complex interplay between neural, socioenvironmental, and behavioral facets.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Jason M; Decety, Jean

    2015-10-13

    The nature and underpinnings of infants' seemingly complex, third-party, social evaluations remain highly contentious. Theoretical perspectives oscillate between rich and lean interpretations of the same expressed preferences. Although some argue that infants and toddlers possess a "moral sense" based on core knowledge of the social world, others suggest that social evaluations are hierarchical in nature and the product of an integration of rudimentary general processes such as attention allocation and approach and avoidance. Moreover, these biologically prepared minds interact in social environments that include significant variation, which are likely to impact early social evaluations and behavior. The present study examined the neural underpinnings of and precursors to moral sensitivity in infants and toddlers (n = 73, ages 12-24 mo) through a series of interwoven measures, combining multiple levels of analysis including electrophysiological, eye-tracking, behavioral, and socioenvironmental. Continuous EEG and time-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) and gaze fixation were recorded while children watched characters engaging in prosocial and antisocial actions in two different tasks. All children demonstrated a neural differentiation in both spectral EEG power density modulations and time-locked ERPs when perceiving prosocial or antisocial agents. Time-locked neural differences predicted children's preference for prosocial characters and were influenced by parental values regarding justice and fairness. Overall, this investigation casts light on the fundamental nature of moral cognition, including its underpinnings in general processes such as attention and approach-withdrawal, providing plausible mechanisms of early change and a foundation for forward movement in the field of developmental social neuroscience. PMID:26324885

  6. Precursors to morality in development as a complex interplay between neural, socioenvironmental, and behavioral facets

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Jason M.; Decety, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The nature and underpinnings of infants’ seemingly complex, third-party, social evaluations remain highly contentious. Theoretical perspectives oscillate between rich and lean interpretations of the same expressed preferences. Although some argue that infants and toddlers possess a “moral sense” based on core knowledge of the social world, others suggest that social evaluations are hierarchical in nature and the product of an integration of rudimentary general processes such as attention allocation and approach and avoidance. Moreover, these biologically prepared minds interact in social environments that include significant variation, which are likely to impact early social evaluations and behavior. The present study examined the neural underpinnings of and precursors to moral sensitivity in infants and toddlers (n = 73, ages 12–24 mo) through a series of interwoven measures, combining multiple levels of analysis including electrophysiological, eye-tracking, behavioral, and socioenvironmental. Continuous EEG and time-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) and gaze fixation were recorded while children watched characters engaging in prosocial and antisocial actions in two different tasks. All children demonstrated a neural differentiation in both spectral EEG power density modulations and time-locked ERPs when perceiving prosocial or antisocial agents. Time-locked neural differences predicted children’s preference for prosocial characters and were influenced by parental values regarding justice and fairness. Overall, this investigation casts light on the fundamental nature of moral cognition, including its underpinnings in general processes such as attention and approach–withdrawal, providing plausible mechanisms of early change and a foundation for forward movement in the field of developmental social neuroscience. PMID:26324885

  7. Activated mast cells release biological activities able to support eosinophil production from mouse hemopoietic precursors.

    PubMed

    Oskéritzian, C; Milon, G; Braquet, P; Mencia-Huerta, J M; David, B

    1996-02-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells cultured for 6 days in the presence of recombinant murine IL-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were used as a source of precursors responsive to eosinopoietins. They were further cultured for 7 days in the presence of either a combination of recombinant cytokines or supernatants of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) activated with either immunological or nonimmunological stimuli. Cytosmears of collected cells were analyzed for eosinophil contents and allowed to demonstrate that supernatants of passively sensitized BMMC support both total cell proliferation and eosinophil production, after various periods of incubation with monoclonal rat anti-mouse IgE antibodies (the 6HD5 mAbs). In contrast, a stimulation with 100 ng/ml dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) did not generate supernatants displaying such bioactivities. Low doses of methyl ester of L (but not D)-leucine or of the calcium ionophore A23187 also allowed the release of eosinopoietic bioactivities. In addition, immunoreactive IL-5, GM-CSF, and IL-3 were quantified in the BMMC supernatants. These results demonstrate that activated BMMC are able to effect eosinophil production. PMID:8603429

  8. Microglia-derived TNFα induces apoptosis in neural precursor cells via transcriptional activation of the Bcl-2 family member Puma

    PubMed Central

    Guadagno, J; Xu, X; Karajgikar, M; Brown, A; Cregan, S P

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a common feature of acute neurological conditions such as stroke and spinal cord injury, as well as neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that acute neuroinflammation can adversely affect the survival of neural precursor cells (NPCs) and thereby limit the capacity for regeneration and repair. However, the mechanisms by which neuroinflammatory processes induce NPC death remain unclear. Microglia are key mediators of neuroinflammation and when activated to induce a pro-inflammatory state produce a number of factors that could affect NPC survival. Importantly, in the present study we demonstrate that tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) produced by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia is necessary and sufficient to trigger apoptosis in mouse NPCs in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microglia-derived TNFα induces NPC apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway regulated by the Bcl-2 family protein Bax. BH3-only proteins are known to play a key role in regulating Bax activation and we demonstrate that microglia-derived TNFα induces the expression of the BH3-only family member Puma in NPCs via an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Specifically, we show that NF-κB is activated in NPCs treated with conditioned media from activated microglia and that Puma induction and NPC apoptosis is blocked by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY-117082. Importantly, we have determined that NPC apoptosis induced by activated microglia-derived TNFα is attenuated in Puma-deficient NPCs, indicating that Puma induction is required for NPC death. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that Puma-deficient NPCs exhibit an ∼13-fold increase in survival as compared with wild-type NPCs following transplantation into the inflammatory environment of the injured spinal cord in vivo. In summary, we have identified a key signaling pathway that regulates neuroinflammation induced apoptosis

  9. Microglia-derived TNFα induces apoptosis in neural precursor cells via transcriptional activation of the Bcl-2 family member Puma.

    PubMed

    Guadagno, J; Xu, X; Karajgikar, M; Brown, A; Cregan, S P

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a common feature of acute neurological conditions such as stroke and spinal cord injury, as well as neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that acute neuroinflammation can adversely affect the survival of neural precursor cells (NPCs) and thereby limit the capacity for regeneration and repair. However, the mechanisms by which neuroinflammatory processes induce NPC death remain unclear. Microglia are key mediators of neuroinflammation and when activated to induce a pro-inflammatory state produce a number of factors that could affect NPC survival. Importantly, in the present study we demonstrate that tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) produced by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia is necessary and sufficient to trigger apoptosis in mouse NPCs in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microglia-derived TNFα induces NPC apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway regulated by the Bcl-2 family protein Bax. BH3-only proteins are known to play a key role in regulating Bax activation and we demonstrate that microglia-derived TNFα induces the expression of the BH3-only family member Puma in NPCs via an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Specifically, we show that NF-κB is activated in NPCs treated with conditioned media from activated microglia and that Puma induction and NPC apoptosis is blocked by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY-117082. Importantly, we have determined that NPC apoptosis induced by activated microglia-derived TNFα is attenuated in Puma-deficient NPCs, indicating that Puma induction is required for NPC death. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that Puma-deficient NPCs exhibit an ∼13-fold increase in survival as compared with wild-type NPCs following transplantation into the inflammatory environment of the injured spinal cord in vivo. In summary, we have identified a key signaling pathway that regulates neuroinflammation induced apoptosis

  10. Tripartite containing motif 32 modulates proliferation of human neural precursor cells in HIV-1 neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Fatima, M; Kumari, R; Schwamborn, J C; Mahadevan, A; Shankar, S K; Raja, R; Seth, P

    2016-05-01

    In addition to glial cells, HIV-1 infection occurs in multipotent human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and induces quiescence in NPCs. HIV-1 infection of the brain alters hNPC stemness, leading to perturbed endogenous neurorestoration of the CNS following brain damage by HIV-1, compounding the severity of dementia in adult neuroAIDS cases. In pediatric neuroAIDS cases, HIV-1 infection of neural stem cell can lead to delayed developmental milestones and impaired cognition. Using primary cultures of human fetal brain-derived hNPCs, we gained novel insights into the role of a neural stem cell determinant, tripartite containing motif 32 (TRIM32), in HIV-1 Tat-induced quiescence of NPCs. Acute HIV-1 Tat treatment of hNPCs resulted in proliferation arrest but did not induce differentiation. Cellular localization and levels of TRIM32 are critical regulators of stemness of NPCs. HIV-1 Tat exposure increased nuclear localization and levels of TRIM32 in hNPCs. The in vitro findings were validated by studying TRIM32 localization and levels in frontal cortex of HIV-1-seropositive adult patients collected at post mortem as well as by infection of hNPCs by HIV-1. We observed increased percentage of cells with nuclear localization of TRIM32 in the subventricular zone (SVZ) as compared with age-matched controls. Our quest for probing into the mechanisms revealed that TRIM32 is targeted by miR-155 as downregulation of miR-155 by HIV-1 Tat resulted in upregulation of TRIM32 levels. Furthermore, miR-155 or siRNA against TRIM32 rescued HIV-1 Tat-induced quiescence in NPCs. Our findings suggest a novel molecular cascade involving miR-155 and TRIM32 leading to HIV-1 Tat-induced attenuated proliferation of hNPCs. The study also uncovered an unidentified role for miR-155 in modulating human neural stem cell proliferation, helping in better understanding of hNPCs and diseased brain. PMID:26586575

  11. Tripartite containing motif 32 modulates proliferation of human neural precursor cells in HIV-1 neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, M; Kumari, R; Schwamborn, J C; Mahadevan, A; Shankar, S K; Raja, R; Seth, P

    2016-01-01

    In addition to glial cells, HIV-1 infection occurs in multipotent human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and induces quiescence in NPCs. HIV-1 infection of the brain alters hNPC stemness, leading to perturbed endogenous neurorestoration of the CNS following brain damage by HIV-1, compounding the severity of dementia in adult neuroAIDS cases. In pediatric neuroAIDS cases, HIV-1 infection of neural stem cell can lead to delayed developmental milestones and impaired cognition. Using primary cultures of human fetal brain-derived hNPCs, we gained novel insights into the role of a neural stem cell determinant, tripartite containing motif 32 (TRIM32), in HIV-1 Tat-induced quiescence of NPCs. Acute HIV-1 Tat treatment of hNPCs resulted in proliferation arrest but did not induce differentiation. Cellular localization and levels of TRIM32 are critical regulators of stemness of NPCs. HIV-1 Tat exposure increased nuclear localization and levels of TRIM32 in hNPCs. The in vitro findings were validated by studying TRIM32 localization and levels in frontal cortex of HIV-1-seropositive adult patients collected at post mortem as well as by infection of hNPCs by HIV-1. We observed increased percentage of cells with nuclear localization of TRIM32 in the subventricular zone (SVZ) as compared with age-matched controls. Our quest for probing into the mechanisms revealed that TRIM32 is targeted by miR-155 as downregulation of miR-155 by HIV-1 Tat resulted in upregulation of TRIM32 levels. Furthermore, miR-155 or siRNA against TRIM32 rescued HIV-1 Tat-induced quiescence in NPCs. Our findings suggest a novel molecular cascade involving miR-155 and TRIM32 leading to HIV-1 Tat-induced attenuated proliferation of hNPCs. The study also uncovered an unidentified role for miR-155 in modulating human neural stem cell proliferation, helping in better understanding of hNPCs and diseased brain. PMID:26586575

  12. Molecular characterization of six intermediate proteins in the processing of mouse protamine P2 precursor.

    PubMed

    Chauvière, M; Martinage, A; Debarle, M; Sautière, P; Chevaillier, P

    1992-03-01

    In mouse spermatozoa, DNA is compacted by two protamines mP1 and mP2. Protamine mP2 (63 residues) is synthesized in spermatid nuclei as a precursor pmP2 (106 residues) which is subsequently processed at the end of spermiogenesis [Yelick, P.C., Balhorn, R., Johnson, P.A., Corzett, M., Mazrimas, J.A., Kleene, K.C. & Hecht, N.B. (1987) Mol. Cell. Biol. 7, 2173-2179]. Six proteins, three of which were described earlier [Chauvière, M., Martinage, A., Debarle, M., Alimi, E., Sautière, P. & Chevaillier, Ph. (1991) C.R. Acad. Sci. 313, 107-112], have molecular and electrophoretic properties similar to those of pmP2. They were isolated from purified testis nuclei and characterized by amino acid composition, N-terminal sequence and peptide mapping. From the amino acid compositions, it appears that all six proteins are rich in arginine, cysteine and histidine and are closely related to pmP2 and mP2. The N-terminal sequence of each protein overlaps a distinct region of the N-terminal part of pmP2. The C-terminal part of protamine mP2 starting at arginine 15 is common to all proteins as assessed by amino acid compositions and peptide maps. All these structural data demonstrate that the six isolated proteins are products of pmP2 precursor processing. The six intermediate proteins pmP2/5, pmP2/11, pmP2/16, pmP2/20, pmP2/26 and pmP2/32 which contain 102, 96, 91, 87, 81 and 75 residues, respectively, are generated from the pmP2 precursor after N-terminal excision of 4, 10, 15, 19, 25 and 31 residues, respectively. The C-terminal sequence of protamine mP2 is strictly identical to that of its precursor; therefore, no maturation occurs in this part of the molecule. At the present time, the proteolytic pathway involved in the amino-terminal processing leading to the mature form of the protamine mP2 (63 residues) has not been elucidated. However, the different representation of six intermediates in the testis suggests that some stages of processing are faster than others or that some

  13. Skeletal myogenic potential of human and mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Galli, R; Borello, U; Gritti, A; Minasi, M G; Bjornson, C; Coletta, M; Mora, M; De Angelis, M G; Fiocco, R; Cossu, G; Vescovi, A L

    2000-10-01

    Distinct cell lineages established early in development are usually maintained throughout adulthood. Thus, adult stem cells have been thought to generate differentiated cells specific to the tissue in which they reside. This view has been challenged; for example, neural stem cells can generate cells that normally originate from a different germ layer. Here we show that acutely isolated and clonally derived neural stem cells from mice and humans could produce skeletal myotubes in vitro and in vivo, the latter following transplantation into adult animals. Myogenic conversion in vitro required direct exposure to myoblasts, and was blocked if neural cells were clustered. Thus, a community effect between neural cells may override such myogenic induction. We conclude that neural stem cells, which generate neurons, glia and blood cells, can also produce skeletal muscle cells, and can undergo various patterns of differentiation depending on exposure to appropriate epigenetic signals in mature tissues. PMID:11017170

  14. A reduction in Npas4 expression results in delayed neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Npas4 is a calcium-dependent transcription factor expressed within neurons of the brain where it regulates the expression of several genes that are important for neuronal survival and synaptic plasticity. It is known that in the adult brain Npas4 plays an important role in several key aspects of neurobiology including inhibitory synapse formation, neuroprotection and memory, yet very little is known about the role of Npas4 during neurodevelopment. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and function of Npas4 during nervous system development by using a combination of in vivo experiments in the developing mouse embryo and neural differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as an in vitro model of the early stages of embryogenesis. Methods Two different neural differentiation paradigms were used to investigate Npas4 expression during neurodevelopment in vitro; adherent monolayer differentiation of mouse ESCs in N2B27 medium and Noggin-induced differentiation of human ESCs. This work was complemented by direct analysis of Npas4 expression in the mouse embryo. The function of Npas4 in the context of neurodevelopment was investigated using loss-of-function experiments in vitro. We created several mouse ESC lines in which Npas4 expression was reduced during neural differentiation through RNA interference and we then analyzed the ability of these Npas4 knockdown mouse ESCs lines to undergo neural differentiation. Results We found that while Npas4 is not expressed in undifferentiated ESCs, it becomes transiently up-regulated during neural differentiation of both mouse and human ESCs at a stage of differentiation that is characterized by proliferation of neural progenitor cells. This was corroborated by analysis of Npas4 expression in the mouse embryo where the Npas4 transcript was detected specifically in the developing forebrain beginning at embryonic day 9.5. Finally, knockdown of Npas4 expression in mouse ESCs undergoing neural differentiation

  15. Neural precursors isolated from the developing cat brain show retinal integration following transplantation to the retina of the dystrophic cat.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Henry; Schwartz, Philip H; Ziaeian, Boback; Nethercott, Hubert; Young, Michael J; Bragadottir, Ragnheidur; Tullis, Gregory E; Warfvinge, Karin; Narfstrom, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The cat has served as an important nonrodent research model for neurophysiology and retinal degenerative disease processes, yet very little is known about feline neural precursor cells. To culture these cells and evaluate marker expression, brains were dissected from 45-day-old fetuses, enzymatically dissociated, and grown in the presence of EGF, bFGF and PDGF. Expanded cells widely expressed nestin, Sox2, Ki-67, fusin (CXCR4) and vimentin, while subpopulations expressed A2B5, GFAP, or beta-III tubulin. Precursors prelabeled with BrdU and/or transduced with a recombinant lentivirus that expresses GFP were transplanted subretinally in five dystrophic Abyssinian cats. Two to 4 weeks following surgery, histology showed survival of grafted cells in three of the animals. Labeled cells were found in the neuroretina and RPE layer, as well as in the vitreous and the vicinity of Bruch's membrane. There was no evidence of an immunologic response in any of the eyes. Neural precursor cells can therefore be cultured from the developing cat brain and survive as allografts for up to 4 weeks without immune suppression. The feasibility of deriving and transplanting feline neural precursor cells, combined with the availability of the dystrophic Abyssinian cat, provide a new feline model system for the study of retinal repair. PMID:17565557

  16. Differentiation of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Photoreceptor Precursors from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Carrying an Atoh7/Math5 Lineage Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takao; Tien, Amy H.; Chen, Andrew; Ge, Jian; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The neural retina is a critical component of the visual system, which provides the majority of sensory input in humans. Various retinal degenerative diseases can result in the permanent loss of retinal neurons, especially the light-sensing photoreceptors and the centrally projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The replenishment of lost RGCs and the repair of optic nerve damage are particularly challenging, as both RGC specification and their subsequent axonal growth and projection involve complex and precise regulation. To explore the developmental potential of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors, we have established mouse iPS cells that allow cell lineage tracing of progenitors that have expressed Atoh7/Math5, a bHLH transcription factor required for RGC production. These Atoh7 lineage reporter iPS cells encode Cre to replace one copy of the endogenous Atoh7 gene and a Cre-dependent YFP reporter in the ROSA locus. In addition, they express pluripotent markers and are capable of generating teratomas in vivo. Under anterior neural induction and neurogenic conditions in vitro, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells differentiate into neurons that co-express various RGC markers and YFP, indicating that these neurons are derived from Atoh7-expressing progenitors. Consistent with previous in vivo cell lineage studies, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells also give rise to a subset of Crx-positive photoreceptor precursors. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling in the iPSC cultures results in a significant increase of YFP-positive RGCs and photoreceptor precursors. Together, these results show that Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells can be used to monitor the development and survival of RGCs and photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25401462

  17. Differentiation of retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptor precursors from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells carrying an Atoh7/Math5 lineage reporter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Xiang-Mei; Hashimoto, Takao; Tien, Amy H; Chen, Andrew; Ge, Jian; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The neural retina is a critical component of the visual system, which provides the majority of sensory input in humans. Various retinal degenerative diseases can result in the permanent loss of retinal neurons, especially the light-sensing photoreceptors and the centrally projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The replenishment of lost RGCs and the repair of optic nerve damage are particularly challenging, as both RGC specification and their subsequent axonal growth and projection involve complex and precise regulation. To explore the developmental potential of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors, we have established mouse iPS cells that allow cell lineage tracing of progenitors that have expressed Atoh7/Math5, a bHLH transcription factor required for RGC production. These Atoh7 lineage reporter iPS cells encode Cre to replace one copy of the endogenous Atoh7 gene and a Cre-dependent YFP reporter in the ROSA locus. In addition, they express pluripotent markers and are capable of generating teratomas in vivo. Under anterior neural induction and neurogenic conditions in vitro, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells differentiate into neurons that co-express various RGC markers and YFP, indicating that these neurons are derived from Atoh7-expressing progenitors. Consistent with previous in vivo cell lineage studies, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells also give rise to a subset of Crx-positive photoreceptor precursors. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling in the iPSC cultures results in a significant increase of YFP-positive RGCs and photoreceptor precursors. Together, these results show that Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells can be used to monitor the development and survival of RGCs and photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25401462

  18. LIF-dependent primitive neural stem cells derived from mouse ES cells represent a reversible stage of neural commitment.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Wan-Hong; Wang, Bin; Wong, Wing Ki; Shi, Shuo; Chen, Xiao; He, Xiangjun; Gu, Shen; Hu, Jiabiao; Wang, Chengdong; Liu, Pi-Chu; Lu, Gang; Chen, Xiongfong; Zhao, Hui; Poon, Wai-Sang; Chan, Wai-Yee; Feng, Bo

    2013-11-01

    Primitive neural stem cells (NSCs) define an early stage of neural induction, thus provide a model to understand the mechanism that controls initial neural commitment. In this study, we investigated primitive NSCs derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). By genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we revealed their unique signature and depicted the molecular changes underlying critical cell fate transitions during early neural induction at a global level. Together with qRT-PCR analysis, our data illustrated that primitive NSCs retained expression of key pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog, while exhibiting repression of other pluripotency-related genes Zscan4, Foxp1 and Dusp9 and up-regulation of neural markers Sox1 and Hes1. The early differentiation feature in primitive NSCs was also supported by their intermediate characters on cell cycle profiles. Moreover, re-plating primitive NSCs back to ESC culture condition could reverse them back to ESC stage, as shown by reversible regulation of marker genes, cell cycle profile changes and enhanced embryoid body formation. In addition, our microarray analysis also identified genes differentially expressed in primitive NSCs, and loss-of-function analysis demonstrated that Hes1 and Ccdc141 play important function at this stage, opening up an opportunity to further understand the regulation of early neural commitment. PMID:23973799

  19. Synergic interaction between amyloid precursor protein and neural cell adhesion molecule promotes neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Keping; Lu, Huixia; Gao, Tianli; Xue, Xiulei; Wang, Chunling; Miao, Fengqin

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases worldwide. The main features of AD are the pathological changes of density and distribution of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and extracellular amyloid plaques. The processing of amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) to β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is one of the critical events in the pathogenesis of AD. In this study, we evaluated the role of the interaction of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and APP in neurite outgrowth using two different experimental systems: PC12E2 cells and hippocampal neurons that were isolated from wild type, APP knock-in and APP knock-out mice. PC12E2 cells or hippocampal neurons were co-cultured with NCAM-negative or NCAM-positive fibroblasts L929 cells. We found that APP promoted neurite outgrowth of PC12E2 cells and hippocampal neurons in either the presence or absence of NCAM. Secreted APP can rescue the neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons from APP knock-out mice. The interaction of APP and NCAM had synergic effect in promoting neurite outgrowth in both PC12E2 cells and hippocampal neurons. Our results suggested that the interaction of APP with NCAM played an important role in AD development and therefore could be a potential therapeutic target for AD treatment. PMID:26883101

  20. Human neural precursor cells promote neurologic recovery in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Tran, Ha; Kopf, Alexandra; Walsh, Craig M; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Macklin, Wendy B; Loring, Jeanne F; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-06-01

    Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs) results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activated T cells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments. PMID:24936469

  1. Neural precursor cells induce cell death of high-grade astrocytomas via stimulation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Kumar, Jitender; Synowitz, Michael; Petrosino, Stefania; Imperatore, Roberta; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Wend, Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Nuber, Ulrike A.; Gurok, Ulf; Matyash, Vitali; Wälzlein, Joo-Hee; Chirasani, Sridhar R.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Momma, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R.; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Primary astrocytomas of World Health Organization grade 3 and grade 4 (HG-astrocytomas) are preponderant among adults and are almost invariably fatal despite multimodal therapy. Here, we show that the juvenile brain has an endogenous defense mechanism against HG-astrocytomas. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) migrate to HG-astrocytomas, reduce glioma expansion and prolong survival by releasing a group of fatty acid ethanolamides that have agonistic activity on the vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1; TRPV1). TRPV1 expression is higher in HG-astrocytomas than in tumor-free brain and TRPV1 stimulation triggers tumor cell death via the activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) controlled branch of the ER stress pathway. The anti-tumorigenic response of NPCs is lost with aging. NPC-mediated tumor suppression can be mimicked in the adult brain by systemic administration of the synthetic vanilloid Arvanil, suggesting that TRPV1 agonists hold potential as new HG-astrocytoma therapeutics. PMID:22820645

  2. Neural precursor cells induce cell death of high-grade astrocytomas through stimulation of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Kumar, Jitender; Synowitz, Michael; Petrosino, Stefania; Imperatore, Roberta; Smith, Ewan St J; Wend, Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Nuber, Ulrike A; Gurok, Ulf; Matyash, Vitali; Wälzlein, Joo-Hee; Chirasani, Sridhar R; Dittmar, Gunnar; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Momma, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2012-08-01

    Primary astrocytomas of grade 3 or 4 according to the classification system of the World Health Organization (high-grade astrocytomas or HGAs) are preponderant among adults and are almost invariably fatal despite the use of multimodal therapy. Here we show that the juvenile brain has an endogenous defense mechanism against HGAs. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) migrate to HGAs, reduce glioma expansion and prolong survival time by releasing endovanilloids that activate the vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1 or TRPV1) on HGA cells. TRPV1 is highly expressed in tumor and weakly expressed in tumor-free brain. TRPV1 stimulation triggers tumor cell death through the branch of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway that is controlled by activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3). The antitumorigenic response of NPCs is lost with aging. NPC-mediated tumor suppression can be mimicked in the adult brain by systemic administration of the synthetic vanilloid arvanil, suggesting that TRPV1 agonists have potential as new HGA therapeutics. PMID:22820645

  3. Biochemical and functional characterization of transiently expressed in neural precursor (TENP) protein in emu egg white.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, Kenji; Ueda, Megumi; Matano, Mami; Takeuchi, Junko; Uchino, Masataka; Kashiwagi, Yutaka; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2014-06-01

    A protein transiently expressed in the neural precursors of developing tissues (TENP) was found to be present in emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) egg white as one of the major proteins. Nucleotide analysis of its encoding cDNA revealed a sequence of 452 amino acids including a 19 amino acid peptide signal. Phylogenetic analysis determined that emu TENP was clustered within the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) superfamily together with other avian TENPs. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the emu TENP gene was highly expressed in the magnum of the oviduct, indicating that TENP is a major egg white component. Emu TENP was purified by anion exchange chromatography and ammonium sulfate fractionation. Unlike BPI, emu TENP exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis, but not against Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. The results suggest that emu TENP is a potent novel antibacterial protein with a spectrum distinct from that of BPI. PMID:24820544

  4. Genetically engineered mouse models of human B-cell precursor leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, Julia; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias (pB-ALLs) are the most frequent type of malignancies of the childhood, and also affect an important proportion of adult patients. In spite of their apparent homogeneity, pB-ALL comprises a group of diseases very different both clinically and pathologically, and with very diverse outcomes as a consequence of their biology, and underlying molecular alterations. Their understanding (as a prerequisite for their cure) will require a sustained multidisciplinary effort from professionals coming from many different fields. Among all the available tools for pB-ALL research, the use of animal models stands, as of today, as the most powerful approach, not only for the understanding of the origin and evolution of the disease, but also for the development of new therapies. In this review we go over the most relevant (historically, technically or biologically) genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of human pB-ALLs that have been generated over the last 20 years. Our final aim is to outline the most relevant guidelines that should be followed to generate an “ideal” animal model that could become a standard for the study of human pB-ALL leukemia, and which could be shared among research groups and drug development companies in order to unify criteria for studies like drug testing, analysis of the influence of environmental risk factors, or studying the role of both low-penetrance mutations and cancer susceptibility alterations. PMID:25486471

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO. J.B. Smith, K.K. Sulik, E.S. Hunter III. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
    The induction of craniofacial defects by ethanol exposure is mediated in part by...

  6. HALOACETIC ACIDS AND KINASE INHIBITORS PERTURB MOUSE NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUNTER, E.S.1, J. SMITH2, J. ANDREWS1. 1 Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park and 2 Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Haloacetic acids and kinase inhibitors perturb mouse neural crest cells in vi...

  7. Astroglial β-Arrestin1-mediated Nuclear Signaling Regulates the Expansion of Neural Precursor Cells in Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yezheng; Ma, Li; Liao, Zhaohui; Le, Qiumin; Yu, Jialing; Liu, Xing; Li, Haohong; Chen, Yuejun; Zheng, Ping; Yang, Zhengang; Ma, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is crucial for preserving normal brain function, but how it is regulated by niche cells is uncertain. Here we show that β-arrestin 1 (β-arr1) in dentate gyrus (DG) regulates neural precursor proliferation. β-arr1 knockout (KO) mice show reduced neural precursor proliferation in subgranular zone (SGZ) which could be rescued by selective viral expression of β-arr1 but not its nuclear-function-deficient mutants under control of hGFAP promotor in DG. Compared with wild type astrocytes, β-arr1 KO astrocytes nurture less neurospheres, and this may be attributed to changed activity of soluble, heat-sensitive excretive factors, such as BMP2. RNA-sequencing reveals that β-arr1 KO DG astrocytes exhibit an aberrant gene expression profile of niche factors, including elevated transcription of Bmp2. Taken together, our data suggest that β-arr1 mediated nuclear signaling regulates the production of excretive factors derived from niche astrocytes and expansion of neural precursors in DG, thus maintaining homeostasis of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26500013

  8. Two-photon imaging of remyelination of spinal cord axons by engrafted neural precursor cells in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Milton L; Weinger, Jason G; Matheu, Melanie P; Carbajal, Kevin S; Parker, Ian; Macklin, Wendy B; Lane, Thomas E; Cahalan, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) offer a promising approach for treating demyelinating diseases. However, the cellular dynamics that underlie transplanted NPC-mediated remyelination have not been described. Using two-photon imaging of a newly developed ventral spinal cord preparation and a viral model of demyelination, we describe the motility and intercellular interactions of transplanted mouse NPCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) with damaged axons expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Our findings reveal focal axonal degeneration that occurs in the ventral side of the spinal cord within 1 wk following intracranial instillation with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV). Axonal damage precedes extensive demyelination and is characterized by swelling along the length of the axon, loss of YFP signal, and transected appearance. NPCs engrafted into spinal cords of JHMV-infected mice exhibited diminished migration velocities and increased proliferation compared with transplanted cells in noninfected mice. NPCs preferentially accumulated within areas of axonal damage, initiated direct contact with axons, and subsequently expressed the myelin proteolipid protein gene, initiating remyelination. These findings indicate that NPCs transplanted into an inflammatory demyelinating microenvironment participate directly in therapeutic outcome through the wrapping of myelin around damaged neurons. PMID:24843159

  9. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  10. Predifferentiated GABAergic Neural Precursor Transplants for Alleviation of Dysesthetic Central Pain Following Excitotoxic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeung Woon; Jergova, Stanislava; Furmanski, Orion; Gajavelli, Shyam; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Intraspinal quisqualic acid (QUIS) injury induce (i) mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, (ii) progressive self-injurious overgrooming of the affected dermatome. The latter is thought to resemble painful dysesthesia observed in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We have reported previously loss of endogenous GABA immunoreactive (IR) cells in the superficial dorsal horn of QUIS rats 2 weeks post injury. Further histological evaluation showed that GABA-, glycine-, and synaptic vesicular transporter VIAAT-IR persisted but were substantially decreased in the injured spinal cord. In this study, partially differentiated GABA-IR embryonic neural precursor cells (NPCs) were transplanted into the spinal cord of QUIS rats to reverse overgrooming by replenishing lost inhibitory circuitry. Rat E14 NPCs were predifferentiated in 0.1 ng/ml FGF-2 for 4 h prior to transplantation. In vitro immunocytochemistry of transplant cohort showed large population of GABA-IR NPCs that double labeled with nestin but few colocalized with NeuN, indicating partial maturation. Two weeks following QUIS lesion at T12-L1, and following the onset of overgrooming, NPCs were transplanted into the QUIS lesion sites; bovine adrenal fibroblast cells were used as control. Overgrooming was reduced in >55.5% of NPC grafted animals, with inverse relationship between the number of surviving GABA-IR cells and the size of overgrooming. Fibroblast-control animals showed a progressive worsening of overgrooming. At 3 weeks post-transplantation, numerous GABA-, nestin-, and GFAP-IR cells were present in the lesion site. Surviving grafted GABA-IR NPCs were NeuN+ and GFAP−. These results indicate that partially differentiated NPCs survive and differentiate in vivo into neuronal cells following transplantation into an injured spinal cord. GABA-IR NPC transplants can restore lost dorsal horn inhibitory signaling and are useful in alleviating central pain following SCI. PMID:22754531

  11. Phosphorylation Regulates Id2 Degradation and Mediates the Proliferation of Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jaclyn M.; Havrda, Matthew C.; Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Paolella, Brenton R.; Zhang, Zhonghua; Gerber, Scott A.; Israel, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding proteins (Id1-Id4) function to inhibit differentiation and promote proliferation of many different cell types. Among the Id family members, Id2 has been most extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). Id2 contributes to cultured neural precursor cell (NPC) proliferation as well as to the proliferation of CNS tumors such as glioblastoma that are likely to arise from NPC-like cells. We identified three phosphorylation sites near the N-terminus of Id2 in NPCs. To interrogate the importance of Id2 phosphorylation, Id2−/− NPCs were modified to express wild type (WT) Id2 or an Id2 mutant protein that could not be phosphorylated at the identified sites. We observed that NPCs expressing this mutant lacking phosphorylation near the N-terminus had higher steady-state levels of Id2 when compared to NPCs expressing WT Id2. This elevated level was the result of a longer half-life and reduced proteasome-mediated degradation. Moreover, NPCs expressing constitutively de-phosphorylated Id2 proliferated more rapidly than NPCs expressing WT Id2, a finding consistent with the well-characterized function of Id2 in driving proliferation. Observing that phosphorylation of Id2 modulates the degradation of this important cell-cycle regulator, we sought to identify a phosphatase that would stabilize Id2 enhancing its activity in NPCs and extended our analysis to include human glioblastoma-derived stem cells (GSCs). We found that expression of the phosphatase PP2A altered Id2 levels. Our findings suggest that inhibition of PP2A may be a novel strategy to regulate the proliferation of normal NPCs and malignant GSCs by decreasing Id2 levels. PMID:26756672

  12. Intravenous Administration of Human ES-derived Neural Precursor Cells Attenuates Cuprizone-induced CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Stephen J.; Bajpai, Ruchi; Moore, Craig S.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Brown, Graham D.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential for human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hES-NPCs) in autoimmune and genetic animal models of demyelinating diseases. Herein, we tested whether intravenous (i.v) administration of hES-NPCs would impact central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in a cuprizone model of demyelination. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were fed cuprizone (0.2%) for two weeks and then separated into two groups that either received an i.v. injection of hES-NPCs or i.v. administration of media without these cells. After an additional two weeks of dietary cuprizone treatment, CNS tissues were analyzed for detection of transplanted cells and differences in myelination in the region of the corpus callosum (CC). Results Cuprizone-induced demyelination in the CC was significantly reduced in mice treated with hES-NPCs compared with cuprizone-treated controls that did not receive stem cells. hES-NPCs were identified within the brain tissues of treated mice and revealed migration of transplanted cells into the CNS. A limited number of human cells were found to express the mature oligodendrocyte marker, O1, or the astrocyte marker, GFAP. Reduced apoptosis and attenuated microglial and astrocytic responses were also observed in the CC of hES-NPC-treated mice. Conclusions These findings indicated that systemically-administered hES-NPCs migrated from circulation into a demyelinated lesion within the CNS and effectively reduced demyelination. Observed reductions in astrocyte and microglial responses, and (c) the benefit of hES-NPC treatment in this model of myelin injury was not obviously accountable to tissue replacement by exogenously administered cells. PMID:21276029

  13. Phosphorylation Regulates Id2 Degradation and Mediates the Proliferation of Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jaclyn M; Havrda, Matthew C; Kettenbach, Arminja N; Paolella, Brenton R; Zhang, Zhonghua; Gerber, Scott A; Israel, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding proteins (Id1-Id4) function to inhibit differentiation and promote proliferation of many different cell types. Among the Id family members, Id2 has been most extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). Id2 contributes to cultured neural precursor cell (NPC) proliferation as well as to the proliferation of CNS tumors such as glioblastoma that are likely to arise from NPC-like cells. We identified three phosphorylation sites near the N-terminus of Id2 in NPCs. To interrogate the importance of Id2 phosphorylation, Id2(-/-) NPCs were modified to express wild type (WT) Id2 or an Id2 mutant protein that could not be phosphorylated at the identified sites. We observed that NPCs expressing this mutant lacking phosphorylation near the N-terminus had higher steady-state levels of Id2 when compared to NPCs expressing WT Id2. This elevated level was the result of a longer half-life and reduced proteasome-mediated degradation. Moreover, NPCs expressing constitutively de-phosphorylated Id2 proliferated more rapidly than NPCs expressing WT Id2, a finding consistent with the well-characterized function of Id2 in driving proliferation. Observing that phosphorylation of Id2 modulates the degradation of this important cell-cycle regulator, we sought to identify a phosphatase that would stabilize Id2 enhancing its activity in NPCs and extended our analysis to include human glioblastoma-derived stem cells (GSCs). We found that expression of the phosphatase PP2A altered Id2 levels. Our findings suggest that inhibition of PP2A may be a novel strategy to regulate the proliferation of normal NPCs and malignant GSCs by decreasing Id2 levels. Stem Cells 2016;34:1321-1331. PMID:26756672

  14. Systems Genetics Analysis of a Recombinant Inbred Mouse Cell Culture Panel Reveals Wnt Pathway Member Lrp6 as a Regulator of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Suresh; Nicola, Zeina; Overall, Rupert W; Ichwan, Muhammad; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gerardo; N Grzyb, Anna; Patone, Giannino; Saar, Kathrin; Hübner, Norbert; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    In much animal research, genetic variation is rather avoided than used as a powerful tool to identify key regulatory genes in complex phenotypes. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is one such highly complex polygenic trait, for which the understanding of the molecular basis is fragmented and incomplete, and for which novel genetic approaches are needed. In this study, we aimed at marrying the power of the BXD panel, a mouse genetic reference population, with the flexibility of a cell culture model of adult neural precursor proliferation and differentiation. We established adult-derived hippocampal precursor cell cultures from 20 strains of the BXD panel, including the parental strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. The rates of cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation were measured, and transcriptional profiles were obtained from proliferating cultures. Together with the published genotypes of all lines, these data allowed a novel systems genetics analysis combining quantitative trait locus analysis with transcript expression correlation at a cellular level to identify genes linked with the differences in proliferation. In a proof-of-principle analysis, we identified Lrp6, the gene encoding the coreceptor to Frizzled in the Wnt pathway, as a potential negative regulator of precursor proliferation. Overexpression and siRNA silencing confirmed the regulatory role of Lrp6. As well as adding to our knowledge of the pathway surrounding Wnt in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, this finding allows the new appreciation of a negative regulator within this system. In addition, the resource and associated methodology will allow the integration of regulatory mechanisms at a systems level. Stem Cells 2016;34:674-684. PMID:26840599

  15. Metformin Acts on Two Different Molecular Pathways to Enhance Adult Neural Precursor Proliferation/Self-Renewal and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fatt, Michael; Hsu, Karolynn; He, Ling; Wondisford, Fredric; Miller, Freda D.; Kaplan, David R.; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recruitment of endogenous adult neural stem cells for brain repair is a promising regenerative therapeutic strategy. This strategy involves stimulation of multiple stages of adult neural stem cell development, including proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. Currently, there is a lack of a single therapeutic approach that can act on these multiple stages of adult neural stem cell development to enhance neural regeneration. Here we show that metformin, an FDA-approved diabetes drug, promotes proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation of adult neural precursors (NPCs). Specifically, we show that metformin enhances adult NPC proliferation and self-renewal dependent upon the p53 family member and transcription factor TAp73, while it promotes neuronal differentiation of these cells by activating the AMPK-aPKC-CBP pathway. Thus, metformin represents an optimal candidate neuro-regenerative agent that is capable of not only expanding the adult NPC population but also subsequently driving them toward neuronal differentiation by activating two distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26677765

  16. Expression of PROKR1 and PROKR2 in Human Enteric Neural Precursor Cells and Identification of Sequence Variants Suggest a Role in HSCR

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Torroglosa, Ana; Núñez-Torres, Rocío; de Agustín, Juan Carlos; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud

    2011-01-01

    Background The enteric nervous system (ENS) is entirely derived from neural crest and its normal development is regulated by specific molecular pathways. Failure in complete ENS formation results in aganglionic gut conditions such as Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR). Recently, PROKR1 expression has been demonstrated in mouse enteric neural crest derived cells and Prok-1 was shown to work coordinately with GDNF in the development of the ENS. Principal Findings In the present report, ENS progenitors were isolated and characterized from the ganglionic gut from children diagnosed with and without HSCR, and the expression of prokineticin receptors was examined. Immunocytochemical analysis of neurosphere-forming cells demonstrated that both PROKR1 and PROKR2 were present in human enteric neural crest cells. In addition, we also performed a mutational analysis of PROKR1, PROKR2, PROK1 and PROK2 genes in a cohort of HSCR patients, evaluating them for the first time as susceptibility genes for the disease. Several missense variants were detected, most of them affecting highly conserved amino acid residues of the protein and located in functional domains of both receptors, which suggests a possible deleterious effect in their biological function. Conclusions Our results suggest that not only PROKR1, but also PROKR2 might mediate a complementary signalling to the RET/GFRα1/GDNF pathway supporting proliferation/survival and differentiation of precursor cells during ENS development. These findings, together with the detection of sequence variants in PROKR1, PROK1 and PROKR2 genes associated to HSCR and, in some cases in combination with RET or GDNF mutations, provide the first evidence to consider them as susceptibility genes for HSCR. PMID:21858136

  17. Mouse as a model for multifactorial inheritance of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Zohn, Irene E

    2012-06-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) such as spina bifida and anencephaly are some of the most common structural birth defects found in humans. These defects occur due to failures of neurulation, a process where the flat neural plate rolls into a tube. In spite of their prevalence, the causes of NTDs are poorly understood. The multifactorial threshold model best describes the pattern of inheritance of NTDs where multiple undefined gene variants interact with environmental factors to cause an NTD. To date, mouse models have implicated a multitude of genes as required for neurulation, providing a mechanistic understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways that control neurulation. However, the majority of these mouse models exhibit NTDs with a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. Still, many examples of multifactorial inheritance have been demonstrated in mouse models of NTDs. These include null and hypomorphic alleles of neurulation genes that interact in a complex fashion with other genetic mutations or environmental factors to cause NTDs. These models have implicated several genes and pathways for testing as candidates for the genetic basis of NTDs in humans, resulting in identification of putative pathogenic mutations in some patients. Mouse models also provide an experimental paradigm to gain a mechanistic understanding of the environmental factors that influence NTD occurrence, such as folic acid and maternal diabetes, and have led to the discovery of additional preventative nutritional supplements such as inositol. This review provides examples of how multifactorial inheritance of NTDs can be modeled in the mouse. PMID:22692891

  18. Genetic dissection of GABAergic neural circuits in mouse neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Diverse and flexible cortical functions rely on the ability of neural circuits to perform multiple types of neuronal computations. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons significantly contribute to this task by regulating the balance of activity, synaptic integration, spiking, synchrony, and oscillation in a neural ensemble. GABAergic interneurons display a high degree of cellular diversity in morphology, physiology, connectivity, and gene expression. A considerable number of subtypes of GABAergic interneurons diversify modes of cortical inhibition, enabling various types of information processing in the cortex. Thus, comprehensively understanding fate specification, circuit assembly, and physiological function of GABAergic interneurons is a key to elucidate the principles of cortical wiring and function. Recent advances in genetically encoded molecular tools have made a breakthrough to systematically study cortical circuitry at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal levels. However, the biggest obstacle to fully applying the power of these to analysis of GABAergic circuits was that there were no efficient and reliable methods to express them in subtypes of GABAergic interneurons. Here, I first summarize cortical interneuron diversity and current understanding of mechanisms, by which distinct classes of GABAergic interneurons are generated. I then review recent development in genetically encoded molecular tools for neural circuit research, and genetic targeting of GABAergic interneuron subtypes, particularly focusing on our recent effort to develop and characterize Cre/CreER knockin lines. Finally, I highlight recent success in genetic targeting of chandelier cells, the most unique and distinct GABAergic interneuron subtype, and discuss what kind of questions need to be addressed to understand development and function of cortical inhibitory circuits. PMID:24478631

  19. Kinesin Light Chain 1 Suppression Impairs Human Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation and Amyloid Precursor Protein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Rhiannon L.; Flippin, Jessica D.; Herrera, Cheryl M.; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) is largely unknown, although evidence implicates the pathological hallmark molecules amyloid beta (Aβ) and phosphorylated Tau. Work in animal models suggests that altered axonal transport caused by Kinesin-1 dysfunction perturbs levels of both Aβ and phosphorylated Tau in neural tissues, but the relevance of Kinesin-1 dependent functions to the human disease is unknown. To begin to address this issue, we generated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) expressing reduced levels of the kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1) Kinesin-1 subunit to use as a source of human neural cultures. Despite reduction of KLC1, undifferentiated hESC exhibited apparently normal colony morphology and pluripotency marker expression. Differentiated neural cultures derived from KLC1-suppressed hESC contained neural rosettes but further differentiation revealed obvious morphological changes along with reduced levels of microtubule-associated neural proteins, including Tau and less secreted Aβ, supporting the previously established connection between KLC1, Tau and Aβ. Intriguingly, KLC1-suppressed neural precursors (NPs), isolated using a cell surface marker signature known to identify cells that give rise to neurons and glia, unlike control cells, failed to proliferate. We suggest that KLC1 is required for normal human neural differentiation, ensuring proper metabolism of AD-associated molecules APP and Tau and for proliferation of NPs. Because impaired APP metabolism is linked to AD, this human cell culture model system will not only be a useful tool for understanding the role of KLC1 in regulating the production, transport and turnover of APP and Tau in neurons, but also in defining the essential function(s) of KLC1 in NPs and their progeny. This knowledge should have important implications for human neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22272245

  20. Neurodifferentiating potential of 8-prenylnaringenin and related compounds in neural precursor cells and correlation with estrogen-like activity.

    PubMed

    Urmann, Corinna; Oberbauer, Eleni; Couillard-Després, Sébastien; Aigner, Ludwig; Riepl, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are an increasing burden for our ageing societies; there is an as yet unmet need for the development of effective therapies. Neurogenesis, i.e., the generation of new neurons in the adult brain from neural stem cells, has received increasing attention since it offers the potential for endogenous brain repair and functional regeneration. Adult neurogenesis is partially under the control of sex hormones such as estradiol, and boosting neurogenesis with estradiol in animals correlates with cognitive improvement. 8-Prenylnaringenin imitates as highly potent phytoestrogen the effects of estradiol. Here, we studied the potential of 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and related compounds on differentiation induction in vitro using neural precursor cells transiently transfected with a doublecortin promoter luciferase construct, which was recently shown to indicate neuronal fate and differentiation. The flavanones 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin showed slight activity in this assay but significant activity by immunostaining. Although the estrogen-like activities of 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin are very different, the activity in differentiation induction is similar. Interestingly, also some prenylflavonoids with extended prenyl groups, e.g., a geranyl group, showed increased differentiation activity, while estrogen-like activity is decreased. This allows the conclusion that estrogen-like activity of prenylflavanones does not correlate directly with the activity of differentiation induction in neural precursor cells. PMID:25714726

  1. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Salbaum, J. Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J.; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  2. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  3. Cellular basis of neuroepithelial bending during mouse spinal neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    McShane, Suzanne G.; Molè, Matteo A.; Savery, Dawn; Greene, Nicholas D. E; Tam, Patrick P.L.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bending of the neural plate at paired dorsolateral hinge points (DLHPs) is required for neural tube closure in the spinal region of the mouse embryo. As a step towards understanding the morphogenetic mechanism of DLHP development, we examined variations in neural plate cellular architecture and proliferation during closure. Neuroepithelial cells within the median hinge point (MHP) contain nuclei that are mainly basally located and undergo relatively slow proliferation, with a 7 h cell cycle length. In contrast, cells in the dorsolateral neuroepithelium, including the DLHP, exhibit nuclei distributed throughout the apico-basal axis and undergo rapid proliferation, with a 4 h cell cycle length. As the neural folds elevate, cell numbers increase to a greater extent in the dorsolateral neural plate that contacts the surface ectoderm, compared with the more ventromedial neural plate where cells contact paraxial mesoderm and notochord. This marked increase in dorsolateral cell number cannot be accounted for solely on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation in this region. We hypothesised that neuroepithelial cells may translocate in a ventral-to-dorsal direction as DLHP formation occurs, and this was confirmed by vital cell labelling in cultured embryos. The translocation of cells into the neural fold, together with its more rapid cell proliferation, leads to an increase in cell density dorsolaterally compared with the more ventromedial neural plate. These findings suggest a model in which DLHP formation may proceed through ‘buckling’ of the neuroepithelium at a dorso-ventral boundary marked by a change in cell-packing density. PMID:26079577

  4. Embryonic Nkx2.1-expressing neural precursor cells contribute to the regional heterogeneity of adult V-SVZ neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ryan N; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-11-15

    The adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral ventricle produces several subtypes of olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons throughout life. Neural stem cells (NSCs) within this zone are heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the lateral ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. The regional expression of specific transcription factors appears to correspond to such geographical differences in the developmental potential of V-SVZ NSCs. However, the transcriptional definition and developmental origin of V-SVZ NSC regional identity are not well understood. In this study, we found that a population of NSCs in the ventral region of the V-SVZ expresses the transcription factor Nkx2.1 and is derived from Nkx2.1-expressing (Nkx2.1+) embryonic precursors. To follow the fate of Nkx2.1+ cells and their progeny in vivo, we used mice with an Nkx2.1-CreER "knock-in" allele. Nkx2.1+ V-SVZ NSCs labeled in adult mice generated interneurons for the deep granule cell layer of the OB. Embryonic brain Nkx2.1+ precursors labeled at embryonic day 12.5 gave rise to Nkx2.1+ NSCs of the ventral V-SVZ in postnatal and adult mice. Thus, embryonic Nkx2.1+ neural precursors give rise to a population of Nkx2.1+ NSCs in the ventral V-SVZ where they contribute to the regional heterogeneity of V-SVZ NSCs. PMID:26387477

  5. Sonic Hedgehog Controls the Phenotypic Fate and Therapeutic Efficacy of Grafted Neural Precursor Cells in a Model of Nigrostriatal Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of soluble growth and survival promoting factors by neural precursor cells (NPCs) is suggested to be a prominent mechanism underlying the protective and regenerative effects of these cells after transplantation. Nevertheless, how and to what extent specific NPC-expressed factors contribute to therapeutic effects is not well understood. Using RNA silencing, the current study investigated the roles of two donor NPC molecules, namely glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and sonic hedgehog (SHH), in the protection of substantia nigra dopamine neurons in rats treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Analyses indicate that as opposed to the knock-down of GDNF, SHH inhibition caused a profound decline in nigrostriatal neuroprotection. Further, SHH silencing also curbed endogenous neurogenesis and the migration of host brdU+/dcx+ neural precursors into the striatum, which was present in the animals receiving control or GDNF silenced NPCs. A change in graft phenotype, mainly reflected by a reduced proportion of undifferentiated nestin+ cells, as well as a significantly greater host microglial activity, suggested an important role for these processes in the attenuation of neuroprotection and neurogenesis upon SHH silencing. Overall these studies reveal core mechanisms fundamental to grafted NPC-based therapeutic effects, and delineate the particular contributions of two graft-expressed molecules, SHH and GDNF, in mediating midbrain dopamine neuron protection, and host plasticity after NPC transplantation. PMID:26340267

  6. Physical exercise counteracts MPTP-induced changes in neural precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus and restores spatial learning but not memory performance in the water maze.

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Rasińska, J; Empl, L; Sparenberg, M; Poshtiban, A; Hain, E G; Iggena, D; Rivalan, M; Winter, Y; Steiner, B

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a continuous loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which not only leads to characteristic motor symptoms but also to cognitive impairments. Physical exercise has been shown to improve hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions in PD patients. Animal studies have demonstrated the involvement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in exercise-induced improvements of visuo-spatial learning and memory. Here, we investigated the direct impact of voluntary wheel running on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) using the1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. We also analyzed striatal and hippocampal dopamine transmission and mRNA expression levels of dopamine receptors. We show that MPTP-induced spatial learning deficits were alleviated by short-term physical exercise but not MPTP-induced spatial memory impairments in either exercise intervention group. Neural precursor proliferation was transiently altered in MPTP-treated mice, while the cell survival was increased by exercise. Dopamine was progressively depleted by MPTP and its turnover altered by exercise. In addition, gene expression of dopamine receptor D1/D5 was transiently upregulated following MPTP treatment but not affected by physical exercise. Our findings suggest that physical exercise benefits spatial learning but not memory performance in the MWM after MPTP-induced dopamine depletion by restoring precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus and influencing dopamine transmission. This adds to the understanding of cognitive decline and mechanisms for potential improvements by physical exercise in PD patients. PMID:27012392

  7. Activating Endogenous Neural Precursor Cells Using Metformin Leads to Neural Repair and Functional Recovery in a Model of Childhood Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dadwal, Parvati; Mahmud, Neemat; Sinai, Laleh; Azimi, Ashkan; Fatt, Michael; Wondisford, Fredric E.; Miller, Freda D.; Morshead, Cindi M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The development of cell replacement strategies to repair the injured brain has gained considerable attention, with a particular interest in mobilizing endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (known as neural precursor cells [NPCs]) to promote brain repair. Recent work demonstrated metformin, a drug used to manage type II diabetes, promotes neurogenesis. We sought to determine its role in neural repair following brain injury. We find that metformin administration activates endogenous NPCs, expanding the size of the NPC pool and promoting NPC migration and differentiation in the injured neonatal brain in a hypoxia-ischemia (H/I) injury model. Importantly, metformin treatment following H/I restores sensory-motor function. Lineage tracking reveals that metformin treatment following H/I causes an increase in the absolute number of subependyma-derived NPCs relative to untreated H/I controls in areas associated with sensory-motor function. Hence, activation of endogenous NPCs is a promising target for therapeutic intervention in childhood brain injury models. PMID:26235894

  8. Activating Endogenous Neural Precursor Cells Using Metformin Leads to Neural Repair and Functional Recovery in a Model of Childhood Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Dadwal, Parvati; Mahmud, Neemat; Sinai, Laleh; Azimi, Ashkan; Fatt, Michael; Wondisford, Fredric E; Miller, Freda D; Morshead, Cindi M

    2015-08-11

    The development of cell replacement strategies to repair the injured brain has gained considerable attention, with a particular interest in mobilizing endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (known as neural precursor cells [NPCs]) to promote brain repair. Recent work demonstrated metformin, a drug used to manage type II diabetes, promotes neurogenesis. We sought to determine its role in neural repair following brain injury. We find that metformin administration activates endogenous NPCs, expanding the size of the NPC pool and promoting NPC migration and differentiation in the injured neonatal brain in a hypoxia-ischemia (H/I) injury model. Importantly, metformin treatment following H/I restores sensory-motor function. Lineage tracking reveals that metformin treatment following H/I causes an increase in the absolute number of subependyma-derived NPCs relative to untreated H/I controls in areas associated with sensory-motor function. Hence, activation of endogenous NPCs is a promising target for therapeutic intervention in childhood brain injury models. PMID:26235894

  9. The protocol for the isolation and cryopreservation of osteoclast precursors from mouse bone marrow and spleen.

    PubMed

    Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for physiological bone remodeling as well as pathological bone destruction in osteoporosis, periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis, and thus represent a pharmacological target for drug development. We aimed to characterize and compare the cytokine-induced osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow and spleen precursors. Established protocols used to generate osteoclasts from bone marrow were modified to examine osteoclastogenesis of the spleen cells of healthy mice. Osteoclast formation was successfully induced from spleen precursors using receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (50 ng/ml) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (50 ng/ml). Compared to bone marrow cultures, differentiation from spleen required a longer cultivation time (9 days for spleen, as compared to 5 days for marrow cultures) and a higher plating density of non-adherent cells (75,000/cm(2) for spleen, as compared to 50,000/cm(2) for bone marrow). Osteoclasts generated from spleen precursors expressed osteoclast marker genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9 and were capable of resorbing hydroxyapatite. The differentiation capacity of spleen and bone marrow precursors was comparable for BALB/c, C57BL/6 and FVB mice. We also developed and tested a cryopreservation protocol for the osteoclast precursors. While 70-80 % of cells were lost during the first week of freezing, during the subsequent 5 weeks the losses were within 2-5 % per week. Osteoclastogenesis from the recovered bone marrow precursors was successful up to 5 weeks after freezing. Spleen precursors retained their osteoclastogenic capacity for 1 week after freezing, but not thereafter. The described protocol is useful for the studies of genetically modified animals as well as for screening new osteoclast-targeting therapeutics. PMID:25245056

  10. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  11. Wnt signaling regulates smooth muscle precursor development in the mouse lung via a tenascin C/PDGFR pathway.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ethan David; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A; Jones, Peter Lloyd; Morrisey, Edward E

    2009-09-01

    Paracrine signaling from lung epithelium to the surrounding mesenchyme is important for lung SMC development and function and is a contributing factor in an array of pulmonary diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and asthma. Wnt7b, which is exclusively expressed in the lung epithelium, is important for lung vascular smooth muscle integrity, but the underlying mechanism by which Wnt signaling regulates lung SMC development is unclear. In this report, we have demonstrated that Wnt7b regulates a program of mesenchymal differentiation in the mouse lung that is essential for SMC development. Genetic loss-of-function studies showed that Wnt7b and beta-catenin were required for expression of Pdgfralpha and Pdgfrbeta and proliferation in pulmonary SMC precursors. In contrast, gain-of-function studies showed that activation of Wnt signaling increased the expression of both Pdgfralpha and Pdgfrbeta as well as the proliferation of SMC precursors. We further showed that the effect on Pdgfr expression was, in part, mediated by direct transcriptional regulation of the ECM protein tenascin C (Tnc), which was necessary and sufficient for Pdgfralpha/beta expression in lung explants. Moreover, this pathway was highly upregulated in a mouse model of asthma and in lung tissue from patients with pulmonary hypertension. Together, these data define a Wnt/Tnc/Pdgfr signaling axis that is critical for smooth muscle development and disease progression in the lung. PMID:19690384

  12. Different Mechanisms Must Be Considered to Explain the Increase in Hippocampal Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation by Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Walker, Tara L.; Fischer, Tim J.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The number of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus is strongly increased by physical activity. The mechanisms through which this behavioral stimulus induces cell proliferation, however, are not yet understood. In fact, even the mode of proliferation of the stem and progenitor cells is not exactly known. Evidence exists for several mechanisms including cell cycle shortening, reduced cell death and stem cell recruitment, but as yet no model can account for all observations. An appreciation of how the cells proliferate, however, is crucial to our ability to model the neurogenic process and predict its behavior in response to pro-neurogenic stimuli. In a recent study, we addressed modulation of the cell cycle length as one possible mode of regulation of precursor cell proliferation in running mice. Our results indicated that the observed increase in number of proliferating cells could not be explained through a shortening of the cell cycle. We must therefore consider other mechanisms by which physical activity leads to enhanced precursor cell proliferation. Here we review the evidence for and against several different hypotheses and discuss the implications for future research in the field. PMID:27536215

  13. Differential Effects of Isoxazole-9 on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells, Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Osumi, Noriko; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hong; Holder, Julie C.; Chuang, Tsu Tshen; McNeish, John D.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brain can be plastic after injury and disease. Therefore, boosting endogenous repair mechanisms would be a useful therapeutic approach for neurological disorders. Isoxazole-9 (Isx-9) has been reported to enhance neurogenesis from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). However, the effects of Isx-9 on other types of progenitor/precursor cells remain mostly unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of Isx-9 on the three major populations of progenitor/precursor cells in brain: NSPCs, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Cultured primary NSPCs, OPCs, or EPCs were treated with various concentrations of Isx-9 (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 μM), and their cell numbers were counted in a blinded manner. Isx-9 slightly increased the number of NSPCs and effectively induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. However, Isx-9 significantly decreased OPC number in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting cytotoxicity. Isx-9 did not affect EPC cell number. But in a matrigel assay of angiogenesis, Isx-9 significantly inhibited tube formation in outgrowth endothelial cells derived from EPCs. This potential anti-tube-formation effect of Isx-9 was confirmed in a brain endothelial cell line. Taken together, our data suggest that mechanisms and targets for promoting stem/progenitor cells in the central nervous system may significantly differ between cell types. PMID:26407349

  14. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. PMID:25582749

  15. Differential transgene expression patterns in Alzheimer mouse models revealed by novel human amyloid precursor protein-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Corinna; Morawski, Markus; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Zanier, Elisa R; Moschke, Katrin; Serdaroglu, Alperen; Canneva, Fabio; von Hörsten, Stephan; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Forloni, Gianluigi; Jäger, Carsten; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Roßner, Steffen; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is histopathologically characterized by neurodegeneration, the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular Aβ deposits that derive from proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). As rodents do not normally develop Aβ pathology, various transgenic animal models of AD were designed to overexpress human APP with mutations favouring its amyloidogenic processing. However, these mouse models display tremendous differences in the spatial and temporal appearance of Aβ deposits, synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and the manifestation of learning deficits which may be caused by age-related and brain region-specific differences in APP transgene levels. Consequentially, a comparative temporal and regional analysis of the pathological effects of Aβ in mouse brains is difficult complicating the validation of therapeutic AD treatment strategies in different mouse models. To date, no antibodies are available that properly discriminate endogenous rodent and transgenic human APP in brains of APP-transgenic animals. Here, we developed and characterized rat monoclonal antibodies by immunohistochemistry and Western blot that detect human but not murine APP in brains of three APP-transgenic mouse and one APP-transgenic rat model. We observed remarkable differences in expression levels and brain region-specific expression of human APP among the investigated transgenic mouse lines. This may explain the differences between APP-transgenic models mentioned above. Furthermore, we provide compelling evidence that our new antibodies specifically detect endogenous human APP in immunocytochemistry, FACS and immunoprecipitation. Hence, we propose these antibodies as standard tool for monitoring expression of endogenous or transfected APP in human cells and APP expression in transgenic animals. PMID:27470171

  16. Mouse vision as a gateway for understanding how experience shapes neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Nicholas J.; McGee, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic programs controlling ontogeny drive many of the essential connectivity patterns within the brain. Yet it is activity, derived from the experience of interacting with the world, that sculpts the precise circuitry of the central nervous system. Such experience-dependent plasticity has been observed throughout the brain but has been most extensively studied in the neocortex. A prime example of this refinement of neural circuitry is found in primary visual cortex (V1), where functional connectivity changes have been observed both during development and in adulthood. The mouse visual system has become a predominant model for investigating the principles that underlie experience-dependent plasticity, given the general conservation of visual neural circuitry across mammals as well as the powerful tools and techniques recently developed for use in rodent. The genetic tractability of mice has permitted the identification of signaling pathways that translate experience-driven activity patterns into changes in circuitry. Further, the accessibility of visual cortex has allowed neural activity to be manipulated with optogenetics and observed with genetically-encoded calcium sensors. Consequently, mouse visual cortex has become one of the dominant platforms to study experience-dependent plasticity. PMID:25324730

  17. Transplantation of subventricular zone neural precursors induces an endogenous precursor cell response in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Paumier, Katrina L; Collier, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Realistically, future stem cell therapies for neurological conditions including Parkinson’s disease (PD) will most probably entail combination treatment strategies, involving both the stimulation of endogenous cells and transplantation. Therefore, this study investigates these two modes of neural precursor cell (NPC) therapy in concert in order to determine their interrelationships in a rat PD model. Human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPAP) labeled NPCs were transplanted unilaterally into host rats which were subsequently infused ipsilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The reaction of host NPCs to the transplantation and 6-OHDA was tracked by bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Two weeks after transplantation, in animals transplanted with NPCs, we found evidence of elevated host subventricular zone NPC proliferation, neurogenesis, and migration to the graft site. In these animals, we also observed a significant preservation of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and substantia nigra TH cell number. We have seen no evidence that neuroprotection is a product of DA neuron replacement by NPC-derived cells. Rather, the NPCs expressed glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), sonic hedgehog (Shh) and stromal cell derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α) providing a molecular basis for the observed neuroprotection and endogenous NPC response to transplantation. In summary, our data suggests plausible synergy between exogenous and endogenous NPC actions, and that NPC implantation before the 6-OHDA insult can create a host microenvironment conducive to stimulation of endogenous NPCs, and protection of mature nigral neurons. PMID:19399899

  18. Effects of growth hormone on the differentiation of mouse B-lymphoid precursors.

    PubMed

    Sumita, Kiminobu; Hattori, Naoki; Inagaki, Chiyoko

    2005-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been known to enhance immune responses directly or through insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). The present study aimed to clarify the roles of GH in the differentiation of B-lineage precursors. In short-term bone marrow cultures, which contained stem cells and early B-lineage cells, GH (10 mug/L) treatment for one day decreased the percentages of stem cells (0.5-fold) and increased those of B-lineage cells (1.4-fold). Furthermore, GH changed the expressions of transcription factors for B cell progenitors differentiation such as paired box gene-5 (Pax-5), immunoglobulin-associated-alpha (Ig-alpha)/CD79a, Ig-beta/CD79b, and IGF-I. Thus, a physiological concentration of GH stimulated the differentiation of B-lymphoid precursors from bone marrow stem cells. Since mRNAs of both GH and GH receptor were present in stem cells and B-cell precursors in bone marrow, GH may modulate B-lymphoid precursors development in an autocrine or paracrine manner in bone marrows. PMID:15750284

  19. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTRINSIC CARDIAC NEURAL PLEXUS IN WHOLE-MOUNT MOUSE HEART PREPARATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rysevaite, Kristina; Saburkina, Inga; Pauziene, Neringa; Vaitkevicius, Raimundas; Noujaim, Sami F.; Jalife, José; Pauza, Dainius H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND The intrinsic neural plexus of the mouse heart has not been adequately investigated despite the extensive use of this species in experimental cardiology. OBJECTIVE We determined the distribution of cholinergic, adrenergic and sensory neural components in whole-mount mouse heart preparations using double immunohistochemical labeling. METHODS AND RESULTS Intrinsic neurons were concentrated within 19±3 ganglia (n = 20 mice) of varying size, scattered on the medial side of the inferior caval (caudal) vein on the right atrium and close to the pulmonary veins on the left atrium. Of a total of 1082±160 neurons, most somata (83%) were choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive, while 4% were tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive; 14% of ganglionic cells were biphenotypic for ChAT and TH. The most intense ChAT staining was observed in axonal varicosities. ChAT was evident in nerve fibers interconnecting intrinsic ganglia. Both ChAT and TH immunoreactivity were abundant within the nerves accessing the heart. However, epicardial TH-immunoreactive nerve fibers were predominant on the dorsal and ventral left atrium, whereas most ChAT-positive axons proceeded on the heart base toward the large intrinsic ganglia and on the epicardium of the root of the right cranial vein. Substance P-positive and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive nerve fibers were abundant on the epicardium and within ganglia adjacent to the heart hilum. Small intensely fluorescent cells were grouped into clusters of 3–8 and dispersed within large ganglia or separately on the atrial and ventricular walls. CONCLUSIONS While some nerves and neuronal bundles of the mouse epicardial plexus are mixed, most express either adrenergic or cholinergic markers. Therefore, selective stimulation and/or ablation of the functionally distinct intrinsic neural pathways should allow the study of specific effects on cardiac function. PMID:21232628

  20. Fgf8-Related Secondary Organizers Exert Different Polarizing Planar Instructions along the Mouse Anterior Neural Tube

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Partanen, Juha; Martinez, Salvador; Echevarria, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Early brain patterning depends on proper arrangement of positional information. This information is given by gradients of secreted signaling molecules (morphogens) detected by individual cells within the responding tissue, leading to specific fate decisions. Here we report that the morphogen FGF8 exerts initially a differential signal activity along the E9.5 mouse neural tube. We demonstrate that this polarizing activity codes by RAS-regulated ERK1/2 signaling and depends on the topographical location of the secondary organizers: the isthmic organizer (IsO) and the anterior neural ridge (anr) but not on zona limitans intrathalamica (zli). Our results suggest that Sprouty2, a negative modulator of RAS/ERK pathway, is important for regulating Fgf8 morphogenetic signal activity by controlling Fgf8-induced signaling pathways and positional information during early brain development. PMID:22792203

  1. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  2. Long-term, stable differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors grafted into the adult mammalian neostriatum.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Xu, Leyan; Hatfield, Glen; Cummings, Brian J; Eberhart, Charles; Ryugo, David K; Maric, Dragan; Bar, Eli; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell grafts have been advocated as experimental treatments for neurological diseases by virtue of their ability to offer trophic support for injured neurons and, theoretically, to replace dead neurons. Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) are a rich source of neural precursors (NPs) for grafting, but have been questioned for their tendency to form tumors. Here we studied the ability of HESC-derived NP grafts optimized for cell number and differentiation stage prior to transplantation, to survive and stably differentiate and integrate in the basal forebrain (neostriatum) of young adult nude rats over long periods of time (6 months). NPs were derived from adherent monolayer cultures of HESCs exposed to noggin. After transplantation, NPs showed a drastic reduction in mitotic activity and an avid differentiation into neurons that projected via major white matter tracts to a variety of forebrain targets. A third of NP-derived neurons expressed the basal forebrain-neostriatal marker dopamine-regulated and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein. Graft-derived neurons formed mature synapses with host postsynaptic structures, including dendrite shafts and spines. NPs inoculated in white matter tracts showed a tendency toward glial (primarily astrocytic) differentiation, whereas NPs inoculated in the ventricular epithelium persisted as nestin(+) precursors. Our findings demonstrate the long-term ability of noggin-derived human NPs to structurally integrate tumor-free into the mature mammalian forebrain, while maintaining some cell fate plasticity that is strongly influenced by particular central nervous system (CNS) niches. PMID:19609935

  3. Long-Term, Stable Differentiation Of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors Grafted Into The Adult Mammalian Neostriatum

    PubMed Central

    Nasonkin, I.; Mahairaki, V.; Xu, L.; Hatfield, G.; Cummings, B.J.; Eberhart, C.; Ryugo, D.; Maric, D.; Bar, E.; Koliatsos, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    Stem-cell grafts have been advocated as experimental treatments for neurological diseases by virtue of their ability to offer trophic support for injured neurons and, theoretically, to replace dead neurons. Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) are a rich source of neural precursors (NPs) for grafting, but have been questioned for their tendency to form tumors. Here we studied the ability of HESC-derived NP grafts optimized for cell number and differentiation stage prior to transplantation, to survive and stably differentiate and integrate in the basal forebrain (neostriatum) of young adult nude rats over long periods of time (6 months). NPs were derived from adherent monolayer cultures of HESCs exposed to noggin. After transplantation, NPs showed a drastic reduction in mitotic activity and an avid differentiation into neurons that projected via major white matter tracts to a variety of forebrain targets. A third of NP-derived neurons expressed the basal forebrain-neostriatal marker Dopamine- and cyclic AMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein. Graft-derived neurons formed mature synapses with host post-synaptic structures, including dendrite shafts and spines. NPs inoculated in white matter tracts showed a tendency towards glial (primarily astrocytic) differentiation, whereas NPs inoculated in the ventricular epithelium persisted as nestin (+) precursors. Our findings demonstrate the long-term ability of noggin-derived human NPs to structurally integrate tumor-free into the mature mammalian forebrain, while maintaining some cell fate plasticity that is strongly influenced by particular CNS niches. PMID:19609935

  4. METHYLMERCURY INDUCED TOXICOGENOMIC RESPONSE IN C57 AND SWV MOUSE EMBRYOS UNDERGOING NEURAL TUBE CLOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Griffith, William C.; Yu, Xiaozhong; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Euvin; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant and teratogen and is hypothesized to perturb a wide range of biological processes, like other metals including arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd). Common inbred mouse strains including C57 (sensitive) and SWV (resistant) display differences in sensitivity to metals such as As and Cd when exposed during neurulation. In this study, we investigated the impact of MeHg on neurulation, assessing for potential differences in sensitivity and associated toxicogenomic response in C57 and SWV mouse embryos. Parallel with morphological assessments of neural tube closure, we evaluated quantitative differences in MeHg-induced alterations in expression between strains at the gene level and within gene-enriched biological processes. Specifically, we observed differing sensitivities to MeHg-induced impacts on neural tube closure between C57 and SWV embryos in a time-dependent manner. These observations correlated with greater impact on the expression of genes associated with development and environmental stress-related pathways in the C57 compared to the SWV. Additional developmental parameters (e.g. mortality, growth effects) evaluated showed mixed significant effects across the two strains and did not support observations of differential sensitivity to MeHg. This study provides potential insights into MeHg-induced mechanisms of developmental toxicity, alterations associated with increased MeHg sensitivity and common biological processes affected by metals in embryos undergoing neurulation. PMID:20493249

  5. Stabilized β-Catenin Functions through TCF/LEF Proteins and the Notch/RBP-Jκ Complex To Promote Proliferation and Suppress Differentiation of Neural Precursor Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Kagawa, Tetsushi; Inoue, Toshihiro; Nonaka, Aya; Takada, Shinji; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Taga, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor cells are mutually exclusive during brain development. Despite its importance for precursor cell self renewal, the molecular linkage between these two events has remained unclear. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) promotes neural precursor cell proliferation and concurrently inhibits their differentiation, suggesting a cross talk between proliferation and differentiation signaling pathways downstream of the FGF receptor. We demonstrate that FGF2 signaling through phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase activation inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and leads to the accumulation of β-catenin in a manner different from that in the Wnt canonical pathway. The nuclear accumulated β-catenin leads to cell proliferation by activating LEF/TCF transcription factors and concurrently inhibits neuronal differentiation by potentiating the Notch1-RBP-Jκ signaling pathway. β-Catenin and the Notch1 intracellular domain form a molecular complex with the promoter region of the antineurogenic hes1 gene, allowing its expression. This signaling interplay is especially essential for neural stem cell maintenance, since the misexpression of dominant-active GSK3β completely inhibits the self renewal of neurosphere-forming stem cells and prompts their neuronal differentiation. Thus, the GSK3β/β-catenin signaling axis regulated by FGF and Wnt signals plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neural stem/precursor cells by linking the cell proliferation to the inhibition of differentiation. PMID:18852283

  6. Depression by relaxin of neurally induced contractile responses in the mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Maria Caterina; Nistri, Silvia; Quattrone, Silvia; Bigazzi, Mario; Bani Sacchi, Tatiana; Calamai, Franco; Bani, Daniele

    2004-01-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin, which attains high circulating levels during pregnancy, has been shown to depress small-bowel motility through a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated mechanism. In the present study we investigated whether relaxin also influences gastric contractile responses in mice. Female mice in proestrus or estrus were treated for 18 h with relaxin (1 microg s.c.) or vehicle (controls). Mechanical responses of gastric fundal strips were recorded via force-displacement transducers. Evaluation of the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms was performed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In control mice, neurally induced contractile responses elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were reduced in amplitude by addition of relaxin to the organ bath medium. In the presence of the NO synthesis inhibitor l-NNA, relaxin was ineffective. Direct smooth muscle contractile responses were not influenced by relaxin or l-NNA. In strips from relaxin-pretreated mice, the amplitude of neurally induced contractile responses was also reduced in respect to the controls, while that of direct smooth muscle contractions was not. Further addition of relaxin to the bath medium did not influence EFS-induced responses, whereas l-NNA did. An increased expression of NOS I and NOS III was observed in gastric tissues from relaxin-pretreated mice. In conclusion, the peptide hormone relaxin depresses cholinergic contractile responses in the mouse gastric fundus by up-regulating NO biosynthesis at the neural level. PMID:14522837

  7. Progranulin promotes the retinal precursor cell proliferation and the photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Sugitani, Sou; Izawa, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yuta; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted growth factor associated with embryo development, tissue repair, and inflammation. In a previous study, we showed that adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) is rich in PGRN. In the present study, we investigated whether PGRN is associated with retinal regeneration in the mammalian retina. We evaluated the effect of ASC-CM using the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced retinal damage model in mice. ASC-CM promoted the differentiation of photoreceptor cells following retinal damage. PGRN increased the number of BrdU+ cells in the outer nuclear layer following retinal damage some of which were Rx (retinal precursor cell marker) positive. PGRN also increased the number of rhodopsin+ photoreceptor cells in primary retinal cell cultures. SU11274, a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor inhibitor, attenuated the increase. These findings suggest that PGRN may affect the differentiation of retinal precursor cells to photoreceptor cells through the HGF receptor signaling pathway. PMID:27030285

  8. The effect of interferon-{beta} on mouse neural progenitor cell survival and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Marek; Knight, Julia; Tobita, Mari; Soltys, John; Panitch, Hillel; Mao-Draayer, Yang

    2009-10-16

    Interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) is a mainstay therapy for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the direct effects of IFN-{beta} on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood. To determine whether IFN-{beta} has direct neuroprotective effects on CNS cells, we treated adult mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro with IFN-{beta} and examined the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. We found that mouse NPCs express high levels of IFN{alpha}/{beta} receptor (IFNAR). In response to IFN-{beta} treatment, no effect was observed on differentiation or proliferation. However, IFN-{beta} treated mouse NPCs demonstrated decreased apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays demonstrated that IFN-{beta} treatment upregulated the STAT 1 and 2 signaling pathway, as well as GFRA2, NOD1, Caspases 1 and 12, and TNFSF10. These results suggest that IFN-{beta} can directly affect NPC survival, possibly playing a neuroprotective role in the CNS by modulating neurotrophic factors.

  9. A post-transcriptional mechanism pacing expression of neural genes with precursor cell differentiation status

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Weijun; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Li, Zhuyun; Tian, Bin; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    Nervous system (NS) development relies on coherent upregulation of extensive sets of genes in a precise spatiotemporal manner. How such transcriptome-wide effects are orchestrated at the molecular level remains an open question. Here we show that 3′-untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) of multiple neural transcripts contain AU-rich cis-elements (AREs) recognized by tristetraprolin (TTP/Zfp36), an RNA-binding protein previously implicated in regulation of mRNA stability. We further demonstrate that the efficiency of ARE-dependent mRNA degradation declines in the neural lineage because of a decrease in the TTP protein expression mediated by the NS-enriched microRNA miR-9. Importantly, TTP downregulation in this context is essential for proper neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, inactivation of TTP in non-neuronal cells leads to dramatic upregulation of multiple NS-specific genes. We conclude that the newly identified miR-9/TTP circuitry limits unscheduled accumulation of neuronal mRNAs in non-neuronal cells and ensures coordinated upregulation of these transcripts in neurons. PMID:26144867

  10. Remyelination Is Correlated with Regulatory T Cell Induction Following Human Embryoid Body-Derived Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plaisted, Warren C; Zavala, Angel; Hingco, Edna; Tran, Ha; Coleman, Ronald; Lane, Thomas E; Loring, Jeanne F; Walsh, Craig M

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described sustained clinical recovery associated with dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination following transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a viral model of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. The hNPCs used in that study were derived by a novel direct differentiation method (direct differentiation, DD-NPCs) that resulted in a unique gene expression pattern when compared to hNPCs derived by conventional methods. Since the therapeutic potential of human NPCs may differ greatly depending on the method of derivation and culture, we wanted to determine whether NPCs differentiated using conventional methods would be similarly effective in improving clinical outcome under neuroinflammatory demyelinating conditions. For the current study, we utilized hNPCs differentiated from a human induced pluripotent cell line via an embryoid body intermediate stage (EB-NPCs). Intraspinal transplantation of EB-NPCs into mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) resulted in decreased accumulation of CD4+ T cells in the central nervous system that was concomitant with reduced demyelination at the site of injection. Dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination was correlated with a transient increase in CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) concentrated within the peripheral lymphatics. However, compared to our earlier study, pathological improvements were modest and did not result in significant clinical recovery. We conclude that the genetic signature of NPCs is critical to their effectiveness in this model of viral-induced neurologic disease. These comparisons will be useful for understanding what factors are critical for the sustained clinical improvement. PMID:27310015

  11. Remyelination Is Correlated with Regulatory T Cell Induction Following Human Embryoid Body-Derived Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Plaisted, Warren C.; Zavala, Angel; Hingco, Edna; Tran, Ha; Coleman, Ronald; Lane, Thomas E.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Walsh, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described sustained clinical recovery associated with dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination following transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a viral model of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. The hNPCs used in that study were derived by a novel direct differentiation method (direct differentiation, DD-NPCs) that resulted in a unique gene expression pattern when compared to hNPCs derived by conventional methods. Since the therapeutic potential of human NPCs may differ greatly depending on the method of derivation and culture, we wanted to determine whether NPCs differentiated using conventional methods would be similarly effective in improving clinical outcome under neuroinflammatory demyelinating conditions. For the current study, we utilized hNPCs differentiated from a human induced pluripotent cell line via an embryoid body intermediate stage (EB-NPCs). Intraspinal transplantation of EB-NPCs into mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) resulted in decreased accumulation of CD4+ T cells in the central nervous system that was concomitant with reduced demyelination at the site of injection. Dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination was correlated with a transient increase in CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) concentrated within the peripheral lymphatics. However, compared to our earlier study, pathological improvements were modest and did not result in significant clinical recovery. We conclude that the genetic signature of NPCs is critical to their effectiveness in this model of viral-induced neurologic disease. These comparisons will be useful for understanding what factors are critical for the sustained clinical improvement. PMID:27310015

  12. Adult neural precursor cells form connexin-dependent networks that improve their survival.

    PubMed

    Ravella, Ajaya; Ringstedt, Thomas; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Pandolfo, Massimo; Herlenius, Eric

    2015-10-21

    Establishment of cellular networks and calcium homeostasis are essential for embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We also hypothesized that adult neural progenitor cells form functional cellular networks relevant for their development. We isolated neuronal progenitor cells from the subventricular zone of 5-week-old mice to investigate the role of gap junctions, calcium homeostasis, and cellular networks in cell differentiation and survival. Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR showed that the cells expressed the gap junction components connexin 26, 36, 43, and 45, and that expression of connexin 43 increased in early (8 days) differentiated cells. Transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry also indicated that gap junctions were present. Scrape-loading experiments showed dye transfer between cells that could be prevented by gapjunction blockers; thus, functional intercellular gap junctions had been established. However, dye transfer was four times stronger in differentiated cultures, correlating with the increased connexin 43 expression. During time-lapse calcium imaging, both differentiated and undifferentiated cultures showed spontaneous calcium activity that was reduced by gap junction blockers. Cross-correlation analysis of the calcium recordings showed that the cells were interconnected through gap junctions and that the early-differentiated cells were organized in small-world networks. Gap junction blockers did not affect proliferation and differentiation, but resulted in twice as many apoptotic cells. mRNAi knockdown of connexin 43 also doubled the number of apoptotic cells. We conclude that adult neural progenitor cells form networks in vitro that are strengthened during early differentiation by increased expression of connexin 43. The networks are functional and improve cell survival. PMID:26351758

  13. PSA-NCAM(+) neural precursor cells from human embryonic stem cells promote neural tissue integrity and behavioral performance in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Soo; Choi, Seong-Mi; Yang, Wonsuk; Kim, Dae-Sung; Lee, Dongjin R; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2014-12-01

    Recently, cell-based therapy has been highlighted as an alternative to treating ischemic brain damage in stroke patients. The present study addresses the therapeutic potential of polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive neural precursor cells (NPC(PSA-NCAM+)) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a rat stroke model with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Data showed that rats transplanted with NPC(PSA-NCAM+) are superior to those treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in behavioral performance throughout time points. In order to investigate its underlying events, immunohistochemical analysis was performed on rat ischemic brains treated with PBS, MSCs, and NPC(PSA-NCAM+). Unlike MSCs, NPC(PSA-NCAM+) demonstrated a potent immunoreactivity against human specific nuclei, doublecortin, and Tuj1 at day 26 post-transplantation, implying their survival, differentiation, and integration in the host brain. Significantly, NPC(PSA-NCAM+) evidently lowered the positivity of microglial ED-1 and astrocytic GFAP, suggesting a suppression of adverse glial activation in the host brain. In addition, NPC(PSA-NCAM+) elevated α-SMA(+) immunoreactivity and the expression of angiopoietin-1 indicating angiogenic stimulation in the host brain. Taken together, the current data demonstrate that transplanted NPC(PSA-NCAM+) preserve brain tissue with reduced infarct size and improve behavioral performance through actions encompassing anti-reactive glial activation and pro-angiogenic activity in a rat stroke model. In conclusion, the present findings support the potentiality of NPC(PSA-NCAM+) as the promising source in the development of cell-based therapy for neurological diseases including ischemic stroke. PMID:24974101

  14. Rhomboid Enhancer Activity Defines a Subset of Drosophila Neural Precursors Required for Proper Feeding, Growth and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, Amy L.; Gutzwiller, Lisa M.; Gauck, Mackenzie K.; Hartenstein, Volker; Cook, Tiffany A.; Gebelein, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Organismal growth regulation requires the interaction of multiple metabolic, hormonal and neuronal pathways. While the molecular basis for many of these are well characterized, less is known about the developmental origins of growth regulatory structures and the mechanisms governing control of feeding and satiety. For these reasons, new tools and approaches are needed to link the specification and maturation of discrete cell populations with their subsequent regulatory roles. In this study, we characterize a rhomboid enhancer element that selectively labels four Drosophila embryonic neural precursors. These precursors give rise to the hypopharyngeal sensory organ of the peripheral nervous system and a subset of neurons in the deutocerebral region of the embryonic central nervous system. Post embryogenesis, the rhomboid enhancer is active in a subset of cells within the larval pharyngeal epithelium. Enhancer-targeted toxin expression alters the morphology of the sense organ and results in impaired larval growth, developmental delay, defective anterior spiracle eversion and lethality. Limiting the duration of toxin expression reveals differences in the critical periods for these effects. Embryonic expression causes developmental defects and partially penetrant pre-pupal lethality. Survivors of embryonic expression, however, ultimately become viable adults. In contrast, post-embryonic toxin expression results in fully penetrant lethality. To better define the larval growth defect, we used a variety of assays to demonstrate that toxin-targeted larvae are capable of locating, ingesting and clearing food and they exhibit normal food search behaviors. Strikingly, however, following food exposure these larvae show a rapid decrease in consumption suggesting a satiety-like phenomenon that correlates with the period of impaired larval growth. Together, these data suggest a critical role for these enhancer-defined lineages in regulating feeding, growth and viability. PMID

  15. Rhomboid Enhancer Activity Defines a Subset of Drosophila Neural Precursors Required for Proper Feeding, Growth and Viability.

    PubMed

    Gresser, Amy L; Gutzwiller, Lisa M; Gauck, Mackenzie K; Hartenstein, Volker; Cook, Tiffany A; Gebelein, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Organismal growth regulation requires the interaction of multiple metabolic, hormonal and neuronal pathways. While the molecular basis for many of these are well characterized, less is known about the developmental origins of growth regulatory structures and the mechanisms governing control of feeding and satiety. For these reasons, new tools and approaches are needed to link the specification and maturation of discrete cell populations with their subsequent regulatory roles. In this study, we characterize a rhomboid enhancer element that selectively labels four Drosophila embryonic neural precursors. These precursors give rise to the hypopharyngeal sensory organ of the peripheral nervous system and a subset of neurons in the deutocerebral region of the embryonic central nervous system. Post embryogenesis, the rhomboid enhancer is active in a subset of cells within the larval pharyngeal epithelium. Enhancer-targeted toxin expression alters the morphology of the sense organ and results in impaired larval growth, developmental delay, defective anterior spiracle eversion and lethality. Limiting the duration of toxin expression reveals differences in the critical periods for these effects. Embryonic expression causes developmental defects and partially penetrant pre-pupal lethality. Survivors of embryonic expression, however, ultimately become viable adults. In contrast, post-embryonic toxin expression results in fully penetrant lethality. To better define the larval growth defect, we used a variety of assays to demonstrate that toxin-targeted larvae are capable of locating, ingesting and clearing food and they exhibit normal food search behaviors. Strikingly, however, following food exposure these larvae show a rapid decrease in consumption suggesting a satiety-like phenomenon that correlates with the period of impaired larval growth. Together, these data suggest a critical role for these enhancer-defined lineages in regulating feeding, growth and viability. PMID

  16. Mouse neuroblastoma cell-based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyoung; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse neuroblastoma cells have been considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and they have been intensively used as a model system in different areas. For example, the differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor-mediated ion current, and glutamate-induced physiological responses have been actively investigated with these cells. These mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells are of interest because they grow faster than other cells of neural origin and have a number of other advantages. The calcium oscillations and neural spikes of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in epileptic conditions are evaluated. Based on our observations of neural spikes in these cells with our proposed imaging modality, we reported that they can be an important model in epileptic activity studies. We concluded that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as those produced by neurons or astrocytes. This evidence suggests that increased levels of neurotransmitter release due to the enhancement of free calcium from 4-aminopyridine causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce epileptic spikes and calcium oscillations.

  17. Nanofiber Matrices Promote the Neuronal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Shawn H.; Christopherson, Gregory T.; Xu, Leyan; Nasonkin, Igor; Yu, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of human embryonic stem (ES) cells as experimental therapies for neuronal replacement has recently received considerable attention. In view of the organization of the mature nervous system into distinct neural circuits, key challenges of such therapies are the directed differentiation of human ES cell-derived neural precursors (NPs) into specific neuronal types and the directional growth of axons along specified trajectories. In the present study, we cultured human NPs derived from the NIH-approved ES line BGO1 on polycaprolactone fiber matrices of different diameter (i.e., nanofibers and microfibers) and orientation (i.e., aligned and random); fibers were coated with poly-L-ornithine/laminin to mimic the extracellular matrix and support the adhesion, viability, and differentiation of NPs. On aligned fibrous meshes, human NPs adopt polarized cell morphology with processes extending along the axis of the fiber, whereas NPs on plain tissue culture surfaces or random fiber substrates form nonpolarized neurite networks. Under differentiation conditions, human NPs cultured on aligned fibrous substrates show a higher rate of neuronal differentiation than other matrices; 62% and 86% of NPs become TUJ1 (+) early neurons on aligned micro- and nanofibers, respectively, whereas only 32% and 27% of NPs acquire the same fate on random micro- and nanofibers. Metabolic cell activity/viability studies reveal that fiber alignment and diameter also have an effect on NP viability, but only in the presence of mitogens. Our findings demonstrate that fibrous substrates serve as an artificial extracellular matrix and provide a microenviroment that influences key aspects of the neuronal differentiation of ES-derived NPs. PMID:20973749

  18. Nanofiber matrices promote the neuronal differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Lim, Shawn H; Christopherson, Gregory T; Xu, Leyan; Nasonkin, Igor; Yu, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2011-03-01

    The potential of human embryonic stem (ES) cells as experimental therapies for neuronal replacement has recently received considerable attention. In view of the organization of the mature nervous system into distinct neural circuits, key challenges of such therapies are the directed differentiation of human ES cell-derived neural precursors (NPs) into specific neuronal types and the directional growth of axons along specified trajectories. In the present study, we cultured human NPs derived from the NIH-approved ES line BGO1 on polycaprolactone fiber matrices of different diameter (i.e., nanofibers and microfibers) and orientation (i.e., aligned and random); fibers were coated with poly-L-ornithine/laminin to mimic the extracellular matrix and support the adhesion, viability, and differentiation of NPs. On aligned fibrous meshes, human NPs adopt polarized cell morphology with processes extending along the axis of the fiber, whereas NPs on plain tissue culture surfaces or random fiber substrates form nonpolarized neurite networks. Under differentiation conditions, human NPs cultured on aligned fibrous substrates show a higher rate of neuronal differentiation than other matrices; 62% and 86% of NPs become TUJ1 (+) early neurons on aligned micro- and nanofibers, respectively, whereas only 32% and 27% of NPs acquire the same fate on random micro- and nanofibers. Metabolic cell activity/viability studies reveal that fiber alignment and diameter also have an effect on NP viability, but only in the presence of mitogens. Our findings demonstrate that fibrous substrates serve as an artificial extracellular matrix and provide a microenviroment that influences key aspects of the neuronal differentiation of ES-derived NPs. PMID:20973749

  19. Chondroitinase and growth factors enhance activation and oligodendrocyte differentiation of endogenous neural precursor cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Schut, Desiree; Wang, Jian; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    The adult spinal cord harbours a population of multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the ability to replace oligodendrocytes. However, despite this capacity, proliferation and endogenous remyelination is severely limited after spinal cord injury (SCI). In the post-traumatic microenvironment following SCI, endogenous spinal NPCs mainly differentiate into astrocytes which could contribute to astrogliosis that exacerbate the outcomes of SCI. These findings emphasize a key role for the post-SCI niche in modulating the behaviour of spinal NPCs after SCI. We recently reported that chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the glial scar restrict the outcomes of NPC transplantation in SCI by reducing the survival, migration and integration of engrafted NPCs within the injured spinal cord. These inhibitory effects were attenuated by administration of chondroitinase (ChABC) prior to NPC transplantation. Here, in a rat model of compressive SCI, we show that perturbing CSPGs by ChABC in combination with sustained infusion of growth factors (EGF, bFGF and PDGF-AA) optimize the activation and oligodendroglial differentiation of spinal NPCs after injury. Four days following SCI, we intrathecally delivered ChABC and/or GFs for seven days. We performed BrdU incorporation to label proliferating cells during the treatment period after SCI. This strategy increased the proliferation of spinal NPCs, reduced the generation of new astrocytes and promoted their differentiation along an oligodendroglial lineage, a prerequisite for remyelination. Furthermore, ChABC and GF treatments enhanced the response of non-neural cells by increasing the generation of new vascular endothelial cells and decreasing the number of proliferating macrophages/microglia after SCI. In conclusions, our data strongly suggest that optimization of the behaviour of endogenous spinal NPCs after SCI is critical not only to promote endogenous oligodendrocyte replacement, but also to reverse the otherwise

  20. Influence of MHC on thymus repopulation following intrathymic transfer of mouse T-cell precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Chervenak, R.; Altazan, J.D.

    1987-04-01

    T-cell precursors (pre-T cells) traditionally have been detected by their ability to repopulate the thymus of heavily irradiated mice following intravenous injection. Recently, an assay system involving the direct injection of pre-T cells into the thymus of sublethally irradiated animals has been described. Here we report the results of experiments designed to evaluate the ability of bone marrow cells to produce thymic repopulation following intrathymic injection in a wide range of donor-host strain combinations. Irradiated (600 R) mice were injected intrathymically with 2 X 10(6) bone marrow cells which differed from the recipient with respect to their Thy-1 allotype and the percentage of thymus cells expressing either donor- or recipient-type Thy-1 was determined 9 to 23 days after injection. The results of these experiments showed that thymocytes expressing the Thy-1 allotype derived from the donor marrow were only detected when the donor and host were matched at MHC. By contrast, thymic repopulation by MHC-mismatched donor marrow cells could readily be observed when these cells were given intravenously.

  1. Identification of myocardial and vascular precursor cells in human and mouse epicardium.

    PubMed

    Limana, Federica; Zacheo, Antonella; Mocini, David; Mangoni, Antonella; Borsellino, Giovanna; Diamantini, Adamo; De Mori, Roberta; Battistini, Luca; Vigna, Elisa; Santini, Massimo; Loiaconi, Vincenzo; Pompilio, Giulio; Germani, Antonia; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2007-12-01

    During cardiac development, the epicardium is the source of multipotent mesenchymal cells, which give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in coronary vessels and also, possibly, to cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether stem cells are retained in the adult human and murine epicardium and to investigate the regenerative potential of these cells following acute myocardial infarction. We show that c-kit(+) and CD34(+) cells can indeed be detected in human fetal and adult epicardium and that they represent 2 distinct populations. Both subsets of cells were negative for CD45, a cell surface marker that identifies the hematopoietic cell lineage. Immunofluorescence revealed that freshly isolated c-kit(+) and CD34(+) cells expressed early and late cardiac transcription factors and could acquire an endothelial phenotype in vitro. In the murine model of myocardial infarction, there was an increase in the absolute number and proliferation of epicardial c-kit(+) cells 3 days after coronary ligation; at this time point, epicardial c-kit(+) cells were identified in the subepicardial space and expressed GATA4. Furthermore, 1 week after myocardial infarction, cells coexpressing c-kit(+), together with endothelial or smooth muscle cell markers, were identified in the wall of subepicardial blood vessels. In summary, the postnatal epicardium contains a cell population with stem cell characteristics that retains the ability to give rise to myocardial precursors and vascular cells. These cells may play a role in the regenerative response to cardiac damage. PMID:17947800

  2. SOX2 primes the epigenetic landscape in neural precursors enabling proper gene activation during hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Cimadamore, Flavio; Huang, Chun-Teng; Wright, Rebecca; Lewis, Susan; Gage, Fred H.; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn granule neurons generated from neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult hippocampus play a key role in spatial learning and pattern separation. However, the molecular mechanisms that control activation of their neurogenic program remain poorly understood. Here, we report a novel function for the pluripotency factor sex-determining region Y (SRY)-related HMG box 2 (SOX2) in regulating the epigenetic landscape of poised genes activated at the onset of neuronal differentiation. We found that SOX2 binds to bivalently marked promoters of poised proneural genes [neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1)] and a subset of neurogenic genes [e.g., SRY-box 21 (Sox21), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), and growth arrest and DNA-damage–inducible, beta (Gadd45b)] where it functions to maintain the bivalent chromatin state by preventing excessive polycomb repressive complex 2 activity. Conditional ablation of SOX2 in adult hippocampal NPCs impaired the activation of proneural and neurogenic genes, resulting in increased neuroblast death and functionally aberrant newborn neurons. We propose that SOX2 sets a permissive epigenetic state in NPCs, thus enabling proper activation of the neuronal differentiation program under neurogenic cue. PMID:25825708

  3. Induction of neural stem cell-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jai-Hee; Yoon, Byung Sun; Kim, Bona; Park, Gyuman; Jung, Hye-Youn; Maeng, Isaac; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Seung Jun; Kim, Aeree; Oh, Sejong; Whang, Kwang Youn; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ki Dong; You, Seungkwon

    2008-06-27

    Recently, Bmi1 was shown to control the proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we demonstrated the induction of NSC-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1 under NSC culture conditions. These NSCLCs exhibited the morphology and growth properties of NSCs, and expressed NSC marker genes, including nestin, CD133, and Sox2. In vitro differentiation of NSCLCs resulted in differentiated cell populations containing astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Following treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A and valproic acid), the potential of NSCLCs for proliferation, dedifferentiation, and self-renewal was significantly inhibited. Our data indicate that multipotent NSCLCs can be generated directly from astrocytes by the addition of Bmi1.

  4. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  5. Preparation of an Awake Mouse for Recording Neural Responses and Injecting Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Muniak, Michael A.; Mayko, Zachary M.; Ryugo, David K.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that anesthesia alters neural response properties in various regions of the brain.13. In the auditory system, fundamental response properties of brainstem neurons including threshold, frequency specificity, and inhibitory sidebands are altered in significant ways under anesthesia1-2. These observations prompted physiologists to seek ways to record from single neurons without the contaminating effects of anesthesia. One result was a decerebrate preparation, where the brainstem was completely transected at the level of the midbrain4. The drawbacks of this preparation are a formidable surgery, the elimination of descending projections from the forebrain, and an inability to use sensory stimulation to examine structures above the midbrain. A different strategy has been to implant electrode arrays chronically to record from single neurons and multiunit clusters while the animal is awake and/or behaving5,6. These techniques however are not compatible with injecting tracer dyes after first electrophysiologically characterizing a brain structure. To avoid altering neural response properties with anesthetics while recording electrophysiological response properties from single neurons, we have adapted a head restraint technique long used in bats7-9 to mouse10-12. Using this method, we are able to conduct electrophysiological recordings over several days in the unanesthetized mouse. At the end of the recording sessions, we can then inject a dye to reconstruct electrode positions and recording sites or inject a tracer so that pathways to and from the recording loci can be determined. This method allows for well isolated single neuron recordings over multiple days without the use anesthetics. PMID:22781848

  6. Effective detection of corrected dystrophin loci in mdx mouse myogenic precursors.

    PubMed

    Todaro, Marian; Quigley, Anita; Kita, Magdalena; Chin, Judy; Lowes, Kym; Kornberg, Andrew J; Cook, Mark J; Kapsa, Robert

    2007-08-01

    Targeted corrective gene conversion (TCGC) holds much promise as a future therapy for many hereditary diseases in humans. Mutation correction frequencies varying between 0.0001% and 40% have been reported using chimeraplasty, oligoplasty, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and small corrective PCR amplicons (CPA). However, PCR technologies used to detect correction events risk either falsely indicating or greatly exaggerating the presence of corrected loci. This is a problem that is considerably exacerbated by attempted improvement of the TCGC system using high corrective nucleic acid (CNA) to nuclear ratios. Small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR)-mediated correction of the exon 23 dystrophin (DMD) gene mutation in the mdx mouse model of DMD has been used in this study to evaluate the effect of increasing CPA amounts. In these experiments, we detected extremely high levels of apparently corrected loci and determined that at higher CNA to nuclear ratios the extent of locus correction was highly exaggerated by residual CNA species in the nucleic acids extracted from the treated cells. This study describes a generic locus-specific detection protocol designed to eradicate residual CNA species and avoid the artifactual or exaggerated detection of gene correction. PMID:17394239

  7. Characterization of neural stem cells and their progeny in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Furube, Eriko; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Although evidence has accumulated that neurogenesis and gliogenesis occur in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult mammalian brains, recent studies indicate the presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in adult brains, particularly the circumventricular regions. In the present study, we aimed to determine characterization of NSCs and their progenitor cells in the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, subfornical organ, and area postrema of adult mouse. There were two types of NSCs: tanycyte-like ependymal cells and astrocyte-like cells. Astrocyte-like NSCs proliferated slowly and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) actively divided. Molecular marker protein expression of NSCs and their progenitor cells were similar to those reported in the SVZ and SGZ, except that astrocyte-like NSCs expressed S100β. These circumventricular NSCs possessed the capacity to give rise to oligodendrocytes and sparse numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. The inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling by using a VEGF receptor-associated tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 largely suppressed basal proliferation of OPCs. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide attenuated proliferation of OPCs and induced remarkable proliferation of microglia. The present study indicates that sensory circumventricular NSCs provide new neurons and glial cells in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. PMID:25994374

  8. Effects of heat shock on survival, proliferation and differentiation of mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Omori, Hiroyuki; Otsu, Masahiro; Suzuki, Asami; Nakayama, Takashi; Akama, Kuniko; Watanabe, Masaru; Inoue, Nobuo

    2014-02-01

    Hyperthermia during pregnancy is a significant cause of reproductive problems ranging from abortion to congenital defects of the central nervous system (CNS), including neural tube defects and microcephaly. Neural stem cells (NSCs) can proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia, playing a key role in the formation of the CNS. Here, we examined the effects of heat shock on homogeneous proliferating NSCs derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. After heat shock at 42 °C for 20 min, the proliferating NSCs continued to proliferate, although subtle changes were observed in gene expression and cell survival and proliferation. In contrast, heat shock at 43 °C caused a variety of responses: the up-regulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSP), induction of apoptosis, temporal inhibition of cell proliferation and retardation of differentiation. Finally, effects of heat shock at 44 °C were severe, with almost all cells disappearing and the remaining cells losing the capacity to proliferate and differentiate. These temperature-dependent effects of heat shock on NSCs may be valuable in elucidating the mechanisms by which hyperthermia during pregnancy causes various reproductive problems. PMID:24316183

  9. Ginkgo Biloba Extract Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Mouse Cochlear Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congpin; Wang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In the organ or Corti, oxidative stress could result in damage to the hearing, and neural stem cells (NSCs) hold great therapeutic potential in treating hearing loss. Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) has been widely shown to exhibit anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in treatments of neural damage and disorder. Using hydrogen peroxide to induced oxidative stress as a model, we investigated the anti-oxidative role of GBE in isolated mouse cochlear NSCs. GBE treatment was found to significantly promote viability of NSCs, by markedly attenuating hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. In addition, this anti-oxidative function of GBE was also able to prevent mitochondrial depolarization and subsequent apoptosis. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic role of GBE was mediated by antagonizing the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, where GBE could reverse the changes in key intrinsic apoptosis pathway factors including Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3. Our data provided the first report on the beneficial role of GBE in protecting cochlear NSCs, by attenuating oxidative stress triggered intrinsic apoptosis, therefore supporting the potential therapeutic value of GBE in preventing oxidative stress-related hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26799058

  10. Dnmt3a regulates both cell proliferation and differentiation of mouse neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhourui; Huang, Kevin; Yu, Juehua; Le, Thuc; Namihira, Masakasu; Liu, Yupeng; Zhang, Jun; Xue, Zhigang; Cheng, Liming; Fan, Guoping

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is known to regulate cell differentiation and neuronal function in vivo. Here we examined whether deficiency of a de novo DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt3a, affects in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to neuronal and glial cell lineages. Early passage neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from Dnmt3a-deficient ESCs exhibited a moderate phenotype in precocious glial differentiation compared to wild-type counterparts. However, successive passaging to passage six (P6), when wild-type NSCs become gliogenic, revealed a robust phenotype of precocious astrocyte and oligodendrocyte differentiation in Dnmt3a−/− NSCs, consistent with our previous findings in the more severely hypomethylated Dnmt1−/− NSCs. Mass-spectrometry analysis revealed total levels of methylcytosine in Dnmt3a−/− NSCs at P6 were globally hypomethylated. Moreover, Dnmt3a−/− NSC proliferation rate was significantly increased when compared to control from P6 on. Thus, our work revealed a novel role for Dnmt3a in regulating both the timing of neural cell differentiation and cell proliferation in the paradigm of mESC-derived-NSCs. PMID:22714992

  11. The balance of Id3 and E47 determines neural stem/precursor cell differentiation into astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Christian; Pfurr, Sabrina; Mammadzada, Könül; Schildge, Sebastian; Plappert, Leandra; Hils, Miriam; Pous, Lauriane; Rauch, Katharina S; Dumit, Verónica I; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Dengjel, Jörn; Kirsch, Matthias; Schachtrup, Kristina; Schachtrup, Christian

    2015-11-12

    Adult neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs) of the subventricular zone (SVZ) are an endogenous source for neuronal replacement in CNS disease. However, adult neurogenesis is compromised after brain injury in favor of a glial cell fate, which is mainly attributed to changes in the NSPC environment. Yet, it is unknown how this unfavorable extracellular environment translates into a transcriptional program altering NSPC differentiation. Here, we show that genetic depletion of the transcriptional regulator Id3 decreased the number of astrocytes generated from SVZ-derived adult NSPCs in the cortical lesion area after traumatic brain injury. Cortical brain injury resulted in rapid BMP-2 and Id3 up-regulation in the SVZ stem cell niche. Id3(-/-) adult NSPCs failed to differentiate into BMP-2-induced astrocytes, while NSPCs deficient for the Id3-controlled transcription factor E47 readily differentiated into astrocytes in the absence of BMP-2. Mechanistically, E47 repressed the expression of several astrocyte-specific genes in adult NSPCs. These results identify Id3 as the BMP-2-induced transcriptional regulator, promoting adult NSPC differentiation into astrocytes upon CNS injury and reveal a molecular link between environmental changes and NSPC differentiation in the CNS after injury. PMID:26438726

  12. Neural precursor cell cultures from GM2 gangliosidosis animal models recapitulate the biochemical and molecular hallmarks of the brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Martino, Sabata; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Cavazzin, Chiara; Tiribuzi, Roberto; Galli, Rossella; Rivaroli, Anna; Valsecchi, Manuela; Sandhoff, Konrad; Sonnino, Sandro; Vescovi, Angelo; Gritti, Angela; Orlacchio, Aldo

    2009-04-01

    In this work we showed that genotype-related patterns of hexosaminidase activity, isoenzyme composition, gene expression and ganglioside metabolism observed during embryonic and postnatal brain development are recapitulated during the progressive stages of neural precursor cell (NPC) differentiation to mature glia and neurons in vitro. Further, by comparing NPCs and their differentiated progeny established from Tay-Sachs (TS) and Sandhoff (SD) animal models with the wild-type counterparts, we studied the events linking the accumulation of undegraded substrates to hexosaminidase activity. We showed that similarly to what observed in brain tissues in TS NPCs and progeny, the stored GM2 was partially converted by sialidase to GA2, which can be then degraded in the lysosomes to its components. The latter can be used in a salvage pathway for the formation of GM3. Interestingly, results obtained from ganglioside feeding assays and from measurement of lysosomal sialidase activity suggest that a similar pathway might work also in the SD model. PMID:19166507

  13. Decreased demand for olfactory periglomerular cells impacts on neural precursor cell viability in the rostral migratory stream

    PubMed Central

    Langenfurth, Anika; Gu, Song; Bautze, Verena; Zhang, Caiyi; Neumann, Julia E.; Schüller, Ulrich; Stock, Kristin; Wolf, Susanne A.; Maier, Anna-Maria; Mastrella, Giorgia; Pak, Andrew; Cheng, Hongwei; Kälin, Roland E.; Holmbeck, Kenn; Strotmann, Jörg; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) provides a constant supply of new neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB). Different studies have investigated the role of olfactory sensory input to neural precursor cell (NPC) turnover in the SVZ but it was not addressed if a reduced demand specifically for periglomerular neurons impacts on NPC-traits in the rostral migratory stream (RMS). We here report that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) deficient mice have reduced complexity of the nasal turbinates, decreased sensory innervation of the OB, reduced numbers of olfactory glomeruli and reduced OB-size without alterations in SVZ neurogenesis. Large parts of the RMS were fully preserved in MT1-MMP-deficient mice, but we detected an increase in cell death-levels and a decrease in SVZ-derived neuroblasts in the distal RMS, as compared to controls. BrdU-tracking experiments showed that homing of NPCs specifically to the glomerular layer was reduced in MT1-MMP-deficient mice in contrast to controls while numbers of tracked cells remained equal in other OB-layers throughout all experimental groups. Altogether, our data show the demand for olfactory interneurons in the glomerular layer modulates cell turnover in the RMS, but has no impact on subventricular neurogenesis. PMID:27573347

  14. Proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells induced from rat embryonic neural precursor cells followed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lü, He-Zuo; Wang, Yan-Xia; Li, Ying; Fu, Sai-Li; Hang, Qin; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cell-intrinsic timer might determine when oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) isolated from the central nervous system (CNS) stop dividing and initiate differentiation in a defined environment. In this report, the proliferation and differentiation of OPCs induced from neural precursor cells (NPCs) were analyzed by flow cytometry combined with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling and propidium iodide staining, respectively. When OPCs were cultured in OPC-medium, more than 30% of cells were in S- and G2/M-phases, and continuously self-renewed without differentiation. After exposure to thyroid hormone, there was an obvious decrease in the fraction of cells in both S- and G2/M-phases (<10%). Furthermore, the OPCs no longer proliferated, but differentiated into oligodendrocytes. The dynamic proliferation and differentiation characteristics of OPCs induced from NPCs and analyzed by flow cytometry were similar to those of OPCs isolated from the CNS and analyzed by other methods. These studies indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of OPCs can be followed simply and rapidly by flow cytometry. PMID:18473382

  15. Pro-gliogenic effect of IL-1alpha in the differentiation of embryonic neural precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Cacci, Emanuele; Ragazzoni, Ylenia; Minghetti, Luisa; Biagioni, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    Inflammation is regarded as a main obstacle to brain regeneration. Major detrimental effects are attributed to microglial/macrophagic products, such as TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6. The role of cytokines of the IL-1 family, particularly of IL-1alpha, in the modulation of neural precursor cell (NPC) properties is less characterized. IL-1alpha is one of the most abundant cytokines released upon acute stimulation of microglia with lipopolysaccharide and is down-regulated upon chronic stimulation. As we recently demonstrated, acutely activated microglia reduces NPC survival, prevent neuronal differentiation and promote glial differentiation. Chronically activated microglia are instead permissive to NPC survival and neuronal differentiation, and less effective in promoting astrocytic differentiation. We thus investigated whether IL-1alpha could contribute to the effects of acutely activated microglia on NPC. We found that NPC express functional IL-1 receptors and that exposure to recombinant IL-1alpha strongly enhances NPC differentiation into astrocytes, without affecting cell viability and neuronal differentiation. In the same conditions, recombinant IL-1beta has pro-gliogenic effects at concentrations 10-fold higher than those found in activated microglial conditioned media. Interestingly, immunodepletion of IL-1alpha in activated microglial conditioned media fails to revert microglial pro-gliogenic action and slightly enhances neuronal differentiation, revealing that other microglial-derived factors contribute to the modulation of NPC properties. PMID:20236219

  16. Epac2 contributes to PACAP-induced astrocytic differentiation through calcium ion influx in neural precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyunhyo; Lee, Kyungmin

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play a critical role in normal brain functions and maintaining the brain microenvironment, and defects in astrocytogenesis during neurodevelopment could give rise to severe mental illness and psychiatric disorders. During neuro-embryogenesis, astrocytogenesis involves astrocytic differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) induced by signals from ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). However, in contrast to the CNTF signaling pathway, the exact mechanism underlying astrocytic differentiation induced by PACAP is unknown. In the present study, we aimed to verify a signaling pathway specific to PACAP-induced astrocytogenesis, using exchange protein directly activated by cAMP2 (Epac2)-knockout mice. We found that PACAP could trigger astrocytic differentiation of NPCs via Epac2 activation and an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration via a calcium ion influx. Taken together, we concluded that astrocytogenesis stimulated by PACAP occurs through a novel signaling pathway independent from CNTF-JAK/STAT signaling, that is the well-known pathway of astrocytogenesis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 128-133] PMID:26645637

  17. Epac2 contributes to PACAP-induced astrocytic differentiation through calcium ion influx in neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyunhyo; Lee, Kyungmin

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes play a critical role in normal brain functions and maintaining the brain microenvironment, and defects in astrocytogenesis during neurodevelopment could give rise to severe mental illness and psychiatric disorders. During neuro-embryogenesis, astrocytogenesis involves astrocytic differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) induced by signals from ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). However, in contrast to the CNTF signaling pathway, the exact mechanism underlying astrocytic differentiation induced by PACAP is unknown. In the present study, we aimed to verify a signaling pathway specific to PACAP-induced astrocytogenesis, using exchange protein directly activated by cAMP2 (Epac2)-knockout mice. We found that PACAP could trigger astrocytic differentiation of NPCs via Epac2 activation and an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration via a calcium ion influx. Taken together, we concluded that astrocytogenesis stimulated by PACAP occurs through a novel signaling pathway independent from CNTF-JAK/STAT signaling, that is the well-known pathway of astrocytogenesis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 128-133]. PMID:26645637

  18. Decreased demand for olfactory periglomerular cells impacts on neural precursor cell viability in the rostral migratory stream.

    PubMed

    Langenfurth, Anika; Gu, Song; Bautze, Verena; Zhang, Caiyi; Neumann, Julia E; Schüller, Ulrich; Stock, Kristin; Wolf, Susanne A; Maier, Anna-Maria; Mastrella, Giorgia; Pak, Andrew; Cheng, Hongwei; Kälin, Roland E; Holmbeck, Kenn; Strotmann, Jörg; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) provides a constant supply of new neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB). Different studies have investigated the role of olfactory sensory input to neural precursor cell (NPC) turnover in the SVZ but it was not addressed if a reduced demand specifically for periglomerular neurons impacts on NPC-traits in the rostral migratory stream (RMS). We here report that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) deficient mice have reduced complexity of the nasal turbinates, decreased sensory innervation of the OB, reduced numbers of olfactory glomeruli and reduced OB-size without alterations in SVZ neurogenesis. Large parts of the RMS were fully preserved in MT1-MMP-deficient mice, but we detected an increase in cell death-levels and a decrease in SVZ-derived neuroblasts in the distal RMS, as compared to controls. BrdU-tracking experiments showed that homing of NPCs specifically to the glomerular layer was reduced in MT1-MMP-deficient mice in contrast to controls while numbers of tracked cells remained equal in other OB-layers throughout all experimental groups. Altogether, our data show the demand for olfactory interneurons in the glomerular layer modulates cell turnover in the RMS, but has no impact on subventricular neurogenesis. PMID:27573347

  19. Transcriptomic study of mouse embryonic neural stem cell differentiation under ethanol treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Mi Ran; Kim, Sun Hwa; Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can be differentiated into one of three cell lineages: neurons, astrocytes or, oligodendrocytes. Some neurotoxins have the ability to deregulate this dynamic process. NSC cell fate can be altered by ethanol as reported previously. Our aim was to investigate the alteration of genes by ethanol during NSC differentiation and to explore the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Here, mouse fetal forebrain derived NSCs were differentiated for 2 days with or without of ethanol (50 mM). We performed a comparative microarray analysis at day two using GeneChip(®) Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 arrays. Microarray analysis showed that the expressions of 496 genes were altered by ethanol (56 and 440 were up- and down-regulated, respectively). Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis revealed the association of the following altered genes in the Wnt signaling pathway: Wnt5a, Csnk2a1, Tcf7l2, Ccnd2, Nlk, Tbl1x, Tbl1xr1, Rac2 and Nfatc3. Quantitative real time PCR analysis also demonstrated the relative expression levels of these genes. As Wnt signaling is a player of brain development, ethanol-induced alterations may contribute to improper development of the brain. Our data could be a useful resource for elucidating the mechanism behind the ethanol neurotoxicity in developing brain. PMID:25697417

  20. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds for Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Bottai, Daniele; Vescovi, Angleo; Zhang, Shuguang

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with β-Tubulin+, GFAP+ and Nestin+ markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology. PMID:17205123

  1. Transcranial laser therapy alters amyloid precursor protein processing and improves mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Thomas; Yu, Jin; El-Amouri, Salim; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Richieri, Steve; De Taboada, Luis; Streeter, Jackson; Kindy, Mark S.

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial laser therapy (TLT) using a near-infrared energy laser system was tested in the 2x Tg amyloid precursor protein (APP) mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TLT was administered 3 times/week at escalating doses, starting at 3 months of age, and was compared to a control group which received no laser treatment. Treatment sessions were continued for a total of six months. The brains were examined for amyloid plaque burden, Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 ), APP cleavage products (sAPPα, CTFβ) and mitochondrial activity. Administration of TLT was associated with a significant, dose-dependent reduction in amyloid load as indicated by the numbers of Aβ plaques. Levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels were likewise reduced in a dose-dependent fashion. All TLT doses produced an increase in brain sAPPα and a decrease in CTFβ levels consistent with an increase in α-secretase activity and a decrease in β-secretase activity. In addition, TLT increased ATP levels and oxygen utilization in treated animals suggesting improved mitochondrial function. These studies suggest that TLT is a potential candidate for treatment of AD.

  2. Investigation of close interactions between sympathetic neural fibres and the follicular dendritic cells network in the mouse spleen.

    PubMed

    Demonceau, Caroline; Marshall, A S; Sales, J; Heinen, E

    2008-01-01

    In this study, co-localization between sympathetic neural fibres and the follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) network was observed within the mouse spleen by confocal technology. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to reveal the rare interactions between the FDCs network and sympathetic neural fibres. We estimated the frequency of three kinds of close interactions which could be defined as overlaps, contacts or neural fibres closer than 10 microm from a FDCs network. Using these estimates, a comparison was made between five uninfected mouse strains exhibiting the same Prnpa genotype but showing different incubation periods when inoculated with primary bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-infected brain. In prion disease, infectivity is generally detected in the spleen much earlier than in the brain, especially after peripheral inoculation. The way by which the infectious agent reaches the central nervous system is still unclear. From the five mouse strains, we obtained differences in the proportion of splenic FDCs networks with close interactions. Our work suggests that the percentage of splenic FDCs networks with at least one sympathetic neural fibre in close vicinity may influence the length of incubation period. PMID:18591154

  3. Chronic cocaine exposure impairs progenitor proliferation but spares survival and maturation of neural precursors in adult rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Escribà, L; Hernández-Rabaza, V; Soriano-Navarro, M; Barcia, J A; Romero, F J; García-Verdugo, J M; Canales, J J

    2006-07-01

    Recent observations indicate that drugs of abuse, including alcohol and opiates, impair adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We have studied in rats the impact of cocaine treatment (20 mg/kg, daily, i.p.) on cell proliferation, survival and maturation following short-term (8-day) and long-term (24-day) exposure. Using 5'-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 as mitotic markers at the end of the drug treatments, we found that both short- and long-term cocaine exposures significantly reduced cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. By labelling mitotic cells with BrdU pulses before or during the early stages of the drug treatment, we determined that long-term cocaine exposure did not affect the survival of newly generated cells. In register with this finding, cocaine chronic exposure did not increase the number of apoptotic cells labelled by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling). Using doublecortin (DCX) immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy, we next examined the effects of cocaine exposure on the maturation of the neural precursors and on synaptic output to CA3. DCX immunocytochemistry showed that immature hippocampal cells of rats exposed to cocaine displayed normal arborization patterns and similar degrees of colocalization with BrdU at two different developmental stages. Moreover, cocaine did not produce significant morphological alterations of the mossy fibre projection system to stratum lucidum in the CA3 area of the hippocampus. The results presented demonstrate that chronic cocaine exposure impairs proliferation dynamics in the DG without significantly altering either the survival and growth of immature cells or the structural features of terminal projections to CA3. PMID:16903860

  4. Co-transplantation of syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells improves survival of allogeneic glial-restricted precursors in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit K; Bulte, Camille A; Shats, Irina; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of functional cells from immunorejection during the early post-transplantation period is an important factor that reduces the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. Recent studies have shown that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can exert therapeutic effects by secreting anti-inflammatory and pro-survival trophic factors. We investigated whether co-transplantation of MSCs could improve the survival of other transplanted therapeutic cells. Allogeneic glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) were isolated from the brain of a firefly luciferase transgenic FVB mouse (at E13.5 stage) and intracerebrally transplanted, either alone, or together with syngeneic MSCs in immunocompetent BALB/c mice (n=20) or immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice as survival control (n=8). No immunosuppressive drug was given to any animal. Using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive readout of cell survival, we found that co-transplantation of MSCs significantly improved (p<0.05) engrafted GRP survival. No significant change in signal intensities was observed in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice, with transplanted cells surviving in both the GRP only and the GRP+MSC group. In contrast, on day 21 post-transplantation, we observed a 94.2% decrease in BLI signal intensity in immunocompetent mice transplanted with GRPs alone versus 68.1% in immunocompetent mice co-transplanted with MSCs and GRPs (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a lower number of infiltrating CD45, CD11b(+) and CD8(+) cells, reduced astrogliosis, and a higher number of FoxP3(+) cells at the site of transplantation for the immunocompetent mice receiving MSCs. The present study demonstrates that co-transplantation of MSCs can be used to create a microenvironment that is more conducive to the survival of allogeneic GRPs. PMID:26515691

  5. On becoming neural: what the embryo can tell us about differentiating neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A; Klein, Steven L; Karpinski, Beverley A; Maynard, Thomas M; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The earliest steps of embryonic neural development are orchestrated by sets of transcription factors that control at least three processes: the maintenance of proliferative, pluripotent precursors that expand the neural ectoderm; their transition to neurally committed stem cells comprising the neural plate; and the onset of differentiation of neural progenitors. The transition from one step to the next requires the sequential activation of each gene set and then its down-regulation at the correct developmental times. Herein, we review how these gene sets interact in a transcriptional network to regulate these early steps in neural development. A key gene in this regulatory network is FoxD4L1, a member of the forkhead box (Fox) family of transcription factors. Knock-down experiments in Xenopus embryos show that FoxD4L1 is required for the expression of the other neural transcription factors, whereas increased FoxD4L1 levels have three different effects on these genes: up-regulation of neural ectoderm precursor genes; transient down-regulation of neural plate stem cell genes; and down-regulation of neural progenitor differentiation genes. These different effects indicate that FoxD4L1 maintains neural ectodermal precursors in an immature, proliferative state, and counteracts premature neural stem cell and neural progenitor differentiation. Because it both up-regulates and down-regulates genes, we characterized the regions of the FoxD4L1 protein that are specifically involved in these transcriptional functions. We identified a transcriptional activation domain in the N-terminus and at least two domains in the C-terminus that are required for transcriptional repression. These functional domains are highly conserved in the mouse and human homologues. Preliminary studies of the related FoxD4 gene in cultured mouse embryonic stem cells indicate that it has a similar role in promoting immature neural ectodermal precursors and delaying neural progenitor differentiation

  6. Neural precursors (NPCs) from adult L967Q mice display early commitment to "in vitro" neuronal differentiation and hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    DiFebo, Francesca; Curti, Daniela; Botti, Francesca; Biella, Gerardo; Bigini, Paolo; Mennini, Tiziana; Toselli, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenic factors leading to selective degeneration of motoneurons in ALS are not yet understood. However, altered functionality of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels may play a role since cortical hyperexcitability was described in ALS patients and riluzole, the only drug approved to treat ALS, seems to decrease glutamate release via blockade or inactivation of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels. The wobbler mouse, a murine model of motoneuron degeneration, shares some of the clinical features of human ALS. At early stages of the wobbler disease, increased cortical hyperexcitability was observed. Moreover, riluzole reduced motoneuron loss and muscular atrophy in treated wobbler mice. Here, we focussed our attention on specific electrophysiological properties, like voltage-activated Na(+) currents and underlying regenerative electrical activity, as read-outs of the neuronal maturation process of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) isolated from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult early symptomatic wobbler mice. In self-renewal conditions, the rate of wobbler NPC proliferation "in vitro" was 30% lower than that of healthy mice. Conversely, the number of wobbler NPCs displaying early neuronal commitment and action potentials was significantly higher. Upon switching from proliferative to differentiative conditions, NPCs underwent significant changes in the key properties of voltage gated Na(+) currents. The most notable finding, in cells with neuronal morphology, was an increase in Na(+) current density that strictly correlated with an increased probability to generate action potentials. This feature was remarkably more pronounced in neurons differentiated from wobbler NPCs that upon sustained stimulation, displayed short trains of pathological facilitation. In agreement with this result, an increase in the number of c-Fos positive cells, a surrogate marker of neuronal network activation, was observed in the mesial cortex of the wobbler mice "in situ". Thus these

  7. Altered behavior and neural activity in conspecific cagemates co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyunwoo; Jung, Seungmoon; Seo, Jinsoo; Khalid, Arshi; Yoo, Jung-Seok; Park, Jihyun; Kim, Soyun; Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun; Jeon, Daejong

    2016-09-01

    The psychosocial environment is one of the major contributors of social stress. Family members or caregivers who consistently communicate with individuals with brain disorders are considered at risk for physical and mental health deterioration, possibly leading to mental disorders. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. To address this, we developed a social stress paradigm in which a mouse model of epilepsy or depression was housed long-term (>4weeks) with normal conspecifics. We characterized the behavioral phenotypes and electrophysiologically investigated the neural activity of conspecific cagemate mice. The cagemates exhibited deficits in behavioral tasks assessing anxiety, locomotion, learning/memory, and depression-like behavior. Furthermore, they showed severe social impairment in social behavioral tasks involving social interaction or aggression. Strikingly, behavioral dysfunction remained in the cagemates 4weeks following co-housing cessation with the mouse models. In an electrophysiological study, the cagemates showed an increased number of spikes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. Our results demonstrate that conspecifics co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders develop chronic behavioral dysfunctions, and suggest a possible association between abnormal mPFC neural activity and their behavioral pathogenesis. These findings contribute to the understanding of the psychosocial and psychiatric symptoms frequently present in families or caregivers of patients with brain disorders. PMID:27211331

  8. Live imaging of apoptosis in a novel transgenic mouse highlights its role in neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Shinotsuka, Naomi; Nonomura, Keiko; Takemoto, Kiwamu; Kuida, Keisuke; Yosida, Hiroki; Miura, Masayuki

    2011-12-12

    Many cells die during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to cranial neural tube closure (NTC) defects like exencephaly, although the mechanism is unclear. Observing cells undergoing apoptosis in a living context could help elucidate their origin, behavior, and influence on surrounding tissues, but few tools are available for this purpose, especially in mammals. In this paper, we used insulator sequences to generate a transgenic mouse that stably expressed a genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based fluorescent reporter for caspase activation and performed simultaneous time-lapse imaging of apoptosis and morphogenesis in living embryos. Live FRET imaging with a fast-scanning confocal microscope revealed that cells containing activated caspases showed typical and nontypical apoptotic behavior in a region-specific manner during NTC. Inhibiting caspase activation perturbed and delayed the smooth progression of cranial NTC, which might increase the risk of exencephaly. Our results suggest that caspase-mediated cell removal facilitates NTC completion within a limited developmental window. PMID:22162136

  9. Generation of Integration-free Induced Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Jong-Wan; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Park, Sang Woong; Kim, Kee-Pyo; Park, Hyunji; Lim, Kyung Tae; Kang, Kyuree; Kim, Jonghun; Yang, Ji Hun; Han, Heonjong; Lee, Insuk; Hyun, Jung Keun; Bae, Young Min; Schöler, Hans R; Lee, Hoon Taek; Han, Dong Wook

    2016-07-01

    The viral vector-mediated overexpression of the defined transcription factors, Brn4/Pou3f4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (BSKM), could induce the direct conversion of somatic fibroblasts into induced neural stem cells (iNSCs). However, viral vectors may be randomly integrated into the host genome thereby increasing the risk for undesired genotoxicity, mutagenesis, and tumor formation. Here we describe the generation of integration-free iNSCs from mouse fibroblasts by non-viral episomal vectors containing BSKM. The episomal vector-derived iNSCs (e-iNSCs) closely resemble control NSCs, and iNSCs generated by retrovirus (r-iNSCs) in morphology, gene expression profile, epigenetic status, and self-renewal capacity. The e-iNSCs are functionally mature, as they could differentiate into all the neuronal cell types both in vitro and in vivo Our study provides a novel concept for generating functional iNSCs using a non-viral, non-integrating, plasmid-based system that could facilitate their biomedical applicability. PMID:27189941

  10. Impact of neural cell adhesion molecule deletion on regeneration after mouse spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vedangana; Loers, Gabriele; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important functional roles in development of the nervous system. We investigated the influence of a constitutive ablation of NCAM on the outcome of spinal cord injury. Transgenic mice lacking NCAM (NCAM-/-) were subjected to severe compression injury of the lower thoracic spinal cord using wild-type (NCAM+/+) littermates as controls. According to the single-frame motion analysis, the NCAM-/- mice showed reduced locomotor recovery in comparison to control mice at 3 and 6 weeks after injury, indicating an overall positive impact of NCAM on recovery after injury. Also the Basso Mouse Scale score was lower in NCAM-/- mice at 3 weeks after injury, whereas at 6 weeks after injury the difference between genotypes was not statistically significant. Worse locomotor function was associated with decreased monoaminergic and cholinergic innervation of the spinal cord caudal to the injury site and decreased axonal regrowth/sprouting at the site of injury. Astrocytic scar formation at the injury site, as assessed by immunohistology for glial fibrillary acidic protein at and around the lesion site was increased in NCAM-/- compared with NCAM+/+ mice. Migration of cultured monolayer astrocytes from NCAM-/- mice was reduced as assayed by scratch wounding. Numbers of Iba-1 immunopositive microglia were not different between genotypes. We conclude that constitutive NCAM deletion in young adult mice reduces recovery after spinal cord injury, validating the hypothesized beneficial role of this molecule in recovery after injury. PMID:27178448

  11. A combination of small molecules directly reprograms mouse fibroblasts into neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Choi, Kyung-Ah; Kang, Phil Jun; Hyeon, Solji; Kwon, Suhyun; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hwang, Insik; Kim, Yang In; Kim, Yoon Sik; Yoon, Byung Sun; Park, Gyuman; Lee, JangBo; Hong, SungHoi; You, Seungkwon

    2016-07-15

    The generation of induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) from somatic cells using defined factors provides new avenues for basic research and cell therapies for various neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and spinal cord injuries. However, the transcription factors used for direct reprogramming have the potential to cause unexpected genetic modifications, which limits their potential application in cell therapies. Here, we show that a combination of four chemical compounds resulted in cells directly acquiring a NSC identity; we termed these cells chemically-induced NSCs (ciNSCs). ciNSCs expressed NSC markers (Pax6, PLZF, Nestin, Sox2, and Sox1) and resembled NSCs in terms of their morphology, self-renewal, gene expression profile, and electrophysiological function when differentiated into the neuronal lineage. Moreover, ciNSCs could differentiate into several types of mature neurons (dopaminergic, GABAergic, and cholinergic) as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that stably expandable and functional ciNSCs can be directly reprogrammed from mouse fibroblasts using a combination of small molecules without any genetic manipulation, and will provide a new source of cells for cellular replacement therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27207831

  12. An update to the list of mouse mutants with neural tube closure defects and advances toward a complete genetic perspective of neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J; Juriloff, Diana M

    2010-08-01

    The number of mouse mutants and strains with neural tube defects (NTDs) now exceeds 240, including 205 representing specific genes, 30 for unidentified genes, and 9 multifactorial strains. These mutants identify genes needed for embryonic neural tube closure. Reports of 50 new NTD mutants since our 2007 review (Harris and Juriloff, 2007) were considered in relation to the previously reviewed mutants to obtain new insights into mechanisms of NTD etiology. In addition to null mutations, some are hypomorphs or conditional mutants. Some mutations do not cause NTDs on their own, but do so in digenic, trigenic, and oligogenic combinations, an etiology that likely parallels the nature of genetic etiology of human NTDs. Mutants that have only exencephaly are fourfold more frequent than those that have spina bifida aperta with or without exencephaly. Many diverse cellular functions and biochemical pathways are involved; the NTD mutants draw new attention to chromatin modification (epigenetics), the protease-activated receptor cascade, and the ciliopathies. Few mutants directly involve folate metabolism. Prevention of NTDs by maternal folate supplementation has been tested in 13 mutants and reduces NTD frequency in six diverse mutants. Inositol reduces spina bifida aperta frequency in the curly tail mutant, and three new mutants involve inositol metabolism. The many NTD mutants are the foundation for a future complete genetic understanding of the processes of neural fold elevation and fusion along mechanistically distinct cranial-caudal segments of the neural tube, and they point to several candidate processes for study in human NTD etiology. PMID:20740593

  13. Identifying Tmem59 related gene regulatory network of mouse neural stem cell from a compendium of expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neural stem cells offer potential treatment for neurodegenerative disorders, such like Alzheimer's disease (AD). While much progress has been made in understanding neural stem cell function, a precise description of the molecular mechanisms regulating neural stem cells is not yet established. This lack of knowledge is a major barrier holding back the discovery of therapeutic uses of neural stem cells. In this paper, the regulatory mechanism of mouse neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation by tmem59 is explored on the genome-level. Results We identified regulators of tmem59 during the differentiation of mouse NSCs from a compendium of expression profiles. Based on the microarray experiment, we developed the parallelized SWNI algorithm to reconstruct gene regulatory networks of mouse neural stem cells. From the inferred tmem59 related gene network including 36 genes, pou6f1 was identified to regulate tmem59 significantly and might play an important role in the differentiation of NSCs in mouse brain. There are four pathways shown in the gene network, indicating that tmem59 locates in the downstream of the signalling pathway. The real-time RT-PCR results shown that the over-expression of pou6f1 could significantly up-regulate tmem59 expression in C17.2 NSC line. 16 out of 36 predicted genes in our constructed network have been reported to be AD-related, including Ace, aqp1, arrdc3, cd14, cd59a, cds1, cldn1, cox8b, defb11, folr1, gdi2, mmp3, mgp, myrip, Ripk4, rnd3, and sncg. The localization of tmem59 related genes and functional-related gene groups based on the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation was also identified. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the expression of tmem59 is an important factor contributing to AD. The parallelized SWNI algorithm increased the efficiency of network reconstruction significantly. This study enables us to highlight novel genes that may be involved in NSC differentiation and provides a shortcut to identifying genes for AD. PMID

  14. Generation and characterization of a novel neural crest marker allele, Inka1-LacZ, reveals a role for Inka1 in mouse neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Bethany S.; Sargent, Thomas D.; Williams, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies identified Inka1 as a gene regulated by AP-2α in the neural crest required for craniofacial morphogenesis in fish and frog. Here, we extend the analysis of Inka1 function and regulation to the mouse by generating a LacZ knock-in allele. Inka1-LacZ allele expression occurs in the cephalic mesenchyme, heart, and paraxial mesoderm prior to E8.5. Subsequently, expression is observed in the migratory neural crest cells and their derivatives. Consistent with expression of Inka1 in tissues of the developing head during neurulation, a low percentage of Inka1−/− mice show exencephaly while the remainder are viable and fertile. Further studies indicate that AP-2α is not required for Inka1 expression in the mouse, and suggest that there is no significant genetic interaction between these two factors during embryogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that while the expression domain of Inka1 is conserved among vertebrates, its function and regulation are not. PMID:20175189

  15. Significant expansion of the REST/NRSF cistrome in human versus mouse embryonic stem cells: potential implications for neural development.

    PubMed

    Rockowitz, Shira; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-07-13

    Recent studies have employed cross-species comparisons of transcription factor binding, reporting significant regulatory network 'rewiring' between species. Here, we address how a transcriptional repressor targets and regulates neural genes differentially between human and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We find that the transcription factor, Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST; also called neuron restrictive silencer factor) binds to a core group of ∼1200 syntenic genomic regions in both species, with these conserved sites highly enriched with co-factors, selective histone modifications and DNA hypomethylation. Genes with conserved REST binding are enriched with neural functions and more likely to be upregulated upon REST depletion. Interestingly, we identified twice as many REST peaks in human ESCs compared to mouse ESCs. Human REST cistrome expansion involves additional peaks in genes targeted by REST in both species and human-specific gene targets. Genes with expanded REST occupancy in humans are enriched for learning or memory functions. Analysis of neurological disorder associated genes reveals that Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and oxidative stress genes are particularly enriched with human-specific REST binding. Overall, our results demonstrate that there is substantial rewiring of human and mouse REST cistromes, and that REST may have human-specific roles in brain development and functions. PMID:25990720

  16. Neural stem/progenitor cells differentiate into oligodendrocytes, reduce inflammation, and ameliorate learning deficits after transplantation in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudaki, Paraskevi N; Papastefanaki, Florentia; Stamatakis, Antonios; Kouroupi, Georgia; Xingi, Evangelia; Stylianopoulou, Fotini; Matsas, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    The central nervous system has limited capacity for regeneration after traumatic injury. Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach while insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has neuroprotective properties following various experimental insults to the nervous system. We have previously shown that NPCs transduced with a lentiviral vector for IGF-I overexpression have an enhanced ability to give rise to neurons in vitro but also in vivo, upon transplantation in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Here we studied the regenerative potential of NPCs, IGF-I-transduced or not, in a mouse model of hippocampal mechanical injury. NPC transplantation, with or without IGF-I transduction, rescued the injury-induced spatial learning deficits as revealed in the Morris Water Maze. Moreover, it had beneficial effects on the host tissue by reducing astroglial activation and microglial/macrophage accumulation while enhancing generation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells. One or two months after transplantation the grafted NPCs had migrated towards the lesion site and in the neighboring myelin-rich regions. Transplanted cells differentiated toward the oligodendroglial, but not the neuronal or astrocytic lineages, expressing the early and late oligodendrocyte markers NG2, Olig2, and CNPase. The newly generated oligodendrocytes reached maturity and formed myelin internodes. Our current and previous observations illustrate the high plasticity of transplanted NPCs which can acquire injury-dependent phenotypes within the host CNS, supporting the fact that reciprocal interactions between transplanted cells and the host tissue are an important factor to be considered when designing prospective cell-based therapies for CNS degenerative conditions. GLIA 2016;64:763-779. PMID:26712314

  17. Functional characterization of neural-restrictive silencer element in mouse pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hideki; Tominaga, Aiko; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is predominantly localized in the nervous system, but the underlying mechanism in its neuron-specific expression remains unclear. In addition to two neural-restrictive silencer-like element (NRSLE1 and 2), as reported previously, we have identified the third element in -1,601 to -1,581 bp from the translational initiation site of mouse PACAP gene and termed it as NRSLE3, of which, the sequence and location were highly conserved among mouse, rat, and human PACAP genes. In luciferase reporter assay, the deletion or site-directed mutagenesis of NRSLE3 in the reporter gene construct, driven by heterologous SV40 promoter, cancelled the repression of luciferase activity in non-neuronal Swiss-3T3 cells. Furthermore, its promoter activity was significantly repressed in Swiss-3T3 cells, but not in neuronal-differentiated PC12 cells. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of Swiss-3T3 cells demonstrated a specific complex with NRSLE3 probe that exhibited the same migration with the neural-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) probe of rat type II sodium channel gene. During neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells, the increment of PACAP mRNA exhibited the correlation with that of REST4 mRNA, which is a neuron-specific variant form of neural-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF). In undifferentiated PC12 cells, trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which indirectly inhibits NRSF-mediated gene silencing, increased PACAP mRNA level and attenuated the repression of promoter activity of 5' flanking region of mouse PACAP gene containing NRSLEs. These suggest that the NRSE-NRSF system implicates in the regulatory mechanism of neuron-specific expression of PACAP gene. PMID:24939248

  18. Detection of Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in PET-CT in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Fendrich, Volker; Schneider, Ralph; Maitra, Anirban; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Opfermann, Thomas; Bartsch, Detlef K

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is among the most dismal of human malignancies. The 5-year survival rate is lower than 5%. The identification of precursor lesions would be the main step to improve this fatal outcome. One precursor lesions are called pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and are graduated in grade 1 to 3, whereas grade 3 is classified as carcinoma in situ. Currently, no reliable, noninvasive imaging technique (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnet resonance imaging) exists to verify PanINs. Methods Recently, a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer was established in which the tumor progression of human pancreatic carcinoma is reproduced. These so-called Pdx-1-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H/+mice develop PanINs, which transform to invasive growing pancreatic carcinoma. The pancreata of mice of different ages were immunohistochemically stained using α-GLUT-2 antibodies. Furthermore, mice underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to evaluate early detection of PanIN lesions. Results An expression of GLUT-2 in murine PanINs was found in PanINs of grade 1B and higher. This finding is associated with an elevated glucose metabolism, leading to the detection of precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer in the FDG PET-CT scan. In addition, immunohistochemical staining of GLUT-2 was detectable in 45 (75%) of 60 human PanINs, whereas PanINs of grade 1B and higher showed a very extensive expression. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that an elevated glucose metabolism occurs already in precursor lesions of murine and human pancreatic carcinoma. These findings are the basis for the detection of precursor lesions by PET-CT, thereby helping improving the prognosis of this devastating disease. PMID:21403843

  19. Lipid droplets of neuroepithelial cells are a major calcium storage site during neural tube formation in chick and mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Bush, K T; Lee, H; Nagele, R G

    1992-05-15

    In situ precipitation of calcium (Ca2+) with fluoride and antimonate shows that Ca(2+)-specific precipitate is localized almost exclusively within lipid droplets of neuroepithelial cells during neural tube formation in chick and mouse embryos. The density of Ca2+ precipitate within lipid droplets is generally greater in the apical ends of cells situated in regions of the neuroepithelium that are actively engaged in bending. These findings suggest that lipid droplets, in addition to providing a source of metabolic fuel for developing neuroepithelial cells, also serve as Ca(2+)-storage and -releasing sites during neurulation. PMID:1601118

  20. In Vivo Transplantation of Enteric Neural Crest Cells into Mouse Gut; Engraftment, Functional Integration and Long-Term Safety

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Julie E.; McCann, Conor J.; Natarajan, Dipa; Choudhury, Shanas; Boesmans, Werend; Delalande, Jean-Marie; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Burns, Alan J.; Thapar, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enteric neuropathies are severe gastrointestinal disorders with unsatisfactory outcomes. We aimed to investigate the potential of enteric neural stem cell therapy approaches for such disorders by transplanting mouse enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) into ganglionic and aganglionic mouse gut in vivo and analysing functional integration and long-term safety. Design Neurospheres generated from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expressing ENCCs selected from postnatal Wnt1-cre;R26R-YFP/YFP murine gut were transplanted into ganglionic hindgut of wild-type littermates or aganglionic hindgut of Ednrbtm1Ywa mice (lacking functional endothelin receptor type-B). Intestines were then assessed for ENCC integration and differentiation using immunohistochemistry, cell function using calcium imaging, and long-term safety using PCR to detect off-target YFP expression. Results YFP+ ENCCs engrafted, proliferated and differentiated into enteric neurons and glia within recipient ganglionic gut. Transplanted cells and their projections spread along the endogenous myenteric plexus to form branching networks. Electrical point stimulation of endogenous nerve fibres resulted in calcium transients (F/F0 = 1.16±0.01;43 cells, n = 6) in YFP+ transplanted ENCCs (abolished with TTX). Long-term follow-up (24 months) showed transplanted ENCCs did not give rise to tumours or spread to other organs (PCR negative in extraintestinal sites). In aganglionic gut ENCCs similarly spread and differentiated to form neuronal and glial networks with projections closely associated with endogenous neural networks of the transition zone. Conclusions Transplanted ENCCs successfully engrafted into recipient ganglionic and aganglionic gut showing appropriate spread, localisation and, importantly, functional integration without any long-term safety issues. This study provides key support for the development and use of enteric neural stem cell therapies. PMID:26824433

  1. Human neural crest cells contribute to coat pigmentation in interspecies chimeras after in utero injection into mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Malkiel A; Wert, Katherine J; Goldmann, Johanna; Markoulaki, Styliani; Buganim, Yosef; Fu, Dongdong; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-02-01

    The neural crest (NC) represents multipotent cells that arise at the interphase between ectoderm and prospective epidermis of the neurulating embryo. The NC has major clinical relevance because it is involved in both inherited and acquired developmental abnormalities. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental platform that would allow for the integration of human NC cells (hNCCs) into the gastrulating mouse embryo. NCCs were derived from pluripotent mouse, rat, and human cells and microinjected into embryonic-day-8.5 embryos. To facilitate integration of the NCCs, we used recipient embryos that carried a c-Kit mutation (W(sh)/W(sh)), which leads to a loss of melanoblasts and thus eliminates competition from the endogenous host cells. The donor NCCs migrated along the dorsolateral migration routes in the recipient embryos. Postnatal mice derived from injected embryos displayed pigmented hair, demonstrating differentiation of the NCCs into functional melanocytes. Although the contribution of human cells to pigmentation in the host was lower than that of mouse or rat donor cells, our results indicate that hNCCs, injected in utero, can integrate into the embryo and form mature functional cells in the animal. This mouse-human chimeric platform allows for a new approach to study NC development and diseases. PMID:26811475

  2. Identification of a mouse brain cDNA that encodes a protein related to the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid beta protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Wasco, W; Bupp, K; Magendantz, M; Gusella, J F; Tanzi, R E; Solomon, F

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid beta protein precursor (APP). This 653-amino acid protein, which we have termed the amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP), appears to be similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are concentrated within three distinct regions of the two proteins where the identities are 47%, 54%, and 56%. The APLP cDNA hybridizes to two messages of approximately 2.4 and 1.6 kilobases that are present in mouse brain and neuroblastoma cells. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a peptide derived from the C terminus of APLP stain the cytoplasm in a pattern reminiscent of Golgi staining. In addition to APP, APLP also displays significant homology to the Drosophila APP-like protein APPL and a rat testes APP-like protein. These data indicate that the APP gene is a member of a strongly conserved gene family. Studies aimed at determining the functions of the proteins encoded by this gene family should provide valuable clues to their potential role in Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Images PMID:1279693

  3. Modulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Proliferation and Neural Differentiation by the P2X7 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Talita; de Oliveira, Sophia La Banca; Cheffer, Arquimedes; Beco, Renata; Martins, Patrícia; Fornazari, Maynara; Lameu, Claudiana; Junior, Helio Miranda Costa; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ulrich, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel developmental functions have been attributed to the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) including proliferation stimulation and neural differentiation. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC), induced with retinoic acid to neural differentiation, closely assemble processes occurring during neuroectodermal development of the early embryo. Principal Findings P2X7R expression together with the pluripotency marker Oct-4 was highest in undifferentiated ESC. In undifferentiated cells, the P2X7R agonist Bz-ATP accelerated cell cycle entry, which was blocked by the specific P2X7R inhibitor KN-62. ESC induced to neural differentiation with retinoic acid, reduced Oct-4 and P2X7R expression. P2X7R receptor-promoted intracellular calcium fluxes were obtained at lower Bz-ATP ligand concentrations in undifferentiated and in neural-differentiated cells compared to other studies. The presence of KN-62 led to increased number of cells expressing SSEA-1, Dcx and β3-tubulin, as well as the number of SSEA-1 and β3-tubulin-double-positive cells confirming that onset of neuroectodermal differentiation and neuronal fate determination depends on suppression of P2X7R activity. Moreover, an increase in the number of Ki-67 positive cells in conditions of P2X7R inhibition indicates rescue of progenitors into the cell cycle, augmenting the number of neuroblasts and consequently neurogenesis. Conclusions In embryonic cells, P2X7R expression and activity is upregulated, maintaining proliferation, while upon induction to neural differentiation P2X7 receptor expression and activity needs to be suppressed. PMID:24798220

  4. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  5. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  6. Electrospun Fibrous Scaffolds of Poly(glycerol-dodecanedioate) for Engineering Neural Tissues From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xizi; Huang, Yen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    For tissue engineering applications, the preparation of biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds is the most desirable but challenging task.  Among the various fabrication methods, electrospinning is the most attractive one due to its simplicity and versatility. Additionally, electrospun nanofibers mimic the size of natural extracellular matrix ensuring additional support for cell survival and growth. This study showed the viability of the fabrication of long fibers spanning a larger deposit area for a novel biodegradable and biocompatible polymer named poly(glycerol-dodecanoate) (PGD)1 by using a newly designed collector for electrospinning. PGD exhibits unique elastic properties with similar mechanical properties to nerve tissues, thus it is suitable for neural tissue engineering applications. The synthesis and fabrication set-up for making fibrous scaffolding materials was simple, highly reproducible, and inexpensive. In biocompatibility testing, cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells could adhere to and grow on the electrospun PGD fibers. In summary, this protocol provided a versatile fabrication method for making PGD electrospun fibers to support the growth of mouse embryonic stem cell derived neural lineage cells. PMID:24961272

  7. Rho-kinase-dependent actin turnover and actomyosin disassembly are necessary for mouse spinal neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Escuin, Sarah; Vernay, Bertrand; Savery, Dawn; Gurniak, Christine B.; Witke, Walter; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytoskeleton is widely considered essential for neurulation, yet the mouse spinal neural tube can close despite genetic and non-genetic disruption of the cytoskeleton. To investigate this apparent contradiction, we applied cytoskeletal inhibitors to mouse embryos in culture. Preventing actomyosin cross-linking, F-actin assembly or myosin II contractile activity did not disrupt spinal closure. In contrast, inhibiting Rho kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) or blocking F-actin disassembly prevented closure, with apical F-actin accumulation and adherens junction disturbance in the neuroepithelium. Cofilin-1-null embryos yielded a similar phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that there is a key role for actin turnover. Co-exposure to Blebbistatin rescued the neurulation defects caused by RhoA inhibition, whereas an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, ML-7, had no such effect. We conclude that regulation of RhoA, Rho kinase, LIM kinase and cofilin signalling is necessary for spinal neural tube closure through precise control of neuroepithelial actin turnover and actomyosin disassembly. In contrast, actomyosin assembly and myosin ATPase activity are not limiting for closure. PMID:26040287

  8. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Kosi, Nina; Alić, Ivan; Kolačević, Matea; Vrsaljko, Nina; Jovanov Milošević, Nataša; Sobol, Margarita; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland; Mitrečić, Dinko

    2015-02-01

    The nucleolar protein 2 gene encodes a protein specific for the nucleolus. It is assumed that it plays a role in the synthesis of ribosomes and regulation of the cell cycle. Due to its link to cell proliferation, higher expression of Nop2 indicates a worse tumor prognosis. In this work we used Nop2(gt1gaj) gene trap mouse strain. While lethality of homozygous animals suggested a vital role of this gene, heterozygous animals allowed the detection of expression of Nop2 in various tissues, including mouse brain. Histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy techniques, applied to a mature mouse brain, human brain and on mouse neural stem cells revealed expression of Nop2 in differentiating cells, including astrocytes, as well as in mature neurons. Nop2 was detected in various regions of mouse and human brain, mostly in large pyramidal neurons. In the human, Nop2 was strongly expressed in supragranular and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex and in layer III of the cingulate cortex. Also, Nop2 was detected in CA1 and the subiculum of the hippocampus. Subcellular analyses revealed predominant location of Nop2 within the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus. To test if Nop2 expression correlates to cell proliferation occurring during tissue regeneration, we induced strokes in mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Two weeks after stroke, the number of Nop2/nestin double positive cells in the region affected by ischemia and the periventricular zone substantially increased. Our findings suggest a newly discovered role of Nop2 in both mature neurons and in cells possibly involved in the regeneration of nervous tissue. PMID:25481415

  9. Adoptive precursor cell therapy to enhance immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Ghosh, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. T cell deficiency following transplantation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss adoptive transfer of committed precursor cells to enhance T cell reconstitution and improve overall prognosis after transplantation. PMID:19015856

  10. Insights into prevention of human neural tube defects by folic acid arising from consideration of mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J

    2009-04-01

    Almost 30 years after the initial study by Richard W. Smithells and coworkers, it is still unknown how maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents human neural tube defects (NTDs). In this article, questions about human NTD prevention are considered in relation to three groups of mouse models: NTD mutants that respond to folate, NTD mutants and strains that do not respond to folate, and mutants involving folate-pathway genes. Of the 200 mouse NTD mutants, only a few have been tested with folate; half respond and half do not. Among responsive mutants, folic acid supplementation reduces exencephaly and/or spina bifida aperta frequency in the Sp(2H), Sp, Cd, Cited2, Cart1, and Gcn5 mutants. Prevention ranges from 35 to 85%. The responsive Sp(2H) (Pax3) mutant has abnormal folate metabolism, but the responsive Cited2 mutant does not. Neither folic nor folinic acid reduces NTD frequency in Axd, Grhl3, Fkbp8, Map3k4, or Nog mutants or in the curly tail or SELH/Bc strains. Spina bifida frequency is reduced in Axd by methionine and in curly tail by inositol. Exencephaly frequency is reduced in SELH/Bc by an alternative commercial ration. Mutations in folate-pathway genes do not cause NTDs, except for 30% exencephaly in folate-treated Folr1. Among folate-pathway mutants, neural tube closure is normal in Cbs, Folr2, Mthfd1, Mthfd2, Mthfr, and Shmt1 mutants. Embryos die by midgestation in Folr1, Mtr, Mtrr, and RFC1 mutants. The mouse models point to genetic heterogeneity in the ability to respond to folic acid and also to heterogeneity in genetic cause of NTDs that can be prevented by folic acid. PMID:19117321

  11. Transcriptomic gene-network analysis of exposure to silver nanoparticle reveals potentially neurodegenerative progression in mouse brain neural cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ho-Chen; Huang, Chin-Lin; Huang, Yuh-Jeen; Hsiao, I-Lun; Yang, Chung-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are commonly used in daily living products. AgNPs can induce inflammatory response in neuronal cells, and potentially develop neurological disorders. The gene networks in response to AgNPs-induced neurodegenerative progression have not been clarified in various brain neural cells. This study found that 3-5nm AgNPs were detectable to enter the nuclei of mouse neuronal cells after 24-h of exposure. The differentially expressed genes in mouse brain neural cells exposure to AgNPs were further identified using Phalanx Mouse OneArray® chip, and permitted to explore the gene network pathway regulating in neurodegenerative progression according to Cytoscape analysis. In focal adhesion pathway of ALT astrocytes, AgNPs induced the gene expression of RasGRF1 and reduced its downstream BCL2 gene for apoptosis. In cytosolic DNA sensing pathway of microglial BV2 cells, AgNPs reduced the gene expression of TREX1 and decreased IRF7 to release pro-inflammatory cytokines for inflammation and cellular activation. In MAPK pathway of neuronal N2a cells, AgNPs elevated GADD45α gene expression, and attenuated its downstream PTPRR gene to interfere with neuron growth and differentiation. Moreover, AgNPs induced beta amyloid deposition in N2a cells, and decreased PSEN1 and PSEN2, which may disrupt calcium homeostasis and presynaptic dysfunction for Alzheimer's disease development. These findings suggested that AgNPs exposure reveals the potency to induce the progression of neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:27131904

  12. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV. PMID:27453325

  13. Application of Self Adaptive Unsupervised Neural Networks for Processing of VLF-LF signals to detect Seismic-Ionospheric Precursor Phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeberis, C.; Xenos, T. D.; Hadjileontiadis, L.; Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the development and application of artificial neural networks (ANN) based on Predictive Modular Neural Networks (PREMONNs) to provide a self adaptive unsupervised method for detecting disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena using VLF radio signals. As such, the neural network is applied to bring forth and adaptively discriminate different characteristics in the received signals, in real time, in order to provide data segments of interest that can be correlated to subsequent seismic phenomena. PREMONNs have been developed for time series prediction and through that for source switching detection in a time series; they are constituted by two modules. The first tier is a module consisting of a dynamic array of neural networks following the data stream in order to predict the next value of a time series whereas the second is a decision one utilizing a Bayes probability equation to decide on source switching. That module is responsible for electing and appropriately training the closest fitting NN or switching to a new NN if a source switch is apparent. For the purpose of this paper, VLF signals transmitted by a number of European VLF transmitters are monitored for over a year in Thessaloniki (40.69N 22.78E) and the data from December 2010 to December 2011 are used. The received signals are sampled and stored for off line processing. The receiver was developed by Elettronika Srl, and is part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). Signals received from the 20.27KHz ICV station in Tavolara, Italy (Lat 40.923,Lon. 9.731) were used. The received VLF signal was normalized and then processed using the Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EMD). The resulting data are used to train the unsupervised ANN and the performance of the developed network is then evaluated. The efficacy of different layouts of the PREMONN is evaluated and the application of a self

  14. Human neural crest cells contribute to coat pigmentation in interspecies chimeras after in utero injection into mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Malkiel A.; Wert, Katherine J.; Goldmann, Johanna; Markoulaki, Styliani; Buganim, Yosef; Fu, Dongdong; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) represents multipotent cells that arise at the interphase between ectoderm and prospective epidermis of the neurulating embryo. The NC has major clinical relevance because it is involved in both inherited and acquired developmental abnormalities. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental platform that would allow for the integration of human NC cells (hNCCs) into the gastrulating mouse embryo. NCCs were derived from pluripotent mouse, rat, and human cells and microinjected into embryonic-day-8.5 embryos. To facilitate integration of the NCCs, we used recipient embryos that carried a c-Kit mutation (Wsh/Wsh), which leads to a loss of melanoblasts and thus eliminates competition from the endogenous host cells. The donor NCCs migrated along the dorsolateral migration routes in the recipient embryos. Postnatal mice derived from injected embryos displayed pigmented hair, demonstrating differentiation of the NCCs into functional melanocytes. Although the contribution of human cells to pigmentation in the host was lower than that of mouse or rat donor cells, our results indicate that hNCCs, injected in utero, can integrate into the embryo and form mature functional cells in the animal. This mouse–human chimeric platform allows for a new approach to study NC development and diseases. PMID:26811475

  15. Bumetanide promotes neural precursor cell regeneration and dendritic development in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wang-shu; Sun, Xuan; Song, Cheng-guang; Mu, Xiao-peng; Ma, Wen-ping; Zhang, Xing-hu; Zhao, Chuan-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Bumetanide has been shown to lessen cerebral edema and reduce the infarct area in the acute stage of cerebral ischemia. Few studies focus on the effects of bumetanide on neuroprotection and neurogenesis in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. We established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by injecting endothelin-1 in the left cortical motor area and left corpus striatum. Seven days later, bumetanide 200 µg/kg/day was injected into the lateral ventricle for 21 consecutive days with a mini-osmotic pump. Results demonstrated that the number of neuroblasts cells and the total length of dendrites increased, escape latency reduced, and the number of platform crossings increased in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that bumetanide promoted neural precursor cell regeneration, dendritic development and the recovery of cognitive function, and protected brain tissue in the chronic stage of ischemia. PMID:27335557

  16. Improvement of Neurological Dysfunctions in Aphakia Mice, a Model of Parkinson’s Disease, after Transplantation of ES Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neuronal Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangmi; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by selective death of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons, and previously we have shown that aphakia mice, which harbor spontaneous Pitx3 gene mutation, show specific degeneration of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons accompanied by behavioral deficits that is reversed by L-DOPA treatment or transplantation of dopaminergic neural precursors. Here, we describe transplantation of dopaminergic neural precursors to a mouse model of PD, an aphakia mouse, followed by behavioral analyses of transplanted mice. PMID:25173391

  17. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration. PMID:19249907

  18. Reproducible expansion and characterization of mouse neural stem/progenitor cells in adherent cultures derived from the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Theus, Michelle H.; Ricard, Jerome; Liebl, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) residing in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse forebrain have been shown to enhance their neurogenic potential in response to CNS injury. Mechanisms involved in regulating adult neurogenesis under naïve or stressed conditions can be studied using a monolayer cell-culture system of the nestin-expressing NSPC lineage to analyze proliferation, survival and differentiation. Here, we describe a protocol for the expansion of NSPCs for studies aimed at understanding the functional role of NSPCs in maintaining adult neurogenic processes. In this unit, we outline in detail the procedures for: (1) isolation, maintenance and culture of the NSPC component of the SVZ niche from the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle; (2) characterization of NSPC functions by examining proliferation, survival and differentiation; and (3) efficient siRNA transfection methods in 96-well format. PMID:22415840

  19. Neurons derived from transplanted neural stem cells restore disrupted neuronal circuitry in a mouse model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Abematsu, Masahiko; Tsujimura, Keita; Yamano, Mariko; Saito, Michiko; Kohno, Kenji; Kohyama, Jun; Namihira, Masakazu; Komiya, Setsuro; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2010-01-01

    The body’s capacity to restore damaged neural networks in the injured CNS is severely limited. Although various treatment regimens can partially alleviate spinal cord injury (SCI), the mechanisms responsible for symptomatic improvement remain elusive. Here, using a mouse model of SCI, we have shown that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) together with administration of valproic acid (VPA), a known antiepileptic and histone deacetylase inhibitor, dramatically enhanced the restoration of hind limb function. VPA treatment promoted the differentiation of transplanted NSCs into neurons rather than glial cells. Transsynaptic anterograde corticospinal tract tracing revealed that transplant-derived neurons reconstructed broken neuronal circuits, and electron microscopic analysis revealed that the transplant-derived neurons both received and sent synaptic connections to endogenous neurons. Ablation of the transplanted cells abolished the recovery of hind limb motor function, confirming that NSC transplantation directly contributed to restored motor function. These findings raise the possibility that epigenetic status in transplanted NSCs can be manipulated to provide effective treatment for SCI. PMID:20714104

  20. Inositol deficiency increases the susceptibility to neural tube defects of genetically predisposed (curly tail) mouse embryos in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cockroft, D L; Brook, F A; Copp, A J

    1992-02-01

    Curly tail (ct/ct) mouse embryos, which have a genetic predisposition for neural tube defects (NTD), were grown in culture from the 2-5 somite stage, before the initiation of neurulation, up to the 22-24 somite stage, when closure of the anterior neural tube is normally complete. The embryos were cultured in whole rat serum or in extensively dialysed serum supplemented with glucose, amino acids, and vitamins, with inositol omitted or added at concentrations of 2, 10, 20, and 50 mg/l. Two strains were used as controls; CBA mice, which are related to curly tails, and an unrelated PO stock. It was found that ct/ct embryos were particularly sensitive to inositol deficiency; both they and the CBA embryos showed a similar high incidence of cranial NTD after culture in inositol deficient medium (12/17 and 11/18, respectively). Furthermore, the lowest dose of inositol had no effect on the frequency of head defects in ct/ct mice, though it halved the incidence in CBA embryos. With higher inositol concentrations, the majority of ct/ct embryos completed head closure normally, and their development was generally similar to that obtained in whole serum. PO embryos showed a lower proportion (5/19) of cranial NTD in the inositol deficient medium than the other two strains, and this was further reduced by even the lowest inositol dose. PMID:1615432

  1. The TRIM-NHL protein TRIM32 activates microRNAs and prevents self-renewal in mouse neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Schwamborn, Jens C; Berezikov, Eugene; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2009-03-01

    In the mouse neocortex, neural progenitor cells generate both differentiating neurons and daughter cells that maintain progenitor fate. Here, we show that the TRIM-NHL protein TRIM32 regulates protein degradation and microRNA activity to control the balance between those two daughter cell types. In both horizontally and vertically dividing progenitors, TRIM32 becomes polarized in mitosis and is concentrated in one of the two daughter cells. TRIM32 overexpression induces neuronal differentiation while inhibition of TRIM32 causes both daughter cells to retain progenitor cell fate. TRIM32 ubiquitinates and degrades the transcription factor c-Myc but also binds Argonaute-1 and thereby increases the activity of specific microRNAs. We show that Let-7 is one of the TRIM32 targets and is required and sufficient for neuronal differentiation. TRIM32 is the mouse ortholog of Drosophila Brat and Mei-P26 and might be part of a protein family that regulates the balance between differentiation and proliferation in stem cell lineages. PMID:19269368

  2. Magnesium regulates neural stem cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus by altering mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shanshan; Mou, Chengzhi; Ma, Yihe; Han, Ruijie; Li, Xue

    2016-04-01

    In the adult brain, neural stem cells from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the cortex progress through the following five developmental stages: radial glia-like cells, neural progenitor cells, neuroblasts, immature neurons, and mature neurons. These developmental stages are linked to both neuronal microenvironments and energy metabolism. Neurogenesis is restricted and has been demonstrated to arise from tissue microenvironments. We determined that magnesium, a key nutrient in cellular energy metabolism, affects neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in cells derived from the embryonic hippocampus by influencing mitochondrial function. Densities of proliferating cells and NSCs both showed their highest values at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o , whereas lower proliferation rates were observed at 0.4 and 1.4 mM [Mg(2+) ]o . The numbers and sizes of the neurospheres reached the maximum at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o and were weaker under both low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) concentrations of magnesium. In vitro experimental evidence demonstrates that extracellular magnesium regulates the number of cultured hippocampal NSCs, affecting both magnesium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. Our findings indicate that the effect of [Mg(2+) ]o on NSC proliferation may lie downstream of alterations in mitochondrial function because mitochondrial membrane potential was highest in the NSCs in the moderate [Mg(2+) ]o (0.8 mM) group and lower in both the low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) [Mg(2+) ]o groups. Overall, these findings demonstrate a new function for magnesium in the brain in the regulation of hippocampal neural stem cells: affecting their cellular energy metabolism. PMID:26634890

  3. Taurine Induces Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells and Synapse Development in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shivaraj, Mattu Chetana; Marcy, Guillaume; Low, Guoliang; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Zhao, Xianfeng; Rosales, Francisco J.; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues. It has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in hippocampal neurogenesis during brain development is still unknown. Here we show that taurine regulates neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the developing brain as well as in cultured early postnatal (P5) hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal slices derived from P5 mice brains. Taurine increased cell proliferation without having a significant effect on neural differentiation both in cultured P5 NPCs as well as cultured hippocampal slices and in vivo. Expression level analysis of synaptic proteins revealed that taurine increases the expression of Synapsin 1 and PSD 95. We also found that taurine stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 indicating a possible role of the ERK pathway in mediating the changes that we observed, especially in proliferation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for taurine in neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in developing brain and suggest the involvement of the ERK1/2 pathways in mediating these actions. Our study also shows that taurine influences the levels of proteins associated with synapse development. This is the first evidence showing the effect of taurine on early postnatal neuronal development using a combination of in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems. PMID:22916184

  4. The long non-coding RNA FMR4 promotes proliferation of human neural precursor cells and epigenetic regulation of gene expression in trans.

    PubMed

    Peschansky, Veronica J; Pastori, Chiara; Zeier, Zane; Wentzel, Katya; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Magistri, Marco; Silva, José P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2016-07-01

    Triplet repeat expansions in the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene cause either intellectual disability and autism, or adult-onset neurodegeneration, with poorly understood variability in presentation. Previous studies have identified several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) at the FMR1 locus, including FMR4. Similarly to FMR1, FMR4 is silenced by large-repeat expansions that result in enrichment of DNA and histone methylation within the shared promoter and repeat sequence, suggesting a possible role for this noncoding RNA in the pathophysiology of Fragile X. We therefore assessed the functional role of FMR4 to gain further insight into the molecular processes in Fragile X-associated disorders. Previous work showed that FMR4 does not exhibit cis-regulation of FMR1. Here, we found that FMR4 is a chromatin-associated transcript and, using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, showed that FMR4 alters the chromatin state and the expression of several hundred genes in trans. Among the genes regulated by FMR4, we found enrichment for those involved in neural development and cellular proliferation. S-phase marker assays further demonstrated that FMR4 may promote cellular proliferation, rather than differentiation, of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs). By establishing this novel function for FMR4 in hNPCs, we lend support to existing evidence of the epigenetic involvement of lncRNA in nervous system development, and increase our understanding of the complex pathogenesis underlying neurological disorders associated with FMR1 repeat expansions. PMID:27001315

  5. Derivation of Schwann cell precursors from neural crest cells resident in bone marrow for cell therapy to improve peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haiyan; Gong, Yanpei; Qiang, Liang; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shibo; Gao, Jiawen; Li, Kai; Ji, Ximeng; Tian, Ling; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei

    2016-05-01

    We have previously successfully enriched post-migratory neural crest cells (NCCs) from postnatal rat bone marrow (BM). These BM-NCCs possess glial and neuronal differentiating potential. Based on the neural crest origin of Schwann cells (SCs), in this study, we aimed at using a straightforward protocol to derive Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) from BM-NCCs. Several clonal subpopulations were isolated from BM-NCCs, displaying long-term proliferative capacity and maintaining the NCC identity. The BM-NCC clones could be induced to differentiate into SCs. In particular, clone N1 gave rise to a large and pure population of SCs. Clone N1-derived SCs demonstrated the myelinating capacity in their co-culture with primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The decreased expression of NCC-markers and increased expression of SC-markers were related to the differentiation state of clone N1-derived SCs. To investigate the repair-promoting effects of clone N1 on injured peripheral neurons in vitro and in vivo, on one hand, the oxygen glucose deprivation-injured DRG neurons were treated with clone N1-conditioned medium, improving the cell survival and axon growth of neurons; on the other hand, clone N1 or clone N1-derived SCs were respectively implanted to the crush sciatic nerve of rats, and clone N1 yielded the better outcome of nerve regeneration and function restoration than clone N1-derived SCs. Taken together, all the results collectively showed that clone N1 could be identified as SCPs, which might hold promise for cell therapy to improve peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26946403

  6. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Ruchaya, Prashant; Cabrera, Claudia; Struebig, Monika; Barnes, Michael; Terry, Anna; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Ameen, Torath; Mein, Charles; Hamada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs) give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study. PMID:26469858

  7. Amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse models and Alzheimer’s disease: Understanding the paradigms, limitations and contributions

    PubMed Central

    Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Roher, Alex E.

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing mutant familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD) amyloid precursor protein (APP) genes have contributed to the understanding of dementia pathology and support the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Although many sophisticated mice APP models exist, none recapitulates AD cellular and behavioral pathology. The morphological resemblance to AD amyloidosis is impressive, but fundamental biophysical and biochemical properties of the APP/Aβ produced in Tg mice differ substantially from those of humans. The greater resilience of Tg mice to substantial Aβ burdens suggests the levels and forms that are deleterious to human neurons are not as noxious in these models. Tg mice have been widely used for testing AD therapeutic agents and demonstrated promising results. Unfortunately, clinical trials resulted in unforeseen adverse events or negative therapeutic outcomes. The disparity between success and failure is in part due to differences in brain environment that separate man and rodent. These observations suggest that the pathogenesis of AD is by far much more intricate than the straightforward accumulation of Aβ. PMID:19560104

  8. MiRNA-128 regulates the proliferation and neurogenesis of neural precursors by targeting PCM1 in the developing cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kim, Paul Jong; Chen, Zhongcan; Lokman, Hidayat; Qiu, Lifeng; Zhang, Ke; Rozen, Steven George; Tan, Eng King; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    During the development, tight regulation of the expansion of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and their differentiation into neurons is crucial for normal cortical formation and function. In this study, we demonstrate that microRNA (miR)-128 regulates the proliferation and differentiation of NPCs by repressing pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1). Specifically, overexpression of miR-128 reduced NPC proliferation but promoted NPC differentiation into neurons both in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, the reduction of endogenous miR-128 elicited the opposite effects. Overexpression of miR-128 suppressed the translation of PCM1, and knockdown of endogenous PCM1 phenocopied the observed effects of miR-128 overexpression. Furthermore, concomitant overexpression of PCM1 and miR-128 in NPCs rescued the phenotype associated with miR-128 overexpression, enhancing neurogenesis but inhibiting proliferation, both in vitro and in utero. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which miR-128 regulates the proliferation and differentiation of NPCs in the developing neocortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11324.001 PMID:26883496

  9. Mouse Fkbp8 activity is required to inhibit cell death and establish dorso-ventral patterning in the posterior neural tube.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca Lee Yean; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Min, Kyung Soo; Scott, Melissa L; Kartiko, Susan; Yu, Wei; Merriweather, Michelle Y; Vogel, Peter; Zambrowicz, Brian P; Finnell, Richard H

    2008-02-15

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects that can be disabling or lethal and are second in their prevalence after cardiac defects among major human congenital malformations. Spina bifida is a NTD where the spinal cord is dysplastic, and the overlying spinal column is absent. At present, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spinal bifida development are largely unknown. In this study, we present a Fkbp8 mouse mutant that has an isolated and completely penetrant spina bifida, which is folate- and inositol-resistant. Fkbp8 mutants are not embryo lethal, but they display striking features of human spina bifida, including a dysplastic spinal cord, open neural canal and disability. The loss of Fkbp8 leads to increased apoptosis in the posterior neural tube, demonstrating that in vivo FKBP8 inhibits cell death. Gene expression analysis of Fkbp8 mutants revealed a perturbation of expression of neural tube patterning genes, suggesting that endogenous FKBP8 activity establishes dorso-ventral patterning of the neural tube. These studies demonstrate that Fkbp8 is not important for embryo survival, but is essential for spinal neural tube patterning, and to block apoptosis, in the developing neural tube. The mutant Fkbp8 allele is a new experimental model which will be useful in dissecting the pathogenesis of spinal NTDs, and enhance our understanding of the etiology of human NTDs. PMID:18003640

  10. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yu; Palmgren, Björn; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Englund Johansson, Ulrica; Spieles-Engemann, Anne L.; Kale, Ajay; Stupp, Samuel I.; Olivius, Petri

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM). Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel), in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC) integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN). PMID:25243135

  11. Overexpression of CD44 in Neural Precursor Cells Improves Trans- Endothelial Migration and Facilitates Their Invasion of Perivascular Tissues In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deboux, Cyrille; Ladraa, Sophia; Cazaubon, Sylvie; Ghribi-Mallah, Siham; Weiss, Nicolas; Chaverot, Nathalie; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Evercooren, Anne Baron-Van

    2013-01-01

    Neural precursor (NPC) based therapies are used to restore neurons or oligodendrocytes and/or provide neuroprotection in a large variety of neurological diseases. In multiple sclerosis models, intravenously (i.v) -delivered NPCs reduced clinical signs via immunomodulation. We demonstrated recently that NPCs were able to cross cerebral endothelial cells in vitro and that the multifunctional signalling molecule, CD44 involved in trans-endothelial migration of lymphocytes to sites of inflammation, plays a crucial role in extravasation of syngeneic NPCs. In view of the role of CD44 in NPCs trans-endothelial migration in vitro, we questioned presently the benefit of CD44 overexpression by NPCs in vitro and in vivo, in EAE mice. We show that overexpression of CD44 by NPCs enhanced over 2 folds their trans-endothelial migration in vitro, without impinging on the proliferation or differentiation potential of the transduced cells. Moreover, CD44 overexpression by NPCs improved significantly their elongation, spreading and number of filopodia over the extracellular matrix protein laminin in vitro. We then tested the effect of CD44 overexpression after i.v. delivery in the tail vein of EAE mice. CD44 overexpression was functional in vivo as it accelerated trans-endothelial migration and facilitated invasion of HA expressing perivascular sites. These in vitro and in vivo data suggest that CD44 may be crucial not only for NPC crossing the endothelial layer but also for facilitating invasion of extravascular tissues. PMID:23468987

  12. Modulation of the Innate Immune Response by Human Neural Precursors Prevails over Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Remyelination to Rescue a Severe Model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease.

    PubMed

    Marteyn, Antoine; Sarrazin, Nadège; Yan, Jun; Bachelin, Corinne; Deboux, Cyrille; Santin, Mathieu D; Gressens, Pierre; Zujovic, Violetta; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) results from an X-linked misexpression of proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1). This leukodystrophy causes severe hypomyelination with progressive inflammation, leading to neurological dysfunctions and shortened life expectancy. While no cure exists for PMD, experimental cell-based therapy in the dysmyelinated shiverer model suggested that human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (hOPCs) or human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) are promising candidates to treat myelinopathies. However, the fate and restorative advantages of human NPCs/OPCs in a relevant model of PMD has not yet been addressed. Using a model of Plp1 overexpression, resulting in demyelination with progressive inflammation, we compared side-by-side the therapeutic benefits of intracerebrally grafted hNPCs and hOPCs. Our findings reveal equal integration of the donor cells within presumptive white matter tracks. While the onset of exogenous remyelination was earlier in hOPCs-grafted mice than in hNPC-grafted mice, extended lifespan occurred only in hNPCs-grafted animals. This improved survival was correlated with reduced neuroinflammation (microglial and astrocytosis loads) and microglia polarization toward M2-like phenotype followed by remyelination. Thus modulation of neuroinflammation combined with myelin restoration is crucial to prevent PMD pathology progression and ensure successful rescue of PMD mice. These findings should help to design novel therapeutic strategies combining immunomodulation and stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for disorders associating hypomyelination with inflammation as observed in PMD. Stem Cells 2016;34:984-996. PMID:26676415

  13. The Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins Mecp2, Mbd2 and Kaiso Are Dispensable for Mouse Embryogenesis, but Play a Redundant Function in Neural Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martín Caballero, Isabel; Hansen, Janne; Leaford, Donna; Pollard, Steven; Hendrich, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The precise molecular changes that occur when a neural stem (NS) cell switches from a programme of self-renewal to commit towards a specific lineage are not currently well understood. However it is clear that control of gene expression plays an important role in this process. DNA methylation, a mark of transcriptionally silent chromatin, has similarly been shown to play important roles in neural cell fate commitment in vivo. While DNA methylation is known to play important roles in neural specification during embryonic development, no such role has been shown for any of the methyl-CpG binding proteins (Mecps) in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the role of DNA methylation in neural cell fate decisions, we have investigated the function of Mecps in mouse development and in neural stem cell derivation, maintenance, and differentiation. In order to test whether the absence of phenotype in singly-mutant animals could be due to functional redundancy between Mecps, we created mice and neural stem cells simultaneously lacking Mecp2, Mbd2 and Zbtb33. No evidence for functional redundancy between these genes in embryonic development or in the derivation or maintenance of neural stem cells in culture was detectable. However evidence for a defect in neuronal commitment of triple knockout NS cells was found. Conclusions/Significance Although DNA methylation is indispensable for mammalian embryonic development, we show that simultaneous deficiency of three methyl-CpG binding proteins genes is compatible with apparently normal mouse embryogenesis. Nevertheless, we provide genetic evidence for redundancy of function between methyl-CpG binding proteins in postnatal mice. PMID:19177165

  14. Promotion of Cortical Neurogenesis from the Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Kyuhyun; Shaker, Mohammed R; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Boram; Lee, Eunsoo; Park, Jae-Yong; Lim, Mi-Sun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Shin, Ki Soon; Kim, Hyun; Geum, Dongho; Sun, Woong

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis occurs spontaneously in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in adult rodent brain, but it has long been debated whether there is sufficient adult neurogenesis in human SVZ. Subcallosal zone (SCZ), a posterior continuum of SVZ closely associated with posterior regions of cortical white matter, has also been reported to contain adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in both rodents and humans. However, little is known whether SCZ-derived aNSC (SCZ-aNSCs) can produce cortical neurons following brain injury. We found that SCZ-aNSCs exhibited limited neuronal differentiation potential in culture and after transplantation in mice. Neuroblasts derived from SCZ initially migrated toward injured cortex regions following brain injury, but later exhibited apoptosis. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic bcl-xL in the SCZ by retroviral infection rescued neuroblasts from cell death in the injured cortex, but neuronal maturation was still limited, resulting in atrophy. In combination with Bcl-xL, infusion of brain-derived neurotropic factor rescued atrophy, and importantly, a subset of such SCZ-aNSCs differentiated and attained morphological and physiological characteristics of mature, excitatory neurons. These results suggest that the combination of anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic factors might enable the use of aNSCs derived from the SCZ in cortical neurogenesis for neural replacement therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:888-901. PMID:26701067

  15. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2–nSOC–CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1–M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca2+ levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2–nSOC–CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the

  16. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Min Y.; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A.

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  17. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shackleford, Gregory M; Shi, Xiang-He; Swanson, Kimberly S; Mahdi, Min Y; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  18. Mouse pre-immunocytes as non-proliferating multipotent precursors of macrophages, interferon-producing cells, CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, L; Seidl, T; Lanzavecchia, A

    2001-11-01

    In this study we characterize in mouse bone marrow and peripheral blood a homogeneous cell subset expressing Ly6C, CD31 and CD11c, that can give rise to multiple cell types involved in the immune response. Under the aegis of M-CSF or GM-CSF these cells rapidly differentiate without division to either macrophages or immature dendritic cells, which can be further induced to mature by LPS stimulation. In fetal thymic organ cultures the same cells generate both CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) dendritic cells in comparable proportion as found in normal thymus. The Ly6C(+), CD31(+) and CD11c(+) cells express not only TLR2 and TLR4, which are characteristic of myeloid dendritic cells, but also TLR7 and TLR9, which conversely are characteristic of human interferon-producing cells. Moreover, following stimulation with influenza virus, they rapidly express high levels of IFN-alpha mRNA. Finally these precursors are increased in bone marrow and peripheral blood during systemic inflammation. These cells are defined as "pre-immunocytes" to underline the fact that they serve in a flexible fashion multiple, and often divergent, functions required for the immune response to pathogens. PMID:11745359

  19. Scutellarin Alleviates Behavioral Deficits in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis, Possibly Through Protecting Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Lu, Lin; Bao, Tian-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Miao; Yuan, Jing; Miao, Wei; Wang, Shu-Fen; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Scutellarin, a flavonoid extracted from an herbal medication (Erigeron breviscapus Hand-Mazz), has been shown to protect neurons against damage and to promote neurogenesis, and thus has therapeutic potential in the treatment of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Since neural stem cells (NSCs) could differentiate into myelin-producing oligodendrocytes, we speculate that scutellarin could also be used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). In the current study, we examined potential effects of scutellarin using a mouse model of MS. Briefly, adult C57BL/6 mice exposed to cuprizone (8 mg/day through diet, for 6 consecutive weeks) randomly received scutellarin (50 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 10 consecutive days. In the scutellarin-treated group, rotarod testing at the end of the treatment showed significant improvement of motor function (increased time to fall); myelin basic protein (MBP) staining of the corpus callosum revealed decreased demyelination; TUNEL staining followed by Nestin or Sox2 staining revealed increased number of NSCs and decreased rate of NSC apoptosis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). In a series of experiments using cultured NSCs subjected to cuprizone injury, we confirmed the protective effects of scutellarin. At 30 μM, scutellarin increased the commitment of NSCs to the oligodendrocyte and neuronal lineages, as evidenced by NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (NG2) and doublecortin (DCX) staining. Differentiation into astrocytes (as revealed by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining) was decreased. Maturation of the NSCs committed to the oligodendrocyte lineage, as evidenced by oligodendrocyte marker O4 antibody (O4) staining and MBP staining, was also promoted by scutellarin. Further analysis revealed that scutellarin might suppress the phosphorylation of p38 in cuprizone-induced NSCs. In summary, scutellarin could alleviate motor deficits in a mouse model for MS, possibly by inhibiting NSC apoptosis and

  20. Brevetoxin-Induced Neural Insult in the Retrosplenial Cortex of Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiuzhen; Benson, Janet M.; Gomez, Andrea P.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    Brevetoxins (polyether breve toxins; PbTx) are polyether neurotoxins produced by the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, an organism associated with red tide blooms in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic coast from Florida to North Carolina. Brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3) is a major component of the array of brevetoxins found in marine aerosols measured along red tide affected beaches. Humans exposed to aerosolized brevetoxins for short periods of time often suffer a variety of adverse health effects. It was consequently of interest to assess the potential for aerosolized brevetoxin to produce a neurotoxic response. Female BALB/c mice were exposed nose-only for 2 consecutive days to PbTx-3 aerosol, with a 2-h exposure on the first day and a 4-h exposure on the second day. The average PbTx-3 exposure concentrations on days 1 and 2 were 312 ± 113 μg brevetoxin 3/m3 and 278± 24μg brevetoxin 3/m3, respectively. The brevetoxin-containing aerosol had a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.92μm with a geometric standard deviation of 1.38. Coronal sections of mouse brains were evaluated for neuronal damage using both silver and Fluoro-Jade B staining to identify degenerating neuronal elements. PbTx-3 inhalation exposure produced neuronal degeneration in the posterior cingu-late/retrosplenial cortex of mice as evidenced by silver-positive degenerating neurons in this region. No staining was found in other regions of the PBTx-3-exposed mouse brains or in brains of control, sham-exposed mice. The existence of a neurotoxic insult in PbTx-3-exposed mice was confirmed using Fluoro-Jade B to label degenerating neurons. Fluro-Jade-positive neurons were observed in the retrosplenial cortex of PBTx-3 exposed, but not control, mice. These results suggest that subacute exposure to PbTx-3 for 2 days is sufficient to induce neuronal degeneration in a discrete region of the mouse cerebral cortex. PMID:17043031

  1. Inositol prevents folate-resistant neural tube defects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Greene, N D; Copp, A J

    1997-01-01

    Clinical trials demonstrate that up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs) can be prevented by folic acid supplementation in early pregnancy, whereas the remaining NTDs are resistant to folate. Here, we show that a second vitamin, myo-inositol, is capable of significantly reducing the incidence of spinal NTDs in curly tail mice, a genetic model of folate-resistant NTDs. Inositol increases flux through the inositol/lipid cycle, stimulating protein kinase C activity and upregulating expression of retinoic acid receptor beta, specifically in the caudal portion of the embryonic hindgut. This reduces the delay in closure of the posterior neuropore, the embryonic defect that is known to lead directly to spina bifida in curly tail embryos. Our findings reveal a molecular pathway of NTD prevention and suggest the possible efficacy of combined treatment with folate and inositol in overcoming the majority of human NTDs. PMID:8986742

  2. From neural to genetic substrates of panic disorder: Insights from human and mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mónica; D'Amico, Davide; Dierssen, Mara

    2015-07-15

    Fear is an ancestral emotion, an intrinsic defensive response present in every organism. Although fear is an evolutionarily advantageous emotion, under certain pathologies such as panic disorder it might become exaggerated and non-adaptive. Clinical and preclinical work pinpoints that changes in cognitive processes, such as perception and interpretation of environmental stimuli that rely on brain regions responsible for high-level function, are essential for the development of fear-related disorders. This review focuses on the involvement of cognitive function to fear circuitry disorders. Moreover, we address how animal models are contributing to understand the involvement of human candidate genes to pathological fear and helping achieve progress in this field. Multidisciplinary approaches that integrate human genetic findings with state of the art genetic mouse models will allow to elucidate the mechanisms underlying pathology and to develop new strategies for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25818748

  3. Return to quiescence of mouse neural stem cells by degradation of a proactivation protein.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Noelia; van den Berg, Debbie L C; Forget, Antoine; Andersen, Jimena; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Hunt, Charles; Ayrault, Olivier; Guillemot, François

    2016-07-15

    Quiescence is essential for long-term maintenance of adult stem cells. Niche signals regulate the transit of stem cells from dormant to activated states. Here, we show that the E3-ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing 1) is required for proliferating stem cells of the adult mouse hippocampus to return to quiescence. Huwe1 destabilizes proactivation protein Ascl1 (achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1) in proliferating hippocampal stem cells, which prevents accumulation of cyclin Ds and promotes the return to a resting state. When stem cells fail to return to quiescence, the proliferative stem cell pool becomes depleted. Thus, long-term maintenance of hippocampal neurogenesis depends on the return of stem cells to a transient quiescent state through the rapid degradation of a key proactivation factor. PMID:27418510

  4. 532 nm Low-Power Laser Irradiation Facilitates the Migration of GABAergic Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in Mouse Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzaki, Yumi; Shin, Hyeryun; Kawai, Hideki D.; Yamanoha, Banri; Kogure, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Accumulating evidence has shown that low-power laser irradiation (LLI) affects cell proliferation and survival, but little is known about LLI effects on neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). Here we investigate whether transcranial 532 nm LLI affects NSPCs in adult murine neocortex and in neurospheres from embryonic mice. Study Design/Materials and Methods We applied 532 nm LLI (Nd:YVO4, CW, 60 mW) on neocortical surface via cranium in adult mice and on cultured cells from embryonic mouse brains in vitro to investigate the proliferation and migration of NSPCs and Akt expression using immunohistochemical assays and Western blotting techniques. Results In vivo experiments demonstrated that 532 nm LLI significantly facilitated the migration of GABAergic NSPCs that were induced to proliferate in layer 1 by mild ischemia. In vitro experiments using GABAergic NSPCs derived from embryonic day 14 ganglionic eminence demonstrated that 532 nm LLI for 60 min promoted the migration of GAD67-immunopositive NSPCs with a significant increase of Akt expression. Meanwhile, the LLI induced proliferation, but not migration, of NSPCs that give rise to excitatory neurons. Conclusion It is concluded that 532 nm LLI promoted the migration of GABAergic NSPCs into deeper layers of the neocortex in vivo by elevating Akt expression. PMID:25919297

  5. Testing for genetic associations in a spina bifida population: analysis of the HOX gene family and human candidate gene regions implicated by mouse models of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Volcik, K A; Blanton, S H; Kruzel, M C; Townsend, I T; Tyerman, G H; Mier, R J; Northrup, H

    2002-07-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common severely disabling birth defects in the United States, affecting approximately 1-2 of every 1,000 live births. The etiology of NTDs is multifactorial, involving the combined action of both genetic and environmental factors. HOX genes play a central role in establishing the initial body plan by providing positional information along the anterior-posterior body and limb axis and have been implicated in neural tube closure. There are many mouse models that exhibit both naturally occurring NTDs in various mouse strains as well as NTDs that have been created by "knocking out" various genes. A nonparametric linkage method, the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), was utilized to test the HOX gene family and human equivalents of genes (when known) or the syntenic region in humans to those in mouse models which could play a role in the formation of NTDs. DNA from 459 spina bifida (SB) affected individuals and their parents was tested for linkage and association utilizing polymorphic markers from within or very close to the HOXA, HOXB, HOXC, and HOXD genes as well as from within the genes/gene regions of eight mouse models that exhibit NTDs. No significant findings were obtained for the tested markers. PMID:12116226

  6. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Fong, Keith S K; Hufnagel, Robert B; Khadka, Vedbar S; Corley, Michael J; Maunakea, Alika K; Fogelgren, Ben; Ahmed, Zubair M; Lozanoff, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct) cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse. PMID:26989192

  7. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Vedbar S.; Corley, Michael J.; Maunakea, Alika K.; Fogelgren, Ben; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct) cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse. PMID:26989192

  8. Pioglitazone significantly prevented decreased rate of neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells which was reduced by Pex11β knock-down.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, M; Ghaedi, K; Shoaraye Nejati, A; Nematollahi, M; Shiralyian, H; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2016-01-15

    Peroxisomes constitute special cellular organelles which display a variety of metabolic functions including fatty acid oxidation and free radical elimination. Abundance of these flexible organelles varies in response to different environmental stimuli. It has been demonstrated that PEX11β, a peroxisomal membrane elongation factor, is involved in the regulation of size, shape and number of peroxisomes. To investigate the role of PEX11β in neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), we generated a stably transduced mESCs line that derives the expression of a short hairpin RNA against Pex11β gene following doxycycline (Dox) induction. Knock-down of Pex11β, during neural differentiation, significantly reduced the expression of neural progenitor cells and mature neuronal markers (p<0.05) indicating that decreased expression of PEX11β suppresses neuronal maturation. Additionally, mRNA levels of other peroxisome-related genes such as PMP70, Pex11α, Catalase, Pex19 and Pex5 were also significantly reduced by Pex11β knock-down (p<0.05). Interestingly, pretreatment of transduced mESCs with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist (pioglitazone (Pio)) ameliorated the inhibitory effects of Pex11β knock down on neural differentiation. Pio also significantly (p<0.05) increased the expression of neural progenitor and mature neuronal markers besides the expression of peroxisomal genes in transduced mESC. Results elucidated the importance of Pex11β expression in neural differentiation of mESCs, thereby highlighting the essential role of peroxisomes in mammalian neural differentiation. The observation that Pio recovered peroxisomal function and improved neural differentiation of Pex11β knocked-down mESCs, proposes a potential new pharmacological implication of Pio for neurogenesis in patients with peroxisomal defects. PMID:26562432

  9. Phenytoin enhances the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and fibroblast growth factor receptor in the subventricular zone and promotes the proliferation of neural precursor cells and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Campos-Ordonez, Tania; Luquin, Sonia; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin is a widely used antiepileptic drug that induces cell proliferation in several tissues, such as heart, bone, skin, oral mucosa and neural precursors. Some of these effects are mediated via fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). These receptors are strongly expressed in the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), the main neurogenic niche in the adult brain. The aim of this study was to determine the cell lineage and cell fate of V-SVZ neural progenitors expanded by phenytoin, as well as the effects of this drug on EGFR/FGFR phosphorylation. Male BALB/C mice received 10 mg/kg phenytoin by oral cannula for 30 days. We analysed the proliferation of V-SVZ neural progenitors by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our findings indicate that phenytoin enhanced twofold the phosphorylation of EGFR and FGFR in the V-SVZ, increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)+/Sox2+ and BrdU+/doublecortin+ cells in the V-SVZ, and expanded the population of Olig2-expressing cells around the lateral ventricles. After phenytoin removal, a large number of BrdU+/Receptor interacting protein (RIP)+ cells were observed in the olfactory bulb. In conclusion, phenytoin enhanced the phosphorylation of FGFR and EGFR, and promoted the expression of neural precursor markers in the V-SVZ. In parallel, the number of oligodendrocytes increased significantly after phenytoin removal. PMID:26370587

  10. Heparan Sulfate Expression in the Neural Crest is Essential for Mouse Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Carbe, Christian; Pickhinke, Ute; Kupich, Sabine; Ohlig, Stefanie; Frye, Maike; Seelige, Ruth; Pallerla, Srinivas R.; Moon, Anne M.; Lawrence, Roger; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Xin; Grobe, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Impaired heparan sulfate (HS) synthesis in vertebrate development causes complex malformations due to the functional disruption of multiple HS-binding growth factors and morphogens. Here, we report developmental heart defects in mice bearing a targeted disruption of the HS-generating enzyme GlcNAc N-Deacetylase/GlcN N-Sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1), including ventricular septal defects (VSD), persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA), double outlet right ventricle (DORV), and retroesophageal right subclavian artery (RERSC). These defects closely resemble cardiac anomalies observed in mice made deficient in the cardiogenic regulator fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8). Consistent with this, we show that HS-dependent FGF8/FGF-receptor2C assembly and FGF8-dependent ERK-phosphorylation are strongly reduced in NDST1−/− embryonic cells and tissues. Moreover, WNT1-Cre/LoxP-mediated conditional targeting of NDST function in neural crest cells (NCCs) revealed that their impaired HS-dependent development contributes strongly to the observed cardiac defects. These findings raise the possibility that defects in HS biosynthesis may contribute to congenital heart defects in humans that represent the most common type of birth defect. PMID:24200809

  11. A Neural Circuit That Controls Cortical State, Plasticity, and the Gain of Sensory Responses in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Stryker, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex were first found to be exquisitely selective for particular properties of visual stimuli in anesthetized animals, including mice. Studies of alert mice in an apparatus that allowed them to stand or run revealed that locomotion causes a change in cortical state that dramatically increases the magnitude of responses in neurons of the visual cortex without altering selectivity, effectively changing the gain of sensory responses. Locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity in the recovery from long-term visual deprivation. We have studied the elements and operation of the neural circuit responsible for the enhancement of activity and shown that it enhances plasticity even in mice not free to run. The circuit consists of projections ascending from the midbrain locomotor region (MLR) to the basal forebrain, activating cholinergic and perhaps other projections to excite inhibitory interneurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the visual cortex. VIP cells activated by locomotion inhibit interneurons that express somatostatin (SST), thereby disinhibiting the excitatory principal neurons and allowing them to respond more strongly to effective visual stimuli. These findings reveal in alert animals how the ascending reticular activating system described in anesthetized animals 50 years ago operates to control cortical state. PMID:25948638

  12. [Macrophages promote the migration of neural stem cells into mouse spinal cord injury site].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhijian; Zhu, Wen; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the role of macrophages in the migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo and in vitro . Methods NSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were isolated from GFP transgenic mice and the immunofluorescence cytochemical staining of nestin was used to identify NSCs. After spinal cord injury was induced, the tissue level of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA was detected using quantitative real time PCR. The migration of GFP-NSCs was investigated 1 week after GFP-NSCs were injected into both sides of the damaged area. The effect of macrophage on the migration of NSCs in vitro was tested by Transwell(TM) system and the content of MCP-1 was detected by ELISA. Results NSCs highly expressed nestin. Compared with the control group, the level of MCP-1 mRNA significantly increased in the spinal cord injury group. The NSCs which were injected into the spinal cord migrated into the center of the injured site where F4/80 was highly expressed. Macrophages significantly increased the number of migrating NSCs in vitro and the secretion of MCP-1. Conclusion Macrophages induce NSC migrating into the spinal cord injury site possibly through promoting the secretion of MCP-1. PMID:27609570

  13. RNA sequencing from neural ensembles activated during fear conditioning in the mouse temporal association cortex.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Hyung; Huang, Ben S; Gray, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    The stable formation of remote fear memories is thought to require neuronal gene induction in cortical ensembles that are activated during learning. However, the set of genes expressed specifically in these activated ensembles is not known; knowledge of such transcriptional profiles may offer insights into the molecular program underlying stable memory formation. Here we use RNA-Seq to identify genes whose expression is enriched in activated cortical ensembles labeled during associative fear learning. We first establish that mouse temporal association cortex (TeA) is required for remote recall of auditory fear memories. We then perform RNA-Seq in TeA neurons that are labeled by the activity reporter Arc-dVenus during learning. We identify 944 genes with enriched expression in Arc-dVenus+ neurons. These genes include markers of L2/3, L5b, and L6 excitatory neurons but not glial or inhibitory markers, confirming Arc-dVenus to be an excitatory neuron-specific but non-layer-specific activity reporter. Cross comparisons to other transcriptional profiles show that 125 of the enriched genes are also activity-regulated in vitro or induced by visual stimulus in the visual cortex, suggesting that they may be induced generally in the cortex in an experience-dependent fashion. Prominent among the enriched genes are those encoding potassium channels that down-regulate neuronal activity, suggesting the possibility that part of the molecular program induced by fear conditioning may initiate homeostatic plasticity. PMID:27557751

  14. Soa genotype selectively affects mouse gustatory neural responses to sucrose octaacetate

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, MASASHI; LI, XIA; McCAUGHEY, STUART A.; BEAUCHAMP, GARY K.; BACHMANOV, ALEXANDER A.

    2013-01-01

    In mice, behavioral acceptance of the bitter compound sucrose octaacetate (SOA) depends on allelic variation of a single gene, Soa. The SW.B6-Soab congenic mouse strain has the genetic background of an “SOA taster” SWR/J strain and an Soa-containing donor chromosome fragment from an “SOA nontaster” C57BL/6J strain. Using microsatellite markers polymorphic between the two parental strains, we determined that the donor fragment spans 5–10 cM of distal chromosome 6. The SWR/J mice avoided SOA in two-bottle tests with water and had strong responses to SOA in two gustatory nerves, the chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (GL). In contrast, the SW.B6-Soab mice were indifferent to SOA in two-bottle tests and had very weak responses to SOA in both of these nerves. The SWR/J and SW.B6-Soab mice did not differ in responses of either nerve to sucrose, NaCl, HCl, or the bitter-tasting stimuli quinine, denatonium, strychnine, 6-n-propylthiouracil, phenylthiocarbamide, and MgSO4. Thus the effect of the Soa genotype on SOA avoidance is mediated by peripheral taste responsiveness to SOA, involving taste receptor cells innervated by both the CT and GL nerves. PMID:11328963

  15. Neuroprotective effect of the endogenous neural peptide apelin in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiang Jun; Yu, Shan Ping; Zhang, Like; Wei, Ling

    2010-07-01

    The adipocytokine apelin and its G protein-coupled APJ receptor were initially isolated from a bovine stomach and have been detected in the brain and cardiovascular system. Recent studies suggest that apelin can protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. Here, we investigated the effect of apelin on apoptosis in mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons. Exposure of the cortical cultures to a serum-free medium for 24 h induced nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic death; apelin-13 (1.0-5.0 nM) markedly prevented the neuronal apoptosis. Apelin neuroprotective effects were mediated by multiple mechanisms. Apelin-13 reduced serum deprivation (SD)-induced ROS generation, mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3. Apelin-13 prevented SD-induced changes in phosphorylation status of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, apelin-13 attenuated NMDA-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} accumulation. These results indicate that apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective adipocytokine that may block apoptosis and excitotoxic death via cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is suggested that apelins may be further explored as a potential neuroprotective reagent for ischemia-induced brain damage.

  16. RNA sequencing from neural ensembles activated during fear conditioning in the mouse temporal association cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin-Hyung; Huang, Ben S.; Gray, Jesse M.

    2016-01-01

    The stable formation of remote fear memories is thought to require neuronal gene induction in cortical ensembles that are activated during learning. However, the set of genes expressed specifically in these activated ensembles is not known; knowledge of such transcriptional profiles may offer insights into the molecular program underlying stable memory formation. Here we use RNA-Seq to identify genes whose expression is enriched in activated cortical ensembles labeled during associative fear learning. We first establish that mouse temporal association cortex (TeA) is required for remote recall of auditory fear memories. We then perform RNA-Seq in TeA neurons that are labeled by the activity reporter Arc-dVenus during learning. We identify 944 genes with enriched expression in Arc-dVenus+ neurons. These genes include markers of L2/3, L5b, and L6 excitatory neurons but not glial or inhibitory markers, confirming Arc-dVenus to be an excitatory neuron-specific but non-layer-specific activity reporter. Cross comparisons to other transcriptional profiles show that 125 of the enriched genes are also activity-regulated in vitro or induced by visual stimulus in the visual cortex, suggesting that they may be induced generally in the cortex in an experience-dependent fashion. Prominent among the enriched genes are those encoding potassium channels that down-regulate neuronal activity, suggesting the possibility that part of the molecular program induced by fear conditioning may initiate homeostatic plasticity. PMID:27557751

  17. Critical role of astrocytic interleukin-17 A in post-stroke survival and neuronal differentiation of neural precursor cells in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Zhang, J-C; Yao, C-Y; Wu, Y; Abdelgawad, A F; Yao, S-L; Yuan, S-Y

    2016-01-01

    The brain and the immune system interact in complex ways after ischemic stroke, and the long-term effects of immune response associated with stroke remain controversial. As a linkage between innate and adaptive immunity, interleukin-17 A (IL-17 A) secreted from gamma delta (γδ) T cells has detrimental roles in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic stroke. However, to date, the long-term actions of IL-17 A after stroke have not been investigated. Here, we found that IL-17 A showed two distinct peaks of expression in the ischemic hemisphere: the first occurring within 3 days and the second on day 28 after stroke. Our data also showed that astrocyte was the major cellular source of IL-17 A that maintained and augmented subventricular zone (SVZ) neural precursor cells (NPCs) survival, neuronal differentiation, and subsequent synaptogenesis and functional recovery after stroke. IL-17 A also promoted neuronal differentiation in cultured NPCs from the ischemic SVZ. Furthermore, our in vitro data revealed that in primary astrocyte cultures activated astrocytes released IL-17 A via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Culture media from reactive astrocytes increased neuronal differentiation of NSCs in vitro. Blockade of IL-17 A with neutralizing antibody prevented this effect. In addition, after screening for multiple signaling pathways, we revealed that the p38 MAPK/calpain 1 signaling pathway was involved in IL-17 A-mediated neurogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Thus, our results reveal a previously uncharacterized property of astrocytic IL-17 A in the maintenance and augment of survival and neuronal differentiation of NPCs, and subsequent synaptogenesis and spontaneous recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:27336717

  18. An In Vivo Characterization of Trophic Factor Production Following Neural Precursor Cell or Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, Gregory W.J.; Mothe, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shelly; Tator, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Cellular transplantation strategies for repairing the injured spinal cord have shown consistent benefit in preclinical models, and human clinical trials have begun. Interactions between transplanted cells and host tissue remain poorly understood. Trophic factor secretion is postulated a primary or supplementary mechanism of action for many transplanted cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support trophin production by transplanted cells in situ. In the present study, trophic factor expression was characterized in uninjured, injured-untreated, injured-treated with transplanted cells, and corresponding control tissue from the adult rat spinal cord. Candidate trophic factors were identified in a literature search, and primers were designed for these genes. We examined in vivo trophin expression in 3 paradigms involving transplantation of either brain or spinal cord-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Injury without further treatment led to a significant elevation of nerve growth factor (NGF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and lower expression of vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) and platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A). Transplantation of NPCs led to modest changes in trophin expression, and the co-administration of intrathecal trophins resulted in significant elevation of the neurotrophins, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), LIF, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). BMSCs transplantation upregulated NGF, LIF, and IGF-1. NPCs isolated after transplantation into the injured spinal cord expressed the neurotrophins, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and bFGF at higher levels than host cord. These data show that trophin expression in the spinal cord is influenced by injury and cell transplantation, particularly when combined with intrathecal trophin infusion

  19. Amyloid-β precursor protein induces glial differentiation of neural progenitor cells by activation of the IL-6/gp130 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Young-Don; Dantuma, Elise; Merchant, Stephanie; Bushnev, Sergey; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2010-11-01

    Although amyloid precursor protein (APP) due to the cytotoxicity of Aβ peptides, has been intensively studied, the physiological role of APP still remains wrapped up in veil. In this article, we propose that α-cleaved ectodomain of APP (sAPPα) stimulates the IL-6/gp130 signaling pathway for induction of gliogenesis within neural progenitor cells (NPCs). In our previous study, a high dose of APP differentiated NPCs into glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism of APP-induced glial differentiation, we examined the effects of sAPPα on the IL-6/gp130 signaling pathway. Application of sAPPα promoted mRNA expression of gp130, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). sAPPα stimulated the glial differentiation by upregulating the expression and phosphorylation of gp130. While mRNA expression of STAT3 was unchanged, phosphorylation of STAT3-Tyr705 gradually increased. Application of small interference RNA (siRNA) for STAT3 suppressed GFAP expression even in the presence of APP. Treatment with siRNA or inhibitor, AG490, of JAK1 efficiently suppressed STAT3 phosphorylation and GFAP expression. Upregulation of CNTF was observed in either short- or long-term treatment with sAPPα. RNA's interference of CNTF dose-dependently inhibited GFAP expression upregulated by treatment with sAPPα. This study suggests that the IL-6/gp130 signaling pathway is involved in sAPPα-induced glial differentiation of NPCs. Although further investigation is needed, this study may provide insight into the mechanism of glial differentiation of NPCs under pathological conditions in Alzheimer's disease or Down syndrome. PMID:20309664

  20. OTX2 exhibits cell-context-dependent effects on cellular and molecular properties of human embryonic neural precursors and medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Aiken, Christopher; Morrison, Ludivine Coudière; Rao, Radhika; Del Bigio, Marc R; Rampalli, Shravanti; Werbowetski-Ogilvie, Tamra

    2015-10-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant primary pediatric brain tumor and is currently divided into four subtypes based on different genomic alterations, gene expression profiles and response to treatment: WNT, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Group 3 and Group 4. This extensive heterogeneity has made it difficult to assess the functional relevance of genes to malignant progression. For example, expression of the transcription factor Orthodenticle homeobox2 (OTX2) is frequently dysregulated in multiple MB variants; however, its role may be subtype specific. We recently demonstrated that neural precursors derived from transformed human embryonic stem cells (trans-hENs), but not their normal counterparts (hENs), resemble Groups 3 and 4 MB in vitro and in vivo. Here, we tested the utility of this model system as a means of dissecting the role of OTX2 in MB using gain- and loss-of-function studies in hENs and trans-hENs, respectively. Parallel experiments with MB cells revealed that OTX2 exerts inhibitory effects on hEN and SHH MB cells by regulating growth, self-renewal and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. This was accompanied by decreased expression of pluripotent genes, such as SOX2, and was supported by overexpression of SOX2 in OTX2+ SHH MB and hENs that resulted in significant rescue of self-renewal and cell migration. By contrast, OTX2 is oncogenic and promotes self-renewal of trans-hENs and Groups 3 and 4 MB independent of pluripotent gene expression. Our results demonstrate a novel role for OTX2 in self-renewal and migration of hENs and MB cells and reveal a cell-context-dependent link between OTX2 and pluripotent genes. Our study underscores the value of human embryonic stem cell derivatives as alternatives to cell lines and heterogeneous patient samples for investigating the contribution of key developmental regulators to MB progression. PMID:26398939

  1. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Signaling is Necessary for Epidermal Growth Factor Mediated Proliferation of SVZ Neural Precursors in vitro Following Neonatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, Dhivyaa; Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Min, Jungsoo; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the importance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor co-signaling for rat neural precursor (NP) cell proliferation and self-renewal in the context of a developmental brain injury that is associated with cerebral palsy. Consistent with previous studies, we found that there is an increase in the in vitro growth of subventricular zone NPs isolated acutely after cerebral hypoxia–ischemia; however, when cultured in medium that is insufficient to stimulate the IGF type 1 receptor, neurosphere formation and the proliferative capacity of those NPs was severely curtailed. This reduced growth capacity could not be attributed simply to failure to survive. The growth and self-renewal of the NPs could be restored by addition of both IGF-I and IGF-II. Since the size of the neurosphere is predominantly due to cell proliferation we hypothesized that the IGFs were regulating progression through the cell cycle. Analyses of cell cycle progression revealed that IGF-1R activation together with EGFR co-signaling decreased the percentage of cells in G1 and enhanced cell progression into S and G2. This was accompanied by increases in expression of cyclin D1, phosphorylated histone 3, and phosphorylated Rb. Based on these data, we conclude that coordinate signaling between the EGF receptor and the IGF type 1 receptor is necessary for the normal proliferation of NPs as well as for their reactive expansion after injury. These data indicate that manipulations that maintain or amplify IGF signaling in the brain during recovery from developmental brain injuries will enhance the production of new brain cells to improve neurological function in children who are at risk for developing cerebral palsy. PMID:24904523

  2. A Cre-lox approach for transient transgene expression in neural precursor cells and long-term tracking of their progeny in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Cédric G; Raineteau, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Background Neural precursor cells (NPCs) can be isolated from various regions of the postnatal central nervous system (CNS). Manipulation of gene expression in these cells offers a promising strategy to manipulate their fate both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we developed a technique that allows the transient manipulation of single/multiple gene expression in NPCs in vitro, and the long-term tracking of their progeny both in vitro and in vivo. Results In order to combine the advantages of transient transfection with the long-term tracking of the transfected cells progeny, we developed a new approach based on the cre-lox technology. We first established a fast and reliable protocol to isolate and culture NPCs as monolayer, from the spinal cord of neonatal transgenic Rosa26-YFP cre-reporter mice. These cells could be reliably transfected with single/multiple plasmids by nucleofection. Nucleofection with mono- or bicistronic plasmids containing the Cre recombinase gene resulted in efficient recombination and the long-term expression of the YFP-reporter gene. The transient cre-expression was non-toxic for the transfected cells and did not alter their intrinsic properties. Finally, we demonstrated that cre-transfected cells could be transplanted into the adult brain, where they maintained YFP expression permitting long-term tracking of their migration and differentiation. Conclusion This approach allows single/multiple genes to be manipulated in NPCs, while at the same time allowing long-term tracking of the transfected cells progeny to be analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17504531

  3. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-08-15

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  4. Effect of trichostatin A on gelsolin levels, proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein, and amyloid beta-protein load in the brain of transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenzhong; Chauhan, Abha; Wegiel, Jerzy; Kuchna, Izabela; Gu, Feng; Chauhan, Ved

    2014-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that gelsolin is an anti-amyloidogenic protein. Trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, promotes the expression of gelsolin. Fibrillized amyoid beta-protein (Aβ) is a key constituent of amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the effects of TSA on the levels of gelsolin; amyloid precursor protein (APP); proteolytic enzymes (γ-secretase and β-secretase) responsible for the production of Aβ; Aβ-cleaving enzymes, i.e., neprilysin (NEP) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE); and amyloid load in the double transgenic (Tg) APPswe/PS1(δE9) mouse model of AD. Intraperitoneal injection of TSA for two months (9-11 months of age) resulted in decreased activity of HDAC, and increased levels of gelsolin in the hippocampus and cortex of the brain in AD Tg mice as compared to vehicle-treated mice. TSA also increased the levels of γ-secretase and β-secretase activity in the brain. However, TSA did not show any effect on the activities or the expression levels of NEP and IDE in the brain. Furthermore, TSA treatment of AD Tg mice showed no change in the amyloid load (percent of examined area occupied by amyloid plaques) in the hippocampus and cortex, suggesting that TSA treatment did not result in the reduction of amyloid load. Interestingly, TSA prevented the formation of new amyloid deposits but increased the size of existing plaques. TSA treatment did not cause any apoptosis in the brain. These results suggest that TSA increases gelsolin expression in the brain, but the pleiotropic effects of TSA negate the anti-amyloidogenic effect of gelsolin in AD Tg mice. PMID:25387339

  5. E mu/S mu transposition into Myc is sometimes a precursor for T(12;15) translocation in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Kim, Joong Su; Janz, Siegfried

    2003-05-01

    Misguided immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) has been implicated in the origin of Myc-activating chromosomal translocations, T(12;15), in BALB/c mouse plasmacytomas (PCTs). CSR has also been involved in the progression of T(12;15); for example, the approximation of Myc to the 3'-C alpha enhancer. This study provides evidence for an additional mechanism by which aberrant CSR may facilitate T(12;15): transposition of Ig heavy-chain (IgH) sequences to Myc. Five IgH transposons containing the intronic heavy-chain enhancer, E mu, and a truncated switch mu region, S mu, were found in the first intron of Myc in lymph node cells of IL-6 transgenic BALB/c mice. In two cases E mu/S mu transposition primed Myc to get involved in apparent trans-chromosomal CSR to C gamma 1, presumably leading to T(12;15). Translocations preceded by E mu/S mu transposition can sometimes be distinguished from de novo translocations by molecular fingerprints in translocation breakpoint regions (Ig switch region [S] inversions and unusual gene orders in composite S regions). The presence of such fingerprints in some PCTs suggests that the tumors sometimes evolve from transposition-bearing precursors. We propose that E mu/S mu transposition to Myc may facilitate plasmacytomagenesis by sensitizing Myc to undergo T(12;15) translocation. T(12;15), in turn, juxtaposes Myc to the 3'-C alpha enhancer, which appears to be required for deregulating Myc in a manner that is conducive to PCT development. PMID:12743607

  6. Effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on proliferation and differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells: Involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; He, Qiang; Dong, Jinhui; Jia, Zhanwei; Hao, Fang; Shan, Chunguang

    2016-06-10

    Since the majority of hearing impaired patients suffer from the significant loss of sensory hair cells and associated neurons, stem cell-based approaches hold great promise by replacing the damaged tissues in the ears. For instance, stem cells from the spiral ganglion could be isolated and expanded to regenerate neural structures of the inner ear. It is thus necessary to explore the potential procedures that may promote the proliferation and differentiation of such cochlear neural stem cells. In the present study, we study the effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a known antioxidant, for potential therapeutic use in NSC regeneration. At a non-toxic concentration, EGCG stimulated both proliferation and neurosphere formation in isolated mouse cochlear neural stem cell (NSC) in vitro. Specifically, the neural differentiation of NSC was promoted by EGCG treatment. The up-regulated neural function by EGCG was also supported by the increased calcium spike frequencies and enhanced neurite complexity in NSC-differentiated neurons. Finally, the induced neuron differentiation and Akt activation of cochlear NSC by EGCG were blocked by PI3 kinase inhibition. These data suggested that EGCG acts through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in cochlea NSC to promote cell growth and neuron differentiation, which may be exploited for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:27012759

  7. Mutation of Celsr1 disrupts planar polarity of inner ear hair cells and causes severe neural tube defects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Curtin, John A; Quint, Elizabeth; Tsipouri, Vicky; Arkell, Ruth M; Cattanach, Bruce; Copp, Andrew J; Henderson, Deborah J; Spurr, Nigel; Stanier, Philip; Fisher, Elizabeth M; Nolan, Patrick M; Steel, Karen P; Brown, Steve D M; Gray, Ian C; Murdoch, Jennifer N

    2003-07-01

    We identified two novel mouse mutants with abnormal head-shaking behavior and neural tube defects during the course of independent ENU mutagenesis experiments. The heterozygous and homozygous mutants exhibit defects in the orientation of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti, indicating a defect in planar cell polarity. The homozygous mutants exhibit severe neural tube defects as a result of failure to initiate neural tube closure. We show that these mutants, spin cycle and crash, carry independent missense mutations within the coding region of Celsr1, encoding a large protocadherin molecule [1]. Celsr1 is one of three mammalian homologs of Drosophila flamingo/starry night, which is essential for the planar cell polarity pathway in Drosophila together with frizzled, dishevelled, prickle, strabismus/van gogh, and rhoA. The identification of mouse mutants of Celsr1 provides the first evidence for the function of the Celsr family in planar cell polarity in mammals and further supports the involvement of a planar cell polarity pathway in vertebrate neurulation. PMID:12842012

  8. Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cell (EPI-NCSC)—Mediated Recovery of Sensory Function in a Mouse Model of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yao Fei; Gourab, Krishnaj; Wells, Clive; Clewes, Oliver; Schmit, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    Here we show that epidermal neural crest stem cell (EPI-NCSC) transplants in the contused spinal cord caused a 24% improvement in sensory connectivity and a substantial recovery of touch perception. Furthermore we present a novel method for the ex vivo expansion of EPI-NCSC into millions of stem cells that takes advantage of the migratory ability of neural crest stem cells and is based on a new culture medium and the use of microcarriers. Functional improvement was shown by two independent methods, spinal somatosensory evoked potentials (SpSEP) and the Semmes-Weinstein touch test. Subsets of transplanted cells differentiated into myelinating oligodendrocytes. Unilateral injections of EPI-NCSC into the lesion of midline contused mouse spinal cords elicited bilateral improvements. Intraspinal EPI-NCSC did not migrate laterally in the spinal cord or invade the spinal roots and dorsal root ganglia, thus implicating diffusible factors. EPI-NCSC expressed neurotrophic factors, angiogenic factors, and metalloproteases. The strength of EPI-NCSC thus is that they can exert a combination of pertinent functions in the contused spinal cord, including cell replacement, neuroprotection, angiogenesis and modulation of scar formation. EPI-NCSC are uniquely qualified for cell-based therapy in spinal cord injury, as neural crest cells and neural tube stem cells share a higher order stem cell and are thus ontologically closely related. PMID:20414748

  9. Brca1 is required for embryonic development of the mouse cerebral cortex to normal size by preventing apoptosis of early neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Pulvers, Jeremy N; Huttner, Wieland B

    2009-06-01

    The extent of apoptosis of neural progenitors is known to influence the size of the cerebral cortex. Mouse embryos lacking Brca1, the ortholog of the human breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1, show apoptosis in the neural tube, but the consequences of this for brain development have not been studied. Here we investigated the role of Brca1 during mouse embryonic cortical development by deleting floxed Brca1 using Emx1-Cre, which leads to conditional gene ablation specifically in the dorsal telencephalon after embryonic day (E) 9.5. The postnatal Brca1-ablated cerebral cortex was substantially reduced in size with regard to both cortical thickness and surface area. Remarkably, although the thickness of the cortical layers (except for the upper-most layer) was decreased, cortical layering as such was essentially unperturbed. High levels of apoptosis were found at E11.5 and E13.5, but dropped to near-control levels by E16.5. The apoptosis at the early stage of neurogenesis occurred in both BrdU pulse-labeled neural progenitors and the neurons derived therefrom. No changes were observed in the mitotic index of apical (neuroepithelial, radial glial) progenitors and basal (intermediate) progenitors, indicating that Brca1 ablation did not affect cell cycle progression. Brca1 ablation did, however, result in the nuclear translocation of p53 in neural progenitors, suggesting that their apoptosis involved activation of the p53 pathway. Our results show that Brca1 is required for the cerebral cortex to develop to normal size by preventing the apoptosis of early cortical progenitors and their immediate progeny. PMID:19403657

  10. Morphological comparison of the craniofacial phenotypes of mouse models expressing the Apert FGFR2 S252W mutation in neural crest- or mesoderm-derived tissues

    PubMed Central

    Heuzé, Yann; Singh, Nandini; Basilico, Claudio; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Holmes, Greg; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-01-01

    Bones of the craniofacial skeleton are derived from two distinct cell lineages, cranial neural crest and mesoderm, and articulate at sutures and synchondroses which represent major bone growth sites. Premature fusion of cranial suture(s) is associated with craniofacial dysmorphogenesis caused in part by alteration in the growth potential at sutures and can occur as an isolated birth defect or as part of a syndrome, such as Apert syndrome. Conditional expression of the Apert FGFR2 S252W mutation in mesoderm was previously shown to be necessary and sufficient to cause coronal craniosynostosis. Here we used micro computed tomography images of mice expressing the Apert mutation constitutively in either mesoderm or neural crest to quantify craniofacial shape variation and suture fusion patterns, and to identify shape changes in craniofacial bones derived from the lineage not expressing the mutation, referred to here as secondary shape changes. Our results show that at postnatal day 0: (i) conditional expression of the FGFR2 S252W mutation in neural crest-derived tissues causes a more severe craniofacial phenotype than when expressed in mesoderm-derived tissues; and (ii) both mesoderm- and neural crest-specific mouse models display secondary shape changes. We also show that premature suture fusion is not necessarily dependent on the expression of the FGFR2 S252W mutation in the sutural mesenchyme. More specifically, it appears that suture fusion patterns in both mouse models are suture-specific resulting from a complex combination of the influence of primary abnormalities of biogenesis or signaling within the sutures, and timing. PMID:24632501