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  1. Genes Involved in Post-Transcriptional Regulation Are Overrepresented in Stem/Progenitor Spermatogonia of Cryptorchid Mouse Testes

    PubMed Central

    Orwig, Kyle E.; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Master, Stephen R.; Phillips, Bart T.; Mack, Matthias; Avarbock, Mary R.; Chodosh, Lewis; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and consequent biological activity of adult tissue stem cells are regulated by signals emanating from the local microenvironment (niche). To gain insights into the molecular regulation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), gene expression was characterized from SSCs isolated from their cognate niches of cryptorchid (stem cell-enriched), wild-type, and busulfan-treated (stem cell-depleted) mouse testes. Quantitative assessment of stem cell activity in each testis model was determined using an in vivo functional assay and correlated with gene expression using Affymetrix MGU74Av2 microarrays and the ChipStat algorithm optimized to detect gene expression from rare cells in complex tissues. We identified 389 stem/progenitor spermatogonia candidate genes, which exhibited significant overlap with genes expressed by embryonic, hematopoietic, and neural stem cells; enriched spermatogonia; and cultured SSCs identified in previous studies. Candidate cell surface markers identified by the microarray may facilitate the isolation and enrichment of stem and/or progenitor spermatogonia. Flow cytometric analyses confirmed the expression of chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) and Cd14 on a subpopulation cryptorchid testis cells (α6-integrin+, side scatterlo) enriched for SSCs. These cell surface molecules may mark progenitor spermatogonia but not SSCs because Ccr2+ and Cd14+ fractions failed to produce spermatogenesis upon transplantation to recipient testes. Functional annotation of candidate genes and subsequent immunohistochemistry revealed that proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation are overrepresented in cryptorchid testes that are enriched for SSCs. Comparative analyses indicated that this is a recurrent biological theme among stem cells. PMID:18203673

  2. Distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Fleck, David; Mundt, Nadine; Bruentgens, Felicitas; Geilenkirchen, Petra; Machado, Patricia A; Veitinger, Thomas; Veitinger, Sophie; Lipartowski, Susanne M; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Oldiges, Marco; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogenesis ranks among the most complex, yet least understood, developmental processes. The physiological principles that control male germ cell development in mammals are notoriously difficult to unravel, given the intricate anatomy and complex endo- and paracrinology of the testis. Accordingly, we lack a conceptual understanding of the basic signaling mechanisms within the testis, which control the seminiferous epithelial cycle and thus govern spermatogenesis. Here, we address paracrine signal transduction in undifferentiated male germ cells from an electrophysiological perspective. We identify distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia, both in vitro and in situ. ATP-a dynamic, widespread, and evolutionary conserved mediator of cell to cell communication in various developmental contexts-activates at least two different spermatogonial purinoceptor isoforms. Both receptors operate within nonoverlapping stimulus concentration ranges, display distinct response kinetics and, in the juvenile seminiferous cord, are uniquely expressed in spermatogonia. We further find that spermatogonia express Ca(2+)-activated large-conductance K(+) channels that appear to function as a safeguard against prolonged ATP-dependent depolarization. Quantitative purine measurements additionally suggest testicular ATP-induced ATP release, a mechanism that could increase the paracrine radius of initially localized signaling events. Moreover, we establish a novel seminiferous tubule slice preparation that allows targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified testicular cell types in an intact epithelial environment. This unique approach not only confirms our in vitro findings, but also supports the notion of purinergic signaling during the early stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:27574293

  3. Data on in vivo phenotypes of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by interstitial GDNF signals in mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Aya; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-09-01

    This article contains the data related to the research article "in vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay" (Uchida et al., 2016) [1]. A novel transplantation assay of growth factor-soaked beads into the mammalian testicular interstitium was developed, in order to examine the effects of various soluble factors on in vivo dynamics of the spermatogonia including spermatogonial stem cells (SSC). Here we provide the image data of GFRα1-positive stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mouse seminiferous tubules near the beads soaked in GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor), one of the SSC niche factors. The data provide various phenotypes of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia induced by bead-derived GDNF signals, which are useful to understand the active state of GFRα1-positive stem/progenitor spermatogonia in vivo. PMID:27547806

  4. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  5. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Beal, Marc A; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  6. Bleomycin, unlike other male-mouse mutagens, is most effective in spermatogonia, inducing primarily deletions.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Kerley, M K; Johnson, D K; Shelby, M D

    2000-08-21

    Dominant-lethal tests [P.D. Sudman, J.C. Rutledge, J.B. Bishop, W.M. Generoso, Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice, Mutat. Res. 296 (1992) 205-217] had suggested that Bleomycin sulfate (Blenoxane), BLM, might be a female-specific mutagen. While confirming that BLM is indeed a powerful inducer of dominant-lethal mutations in females that fails to induce such mutations in postspermatogonial stages of males, we have shown in a specific-locus test that BLM is, in fact, mutagenic in males. This mutagenicity, however, is restricted to spermatogonia (stem-cell and differentiating stages), for which the specific-locus mutation rate differed significantly (P<0.008) from the historical control rate. In treated groups, dominant mutations, also, originated only in spermatogonia. With regard to mutation frequencies, this germ-cell-stage pattern is different from that for radiation and for any other chemical studied to date, except ethylnitrosourea (ENU). However, the nature of the spermatogonial specific-locus mutations differentiates BLM from ENU as well, because BLM induced primarily (or, perhaps, exclusively) multilocus deletions. Heretofore, no chemical that induced specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia did not also induce specific-locus as well as dominant-lethal mutations in postspermatogonial stages, making the dominant lethal test, up till now, predictive of male mutagenicity in general. The BLM results now demonstrate that there are chemicals that can induce specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia without testing positive in postspermatogonial stages. Thus, BLM, while not female-specific, is unique, (a) in its germ-cell-stage specificity in males, and (b) in inducing a type of mutation (deletions) that is atypical for the responding germ-cell stages (spermatogonia). PMID:10946246

  7. Paracrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling mediates proliferation of undifferentiated spermatogonia in the adult mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Hinako M.; Nusse, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) fuel the production of male germ cells but the mechanisms behind SSC self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation are still poorly understood. Using the Wnt target gene Axin2 and genetic lineage-tracing experiments, we found that undifferentiated spermatogonia, comprising SSCs and transit amplifying progenitor cells, respond to Wnt/β-catenin signals. Genetic elimination of β-catenin indicates that Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes the proliferation of these cells. Signaling is likely initiated by Wnt6, which is uniquely expressed by neighboring Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells in the seminiferous tubule that support germ cells and act as a niche for SSCs. Therefore, unlike other stem cell systems where Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in self-renewal, the Wnt pathway in the testis specifically contributes to the proliferation of SSCs and progenitor cells. PMID:26929341

  8. Antimutagenic properties of selected radioprotective drug mixtures with regard to X-ray-induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Benova, D K

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotective drugs AET, serotonin, and ATP were tested for antimutagenic activity against induction by 4.0 Gy X-rays of reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia. Single drugs administered in doses of 8, 24 and 360 mg/kg b.wt., respectively, had no effect on translocation yields recorded in diakinesis-metaphase I spermatocytes. Two-drug mixtures afforded insignificant protection. Three-drug mixtures, however, were found to reduce radiation damage considerably, and the extent of protection was dependent in part on the amount of ATP. The best effect was obtained with formulations of serotonin-AET-ATP at the following doses, respectively: 8 + 24 + 360 mg/kg, 16 + 24 + 336 mg/kg, and 16 + 32 + 264 mg/kg. Less effective were the serotonin-AET-ATP formulations: 16 + 32 + 120 mg/kg, and 8 + 24 + 480 mg/kg. Treatment with drugs omitting radiation exposure was observed to raise, though insignificantly, the level of spontaneous translocation frequency. PMID:3941667

  9. The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B; Hunsicker, Patricia R

    2012-01-01

    A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

  10. Antimutagenic properties of WR 2721 and of a radioprotective mixture, ATP-AET-serotonin, with regard to X ray induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia

    SciTech Connect

    Benova, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment by intraperitoneal administration of WR 2721 at 400 mg/kg body weight in mice receiving 4.0 Gy X rays was found to have an appreciable antimutagenic effect with regard to reciprocal translocation induction in spermatogonia. The effectiveness of the product tested proved superior to that of a radioprotective mixture of ATP-AET-serotonin given at optimal dose ratio--360, 24, and 8 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The RF (Reduction Factor) was 2.4 for WR 2721 and 1.8 for the mixture. The effect observed indicated WR 2721 to have potential capabilities for reducing the genetic risk of radiation in male individuals.

  11. Antimutagenic properties of WR 2721 and of a radioprotective mixture, ATP-AET-serotonin, with regard to X ray induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Benova, D

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment by intraperitoneal administration of WR 2721 at 400 mg/kg body weight in mice receiving 4.0 Gy X rays was found to have an appreciable antimutagenic effect with regard to reciprocal translocation induction in spermatogonia. The effectiveness of the product tested proved superior to that of a radioprotective mixture of ATP-AET-serotonin given at optimal dose ratio--360, 24, and 8 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The RF (Reduction Factor) was 2.4 for WR 2721 and 1.8 for the mixture. The effect observed indicated WR 2721 to have potential capabilities for reducing the genetic risk of radiation in male individuals. PMID:3027009

  12. A G-quadruplex DNA structure resolvase, RHAU, is essential for spermatogonia differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, X; Ma, W; Nie, J; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Yao, G; Han, J; Xu, J; Hu, B; Du, Y; Shi, Q; Yang, Z; Huang, X; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) DNA and G4 DNA resolvase are involved in a variety of biological processes. To understand the biological function of G4 DNA structures and their resolvases in spermatogenesis, we investigated the distribution of G4 structures in mouse testis and identified their alterations during spermatogenesis. Meanwhile, we studied the function of RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element (RHAU), a G4 DNA resolvase, in spermatogenesis with a germ-cell-specific knockout mouse model. The results showed that the ablation of RHAU in germ cells caused the increase of G4 structures and thus resulted in the decrease of spermatogonial differentiation. c-kit, a spermatogonia differentiation-related gene, contains two G4 DNA motifs on its promoter. We found its expression was significantly downregulated in RHAU conditional knockout testis. A further analysis demonstrated that RHAU directly bound to the G4 structures to activate c-kit expression. We concluded that RHAU regulates spermatogonia differentiation by promoting c-kit expression via directly binding to the G4 DNA motifs c-kit promoter. PMID:25611385

  13. In vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Aya; Kishi, Kasane; Aiyama, Yoshimi; Miura, Kento; Takase, Hinako M; Suzuki, Hitomi; Kanai-Azuma, Masami; Iwamori, Tokuko; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-08-01

    In mouse testes, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), a subpopulation of GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor-α1)-positive spermatogonia, are widely distributed along the convoluted seminiferous tubules. The proliferation and differentiation of the SSCs are regulated in part by local expression of GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotorphic factor), one of major niche factors for SSCs. However, the in vivo dynamics of the GDNF-stimulated GFRα1-positive spermatogonia remains unclear. Here, we developed a simple method for transplanting DiI-labeled and GDNF-soaked beads into the mouse testicular interstitium. By using this method, we examined the dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia in the tubular walls close to the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. The bead-derived GDNF signals were able to induce the stratified aggregate formation of GFRα1-positive undifferentiated spermatogonia by day 3 post-transplantation. Each aggregate consisted of tightly compacted Asingle and marginal Apaired-Aaligned GFRα1-positive spermatogonia and was surrounded by Aaligned GFRα1-negative spermatogonia at more advanced stages. These data not only provide in vivo evidence for the inductive roles of GDNF in forming a rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia but also indicate the usefulness of this in vivo assay system of various growth factors for the stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:27255992

  14. The regulatory repertoire of PLZF and SALL4 in undifferentiated spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Dawn L; Gao, Zhen; Mutoji, Kazadi; Song, Yuntao Charlie; Ruan, Jianhua; Hermann, Brian P

    2016-06-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) maintain spermatogenesis throughout adulthood through balanced self-renewal and differentiation, yet the regulatory logic of these fate decisions is poorly understood. The transcription factors Sal-like 4 (SALL4) and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF; also known as ZBTB16) are known to be required for normal SSC function, but their targets are largely unknown. ChIP-seq in mouse THY1(+) spermatogonia identified 4176 PLZF-bound and 2696 SALL4-bound genes, including 1149 and 515 that were unique to each factor, respectively, and 1295 that were bound by both factors. PLZF and SALL4 preferentially bound gene promoters and introns, respectively. Motif analyses identified putative PLZF and SALL4 binding sequences, but rarely both at shared sites, indicating significant non-autonomous binding in any given cell. Indeed, the majority of PLZF/SALL4 shared sites contained only PLZF motifs. SALL4 also bound gene introns at sites containing motifs for the differentiation factor DMRT1. Moreover, mRNA levels for both unique and shared target genes involved in both SSC self-renewal and differentiation were suppressed following SALL4 or PLZF knockdown. Together, these data reveal the full profile of PLZF and SALL4 regulatory targets in undifferentiated spermatogonia, including SSCs, which will help elucidate mechanisms controlling the earliest cell fate decisions in spermatogenesis. PMID:27068105

  15. Expression of c-kit receptor and its autophosphorylation in immature rat type A spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Dym, M; Jia, M C; Dirami, G; Price, J M; Rabin, S J; Mocchetti, I; Ravindranath, N

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activation of the c-kit receptor, a specific receptor for kit ligand (stem cell factor, steel factor), in rat type A spermatogonia. Testes were obtained from 9-day-old rats, decapsulated, and then subjected to sequential enzymatic digestion. The mixture of testicular cell types was then separated by sedimentation velocity at unit gravity. The isolated type A spermatogonia were characterized by light and electron microscopy. They exhibited spherical nuclei containing several nucleoli and associated chromatin clumps and organelles generally in a perinuclear location similar to that found in the in vivo 9-day-old testis. The synthesis of the c-kit receptor by the spermatogonia was established by hybridization of total RNA with a specific cDNA for mouse c-kit receptor. Two mRNA transcripts migrating at 4.8 kb and 12 kb were observed. Localization of the c-kit receptor in the isolated cells was determined by immunocytochemistry using an antibody to c-kit protein. Specific staining for c-kit receptor was observed in the cytoplasm of the isolated type A spermatogonia. Furthermore, the presence of the c-kit receptor protein in the spermatogonia was confirmed by Western blot analysis using the same antibody. The antibody recognized the c-kit receptor at approximately 160 kDa. In an attempt to determine whether this receptor has a functional significance, we examined the effect of kit ligand on the phosphorylation of the c-kit receptor. The c-kit receptor appeared to be constitutively autophosphorylated on tyrosine at low basal levels, and upon stimulation with kit ligand, the amount of phosphorylated protein increased significantly. These observations indicate that kit ligand induces autophosphorylation of the c-kit receptor, which may lead to the activation of other cellular target proteins responsible for spermatogonial proliferation and/or differentiation. PMID:7536046

  16. Production of donor-derived offspring by allogeneic transplantation of spermatogonia in the yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata).

    PubMed

    Morita, Tetsuro; Kumakura, Naoki; Morishima, Kagayaki; Mitsuboshi, Toru; Ishida, Masashi; Hara, Takashi; Kudo, Satomi; Miwa, Misako; Ihara, Shoko; Higuchi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2012-06-01

    Although the yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) is the fish most commonly farmed in Japan, breeding of this species has not yet started. This is primarily due to the lack of sufficiently sophisticated methods for manipulating gametogenesis, which makes it difficult to collect gametes from specific dams and sires. If it were possible to produce large numbers of surrogate fish by transplanting germ cells isolated from donor individuals harboring desirable genetic traits, then the probability of acquiring gametes carrying the donor-derived haplotype would increase, and breeding programs involving this species might increase as a result. As a first step, we established a method for the allogeneic transplantation of yellowtail spermatogonia and the production of donor-derived offspring. Donor cells were collected from immature (10-month-old) yellowtail males with testes containing abundant type A spermatogonia, labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye, and transferred into the peritoneal cavities of 8-day-old larvae. Fluorescence observation at 28 days post-transplantation revealed that PKH26-labeled cells were incorporated into recipients' gonads. To assess whether donor-derived spermatogonia could differentiate into functional gametes in the allogeneic recipient gonads, gametes collected from nine male and four female adult recipients were fertilized with wild-type eggs and milt. Analysis of microsatellite DNA markers confirmed that some of the first filial (F(1)) offspring were derived from donor fish, with the average contribution of donor-derived F(1) offspring being 66% and the maximum reaching 99%. These findings confirmed that our method was effective for transplanting yellowtail spermatogonia into allogeneic larvae to produce donor-derived offspring. PMID:22460666

  17. Depletion of the spermatogonia from the seminiferous epithelium of the rhesus monkey after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1988-03-01

    In unirradiated testes large differences were found in the total number of spermatogonia among different monkeys, but the number of spermatogonia in the right and the left testes of the same monkey appeared to be rather similar. During the first 11 days after irradiation with 0.5 to 4.0 Gy of X rays the number of Apale spermatogonia (Ap) decreased to about 13% of the control level, while the number of Adark spermatogonia (Ad) did not change significantly. A significant decrease in the number of Ad spermatogonia was seen at Day 14 together with a significant increase in the number of Ap spermatogonia. It was concluded that the resting Ad spermatogonia are activated into proliferating Ap spermatogonia. After Day 16 the number of both Ap and Ad spermatogonia decreased to low levels. Apparently the new Ap spermatogonia were formed by lethally irradiated Ad spermatogonia and degenerated while attempting to divide. The activation of the Ad spermatogonia was found to take place throughout the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. Serum FSH, LH, and testosterone levels were measured before and after irradiation. Serum FSH levels already had increased during the first week after irradiation to 160% of the control level. Serum LH levels increased between 18 and 25 days after irradiation. Serum testosterone levels did not change at all. The results found in the rhesus monkey are in line with those found in humans, but due to the presence of Ad spermatogonia they differ from those obtained in non-primates.

  18. Genetic mapping of tumor susceptibility genes involved in mouse plasmacytomagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.A.; Krall, M.M.; Dosik, J.K. )

    1993-10-15

    Plasmacytomas (PCTs) were induced in 47% of BALB/cAnPt mice by the intraperitoneal injection of pristane, in 2% of (BALB/c [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1], and in 11% of 773 BALB/cAnPt [times] (BALB/cAnPt [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1]N[sub 2] backcross mice. This result indicates a multigenic mode of inheritance for PCT susceptibility. To locate genes controlling this complex genetic trait, tumor susceptibility in backcross progeny generated from BALB/c and DBA/2N (resistant) mice was correlated with alleles of 83 marker loci. The genotypes of the PCT-susceptible progeny displayed an excess homozygosity for BALB/c alleles with a 32-centimorgan stretch of mouse chromosome 4 (>95% probability of linkage) with minimal recombination (12%) near Gt10. Another susceptibility gene on mouse chromosome 1 may be linked to Fcgr2 (90% probability of linkage); there were excess heterozygotes for Fcgr2 among the susceptible progeny and excess homozygotes among the resistant progeny. Regions of mouse chromosomes 4 and 1 that are correlated with PCT susceptibility share extensive linkage homology with regions of human chromosome 1 that have been associated with cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma and lymphoid, breast, and endocrine tumors. 68 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Conditions for Long-Term Culture of Cattle Undifferentiated Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Oatley, Melissa J; Kaucher, Amy V; Yang, Qi-En; Waqas, Muhammad Salman; Oatley, Jon M

    2016-07-01

    Continual and robust spermatogenesis relies on the actions of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population that contains stem cells. A remarkable feature of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is the capacity to regenerate spermatogenesis following isolation from a donor testis and transplantation into a permissive recipient testis. This capacity has enormous potential as a tool for enhancing the reproductive capacity of livestock, which can improve production efficiency. Because SSCs are a rare subset of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population, a period of in vitro amplification in number following isolation from donor testicular tissue is essential. Here, we describe methodology for isolation of a cell fraction from prepubertal bull testes that is enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia and long-term maintenance of the cells in both the feeder cell coculture and the feeder-free format. To achieve this method, we derived bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFF) to serve as feeders for optimizing medium conditions that promote maintenance of bovine undifferentiated spermatogonia for at least 2 mo. In addition, we devised a feeder-free system with BFF-conditioned medium that sustained bovine undifferentiated spermatogonia for at least 1 mo in vitro. The methodologies described could be optimized to provide platforms for exponential expansion of bovine SSCs that will provide the numbers needed for transplantation into recipient testes. PMID:27251094

  20. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  1. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  2. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 in mouse sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    HAMANO, Koh-ichi; KAWANISHI, Tae; MIZUNO, Atsuko; SUZUKI, Makoto; TAKAGI, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is one of the temperature-sensitive ion channels involved in temperature receptors, and it is known to be activated from 35 to 40ºC. Here we analyzed sperm motility function of Trpv4 knockout (KO) mouse in temperature-gradient conditions to elucidate the thermotaxis of mouse sperm and the involvement of TRPV4 in thermotaxis. The sperm were introduced at the vertical column end of a T-shaped chamber filled with medium in a plastic dish, and we measured the number of sperm that arrived at both ends of the wide column where we had established a temperature gradient of approx. 2ºC, and we evaluated the sperm’s thermotaxis. Large numbers of wild-type (WT) mouse sperm migrated into the high level of the temperature gradient that was set in the wide column, and thermotaxis was confirmed. The ratio of migrated sperm at the high temperature level of the T-shaped chamber was decreased in the KO sperm and Ruthenium red (a TRPV antagonist) treated sperm compared with the WT sperm. The thermotaxis of the mouse sperm was confirmed, and the involvement of TRPV4 in this thermotaxis was suggested. PMID:27180924

  3. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 in mouse sperm thermotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Koh-Ichi; Kawanishi, Tae; Mizuno, Atsuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Takagi, Yuji

    2016-08-25

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is one of the temperature-sensitive ion channels involved in temperature receptors, and it is known to be activated from 35 to 40ºC. Here we analyzed sperm motility function of Trpv4 knockout (KO) mouse in temperature-gradient conditions to elucidate the thermotaxis of mouse sperm and the involvement of TRPV4 in thermotaxis. The sperm were introduced at the vertical column end of a T-shaped chamber filled with medium in a plastic dish, and we measured the number of sperm that arrived at both ends of the wide column where we had established a temperature gradient of approx. 2ºC, and we evaluated the sperm's thermotaxis. Large numbers of wild-type (WT) mouse sperm migrated into the high level of the temperature gradient that was set in the wide column, and thermotaxis was confirmed. The ratio of migrated sperm at the high temperature level of the T-shaped chamber was decreased in the KO sperm and Ruthenium red (a TRPV antagonist) treated sperm compared with the WT sperm. The thermotaxis of the mouse sperm was confirmed, and the involvement of TRPV4 in this thermotaxis was suggested. PMID:27180924

  4. Mouse neuron navigator 1, a novel microtubule-associated protein involved in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, María José; Alcántara, Soledad; Mascaró, Cristina; Pérez-Brangulí, Francesc; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Maes, Tamara; Soriano, Eduardo; Buesa, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    The development of the nervous system (NS) requires the coordinated migration of multiple waves of neurons and subsequent processes of neurite maturation, both involving selective guidance mechanisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, unc-53 codes for a new multidomain protein involved in the directional migration of a subset of cells. We describe here the first functional characterization of the mouse homologue, mouse Neuron navigator 1 (mNAV1), whose expression is largely restricted to the NS during development. EGFP-mNAV1 associates with microtubules (MTs) plus ends present in the growth cone through a new microtubule-binding (MTB) domain. Moreover, its overexpression in transfected cells leads to MT bundling. The abolition of mNAV1 causes loss of directionality in the leading processes of pontine-migrating cells, providing evidence for a role of mNAV1 in mediating Netrin-1-induced directional migration. PMID:15797708

  5. Axial elongation in mouse embryos involves mediolateral cell intercalation behavior in the paraxial mesoderm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, WeiWei; Burdsal, Carol; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sutherland, Ann E.

    2006-02-01

    The cell mechanical and signaling pathways involved in gastrulation have been studied extensively in invertebrates and amphibians, such as Xenopus, and more recently in non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish and chick. However, because culturing mouse embryos extra-utero is very difficult, this fundamental process has been least characterized in the mouse. As the primary mammalian model for genetics, biochemistry, and the study of human disease and birth defects, it is important to investigate how gastrulation proceeds in murine embryos. We have developed a method of using 4D multiphoton excitation microscopy and extra-utero culture to visualize and characterize the morphogenetic movements in mouse embryos dissected at 8.5 days of gestation. Cells are labeled by expression of an X chromosome-linked enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene. This method has provided a unique approach, where, for the first time, patterns of cell behavior in the notochord and surrounding paraxial mesoderm can be visualized and traced quantitatively. Our observations of mouse embryos reveal both distinct differences as well as striking similarities in patterned cell motility relative to other vertebrate models such as Xenopus, where axial extension is driven primarily by mediolateral oriented cell behaviors in the notochord and paraxial somitic mesoderm. Unlike Xenopus, the width of the mouse notochord remains the same between 4-somite stage and 8-somite stage embryos. This implies the mouse notochord plays a lesser role in driving axial extension compared to Xenopus, although intercalation may occur where the anterior region of the node becomes notochordal plate. In contrast, the width of mouse paraxial mesoderm narrows significantly during this period and cells within the paraxial mesoderm are both elongated and aligned perpendicular to the midline. In addition, these cells are observed to intercalate, consistent with a role for paraxial mesoderm in driving convergence

  6. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  7. p90Rsk is not involved in cytostatic factor arrest in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Julien; Umbhauer, Muriel; Rassinier, Pascale; Hanauer, André; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2005-01-01

    Vertebrate oocytes arrest in metaphase of the second meiotic division (MII), where they maintain a high cdc2/cyclin B activity and a stable, bipolar spindle because of cytostatic factor (CSF) activity. The Mos–MAPK pathway is essential for establishing CSF. Indeed, oocytes from the mos−/− strain do not arrest in MII and activate without fertilization, as do Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with morpholino oligonucleotides directed against Mos. In Xenopus oocytes, p90Rsk (ribosomal S6 kinase), a MAPK substrate, is the main mediator of CSF activity. We show here that this is not the case in mouse oocytes. The injection of constitutively active mutant forms of Rsk1 and Rsk2 does not induce a cell cycle arrest in two-cell mouse embryos. Moreover, these two mutant forms do not restore MII arrest after their injection into mos−/− oocytes. Eventually, oocytes from the triple Rsk (1, 2, 3) knockout present a normal CSF arrest. We demonstrate that p90Rsk is not involved in the MII arrest of mouse oocytes. PMID:15837801

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  10. Extraordinary sequence divergence at Tsga8, an X-linked gene involved in mouse spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Good, Jeffrey M; Vanderpool, Dan; Smith, Kimberly L; Nachman, Michael W

    2011-05-01

    The X chromosome plays an important role in both adaptive evolution and speciation. We used a molecular evolutionary screen of X-linked genes potentially involved in reproductive isolation in mice to identify putative targets of recurrent positive selection. We then sequenced five very rapidly evolving genes within and between several closely related species of mice in the genus Mus. All five genes were involved in male reproduction and four of the genes showed evidence of recurrent positive selection. The most remarkable evolutionary patterns were found at Testis-specific gene a8 (Tsga8), a spermatogenesis-specific gene expressed during postmeiotic chromatin condensation and nuclear transformation. Tsga8 was characterized by extremely high levels of insertion-deletion variation of an alanine-rich repetitive motif in natural populations of Mus domesticus and M. musculus, differing in length from the reference mouse genome by up to 89 amino acids (27% of the total protein length). This population-level variation was coupled with striking divergence in protein sequence and length between closely related mouse species. Although no clear orthologs had previously been described for Tsga8 in other mammalian species, we have identified a highly divergent hypothetical gene on the rat X chromosome that shares clear orthology with the 5' and 3' ends of Tsga8. Further inspection of this ortholog verified that it is expressed in rat testis and shares remarkable similarity with mouse Tsga8 across several general features of the protein sequence despite no conservation of nucleotide sequence across over 60% of the rat-coding domain. Overall, Tsga8 appears to be one of the most rapidly evolving genes to have been described in rodents. We discuss the potential evolutionary causes and functional implications of this extraordinary divergence and the possible contribution of Tsga8 and the other four genes we examined to reproductive isolation in mice. PMID:21186189

  11. AZFc deletions do not affect the function of human spermatogonia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nickkholgh, B.; Korver, C.M.; van Daalen, S.K.M.; van Pelt, A.M.M.; Repping, S.

    2015-01-01

    Azoospermic factor c (AZFc) deletions are the underlying cause in 10% of azoo- or severe oligozoospermia. Through extensive molecular analysis the precise genetic content of the AZFc region and the origin of its deletion have been determined. However, little is known about the effect of AZFc deletions on the functionality of germ cells at various developmental steps. The presence of normal, fertilization-competent sperm in the ejaculate and/or testis of the majority of men with AZFc deletions suggests that the process of differentiation from spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) to mature spermatozoa can take place in the absence of the AZFc region. To determine the functionality of AZFc-deleted spermatogonia, we compared in vitro propagated spermatogonia from six men with complete AZFc deletions with spermatogonia from three normozoospermic controls. We found that spermatogonia of AZFc-deleted men behave similar to controls during culture. Short-term (18 days) and long-term (48 days) culture of AZFc-deleted spermatogonia showed the same characteristics as non-deleted spermatogonia. This similarity was revealed by the same number of passages, the same germ cell clusters formation and similar level of genes expression of spermatogonial markers including ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1), zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha 1 (GFRA1), as well as germ cell differentiation markers including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loophelix 2 (SOHLH2), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) and synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3). The only exception was melanoma antigen family A4 (MAGEA4) which showed significantly lower expression in AZFc-deleted samples than controls in short-term culture while in long-term culture it was hardly detected in both AZFc-deleted and control

  12. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-2 in carbachol-induced positive inotropic response in mouse isolated left atrium.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yukio; Ike, Asako; Tanida, Riyo; Okada, Muneyoshi; Yamawaki, Hideyuki

    2009-12-01

    The mouse heart is expected to have characteristic contractile properties. However, basic information on the function of the mouse heart has not been accumulated sufficiently. In this study, the involvement of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in carbachol (CCh)-induced inotropic response was investigated in mouse isolated left atrium. Influences of CCh and their mechanisms of action on developed tension elicited by electrical stimulation were examined pharmacologically. The presence of COX-2 in atrium was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. CCh (3 microM for 15 min) produced a biphasic inotropic response: a transient decrease in contractile force followed by a late increase. Atropine suppressed the biphasic inotropic response to CCh. A muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonist, 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methlpiperidine, inhibited the late positive inotropic action. Blockade of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) or F(2alpha) receptor by 6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid (AH6809) or 9alpha, 15R-dihydroxy-11beta-fluoro-15-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-2-yl)-16,17,18,19,20-pentanor-prosta 5Z, 13E-dien-1-oic acid (AL8810), respectively, significantly suppressed the positive inotropic response to CCh. A nonselective COX inhibitor, indomethacin, and a selective COX-2 inhibitor, N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) inhibited the positive response. A COX-1 inhibitor, valeroyl salicylate, did not affect the positive response. The positive response was almost completely abolished in the endocardial endothelium-deprived atria. Existence of COX-2 in endocardial endothelium was confirmed by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. The present study indicated that the CCh-induced positive inotropic response was mediated by PGs, possibly PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha), released in part from endocardial endothelium. Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrated that the production of PGs depended in part on COX-2 in endocardial endothelium through the

  13. Involvement of Autophagic Pathway in the Progression of Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Della Santina, Luca; Strettoi, Enrica; Cervetto, Luigi; Gargini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The notion that diabetic retinopathy (DR) is essentially a micro-vascular disease has been recently challenged by studies reporting that vascular changes are preceded by signs of damage and loss of retinal neurons. As to the mode by which neuronal death occurs, the evidence that apoptosis is the main cause of neuronal loss is far from compelling. The objective of this study was to investigate these controversies in a mouse model of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes. Starting from 8 weeks after diabetes induction there was loss of rod but not of cone photoreceptors, together with reduced thickness of the outer and inner synaptic layers. Correspondingly, rhodopsin expression was downregulated and the scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) is suppressed. In contrast, cone opsin expression and photopic ERG response were not affected. Suppression of the scotopic ERG preceded morphological changes as well as any detectable sign of vascular alteration. Only sparse apoptotic figures were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and glia was not activated. The physiological autophagy flow was altered instead, as seen by increased LC3 immunostaining at the level of outer plexiform layer (OPL) and upregulation of the autophagic proteins Beclin-1 and Atg5. Collectively, our results show that the streptozotocin induced DR in mouse initiates with a functional loss of the rod visual pathway. The pathogenic pathways leading to cell death develop with the initial dysregulation of autophagy well before the appearance of signs of vascular damage and without strong involvement of apoptosis. PMID:26924963

  14. Dose-response involvement of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by triazole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Matsuo, Saori; Irie, Kaoru; Kodama, Yukio; Ozawa, Shogo; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Yoshida, Midori

    2013-07-31

    To clarify the dose-response relationship between constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activity and induction of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) expression and hypertrophy by triazole fungicides in mouse liver, three dose levels of cyproconazole (Cypro), tebuconazole (Teb), fluconazole (Flu), and phenobarbital (PB), a typical CYP2B inducer, were administrated in diet to male wild-type (WT) and CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice for one week. In WT mice, all compounds dose-dependently induced liver weight increases and hepatocellular hypertrophy accompanied by CYP2B expression. In CARKO mice, these effects were not induced by PB, while Cypro or Flu induced these effects only at the highest dose. Dose-dependent liver hypertrophy was detected in CARKO mice treated with Teb, but at the lowest dose the intensity was weakened compared to WT mice. The present results indicate that Cypro and Flu mainly induced CAR-mediated liver hypertrophy, while Teb slightly involved CAR. The involvement of CAR in triazole-induced liver hypertrophy was dose-responsive. In addition, all three triazoles have non-CAR-mediated liver hypertrophy pathways, indicating that the hypertrophy induced by these triazoles differs from that of PB. PMID:23721867

  15. Successful cryopreservation of spermatogonia in critically endangered Manchurian trout (Brachymystax lenok).

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungki; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2016-04-01

    Because of the lack of cryopreservation techniques for fish eggs and embryos, cryopreservation of fish spermatogonia and subsequent generation of eggs and sperm would be an exit strategy for the long-term preservation of genetic resources. This study aimed to optimize cryoprotectants, cooling rates, and thawing temperatures for slow freezing of spermatogonia from endangered Manchurian trout (Brachymystax lenok). Whole testes were frozen with a cryomedium containing 1.3 M methanol, 0.2 M trehalose, and 10% egg yolk at a cooling rate of -1 °C/min and then stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 days. After thawing at 30 °C in a water bath, testicular cells from thawed testes were intraperitoneally transplanted into allogeneic triploid hatchlings. Transplanted spermatogonia migrated toward and were incorporated into recipient gonads, where they underwent gametogenesis. Transplantation efficiency did not significantly differ between frozen and fresh testes, demonstrating that Manchurian trout spermatogonia can be successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. PMID:26827783

  16. Involvement of Rab6a in organelle rearrangement and cytoskeletal organization during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Jiaqi; Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Ling; Liu, Honglin; Rui, Rong; Gu, Ling; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Rab GTPases have been reported to define the identity and transport routes of vesicles. Rab6 is one of the most extensively studied Rab proteins involved in regulating organelle trafficking and integrity maintenance. However, to date, the function of Rab6 in mammalian oocytes has not been addressed. Here we report severe disorganization of endoplasmic reticulum upon specific knockdown of Rab6a in mouse oocytes. In line with this finding, intracellular Ca2+ stores are accordingly reduced in Rab6a-depleted oocytes. Furthermore, in these oocytes, we observe the absence of cortical granule free domain, which is a kind of special organelle in matured oocytes and its exocytosis is calcium dependent. On the other hand, following Rab6a knockdown, the prominent defects of cytoskeletal structures are detected during oocyte meiosis. In particular, the majority of Rab6a-depleted oocytes fail to form the actin cap, and the frequency of spindle defects and chromosome misalignment is significantly elevated. In summary, our data reveal that Rab6a not only participates in modulating the organization of oocyte organelles, but also is a novel regulator of meiotic apparatus in mammalian oocytes. PMID:27030207

  17. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  18. High telomerase is a hallmark of undifferentiated spermatogonia and is required for maintenance of male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pech, Matthew F; Garbuzov, Alina; Hasegawa, Kazuteru; Sukhwani, Meena; Zhang, Ruixuan J; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Brockman, Stephanie A; Lin, Shengda; Brunet, Anne; Orwig, Kyle E; Artandi, Steven E

    2015-12-01

    Telomerase inactivation causes loss of the male germline in worms, fish, and mice, indicating a conserved dependence on telomere maintenance in this cell lineage. Here, using telomerase reverse transcriptase (Tert) reporter mice, we found that very high telomerase expression is a hallmark of undifferentiated spermatogonia, the mitotic population where germline stem cells reside. We exploited these high telomerase levels as a basis for purifying undifferentiated spermatogonia using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Telomerase levels in undifferentiated spermatogonia and embryonic stem cells are comparable and much greater than in somatic progenitor compartments. Within the germline, we uncovered an unanticipated gradient of telomerase activity that also enables isolation of more mature populations. Transcriptomic comparisons of Tert(High) undifferentiated spermatogonia and Tert(Low) differentiated spermatogonia by RNA sequencing reveals marked differences in cell cycle and key molecular features of each compartment. Transplantation studies show that germline stem cell activity is confined to the Tert(High) cKit(-) population. Telomere shortening in telomerase knockout strains causes depletion of undifferentiated spermatogonia and eventual loss of all germ cells after undifferentiated spermatogonia drop below a critical threshold. These data reveal that high telomerase expression is a fundamental characteristic of germline stem cells, thus explaining the broad dependence on telomerase for germline immortality in metazoans. PMID:26584619

  19. atRA-induced apoptosis of mouse embryonic palate mesenchymal cells involves activation of MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: yuzengli@263.net; Xing Ying . E-mail: xingy@zzu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that atRA treatment resulted in cell-cycle block and growth inhibition in mouse embryonic palatal mesenchymal (MEPM). In the current study, gestation day (GD) 13 MEPM cells were used to test the hypothesis that the growth inhibition by atRA is due to apoptosis. The effects of atRA on apoptosis were assessed by performing MTT assay, Cell Death Detection ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Data analysis confirmed that atRA treatment induced apoptosis-like cell death, as shown by decreased cell viability and increased fragmented DNA and sub-G1 fraction. atRA-induced apoptosis was associated with upregulation of bcl-2, translocation of bax protein to the mitochondria from the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cytochrome c release into cytosol. atRA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 specific inhibitor, and z-VAD-fmk, a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the atRA-induced cell death of MEPM cells occurs through the cytochrome c- and caspase-3-dependent pathways. In addition, atRA treatment caused a strong and sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38), as well as an early but transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, atRA-induced DNA fragmentation and capase-3 activation were prevented by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and the p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190), but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitor (U0126). From these results, we suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways is involved in the atRA-induced apoptosis of MEPM cells.

  20. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration. PMID:8223869

  1. Involvement of catecholaminergic neurons in motor innervation of striated muscle in the mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    van der Keylen, Piet; Garreis, Fabian; Steigleder, Ruth; Sommer, Daniel; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Enteric co-innervation is a peculiar innervation pattern of striated esophageal musculature. Both anatomical and functional data on enteric co-innervation related to various transmitters have been collected in different species, although its function remains enigmatic. However, it is unclear whether catecholaminergic components are involved in such a co-innervation. Thus, we examined to identify catecholaminergic neuronal elements and clarify their relationship to other innervation components in the esophagus, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), α-bungarotoxin (α-BT) and PCR with primers for amplification of cDNA encoding TH and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH). TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant throughout the myenteric plexus and localized on about 14% of α-BT-labelled motor endplates differing from VAChT-positive vagal nerve terminals. TH-positive perikarya represented a subpopulation of only about 2.8% of all PGP 9.5-positive myenteric neurons. Analysis of mRNA showed both TH and DBH transcripts in the mouse esophagus. As ChAT-positive neurons in the compact formation of the nucleus ambiguus were negative for TH, the TH-positive nerve varicosities on motor endplates are presumably of enteric origin, although a sympathetic origin cannot be excluded. In the medulla oblongata, the cholinergic ambiguus neurons were densely supplied with TH-positive varicosities. Thus, catecholamines may modulate vagal motor innervation of esophageal-striated muscles not only at the peripheral level via enteric co-innervation but also at the central level via projections to the nucleus ambiguus. As Parkinson's disease, with a loss of central dopaminergic neurons, also affects the enteric nervous system and dysphagia is prevalent in patients with this disease, investigation of intrinsic catecholamines in the esophagus may

  2. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model

    PubMed Central

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Molecular biology techniques are being used to aid in determining the mechanisms responsible for tissue repair without scar formation. Wound healing is genetically determined, but there have been few studies that examine the genes responsible for tissue regeneration in mammals. Research using genetic mapping is extremely important for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the different phases of tissue regeneration. This process is complex, but an early inflammatory phase appears to influence lesion closure, and the present study demonstrates that acute inflammation loci influence tissue regeneration in mice in a positive manner. Recent Advances: Mapping studies of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been undertaken in recent years to examine candidate genes that participate in the regeneration phenotype. Our laboratory has identified inflammation modifier QTL for wound healing. Mouse lines selected for the maximum (AIRmax) or minimum (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) have been used to study not only the tissue repair but also the impact of the genetic control of inflammation on susceptibility to autoimmune, neoplasic, and infectious diseases. Murphy Roths Large and AIRmax mice are exclusive in their complete epimorphic regeneration, although middle-aged inbred mice may also be capable of healing. Critical Issues: Inflammatory reactions have traditionally been described in the literature as negative factors in the process of skin injury closure. Inflammation is exacerbated due to the early release of mediators or the intense release of factors that cause cell proliferation after injury. The initial release of these factors as well as the clean-up of the lesion microenvironment are both crucial for following events. In addition, the activation and repression of some genes related to the regeneration phenotype may modulate lesion closure, demonstrating the significance of genetic studies to better understand the mechanisms

  3. Retinoic acid induces Sertoli cell paracrine signals for spermatogonia differentiation but cell autonomously drives spermatocyte meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Raverdeau, Mathilde; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Féret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Benoit, Gérard; Davidson, Irwin; Chambon, Pierre; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.

    2012-01-01

    Direct evidence for a role of endogenous retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A in the initial differentiation and meiotic entry of spermatogonia, and thus in the initiation of spermatogenesis is still lacking. RA is synthesized by dedicated enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH), and binds to and activates nuclear RA receptors (RARA, RARB, and RARG) either within the RA-synthesizing cells or in the neighboring cells. In the present study, we have used a combination of somatic genetic ablations and pharmacological approaches in vivo to show that during the first, prepubertal, spermatogenic cycle (i) RALDH-dependent synthesis of RA by Sertoli cells (SC), the supporting cells of the germ cell (GC) lineage, is indispensable to initiate differentiation of A aligned into A1 spermatogonia; (ii) RARA in SC mediates the effects of RA, possibly through activating Mafb expression, a gene whose Drosophila homolog is mandatory to GC differentiation; (iii) RA synthesized by premeiotic spermatocytes cell autonomously induces meiotic initiation through controlling the RAR-dependent expression of Stra8. Furthermore, we show that RA of SC origin is no longer necessary for the subsequent spermatogenic cycles but essential to spermiation. Altogether, our data establish that the effects of RA in vivo on spermatogonia differentiation are indirect, via SC, but direct on meiotic initiation in spermatocytes, supporting thereby the notion that, contrary to the situation in the female, RA is necessary to induce meiosis in the male. PMID:23012458

  4. Retinoic Acid Receptors Control Spermatogonia Cell-Fate and Induce Expression of the SALL4A Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Teletin, Marius; Vernet, Nadège; Féret, Betty; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Dennefeld, Christine; Davidson, Irwin; Benoit, Gérard; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B

    2015-10-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is instrumental to male germ cell differentiation, but its mechanism of action remains elusive. To address this question, we have analyzed the phenotypes of mice lacking, in spermatogonia, all rexinoid receptors (RXRA, RXRB and RXRG) or all ATRA receptors (RARA, RARB and RARG). We demonstrate that the combined ablation of RXRA and RXRB in spermatogonia recapitulates the set of defects observed both upon ablation of RAR in spermatogonia. We also show that ATRA activates RAR and RXR bound to a conserved regulatory region to increase expression of the SALL4A transcription factor in spermatogonia. Our results reveal that this major pluripotency gene is a target of ATRA signaling and that RAR/RXR heterodimers are the functional units driving its expression in spermatogonia. They add to the mechanisms through which ATRA promote expression of the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor to trigger a critical step in spermatogonia differentiation. Importantly, they indicate also that meiosis eventually occurs in the absence of a RAR/RXR pathway within germ cells and suggest that instructing this process is either ATRA-independent or requires an ATRA signal originating from Sertoli cells. PMID:26427057

  5. Retinoic Acid Receptors Control Spermatogonia Cell-Fate and Induce Expression of the SALL4A Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Teletin, Marius; Vernet, Nadège; Féret, Betty; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Dennefeld, Christine; Davidson, Irwin; Benoit, Gérard; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is instrumental to male germ cell differentiation, but its mechanism of action remains elusive. To address this question, we have analyzed the phenotypes of mice lacking, in spermatogonia, all rexinoid receptors (RXRA, RXRB and RXRG) or all ATRA receptors (RARA, RARB and RARG). We demonstrate that the combined ablation of RXRA and RXRB in spermatogonia recapitulates the set of defects observed both upon ablation of RAR in spermatogonia. We also show that ATRA activates RAR and RXR bound to a conserved regulatory region to increase expression of the SALL4A transcription factor in spermatogonia. Our results reveal that this major pluripotency gene is a target of ATRA signaling and that RAR/RXR heterodimers are the functional units driving its expression in spermatogonia. They add to the mechanisms through which ATRA promote expression of the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor to trigger a critical step in spermatogonia differentiation. Importantly, they indicate also that meiosis eventually occurs in the absence of a RAR/RXR pathway within germ cells and suggest that instructing this process is either ATRA-independent or requires an ATRA signal originating from Sertoli cells. PMID:26427057

  6. Evidence for the involvement of mouse heat shock factor 1 in the atypical expression of the HSP70.1 heat shock gene during mouse zygotic genome activation.

    PubMed Central

    Christians, E; Michel, E; Adenot, P; Mezger, V; Rallu, M; Morange, M; Renard, J P

    1997-01-01

    The mouse HSP70.1 gene, which codes for a heat shock protein (hsp70), is highly transcribed at the onset of zygotic genome activation (ZGA). This expression, which occurs in the absence of stress, is then repressed. It has been claimed that this gene does not exhibit a stress response until the blastocyst stage. The promoter of HSP70.1 contains four heat shock element (HSE) boxes which are the binding sites of heat shock transcription factors (HSF). We have been studying the presence and localization of the mouse HSFs, mHSF1 and mHSF2, at different stages of embryo development. We show that mHSF1 is already present at the one-cell stage and concentrated in the nucleus. Moreover, by mutagenizing HSE sequences and performing competition experiments (in transgenic embryos with the HSP70.1 promoter inserted before a reporter gene), we show that, in contrast with previous findings, HSE boxes are involved in this spontaneous activation. Therefore, we suggest that HSF1 and HSE are important in this transient expression at the two-cell stage and that the absence of typical inducibility at this early stage of development results mainly from the high level of spontaneous transcription of this gene during the ZGA. PMID:9001232

  7. Gene repressive mechanisms in the mouse brain involved in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nam-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-04-01

    Gene regulation in the brain is essential for long-term plasticity and memory formation. Despite this established notion, the quantitative translational map in the brain during memory formation has not been reported. To systematically probe the changes in protein synthesis during memory formation, our recent study exploited ribosome profiling using the mouse hippocampal tissues at multiple time points after a learning event. Analysis of the resulting database revealed novel types of gene regulation after learning. First, the translation of a group of genes was rapidly suppressed without change in mRNA levels. At later time points, the expression of another group of genes was downregulated through reduction in mRNA levels. This reduction was predicted to be downstream of inhibition of ESR1 (Estrogen Receptor 1) signaling. Overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the genes whose translation was suppressed, or activating ESR1 by injecting an agonist interfered with memory formation, suggesting the functional importance of these findings. Moreover, the translation of genes encoding the translational machineries was found to be suppressed, among other genes in the mouse hippocampus. Together, this unbiased approach has revealed previously unidentified characteristics of gene regulation in the brain and highlighted the importance of repressive controls. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 199-200]. PMID:26949020

  8. Gene repressive mechanisms in the mouse brain involved in memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nam-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in the brain is essential for long-term plasticity and memory formation. Despite this established notion, the quantitative translational map in the brain during memory formation has not been reported. To systematically probe the changes in protein synthesis during memory formation, our recent study exploited ribosome profiling using the mouse hippocampal tissues at multiple time points after a learning event. Analysis of the resulting database revealed novel types of gene regulation after learning. First, the translation of a group of genes was rapidly suppressed without change in mRNA levels. At later time points, the expression of another group of genes was downregulated through reduction in mRNA levels. This reduction was predicted to be downstream of inhibition of ESR1 (Estrogen Receptor 1) signaling. Overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the genes whose translation was suppressed, or activating ESR1 by injecting an agonist interfered with memory formation, suggesting the functional importance of these findings. Moreover, the translation of genes encoding the translational machineries was found to be suppressed, among other genes in the mouse hippocampus. Together, this unbiased approach has revealed previously unidentified characteristics of gene regulation in the brain and highlighted the importance of repressive controls. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 199-200] PMID:26949020

  9. Isolation, identification and enrichment of type a spermatogonia from the testis of chinese cross-bred buffaloes (swamp × river).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S; Xiao, Y; Han, L; Hua, H; Riaz, H; Liang, A; Yang, L-G

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of type A spermatogonia in the isolated testis cells is a prerequisite for conducting experiments and the manipulation of these germ cells. Thus, this study was designed to examine the wide range of strategies for the isolation, identification and enrichment of type A spermatogonia in pre-pubertal buffalo calves (3-6 months). Histological findings revealed the presence of maximum number of type A spermatogonia at 5 months, which was further confirmed by DBA immunohistochemistry. In a newly modified strategy for the isolation of testis tissues, mincing followed by trituration and two rounds of digestion with collagenase, hyaluronidase and DNase yielded more than 95% testis cell population. Differential plating with laminin, poly-l-lysine and gelatin significantly (p < 0.05) affected the purity of type A spermatogonia. Among these extracellular matrix (ECMs) molecules, laminin and gelatin performed well and reached at a purity of 39.38 ± 1.21% and 32.15 ± 1.60%, respectively. In addition, combination of laminin and gelatin followed by Percoll centrifugation performed the best and yielded >90% type A spermatogonial purity. Moreover, viability of the cells was not affected (p > 0.05) irrespective of different enrichment methods. In conclusion, type A spermatogonia isolation and enrichment system was developed using different ECM molecules in buffaloes, which will aid in solving wide range of problems especially fertility-related problems and transgenic animal production in buffaloes. PMID:22928737

  10. Calcium imaging reveals glial involvement in transcranial direct current stimulation-induced plasticity in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Monai, Hiromu; Ohkura, Masamichi; Tanaka, Mika; Oe, Yuki; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Nakai, Junichi; Iwai, Youichi; Hirase, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Transcranical direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a treatment known to ameliorate various neurological conditions and enhance memory and cognition in humans. tDCS has gained traction for its potential therapeutic value; however, little is known about its mechanism of action. Using a transgenic mouse expressing G-CaMP7 in astrocytes and a subpopulation of excitatory neurons, we find that tDCS induces large-amplitude astrocytic Ca(2+) surges across the entire cortex with no obvious changes in the local field potential. Moreover, sensory evoked cortical responses are enhanced after tDCS. These enhancements are dependent on the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor and are not observed in IP3R2 (inositol trisphosphate receptor type 2) knockout mice, in which astrocytic Ca(2+) surges are absent. Together, we propose that tDCS changes the metaplasticity of the cortex through astrocytic Ca(2+)/IP3 signalling. PMID:27000523

  11. Calcium imaging reveals glial involvement in transcranial direct current stimulation-induced plasticity in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Monai, Hiromu; Ohkura, Masamichi; Tanaka, Mika; Oe, Yuki; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Nakai, Junichi; Iwai, Youichi; Hirase, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Transcranical direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a treatment known to ameliorate various neurological conditions and enhance memory and cognition in humans. tDCS has gained traction for its potential therapeutic value; however, little is known about its mechanism of action. Using a transgenic mouse expressing G-CaMP7 in astrocytes and a subpopulation of excitatory neurons, we find that tDCS induces large-amplitude astrocytic Ca2+ surges across the entire cortex with no obvious changes in the local field potential. Moreover, sensory evoked cortical responses are enhanced after tDCS. These enhancements are dependent on the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor and are not observed in IP3R2 (inositol trisphosphate receptor type 2) knockout mice, in which astrocytic Ca2+ surges are absent. Together, we propose that tDCS changes the metaplasticity of the cortex through astrocytic Ca2+/IP3 signalling. PMID:27000523

  12. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio; Campagnolo, Luisa

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090961

  14. Involvement of dorsal raphe nucleus and dorsal periaqueductal gray 5-HT receptors in the modulation of mouse defensive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pobbe, Roger L H; Zangrossi, Helio; Blanchard, D Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J

    2011-04-01

    Previous findings point to the involvement of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) serotonergic receptors in the mediation of defensive responses that are associated with specific subtypes of anxiety disorders. These studies have mostly been conducted with rats tested in the elevated T-maze, an experimental model of anxiety that was developed to allow the measurement, in the same animal, of two behaviors mentioned: inhibitory avoidance and one-way escape. Such behavioral responses have been respectively related to generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD). In order to assess the generality of these findings, in the current study we investigated the effects of the injection of 5-HT-related drugs into the DRN and dPAG of another rodent species, mouse, on the mouse defense test battery (MDTB), a test of a range of defensive behaviors to an unconditioned threat, a predator. Male CD-1 mice were tested in the MDTB after intra-DRN administration of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY-100635 or after intra-dPAG injection of two serotonergic agonists, the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT and the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist DOI. Intra-DRN injection of WAY-100635 did not change behavioral responses of mice confronted with a rat in the MDTB. In the dPAG, both 8-OH-DPAT and DOI consistently impaired mouse escape behavior assessed in the MDTB. Intra-dPAG infusion of 8-OH-DPAT also decreased measures of mouse risk assessment in the rat exposure test. In conclusion, the current findings are in partial agreement with previous results obtained with rats tested in the elevated T-maze. Although there is a high level of similarity between the behavioral effects obtained in rats (elevated T-maze) and mice (MDTB and RET) with the infusion of 5-HT agonists into the dPAG, the same is not true regarding the effects of blockade of DRN 5-HT(1A) receptors in these rodent species. These data suggest that there may be differences between mice

  15. TRAIP is involved in chromosome alignment and SAC regulation in mouse oocyte meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi-Feng; Ren, Yi-Xin; Yuan, Peng; Yan, Li-Ying; Qiao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies demonstrated that TRAIP is associated with primordial dwarfism. Although TRAIP was partially studied in mitosis, its function in oocyte meiosis remained unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of TRAIP during mouse oocyte meiosis. TRAIP was stably expressed during oocytes meiosis and co-localized with CREST at the centromere region. Knockdown of TRAIP led to DNA damage, as revealed by the appearance of γH2AX. Although oocytes meiotic maturation was not affected, the proportions of misaligned chromosomes and aneuploidy were elevated after TRAIP knockdown, suggesting TRAIP is required for stable kinetochore–microtubule (K-MT) attachment. TRAIP knockdown decreased the accumulation of Mad2 on centromeres, potentially explaining why oocyte maturation was not affected following formation of DNA lesions. Securin, a protein which was prevent from precocious degradation by Mad2, was down-regulated after TRAIP knockdown. Inhibition of TRAIP by microinjection of antibody into pro-metaphase I (pro-MI) stage oocytes resulted in precocious first polar body (PB1) extrusion, and live-cell imaging clearly revealed misaligned chromosomes after TRAIP knockdown. Taken together, these data indicate that TRAIP plays important roles in oocyte meiosis regulation. PMID:27405720

  16. TRAIP is involved in chromosome alignment and SAC regulation in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yi-Feng; Ren, Yi-Xin; Yuan, Peng; Yan, Li-Ying; Qiao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies demonstrated that TRAIP is associated with primordial dwarfism. Although TRAIP was partially studied in mitosis, its function in oocyte meiosis remained unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of TRAIP during mouse oocyte meiosis. TRAIP was stably expressed during oocytes meiosis and co-localized with CREST at the centromere region. Knockdown of TRAIP led to DNA damage, as revealed by the appearance of γH2AX. Although oocytes meiotic maturation was not affected, the proportions of misaligned chromosomes and aneuploidy were elevated after TRAIP knockdown, suggesting TRAIP is required for stable kinetochore-microtubule (K-MT) attachment. TRAIP knockdown decreased the accumulation of Mad2 on centromeres, potentially explaining why oocyte maturation was not affected following formation of DNA lesions. Securin, a protein which was prevent from precocious degradation by Mad2, was down-regulated after TRAIP knockdown. Inhibition of TRAIP by microinjection of antibody into pro-metaphase I (pro-MI) stage oocytes resulted in precocious first polar body (PB1) extrusion, and live-cell imaging clearly revealed misaligned chromosomes after TRAIP knockdown. Taken together, these data indicate that TRAIP plays important roles in oocyte meiosis regulation. PMID:27405720

  17. Evidence for indirect involvement of thymidine kinase in excision repair processes in mouse cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, P.G.; Yasseen, A.A.; McKelvey, V.J.

    1985-05-01

    Wild-type cells and thymidine kinase-deficient clones from two mouse lymphoma cell lines, P388 and L5178Y, were compared for sensitivity to killing by the mutagens, ultraviolet irradiation (UV), ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Two out of three thymidine kinase-deficient P388 clones showed significantly enhanced sensitivity to killing by all three mutagens. This increased sensitivity to killing was also reflected in increased mutagenesis by the three mutagens. In the L5178Y cell line, wild-type cells showed little difference to two thymidine kinase-deficient clones in terms of mutagen sensitivity. This indicates that thymidine kinase may be significant for DNA repair processes in P388 but not in L5178Y cells. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) experiments were carried out on P388 and L5178Y wild-type cells and wild-type Friend leukemia cells (which are mutagen-sensitive when deficient in thymidine kinase). The UDS experiments showed the L5178Y cells were low in excision repair abilities relative to the P388 cells and the Friend cell clone. This indicates that the increased mutagen sensitivity in thymidine kinase-deficient P388 and clone 707 Friend cells may be due to thymidine kinase playing an indirect role in DNA excision repair, a process which is of little significance in the L5178Y cell line.

  18. Quantitative detection of human spermatogonia for optimization of spermatogonial stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Thomas, A.; Schmidt, C.M.; Dann, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human spermatogonia be detected in long-term primary testicular cell cultures using validated, germ cell-specific markers of spermatogonia? SUMMARY ANSWER Germ cell-specific markers of spermatogonia/spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are detected in early (1–2 weeks) but not late (> 6 weeks) primary testicular cell cultures; somatic cell markers are detected in late primary testicular cell cultures. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The development of conditions for human SSC culture is critically dependent on the ability to define cell types unequivocally and to quantify spermatogonia/SSCs. Growth by somatic cells presents a major challenge in the establishment of SSC cultures and therefore markers that define spermatogonia/SSCs, but are not also expressed by testicular somatic cells, are essential for accurate characterization of SSC cultures. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Testicular tissue from eight organ donors with normal spermatogenesis was used for assay validation and establishing primary testicular cell cultures. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Immunofluorescence analysis of normal human testicular tissue was used to validate antibodies (UTF1, SALL4, DAZL and VIM) and then the antibodies were used to demonstrate that primary testicular cells cultured in vitro for 1–2 weeks were composed of somatic cells and rare germ cells. Primary testicular cell cultures were further characterized by comparing to testicular somatic cell cultures using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (UTF1, FGFR3, ZBTB16, GPR125, DAZL, GATA4 and VIM) and flow cytometry (CD9 and SSEA4). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE UTF1, FGFR3, DAZL and ZBTB16 qRT–PCR and SSEA4 flow cytometry were validated for the sensitive, quantitative and specific detection of germ cells. In contrast, GPR125 mRNA and CD9 were found to be not specific to germ cells because they were also expressed in testicular somatic cell cultures. While the germ cell-specific markers were detected in

  19. In vitro differentiation of rat spermatogonia into round spermatids in tissue culture

    PubMed Central

    Reda, A.; Hou, M.; Winton, T.R.; Chapin, R.E.; Söder, O.; Stukenborg, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do the organ culture conditions, previously defined for in vitro murine male germ cell differentiation, also result in differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting specific markers for haploid germ cells? SUMMARY ANSWER We demonstrated the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic cells in vitro, with emphasis on exhibiting, protein markers described for round spermatids. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Full spermatogenesis in vitro from immature germ cells using an organ culture technique in mice was first reported 5 years ago. However, no studies reporting the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting the characteristic protein expression profile or into functional sperm have been reported. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Organ culture of testicular fragments of 5 days postpartum (dpp) neonatal rats was performed for up to 52 days. Evaluation of microscopic morphology, testosterone levels, mRNA and protein expression as measured by RT-qPCR and immunostaining were conducted to monitor germ cell differentiation in vitro. Potential effects of melatonin, Glutamax® medium, retinoic acid and the presence of epidydimal fat tissue on the spermatogenic process were evaluated. A minimum of three biological replicates were performed for all experiments presented in this study. One-way ANOVA, ANOVA on ranks and student's t-test were applied to perform the statistical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Male germ cells, present in testicular tissue pieces grown from 5 dpp rats, exhibited positive protein expression for Acrosin and Crem (cAMP (cyclic adenosine mono phosphate) response element modulator) after 52 days of culture in vitro. Intra-testicular testosterone production could be observed after 3 days of culture, while when epididymal fat tissue was added, spontaneous contractility of cultured seminiferous tubules could be observed after 21 days. However, no

  20. Nrf2 signalling and autophagy are involved in diabetes mellitus-induced defects in the development of mouse placenta

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sha-sha; Jin, Ya; Li, He; Wu, Xia; Ma, Zheng-lai; cheng, Xin; Tang, Xiuwen

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that diabetes mellitus impairs placental development, but the mechanism by which the disease operates to impair development remains controversial. In this study, we demonstrated that pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM)-induced defects in placental development in mice are mainly characterized by the changes of morphological structure of placenta. The alteration of differentiation-related gene expressions in trophoblast cells rather than cell proliferation/apoptosis is responsible for the phenotypes found in mouse placenta. Meanwhile, excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activated nuclear factor erythroid2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signalling were observed in the placenta of mice suffering from PGDM. Using BeWo cells, we also demonstrated that excess ROS was produced and Nrf2 signalling molecules were activated in settings characterized by a high concentration of glucose. More interestingly, differentiation-related gene expressions in trophoblast cells were altered when endogenous Nrf2 expression is manipulated by transfecting Nrf2-wt or Nrf2-shRNA. In addition, PGDM interferes with autophagy in both mouse placenta and BeWo cells, implying that autophagy is also involved, directly or indirectly, in PGDM-induced placental phenotypes. Therefore, we revealed that dysfunctional oxidative stress-activated Nrf2 signalling and autophagy are probably responsible for PGDM-induced defects in the placental development of mice. The mechanism was through the interference with differentiation-related gene expression in trophoblast cells. PMID:27383629

  1. Docosahexaenoic Acid Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hepatic Steatosis Involving ER Stress Response in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinying; Peng, Chuan; Ai, Yanbiao; Wang, Heng; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Li, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    The increase in fructose consumption is considered to be a risk factor for developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-treated primary mouse hepatocytes, and the changes of Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to DHA treatment. The hepatocytes were treated with fructose, DHA, fructose plus DHA, tunicamycin (TM) or fructose plus 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 24 h. Intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation was assessed by Oil Red O staining. The mRNA expression levels and protein levels related to lipid metabolism and ER stress response were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot. Fructose treatment led to obvious TG accumulation in primary hepatocytes through increasing expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), two key enzymes in hepatic de novo lipogenesis. DHA ameliorates fructose-induced TG accumulation by upregulating the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT-1α) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1). DHA treatment or pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor PBA significantly decreased TG accumulation and reduced the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), total inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1α) and p-IRE1α. The present results suggest that DHA protects against high fructose-induced hepatocellular lipid accumulation. The current findings also suggest that alleviating the ER stress response seems to play a role in the prevention of fructose-induced hepatic steatosis by DHA. PMID:26805874

  2. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  3. Involvement of MAPK ERK activation in upregulation of water channel protein aquaporin 1 in a mouse model of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fan; Liu, Cai-Yue; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Lie; Qian, Yu-Xin; Yi, Jing; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to immunolocalize the aquaporin 1 water channel protein (AQP1) in Schwann cells of idiopathic facial nerve and explore its possible role during the development of facial palsy induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). HSV-1 was inoculated into the surface of posterior auricle of mouse to establish a paralyzed animal model. In HSV-1-induced facial palsy mice, protein levels of AQP1 significantly increased on the 9th to 16th day after inoculation of HSV-1. The upregulation of AQP1 was closely related to the intratemporal facial nerve edema in facial nerve canal, which was also consistent with the symptom of facial palsy in mice. In a hypoxia model of Schwann cells in vitro, we found that U0126, an ERK antagonist, inhibited not only morphological changes of cultures Schwann cells but also upregulation of both AQP1 and phosphorylated ERK. Combined with increased phosphorylated ERK in HSV-1-induced facial palsy mice, we inferred that ERK MAPK pathway might also be involved in increased AQP1 in mouse model of Bell's palsy. Although the precise mechanism needs to be further explored, our findings suggest that AQP1 in Schwann cells of intratemporal facial nerve is involved in the evolution of facial palsy induced by HSV-1 and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. AQP1 might be a potential target, and the ERK antagonist U0126 could be a new drug for the treatment of HSV-1-induced Bell's palsy in an early stage. PMID:25527444

  4. Conservation of avian germplasm by xenogeneic transplantation of spermatogonia from sexually mature donors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ricardo J G; Napolitano, Angelo; Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L; Baldo, Caroline F; Suhr, Steven T; King, Louis E; Cibelli, Jose B; Karcher, Darrin M; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Perez, Gloria I

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 12.5% of all 9,920 extant bird species in the world are threatened with extinction, and yet conservation efforts through natural breeding of captive species continue to encounter difficulties. However, sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination offer potential benefits over natural breeding, but their applicability is still limited in nondomestic species. In this study, we aimed to exploit the potential of germ cell xenotransplantation as an alternative tool for preserving germplasm of endangered birds. The study was designed to investigate whether transfer of either spermatogonia-enriched cell fraction (SEF) or crude testicular cell fraction (CTF) from adult Japanese quails (as a model for wild species) would result in recolonization of gamma-irradiated gonads of adult recipient chickens. One month after transplantation, 75% of recipients injected with SEF and 25% of recipients injected with CTF resumed spermatogenesis. However, it took more than 3 months for 33% of the negative controls to resume marginal production of sperm. Some SEF recipients produced more spermatozoa bearing head morphology compared with donor controls. DNA analysis using quail-specific primers did not detect donor's DNA in these recipients' semen. However, 6 months after xenotransplantation, presence of quail germ cells was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry in 1 rooster injected with SEF. These findings indicate that spermatogonia from adult quails were capable of colonizing immunocompetent testis of adult chickens but failed to produce sufficient sperm. Despite this limitation, the present approach represents a potential conservation tool that may be used to rescue germ cells of endangered adult male birds. PMID:23025754

  5. Host and Bacterial Factors Involved in the Innate Ability of Mouse Macrophages To Eliminate Internalized Unopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Terri S.; Havell, Edward A.; Horton, John R.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to better understand genetic and cellular factors that influence innate immunity, we examined host and bacterial factors involved in the nonopsonic phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli K-12 by mouse macrophages. Unelicited (resident) peritoneal macrophages from five different mouse strains, BALB/c, C57BL/6, CD-1, C3H/HeJ, and C3H/HeN, were employed. Additional macrophage populations were obtained from CD-1 mice (bone marrow-derived macrophages). Also, for BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, peritoneal macrophages elicited with either thioglycolate or proteose peptone, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and macrophage-like cell lines derived from the two strains were employed. Two E. coli K-12 strains that differed specifically in their abilities to produce type 1 pili containing the adhesive protein FimH were examined. The parameters used to assess macrophage bacteriocidal activity were (i) the killing of internalized (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during the approximately 4-h assay and (ii) the initial rate at which internalized E. coli were eliminated. Data on these parameters allowed the following conclusions: (i) unelicited or proteose peptone-elicited peritoneal macrophages were significantly better at eliminating internalized bacteria than thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages, or macrophage cell lines; (ii) the host genetic background had no significant effect upon the ability of unelicited peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli (even though the mouse strains differ widely in their in vivo susceptibilities to bacterial infection); and (iii) the FimH phenotype had no significant effect upon E. coli survival once the bacterium was inside a macrophage. Additionally, there was no correlation between the bacteriocidal effectiveness of a macrophage population and the number of bacteria bound per macrophage. However, macrophage populations that were the least bacteriocidal tended to bind higher ratios of FimH+ to Fim

  6. Krabbe disease: involvement of connexin43 in the apoptotic effects of sphingolipid psychosine on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Graziano, A C E; Parenti, R; Avola, R; Cardile, V

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a genetic demyelinating syndrome characterized by deficiency of the enzyme β-galactosylceramidase, lysosomal psychosine accumulation, and loss of myelin-forming cells. In this study, some apoptotic markers such as apoptotic index (AI), DNA fragmentation, caspase-3, PTEN, Bad, and PI3K were determined in oligodendrocyte precursors from wild type or twitcher mice untreated or treated with psychosine. Twitcher is a natural mouse model of Krabbe disease containing a premature stop codon (W339X) in the β-galactosylceramidase gene. Moreover, a possible involvement of connexin (Cx)43 in cell death of oligodendrocyte precursors induced by psychosine was investigated with the final aim to provide a contribution to the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and pathophysiological events that occur in Krabbe disease. Connexins are a multigene family of structurally related trans-membrane proteins able to modulate essential cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and migration. Among these, Cx43 is the predominant isoform in many cell types, including neural progenitor cells. Our results showed an increase of AI, DNA fragmentation, caspase-3, PTEN, Bad, and Cx43 associated to a decrease of PI3K, pAKT and pBad. Taken together, these findings suggest an involvement of Cx43 in the psychosine-mediated apoptosis of primary oligodendrocyte progenitors from wild type or twitcher mice, used for the first time as cell models in comparison. It could open unexplored perspective also for other demyelinating diseases. PMID:26459425

  7. PAK1 is involved in sensing the orientation of collagen stiffness gradients in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pinto, V I; Mohammadi, H; Lee, W S; Cheung, A H; McCulloch, C A

    2015-10-01

    Migrating cells sense variations of stiffness in connective tissue matrices but how cells detect and respond to stiffness orientation is not defined. We examined cell extension formation on collagen with underlying support (vertical stiffness gradient) or on collagen laterally supported by nylon (lateral stiffness gradient). At 6 h after plating, cells plated on laterally-supported collagen exhibited >2-fold more abundant and ~2-fold longer cell extensions than cells plated on collagen with underlying support. We examined whether p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) influences extension formation that is dependent on the orientation of support. At 6 h after plating on collagen with underlying support, wild-type cell extensions were 40% shorter than PAK1 knockdown cells. In contrast, on laterally-supported collagen, wild-type cell extensions were 2-fold longer than PAK1 knockdown cells. In cells plated on laterally-supported collagen, there were ~2-fold reductions of collagen fiber alignment and compaction in PAK1 knockdown cells compared with wild-type cells. PAK1 knockdown did not affect collagen fiber alignment or compaction by cells plated on collagen with underlying support. Wild-type cells with lateral support of collagen exhibited 3-fold increases of phospho-myosin staining at 6h, which was 2-fold lower in PAK1 knockdown cells. In contrast, cells on collagen with underlying support showed no increase of phospho-myosin staining at any times. PAK1 knockdown did not affect α2 or β1 integrin expression or function. We conclude that PAK1 is involved in the ability of cells to sense the orientation of stiffness in collagen substrates and generate contractile forces that affect cell extension formation. PMID:26025676

  8. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes involved in facilitation of GABAergic inhibition in mouse superficial superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiaki; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Isa, Tadashi

    2005-12-01

    The superficial superior colliculus (sSC) is a key station in the sensory processing related to visual salience. The sSC receives cholinergic projections from the parabigeminal nucleus, and previous studies have revealed the presence of several different nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the sSC. In this study, to clarify the role of the cholinergic inputs to the sSC, we examined current responses induced by ACh in GABAergic and non-GABAergic sSC neurons using in vitro slice preparations obtained from glutamate decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice in which GFP is specifically expressed in GABAergic neurons. Brief air pressure application of acetylcholine (ACh) elicited nicotinic inward current responses in both GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons. The inward current responses in the GABAergic neurons were highly sensitive to a selective antagonist for alpha3beta2- and alpha6beta2-containing receptors, alpha-conotoxin MII (alphaCtxMII). A subset of these neurons exhibited a faster alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive inward current component, indicating the expression of alpha7-containing nAChRs. We also found that the activation of presynaptic nAChRs induced release of GABA, which elicited a burst of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by GABA(A) receptors in non-GABAergic neurons. This ACh-induced GABA release was mediated mainly by alphaCtxMII-sensitive nAChRs and resulted from the activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Morphological analysis revealed that recorded GFP-positive neurons are interneurons and GFP-negative neurons include projection neurons. These findings suggest that nAChRs are involved in the regulation of GABAergic inhibition and modulate visual processing in the sSC. PMID:16107532

  9. Beta-arrestin 1 is involved in the catabolic response stimulated by hyaluronan degradation in mouse chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; D'Ascola, Angela; Scuruchi, Michele; Calatroni, Alberto; Campo, Salvatore

    2015-08-01

    Beta-arrestin-1 (β-arrestin-1) is an adaptor protein that functions in the termination of G-protein activation and seems to be involved in the mediation of the inflammatory response. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) elicits the expression of inflammatory mediators through a mechanism involving hyaluronan (HA) degradation, thereby contributing to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and CD44 activation. Stimulation of both receptors induces nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kB) activation that, through transforming-growth-factor-activated-kinase-1 (TAK-1), in turn stimulates the inflammatory mediators of transcription. As β-arrestin-1 seems to play an inflammatory role in arthritis, we have investigated the involvement of β-arrestin-1 in a model of IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in mouse chondrocytes. IL-1β treatment significantly increases chondrocytes TLR-4, CD44, β-arrestin-1, TAK-1, and serine/threonine kinase (AKT) mRNA expression and related protein levels. NF-kB is also markedly activated with consequent tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and inducible-nitric-oxide-synthase up-regulation. Treatment of IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes with β-arrestin-1 and/or AKT and/or TAK-1-specific inhibitors significantly reduces all parameters, although the inhibitory effect exerted by TAK-1-mediated pathways is more effective than that of β-arrestin-1. β-Arrestin-1-induced NF-kB activation is mediated by the AKT pathway as shown by IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes treated with AKT inhibitor. Finally, a specific HA-blocking peptide (Pep-1) has confirmed the inflammatory role of degraded HA as a mediator of the IL-1β-induced activation of β-arrestin-1. PMID:25673209

  10. Immune cell types involved in early uptake and transport of recombinant mouse prion protein in Peyer's patches of calves.

    PubMed

    Lwin, Sein; Inoshima, Yasuo; Atoji, Yasuro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2009-12-01

    We have previously reported the early uptake and transport of foreign particles into Peyer's patches (PPs) of newborn and 2-month-old calves and shown that the peak uptake of particles occurs 6 h after inoculation, in addition to site- and size-related effects on particle uptake. We now report the distribution of immune cells within PPs of the distal ileum in newborn and 2-month-old calves inoculated with carbon black. The types of immune cells involved in the early uptake and transport of recombinant mouse prion protein (rMPrP) within PPs of newborn calf were investigated by using monoclonal antibodies CD11c, CD14, CD68, CD172a, and CD21. CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD68(+), CD172a(+), and CD21(+) immune cells were widely distributed in four tissue compartments (villi, dome, interfollicular region, and follicles) of PPs in the distal ileum of newborn and 2-month-old calves, whereas CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD172a(+), and CD21(+) immune cells were more prominently distributed in the dome areas of newborn calves than in 2-month-old calves. Moreover, CD11c(+) and CD14(+) dendritic cells, CD172a(+) and CD68(+) macrophages, and CD21(+) follicular dendritic cells containing rMPrP were primarily observed in the dome and inner follicular regions. The deposition of rMPrP within CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD172a(+), and CD68(+) cells, but not CD21(+) cells, was detected in villous regions. rMPrP-positive immune cells within the interfollicular regions included only CD11c(+) and CD172(+) cells. Although the particles used in this investigation do not include the infectious prion protein, PrP(Sc), our experimental setup provides a useful model for studying immune cells involved in the early uptake and transport of PrP(Sc). PMID:19834742

  11. No Evidence of Pathogenic Involvement of Cathelicidins in Patient Cohorts and Mouse Models of Lupus and Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kienhöfer, D.; Hahn, J.; Schubert, I.; Reinwald, C.; Ipseiz, N.; Lang, S. C.; Borràs, È. Bosch; Amann, K.; Sjöwall, C.; Barron, A. E.; Hueber, A. J.; Agerberth, B.; Schett, G.; Hoffmann, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from their role in the immune defence against pathogens evidence of a role of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in autoimmune diseases has accumulated in the past years. The aim of this project was to examine the functional impact of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and the mouse cathelicidin-related AMP (CRAMP) on the pathogenesis of lupus and arthritis. Serum LL-37 and anti-LL-37 levels were measured by ELISA in healthy donors and patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pristane-induced lupus was induced in female wild type (WT) and cathelicidin-deficient (CRAMP−/−) mice. Serum levels of anti-Sm/RNP, anti-dsDNA, and anti-histone were determined via ELISA, cytokines in sera and peritoneal lavages were measured via Multiplex. Expression of Interferon I stimulated genes (ISG) was determined by real-time PCR. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in male WT and CRAMP−/− mice and arthritis severity was visually scored and analysed histomorphometrically by OsteoMeasure software. Serum levels of anti-LL-37 were higher in SLE-patients compared to healthy donors or patients with RA. However, no correlation to markers of disease activity or organ involvement was observed. No significant differences of autoantibody or cytokine/chemokine levels, or of expression of ISGs were observed between WT and CRAMP−/− mice after pristane-injection. Furthermore, lung and kidney pathology did not differ in the absence of CRAMP. Incidence and severity of CIA and histological parameters (inflammation, cartilage degradation, and bone erosion) were not different in WT and CRAMP−/− mice. Although cathelicidins are upregulated in mouse models of lupus and arthritis, cathelicidin-deficiency did not persistently affect the diseases. Also in patients with SLE, autoantibodies against cathelicidins did not correlate with disease manifestation. Reactivity against cathelicidins in lupus and arthritis could thus be an epiphenomenon caused by

  12. No evidence of pathogenic involvement of cathelicidins in patient cohorts and mouse models of lupus and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kienhöfer, D; Hahn, J; Schubert, I; Reinwald, C; Ipseiz, N; Lang, S C; Borràs, È Bosch; Amann, K; Sjöwall, C; Barron, A E; Hueber, A J; Agerberth, B; Schett, G; Hoffmann, M H

    2014-01-01

    Apart from their role in the immune defence against pathogens evidence of a role of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in autoimmune diseases has accumulated in the past years. The aim of this project was to examine the functional impact of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and the mouse cathelicidin-related AMP (CRAMP) on the pathogenesis of lupus and arthritis. Serum LL-37 and anti-LL-37 levels were measured by ELISA in healthy donors and patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pristane-induced lupus was induced in female wild type (WT) and cathelicidin-deficient (CRAMP-/-) mice. Serum levels of anti-Sm/RNP, anti-dsDNA, and anti-histone were determined via ELISA, cytokines in sera and peritoneal lavages were measured via Multiplex. Expression of Interferon I stimulated genes (ISG) was determined by real-time PCR. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in male WT and CRAMP-/- mice and arthritis severity was visually scored and analysed histomorphometrically by OsteoMeasure software. Serum levels of anti-LL-37 were higher in SLE-patients compared to healthy donors or patients with RA. However, no correlation to markers of disease activity or organ involvement was observed. No significant differences of autoantibody or cytokine/chemokine levels, or of expression of ISGs were observed between WT and CRAMP-/- mice after pristane-injection. Furthermore, lung and kidney pathology did not differ in the absence of CRAMP. Incidence and severity of CIA and histological parameters (inflammation, cartilage degradation, and bone erosion) were not different in WT and CRAMP-/- mice. Although cathelicidins are upregulated in mouse models of lupus and arthritis, cathelicidin-deficiency did not persistently affect the diseases. Also in patients with SLE, autoantibodies against cathelicidins did not correlate with disease manifestation. Reactivity against cathelicidins in lupus and arthritis could thus be an epiphenomenon caused by extensive

  13. Myosin light chain phosphatase activation is involved in the hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation in mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2009-03-15

    The relaxant effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the vascular tree is well established but its influence and mechanism of action in gastrointestinal smooth muscle was hardly investigated. The influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse gastric fundus was therefore examined. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) was administered to prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse gastric fundus, before and after incubation with interfering drugs. NaHS caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridin and barium chloride had no influence on the NaHS-induced relaxation. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by L-NAME, ODQ and SQ 22536, inhibitors of the cGMP and cAMP pathway, by nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A reduced the NaHS-induced relaxation, but the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We show that NaHS is able to relax PGF(2alpha)-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The results suggest that in the mouse gastric fundus, H(2)S causes relaxation at least partially via activation of MLCP. PMID:19374871

  14. Nitric oxide synthase expression correlates with death in an experimental mouse model of dengue with CNS involvement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical presentation of dengue is classified by the World Health Organization into dengue without warning signs, dengue with warning signs and severe dengue. Reports of neurological disease caused by Dengue virus (DENV) are becoming frequent, with symptoms that include reduced consciousness, severe headache, neck stiffness, focal neurological signs, tense fontanelle and convulsions. However, the immune mechanisms involved in neurovirulence remain poorly understood. Here we present a mouse model in which one genotype of DENV is inoculated by the intracranial route and infects C57/BL6 mice and replicates in the brain, causing death of mice. Methods Mice were infected with different serotypes/genotypes of DENV by the intracranial route to evaluate viral replication, host cytokine and nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2) expression in the brain via real-time PCR. Histological analysis of the brain tissues was also performed. An analysis of which cells were responsible for the expression of cytokines and Nos2 was performed using flow cytometry. Survival curves of infected animals were also generated Results DENV 3 genotype I infected mice and replicated in the brain, causing death in our murine model. The increased levels of NOS2 could be the cause of the death of infected mice, as viral replication correlates with increased Nos2 and cytokine expression in the brain of C57BL/6 mice. In Nos2−/− mice that were infected with DENV, no clinical signs of infection were observed and cytokines were expressed at low levels, with the exception of interferon gamma (Ifng). Additionally, the Ifng−/− mice infected with DENV exhibited a severe and lethal disease, similar to the disease observed in C57BL/6 mice, while the DENV- infected Nos2−/− mice did not display increased mortality. Analyses of the brains from infected C57BL/6 mice revealed neuronal degeneration and necrosis during histopathologic examination. IFNg and NOS2 were produced in the brains of

  15. Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP): software to facilitate the planning and design of breeding strategies involving mice with conditional alleles.

    PubMed

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Miller, R Lance

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic and conditional knockout mouse models play an important role in biomedical research and their use has grown exponentially in the last 5-10 years. Generating conditional knockouts often requires breeding multiple alleles onto the background of a single mouse or group of mice. Breeding these mice depends on parental genotype, litter size, transmission frequency, and the number of breeding rounds. Therefore, a well planned breeding strategy is critical for keeping costs to a minimum. However, designing a viable breeding strategy can be challenging. With so many different variables this would be an ideal task for a computer program. To facilitate this process, we created a Java-based program called Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP). CAMP is designed to provide an estimate of the number of breeders, amount of time, and costs associated with generating mice of a particular genotype. We provide a description of CAMP, how to use it, and offer it freely as an application. PMID:21870117

  16. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  17. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  18. Conservation of spermatogonial stem cell marker expression in undifferentiated felid spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Vansandt, Lindsey M; Livesay, Janelle L; Dickson, Melissa Joy; Li, Lei; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S; Keefer, Carol L

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are distinct in their ability to self-renew, transmit genetic information, and persist throughout the life of an individual. These characteristics make SSCs a useful tool for addressing diverse challenges such as efficient transgenic production in nonrodent, biomedical animal models, or preservation of the male genome for species in which survival of frozen-thawed sperm is low. A requisite first step to access this technology in felids is the establishment of molecular markers. This study was designed to evaluate, in the domestic cat (Felis catus), the expression both in situ and following enrichment in vitro of six genes (GFRA1, GPR125, ZBTB16, POU5F1, THY1, and UCHL1) that had been previously identified as SSC markers in other species. Antibodies for surface markers glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha 1, G protein-coupled receptor 125, and thymus cell antigen 1 could not be validated, whereas Western blot analysis of prepubertal, peripubertal, and adult cat testis confirmed protein expression for the intracellular markers ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase 1, zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 16, and POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1. Colocalization of the markers by immunohistochemistry revealed that several cells within the subpopulation adjacent to the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules and identified morphologically as spermatogonia, expressed all three intracellular markers. Studies performed on cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) testis exhibited a conserved expression pattern in protein molecular weights, relative abundance, and localization of positive cells within the testis. The expression of the three intracellular SSC marker proteins in domestic and wild cat testes confirms conservation of these markers in felids. Enrichment of marker transcripts after differential plating was also observed. These markers will

  19. Adaptation of the targeted capture Methyl-Seq platform for the mouse genome identifies novel tissue-specific DNA methylation patterns of genes involved in neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Hing, Benjamin; Ramos, Enrique; Braun, Patricia; McKane, Melissa; Jancic, Dubravka; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Lee, Richard S; Michaelson, Jacob J; Druley, Todd E; Potash, James B

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-Seq was recently developed as a targeted approach to assess DNA methylation (DNAm) at a genome-wide level in human. We adapted it for mouse and sought to examine DNAm differences across liver and 2 brain regions: cortex and hippocampus. A custom hybridization array was designed to isolate 99 Mb of CpG islands, shores, shelves, and regulatory elements in the mouse genome. This was followed by bisulfite conversion and sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq2000. The majority of differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs) were present at greater than expected frequency in introns, intergenic regions, near CpG islands, and transcriptional enhancers. Liver-specific enhancers were observed to be methylated in cortex, while cortex specific enhancers were methylated in the liver. Interestingly, commonly shared enhancers were differentially methylated between the liver and cortex. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed that genes that were hypomethylated in the cortex and hippocampus were enriched for neuronal components and neuronal function. In contrast, genes that were hypomethylated in the liver were enriched for cellular components important for liver function. Bisulfite-pyrosequencing validation of 75 DMCs from 19 different loci showed a correlation of r = 0.87 with Methyl-Seq data. We also identified genes involved in neurodevelopment that were not previously reported to be differentially methylated across brain regions. This platform constitutes a valuable tool for future genome-wide studies involving mouse models of disease. PMID:25985232

  20. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  1. Fetal Calcium Regulates Branching Morphogenesis in the Developing Human and Mouse Lung: Involvement of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Finney, Brenda A.; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E.; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9–17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5–16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (∼1.7 in the fetus vs. ∼1.1–1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  2. In-depth behavioral characterization of the corticosterone mouse model and the critical involvement of housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Demuyser, Thomas; Deneyer, Lauren; Bentea, Eduard; Albertini, Giulia; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Merckx, Ellen; De Prins, An; De Bundel, Dimitri; Massie, Ann; Smolders, Ilse

    2016-03-15

    Depression and anxiety are disabling and highly prevalent psychiatric disorders. To better understand the neurobiological basis of mood and anxiety disorders, relevant animal models are needed. The corticosterone mouse model is frequently used to study depression. Chronic stress and accompanying glucocorticoid elevation causes pathological changes in the central nervous system, which are related to psychiatric symptoms. Exogenous administration of corticosterone is therefore often used to induce depressive-like behavior in mice and in some cases also features of anxiety-like behavior are shown. However, a thorough characterization of this model has never been conducted and housing conditions of the used subjects often differ between the implemented protocols. We chronically administered a subcutaneous corticosterone bolus injection to single- and group-housed mice, and we subsequently evaluated the face validity of this model by performing a battery of behavioral tests (forced swim test, mouse-tail suspension test, saccharin intake test, novelty-suppressed feeding test, elevated plus maze, light/dark paradigm and open field test). Our results show that corticosterone treatment has a substantial overall effect on depressive-like behavior. Increases in anxiety-like behavior on the other hand are mainly seen in single housed animals, independent of treatment. The current study therefore does not only show a detailed behavioral characterization of the corticosterone mouse model, but furthermore also elucidates the critical influence of housing conditions on the behavioral outcome in this model. PMID:26707853

  3. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs. PMID:26938987

  4. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs. PMID:26938987

  5. Evidence that glucose metabolism is decreased in the cerebrum of aged female senescence-accelerated mouse; possible involvement of a low hexokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, T; Sato, E; Inoue, A; Ishibashi, S

    1996-08-16

    d-Glucose metabolism in cerebral cells prepared from aged senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), was investigated in consideration of a sex difference. The production of 14CO2 from 6-[14C]D-glucose was reduced in female senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, a prone substrain, in comparison with that in female senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR) 2, a control substrain, whereas there was no difference in males. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake into cerebral cells from female SAMP8 was also lower than that of control mice. But, the 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in SAMP8 was higher than that of SAMR2, suggesting that the low hexokinase activity was involved in the decreased glucose metabolism in cerebrum of SAMP8 females irrespective of glucose transporter. This possibility was supported by the finding that the contents of glucose 6-phosphate produced from glucose added to cerebral cells from SAMP8 was lower than that in ICR mice. PMID:8873128

  6. A transgenic mouse model of metastatic carcinoma involving transdifferentiation of a gastric epithelial lineage progenitor to a neuroendocrine phenotype.

    PubMed

    Syder, Andrew J; Karam, Sherif M; Mills, Jason C; Ippolito, Joseph E; Ansari, Habib R; Farook, Vidya; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2004-03-30

    Human neuroendocrine cancers (NECs) arise in various endoderm-derived epithelia, have diverse morphologic features, exhibit a wide range of growth phenotypes, and generally have obscure cellular origins and ill-defined molecular mediators of initiation and progression. We describe a transgenic mouse model of metastatic gastric cancer initiated by expressing simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (SV40 TAg), under control of regulatory elements from the mouse Atp4b gene, in the progenitors of acid-producing parietal cells. Parietal cells normally do not express endocrine or neural features, and Atp4b-Cre bitransgenic mice with a Cre reporter confirmed that the Atp4b regulatory elements are not active in gastric enteroendocrine cells. GeneChip analyses were performed on laser capture microdissected SV40 TAg-expressing cells in preinvasive foci and invasive tumors. Genes that distinguish invasive from preinvasive cells were then hierarchically clustered with DNA microarray datasets obtained from human lung and gastric cancers. The results, combined with immunohistochemical and electron microscopy studies of Apt4b-SV40 TAg stomachs, revealed that progression to invasion was associated with transdifferentiation of parietal cell progenitors to a neuroendocrine phenotype, and that invasive cells shared molecular features with NECs arising in the human pulmonary epithelium, including transcription factors that normally regulate differentiation of various endocrine lineages and maintain neural progenitors in an undifferentiated state. The 399 mouse genes identified as regulated during acquisition of an invasive phenotype and concomitant neuroendocrine transdifferentiation, plus their human orthologs associated with lung NECs, provide a foundation for molecular classification of NECs arising in other tissues and for genetic tests of the molecular mechanisms underlying NEC pathogenesis. PMID:15070742

  7. Inhibitory effect of genistein on mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells involved TGF-{beta}1/Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: zengliy@yahoo.com.cn; Tang Yunan; Hu Dongsheng; Li Juan

    2005-08-05

    TGF-{beta}1/signaling has been shown to be associated with proapoptotic and antimitotic activities in epithelial tissues. Genistein, a major component of soybean isoflavone, has multiple functions resulting in anticancer proliferation. We herein showed that genistein dose-dependently increased TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression in mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells. A mouse monoclonal anti-TGF-{beta}1 neutralizing antibody partially, but not completely, blocked the growth inhibition by genistein. By using adenoviral vector, we demonstrated that Smad7 overexpression attenuated genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis as determined by MTT and apoptosis ELISA. Smad7 overexpression also inhibited upregulation of p21 and caspase-3 activity by geinistein. To further confirm inhibitory effect of genistein in MC-26 cells require TGF-{beta}1/Smad signaling, we employed Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to detect formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, respectively. Data revealed that genistein induced an evident formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, indicating increased TGF-{beta}1 signaling. Taken together, these findings first provided insights into possible molecular mechanisms of growth inhibition by genistein that required Smad signaling, which could aid in its evaluation for colon tumor prevention.

  8. Naegleria fowleri glycoconjugates with residues of α-D-mannose are involved in adherence of trophozoites to mouse nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Yepez, Maricela; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Godinez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Rodriguez-Monroy, Marco Aurelio; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; De Oca, Arturo Contis-Montes; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed the possible role of glycoconjugates containing α-D-mannose and α-D-glucose residues in adherence of trophozoites to mouse nasal epithelium. Trophozoites incubated with 20 μg of one of three different lectins which preferentially recognized these residues were inoculated intranasally in Balb/c mice. Mouse survival was 40% with Pisum sativum and Canavalia ensiformis and 20% with Galanthus nivalis amebic pretreatment, compared with 0% survival for control animals administered trophozoites without pretreatment. Possibly some of the glycoproteins found in Naegleria fowleri represent an adherence factor. Differences in the saccharide sequences of the Naegleria species, even on the same glycoconjugate structure, could explain the different results corresponding to the distinct pretreatments (C. ensiformis, G. nivalis, and P. sativum). We found a higher expression of glycoconjugates recognized by P. sativum in Naegleria lovaniensis than N. fowleri, probably due to the higher number of oligosaccharides containing an α-1,6-linked fucose moiety expressed on the former species. PMID:23922203

  9. Involvement of the T-box transcription factor Brachyury in early-stage embryonic mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouhei; Ikari, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Goro; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Ohyama, Yukiko; Kumamaru, Wataru; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu; Mori, Yoshihide

    2016-09-01

    The mouse submandibular gland (SMG) is important organ for embryonic development, and branching morphogenesis is regulated by many molecules containing transcription factors. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed that the expression of Brachyury increased in the SMG and peaked between E12.5-E13.5, concomitant with the early stage of branching morphogenesis. The expression of Brachyury in SMG rudiments between E12.5-E13.5 was confirmed by western blotting. In addition, fibronectin and Btbd7 (regulated by fibronectin), which are both essential for cleft formation, were expressed strongly during the same period. The Sox2 and Wnt3a, which regulate cell growth, were also expressed strongly during E12.5-E13.5. On the other hand, cleft formation and branching morphogenesis was suppressed by knockdown of Brachyury gene, suggesting that Brachyury plays a central role in regulating cell growth and cleft formation in early-stage embryonic mouse salivary gland development. PMID:27369076

  10. Relocalization of STIM1 in mouse oocytes at fertilization: early involvement of store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, Carolina; Pozo-Guisado, Eulalia; Gañán-Parra, Miguel; Perianes, Mario J; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Martín-Romero, Francisco Javier

    2009-08-01

    Calcium waves represent one of the most important intracellular signaling events in oocytes at fertilization required for the exit from metaphase arrest and the resumption of the cell cycle. The molecular mechanism ruling this signaling has been described in terms of the contribution of intracellular calcium stores to calcium spikes. In this work, we considered the possible contribution of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) to this signaling, by studying the localization of the protein STIM1 in oocytes. STIM1 has been suggested to play a key role in the recruitment and activation of plasma membrane calcium channels, and we show here that mature mouse oocytes express this protein distributed in discrete clusters throughout their periphery in resting cells, colocalizing with the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin. However, immunolocalization of the endogenous STIM1 showed considerable redistribution over larger areas or patches covering the entire periphery of the oocyte during Ca(2+) store depletion induced with thapsigargin or ionomycin. Furthermore, pharmacological activation of endogenous phospholipase C induced a similar pattern of redistribution of STIM1 in the oocyte. Finally, fertilization of mouse oocytes revealed a significant and rapid relocalization of STIM1, similar to that found after pharmacological Ca(2+) store depletion. This particular relocalization supports a role for STIM1 and SOCE in the calcium signaling during early stages of fertilization. PMID:19470709

  11. Expression patterns of taste receptor type 1 subunit 3 and α-gustducin in the mouse testis during development.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Wei, Quanwei; Mao, Dagan; Shi, Fangxiong

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptor type 1 subunit 3 (T1R3) and its associated heterotrimeric G protein α-gustducin (Gα) are involved in sweet and umami sensing in taste cells. They are also strongly expressed in the testis and sperm, but their expression patterns and potential roles involved were previously unknown. In present study, we investigated the expression patterns of T1R3 and Gα in the mouse testis at critical stages of postnatal life, and throughout the spermatogenic cycle. Our results indicated that T1R3 and Gα exhibited a stage-dependent expression pattern during mouse development, and a cell-specific pattern during the spermatogenic cycle. Their expressions have been increased significantly from prepubertal to pubertal periods (P<005), and decreased significantly in aged mice (P<005). The changes were mainly attributed to the differential expression of T1R3 or Gα in elongated spermatids and Leydig cells at different stages of the spermatogenic cycle. In addition, the expression of T1R3 and Gα were first observed in residual bodies of spermatozoa and endothelial cells of blood vessels at post-pubertal mice, while Gα was located in apoptotic spermatogonia of postnatal mice. These novel expression patterns suggest a role of T1R3 and Gα in the onset of spermatogenesis, pace of spermatogenic cycle, and aging of the testis. PMID:26589384

  12. Characterization of factors involved in modulating persistence of transgene expression from recombinant adenovirus in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J M; Armentano, D; Sparer, T E; Wynn, S G; Peterson, P A; Wadsworth, S C; Couture, K K; Pennington, S E; St George, J A; Gooding, L R; Smith, A E

    1997-01-01

    One potential limitation of adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors for the gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other genetic diseases is the transience of expression observed in most in vivo systems. In this study, the influence of various factors on persistence of transgene expression in the lung was investigated. In the absence of immune pressure, such as in the nude mouse, the genomic structure of the vector was found to be predominant in determining the persistence of expression; Ad vector constructs with an E1-E3+E4ORF6+ backbone encoding beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) or the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) produced declining levels of expression while an Ad/CMV beta Gal vector with an E1-E3+E4+ backbone gave rise to sustained, long-term reporter gene expression. The ability of the latter vector to persist was in turn limited in part by the presence of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that CTLs directed against either viral proteins or the beta-Gal reporter gene product were able to reduce expression in nude C57BL/6 mice stably expressing beta-Gal from the E4+ vector. Finally, the specificity and strength of the CTL response elicited by Ad vector was found to vary considerably depending on mouse strain haplotype. These results indicate that persistence of transgene expression in a given system is determined by the interplay between several factors including genomic structure of the vector, host background, and immune response. PMID:8989994

  13. Alpha B-crystallin expression in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts: glucocorticoid responsiveness and involvement in thermal protection.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, A; Fröhli, E; Schäfer, R; Klemenz, R

    1993-01-01

    alpha B-crystallin, a major soluble protein of vertebrate eye lenses, is a small heat shock protein which transiently accumulates in response to heat shock and other kinds of stress in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Ectopic expression of an alpha B-crystallin cDNA clone renders NIH 3T3 cells thermoresistant. alpha B-crystallin accumulates in response to the synthetic glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone. Dexamethasone-treated NIH 3T3 cells become thermoresistant to the same extent as they accumulate alpha B-crystallin. A cell clone in which alpha B-crystallin is superinduced upon heat shock acquires augmented thermotolerance. Expression of the ras oncogene causes a rapid but transient accumulation of alpha B-crystallin within 1 day. Later, sustained ras oncogene expression suppresses the dexamethasone-mediated alpha B-crystallin accumulation. Thus, oncogenic transformation triggered by the ras oncogene interferes with hormone-mediated accumulation of alpha B-crystallin and concomitant acquisition of thermoresistance. Other known heat shock proteins do not accumulate in response to ectopic alpha B-crystallin expression or to dexamethasone treatment. These results indicate that alpha B-crystallin can protect NIH 3T3 fibroblasts from thermal shock. Images PMID:8441415

  14. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: Evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-specific SMN function. We addressed the first possibility by exon junction microarray analysis of motoneurons (MNs) isolated by laser capture microdissection from a severe SMA mouse model. This revealed changes in multiple U2-dependent splicing events. Moreover, splicing appeared to be more strongly affected in MNs than in other cells. By testing mutiple genes in a model of progressive SMN depletion in NB2a neuroblastoma cells, we obtained evidence that U2-dependent splicing changes occur earlier than U12-dependent ones. As several of these changes affect genes coding for splicing regulators, this may acerbate the splicing response induced by low SMN levels and induce secondary waves of splicing alterations. PMID:25692239

  15. Analysis of PRICKLE1 in human cleft palate and mouse development demonstrates rare and common variants involved in human malformations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Jia, Zhonglin; Bryant-Pike, Whitney; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Murray, Jeffrey C; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bassuk, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Palate development is shaped by multiple molecular signaling pathways, including the Wnt pathway. In mice and humans, mutations in both the canonical and noncanonical arms of the Wnt pathway manifest as cleft palate, one of the most common human birth defects. Like the palate, numerous studies also link different Wnt signaling perturbations to varying degrees of limb malformation; for example, shortened limbs form in mutations of Ror2,Vangl2looptail and, in particular, Wnt5a. We recently showed the noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling molecule Prickle1 (Prickle like 1) also stunts limb growth in mice. We now expanded these studies to the palate and show that Prickle1 is also required for palate development, like Wnt5a and Ror2. Unlike in the limb, the Vangl2looptail mutation only aggravates palate defects caused by other mutations. We screened Filipino cleft palate patients and found PRICKLE1 variants, both common and rare, at an elevated frequency. Our results reveal that in mice and humans PRICKLE1 directs palate morphogenesis; our results also uncouple Prickle1 function from Vangl2 function. Together, these findings suggest mouse and human palate development is guided by PCP-Prickle1 signaling that is probably not downstream of Vangl2. PMID:24689077

  16. Involvement of N-acetyl-lactosamine-containing sugar structures in the liver metastasis of mouse colon carcinoma (colon 26) cells.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, H; Ito, M; Miura, Y; Hirano, H

    1994-01-01

    Histochemical aspects of the process of experimentally induced metastasis were examined by light and electron microscopy with labelled lectins employed as a probe. Mouse colon carcinoma cells (colon 26) were injected into the spleen of Balb/c mice and liver metastasis was induced. Among the lectins tested, Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) stained the metastasized colon 26 cells strongly compared with the heterogeneous and faint staining in non-metastasized tumour foci in the spleen or in the subcutaneous space. Other lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E) and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), having specificity for branched complex type sugar chains, did not show any differences between metastasized cells and non-metastasized tumour foci. In addition, N-acetyl-lactosamine, a specific inhibitor of ECA binding, significantly inhibited the attachment of suspended colon 26 cells to sectioned unfixed normal liver tissue. These results indicate that the expression of galactose (Gal) beta 1-4 N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residues of branched complex type sugar chains having specificity for ECA are important for the interaction process of carcinoma cells with hepatic cells in the process of liver metastasis. PMID:7532448

  17. Acute fasting decreases the expression of GLUT1 and glucose utilisation involved in mouse oocyte maturation and cumulus cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Yan, Jun; Zhou, Jinlian; Teng, Zhen; Bian, Fenghua; Guo, Meng; Mao, Guankun; Li, Junxia; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Meijia; Xia, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Acute fasting impairs meiotic resumption and glucose consumption in mouse cumulus cell and oocyte complexes (COCs). This study examines the effects of acute fasting on the regulation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression and glucose consumption in oocyte maturation. Our results indicate that the restriction of glucose utilisation by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) mimicked the inhibitory effects of acute fasting on oocyte meiotic resumption and cumulus cell expansion, effects that were rescued by high glucose concentrations in the culture medium. GLUT1 protein levels were higher in cumulus cells compared with oocytes, and GLUT1 expression in COCs increased with FSH treatment in vitro. However, under acute fasting conditions, GLUT1 expression in COCs decreased and the response to FSH disappeared. Exposure to high glucose conditions (27.5mM and 55mM), significantly increased both glucose consumption and GLUT1 levels in COCs. Inhibition of GLUT1 function using an anti-GLUT1 antibody significantly inhibited FSH-induced oocyte meiotic resumption. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fasting decreases GLUT1 expression and glucose utilisation, inhibiting the processes of oocyte maturation and cumulus cell expansion. PMID:22697123

  18. Metformin decreases the dose of chemotherapy for prolonging tumor remission in mouse xenografts involving multiple cancer cell types

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Metformin, the first-line drug for treating diabetes, selectively kills the chemotherapy-resistant, sub-population of cancer stem cells in genetically distinct types of breast cancer cell lines. In mouse xenografts, injection of metformin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin near the tumor is more effective than either drug alone in blocking tumor growth and preventing relapse. Here, we show that metformin is equally effective when given orally together with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and doxorubicin indicating that metformin works together with a variety of standard chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, metformin has comparable effects on tumor regression and preventing relapse when metformin combined with a 4-fold reduced dose of doxorubicin that is not effective as a monotherapy. Lastly, the combination of metformin and doxorubicin prevents relapse in xenografts generated with prostate and lung cancer cell lines. These observations provide further evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis for cancer relapse, as well as an experimental rationale for using metformin as part of combinatorial therapy in a variety of clinical settings and for reducing the chemotherapy dose in cancer patients. PMID:21415163

  19. RFX3 governs growth and beating efficiency of motile cilia in mouse and controls the expression of genes involved in human ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    El Zein, Loubna; Ait-Lounis, Aouatef; Morlé, Laurette; Thomas, Joëlle; Chhin, Brigitte; Spassky, Nathalie; Reith, Walter; Durand, Bénédicte

    2009-09-01

    Cilia are cellular organelles that play essential physiological and developmental functions in various organisms. They can be classified into two categories, primary cilia and motile cilia, on the basis of their axonemal architecture. Regulatory factor X (RFX) transcription factors have been shown to be involved in the assembly of primary cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and mice. Here, we have taken advantage of a novel primary-cell culture system derived from mouse brain to show that RFX3 is also necessary for biogenesis of motile cilia. We found that the growth and beating efficiencies of motile cilia are impaired in multiciliated Rfx3(-/-) cells. RFX3 was required for optimal expression of the FOXJ1 transcription factor, a key player in the differentiation program of motile cilia. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that RFX3 regulates the expression of axonemal dyneins involved in ciliary motility by binding directly to the promoters of their genes. In conclusion, RFX proteins not only regulate genes involved in ciliary assembly, but also genes that are involved in ciliary motility and that are associated with ciliopathies such as primary ciliary dyskinesia in humans. PMID:19671664

  20. Enrichment of Undifferentiated Type A Spermatogonia from Goat Testis Using Discontinuous Percoll Density Gradient and Differential Plating

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Banafsheh; Gifani, Minoo; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Baradaran, Behzad; Naderi, Mohammad Mehdi; Behzadi, Bahareh; Borjian-Boroujeni, Sara; Sarvari, Ali; Lakpour, Niknam; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background The well documented source for adult multipotent stem cells is Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs). They are the foundation of spermatogenesis in the testis throughout adult life by balancing self-renewal and differentiation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of percoll density gradient and differential plating on enrichment of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia in dissociated cellular suspension of goat testes. Additionally, we evaluated the separated fractions of the gradients in percoll and samples in differential plating at different times for cell number, viability and purification rate of goat SSCs in culture. Methods Testicular cells were successfully isolated from one month old goat testis using two-step enzymatic digestion and followed by two purification protocols, differential plating with different times of culture (3, 4, 5, and 6 hr) and discontinuous percoll density with different gradients (20, 28, 30, and 32%). The difference of percentage of undifferentiated SSCs (PGP9.5 positive) in each method was compared using ANOVA and comparison between the highest percentage of corresponding value between two methods was carried out by t-test using Sigma Stat (ver. 3.5). Results The highest PGP9.5 (94.6±0.4) and the lowest c-Kit positive (25.1±0.7) in Percoll method was significantly (p ≤ 0.001) achieved in 32% percoll gradient. While the corresponding rates in differential plating method for the highest PGP9.5 positive cells (81.3±1.1) and lowest c-Kit (17.1±1.4) was achieved after 5 hr culturing (p < 0.001). The enrichment of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia using Percoll was more efficient than differential plating method (p < 0.001). Conclusion Percoll density gradient and differential plating were efficient and fast methods for enrichment of type A spermatogonial stem cells from goat testes. PMID:24834311

  1. Mitofusin 2 expression dominates over mitofusin 1 exclusively in mouse dorsal root ganglia - a possible explanation for peripheral nervous system involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2A.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Maria; Zabłocka, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Neska, Jacek; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, is essential for mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A (CMT2A), an inherited disease affecting peripheral nerve axons. The precise mechanism by which mutations in MFN2 selectively cause the degeneration of long peripheral axons is not known. There is a hypothesis suggesting the involvement of reduced expression of a homologous protein, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), in the peripheral nervous system, and less effective compensation of defective mitofusin 2 by mitofusin 1. We therefore aimed to perform an analysis of the mitofusin 1 and mitofusin 2 mRNA and protein expression profiles in different mouse tissues, with special attention paid to dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), as parts of the peripheral nervous system. Quantitative measurement relating to mRNA revealed that expression of the Mfn2 gene dominates over Mfn1 mainly in mouse DRG, as opposed to other nervous system samples and other tissues studied. This result was further supported by Western blot evaluation. Both these sets of data confirm the hypothesis that the cellular consequences of mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene can mostly be manifested in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25574749

  2. Apoptosis induced by domoic acid in mouse cerebellar granule neurons involves activation of p38 and JNK MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, G.; Klintworth, H.M.; Kavanagh, T.J.; Costa, L.G.

    2008-01-01

    In mouse cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) the marine neurotoxin domoic acid (DomA) induces neuronal cell death, either by apoptosis or by necrosis, depending on its concentration, with apoptotic damage predominating in response to low concentrations (100 nM). DomA-induced apoptosis is due to selective activation of AMPA/kainate receptors, and is mediated by DomA-induced oxidative stress, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of caspase-3. The p38 MAP kinase and the c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) have been shown to be preferentially activated by oxidative stress. Here we report that DomA increases p38 MAP kinase and JNK phosphorylation, and that this effect is more pronounced in CGNs from Gclm (−/−) mice, which lack the modifier subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, have very low glutathione (GSH) levels, and are more sensitive to DomA-induced apoptosis than CGNs from wild-type mice. The increased phosphorylation of JNK and p38 kinase was paralleled by a decreased phosphorylation of Erk 1/2. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, prevents DomA-induced activation of p38 and JNK kinases. Several antioxidants (GSH ethyl ester, catalase, phenylbutylnitrone) also prevent DomA-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases. Inhibitors of p38 (SB203580) and of JNK (SP600125) antagonize DomA-induced apoptosis. These results indicate the importance of oxidative stress-activated JNK and p38 MAP kinase pathways in DomA-induced apoptosis in CGNs. PMID:18164102

  3. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17. PMID:26271098

  4. Restraint Stress Inhibits Mouse Implantation: Temporal Window and the Involvement of HB-EGF, Estrogen and Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hong-Jie; Liang, Bo; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2013-01-01

    It is known that psychological stress affects reproduction in women, but it is unknown whether the effect is by impairing implantation. Although studies suggest that long periods of auditory or restraint stress may inhibit implantation in rats and mice, the exact stage of pregnancy at which stress impairs implantation is unclear. Furthermore, whether stress impairs implantation by decreasing the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), estrogen and/or progesterone and whether by acting on embryos or on the uterus need further investigations. In this study, a 24-h restraint stress was initiated at 15:30 of day 3 (regimen 1) or at 07:30 (regimen 2) or 15:30 of day 4 (regimen 3) of pregnancy (vaginal plug  =  day 1) to observe effects of restraint stress applied at different peri-implantation stages on implantation. Among the three regimens, whereas regimens 1 and 3 affected neither term pregnancy nor litter size, regimen 2 reduced both. Further observations indicated that regimen 2 of restraint stress also delayed blastocyst hatching and the attachment reaction, decreased serum concentrations of progesterone and estradiol, and down regulated the expression of HB-EGF in both the endometrium and blastocysts. Taken together, the results suggested that restraint stress inhibited mouse implantation in a temporal window-dependent manner and by impairing blastocyst activation and hatching and uterine receptivity via down-regulating HB-EGF, estrogen and progesterone. Thus, the stress applied within the implantation window impaired implantation by acting on both embryos and the uterus. PMID:24244689

  5. Interference by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin with cultured mouse submandibular gland branching morphogenesis involves reduced epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kiukkonen, Anu . E-mail: anummela@mappi.helsinki.fi; Sahlberg, Carin; Partanen, Anna-Maija; Alaluusua, Satu; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Tuomisto, Jouko; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa

    2006-05-01

    Toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to mouse embryonic teeth, sharing features of early development with salivary glands in common, involves enhanced apoptosis and depends on the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. EGF receptor signaling, on the other hand, is essential for salivary gland branching morphogenesis. To see if TCDD impairs salivary gland morphogenesis and if the impairment is associated with EGF receptor signaling, we cultured mouse (NMRI) E13 submandibular glands with TCDD or TCDD in combination with EGF or fibronectin (FN), both previously found to enhance branching morphogenesis. Explants were examined stereomicroscopically and processed to paraffin sections. TCDD exposure impaired epithelial branching and cleft formation, resulting in enlarged buds. The glands were smaller than normal. EGF and FN alone concentration-dependently stimulated or inhibited branching morphogenesis but when co-administered with TCDD, failed to compensate for its effect. TCDD induced cytochrome P4501A1 expression in the glandular epithelium, indicating activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. TCDD somewhat increased epithelial apoptosis as observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated nick end-labeling method but the increase could not be correlated with morphological changes. The frequency of proliferating cells was not altered. Corresponding to the reduced cleft sites in TCDD-exposed explants, FN immunoreactivity in the epithelium was reduced. The results show that TCDD, comparably with EGF and FN at morphogenesis-inhibiting concentrations, impaired salivary gland branching morphogenesis in vitro. Together with the failure of EGF and FN at morphogenesis-stimulating concentrations to compensate for the effect of TCDD this implies that TCDD toxicity to developing salivary gland involves reduced EGF receptor signaling.

  6. Involvement of EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a and associated molecules in pathogenesis of urethane induced mouse lung tumors: Potential targets for cancer control

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Manuraj; Sahay, Satya; Tiwari, Prakash; Upadhyay, Daya S.; Sultana, Sarwat; Gupta, Krishna P.

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, we showed the correlation of EZH2, SUV39H1 or G9a expression and histone modifications with the urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis in the presence or absence of antitumor agent, inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). Tumorigenesis and the molecular events involved therein were studied at 1, 4, 12 or 36 weeks after the exposure. There were no tumors at 1 or 4 weeks but tumors started appearing at 12 weeks and grew further till 36 weeks after urethane exposure. Among the molecular events, upregulation of EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions appeared to be time dependent, but G9a expression was altered significantly only at later stages of 12 or 36 weeks. Alteration in miR-138 expression supports the upregulation of its target, EZH2. H3K9me2, H3K27me3 or H4K20me3 was found to be altered at 12 or 36 weeks. However, ChIP analysis of p16 and MLH1 promoters showed their binding with H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 which was maximum at 36 weeks. Thus, histone modification and their interactions with gene promoter resulted in the reduced expression of p16 and MLH1. IP6 prevented the incidence and the size of urethane induced lung tumors. IP6 also prevented the urethane induced alterations in EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a expressions and histone modifications. Our results suggest that the alterations in the histone modification pathways involving EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions are among the early events in urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis and could be exploited for cancer control. - Highlights: • Urethane induces mouse lung tumor in a time dependent manner. • EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a induced by urethane and progress with time • Downregulation of miRNA-138 supports the EZH2 upregulation. • Methylation of histones showed a consequence of upregulated EZH2, SUV39H1 and G9a. • IP6 inhibits urethane induced changes and prevents tumor development.

  7. Regulation of Genes Involved in Carnitine Homeostasis by PPARα across Different Species (Rat, Mouse, Pig, Cattle, Chicken, and Human)

    PubMed Central

    Ringseis, Robert; Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in rodents convincingly demonstrated that PPARα is a key regulator of genes involved in carnitine homeostasis, which serves as a reasonable explanation for the phenomenon that energy deprivation and fibrate treatment, both of which cause activation of hepatic PPARα, causes a strong increase of hepatic carnitine concentration in rats. The present paper aimed to comprehensively analyse available data from genetic and animal studies with mice, rats, pigs, cows, and laying hens and from human studies in order to compare the regulation of genes involved in carnitine homeostasis by PPARα across different species. Overall, our comparative analysis indicates that the role of PPARα as a regulator of carnitine homeostasis is well conserved across different species. However, despite demonstrating a well-conserved role of PPARα as a key regulator of carnitine homeostasis in general, our comprehensive analysis shows that this assumption particularly applies to the regulation by PPARα of carnitine uptake which is obviously highly conserved across species, whereas regulation by PPARα of carnitine biosynthesis appears less well conserved across species. PMID:23150726

  8. Paradoxical effects of VEGF on synaptic activity partially involved in notch1 signaling in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiajia; Yang, Chunxiao; Liu, Chunhua; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the neuronal effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) include modulating learning and memory, plasticity of mature neurons, and synaptic transmission in addition to neurogenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence particularly of its role in the regulation of excitatory synaptic activity. In this study, application of the patch-clamp technique revealed that lower doses (10 and 50 ng/mL) of VEGF enhanced excitatory neurotransmission in hippocampal slices of mice through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. However, the effects were reversed by higher doses of VEGF (>100 ng/mL), which inhibited excitatory neurotransmission via a presynaptic mechanism. These competing, concentration-dependent effects of VEGF suggested that different pathways were involved. The involvement of the Notch1 receptor was tested in the modulation of VEGF on synaptic activity by using heterozygous Notch1(+/-) mice. Notch1 knockdown did not influence the inhibitory effect of high VEGF doses (200 ng/mL) but reduced the enhancement effects of low concentration of VEGF (50 ng/mL) at the postsynaptic level, which might be due to the decreased level of VEGF receptor. The results indicate that the Notch1 receptor plays a role in VEGF-induced modulation of synaptic activity, which provides new insights into a complex VEGF/Notch signaling cross-talk. These findings set the groundwork for understanding new mechanisms of Notch signaling and the neurotrophic effects of VEGF, which is beneficial to develop new therapeutic targets to the VEGF/Notch axis and improve current treatments for neural diseases. PMID:26482652

  9. Retinoblastoma Protein (RB1) Controls Fate Determination in Stem Cells and Progenitors of the Mouse Male Germline1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi-En; Gwost, Ivy; Oatley, Melissa J.; Oatley, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Continual spermatogenesis is the cornerstone of male fertility and relies on the actions of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population comprised of stem cells and progenitors. A foundational spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) pool is established during postnatal development that serves as a self-renewing reservoir from which progenitor spermatogonia arise that transiently amplify in number before committing to terminal differentiation. At present, the underlying molecular mechanisms governing these actions are undefined. Using conditional mutant mouse models, we investigated whether function of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population during postnatal life is influenced by the tumor suppressor protein RB1. Spermatogenesis initiates in mice with conditional inactivation of Rb1 in prospermatogonial precursors, but the germline is progressively lost upon aging due to impaired renewal of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population. In contrast, continual spermatogenesis is sustained following Rb1 inactivation in progenitor spermatogonia, but some cells transform into a carcinoma in situ-like state. Furthermore, knockdown of Rb1 abundance within primary cultures of wild-type undifferentiated spermatogonia impairs maintenance of the SSC pool, and some cells are invasive of the basement membrane after transplant into recipient testes, indicating acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Collectively, these findings indicate that RB1 plays an essential role in establishment of a self-renewing SSC pool and commitment to the spermatogenic lineage within progenitor spermatogonia. PMID:24089198

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the detection of IMP and L-amino acids by mouse taste sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, S; Delay, R J; Delay, E R

    2016-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to be involved in the detection of umami and L-amino acid taste. These include the heterodimer taste receptor type 1 member 1 (T1r1)+taste receptor type 1 member 3 (T1r3), taste and brain variants of mGluR4 and mGluR1, and calcium sensors. While several studies suggest T1r1+T1r3 is a broadly tuned lLamino acid receptor, little is known about the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in L-amino acid taste transduction. Calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells (TSCs) of T1r3-GFP and T1r3 knock-out (T1r3 KO) mice was performed using the ratiometric dye Fura 2 AM to investigate the role of different mGluRs in detecting various L-amino acids and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). Using agonists selective for various mGluRs such as (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (an mGluR1 agonist) and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (an mGluR4 agonist), we evaluated TSCs to determine if they might respond to these agonists, IMP, and three L-amino acids (monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine and L-arginine). Additionally, we used selective antagonists against different mGluRs such as (RS)-L-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) (an mGluR1 antagonist), and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (an mGluR4 antagonist) to determine if they can block responses elicited by these L-amino acids and IMP. We found that L-amino acid- and IMP-responsive cells also responded to each agonist. Antagonists for mGluR4 and mGluR1 significantly blocked the responses elicited by IMP and each of the L-amino acids. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the involvement of taste and brain variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4 in L-amino acid and IMP taste responses in mice, and support the concept that multiple receptors contribute to IMP and L-amino acid taste. PMID:26701297

  11. Antinociceptive effects of dehydrocorydaline in mouse models of inflammatory pain involve the opioid receptor and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhi-Yu; Li, Lu; Chu, Shuai-Shuai; Sun, Qing; Ma, Zheng-Liang; Gu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrocorydaline (DHC) is an alkaloidal component isolated from Rhizoma corydalis. Previous studies have shown that DHC has anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects and that it can protect the cardiovascular system. However, there are few studies of the antinociceptive effects of DHC in vivo. This study explored the antinociceptive effects and possible mechanisms of DHC in mice using two inflammatory pain models: the acetic acid-induced writhing test and the formalin paw test. The intraperitoneal administration of DHC (3.6, 6 or 10 mg/kg) showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and significantly attenuated the formalin-induced pain responses in mice. The antinociceptive effects of DHC were not associated with changes in the locomotor activity or motor responses of animals, and no obvious acute or chronic toxic effects were observed in the mice. Furthermore, the use of naloxone confirmed the involvement of the opioid receptor in the central antinociceptive effects of DHC. DHC reduced formalin-induced paw edema, which indicated that DHC may produce an anti-inflammatory effect in the periphery. In the formalin test, DHC decreased the expression of caspase 6 (CASP6), TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 proteins in the spinal cord. These findings confirm that DHC has antinociceptive effects in mice. PMID:27272194

  12. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues. PMID:27059198

  13. Antinociceptive effects of dehydrocorydaline in mouse models of inflammatory pain involve the opioid receptor and inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhi-Yu; Li, Lu; Chu, Shuai-Shuai; Sun, Qing; Ma, Zheng-Liang; Gu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrocorydaline (DHC) is an alkaloidal component isolated from Rhizoma corydalis. Previous studies have shown that DHC has anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects and that it can protect the cardiovascular system. However, there are few studies of the antinociceptive effects of DHC in vivo. This study explored the antinociceptive effects and possible mechanisms of DHC in mice using two inflammatory pain models: the acetic acid-induced writhing test and the formalin paw test. The intraperitoneal administration of DHC (3.6, 6 or 10 mg/kg) showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and significantly attenuated the formalin-induced pain responses in mice. The antinociceptive effects of DHC were not associated with changes in the locomotor activity or motor responses of animals, and no obvious acute or chronic toxic effects were observed in the mice. Furthermore, the use of naloxone confirmed the involvement of the opioid receptor in the central antinociceptive effects of DHC. DHC reduced formalin-induced paw edema, which indicated that DHC may produce an anti-inflammatory effect in the periphery. In the formalin test, DHC decreased the expression of caspase 6 (CASP6), TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 proteins in the spinal cord. These findings confirm that DHC has antinociceptive effects in mice. PMID:27272194

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-type and Mutant Huntingtin-associated Proteins in Mouse Brains Identifies Unique Interactions and Involvement in Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Park, Sung K.; Choi, Jeong H.; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O.; Yates, John R.; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis. PMID:22556411

  15. Identification of differentially expressed genes involved in transient regeneration of the neonatal C57BL/6J mouse heart by digital gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Zhu, Jin-Gai; Yu, Zhang-Bin; Song, Gui-Xian; Shen, Ya-Hui; Liu, Yao-Qiu; Zhu, Chun; Qian, Ling-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has revealed that the mammalian heart possesses a measurable capacity for renewal. Neonatal mice retain a regenerative capacity over a short time-frame (≤6 days), but this capacity is lost by 7 days of age. In the present study, differential gene expression profiling of mouse cardiac tissue was performed to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying this process. The global gene expression patterns of the neonatal C57BL/6J mouse heart were examined at three key time-points (1, 6 and 7 days old) using digital gene expression analysis. In the distribution of total clean tags, high-expression tags (>100 copies) were found to be predominant, whereas low expression tags (<5 copies) occupied the majority of distinct tag distributions. In total, 306 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in cardiac tissue, with the expression levels of 115 genes upregulated and those of 191 genes downregulated in 7-day-old mice compared with expression levels in 1- and 6-day-old mice, respectively. The expression levels of five DEGs were confirmed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gene ontology analysis revealed a large proportion of DEGs distributed throughout the cell, and these DEGs were associated with binding as well as catalytic, hydrolase, transferase and molecular transducer activities. Furthermore, these genes were involved in cellular, metabolic and developmental processes, as well as biological regulation and signaling pathways. Pathway analysis identified the oxidative phosphorylation pathway to be the process most significantly putatively affected by the differential expression of these genes. These data provide the basis for future analysis of the gene expression patterns that regulate the molecular mechanism of cardiac regeneration. PMID:24699800

  16. Connexin43 gap junctions in normal, regenerating, and cultured mouse bone marrow and in human leukemias: their possible involvement in blood formation.

    PubMed Central

    Krenacs, T.; Rosendaal, M.

    1998-01-01

    their membrane replicas. In normocellular human bone marrow, gap junctions were as rare as in adult mouse and similarly distributed, except that they were also on adipocytic membranes. In a few leukemic samples, characterized by an increased stromal/hematopoietic cell ratio, there were two- to fourfold more Cx43 (2.8 x 10(5) to 3.9 x 10(5)/mm3) than in the normal (1.0 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(5)/mm3). The cases included a hypoplastic acute lymphoblastic leukemia, an acute myeloid leukemia (French-American-British classification M4-5), a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with elevated number of megakaryocytes, and a CD34+ acute hemoblastosis, probably acute myeloid leukemia (French-American-British classification M7). Taken together, our results indicate that direct cell-cell communication may be involved in hematopoiesis, ie, in developmentally active epiphyseal bone marrow and when there is a demand for progenitors in regeneration. However, gap junctions may not play as important a role in resting adult hematopoiesis and in leukemias. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9546360

  17. MicroRNA-674-5p/5-LO axis involved in autoimmune reaction of Concanavalin A-induced acute mouse liver injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Kunkai; Wang, Qi; Qi, Luoyang; Hua, Dasong; Tao, Jingjing; Mangan, Connor J; Lou, Yijia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is characterized, in part, by the pathways involving cysteinyl-leukotriene metabolites of arachidonic acid, the dynamics of which remain unclear. Here, we explored post-transcriptional regulation in the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway of arachidonic acid in a Concanavalin A (Con A) induced mouse model. We found that Con A administration lead to 5-LO overexpression and cysteinyl-leukotriene release in early hepatic injury, which was attenuated by cyclosporin A pretreatment. Subsequent microarray and qRT-PCR analysis further showed that microRNA-674-5p (miR-674-5p) displayed a significant decrease in expression in Con A-damaged liver. Noting that miR-674-5p harbors a potential binding region for 5-LO, we further transfected hepatic cell lines with overexpressing miR-674-5p mimic and discovered a negative regulating effect of miR-674-5p on 5-LO expression in the presence of IL-6 or TNF-α. These findings suggest that miR-674-5p might be a negative regulator in 5-LO mediated autoimmune liver injury, representing a compelling avenue towards future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27313091

  18. Regulatory volume increase in epithelial cells isolated from the mouse fourth ventricle choroid plexus involves Na(+)-H(+) exchange but not Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransport.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alexandra L H; Pakhomova, Antonina; Brown, Peter D

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of choroid plexus epithelial cells to volume regulate when exposed to hypertonic solutions, and furthermore to identify the ion transporters involved in any volume regulation. Experiments were performed on cells freshly isolated, using the enzyme dispase, from the mouse fourth ventricle choroid plexus. Cell volume was measured using a video-imaging method. Cells used in this study were all of a similar morphology and had a mean volume of 0.71pl. Cells shrank when superfused with hypertonic solutions to a minimum relative cell volume of 0.84+/-0.01 (n=8) in 3min. They then exhibited a regulatory volume increase (RVI) to reach a relative volume of 0.92+/-0.02 over the following 12min. The RVI was HCO(3)(-)-dependent, that is it was not observed in hepes-buffered solutions. A post-regulatory volume decrease RVI (post-RVD RVI) was also observed in cells following exposure to hypotonic solutions. The RVI and post-RVD RVI were inhibited by 10microM 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride or 10microM 5-(N-methyl-N-isobutyl) amiloride, both selective inhibitors of Na(+)-H(+) exchange (NHE). They were also inhibited by the anion transport inhibitor 100microM 2,2'-(1,2-ethenediyl) bis (5-isothiocyanatobenzenesulfonic acid). The Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter inhibitor, 10microM bumetanide, was without effect on either the RVI or the post-RVD RVI. The data indicate that NHE, probably in combination with Cl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchangers, contributes to RVI in choroid plexus epithelial cells. PMID:20144884

  19. Emodin-induced muscle contraction of mouse diaphragm and the involvement of Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y W; Kang, J J

    1998-01-01

    The effects on skeletal muscle of emodin, an anthraquinone, were studied in the mouse isolated diaphragm and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles.Emodin dose-dependently caused muscle contracture, simultaneously depressing twitch amplitude. Neither tubocurarine nor tetrodotoxin blocked the contraction suggesting that it was caused myogenically.The contraction induced by emodin persisted in a Ca2+ free medium with a slight reduction in the maximal force of contraction. The contraction induced by emodin in the Ca2+ free medium was completely blocked when the internal Ca2+ pool of the muscle was depleted by ryanodine. These data suggest that the contraction caused by emodin is due to the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular ryanodine-sensitive pool.In contrast to the effect seen in the Ca2+ free medium, emodin induced a small but consisted contraction in the ryanodine-treated muscle in Krebs medium. The contraction was blocked in the presence of dithiothreitol and was partially blocked by nifedipine, suggesting that oxidation of a sulphhydryl group on the external site of dihydropyridine receptor is involved.Emodin dose-dependently increased Ca2+ release from actively loaded SR vesicles and this effect was blocked by ruthenium red, a specific Ca2+ release channel blocker, and the thiol reducing agent, DTT, suggesting that emodin induced Ca2+ release through oxidation of the critical SH of the ryanodine receptor.[3H]-ryanodine binding was dose-dependently potentiated by emodin in a biphasic manner. The degree of potentiation of ryanodine binding by emodin increased dose-dependently at concentrations up to 10 μM but decreased at higher concentrations of 10–100 μM.These data suggest that muscle contraction induced by emodin is due to Ca2+ release from the SR of skeletal muscle, as a result of oxidation of the ryanodine receptor and influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of the plasma membrane. PMID:9535008

  20. Amyloid Core Formed of Full-Length Recombinant Mouse Prion Protein Involves Sequence 127–143 but Not Sequence 107–126

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Biswanath; Lee, Chung-Yu; Lin, Chen; Chen, Eric H.-L.; Huang, Chao-Li; Yang, Chien-Chih; Chen, Rita P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    The principal event underlying the development of prion disease is the conversion of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) into its disease-causing isoform, PrPSc. This conversion is associated with a marked change in secondary structure from predominantly α-helical to a high β-sheet content, ultimately leading to the formation of aggregates consisting of ordered fibrillar assemblies referred to as amyloid. In vitro, recombinant prion proteins and short prion peptides from various species have been shown to form amyloid under various conditions and it has been proposed that, theoretically, any protein and peptide could form amyloid under appropriate conditions. To identify the peptide segment involved in the amyloid core formed from recombinant full-length mouse prion protein mPrP(23–230), we carried out seed-induced amyloid formation from recombinant prion protein in the presence of seeds generated from the short prion peptides mPrP(107–143), mPrP(107–126), and mPrP(127–143). Our results showed that the amyloid fibrils formed from mPrP(107–143) and mPrP(127–143), but not those formed from mPrP(107–126), were able to seed the amyloidogenesis of mPrP(23–230), showing that the segment residing in sequence 127–143 was used to form the amyloid core in the fibrillization of mPrP(23–230). PMID:23844138

  1. The cellular expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit during spermatogenesis in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Kiyoto; Okamoto, Keiko; Nomura, Sakashi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masahito; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2010-10-01

    GABA(A) receptors are pentamers in structure and are mainly composed of alpha, beta and gamma subunits. These receptors are known to function as chloride channels. We observed alpha5, beta1 and gamma3 subunit immunoreactivity in the mouse testes, specifically in the cytoplasm surrounding the nucleus in the spermatocytes and spermatids. In the current study, alpha1 subunit immunoreactivity was located in the nucleus of spermatogonia, spermatocytes and round spermatids. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the alpha1 subunit was localized within the nucleus of pachytene and diplotene spermatocytes in the area of condensed chromatin rather than extended chromatin. Protein sequence analysis revealed that the alpha1 subunit included DM DNA binding domains that were related to transcription factors involved in testicular differentiation in adult mice. These findings suggest that the alpha1 subunit may undertake a gene transcription function during the maturation of germ cells. a1 immunoreactivity was also detected within the mitochondria of spermatocytes and in the acrosome of round and elongated spermatids. Although the precise physiological role of the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit in mitochondria remains unknown, we hypothesize that its function in the acrosome may be related to the acrosome reaction during fertilization or during spermatogenesis. PMID:20712007

  2. Classification of several types of maturational arrest of spermatogonia according to Sertoli cell morphology: an approach to aetiology.

    PubMed

    Nistal, M; De Mora, J C; Paniagua, R

    1998-12-01

    Bilateral testicular biopsies and clinical histories from 34 adult men with maturational arrest of spermatogonia were examined. According to the morphology of Sertoli cell nuclei, five testicular types of spermatogonial maturational arrest were established. In type I lesion, Sertoli cells resembled the immature Sertoli cells of infant testes. These cells had a round, regularly outlined, dark nucleus with a small nucleolus. The seminiferous tubules showed no apparent lumen and a poorly developed lamina propria lacking in elastic fibres. This lesion was found in patients exhibiting a eunuchoid phenotype, with small tests and low serum levels of gonadotrophins and testosterone (hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism). Type II lesion showed morphologically normal, mature, adult Sertoli cells which had a pale, irregularly outlined nucleus, many often triangle-shaped, with a large, centrally located nucleolus. The seminiferous tubules were reduced in diameter and showed a few spermatocytes and spermatids. This lesion was found in patients with varicocoele, epididymitis, testicular trauma or idiopathic infertility. Serum FSH levels were normal or increased while LH and testosterone levels were normal. In type III lesion, Sertoli cells resembled the involuting Sertoli cells found in the testes of aging men, and displayed very infolded nuclei, with abundant dense chromatin patches and a large nucleolus. The seminiferous tubules showed a slightly dilated lumen and a normal tubular wall. The most relevant clinical findings in patients with this lesion were alcoholism, varicocoele, falciform cell anaemia, epididymitis and germ cell tumour. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were normal or increased while luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone levels were normal. Type IV lesion Sertoli cells presented with a de-differentiated appearance. These cells had a small, round euchromatic nucleus with a small nucleolus and vacuolated cytoplasm. The seminiferous tubules were

  3. Molecular characterization of mouse-virulent poliovirus type 1 Mahoney mutants: involvement of residues of polypeptides VP1 and VP2 located on the inner surface of the capsid protein shell.

    PubMed Central

    Couderc, T; Hogle, J; Le Blay, H; Horaud, F; Blondel, B

    1993-01-01

    determinant on capsid protein VP1, and we showed that at least one other capsid protein, VP2, could also express a mouse adaptation determinant. Both determinants are located in the inside of the three-dimensional structure of the viral capsid. They may be involved in the early steps of mouse nerve cell infection subsequent to receptor attachment. Images PMID:8389907

  4. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for the Involvement of Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects linked to liver cancer through the nuclear recep...

  5. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for Involvement of the Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects related to liver carcinogenesis through the nucle...

  6. Induction of reciprocal translocations in rhesus monkey stem-cell spermatogonia: effects of low doses and low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    van Buul, P.P.; Richardson, J.F. Jr.; Goudzwaard, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of reciprocal translocation in rhesus monkey spermatogonial stem cells was studied following exposure to low doses of acute X rays (0.25 Gy, 300 mGy/min) or to low-dose-rate X rays (1 Gy, 2 mGy/min) and gamma rays (1 Gy, 0.2 mGy/min). The results obtained at 0.25 Gy of X rays fitted exactly the linear extrapolation down from the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy points obtained earlier. Extension of X-ray exposure reduced the yield of translocations similar to that in the mouse by about 50%. The reduction to 40% of translocation rate after chronic gamma exposure was clearly less than the value of about 80% reported for the mouse over the same range of dose rates. Differential cell killing with ensuing differential elimination of aberration-carrying cells is the most likely explanation for the differences between mouse and monkey.

  7. Stimulation of IFN-γ production by garlic lectin in mouse spleen cells: involvement of IL-12 via activation of p38 MAPK and ERK in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Sugiura, Tsutomu; Toyohira, Yumiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Karasaki, Yuji

    2011-02-15

    Several lectins, present in beans and edible plant products, have immuno-potentiating and anti-tumor activities. We here report the effects of garlic lectin purified from garlic bulbs on the production of cytokines such as interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the mouse. Garlic lectin induced IFN-γ production in spleen cells in a bell-shaped time (24-60 h)- and concentration (0.25-2.0 mg/ml)-dependent manner. The maximal enhancement was observed at 36 h with 0.5 mg/ml of garlic lectin. The stimulatory effect of garlic lectin on IFN-γ production was completely inhibited by both actinomycin D and cycloheximide, an inhibitor of ribosomal protein synthesis and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively, and was associated with an increase in IFN-γ mRNA level. Garlic lectin also induced IL-12 production in mouse peritoneal macrophages in a concentration (0.25-1.0 mg/ml)- and bell-shaped time (3-24 h)-dependent manner. The lectin increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in macrophages. Furthermore, specific pharmacological inhibitors of ERK kinase (U0126) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) also suppressed the production of IL-12 induced by garlic lectin. The present findings suggest that garlic lectin induces IL-12 production via activation of p38 MAPK and ERK in mouse macrophages, which, in turn, stimulates IFN-γ production through an increase in IFN-γ mRNA in the spleen cells. PMID:20724126

  8. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in regulating low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated β-amyloid protein internalization in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai-Ge; Lv, Jia; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Li-Li; Chang, Ke-Wei; Chen, Xin-Lin; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that intracellular β-amyloid protein (Aβ) alone plays a pivotal role in the progression of AD. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway and proteins that control Aβ internalization may provide new insight for regulating Aβ levels. In the present study, the regulation of Aβ internalization by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was analyzed in vivo. The data derived from this investigation revealed that Aβ1-42 were internalized by neurons and astrocytes in mouse brain, and were largely deposited in mitochondria and lysosomes, with some also being found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex was formed during Aβ1-42 internalization, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated by Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were co- localized in the cells of parietal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the level of LRP1-mRNA and LRP1 protein involved in Aβ1-42 internalization in mouse brain. The results of this investigation demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced an LRP1-dependent pathway that related to the activation of p38 MAPK resulting in internalization of Aβ1-42. These results provide evidence supporting a key role for the p38 MAPK signaling pathway which is involved in the regulation of Aβ1-42 internalization in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of mouse through LRP1 in vivo. PMID:27163530

  9. Early synaptic deficits in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease involve neuronal adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Viana da Silva, Silvia; Haberl, Matthias Georg; Zhang, Pei; Bethge, Philipp; Lemos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gorlewicz, Adam; Malezieux, Meryl; Gonçalves, Francisco Q; Grosjean, Noëlle; Blanchet, Christophe; Frick, Andreas; Nägerl, U Valentin; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Mulle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the autoassociative network of recurrent connections among hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells is thought to enable the storage of episodic memory. Impaired episodic memory is an early manifestation of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the APP/PS1 mouse model of AD amyloidosis, we show that associative long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is abolished in CA3 pyramidal cells at an early stage. This is caused by activation of upregulated neuronal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) rather than by dysregulation of NMDAR signalling or altered dendritic spine morphology. Neutralization of A2AR by acute pharmacological inhibition, or downregulation driven by shRNA interference in a single postsynaptic neuron restore associative CA3 LTP. Accordingly, treatment with A2AR antagonists reverts one-trial memory deficits. These results provide mechanistic support to encourage testing the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR antagonists in early AD patients. PMID:27312972

  10. Early synaptic deficits in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease involve neuronal adenosine A2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viana da Silva, Silvia; Haberl, Matthias Georg; Zhang, Pei; Bethge, Philipp; Lemos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gorlewicz, Adam; Malezieux, Meryl; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Grosjean, Noëlle; Blanchet, Christophe; Frick, Andreas; Nägerl, U Valentin; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Mulle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the autoassociative network of recurrent connections among hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells is thought to enable the storage of episodic memory. Impaired episodic memory is an early manifestation of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the APP/PS1 mouse model of AD amyloidosis, we show that associative long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is abolished in CA3 pyramidal cells at an early stage. This is caused by activation of upregulated neuronal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) rather than by dysregulation of NMDAR signalling or altered dendritic spine morphology. Neutralization of A2AR by acute pharmacological inhibition, or downregulation driven by shRNA interference in a single postsynaptic neuron restore associative CA3 LTP. Accordingly, treatment with A2AR antagonists reverts one-trial memory deficits. These results provide mechanistic support to encourage testing the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR antagonists in early AD patients. PMID:27312972

  11. The CD4 T cell-deficient mouse mutation nackt (nkt) involves a deletion in the cathepsin L (CtsI) gene.

    PubMed

    Benavides, F; Venables, A; Poetschke Klug, H; Glasscock, E; Rudensky, A; Gómez, M; Martin Palenzuela, N; Guénet, J L; Richie, E R; Conti, C J

    2001-04-01

    We recently reported a novel autosomal recessive mouse mutation designated nackt (nkt). Homozygous mutant mice have diffuse alopecia and a marked reduction in the proportion of CD4+ T cells in the thymus and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Here we show that the CD4 T-cell deficiency is due to a defect in the thymic microenvironment rather than the hematopoietic compartment. Furthermore, we identified the molecular basis of the mutant phenotype by demonstrating that the nkt mutation represents a 118-bp deletion of the cathepsin L (Ctsl) gene which is required for degradation of the invariant chain, a critical chaperone for major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. This finding explains the similarities in skin and immune defects observed in nkt/nkt and Ctsl -/- mice. The data reported here provide further in vivo evidence that the lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L plays a critical role in CD4+ T-cell selection in the thymus. PMID:11398968

  12. Protection of the mouse from genetic radiation damage by an optimal-dose-ratio combination of ATP, AET, and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Benova, D; Baev, I

    1978-07-15

    The study concerned antiradiation effects in germ-cell genetic structures produced by a combination of ATP, AET, and serotonin at dose ratio optimal for lethality namely, 45:3:1, as arrived at in our previous work. Such a combination was found to reduce by a factor of 2 the translocation yields observed after 400 R X-rays to mouse spermatogonia. In terms of animal survival, ATP has been shown to contribute little to total protection achieved by the same combination; in terms of genetic damage; however, the role of ATP proved essential. Removal of ATP from the combination led to a significant reduction in protective effect. PMID:668857

  13. Up-regulation of immunomodulatory effects of mouse bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells by tetrahydrocannabinol pre-treatment involving cannabinoid receptor CB2

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Junran; Xiao, Dongju; Xu, Yun; Zhao, Jinning; Jiang, Li; Hu, Xuming; Zhang, Yaping; Yu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is commonly and closely correlated with inflammation. Both cannabinoid signaling and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to reduce inflammatory pain. Although cannabinoid signaling is essential for mesenchymal stem cell survival and differentiation, little is known about its role in modulatory effect of MSCs on inflammation and pain sensitivity. Here we showed that mouse bone-marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) expressed both cannabinoid receptor type 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2). CB2 expression level in BM-MSCs increased with their maturation. In addition, we found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) activated CB2 receptor and ERK signaling, consequently enhancing the modulation of MSCs on inflammation-associated cytokine release from lipopolysaccharides-stimulated microglia. Consistent with in vitro data, THC pretreatment enhanced the immunomodulatory effects of BM-MSC on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury model, by decreasing the release of pro-inflammation cytokines. Our study revealed the crucial role of THC in promoting the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs and proposed a new strategy to alleviate pain based on stem cells therapy. PMID:26824325

  14. Effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on proliferation and differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells: Involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; He, Qiang; Dong, Jinhui; Jia, Zhanwei; Hao, Fang; Shan, Chunguang

    2016-06-10

    Since the majority of hearing impaired patients suffer from the significant loss of sensory hair cells and associated neurons, stem cell-based approaches hold great promise by replacing the damaged tissues in the ears. For instance, stem cells from the spiral ganglion could be isolated and expanded to regenerate neural structures of the inner ear. It is thus necessary to explore the potential procedures that may promote the proliferation and differentiation of such cochlear neural stem cells. In the present study, we study the effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a known antioxidant, for potential therapeutic use in NSC regeneration. At a non-toxic concentration, EGCG stimulated both proliferation and neurosphere formation in isolated mouse cochlear neural stem cell (NSC) in vitro. Specifically, the neural differentiation of NSC was promoted by EGCG treatment. The up-regulated neural function by EGCG was also supported by the increased calcium spike frequencies and enhanced neurite complexity in NSC-differentiated neurons. Finally, the induced neuron differentiation and Akt activation of cochlear NSC by EGCG were blocked by PI3 kinase inhibition. These data suggested that EGCG acts through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in cochlea NSC to promote cell growth and neuron differentiation, which may be exploited for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:27012759

  15. SKAP, an outer kinetochore protein, is required for mouse germ cell development

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Corinne; Espeut, Julien; Ametsitsi, Rachel; Kumar, Rajeev; Luksza, Malgorzata; Brun, Christine; Verlhac, Marie-Hélene; Suja, José Angél; de Massy, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In sexually reproducing organisms, accurate gametogenesis is crucial for the transmission of genetic material from one generation to the next. This requires the faithful segregation of chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic divisions. One of the main players in this process is the kinetochore, a large multi-protein complex that forms at the interface of centromeres and microtubules. Here, we analyzed the expression profile and function of small kinetochore-associated protein (SKAP) in the mouse. We found that two distinct SKAP isoforms are specifically expressed in the germline: a smaller isoform, which is detected in spermatogonia and spermatocytes and localized in the outer mitotic and meiotic kinetochores from metaphase to telophase, and a larger isoform, which is expressed in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. We generated SKAP-deficient mice and found that testis size and sperm production were severely reduced in mutant males. This phenotype was partially caused by defects during spermatogonia proliferation before entry into meiosis. We conclude that mouse SKAP, while being dispensable for somatic cell divisions, has an important role in the successful outcome of male gametogenesis. In germ cells, analogous to what has been suggested in studies using immortalized cells, SKAP most likely stabilizes the interaction between kinetochores and microtubules, where it might be needed as an extra safeguard to ensure the correct segregation of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. PMID:26667018

  16. Dl-3-n-butylphthalide-induced upregulation of antioxidant defense is involved in the enhancement of cross talk between CREB and Nrf2 in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Zhan-You; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xu; Xu, Ye; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Synapse impairment in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain is an early event leading to cognitive dysfunction. Most oxidative stress localizes to the synapse, and synapse loss is the basis of cognitive decline in AD. Dl-3-n-butylphthalide (Dl-NBP), a small molecule compound has been shown to ameliorate oxidative stress. We evaluated the effects of a 5-month oral delivery with Dl-NBP on oxidative stress and cognitive function in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Dl-NBP treatment reduced oxidative stress in the APP/PS1 mouse brain and alleviated learning and memory deficits. Dl-NBP supplementation meliorated synaptic plasticity, diminished soluble amyloid beta and amyloid beta oligomer in the APP/PS1 mouse brain. Dl-NBP administration caused an increase of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)-associated Ser133-phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) protein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Dl-NBP increased the recruitment of CBP to the promoters of best-characterized genes downstream of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) quinone oxidoreductase 1, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase modifier subunit. We demonstrate that the Dl-NBP-triggered upregulation of antioxidant defenses is involved in the enhancement of cross talk between CREB and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 via CBP. Our results suggest that Dl-NBP may be a useful agent for the treatment of AD. PMID:26827641

  17. The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) of Vibrio cholerae: molecular cloning of genes involved in pilus biosynthesis and evaluation of TCP as a protective antigen in the infant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D P; Stroeher, U H; Thomas, C J; Manning, P A; Attridge, S R

    1989-12-01

    A serum containing antibodies to non-lipopolysaccharide (non-LPS) protective antigens of Vibrio cholerae has been used, after extensive absorption, to facilitate the cloning of genes involved in the synthesis of toxin-coregulated pili (TCP). A gene bank was constructed from V. cholerae Z17561 DNA using a mobilizable cosmid vector in Escherichia coli, and subsequently transferred by conjugation into V. cholerae O17. This strain does not produce TCP in vitro and lacks non-LPS protective antigens. Eight positive clones were isolated, and of these, four produced TCP as determined by electron microscopic and immunoblotting analyses. TCP-positive O17 clones were 70-fold more virulent than TCP-negative clones or O17 in the infant mouse cholera model. Only the former could remove protective antibodies from the clone-probing serum by absorption. As a corollary, serum containing antibodies to TCP protected mice from challenge with TCP-positive clones, but not with TCP-negative clones or O17. Our data indicate that TCP can function as both a virulence determinant and a protective antigen in the infant mouse model. PMID:2576091

  18. Ultraviolet Radiation and 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Interaction of Mouse Epidermal Protein Kinase Cε With Stat3 Involve Integration With Erk1/2

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Jordan Marshall; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Siebers, Emily Marie; Dreckschmidt, Nancy Ellen; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We have reported that protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) expression level in epidermis dictates the susceptibility of mice to the development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) elicited either by repeated exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) or by the DMBA-TPA tumor promotion protocol. To find clues about the mechanism by which PKCε mediates susceptibility to UVR-induced development of SCC, we found that PKCε-over-expressing transgenic mice, as compared to their wild-type littermates, when exposed to UVR, elicit enhanced phosphorylation of Stat3 at Ser727 residues. Stat3 is constitutively activated in SCC and UVR fails to induce SCC in Stat3 mutant mice. Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation is essential for Stat3 transcriptional activity (Cancer Res. 67: 1385, 2007). We now present severa novel findings including that PKCε integrates with its downstream partner ERK1/2 to phosphorylate Stat3Ser727. In these experiments, mice were either exposed to UVR (2 kJ/m2/dose) emitted by Kodacel-filtered FS-40 sun lamps or treated with TPA (5 nmol). Both UVR and TPA treatment stimulated PKCε-Stat3 interaction, Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation and Stat3-regulated gene COX-2 expression. PKCε-Stat3 interaction and Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation was also observed in SCC elicited by repeated UVR exposures of mice. PKCε-Stat3 interaction was PKCε specific. UVR or TPA-stimulated Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation accompanied interaction of PKCε with ERK1/2 in intact mouse skin in vivo. Deletion of PKCε in wild-type mice attenuated both TPA and UVR-induced expression of phosphoforms of ERK1/2 and Stat3Ser727. These results indicate that PKCε integrates with ERK1/2 to mediate both TPA and UVR-induced epidermal Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation. PKCε and Stat3 may be potential molecular targets for SCC prevention. PMID:21480396

  19. Ultraviolet radiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced interaction of mouse epidermal protein kinase Cε with Stat3 involve integration with ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Sand, Jordan Marshall; Bin Hafeez, Bilal; Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Siebers, Emily Marie; Dreckschmidt, Nancy Ellen; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2012-04-01

    We have reported that protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) expression level in epidermis dictates the susceptibility of mice to the development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) elicited either by repeated exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) or by the DMBA-TPA tumor promotion protocol. To find clues about the mechanism by which PKCε mediates susceptibility to UVR-induced development of SCC, we found that PKCε-over-expressing transgenic mice, as compared to their wild-type littermates, when exposed to UVR, elicit enhanced phosphorylation of Stat3 at Ser727 residues. Stat3 is constitutively activated in SCC and UVR fails to induce SCC in Stat3 mutant mice. Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation is essential for Stat3 transcriptional activity (Cancer Res. 67: 1385, 2007). We now present several novel findings including that PKCε integrates with its downstream partner ERK1/2 to phosphorylate Stat3Ser727. In these experiments, mice were either exposed to UVR (2 kJ/m(2)/dose) emitted by Kodacel-filtered FS-40 sun lamps or treated with TPA (5 nmol). Both UVR and TPA treatment stimulated PKCε-Stat3 interaction, Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation and Stat3-regulated gene COX-2 expression. PKCε-Stat3 interaction and Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation was also observed in SCC elicited by repeated UVR exposures of mice. PKCε-Stat3 interaction was PKCε specific. UVR or TPA-stimulated Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation accompanied interaction of PKCε with ERK1/2 in intact mouse skin in vivo. Deletion of PKCε in wild-type mice attenuated both TPA and UVR-induced expression of phosphoforms of ERK1/2 and Stat3Ser727. These results indicate that PKCε integrates with ERK1/2 to mediate both TPA and UVR-induced epidermal Stat3Ser727 phosphorylation. PKCε and Stat3 may be potential molecular targets for SCC prevention. PMID:21480396

  20. Glucocorticoid and progestin receptors are differently involved in the cooperation with a structural element of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Le Ricousse, S; Gouilleux, F; Fortin, D; Joulin, V; Richard-Foy, H

    1996-01-01

    We have previously characterized a regulatory element located between -294 and -200 within the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR). This element termed AA element cooperates with the glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for glucocorticoid activation. Here we show that in a MMTV LTR wild type context, the deletion of this element significantly reduces both glucocorticoid and progestin activation of the promoter. Deletion of the two most distal GREs forces the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the progestin receptor (PR) to bind the same response elements and results in a dramatic decrease in the inducibility of the MMTV promoter by the two hormones. The simultaneous deletion of the two distal GREs and of the AA element abolishes completely the glucocorticoid-induced activation of the promoter. In contrast it restores a significant level of progestin-induced activation. This different effect of the double deletion on glucocorticoid- and progestin-induced MMTV promoter activation is not cell specific because it is also observed, and is even stronger, when either GR or PR is expressed in the same cell line (NIH 3T3). This is the first description of a mutated MMTV promoter that, although retaining GREs, is activated by progestins and not by glucocorticoids. This suggests a different functional cooperation between protein(s) interacting with the AA element and GR or PR. Cotransfections with constructs containing wild-type or mutated MMTV LTR with either PR lacking its C-terminal domain or GR/PR chimeras in which the N-terminal domains have been exchanged demonstrate that the N-terminal domains of the receptors specify the different behavior of GR and PR regarding the AA element. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643531

  1. Extracellular Ca2+-induced force restoration in K+-depressed skeletal muscle of the mouse involves an elevation of [K+]i: implications for fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Leader, John P.; Loiselle, Denis S.; Higgins, Amanda; Lin, Wei; Renaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether a Ca2+-K+ interaction was a potential mechanism operating during fatigue with repeated tetani in isolated mouse muscles. Raising the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) from 1.3 to 10 mM in K+-depressed slow-twitch soleus and/or fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles caused the following: 1) increase of intracellular K+ activity by 20–60 mM (raised intracellular K+ content, unchanged intracellular fluid volume), so that the K+-equilibrium potential increased by ∼10 mV and resting membrane potential repolarized by 5–10 mV; 2) large restoration of action potential amplitude (16–54 mV); 3) considerable recovery of excitable fibers (∼50% total); and 4) restoration of peak force with the peak tetanic force-extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) relationship shifting rightward toward higher [K+]o. Double-sigmoid curve-fitting to fatigue profiles (125 Hz for 500 ms, every second for 100 s) showed that prior exposure to raised [K+]o (7 mM) increased, whereas lowered [K+]o (2 mM) decreased, the rate and extent of force loss during the late phase of fatigue (second sigmoid) in soleus, hence implying a K+ dependence for late fatigue. Prior exposure to 10 mM [Ca2+]o slowed late fatigue in both muscle types, but was without effect on the extent of fatigue. These combined findings support our notion that a Ca2+-K+ interaction is plausible during severe fatigue in both muscle types. We speculate that a diminished transsarcolemmal K+ gradient and lowered [Ca2+]o contribute to late fatigue through reduced action potential amplitude and excitability. The raised [Ca2+]o-induced slowing of fatigue is likely to be mediated by a higher intracellular K+ activity, which prolongs the time before stimulation-induced K+ efflux depolarizes the sarcolemma sufficiently to interfere with action potentials. PMID:25571990

  2. An EF-hands protein, centrin-1, is an EGTA-sensitive SUMO-interacting protein in mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Niina; Goto, Miki; Kawasaki, Azusa; Sasano, Takashi; Eto, Ko; Nishi, Ryotaro; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Abe, Shinichi; Saitoh, Hisato

    2010-10-01

    A multifunctional calcium-binding protein, centrin-1, is specifically expressed in male germ cells, certain neurons and ciliated cells. We identified centrin-1 as a protein interacting with SUMO-2/3 using yeast two-hybrid screening of a mouse testicular cDNA library. In bead halo assays, the interaction between centrin-1 and SUMO-2/3 was reduced in the presence of EGTA and facilitated by the addition of CaCl₂. immunostaining of seminiferous tubules in 35-day-old mouse testes revealed that cells in the layer containing spermatogonia showed colocalization of SUMO-2/3 with centrin-1 in cytoplasmic spots. Identification of centrin-1 as the EGTA-sensitive SUMO-2/3-interacting protein indicates the possible role of calcium in modulating the centrin-1-SUMO-2/3 interaction and suggests the importance of this interaction in mouse testis. PMID:20941751

  3. Involvement of calyculin A inhibitable protein phosphatases in the cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway of mouse corticotroph tumour (AtT20) cells

    PubMed Central

    Antaraki, A; Ang, K L; Antoni, F A

    1997-01-01

    The role of non-calcineurin protein phosphatases in the cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway was examined in mouse pituitary corticotroph tumour (AtT20) cells. Blockers of protein phosphatases, calyculin A and okadaic acid, were applied in AtT20 cells depleted of rapidly mobilizable pools of intracellular calcium and activated by various cyclic AMP generating agonists. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases were present throughout. The accumulation of cyclic AMP was monitored by radioimmunoassay, phosphodiesterase activity in cell homogenates was measured by radiometric assay. Neither calyculin A nor okadaic acid altered basal cyclic AMP levels but cyclic AMP formation induced by 41 amino acid residue corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF) was strongly inhibited (up to 80%). 1-Norokadaone was inactive. Similar data were also obtained when isoprenaline or pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide1–38 were used as agonists. Pertussis toxin did not modify the inhibition of CRF-induced cyclic AMP production by calyculin A. Pretreatment with calyculin A completely prevented the stimulation of cyclic AMP formation by cholera toxin even in the presence of 0.5 mM isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and 0.1 mM rolipram. Cholera toxin mediated ADP-ribosylation of the 45K and 52K molecular weight Gsα isoforms in membranes from calyculin A-pretreated cells was enhanced to 150–200% when compared with controls. Cholera toxin-induced cyclic AMP was reduced by calyculin A within 10 min when calyculin A was applied after a 90 min pretreatment with cholera toxin. Under these conditions the effect of calyculin A could be blocked by the combination of 0.5 mM IBMX and 0.1 mM rolipram, but not by 0.5 mM IBMX alone. Phosphodiesterase activity in AtT20 cell homogenates showed a significant, 2.7 fold increase after treatment with calyculin A. In control cells phosphodiesterase activity was blocked by 80% in the presence of IBMX (0.5 mM), or IBMX plus

  4. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse with a functional human TSPY.

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Skawran, B; Dechend, F; Nayernia, K; Meinhardt, A; Nanda, I; Schmid, M; Engel, W; Schmidtke, J

    2003-09-01

    To generate an animal model that is suitable for the analysis of regulation and expression of human testis-specific protein, Y-encoded TSPY, a transgenic mouse line, TgTSPY9, harboring a complete structural human TSPY gene was generated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and Southern analyses show that approximately 50 copies of the human TSPY transgene are integrated at a single chromosomal site that maps to the distal long arm of the Y chromosome. The transgene is correctly transcribed and spliced according to the human pattern and is mainly expressed in testicular tissue, with spermatogonia and early primary spermatocytes (leptotene and zygotene) as expressing germ cells. TSPY transgenic mice are phenotypically normal, and spermatogenesis is neither impaired nor enhanced by the human transgene. The present study shows that a human TSPY gene integrated into the mouse genome follows the human expression pattern although murine tspy had lost its function in rodent evolution millions of years ago. PMID:12773407

  5. NRG1 and KITL Signal Downstream of Retinoic Acid in the Germline to Support Soma-Free Syncytial Growth of Differentiating Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Karen M.; Medrano, Gerardo A.; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Hamra, F. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Defined culture systems supporting spermatogonial differentiation will provide experimental platforms to study spermatogenesis. However, germline-intrinsic signaling mechanisms sufficient to support spermatogonial differentiation without somatic cells remain largely undefined. Here, we analyzed EGF superfamily receptor and ligand diversity in rat testis cells, and delineated germline-intrinsic signaling via an ERBB3 co-transducer, ERBB2, as essential for retinoic acid-induced syncytial growth by differentiating spermatogonia. Like the ERBB2/3 agonist NRG1, we found KIT Ligand (KITL) robustly supported spermatogonial differentiation without serum or somatic cells. ERBB2 inhibitors failed to disrupt KITL-dependent spermatogonial development, and, KITL prevented ERBB3-deficient spermatogonial degeneration upon differentiation. Thus, we report NRG1 and KITL activate alternative pathways downstream of retinoic acid signaling in the germline that are essential for stem cells to undergo pre-meiotic steps of spermatogenesis in culture. Robust serum/soma-free spermatogonial differentiation opens new doors to study mammalian germ cell biology in culture, which will facilitate the discovery of spermatogenic factors that can drive meiotic progression in vitro. PMID:26500786

  6. Proteinase activated receptor-2-mediated dual oxidase-2 up-regulation is involved in enhanced airway reactivity and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Alharbi, Naif O; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Tyagi, Manoj; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M

    2015-07-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) express a variety of receptors, which sense danger signals from various aeroallergens/pathogens being inhaled constantly. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is one such receptor and is activated by cockroach allergens, which have intrinsic serine proteinase activity. Recently, dual oxidases (DUOX), especially DUOX-2, have been shown to be involved in airway inflammation in response to Toll-like receptor activation. However, the association between PAR-2 and DUOX-2 has not been explored in airways of allergic mice. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of DUOX-2/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling in airway reactivity and inflammation after PAR-2 activation. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with intact cockroach allergen extract (CE) in the presence of aluminium hydroxide followed by intranasal challenge with CE. Mice were then assessed for airway reactivity, inflammation, oxidative stress (DUOX-2, ROS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitrite, nitrotyrosine and protein carbonyls) and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3). Challenge with CE led to up-regulation of DUOX-2 and ROS in AECs with concomitant increases in airway reactivity/inflammation and parameters of oxidative stress, and apoptosis. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by intranasal administration of ENMD-1068, a small molecule antagonist of PAR-2 in allergic mice. Administration of diphenyliodonium to allergic mice also led to improvement of allergic airway responses via inhibition of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway; however, these effects were less pronounced than PAR-2 antagonism. The current study suggests that PAR-2 activation leads to up-regulation of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway in AECs, which is involved in regulation of airway reactivity and inflammation via oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:25684443

  7. Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR)2, but Not PAR1, Is Involved in Collateral Formation and Anti-Inflammatory Monocyte Polarization in a Mouse Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Anne Yael; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Spek, C. Arnold; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Hamming, Jaap F.; de Boer, Hetty C.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Quax, Paul H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In collateral development (i.e. arteriogenesis), mononuclear cells are important and exist as a heterogeneous population consisting of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory/repair-associated cells. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR2 are G-protein-coupled receptors that are both expressed by mononuclear cells and are involved in pro-inflammatory reactions, while PAR2 also plays a role in repair-associated responses. Here, we investigated the physiological role of PAR1 and PAR2 in arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Methods and Results PAR1-deficient (PAR1-/-), PAR2-deficient (PAR2-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent femoral artery ligation. Laser Doppler measurements revealed reduced post-ischemic blood flow recovery in PAR2-/- hind limbs when compared to WT, while PAR1-/- mice were not affected. Upon ischemia, reduced numbers of smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive collaterals and CD31-positive capillaries were found in PAR2-/- mice when compared to WT mice, whereas these parameters in PAR1-/- mice did not differ from WT mice. The pool of circulating repair-associated (Ly6C-low) monocytes and the number of repair-associated (CD206-positive) macrophages surrounding collaterals in the hind limbs were increased in WT and PAR1-/- mice, but unaffected in PAR2-/- mice. The number of repair-associated macrophages in PAR2-/- hind limbs correlated with CD11b- and CD115-expression on the circulating monocytes in these animals, suggesting that monocyte extravasation and M-CSF-dependent differentiation into repair-associated cells are hampered. Conclusion PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in arteriogenesis and promotes the repair-associated response in ischemic tissues. Therefore, PAR2 potentially forms a new pro-arteriogenic target in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. PMID:23637930

  8. Overexpression of the IGF-II/M6P Receptor in Mouse Fibroblast Cell Lines Differentially Alters Expression Profiles of Genes Involved in Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanlin; Thinakaran, Gopal; Kar, Satyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of senile dementia affecting elderly people. The processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) leading to the generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide contributes to neurodegeneration and development of AD pathology. The endocytic trafficking pathway, which comprises of the endosomes and lysosomes, acts as an important site for Aβ generation, and endocytic dysfunction has been linked to increased Aβ production and loss of neurons in AD brains. Since insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptor plays a critical role in the transport of lysosomal enzymes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomes, it is likely that the receptor may have a role in regulating Aβ metabolism in AD pathology. However, very little is known on how altered levels of the IGF-II receptor can influence the expression/function of various molecules involved in AD pathology. To address this issue, we evaluated the expression profiles of 87 selected genes related to AD pathology in mouse fibroblast MS cells that are deficient in murine IGF-II receptor and corresponding MS9II cells overexpressing ∼500 times the human IGF-II receptors. Our results reveal that an elevation in IGF-II receptor levels alters the expression profiles of a number of genes including APP as well as enzymes regulating Aβ production, degradation and clearance mechanisms. Additionally, it influences the expression of various lysosomal enzymes and protein kinases that are involved in Aβ toxicity. IGF-II receptor overexpression also alters expression of several genes involved in intracellular signalling as well as cholesterol metabolism, which play a critical role in AD pathology. The altered gene profiles observed in this study closely match with the corresponding protein levels, with a few exceptions. These results, taken together, suggest that an elevation in IGF-II receptor levels can influence the expression profiles of transcripts as well as proteins that are involved

  9. Pathophysiological Changes Induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Are Involved in MMP-12 and MMP-13 Upregulation in Human Carcinoma Epithelial Cells and a Pneumonia Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Won; Shin, In-Sik; Ha, Un-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections persist in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and drive lung disease progression. P. aeruginosa potently activates the innate immune system mostly through the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as flagellin. Matrix metalloproteinases 12 and 13 (MMP-12 and MMP-13, respectively) exacerbate chronic lung infection and inflammation by promoting uncontrolled tissue rearrangements and fibrosis, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain largely unknown. In this study, we used quantitative bacteriology, histological examination, and proinflammatory cytokine levels to evaluate the effects of MMP-12 and MMP-13 on P. aeruginosa strain K-induced infection and pneumonia in H292 epithelial cells and mice, respectively. Under inflammatory stimulation, mRNA and protein expression levels of proinflammatory mediators were higher in strain K-infected mice and cells than in uninfected counterparts, in which MMP-12 and MMP-13 expression reached levels similar to those observed in epithelial cells. Moreover, we also found that the NF-κB pathway might be involved in the induction of cytokines in response to strain K infection. Taken together, these data suggest that MMP-12 and MMP-13 alter strain K infection in mice and play a role in inflammatory regulation by modulating cytokine levels. PMID:26438797

  10. Possible involvement of integrin-mediated signalling in oocyte activation: evidence that a cyclic RGD-containing peptide can stimulate protein kinase C and cortical granule exocytosis in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tatone, Carla; Carbone, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian sperm-oocyte interaction at fertilization involves several combined interactions between integrins on the oocyte and integrin ligands (disintegrins) on the sperm. Recent research has indicated the ability of peptides containing the RGD sequence that characterized several sperm disintegrins, to induce intracellular Ca2+ transients and to initiate parthenogenetic development in amphibian and bovine oocytes. In the present study, we investigate the hypothesis that an integrin-associated signalling may participate in oocyte activation signalling by determining the ability of a cyclic RGD-containing peptide to stimulate the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and the exocytosis of cortical granules in mouse oocytes. Methods An In-Vitro-Fertilization assay (IVF) was carried in order to test the condition under which a peptide containing the RGD sequence, cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Val), was able to inhibit sperm fusion with zona-free mouse oocytes at metaphase II stage. PKC activity was determined by means of an assay based on the ability of cell lysates to phosphorylate MARKS peptide, a specific PKC substrate. Loss of cortical granules was evaluated by measuring density in the oocyte cortex of cortical granules stained with LCA-biotin/Texas red-streptavidin. In all the experiments, effects of a control peptide containing a non RGD sequence, cyclo(Arg-Ala-Asp-D-Phe-Val), were evaluated. Results The IVF assay revealed that the fusion rate declined significantly when insemination was carried out in the presence of cyclic RGD peptide at concentrations > or = 250 microM (P < 0.05, Student-Newman-Keuls Method). When the peptide was applied to the oocytes at these concentrations, a dose-dependent increase of PKC activity was observed, in association with a loss of cortical granules ranging from 38+/-2.5 % to 52+/-5.4 %. Evaluation of meiotic status revealed that cyclic RGD peptide was ineffective in inducing meiosis resumption under conditions used in the

  11. Lipid rafts enriched in monosialylGb5Cer carrying the stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope are involved in development of mouse preimplantation embryos at cleavage stage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lipid rafts enriched in glycosphingolipids (GSLs), cholesterol and signaling molecules play an essential role not only for signal transduction started by ligand binding, but for intracellular events such as organization of actin, intracellular traffic and cell polarity, but their functions in cleavage division of preimplantation embryos are not well known. Results Here we show that monosialylGb5Cer (MSGb5Cer)-enriched raft domains are involved in development during the cleavage stage of mouse preimplantation embryos. MSGb5Cer preferentially localizes at the interfaces between blastomeres in mouse preimplantation embryos. Live-imaging analysis revealed that MSGb5Cer localizes in cleavage furrows during cytokinesis, and that by accumulating at the interfaces, it thickens them. Depletion of cholesterol from the cell membrane with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbCD) reduced the expression of MSGb5Cer and stopped cleavage. Extensive accumulation of MSGb5Cer at the interfaces by cross-linking with anti-MSGb5Cer Mab (6E2) caused F-actin to aggregate at the interfaces and suppressed the localization of E-cadherin at the interfaces, which resulted in the cessation of cleavage. In addition, suppression of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D (CCD) decreased the accumulation of MSGb5Cer at the interfaces. In E-cadherin-targeted embryos, the MSGb5Cer-enriched raft membrane domains accumulated heterotopically. Conclusions These results indicate that MSGb5Cer-enriched raft membrane domains participate in cytokinesis in a close cooperation with the cortical actin network and the distribution of E-cadherin. PMID:21489308

  12. Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the NMDA receptor and nitric oxide pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ahangari, Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Samira; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Chamanara, Mohsen; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant agent that shows clinical antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) synthesis in possible antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Intraperitoneal administration of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time in the FST (P<0.01) without any effect on locomotor activity in the open-field test (OFT), while higher dose of lamotrigine (30mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST (P<0.001) as well as the number of crossings in the OFT. Pretreatment of animals with NMDA (75mg/kg), l-arginine (750mg/kg, a substrate for nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, a phosphodiesterase [PDE] 5 inhibitor) reversed the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) in the FST. Injection of l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, a neuronal NOS inhibitor), methylene blue (20mg/kg, an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]), or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg), ketamine (1mg/kg), and magnesium sulfate (10mg/kg) as NMDA receptor antagonists in combination with a sub-effective dose of lamotrigine (5mg/kg) diminished the immobility time of animals in the FST compared with either drug alone. None of the drugs produced significant effects on the locomotor activity in the OFT. Based on our findings, it is suggested that the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine might mediated through inhibition of either NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP synthesis. PMID:27470415

  13. A study of the mechanisms involved in the neurotoxic action of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy') on dopamine neurones in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Colado, M Isabel; Camarero, Jorge; Mechan, Annis O; Sanchez, Veronica; Esteban, Blanca; Elliott, J Martin; Green, A Richard

    2001-01-01

    Administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy') to mice produces acute hyperthermia and long-term degeneration of striatal dopamine nerve terminals. Attenuation of the hyperthermia decreases the neurodegeneration. We have investigated the mechanisms involved in producing the neurotoxic loss of striatal dopamine. MDMA produced a dose-dependent loss in striatal dopamine concentration 7 days later with 3 doses of 25 mg kg−1 (3 h apart) producing a 70% loss. Pretreatment 30 min before each MDMA dose with either of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists AR-R15896AR (20, 5, 5 mg kg−1) or MK-801 (0.5 mg kg−1×3) failed to provide neuroprotection. Pretreatment with clomethiazole (50 mg kg−1×3) was similarly ineffective in protecting against MDMA-induced dopamine loss. The free radical trapping compound PBN (150 mg kg−1×3) was neuroprotective, but it proved impossible to separate neuroprotection from a hypothermic effect on body temperature. Pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-NI (50 mg kg−1×3) produced neuroprotection, but also significant hypothermia. Two other NOS inhibitors, S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (10 mg kg−1×3) and AR-R17477AR (5 mg kg−1×3), provided significant neuroprotection and had little effect on MDMA-induced hyperthermia. MDMA (20 mg kg−1) increased 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid formation from salicylic acid perfused through a microdialysis tube implanted in the striatum, indicating increased free radical formation. This increase was prevented by AR-R17477AR administration. Since AR-R17477AR was also found to have no radical trapping activity this result suggests that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity results from MDMA or dopamine metabolites producing radicals that combine with NO to form tissue-damaging peroxynitrites. PMID:11739248

  14. The involvement of NMDA receptor/NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant like effects of baclofen in mouse force swimming test.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Zolfaghari, Samira; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-01-26

    In the current study, the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) system in the antidepressant-like effects of baclofen was evaluated by using animal model in forced swimming test. Followed by an open field test for the evaluation of locomotor activity, the immobility time for mice in force swimming test was recorded. Only the last four min was analyzed. Administration of Baclofen (0.5 and 1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility interval in the FST. Prior administration of l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.,) a nitric oxide synthase substrate or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.) a phosphodiesterase 5 into mice suppressed the antidepressant-like activity of baclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.).Co-treatment of 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.,) an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.,) a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.) an NMDA receptor antagonist with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time in the FST as compared to the drugs when used alone. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) or l-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time however, simultaneous administration of these two agents in same dose with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), minimized the immobility time in the FST. Thus, our results support the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant-like action of baclofen. PMID:26679225

  15. Id4 Marks Spermatogonial Stem Cells in the Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Xu, Qing; Zhao, Danfeng; Degui Chen, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a classic adult stems cell–dependent process, supported by the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). However, the identification of SSCs and elucidation of their behaviors in undisturbed testis has long been a big challenge. Here, we generated a knock-in mouse model, Id4-2A-CreERT2-2A-tdTomato, which allowed us to mark Id4-expressing (Id4+) cells at different time points in situ and track their behaviors across distinct developmental stages during steady-state and regenerating spermatogenesis. We found that Id4+ cells continue to produce spermatogonia, spermatocytes and sperm in mouse testis, showing they are capable of self-renewal and have differentiation potential. Consistent with these findings, ablation of Id4+ cells in mice results in a loss of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, developmental fate mapping reveals that Id4+ SSCs originate from neonate Id4+ gonocytes. Therefore, our results indicate that Id4 marks spermatogonial stem cells in the mouse testis. PMID:26621350

  16. Involvement of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of selegiline in maternal separation model of mouse.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shayan; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Razmi, Ali; Olson, Carl O; Rastegar, Mojgan; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-09-01

    Mother-infant interactions are known to be associated with the psychological well-being of an individual in adulthood. It is well accepted that emotional stress in early life, such as maternal separation (MS), leads to alterations in the neurotransmission systems of various brain regions, especially the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, and subsequently can increase the risk for development of psychiatric disorders including depression in adulthood. Selegiline is an irreversible monoamine oxidase (MAO) type B inhibitor which increases striatal dopamine levels and exerts an antidepressant effect. In this study, 180min of MS stress was applied to mice at postnatal day (PND) 2-14 followed by behavioral tests for determining depressive-like behaviors, such as forced swimming test (FST), splash test and sucrose preference test (SPT) in adult mice (PND 50). The open field test (OFT) also was applied to validate FST results. We used SCH23390 (D1 antagonist) and sulpiride (D2 antagonist) in order to determine the role of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in antidepressant-like effects of selegiline. Our results revealed that MS provoked depressive-like behaviors in adult male mice, and the administration of selegiline attenuated depressive-like behaviors in MS mice. Our findings showed that D1 dopamine receptors facilitate the positive effects of selegiline on the passive behavior in the FST. Furthermore, antidepressant effects of selegiline on hedonic difficulties are mediated via D2 receptor in the SPT. The results of the splash test revealed that both D1 and D2 receptors mediate the protective effect of selegiline against motivational and self-care problems. Based on our results, we conclude that both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors are involved in mediating the antidepressant-like effect of selegiline. We found that D1 receptors mediate an effect on despair behavior, D2 receptors mediate an effect on anhedonia, and both D1 and D2 receptors contribute to the protective effects of

  17. Protective effects of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside in the MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of reactive oxygen species-mediated JNK, P38 and mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Wang, Songhai; Tian, Jiyu; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Junjie; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianzong

    2015-11-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Oxidative stress-induced neuron loss is thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of PD. Previous work from our group suggests that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an active component extracted from a traditional Chinese herb, Polygonum multiflorum thunb, can attenuate 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridium-induced apoptosis in the neuronal cell line PC12, by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation and modulating c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation. Here, we investigated the protective effects of TSG against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropypridine (MPTP)-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in mice and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that MPTP-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells and reactive oxygen species generation were prevented by TSG in a dose-dependent manner. The reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine could also mitigate reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, JNK and P38 were activated by MPTP, but extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases phosphorylation did not change after MPTP treatment. TSG at different doses blocked the activation of JNK and P38. The protective effect of TSG was also associated with downregulation of the bax/bcl-2 ratio, reversed the release of cytochrome c and smac, and inhibited the activation of caspase-3, -6, and -9 induced by MPTP. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that the protective effects of TSG in the MPTP-induced mouse model of PD are involved, at least in part, in controlling reactive oxygen species-mediated JNK, P38, and mitochondrial pathways. PMID:26477638

  18. Identification of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled cells during mouse spermatogenesis by heat-induced antigen retrieval in lectin staining and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakata, Hiroki; Kumchantuek, Tewarat; Gewaily, Mahmoud Saad; Iseki, Shoichi

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication occurs during S-phase in spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes during spermatogenesis. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is incorporated into synthesized DNA and is detectable in the nucleus by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To identify BrdU-labeled spermatogenic cells, the spermatogenic stages must be determined by visualizing acrosomes and detecting cell type-specific marker molecules in the seminiferous tubules. However, the antibody reaction with BrdU routinely requires denaturation of the DNA, which is achieved by pretreating tissue sections with hydrochloric acid; however, this commonly interferes with further histochemical approaches. Therefore, we examined optimal methods for pretreating paraffin sections of the mouse testis to detect incorporated BrdU by an antibody and, at the same time, visualize acrosomes with peanut agglutinin (PNA) or detect several marker molecules with antibodies. We found that the use of heat-induced antigen retrieval (HIAR), which consisted of heating at 95C in 20 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0) for 15 min, was superior to the use of 2 N hydrochloric acid for 90 min at room temperature in terms of the quality of subsequent PNA-lectin histochemistry with double IHC for BrdU and an appropriate stage marker protein. With this method, we identified BrdU-labeled spermatogenic cells during mouse spermatogenesis as A1 spermatogonia through to preleptotene spermatocytes. PMID:25479790

  19. Absence of testicular protection by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue against cyclophosphamide-induced testicular cytotoxicity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, M F; Meistrich, M L; Nader, S

    1987-02-15

    Protection of testicular integrity against damage from cyclophosphamide (CY) by simultaneous treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue was reported in BALB/c mice (L.M. Glode et al., Lancet, 1: 1132-1134, 1981). This approach has been used as the basis for clinical trials in various treatment centers (D. H. Johnson et al., Blood, 65:832-836, 1985) in an attempt to prevent iatrogenic sterility in males. This study aims at duplicating the original findings and obtaining quantitative data on spermatogonial killing by CY, and possible protection by GnRH, of differentiating and stem cell spermatogonia. Mice were treated with 23 daily injections of 0.4 micrograms D-leucine-6 GnRH, and with 200 mg/kg CY on Days 8, 15, and 22. Three additional groups of mice received phosphate-buffered saline and bovine serum albumin only, GnRH only, and CY only. Animals were killed at 29 days after the last injection to determine the number of late spermatids in testicular homogenates, and at 56 days for histological measurement of the ratio of elongated spermatids to Sertoli cells in the tubules. The twenty-ninth day assay was a measure of damage to differentiating spermatogonia, whose killing results in temporary sterility. The fifty-sixth day point assay assessed damage to stem spermatogonia, whose killing results in long-term or permanent sterility. Sperm counts at 29 days were identical in saline-treated control mice and GnRH-treated mice; no sperm were present in the CY-treated mice, both with and without GnRH. Thus, killing of differentiating spermatogonia by CY is not prevented by GnRH treatment. Similarly, counts of spermatids at 56 days showed no difference between saline- and GnRH-treated groups; a reduction to approximately 40% of control counts was observed equally with CY and CY plus GnRH treatments. Since GnRH treatment did not alter spermatogonial kinetics in BALB/c mice, it is not surprising that it did not protect against CY-induced damage. Thus

  20. Quantitative T2 Combined with Texture Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Images Identify Different Degrees of Muscle Involvement in Three Mouse Models of Muscle Dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C. M.; Almeida, Camila F.; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F.; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant—T2—measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research

  1. Quantitative T2 combined with texture analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images identify different degrees of muscle involvement in three mouse models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd.

    PubMed

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C M; Almeida, Camila F; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant-T2-measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research. PMID

  2. Expression of cubilin in mouse testes and Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Seo, J T; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2016-04-01

    Cubilin (cubn) is a receptor for vitamins and various protein ligands. Cubn lacks a transmembrane domain but anchors to apical membranes by forming complexes with Amnionless or Megalin. In an effort to better understand the uptake of nutrients in testis, we analysed cubn expression in the developing mice testes. In testes, cubn mRNA increased from birth to adulthood. In the inter-stitium and isolated seminiferous tubules, neonatal increase in cubn mRNA until 14 days post-partum (pp) was followed by a marked increase at puberty (28 days pp). Cubn was found in the gonocytes, spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testes. In adult testes, strong Cubn immunoreactivity was found in the elongating spermatids, suggesting the role of Cubn in endocytosis during early spermiogenesis. In Sertoli cells and peritubular cells, Cubn immunoreactivity was weak throughout the testis development. In the inter-stitium, Cubn immunoreactivity was found in foetal Leydig cells, was weak to negligible in the stem cells and progenitor Leydig cells and was strong in immature and adult Leydig cells, demonstrating a positive association between Cubn and steroidogenic activity of Leydig cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Cubn may participate in the endocytotic uptake of nutrients in germ cells and somatic cells, supporting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in mouse testes. PMID:26148765

  3. The Mouse Cohesin-Associated Protein PDS5B Is Expressed in Testicular Cells and Is Associated with the Meiotic Chromosome Axes.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Hoog, Christer

    2010-01-01

    During the first meiotic prophase, the cohesin complex is localized to the chromosome axis and contributes to chromosome organization, pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The PDS5 protein, an accessory factor of the cohesin complex, is known to be a component of meiotic chromosome cores in fungi and to be implicated in meiotic chromosome structure and function. We found by immunoblotting experiments that a mammalian PDS5 protein, PDS5B, is abundantly expressed in mouse testis compared to other tissues. Immunofluorescence labeling experiments revealed that PDS5B is highly expressed in spermatogonia and that most PDS5B is depleted from chromatin as cells enter meiosis. During the first meiotic prophase, PDS5B associates with the axial cores of chromosomes. The axial association of PDS5B was observed also in the absence of synaptonemal complex proteins, such as SYCP1 and SYCP3, suggesting that PDS5B is an integral part of the chromosome axis as defined by the cohesin complex. These results suggest that PDS5B modulates cohesin functions in spermatocytes as well as in spermatogonia, contributing to meiotic chromosome structure and function. PMID:24710098

  4. The Mouse Cohesin-Associated Protein PDS5B Is Expressed in Testicular Cells and Is Associated with the Meiotic Chromosome Axes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Hoog, Christer

    2010-01-01

    During the first meiotic prophase, the cohesin complex is localized to the chromosome axis and contributes to chromosome organization, pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The PDS5 protein, an accessory factor of the cohesin complex, is known to be a component of meiotic chromosome cores in fungi and to be implicated in meiotic chromosome structure and function. We found by immunoblotting experiments that a mammalian PDS5 protein, PDS5B, is abundantly expressed in mouse testis compared to other tissues. Immunofluorescence labeling experiments revealed that PDS5B is highly expressed in spermatogonia and that most PDS5B is depleted from chromatin as cells enter meiosis. During the first meiotic prophase, PDS5B associates with the axial cores of chromosomes. The axial association of PDS5B was observed also in the absence of synaptonemal complex proteins, such as SYCP1 and SYCP3, suggesting that PDS5B is an integral part of the chromosome axis as defined by the cohesin complex. These results suggest that PDS5B modulates cohesin functions in spermatocytes as well as in spermatogonia, contributing to meiotic chromosome structure and function. PMID:24710098

  5. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    diameter of about 12 miles. Their formation is associated with a Type II supernova, the collapse and subsequent explosion of a massive star. The origin of a pulsar's high velocity is not known, but many astrophysicists suspect that it is directly related to the explosive circumstances involved in the birth of the pulsar. The rapid rotation and strong magnetic field of a pulsar can generate a wind of high-energy matter and antimatter particles that rush out at near the speed of light. These pulsar winds create large, magnetized bubbles of high-energy particles called pulsar wind nebulae. The X-ray and radio data on the Mouse have enabled Gaensler and his colleagues to constrain the properties of the ambient gas, to estimate the velocity of the pulsar, and to analyze the structure of the various shock waves created by the pulsar, the flow of particles away from the pulsar, and the magnetic field in the nebula. Zoom into Chandra's Image of the Mouse Zoom into Chandra's Image of the Mouse Other members of the research team were Eric van der Swaluw (FOM Institute of Physics, The Netherlands), Fernando Camilo (Columbia Univ., New York), Vicky Kaspi (McGill Univ., Montreal), Frederick K. Baganoff (MIT, Cambridge, Mass.), Farhad Yusef-Zadeh (Northwestern), and Richard Manchester (Australia Telescope National Facility). The pulsar in the Mouse was originally detected by Camilo et al. in 2002 using Australia's Parkes radio telescope. Chandra observed the Mouse on October 23 and 24, 2002. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington. Northrop Grumman of Redondo Beach, Calif., formerly TRW, Inc., was the prime development contractor for the observatory. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  6. Transcriptional induction of the mouse metallothionein-I gene in hydrogen peroxide-treated Hepa cells involves a composite major late transcription factor/antioxidant response element and metal response promoter elements.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, T; Palmiter, R D; Andrews, G K

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of metallothionein-I (MT-I) and heme oxygenase mRNAs is rapidly and transiently induced by H2O2 in mouse hepatoma cells (Hepa) and this effect is blocked by catalase. Menadione, which generates free radicals, also induces these mRNAs. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that a region between -42 and -153 in the mouse MT-I promoter was essential for induction of a CAT reporter gene. A multimer of a 16 bp sequence (-101 to -86) that includes an antioxidant response element and overlapping adenovirus major late transcription factor binding site elevated basal expression and allowed induction by H2O2 when inserted upstream of a minimal promoter. However, deletion of this region (-100 to -89) from the intact MT-I promoter (-153) did not completely eliminate response. Multiple copies of a metal response element also permitted response to H2O2. These results suggest that induction of MT-I gene transcription by H2O2 is mediated by at least two different elements within the proximal MT-I gene promoter and suggest a previously undescribed function of the MRE. Induction of MT gene transcription by ROS and the subsequent scavenging of ROS by the MT peptide is reminiscent of the metal regulatory loop and is consistent with the hypothesized protective functions of MT. Images PMID:7800494

  7. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  8. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics. PMID:25777761

  9. Unique subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Plk1 (Ser137 and Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division and pPlk1(Ser137) involvement in spindle formation and REC8 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Qunyuan; Ma, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is pivotal for proper mitotic progression, its targeting activity is regulated by precise subcellular positioning and phosphorylation. Here we assessed the protein expression, subcellular localization and possible functions of phosphorylated Plk1 (pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210)) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed a peptide of pPlk1(Ser137) with high and stable expression from germinal vesicle (GV) until metaphase II (MII), while pPlk1(Thr210) was detected as one large single band at GV stage and 2 small bands after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which maintained stable up to MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed pPlk1(Ser137) was colocalized with microtubule organizing center (MTOC) proteins, γ-tubulin and pericentrin, on spindle poles, concomitantly with persistent concentration at centromeres and dynamic aggregation between chromosome arms. Differently, pPlk1(Thr210) was persistently distributed across the whole body of chromosomes after meiotic resumption. The specific Plk1 inhibitor, BI2536, repressed pPlk1(Ser137) accumulation at MTOCs and between chromosome arms, consequently disturbed γ-tubulin and pericentrin recruiting to MTOCs, destroyed meiotic spindle formation, and delayed REC8 cleavage, therefore arresting oocytes at metaphase I (MI) with chromosome misalignment. BI2536 completely reversed the premature degradation of REC8 and precocious segregation of chromosomes induced with okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor to protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, the protein levels of pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210), as well as the subcellular distribution of pPlk1(Thr210), were not affected by BI2536. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Plk1 activity is required for meiotic spindle assembly and REC8 cleavage, with pPlk1(Ser137) is the action executor, in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26654596

  10. Analysis of the Albino-Locus Region of the Mouse. I. Origin and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Liane B.; Russell, W. L.; Kelly, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Numerous specific-locus experiments designed to test the mutagenic effect of external radiation have yielded, in over 3,600,000 animals observed, altogether 119 presumed mutations involving the c locus. Of these, 55 were viable and albino (cav), 13 were viable and of various intermediate pigment types (cxv), four were subvital (cas and cxs), seven were neonatally lethal albinos (cal), 28 prenatally lethal albinos (cal); 12 died untested. All of the prenatally lethal and at least one of the neonatally lethal c-locus mutations (cal classes) are probably deficiencies that we have analyzed extensively in other experiments. Since absence of the locus mimics albino in phenotype, the intermediates (cxv and cxs groups) probably resulted from intragenic changes. The class of viable albino mutants (cav) might include, in addition to intragenic changes, some extremely small deficiencies.—The effects on viability of c-locus lethals (cal's) in heterozygous condition are not drastic enough to be perceived in stocks of mixed genetic background except in the case of the two longest known deficiencies and a few others.—Analysis of the relation between radiation treatment and type of c-locus mutants obtained shows that the relative frequency of viable mutations, for each germ-cell type, is greater for low-LET than for neutron irradiation; however, the difference for any individual cell type is not significant. The majority (66.7%) of mutations derived from X- or γ-ray irradiated spermatogonia are viable, and the proportion of "intermediates" among these viables is similar to that among presumed spontaneous c-locus mutations. No significant dose-rate effect on the proportion of lethals could be demonstrated within the set of mutants induced by low-LET irradiation of spermatogonia. Although sets from other germ-cell stages are too small for statistical tests, the results for oocytes are similar, as far as they go. Furthermore, most of the c-locus mutations induced in

  11. Interaction between basigin and monocarboxylate transporter 2 in the mouse testes and spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Maekawa, Mamiko; Yamatoya, Kenji; Nozaki, Masami; Ito, Chizuru; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Toshimori, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Basigin is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and plays various important roles in biological events including spermatogenesis. To examine the basigin molecular variants during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation in the mouse, immunoprecipitated basigin samples from testis and epididymal spermatozoa were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results demonstrated that basigin molecules from the testis and spermatozoa were separable into two major bands and that the differences in the molecular sizes were possibly because of an endoproteolytic cleavage. Since basigin is known to be a chaperone for the monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), the localization of basigin, MCT1 and MCT2 was examined during postnatal testicular development. Immunohistochemical studies showed different expression patterns of MCT1 and MCT2. MCT1 was localized on the surface of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids. In contrast, MCT2 appeared on the principal piece of spermatozoa in the testis, where basigin was also observed. In mature epididymal spermatozoa, MCT2 was located on the midpiece, where basigin co-localized with MCT2 but not with MCT1. Furthermore, MCT2 was immunoprecipitated with basigin in mouse testes and sperm. These results suggest that basigin has a functional role as a binding partner with MCT2 in testicular and epididymal spermatozoa. PMID:26208397

  12. Exposure of the mouse perinatal testis to radiation leads to hypospermia at sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    Forand, A; Messiaen, S; Habert, R; Bernardino-Sgherri, J

    2009-03-01

    The first round of mouse spermatogenesis begins from 3 to 4 days after birth through differentiation of gonocytes into spermatogonial-stem cells and type A spermatogonia. Consequently, this step of differentiation may determine generation of the original population of stem cells and the fertility potential of the adult mouse. We aimed to determine the effect of perinatal exposure to ionizing radiation on the testis at the end of the first wave of spermatogenesis and at sexual maturity. Our results show that, radiation sensitivity of the testis substantially decreases from late foetal life to the end of the first week after birth. In addition, partial or full recovery from radiation induced testicular weight loss occurred between the first round of spermatogenesis and sexual maturity, and this was associated with the stimulation of spermatogonial proliferation. Exposure of mice at 17.5 days after conception or at 1 day after birth to gamma-rays decreased the sperm counts at sexual maturity, while exposure of 8 day-old mice had no effect. This suggests that irradiation of late foetal or early neonatal testes has a direct impact on the generation of the neonatal spermatogonial-stem cell pool. PMID:19109333

  13. Tumoral Vitamin D Synthesis by CYP27B1 1-α-Hydroxylase Delays Mammary Tumor Progression in the PyMT-MMTV Mouse Model and Its Action Involves NF-κB Modulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiarong; Luco, Aimée-Lee; Ochietti, Benoît; Fadhil, Ibtihal; Camirand, Anne; Reinhardt, Timothy A; St-Arnaud, René; Muller, William; Kremer, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Biologically active vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or 1,25(OH)2D) is synthetized from inactive prohormone 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) by the enzyme CYP27B1 1-α-hydroxylase in kidney and several extrarenal tissues including breast. Although the development of breast cancer has been linked to inadequate vitamin D status, the importance of bioactive vitamin D production within tumors themselves is not fully understood. To investigate the role of tumoral vitamin D production in mammary epithelial cell progression to breast cancer, we conducted a Cre-loxP-mediated Cyp27b1 gene ablation in the mammary epithelium of the polyoma middle T antigen-mouse mammary tumor virus (PyMT-MMTV) mouse breast cancer model. Targeted ablation of Cyp27b1 was accompanied by significant acceleration in initiation of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis. In vivo, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, and survival markers were up-regulated in tumors by Cyp27b1 ablation, and apoptosis was decreased. AK thymoma (AKT) phosphorylation and expression of several components of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), integrin, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways were increased in Cyp27b1-ablated tumors compared with nonablated controls. In vitro, 1,25(OH)2D treatment induced a strong antiproliferative action on tumor cells from both ablated and nonablated mice, accompanied by rapid disappearance of NF-κB p65 from the nucleus and segregation in the cytoplasm. In contrast, treatment with the metabolic precursor 25(OH)D was only effective against cells from nonablated mice. 25(OH)D did not inhibit growth of Cyp27b1-ablated cells, and their nuclear NF-κB p65 remained abundant. Our findings demonstrate that in-tumor CYP27B1 1-α-hydroxylase activity plays a crucial role in controlling early oncogene-mediated mammary carcinogenesis events, at least in part by modulating tumoral cell NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. PMID:27119753

  14. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  15. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  16. Involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase class IA (PI3K 110α) and NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) in regulation of vascular differentiation induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bekhite, Mohamed M; Müller, Veronika; Tröger, Sebastian H; Müller, Jörg P; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Sauer, Heinrich; Wartenberg, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The impact of reactive oxygen species and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells is largely unknown. Here, we show that the silencing of the PI3K catalytic subunit p110α and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 1 (NOX1) by short hairpin RNA or pharmacological inhibition of NOX and ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) abolishes superoxide production by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse ES cells and in ES-cell-derived fetal liver kinase-1(+) (Flk-1(+)) vascular progenitor cells, whereas the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone does not have an effect. Silencing p110α or inhibiting Rac1 arrests vasculogenesis at initial stages in embryoid bodies, even under VEGF treatment, as indicated by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1)-positive areas and branching points. In the absence of p110α, tube-like structure formation on matrigel and cell migration of Flk-1(+) cells in scratch migration assays are totally impaired. Silencing NOX1 causes a reduction in PECAM-1-positive areas, branching points, cell migration and tube length upon VEGF treatment, despite the expression of vascular differentiation markers. Interestingly, silencing p110α but not NOX1 inhibits the activation of Rac1, Ras homologue gene family member A (RhoA) and Akt leading to the abrogation of VEGF-induced lamellipodia structure formation. Thus, our data demonstrate that the PI3K p110α-Akt/Rac1 and NOX1 signalling pathways play a pivotal role in VEGF-induced vascular differentiation and cell migration. Rac1, RhoA and Akt phosphorylation occur downstream of PI3K and upstream of NOX1 underscoring a role of PI3K p110α in the regulation of cell polarity and migration. PMID:26553657

  17. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the fetal mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de; Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of prenatal X irradiation on postnatal development of the CBA/P mouse testis was studied. At days 14, 15 and 18 post coitus pregnant female mice were exposed to single doses of X rays ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy. Higher doses resulted in extensive loss of fetal mice. In the male offspring, at days 3 and 31 post partum, the numbers of gonocytes, type A spermatogonia and Sertoli cells per testis were determined using the disector method. Furthermore, after irradiation at day 15 post coitus, the numbers of Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelial cells and perivascular cells per testis were also determined at days 3 and 31 post partum. At day 3 post partum, the number of germ cells was decreased after irradiation at days 14 and 15 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.7 Gy was determined for the radiosensitivity of the gonocytes at day 14 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.8 Gy was determined for the gonocytes at day 15 post coitus which, however, seems to be less accurate. No accurate D{sub o} value could be determined for the gonocytes at day 18 post coitus. At day 31 post partum, the repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium as well as testis weights and tubular diameters were more affected by irradiation with increasing age of the mice at the time of irradiation. The percentage of tubular cross sections showing spermatids decreased with increasing dose after irradiation at days 15 and 18 post coitus, but not after irradiation at day 14 post coitus. Furthermore, in tubular cross sections showing spermatids, exposure of testes to 1.25 and 1.5 Gy at day 18 post coitus resulted in significantly lower numbers of spermatids per cross section when compared to those testes exposed to the same doses at day 15 post coitus. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and…

  19. Coordinate secretion of mouse alphafetoprotein, mouse albumin and rat albumin by mouse hepatoma-rat hepatoma hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Cassio, D; Hassoux, R; Dupiers, M; Uriel, J; Weiss, M C

    1980-09-01

    Mouse heptoma cells that secrete large amounts of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin have been crossed with rat hepatoma cells that secret only albumin, and in relatively small amounts, to investigate the influence of each parental genome upon the expression of serum proteins. All of the ten independent hybrid clones examined produce mouse AFP and both mouse and rat albumin; none produces rat AFP. The absence of production of rat AFP by the hybrids suggests that different mechanisms are involved in the initiation and in the maintenance of expression of this function. The secretion of the three proteins by the hybrid cells is coordinate: Whatever the growth phase (exponential or stationary) and irrespective of the amounts produced over a wide range, the ratio secreted of mouse AFP to mouse albumin is near to one, and that of mouse albumin to rat albumin is near to five. In addition, even though the pattern of protein secretion during the growth cycle of hybrid cells is different from those of both parents, the products of both parental genomes conform to the new hybrid pattern. Finally, some hybrids secrete less of the proteins with increasing numbers of cell generations, yet all three continue to be secreted in coordinate fashion. Since the rates of secretion of serum proteins probably reflect their rates of synthesis, we conclude that coordinate secretion indicates coordinate synthesis, and may reflect coordinate transcription of the relevant genes. PMID:6158520

  20. Involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in the forced swimming test and mouse strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Furutani, Sachiko; Kajiwara, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Kazufumi; Yamada, Shizuo; Tagawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Jun

    2010-03-10

    We previously demonstrated the presence of strain differences in baseline immobility time and sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine in five strains of mice (ICR, ddY, C57BL, DBA/2 and BALB/c mice). Furthermore, variations in serotonin (5-HT) transporter binding in the brain were strongly related to strain differences in baseline immobility and sensitivity to fluvoxamine. In the present study, we examined the involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in anti-immobility effects in DBA/2 mice, which show high sensitivity to fluvoxamine. The anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice were inhibited by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635). However, the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist 3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-4-hydroxy-N-[4-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]benzamide (GR55562), the 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist 6-methyl-1-(methylethyl)-ergoline-8beta-carboxylic acid 2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl ester (LY 53857), the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxy-benzoic acid 2-(diethylamino)ethyl ester (SDZ 205,557) did not influence the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice. These results suggest that fluvoxamine-induced antidepressant-like effects in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor. We analyzed 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the brains of five strains of mice. Strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding were observed. 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in brain was not correlated with baseline immobility time in the five strains of mice examined. These results suggest that, although the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor, strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding are not related to variation in immobility time and responses to fluvoxamine. PMID:19958758

  1. Remyelination of demyelinated rat axons by transplanted mouse oligodendrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Crang, A.J.; Blakemore, W.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The injection of the gliotoxic agent ethidium bromide (EB) into spinal white matter produces a CNS lesion in which it is possible to investigate the ability of transplanted glial cells to reconstruct a glial environment around demyelinated axons. This study demonstrates that transplanted mouse glial cells can repopulate EB lesions in rats provided tissue rejection is controlled. In X-irradiated EB lesions in cyclosporin-A-treated rats, mouse oligodendrocytes remyelinated rat axons and, together with mouse astrocytes, re-established a CNS environment. When transplanted into nonirradiated EB lesions in nude rats, mouse glial cells modulated the normal host repair by Schwann cells to remyelination by oligodendrocytes. In both X-irradiated and non-irradiated EB lesions, transplanted mouse glial cells behaved similarly to isogenic rat glial cell transplants. These findings indicate that the cell-cell interactions involved in reconstruction of a glial environment are common to both mouse and rat.

  2. Optical mouse acting as biospeckle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Michel Melo; Nozela, Jose Roberto de Almeida; Chaves, Marcio Jose; Alves Braga, Roberto; Rabal, Hector Jorge

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose some experiments with the use of optical computer mouse, associated to low cost lasers that can be used to perform several measurements with applications in industry and in human health monitoring. The mouse was used to grab the movements produced by speckle pattern changes and to get information through the adaptation of its structure. We measured displacements in wood samples under strain, variations of the diameter of an artery due to heart beat and, through a hardware simulation, the movement of an eye, an experiment that could be of low cost help for communication to severely handicapped motor patients. Those measurements were done in spite of the fact that the CCD sensor of the mice is monolithically included into an integrated circuit so that the raw image cannot be accessed. If, as was the case with primitive optical mouse, that signal could be accessed, the quality and usefulness of the measurements could be significantly increased. As it was not possible, a webcam sensor was used for measuring the drying of paint, a standard phenomenon for testing biospeckle techniques, in order to prove the usefulness of the mouse design. The results showed that the use of the mouse associated to a laser pointer could be the way to get metrological information from many phenomena involving the whole field spatial displacement, as well as the use of the mouse as in its prime version allowed to get images of the speckle patterns and to analyze them.

  3. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  4. Mouse round spermatids developed in vitro from preexisting spermatocytes can produce normal offspring by nuclear injection into in vivo-developed mature oocytes.

    PubMed

    Marh, Joel; Tres, Laura L; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Kierszenbaum, Abraham L

    2003-07-01

    It has been shown that mature oocytes injected with nuclei from round spermatids collected from mouse testis can generate normal offspring and that round spermatids can develop in vitro. An undetermined issue is whether spermatids developed in vitro are capable of generating fertile offspring by nuclear injection into oocytes. Herein, we report the production of normal and fertile offspring by nuclear injection using haploid spermatid donors derived from mouse primary spermatocyte precursors cocultured with Sertoli cells. Cocultured spermatogonia and spermatocytes were characterized by their nuclear immunoreactive patterns determined by an antibody to phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), a marker for DNA double-strand breaks. Cocultured round spermatid progenies display more than one motile flagellum, whose axonemes were recognized by antitubulin immunostaining. Flagellar wavelike movement and flagellar-driven propulsion of round spermatids developed in vitro were documented by videomicroscopy (http://www.sci.ccny.cuny.edu/ approximately kier). We also show that breeding of male and female mouse offspring generated by spermatid nuclear injection produced fertile offspring. In addition to their capacity to produce fertile offspring, cocultured, flagellated round spermatids can facilitate the analysis of the mechanisms of centriolar polarity, duplication, assembly, and flagellar growth, including the intraflagellar transport of cargo proteins. PMID:12620938

  5. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  6. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  7. Mouse dead end 1-β interacts with c-Jun and stimulates activator protein 1 transactivation

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YONG; SU, YAN-LIN; LI, LE-SAI; YANG, ZHI; CHEN, SI; XIONG, JIE; FU, XIAO-HUA; PENG, XIAO-NING

    2015-01-01

    Dead end 1 (DND1), important for maintaining the viability of primordial germ cells, is the first protein containing an RNA recognition motif that has been directly implicated as a heritable cause of spontaneous tumorigenesis. In the present study, c-Jun was identified through yeast two-hybrid screening of a 10.5-day old mouse embryo cDNA library as one of the proteins which interact with DND1-β. The interaction between DND1-β and c-Jun was demonstrated to occur by glutathione S-transferase pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation. Using confocal microscopy, DND1-β was found to be specifically expressed in GC-1 spermatogonia cells, mainly in the nuclei. When transfected into GC-1 cells, DND1-β and c-Jun were demonstrated to be co-localized principally in the nuclei. Furthermore, in a dual luciferase reporter assay, the transcriptional activity of activator protein 1 was demonstrated to be significantly increased by co-transfection with DND1-β and c-Jun plasmids in GC-1 cells. The identification and confirmation of an additional protein interacting with DND1-β facilitates the investigation of the functions and molecular mechanisms of DND1. PMID:25405725

  8. Mouse testis cell sorting according to DNA and mitochondrial changes during spermatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, J.M.; Ratinaud, M.H.; Cordelli, E.; Spano, M.; Julien, R.

    1995-04-01

    Flow cytometry can measure variations in DNA content and chromatin structure as well as dramatic changes in the mitochondria of germ cells during maturation from spermatogonia to elongated spermatids. Using 10-N nonyl acridine orange (NAO), an inner mitochondrial membrane dye, it is easy to follow mitochondria rearrangements. Mouse testis cells stained with the DNA fluorescent probe propidium iodide (PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry can be discriminated on the basis of their ploidy levels into five main regions corresponding to elongated spermatids, round spermatids, diploid, S-phase, and tetraploid cells. The simultaneous use of PI and NAO demonstrated the presence of cells having low and high mitochondrial content in the haploid, diploid, and tetraploid compartments. Eleven sorting windows were selected from the bivariate analysis (PI/NAO) and the corresponding cells were identified by microscopic observation. Cells were also discriminated by two parameter analysis of DNA content vs. cell diameter. The definition of seven different regions allowed us to determine NAO or rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) uptakes in each compartment. We observed that the ratio (Rh 123/NAO) dramatically changed according to the progression of cell differentiation which occurs during spermatogenesis. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2016-09-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  10. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  11. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  12. Classification of the spermatogenic cycle, seasonal changes of seminiferous tubule morphology and estimation of the breeding season of the large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus) in Toyama and Aomori prefectures, Japan

    PubMed Central

    OKANO, Tsukasa; ONUMA, Manabu; ISHINIWA, Hiroko; AZUMA, Noriko; TAMAOKI, Masanori; NAKAJIMA, Nobuyoshi; SHINDO, Junji; YOKOHATA, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    The large Japanese field mouse, Apodemus speciosus, is a potential indicator of environmental stress, but this function has not been confirmed by histological studies. Since environmental stress affects the reproductive function of mice, we determined the reproductive characteristics of this species at two locations: Toyama (36°35ʹN, 137°24ʹE) and Aomori (40°35ʹN, 140°57ʹE). Mice were captured during May–November (n=119) and July–November (n=146) at these locations, respectively. We classified the breeding season from the numbers of pregnant females and young, in addition to the spermatogenic cycle and seasonal changes in seminiferous tubule morphology of males. Testicular weight was measured, and seminiferous tubule morphology was examined histologically. Fourteen stages were found in the seminiferous epithelium cycle based on acrosome formation and spermatid head morphology. At both locations, the breeding season peaked from late summer to early autumn and possibly in spring. Spermatogenic activity was classified into 4 periods from June to November: resting around June and October–November; resumptive around July; active around August; and degenerative around September. During the resting period, the seminiferous tubules consisted of Sertoli cells, spermatogonia and spermatocytes. Spermatogenesis began during the resumptive period, and spermatids were observed. During the active period, active spermatogenesis and a broad lumen were observed. During the degenerative period, spermatogenesis ended, and Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, spermatocytes and degenerating exfoliated round spermatids were observed. This study provides scientific information about the testicular histopathological evaluations of the large Japanese field mouse for its use as an index species of environmental pollution. PMID:25754934

  13. Effect of different cryoprotectant agents on spermatogenesis efficiency in cryopreserved and grafted neonatal mouse testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Cengiz; Mullen, Brendan; Jarvi, Keith; McKerlie, Colin; Lo, Kirk C

    2013-08-01

    Restoration of male fertility associated with use of the cryopreserved testicular tissue would be a significant advance in human and animal assisted reproductive technology. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of four different cryoprotectant agents (CPA) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in cryopreserved and allotransplanted neonatal mouse testicular tissue. Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) with 5% fetal bovine serum including either 0.7 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 0.7 M propylene glycol (PrOH), 0.7 M ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol was used as the cryoprotectant solution. Donor testes were collected and dissected from neonatal pups of CD-1 mice (one day old). Freezing and seeding of the testicular whole tissues was performed using an automated controlled-rate freezer. Four fresh (non-frozen) or frozen-thawed pieces of testes were subcutaneously grafted onto the hind flank of each castrated male NCr nude recipient mouse and harvested after 3 months. Fresh neonatal testes grafts recovered from transplant sites had the most advanced rate of spermatogenesis with elongated spermatid and spermatozoa in 46.6% of seminiferous tubules and had higher levels of serum testosterone compared to all other frozen-thawed-graft groups (p<0.05). Fresh grafts and frozen-thawed grafts in the DMSO group had the highest rate of tissue survival compared to PrOH, EG, and glycerol after harvesting (p>0.05). The most effective CPA for the freezing and thawing of neonatal mouse testes was DMSO in comparison with EG (p<0.05) in both pre-grafted and post-grafted tissues based on histopathological evaluation. Likewise, the highest level of serum testosterone was obtained from the DMSO CPA group compared to all other cryoprotectants evaluated (p<0.05). The typical damage observed in the frozen-thawed grafts included disruption of the interstitial stroma, intercellular connection ruptures, and detachment of spermatogonia from the basement membrane. These findings

  14. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  15. TAF4b is required for mouse spermatogonial stem cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lovasco, Lindsay A.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term mammalian spermatogenesis requires proper development of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that replenish the testis with germ cell progenitors during adult life. TAF4b is a gonadal-enriched component of the general transcription factor complex, TFIID, which is required for the maintenance of spermatogenesis in the mouse. Successful germ cell transplantation assays into adult TAF4b-deficient host testes suggested that TAF4b performs an essential germ cell autonomous function in SSC establishment and/or maintenance. To elucidate the SSC function of TAF4b, we characterized the initial gonocyte pool and rounds of spermatogenic differentiation in the context of the Taf4b-deficient mouse testis. Here we demonstrate a significant reduction in the late embryonic gonocyte pool and a deficient expansion of this pool soon after birth. Resulting from this reduction of germ cell progenitors is a developmental delay in meiosis initiation, as compared to age-matched controls. While GFRα1+ spermatogonia are appropriately present as Asingle and Apaired in wild type testes, TAF4b-deficient testes display an increased proportion of long and clustered chains of GFRα1+ cells. In the absence of TAF4b, seminiferous tubules in the adult testis either lack germ cells altogether or are found to have missing generations of spermatogenic progenitor cells. Together these data indicate that TAF4b-deficient spermatogenic progenitor cells display a tendency for differentiation at the expense of self-renewal and a renewing pool of SSCs fail to establish during the critical window of SSC development. PMID:25727968

  16. Distribution of lectin-bindings in the testis of the lesser mouse deer, Tragulus javanicus.

    PubMed

    Agungpriyono, S; Kurohmaru, M; Kimura, J; Wahid, A H; Sasaki, M; Kitamura, N; Yamada, J; Fukuta, K; Zuki, A B

    2009-06-01

    The distribution of lectin bindings in the testis of the smallest ruminant, lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus), was studied using 12 biotinylated lectins specific for d-galactose (peanut agglutinin PNA, Ricinus communis agglutinin RCA I), N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin DBA, Vicia villosa agglutinin VVA, Soybean agglutinin SBA), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic acid (wheat germ agglutinin WGA, s-WGA), D-mannose and d-glucose (Lens culinaris agglutinin LCA, Pisum sativum agglutinin PSA, Concanavalin A Con A), L-fucose (Ulex europaeus agglutinin UEA I), and oligosaccharide (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin PHA-E) sugar residues. In Golgi-, cap-, and acrosome-phase spermatids, lectin-bindings were found in the acrosome (PNA, RCA I, VVA, SBA, WGA and s-WGA), and in the cytoplasm (PNA, RCA I, VVA, SBA, WGA, LCA, PSA, Con A and PHA-E). s-WGA binding was confined to the spermatid acrosome, but other lectins were also observed in spermatocytes. In spermatogonia, VVA, WGA, Con A, and PHA-E bindings were observed. Sertoli cells were intensely stained with DBA and Con A, and weakly with PHA-E. In interstitial Leydig cells, RCA I, DBA, VVA, Con A, PSA, LCA, WGA and PHA-E were positive. UEA I was negative in all cell types including spermatogenic cells. Unusual distribution of lectin-bindings noted in the testis of lesser mouse deer included the limited distribution of s-WGA only in the spermatid acrosome, the distribution of DBA in Sertoli cells, Leydig cells and lamina propria, and the absence of UEA I in all type cells. The present results were discussed in comparison with those of other animals and their possible functional implications. PMID:19245668

  17. Somatic cell hybrid mapping on mouse chromosome 11 (MMU11): Assignment of markers relative to two breakpoints in band D

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.J.; Robinson, T.J. ); Adler, I.D. )

    1993-02-01

    Mouse [times] rat somatic cell hybrids were generated by fusing mouse cell lines that are heterozygous for reciprocal translocations involving the T42H and T9Ad breakpoints on mouse chromosome 11 (MMU11) to a thymidine kinase-negative (Tk[sup [minus

  18. Clinicopathological characterization of mouse models of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Blake; Soyer, H Peter; Walker, Graeme J

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of melanoma have proven invaluable in the delineation of key molecular events involved in disease progression in humans and provide potential preclinical models for therapeutic testing (Damsky and Bosenberg, Pigment Cell Melanoma Res 25(4):404-405, 2012; Walker et al., Pigment Cell Melanoma Res 24(6):1158-1176, 2011). Here we concentrate on the clinicopathological analysis of melanocytic tumors. PMID:25636472

  19. Ethylnitrosourea Mutagenesis and the Isolation of Mutant Alleles for Specific Genes Located in the t Region of Mouse Chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Vernon C.

    1984-01-01

    Ethylnitrosourea mutagenesis of spermatogonia in male mice is very efficient and makes it practical to isolate new desired mutant alleles by subsequent progeny screening. This is demonstrated for three genes in the t region of chromosome 17. The first, a mutation designated t-int, interacts with the dominant mutation, T (Brachyury), to produce a tailless mouse. Previously, mutant alleles of the t-int gene were available only in t haplotypes, where they are part of a t chromatin block within which recombination with wild-type chromosomes is inhibited. In addition to t-int, new mutations at the quaking and tufted loci were obtained, as well as at several loci not on chromosome 17, e.g., an X-linked lethal that causes a mottled phenotype in the heterozygote and four new mutant W alleles on chromosome 5. In the experiment, an average of one fertilizing spermatozoan in 1500 was mutant at a given locus and an average of one male in five was able to sire mutants at that locus. PMID:6500258

  20. Functional Differences between GDNF-Dependent and FGF2-Dependent Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Seiji; Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Tanaka, Takashi; Morimoto, Hiroko; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Takahashi, Masahide; Ogura, Atsuo; Shinohara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are required for spermatogenesis. Earlier studies showed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was indispensable for SSC self-renewal by binding to the GFRA1/RET receptor. Mice with mutations in these molecules showed impaired spermatogenesis, which was attributed to SSC depletion. Here we show that SSCs undergo GDNF-independent self-renewal. A small number of spermatogonia formed colonies when testis fragments from a Ret mutant mouse strain were transplanted into heterologous recipients. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) supplementation enabled in vitro SSC expansion without GDNF. Although GDNF-mediated self-renewal signaling required both AKT and MAP2K1/2, the latter was dispensable in FGF2-mediated self-renewal. FGF2-depleted testes exhibited increased levels of GDNF and were enriched for SSCs, suggesting that the balance between FGF2 and GDNF levels influences SSC self-renewal in vivo. Our results show that SSCs exhibit at least two modes of self-renewal and suggest complexity of SSC regulation in vivo. PMID:25684228

  1. Targeted disruption of the mouse testis-enriched gene Znf230 does not affect spermatogenesis or fertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunqiang; Tao, Dachang; Lu, Yongjie; Yang, Yuan; Ma, Yongxin; Zhang, Sizhong

    2014-01-01

    The mouse testis-enriched Znf230 gene, which encodes a type of RING finger protein, is present primarily in the nuclei of spermatogonia, the acrosome and the tail of spermatozoa. To investigate the role of Znf230 in spermatogenesis, we generated Znf230-deficient mice by disrupting Znf230 exon-5 and exon-6 using homologous recombination. The homozygous Znf230-knockout (KO) mice did not exhibit Znf230 mRNA expression and Znf230 protein production. Znf230 KO mice exhibited no obvious impairment in body growth or fertility. Male Znf230 KO mice had integral reproductive systems and mature sperm that were regular in number and shape. The developmental stages of male germ cells of Znf230 KO mice were also normal. We further examined variations in the transcriptomes of testicular tissue between Znf230 KO and wild-type mice through microarray analysis. The results showed that the mRNA level of one unclassified transcript 4921513I08Rik was increased and that the mRNA levels of three other transcripts, i.e., 4930448A20Rik, 4931431B13Rik and potassium channel tetramerisation domain containing 14(Kctd14), were reduced more than two-fold in Znf230 KO mice compared with wild-type mice. Using our current examination techniques, these findings suggested that Znf230 deficiency in mice may not affect growth, fertility or spermatogenesis. PMID:25505846

  2. Colonization, mouse-style

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325 PMID:20977781

  3. MOUSE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cost or risk analysis equations. t was especially intended for use by individuals with li...

  4. Mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Berns, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease and a major therapeutic burden with poor survival rates. It is responsible for 30% of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, although some subtypes are also seen in non-smokers. Tumors in the latter group are mostly adenocarcinomas with many carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Survival statistics of lung cancer are grim because of its late detection and frequent local and distal metastases. Although DNA sequence information from tumors has revealed a number of frequently occurring mutations, affecting well-known tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, many of the driver mutations remain ill defined. This is likely due to the involvement of numerous rather infrequently occurring driver mutations that are difficult to distinguish from the very large number of passenger mutations detected in smoking-related lung cancers. Therefore, experimental model systems are indispensable to validate putative driver lesions and to gain insight into their mechanisms of action. Whereas a large fraction of these analyzes can be performed in cell cultures in vitro, in many cases the consequences of the mutations have to be assessed in the context of an intact organism, as this is the context in which the Mendelian selection process of the tumorigenic process took place and the advantages of particular mutations become apparent. Current mouse models for cancer are very suitable for this as they permit mimicking many of the salient features of human tumors. The capacity to swiftly re-engineer complex sets of lesions found in human tumors in mice enables us to assess the contribution of defined combinations of lesions to distinct tumor characteristics such as metastatic behavior and response to therapy. In this review we will describe mouse models of lung cancer and how they are used to better understand the disease and how they are exploited to develop better intervention strategies

  5. Genetically engineered mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwak, I; Tsai, S Y; DeMayo, F J

    2004-01-01

    The lung is a complex organ consisting of numerous cell types that function to ensure sufficient gas exchange to oxygenate the blood. In order to accomplish this function, the lung must be exposed to the external environment and at the same time maintain a homeostatic balance between its function in gas exchange and the maintenance of inflammatory balance. During the past two decades, as molecular methodologies have evolved with the sequencing of entire genomes, the use of in vivo models to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in pulmonary physiology and disease have increased. The mouse has emerged as a potent model to investigate pulmonary physiology due to the explosion in molecular methods that now allow for the developmental and tissue-specific regulation of gene transcription. Initial efforts to manipulate gene expression in the mouse genome resulted in the generation of transgenic mice characterized by the constitutive expression of a specific gene and knockout mice characterized by the ablation of a specific gene. The utility of these original mouse models was limited, in many cases, by phenotypes resulting in embryonic or neonatal lethality that prevented analysis of the impact of the genetic manipulation on pulmonary biology. Second-generation transgenic mouse models employ multiple strategies that can either activate or silence gene expression thereby providing extensive temporal and spatial control of the experimental parameters of gene expression. These highly regulated mouse models are intended to serve as a foundation for further investigation of the molecular basis of human disease such as tumorigenesis. This review describes the principles, progress, and application of systems that are currently employed in the conditional regulation of gene expression in the investigation of lung cancer. PMID:14977417

  6. Neuroanatomy and Neurochemistry of Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Haydee E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the entire nerve architecture and content of the two main sensory neuropeptides in mouse cornea to determine if it is a good model with similarities to human corneal innervation. Methods Mice aged 1 to 24 weeks were used. The corneas were stained with neuronal-class βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP), and substance P (SP) antibodies; whole-mount images were acquired to build an entire view of corneal innervation. To test the origin of CGRP and SP, trigeminal ganglia (TG) were processed for immunofluorescence. Relative corneal nerve fiber densities or neuron numbers were assessed by computer-assisted analysis. Results Between 1 and 3 weeks after birth, mouse cornea was mainly composed of a stromal nerve network. At 4 weeks, a whorl-like structure (or vortex) appeared that gradually became more defined. By 8 weeks, anatomy of corneal nerves had reached maturity. Epithelial bundles converged into the central area to form the vortex. The number and pattern of whorl-like structures were different. Subbasal nerve density and nerve terminals were greater in the center than the periphery. Nerve fibers and terminals that were CGRP-positive were more abundant than SP-positive nerves and terminals. In trigeminal ganglia, the number of CGRP-positive neurons significantly outnumbered those positive for SP. Conclusions This is the first study to show a complete map of the entire corneal nerves and CGRP and SP sensory neuropeptide distribution in the mouse cornea. This finding shows mouse corneal innervation has many similarities to human cornea and makes the mouse an appropriate model to study pathologies involving corneal nerves. PMID:26906155

  7. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  8. A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Robert E; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M A; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Bansal, Mukul S; Kellis, Manolis; Keller, Cheryl A; Morrissey, Christapher S; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Erickson, Drew T; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Lacerda de Sousa, Beatriz; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W James; Ramalho Santos, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J; Wilken, Matthew S; Reh, Thomas A; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E; Orkin, Stuart H; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J; Blobel, Gerd A; Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Good, Peter J; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J; Feingold, Elise A; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael P; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Gilbert, David M; Hardison, Ross C; Beer, Michael A; Ren, Bing

    2014-11-20

    The laboratory mouse shares the majority of its protein-coding genes with humans, making it the premier model organism in biomedical research, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:25409824

  9. A Comparative Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D.; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Bob; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K.; Williams, Brian A.; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M. A.; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T.; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Bansal, Mukul S.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S.; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S.; Cline, Melissa S.; Erickson, Drew T.; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; de Sousa, Beatriz Lacerda; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W. James; Santos, Miguel Ramalho; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J.; Wilken, Matthew S.; Reh, Thomas A.; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P.; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R. Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Good, Peter J.; Lowdon, Rebecca F.; Adams, Leslie B.; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Kellis, Manolis; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Snyder, Michael P.; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Gilbert, David M.; Hardison, Ross C.; Beer, Michael A.; Ren, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Summary As the premier model organism in biomedical research, the laboratory mouse shares the majority of protein-coding genes with humans, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications, and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of other sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:25409824

  10. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  11. Mouse phenome database.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Stephen C; Bult, Carol J; Bogue, Molly A

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  12. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  13. Translational activation of developmental messenger RNAs during neonatal mouse testis development.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Vesna A; Busada, Jonathan T; Keiper, Brett D; Geyer, Christopher B

    2013-09-01

    The basic tenets of germ cell development are conserved among metazoans. Following lineage commitment in the embryo, germ cells proliferate, transition into meiosis, and then differentiate into gametes capable of fertilization. In lower organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans, germline stem cells make the decision to proliferate or enter meiosis based in large part on the regulated expression of genes by translational control. This study undertakes a direct characterization of mRNAs that experience translational control and their involvement in similar decisions in the mammalian testis. We previously showed that translation of mRNA encoding the germ cell-specific gene Rhox13 was suppressed in the fetal and neonatal testis. By investigating changes in message utilization during neonatal testis development, we found that a large number of mRNAs encoding both housekeeping and germ cell-specific proteins experience enhanced translational efficiency, rather than increase in abundance, in the testis as quiescent gonocytes transition to mitotic spermatogonia. Our results indicate that translational control is a significant regulator of the germ cell proteome during neonatal testis development. PMID:23926285

  14. Modeling Cutaneous Squamous Carcinoma Development in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Phillips Y.; Balmain, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the most common cancers in Caucasian populations and is associated with a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. The classic mouse model for studying SCC involves two-stage chemical carcinogenesis, which has been instrumental in the evolution of the concept of multistage carcinogenesis, as widely applied to both human and mouse cancers. Much is now known about the sequence of biological and genetic events that occur in this skin carcinogenesis model and the factors that can influence the course of tumor development, such as perturbations in the oncogene/tumor-suppressor signaling pathways involved, the nature of the target cell that acquires the first genetic hit, and the role of inflammation. Increasingly, studies of tumor-initiating cells, malignant progression, and metastasis in mouse skin cancer models will have the potential to inform future approaches to treatment and chemoprevention of human squamous malignancies. PMID:25183851

  15. The Mouse Olfactory Peduncle

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C; Kay, Rachel B; Arrivillaga, J. P

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory peduncle, the region connecting the olfactory bulb with the basal forebrain, contains several neural areas that have received relatively little attention. The present work includes studies that provide an overview of the region in the mouse. An analysis of cell soma size in pars principalis (pP) of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) revealed considerable differences in tissue organization between mice and rats. An unbiased stereological study of neuron number in the cell-dense regions of pars externa (pE) and pP of the AON of 3, 12 and 24 month-old mice indicated that pE has about 16,500 cells in 0.043 mm3and pP about 58,300 cells in 0.307 mm3. Quantitative Golgi studies of pyramidal neurons in pP suggested that mouse neurons are similar though smaller to those of the rat. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that all peduncular regions (pE, pP, the dorsal peduncular cortex, ventral tenia tecta, and anterior olfactory tubercle and piriform cortex) have cells that express either calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, neuropeptide Y or cholecystokinin (antigens commonly co-expressed by subspecies of GABAergic neurons), though the relative numbers of each cell type differs between zones. Finally, an electron microscopic comparison of the organization of myelinated fibers in lateral olfactory tract in the anterior and posterior peduncle indicated that the region is less orderly in mice than in the rat. The results provide a caveat for investigators who generalize data between species as both similarities and differences between the laboratory mouse and rat were observed. PMID:21618219

  16. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes. PMID:10767323

  17. SIRT1 regulates the mouse gastric emptying and intestinal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addressed physiological significance of SIRT1 gene on mouse gastrointestinal growth and function (gastric emptying and intestinal growth). SIRT1 (a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase) is a key cellular energy sensor, and involved in a wide variety of cellular functions including energy me...

  18. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  19. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  20. KRAS Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Rónán C.; Heyer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    KRAS is a potent oncogene and is mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. However, the biological context of KRAS-dependent oncogenesis is poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models of cancer provide invaluable tools to study the oncogenic process, and insights from KRAS-driven models have significantly increased our understanding of the genetic, cellular, and tissue contexts in which KRAS is competent for oncogenesis. Moreover, variation among tumors arising in mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to therapy in KRAS-dependent cancers. Hence, it is essential that models of KRAS-driven cancers accurately reflect the genetics of human tumors and recapitulate the complex tumor-stromal intercommunication that is manifest in human cancers. Here, we highlight the progress made in modeling KRAS-dependent cancers and the impact that these models have had on our understanding of cancer biology. In particular, the development of models that recapitulate the complex biology of human cancers enables translational insights into mechanisms of therapeutic intervention in KRAS-dependent cancers. PMID:21779503

  1. [Genetics of mouse-hole].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    The Oldfield mouse and the Deer mouse build very different burrows in nature and also in the laboratory. This behaviour is innate and, in a series of beautiful experiments making use of new generation sequencing for genetic mapping, the authors map the burrow architecture to a very small number of loci and demonstrate modular evolution of behaviour. PMID:23621941

  2. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  3. Serotonin regulates mouse cranial neural crest migration.

    PubMed Central

    Moiseiwitsch, J R; Lauder, J M

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic agents (uptake inhibitors, receptor ligands) cause significant craniofacial malformations in cultured mouse embryos suggesting that 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT) may be an important regulator of craniofacial development. To determine whether serotonergic regulation of cell migration might underly some of these effects, cranial neural crest (NC) explants from embryonic day 9 (E9) (plug day = E1) mouse embryos or dissociated mandibular mesenchyme cells (derived from NC) from E12 embryos were placed in a modified Boyden chamber to measure effects of serotonergic agents on cell migration. A dose-dependent effect of 5-HT on the migration of highly motile cranial NC cells was demonstrated, such that low concentrations of 5-HT stimulated migration, whereas this effect was progressively lost as the dose of 5-HT was increased. In contrast, most concentrations of 5-HT inhibited migration of less motile, mandibular mesenchyme cells. To investigate the possible involvement of specific 5-HT receptors in the stimulation of NC migration, several 5-HT subtype-selective antagonists were used to block the effects of the most stimulatory dose of 5-HT (0.01 microM). Only NAN-190 (a 5-HT1A antagonist) inhibited the effect of 5-HT, suggesting involvement of this receptor. Further evidence was obtained by using immunohistochemistry with 5-HT receptor antibodies, which revealed expression of the 5-HT1A receptor but not other subtypes by migrating NC cells in both embryos and cranial NC explants. These results suggest that by activating appropriate receptors 5-HT may regulate migration of cranial NC cells and their mesenchymal derivatives in the mouse embryo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7638165

  4. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  5. Preclinical mouse models of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Segaliny, Aude; Botter, Sander; Santiago, Janice M; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common form of primary bone tumors with high prevalence in children. Survival rates of osteosarcoma are low, especially in the case of metastases. Mouse models of this disease have been very valuable in investigation of mechanisms of tumorigenesis, metastasis, as well as testing possible therapeutic options. In this chapter, we summarize currently available mouse models for osteosarcoma and provide detailed methodology for the isolation of cell lines from genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), gene modification and tumor cell injection methods, as well as imaging techniques. PMID:25987985

  6. The Mouse That Roared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paley, Vivian Gussin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the animal fables of Leo Lionni and recalls a kindergarten class's involvement with his books and their characters. Considers his themes of fairness, friendship, individual decisions versus group decisions, and conformity. (LRW)

  7. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and long term use. Potential Hazards: When the sensitivity for the input device is not appropriately set, ... provide adequate control. A mouse that has insufficient sensitivity may require large deviation of the wrist to ...

  8. Home Fires Involving Grills

    MedlinePlus

    ... fires were fueled by gas while 13% used charcoal or other solid fuel. Gas grills were involved ... structure fires and 4,300 outdoor fires annually. Charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were involved in ...

  9. A Provisional Gene Regulatory Atlas for Mouse Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hailin; VanBuren, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS) motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD. PMID:24421884

  10. Targeted Disruption of miR-17-92 Impairs Mouse Spermatogenesis by Activating mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Raoying; Lin, Xiaolin; Du, Tao; Xu, Kang; Shen, Hongfen; Wei, Fang; Hao, Weichao; Lin, Taoyan; Lin, Xia; Qin, Yujuan; Wang, Huiyan; Chen, Lin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Jie; Rong, Xiaoxiang; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Jia, Junshuang; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The miR-17-92 cluster and its 6 different mature microRNAs, including miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-20a, miR-19b-1, and miR-92a, play important roles in embryo development, immune system, kidney and heart development, adipose differentiation, aging, and tumorigenicity. Currently, increasing evidence indicates that some members of miR-17-92 cluster may be critical players in spermatogenesis, including miR-17, miR-18a, and miR-20a. However, the roles and underlying mechanisms of miR-17-92 in spermatogenesis remain largely unknown. Our results showed that the targeted disruption of miR-17-92 in the testes of adult mice resulted in severe testicular atrophy, empty seminiferous tubules, and depressed sperm production. This phenotype is partly because of the reduced number of spermatogonia and spermatogonial stem cells, and the significantly increased germ cell apoptosis in the testes of miR-17-92-deficient mice. In addition, overactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim, Stat3, c-Kit, and Socs3 were also observed in miR-17-92-deficient mouse testes, which might be, at least partially if not all, responsible for the aforementioned phenotypic changes in mutant testes. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-17-92 is essential for normal spermatogenesis in mice. PMID:26886608

  11. Involving Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes L.; Diaz, Delia M.; Sanchez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Describes barriers to Latino parent involvement in educational activities, factors to consider when involving Latino parents, and two examples of Latino involvement programs in California: Family Literacy Workshop at James Monroe Elementary School, Madera Unified School District, and Parents Take P.A.R.T. (Parent Assisted Reading Training) at…

  12. Affective Involvement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1970-01-01

    The Affective Involvement Instrument (AII) describes and classifies affective involvement in the process of decision-making as it occurs during classroom activities such as role-playing or group discussions. The thirty-celled instrument behaviorizes the six processes involved in decision-making and combines them with the taxonomic levels of the…

  13. Training pathologists in mouse pathology.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Ward, J M; HogenEsch, H; Nikitin, A Yu; Treuting, P M; Macauley, J B; Schofield, P N

    2012-03-01

    Expertise in the pathology of mice has expanded from traditional regulatory and drug safety screening (toxicologic pathology) primarily performed by veterinary pathologists to the highly specialized area of mouse research pathobiology performed by veterinary and medical pathologists encompassing phenotyping of mutant mice and analysis of research experiments exploiting inbred mouse strains and genetically engineered lines. With increasing use of genetically modified mice in research, mouse pathobiology and, by extension, expert mouse research-oriented pathologists have become integral to the success of basic and translational biomedical research. Training for today's research-oriented mouse pathologist must go beyond knowledge of anatomic features of mice and strain-specific background diseases to the specialized genetic nomenclature, husbandry, and genetics, including the methodology of genetic engineering and complex trait analysis. While training can be accomplished through apprenticeships in formal programs, these are often heavily service related and do not provide the necessary comprehensive training. Specialty courses and short-term mentoring with expert specialists are opportunities that, when combined with active practice and publication, will lead to acquisition of the skills required for cutting-edge mouse-based experimental science. PMID:20817889

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) Is required for mouse spermatogonial differentiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Busada, Jonathan T; Niedenberger, Bryan A; Velte, Ellen K; Keiper, Brett D; Geyer, Christopher B

    2015-11-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) must balance self-renewal with production of transit-amplifying progenitors that differentiate in response to retinoic acid (RA) before entering meiosis. This self-renewal vs. differentiation spermatogonial fate decision is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis, as imbalances cause spermatogenesis defects that can lead to human testicular cancer or infertility. A great deal of effort has been exerted to understand how the SSC population is maintained. In contrast, little is known about the essential program of differentiation initiated by retinoic acid (RA) that precedes meiosis, and the pathways and proteins involved are poorly defined. We recently reported a novel role for RA in stimulating the PI3/AKT/mTOR kinase signaling pathway to activate translation of repressed mRNAs such as Kit. Here, we examined the requirement for mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in mediating the RA signal to direct spermatogonial differentiation in the neonatal testis. We found that in vivo inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin blocked spermatogonial differentiation, which led to an accumulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia. In addition, rapamycin also blocked the RA-induced translational activation of mRNAs encoding KIT, SOHLH1, and SOHLH2 without affecting expression of STRA8. These findings highlight dual roles for RA in germ cell development - transcriptional activation of genes, and kinase signaling to stimulate translation of repressed messages required for spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:26254600

  15. The clinical implications of mouse models of enhanced anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Simone B; Landgraf, Rainer; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Mice are increasingly overtaking the rat model organism in important aspects of anxiety research, including drug development. However, translating the results obtained in mouse studies into information that can be applied in clinics remains challenging. One reason may be that most of the studies so far have used animals displaying ‘normal’ anxiety rather than ‘psychopathological’ animal models with abnormal (elevated) anxiety, which more closely reflect core features and sensitivities to therapeutic interventions of human anxiety disorders, and which would, thus, narrow the translational gap. Here, we discuss manipulations aimed at persistently enhancing anxiety-related behavior in the laboratory mouse using phenotypic selection, genetic techniques and/or environmental manipulations. It is hoped that such models with enhanced construct validity will provide improved ways of studying the neurobiology and treatment of pathological anxiety. Examples of findings from mouse models of enhanced anxiety-related behavior will be discussed, as well as their relation to findings in anxiety disorder patients regarding neuroanatomy, neurobiology, genetic involvement and epigenetic modifications. Finally, we highlight novel targets for potential anxiolytic pharmacotherapeutics that have been established with the help of research involving mice. Since the use of psychopathological mouse models is only just beginning to increase, it is still unclear as to the extent to which such approaches will enhance the success rate of drug development in translating identified therapeutic targets into clinical trials and, thus, helping to introduce the next anxiolytic class of drugs. PMID:21901080

  16. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  17. Mapping mouse hemangioblast maturation from headfold stages

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jerry M.; Iannaccone, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    The mouse posterior primitive streak at neural plate/headfold stages (NP/HF, ~7.5dpc–8dpc) represents an optimal window from which hemangioblasts can be isolated. We performed immunohistochemistry on this domain using established monoclonal antibodies for proteins that affect blood and endothelial fates. We demonstrate that HoxB4 and GATA1 are the first set of markers that segregate independently to endothelial or blood populations during NP/HF stages of mouse embryonic development. In a subset of cells, both proteins are co-expressed and immunoreactivities appear mutually excluded within nuclear spaces. We searched for this particular state at later sites of hematopoietic stem cell emergence, viz., the aorta-gonadmesonephros (AGM) and the fetal liver at 10.5–11.5dpc, and found that only a rare number of cells displayed this character. Based on this spatial-temporal argument, we propose that the earliest blood progenitors emerge either directly from the epiblast or through segregation within the allantoic core domain (ACD) through reduction of cell adhesion and pSmad1/5 nuclear signaling, followed by a stochastic decision toward a blood or endothelial fate that involves GATA1 and HoxB4, respectively. A third form in which binding distributions are balanced may represent a common condition shared by hemangioblasts and HSCs. We developed a heuristic model of hemangioblast maturation, in part, to be explicit about our assumptions. PMID:22426104

  18. Unitary response of mouse olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, Yair; Cheng, Melody M.; Yau, King-Wai

    2011-01-01

    The sense of smell begins with odorant molecules binding to membrane receptors on the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), thereby activating a G protein, Golf, and the downstream effector enzyme, an adenylyl cyclase (ACIII). Recently, we have found in amphibian ORNs that an odorant-binding event has a low probability of activating sensory transduction at all; even when successful, the resulting unitary response apparently involves a single active Gαolf–ACIII molecular complex. This low amplification is in contrast to rod phototransduction in vision, the best-quantified G-protein signaling pathway, where each photoisomerized rhodopsin molecule is well known to produce substantial amplification by activating many G-protein, and hence effector-enzyme, molecules. We have now carried out similar experiments on mouse ORNs, which offer, additionally, the advantage of genetics. Indeed, we found the same low probability of transduction, based on the unitary olfactory response having a fairly constant amplitude and similar kinetics across different odorants and randomly encountered ORNs. Also, consistent with our picture, the unitary response of Gαolf+/− ORNs was similar to WT in amplitude, although their Gαolf-protein expression was only half of normal. Finally, from the action potential firing, we estimated that ≤19 odorant-binding events successfully triggering transduction in a WT mouse ORN will lead to signaling to the brain. PMID:21187398

  19. Involvement of opsins in mammalian sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Afanzar, Oshri; Brandis, Alexander; Nevo, Reinat; Kiss, Vladimir; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian sperm thermotaxis is extreme temperature sensitivity, manifested by the capacity of spermatozoa to respond to temperature changes of <0.0006 °C as they swim their body-length distance. The identity of the sensing system that confers this exceptional sensitivity on spermatozoa is not known. Here we show that the temperature-sensing system of mammalian spermatozoa involves opsins, known to be G-protein-coupled receptors that act as photosensors in vision. We demonstrate by molecular, immunological, and functional approaches that opsins are present in human and mouse spermatozoa at specific sites, which depend on the species and the opsin type, and that they are involved in sperm thermotaxis via two signalling pathways—the phospholipase C and the cyclic-nucleotide pathways. Our results suggest that, depending on the context and the tissue, mammalian opsins act not only as photosensors but also as thermosensors. PMID:26537127

  20. Preventive effect of antihistaminics on mouse skin photosensitization with hematoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Nai-wu; Yan, Li-xue

    1993-03-01

    Beta-carotene 100 mg/kg per day or vitamin C 50 mg/kg per day was administered orally for two days and did not prevent mouse skin photosensitization caused by hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD). However, (beta) -carotene 100 mg/kg per day administered intramuscularly for two days prevented mouse skin reaction. Cimetidine and benadryl 10 mg/kg per day, P.O.X 2, effectively prevented mouse skin reaction. This suggests histamine may be involved in skin photoreaction induced by HpD.

  1. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  2. High Involvement Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on high-involvement work teams moderated by Michael Leimbach at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Beyond Training to the New Learning Environment: Workers on the High-Involvement Frontline" (Joseph Anthony Ilacqua, Carol Ann Zulauf) shows the link between an…

  3. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  4. [Families Involved in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Community Update" focuses on families involved in learning. The first article briefly discusses the "Ready to Read, Ready to Learn" White House summit that highlighted new research on early childhood learning. The center spread of this issue offers "Priming the Primary Educator: A Look at L. A. County's Parent Involvement Programs"…

  5. Conversational Involvement and Loneliness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed the relationship of conversational involvement and loneliness among college students. Found that lonely participants in this study had lower rates of talkativeness, interruptions, and attention than the nonlonely; they were also perceived as less involved and less interpersonally attractive. (PD)

  6. Mechanisms of gender-specific regulation of mouse sulfotransferases (Sults).

    PubMed

    Alnouti, Yazen; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2011-03-01

    1. Marked gender differences in the expression of sulfotransferases (Sults) are known to exist in several species including rats, mice and hamsters. However, the mechanism for this gender difference is not known. Therefore, in the present study, it was determined whether sex and/or growth hormone (GH) are responsible for the gender difference in the expression of Sults using gonadectomized (GNX), hypophysectomized (HX) and GH-releasing hormone receptor-deficient little (lit/lit) mouse models. 2. Sult1a1 and Papss2 in liver and kidney, and Sult1d1 in liver are female-predominant in mice because of suppressive effects of both androgens and male-pattern GH secretion. Sult2a1/a2 is the most markedly female-predominant Sult in mouse liver due to suppressive effects of androgens and male-pattern GH secretion, as well as stimulatory effects by estrogens and female-pattern GH secretion. Sult3a1 is female-predominant in mouse liver due to suppressive effects of androgens as well as stimulatory effects of estrogens and female-pattern GH secretion. Sult1c1 expression is male-predominant in mouse liver and kidney because of stimulatory effects of androgens in males. Sult4a1 expression is female-predominant in mouse brain due to stimulatory effects of estrogens. 3. In conclusion, gender-divergent Sults are mostly female-predominant and Sult1c1 is the only male-dominant Sult. The gender differences in expression of various mouse Sults are influenced by various mechanisms involving sex and/or GHs. PMID:21091322

  7. [Evaluation of imaging biomarker by transgenic mouse models].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jun; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2009-04-01

    The invention of trangenic and gene knockout mice contributes to the understanding of various brain functions. With the previous-generation positron emission tomography (PET) camera it was impossible to visualize the mouse brain functions, while the newly developed small-animal PET camera with higher resolution is enough to visualize the mouse brain functions. In the present study, we investigated the visualization of functional brain images for a few transgenic mouse models using the small-animal PET. In neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer disease (AD), the relationship between etiopathology and main symptoms has been elucidated relatively well; therefore several transgenic mice have been already developed. We succeeded in visualizing amyloid images in human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice brains. This result suggested that small-animal PET enabled the quantitative analysis of pathologies in the Tg mouse brain. Psychiatric disorders are presumed to have underlying multiple neural dysfunctions. Despite some efficient medicinal therapies having been already established, the etiopathology of mental illness and its biological markers have not been clarified. Thus, we investigated in type II Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase alpha (CaMKII alpha) heterozygous knockout (hKO) mouse, a major protein kinase in the brain. The CaMKII alpha hKO mice have several abnormal behavioral phenotypes, such as hyper aggression and lack of anxiogenic responses; therefore CaMKII alpha might involve in the pathogenesis of mood disorder and affect personal characterizations. Furthermore, serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptor density in the CaMKII alpha hKO mouse brain changed among various brain regions compared to wild mice. These mechanistic insights, PET assays of Tg mice that we have established here, provide an efficient methodology for preclinical evaluation of emerging diagnostic and therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative and psychiatric illnesses

  8. Chemical synthesis of mouse cripto CFC variants.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Daniela; Saporito, Angela; Ponticelli, Salvatore; Chambery, Angela; De Falco, Sandro; Pedone, Carlo; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Ruvo, Menotti

    2006-08-15

    We report for the first time the chemical synthesis of refolded CFC domain of mouse Cripto (mCFC) and of two variants bearing mutations on residues W107 and H104 involved in Alk4 binding. The domains undergo spontaneous and quantitative refolding in about 4 h, yet with very different kinetics. Disulfide linkages have been assessed by enzyme digestion and mass spectrometry analysis of resulting fragments, and the first experimental studies on structural organization have been conducted by circular dichroism spectroscopy under different pH conditions. Upon refolding, the domains considerably change their conformations, although they do not assume canonical structures, and become highly resistant to enzyme degradation. A comparative study of receptor binding shows that the CFC domain can bind Alk4 and confirms the importance of W107 and H104 for receptor recognition. PMID:16752415

  9. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model. PMID:26983733

  10. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.