Science.gov

Sample records for mozhete vbrat sami

  1. Perspectives on Sami Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte; Eira, Ellen J. Sara; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    The Sami are an indigenous people of the Arctic, and through a resolution of the United Nations, Norway is bound to take care of the Sami culture and language. Since 1987 the Sami have had their own curriculum, but they have no mathematics syllabus. In this paper we summarize the legal acts that take care of the Sami culture within the Norwegian…

  2. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland. PMID:22765936

  3. Sami Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keskitalo, Pigga; Maatta, Kaarina; Uusiautti, Satu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is, first, to describe Sami children's education and its status in the Finnish education system and, secondly, to contemplate its development in Finland. The core of the article is intertwined with issues concerning the status, language, and culture of indigenous peoples. According to the article, the western school…

  4. Publishing Sami Literature--From Christian Translations to Sami Publishing Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paltto, Kirsti

    2010-01-01

    Publishing in the Sami languages has always been difficult. The Sami are currently spread across four countries, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. There are nine different Sami languages, some of them with only a few speakers. The Sami publishing industry is entirely dependent on government funding as it does not have its own funds nor is there…

  5. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.; Farrell, T.; Goodwin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  6. The SAMI2 Open Source Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Joyce, G.

    2001-05-01

    In the past decade, the Open Source Model for software development has gained popularity and has had numerous major achievements: emacs, Linux, the Gimp, and Python, to name a few. The basic idea is to provide the source code of the model or application, a tutorial on its use, and a feedback mechanism with the community so that the model can be tested, improved, and archived. Given the success of the Open Source Model, we believe it may prove valuable in the development of scientific research codes. With this in mind, we are `Open Sourcing' the low to mid-latitude ionospheric model that has recently been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory: SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere). The model is comprehensive and uses modern numerical techniques. The structure and design of SAMI2 make it relatively easy to understand and modify: the numerical algorithms are simple and direct, and the code is reasonably well-written. Furthermore, SAMI2 is designed to run on personal computers; prohibitive computational resources are not necessary, thereby making the model accessible and usable by virtually all researchers. For these reasons, SAMI2 is an excellent candidate to explore and test the open source modeling paradigm in space physics research. We will discuss various topics associated with this project. Research supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  7. Sensibility: A New Focus in Sami Health Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nymo, Randi

    2007-01-01

    Colonialism has had significant bodily impacts on Indigenous peoples through medicine. Excluded from the German race, Sami have been burdened by mainstream prejudices which perpetuate myths about Sami having poor genetic material and, as a consequence, having an inferior culture and language. This offensive burden and subsequent humiliation has…

  8. The Linguistic Special Features of the Sami Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keskitalo, Pigga; Maatta, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the features of Sami language instruction at the first school grades in Norway. The most important part is to describe what kind of challenges Sami language instruction at the first grades as an indigenous people's language and with the status of a minority language has. This situation introduces some differences and…

  9. Indigenous Teachers' Experiences of the Implementation of Culture-Based Mathematics Activities in Sami School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutti, Ylva Jannok

    2013-01-01

    The goal of Indigenous education is that it should be approached on the basis of the Indigenous language and culture; this is also the case with Sami education. The Sami School Board has stated that all teaching in Sami schools should be culturally based, despite the fact that Sami culture-based teaching is not specifically defined. Therefore,…

  10. SAMIS- STANDARD ASSEMBLY-LINE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY SIMULATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Standard Assembly-Line Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program was originally developed to model a hypothetical U. S. industry which manufactures silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. The SAMIS program has now been generalized to the extent that it should be useful for simulating many different production-line manufacturing industries and companies. The most important capability of SAMIS is its ability to "simulate" an industry based on a model developed by the user with the aid of the SAMIS program. The results of the simulation are a set of financial reports which detail the requirements, including quantities and cost, of the companies and processes which comprise the industry. SAMIS provides a fair, consistent, and reliable means of comparing manufacturing processes being developed by numerous independent efforts. It can also be used to assess the industry-wide impact of changes in financial parameters, such as cost of resources and services, inflation rates, interest rates, tax policies, and required return on equity. Because of the large amount of data needed to describe an industry, a major portion of SAMIS is dedicated to data entry and maintenance. This activity in SAMIS is referred to as model management. Model management requires a significant amount of interaction through a system of "prompts" which make it possible for persons not familiar with computers, or the SAMIS program, to provide all of the data necessary to perform a simulation. SAMIS is written in TURBO PASCAL (version 2.0 required for compilation) and requires 10 meg of hard disk space, an 8087 coprocessor, and an IBM color graphics monitor. Executables and source code are provided. SAMIS was originally developed in 1978; the IBM PC version was developed in 1985. Release 6.1 was made available in 1986, and includes the PC-IPEG program.

  11. Design and Applications of the SAMI-pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. S.; Degrandpre, M. D.; Cullison, S. E.; Harris, K. E.; Beck, J.; Spalding, R.; Dickson, A. G.

    2010-12-01

    Spectrophotometric methods are routinely used to make high-precision pH measurements in oceanographic studies. The SAMI-pH sensor incorporates this technique into an autonomous, in situ sensor capable of extended deployments with minimal instrument drift. The SAMI-pH operates by mixing seawater with an indicator dye (metacresol purple) and measuring pH by absorbance. Laboratory studies have found that the SAMI-pH has an accuracy of 0.0017 ± 0.0007 pH units. Additionally, two SAMIs deployed for 22 days in coastal waters had a mean difference of +0.0042, and there was no drift evident during the deployment. The SAMI-pH has recently been re-designed with funding from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program. The new SAMI-pH design replaces the tungsten lamp with LEDs, decreasing power consumption. The SAMI-pH can now make more than 2,300 measurements in a single deployment, i.e. run for 290 days sampling every 3 hours. The design is also much more compact, allowing for easier deployment. Additionally, the SAMI-pH can now be deployed with a certified reference material (CRM), allowing for in situ data verification. The CRM, produced by Dr. Andrew Dickson (Scripps), is a tris seawater buffer that has a pH that is accurately known over the range of seawater temperatures. The new SAMI-pH has been tested extensively in the lab, with consistent high accuracy and precision. Field based studies have also yielded very good results. The SAMI-pH was deployed for three months at the MBARI M0 mooring. Data collected were used with salinity derived alkalinity to calculate in situ pCO2, which initially had a mean difference of 2.0 ± 0.4 μatm, as compared to an infrared CO2 sensor mounted on the buoy. During this time aragonite saturation states varied from 1.8-3.7, and calcite saturation states varied from 2.9-5.8. Data collected by a SAMI-pH and SAMI-CO2 on the NH-10 mooring off the Oregon Coast gave similar results. The SAMI-pH was deployed on a drifter for 1 month in the

  12. How Do the Sami Culture and School Culture Converge--Or Do They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keskitalo, Pigga; Maatta, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    This article dissects instruction in the Norwegian Sami School and its cultural sensitivity. The focus is on the classroom culture of Sami education: how Sami education is arranged in practice. The core of the research is intertwined with issues concerning the status, language, and culture of Indigenous people in education. The research was…

  13. How to Make the Small Indigenous Cultures Bloom? Special Traits of Sami Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keskitalo, Pigga; Uusiautti, Satu; Maatta, Kaarina

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses smallness from the point of view of the Sami, an indigenous people of the Arctic, and describes today's Sami education in Finland, the factors that have affected its formation and the challenges in strengthening it. The purpose of the article is to provide ideas to develop Sami education and encourage discovering methods…

  14. Incidence of galactic outflows: EAGLE simulations vs SAMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tescari, E.

    2016-06-01

    I presented the results of the joint SAMI-EAGLE project on outflows I lead at the University of Melbourne. We use the highest resolution EAGLE cosmological simulations to study the incidence of supernova driven winds ejected from galaxies on the main sequence. We produce synthetic SAMI observations of outflows that we compare directly with real data. While winds are observed in only a fraction of SAMI galaxies, they appear ubiquitous among simulated star forming objects. Moreover, the velocity dispersion distribution is only weakly dependent on stellar mass (M*) and sSFR (SFR/M*). I presented additional analyses and discuss the implications of these results and how they provide important constraints to ongoing and future IFS surveys.

  15. Ethical and methodological issues in research with Sami experiencing disability

    PubMed Central

    Melbøe, Line; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Johnsen, Bjørn-Eirik; Fedreheim, Gunn Elin; Dinesen, Tone; Minde, Gunn-Tove; Rustad, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background A study of disability among the indigenous Sami people in Norway presented a number of ethical and methodological challenges rarely addressed in the literature. Objectives The main study was designed to examine and understand the everyday life, transitions between life stages and democratic participation of Norwegian Sami people experiencing disability. Hence, the purpose of this article is to increase the understanding of possible ethical and methodological issues in research within this field. The article describes and discusses ethical and methodological issues that arose when conducting our study and identifies some strategies for addressing issues like these. Methods The ethical and methodological issues addressed in the article are based on a qualitative study among indigenous Norwegian Sami people experiencing disability. The data in this study were collected through 31 semi-structured in-depth interviews with altogether 24 Sami people experiencing disability and 13 next of kin of Sami people experiencing disability (8 mothers, 2 fathers, 2 sister and 1 guardian). Findings and discussion The researchers identified 4 main areas of ethical and methodological issues. We present these issues chronologically as they emerged in the research process: 1) concept of knowledge when designing the study, 2) gaining access, 3) data collection and 4) analysis and accountability. Conclusion The knowledge generated from this study has the potential to benefit future health research, specifically of Norwegian Sami people experiencing disability, as well as health research concerning indigenous people in general, providing scientific-based insight into important ethical and methodological issues in research with indigenous people experiencing disability. PMID:27396747

  16. Ethnic difference in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in regions with Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway – the SAMINOR1 study

    PubMed Central

    Naseribafrouei, Ali; Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Melhus, Marita; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in rural populations of Norway, as well as to explore potential ethnic disparities with respect to dysglycaemia in Sami and non-Sami populations. Design Cross-sectional population-based study. Methods The SAMINOR1 study was performed in 2003–2004. The study took place in regions with both Sami and non-Sami populations and had a response rate of 60.9%. Information in the SAMINOR1 study was collected using two self-administered questionnaires, clinical examination and laboratory tests. The present analysis included 15,208 men and women aged 36–79 years from the SAMINOR1 study. Results Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami men was 3.4 and 5.5%, respectively. Corresponding values for non-Sami men were 3.3 and 4.6%. Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus for Sami women was 2.7 and 4.8%, respectively, while corresponding values for non-Sami women were 2.3 and 4.5%. Relative risk ratios for dysglycaemia among Sami participants compared with non-Sami participants were significantly different in different geographical regions, with the southern region having the highest prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami participants. Conclusion We observed a heterogeneity in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in different geographical regions both within and between different ethnic groups. PMID:27507149

  17. Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway – the SAMINOR study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Brustad, Magritt; Johnsen, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Objective The main purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among Sami and non-Sami adults. Study design A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study). Data were collected by self-administrated questionnaires. Method SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions conducted in 24 municipalities in Northern Norway during 2003 and 2004. The present study included 15,546 individuals aged between 36 and 79, whose ethnicity was categorized as Sami (33.4%), Kven (7.3%) and Norwegian majority population (57.2%). Results Sami respondents had a higher prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk than the Norwegian majority population. The reporting was highest among Sami females (27.1%). Consumption of milk and dairy products (yoghurt and cheese) was high among all the ethnic groups. However, significantly more Sami than non-Sami never (or rarely) consume milk or cheese, and individuals who reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk had an significant lower intake of dairy products than those not reporting stomach symptoms after consuming dairy products. Sami reported general abdominal pain more often than the majority population. The adjusted models show a significant effect of Sami ethnicity in both men and women on self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk. In females, the odds ratio (OR)=1.77 (p=0.001) and in males OR=1.64 (p=0.001). Conclusion Our study shows that the Sami population reported more stomach symptoms after consuming milk, suggesting a higher prevalence of milk intolerance among the Sami population than the Norwegian majority population. PMID:25694052

  18. SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spectrally Dissecting 3400 Galaxies By the Dozen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Croom, S.; The SAMI Galaxy Survey Team

    2014-01-01

    More than 440 mapped, less than 3000 to go in the Sydney-AAO Multi-object IFU (SAMI) Galaxy Survey! SAMI uses novel, photonic fused-optical fiber “hexabundles” that were developed successfully at The University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory AAO), with support from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO). The SAMI Galaxy Survey, led by Assoc. Prof. Croom, is backed by an international team. This spectro-bolometric survey mitigates against “aperture effects” that may mislead when stacking single-fiber galaxy spectra. We seek to answer questions such as “what is the physical role of environment in galaxy evolution? How is stellar mass growth and angular momentum development related in galaxies? How does gas get into and out of galaxies, and how do such flows drive star formation?” SAMI maps stellar and gas properties with 13 integral-field units (IFU) plugged onto a dozen galaxies over the 1° field of the AAT prime-focus corrector. 78% of each bundle's area is filled by sixty-one 1.6-arcsec diameter fibers that are packed closely into concentric circles then their etched, thinned cladding is fused without deforming their cores. The fiber hexabundles route to the bench-mounted AAOmega double-beam spectrograph to cover simultaneously 373-570 nm at R=1730 and 620-735 nm at R=4500. Full spatial resolution of the observing site is recovered by dithered exposures totaling 3.5 hours per field. Target stellar masses generally exceed 108 M⊙, and span a range of environments: ˜650 are within clusters of virial mass 1014-15 M⊙ at 0.03 < z < 0.06, the rest are in the z < 0.1 field with extensive frequency data ancillary to the GAMA Survey. We display some key early results of major science themes being addressed by the SAMI survey team, from rotation curve dependence on group halo mass, through galaxy winds and AGN feedback mechanisms, to oxygen abundance gradients, kinematic decomposition

  19. "Too Hot for the Reindeer"--Voicing Sami Children's Visions of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonsson, Gunnar; Sarri, Carina; Alerby, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus attention on the issue of the future by listening to the voices of Indigenous children in the far north of Sweden--the Sami children. The overall aim of the study is to explore the meaning of Sami children's visions of the future. The participants attend the same Sami School, and they were of the age of 9-12 years. Data…

  20. SAMIS - A simulation of the solar array manufacturing industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    SAMIS is a continuing activity of the Project Analysis and Integration Task of the Low-cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA). It provides a standardized procedure for producing reliable estimates of the cost of manufacturing solar arrays or their components. These estimates are based on descriptions of the manufacturing processes which are being studied and developed by LSSA subcontractors and will be used to assess the commercial viability of those processes and to set research priorities.

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. J.; Owers, M. S.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Cortese, L.; Scott, N.; Colless, M.; Schaefer, A.; Taylor, E. N.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Allen, J. T.; Baldry, I.; Barnes, L.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Brooks, A. M.; Brough, S.; Cecil, G.; Couch, W.; Croton, D.; Davies, R.; Ellis, S.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Foster, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A.; Gunawardhana, M. L.; Hampton, E.; Ho, I.-T.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kewley, L.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Leslie, S.; McElroy, R.; Lewis, G.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mahajan, S.; Medling, A. M.; Metcalfe, N.; Meyer, M.; Mould, J.; Obreschkow, D.; O'Toole, S.; Pracy, M.; Richards, S. N.; Shanks, T.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Thomas, A. D.; Tonini, C.; Walcher, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope in a 3-yr survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume-limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar-mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12 and 14.5 h, and cover a total of 144 deg2 (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and photometry in regions covered by the SDSS and/or VLT Survey Telescope/ATLAS. The aim is to cover a broad range in stellar mass and environment, and therefore the primary survey targets cover redshifts 0.004 < z < 0.095, magnitudes rpet < 19.4, stellar masses 107-1012 M⊙, and environments from isolated field galaxies through groups to clusters of ˜1015 M⊙.

  2. "I Really Want to Save Our Language": Facing the Challenge of Revitalising and Maintaining Southern Sami Language through Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyngsnes, Kitt Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on a study of Southern Sami language learning in Norway. There are around 600-1000 Southern Sami living widely dispersed over a large territorial area in Norway. As an indigenous people, they have a right to instruction in their own language. The Southern Sami language however is in danger of extinction. The purpose of this…

  3. Ethnic Identity and Acculturation Attitudes among Indigenous Norwegian Sami and Ethnocultural Kven Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernmo, Siv; Heyerdahl, Sonja

    2004-01-01

    Ethnic identity and acculturation attitudes were studied in indigenous Sami (earlier named Lapps) and ethnocultural Kvens (descendants of early Finnish-speaking immigrants from the northern part of Sweden and Finland) in Northern Norway. The sample consisted of 674 Sami and 347 Kven high school students ages 16 to 19 years. Ethnic identity was…

  4. Tromso as a "Sami Town"?--Language Ideologies, Attitudes, and Debates Surrounding Bilingual Language Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on local people's expressions of attitudes and ideologies in the light of proposed Sami-Norwegian bilingual policies in their Northern Norwegian hometown. The local politicians' plan to introduce the bilingual regulations of an "administrative area for the Sami language" in the town of Tromso encountered conflicting language…

  5. Socioeconomic characteristics and health outcomes in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group in northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Norum, Jan; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Sami people constitute an ethnic minority in northern Norway. The objectives of this study were to compare municipalities with a majority of Sami in the population and a control group with regard to socioeconomic factors and health outcome. Methods Original data from Statistics Norway and Directorate of health on socioeconomic factors (education, unemployment, disability, poverty) and health outcomes [total mortality, cancer specific mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) specific mortality] were imported from the “Health Atlas” at the Northern Norway Regional Health Authority (NNRHA) trust. The 8 municipalities in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami-majority group – 18,868 inhabitants) was compared with a control group consisting of 11 municipalities where the Sami constitute a small minority in the population (18,931 inhabitants). Most data were from 2005 and 2008. Results There was no significant difference in socioeconomic factors. Overall, cancer- and CVD-specific mortality rates were similar in both groups. The life expectancy was significantly longer among women in the Sami-majority area (81.3 vs. 79.5 years, p=0.035) and males (74.5 vs. 72.0 years, p=0.037). Conclusion Socioeconomic factors and cause-specific mortality rate were similar in the Sami-majority group and the control group. Residents of both sexes in Sami-majority areas enjoyed longer life expectancy. PMID:22901291

  6. Infant mortality of Sami and settlers in Northern Sweden: the era of colonization 1750–1900

    PubMed Central

    Sköld, Peter; Axelsson, Per; Karlsson, Lena; Smith, Len

    2011-01-01

    The study deals with infant mortality (IMR) that is one of the most important aspects of indigenous vulnerability. Background The Sami are one of very few indigenous peoples with an experience of a positive mortality transition. Objective Using unique mortality data from the period 1750–1900 Sami and the colonizers in northern Sweden are compared in order to reveal an eventual infant mortality transition. Findings The results show ethnic differences with the Sami having higher IMR, although the differences decrease over time. There were also geographical and cultural differences within the Sami, with significantly lower IMR among the South Sami. Generally, parity has high explanatory value, where an increased risk is noted for children born as number five or higher among siblings. Conclusion There is a striking trend of decreasing IMR among the Sami after 1860, which, however, was not the result of professional health care. Other indigenous peoples of the Arctic still have higher mortality rates, and IMR below 100 was achieved only after 1950 in most countries. The decrease in Sami infant mortality was certainly an important factor in their unique health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900. PMID:22043216

  7. samiDB: A Prototype Data Archive for Big Science Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Green, A. W.; Cortese, L.; Foster, C.; Scott, N.

    2015-04-01

    samiDB is an archive, database, and query engine to serve the spectra, spectral hypercubes, and high-level science products that make up the SAMI Galaxy Survey. Based on the versatile Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5), samiDB does not depend on relational database structures and hence lightens the setup and maintenance load imposed on science teams by metadata tables. The code, written in Python, covers the ingestion, querying, and exporting of data as well as the automatic setup of an HTML schema browser. samiDB serves as a maintenance-light data archive for Big Science and can be adopted and adapted by science teams that lack the means to hire professional archivists to set up the data back end for their projects.

  8. Self-rated health among Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami adolescents: associated risk and protective correlates

    PubMed Central

    Spein, Anna Rita; Pedersen, Cecilia Petrine; Silviken, Anne Cathrine; Melhus, Marita; Kvernmo, Siv Eli; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami. Design Cross-sectional data were collected from “Well-being among Youth in Greenland” (WBYG) and “The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study” (NAAHS), conducted during 2003–2005 and comprising 10th and 11th graders, 378 Inuit and 350 Sami. Methods SRH was assessed by one single item, using a 4-point and 5-point scale for NAAHS and WBYG, respectively. Logistic regressions were performed separately for each indigenous group using a dichotomous measure with “very good” (NAAHS) and “very good/good” (WBYG) as reference categories. We simultaneously controlled for various socio-demographics, risk correlates (drinking, smoking, violence and suicidal behaviour) and protective correlates (physical activity, well-being in school, number of close friends and adolescent–parent relationship). Results A majority of both Inuit (62%) and Sami (89%) youth reported “good” or “very good” SRH. The proportion of “poor/fair/not so good” SRH was three times higher among Inuit than Sami (38% vs. 11%, p≤0.001). Significantly more Inuit females than males reported “poor/fair” SRH (44% vs. 29%, p≤0.05), while no gender differences occurred among Sami (12% vs. 9%, p≤0.08). In both indigenous groups, suicidal thoughts (risk) and physical activity (protective) were associated with poor and good SRH, respectively. Conclusions In accordance with other studies of indigenous adolescents, suicidal thoughts were strongly associated with poorer SRH among Sami and Inuit. The Inuit–Sami differences in SRH could partly be due to higher “risk” and lower “protective” correlates among Inuit than Sami. The positive impact of physical activity on SRH needs to be targeted in future intervention programs. PMID:23396865

  9. When autonomy kills: the case of Sami Mbarka Ben Garci.

    PubMed

    Garasic, Mirko; Foster, Charles

    2012-12-01

    Foucault suggested that foreigners and criminals are treated in a particularly unfavourable way by the law. We find arguable support for that proposition in the case of Sami Mbarka Ben Garci. He was a Tunisian Muslim prisoner, charged with rape, held in an Italian prison. He went on a hunger strike, protesting his innocence. He was not force-fed, and was allowed to die. Hunger strikers are commonly force fed. We ask why he was not, and although the reasons in his case are not clear, we suggest that many prisoners perceived as being 'undesirable' (in the sense of being foreigners, or facing particularly serious allegations) are allowed to die (the rhetoric being that their autonomy is being respected), while other prisoners' autonomy would be violated in order to ensure survival. We explore the European and some domestic jurisprudence surrounding force-feeding, and conclude that the law is applied in a worryingly inconsistent way. PMID:23447905

  10. Comparison of incoherent scatter radar observations of SIMPLEX electron density depletion with SAMI2 and SAMI3 model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, A.; Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Erickson, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Space Shuttle's Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engines have been used for active ionospheric modification experiments employing ground based ionospheric radars as diagnostic tools. These experiments initiated by the Naval Research Laboratory in 1995 have been scheduled as the Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust or SIMPLEX through the US Dept. of Defense's Space Test Program. During 2009, two SIMPLEX experiments with the shuttles STS-119 and STS-128 were viewed by the Millstone Hill 440 MHz radar in Westford, MA operated by the MIT Haystack Observatory. The objectives of these experiments were to observe local ion-acoustic turbulence and the ionospheric density irregularities created by the exhaust injection across the magnetic field that present a Bragg scattering target for the radar. The exhaust also creates a depletion in the background electron density at F-region altitudes that persists for a relatively long time and is readily detected by an incoherent scatter radar. The OMS engine burns release 10 kg/s of H2O, CO2, H2, and N2 molecules that charge exchange with ambient O+ ions at the F region heights, producing molecular ions and the electron density depletion due to the recombination with the ambient electrons. 2009 was a year of deep solar minimum that saw the background electron density values 19% lower than were expected during a solar minimum. (Emmert et al., GRL, 2010). We believe that the long recovery time from density depletion in SIMPLEX experiments of 2009 may have a root in the unique nature of the deep solar minimum. The density whole production and recovery will be modeled using NRL SAMI2 and SAMI3 model and the results will be discussed along with the observations using the incoherent scatter radar.

  11. Sami Culture and Values: A Study of the National Mathematics Exam for the Compulsory School in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    Norway ratified the ILO convention 169 concerning indigenous and tribal people in independent countries in 1990. In accordance with the convention the education programs for the Sami shall address their value systems and their cultural aspirations. Our aim is to investigate the implementation of this convention. The focus is on how Sami values are…

  12. Tertiary contacts control switching of the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Hennelly, Scott P; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2011-03-01

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by sensing small molecules through changes in secondary structure. While secondary structure and ligand interactions are thought to control switching, the exact mechanism of control is unknown. Using a novel two-piece assay that competes the anti-terminator against the aptamer, we directly monitor the process of switching. We find that the stabilization of key tertiary contacts controls both aptamer domain collapse and the switching of the SAM-I riboswitch from the aptamer to the expression platform conformation. Our experiments demonstrate that SAM binding induces structural alterations that indirectly stabilize the aptamer domain, preventing switching toward the expression platform conformer. These results, combined with a variety of structural probing experiments performed in this study, show that the collapse and stabilization of the aptamer domain are cooperative, relying on the sum of key tertiary contacts and the bimodal stability of the kink-turn motif for function. Here, ligand binding serves to shift the equilibrium of aptamer domain structures from a more open toward a more stable collapsed form by stabilizing tertiary interactions. Our data show that the thermodynamic landscape for riboswitch operation is finely balanced to allow large conformational rearrangements to be controlled by small molecule interactions. PMID:21097777

  13. Tertiary contacts control switching of the SAM-I riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Hennelly, Scott P.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2011-01-01

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by sensing small molecules through changes in secondary structure. While secondary structure and ligand interactions are thought to control switching, the exact mechanism of control is unknown. Using a novel two-piece assay that competes the anti-terminator against the aptamer, we directly monitor the process of switching. We find that the stabilization of key tertiary contacts controls both aptamer domain collapse and the switching of the SAM-I riboswitch from the aptamer to the expression platform conformation. Our experiments demonstrate that SAM binding induces structural alterations that indirectly stabilize the aptamer domain, preventing switching toward the expression platform conformer. These results, combined with a variety of structural probing experiments performed in this study, show that the collapse and stabilization of the aptamer domain are cooperative, relying on the sum of key tertiary contacts and the bimodal stability of the kink-turn motif for function. Here, ligand binding serves to shift the equilibrium of aptamer domain structures from a more open toward a more stable collapsed form by stabilizing tertiary interactions. Our data show that the thermodynamic landscape for riboswitch operation is finely balanced to allow large conformational rearrangements to be controlled by small molecule interactions. PMID:21097777

  14. Performance of the IRI-2007 and SAMI2 Models during Extreme Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J.; Bilitza, D.; Burrell, A. G.; Heelis, R. A.; Huba, J.; Simoes, F.

    2012-01-01

    During the recent solar minimum, solar activity reached the lowest levels observed during the space age. This extremely low solar activity has accompanied a number of unexpected observations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere when compared to previous solar minima. Among these is the fact that the ionosphere is significantly contracted beyond expectations based on empirical models. Data from the CINDI instrument on board C/NOFS is used to evaluate the performance of the IRI-2007 and SAMI2 models during the deepest part of the minimum. Additionally, the inputs to SAMI2 are modified in order to estimate the contributions of a contracted thermosphere and reduced EUV on the resultant ionosphere.

  15. “We are like lemmings”: making sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among the indigenous Sami in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Stoor, Jon Petter A; Kaiser, Niclas; Jacobsson, Lars; Renberg, Ellinor Salander; Silviken, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicide is a widespread problem among indigenous people residing in the circumpolar Arctic. Though the situation among the indigenous Sami in northern Scandinavia is better than among some other indigenous people, suicide is still regarded as a major public health issue. To adapt prevention strategies that are culturally attuned one must understand how suicide is understood within context. That is, the cultural meaning(s) of suicide. Objective To explore and make sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among Sami in Sweden. Design Open-ended focus group discussions (FGDs) on the topic “suicide among Sami” were carried out in 5 Sami communities in Sweden, with in total 22 strategically selected Sami participants. FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed through employing content analysis. Results From the FGDs 4 themes emerged including “The Sami are fighting for their culture and the herders are in the middle of the fight,” “Suicide as a consequence of Sami losing (or having lost) their identity,” “A wildfire in the Sami world” and “Difficult to get help as a Sami.” Conclusions Findings indicate that Sami in Sweden make sense of suicide in relation to power and identity within a threatened Sami cultural context. Suicide is then understood as an act that takes place and makes sense to others when a Sami no longer has the power to maintain a Sami identity, resulting in being disconnected from the Sami world and placed in an existential void where suicide is a solution. The findings are useful in development of culturally attuned suicide prevention among Sami in Sweden. PMID:26333721

  16. Convergence and Divergence in Basque, Irish and Sami Media Language Policing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly-Holmes, Helen; Moriarty, Mairead; Pietikainen, Sari

    2009-01-01

    The language policies adopted, imposed, or rejected in minority language media highlight the complexities of multilingualism and its regulation or ordering in contemporary contexts. In this article, we discuss convergence and divergence in the language policing of three minority language media contexts, namely Basque, Irish and Sami. All of the…

  17. SAMI2-PE: A model of the ionosphere including multistream interhemispheric photoelectron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Swartz, W. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Huba, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    In order to improve model comparisons with recently improved incoherent scatter radar measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory we have added photoelectron transport and energy redistribution to the two dimensional SAMI2 ionospheric model. The photoelectron model uses multiple pitch angle bins, includes effects associated with curved magnetic field lines, and uses an energy degradation procedure which conserves energy on coarse, non-uniformly spaced energy grids. The photoelectron model generates secondary electron production rates and thermal electron heating rates which are then passed to the fluid equations in SAMI2. We then compare electron and ion temperatures and electron densities of this modified SAMI2 model with measurements of these parameters over a range of altitudes from 90 km to 1650 km (L = 1.26) over a 24 hour period. The new electron heating model is a significant improvement over the semi-empirical model used in SAMI2. The electron temperatures above the F-peak from the modified model qualitatively reproduce the shape of the measurements as functions of time and altitude and quantitatively agree with the measurements to within ˜30% or better during the entire day, including during the rapid temperature increase at dawn.

  18. Abandoning "the other": statistical enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Per

    2010-09-01

    Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless--and in contrast to many other countries--Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population. PMID:21466142

  19. Modeling study of the mid-latitude ionospheric nighttime electron density enhancement by SAMI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Huba, J. D.; Saito, A.; Lin, C.; Liu, J. G.; Chang, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is a feature that the nighttime electron density is larger than in the daytime around the mid-latitude ionosphere. This anomaly was first detected in the southern hemisphere five decades ago and reported in the northern hemisphere recently. Previous studies presented the electron density structure of MSNA by satellite observation data and found that MSNA is clearly seen at 300 km altitude during local summer around South American, European, and Northeast Asian regions. A three-dimensional self-consistent model, SAMI3 (Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere), with inputting neutral wind data from TIEGCM (Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model) model is used to simulate the MSNA feature and further discuss its mechanisms. The comparisons between observation data and the model simulation results suggest that the equatorial neutral winds play the most important role in the formation of MSNA.

  20. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: cubism and covariance, putting round pegs into square holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Croom, S. M.; Cortese, L.; Green, A. W.; Nielsen, J.; Richards, S. N.; Scott, N.; Taylor, E. N.; Barnes, L. A.; Bauer, A. E.; Birchall, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J. J.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M.; Couch, W. J.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Driver, S.; Foster, C.; Goodwin, M.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Ho, I.-T.; Hampton, E. J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, H.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leslie, S. K.; Lewis, G. F.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; McElroy, R.; Medling, A. M.; Mahajan, S.; Mould, J.; Parker, Q.; Pracy, M. B.; Obreschkow, D.; Owers, M. S.; Schaefer, A. L.; Sweet, S. M.; Thomas, A. D.; Tonini, C.; Walcher, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a methodology for the regularization and combination of sparse sampled and irregularly gridded observations from fibre-optic multiobject integral field spectroscopy. The approach minimizes interpolation and retains image resolution on combining subpixel dithered data. We discuss the methodology in the context of the Sydney-AAO multiobject integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey underway at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The SAMI instrument uses 13 fibre bundles to perform high-multiplex integral field spectroscopy across a 1° diameter field of view. The SAMI Galaxy Survey is targeting ˜3000 galaxies drawn from the full range of galaxy environments. We demonstrate the subcritical sampling of the seeing and incomplete fill factor for the integral field bundles results in only a 10 per cent degradation in the final image resolution recovered. We also implement a new methodology for tracking covariance between elements of the resulting data cubes which retains 90 per cent of the covariance information while incurring only a modest increase in the survey data volume.

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: A prototype data archive for Big Science exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Green, A. W.; Foster, C.; Scott, N.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Sweet, S. M.; Hopkins, A. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the data archive and database for the SAMI Galaxy Survey, an ongoing observational program that will cover ≈3400 galaxies with integral-field (spatially-resolved) spectroscopy. Amounting to some three million spectra, this is the largest sample of its kind to date. The data archive and built-in query engine use the versatile Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5), which precludes the need for external metadata tables and hence the setup and maintenance overhead those carry. The code produces simple outputs that can easily be translated to plots and tables, and the combination of these tools makes for a light system that can handle heavy data. This article acts as a contextual companion to the SAMI Survey Database source code repository, samiDB, which is freely available online and written entirely in Python. We also discuss the decisions related to the selection of tools and the creation of data visualisation modules. It is our aim that the work presented in this article-descriptions, rationale, and source code-will be of use to scientists looking to set up a maintenance-light data archive for a Big Science data load.

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus in Sami and Norwegian populations. The SAMINOR—a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild; Melhus, Marita

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is recognised as a reliable long-term predictor of adverse health outcomes. Elevated prevalence rates of MetS and chronic lifestyle diseases have been documented in different indigenous groups. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of MetS and diabetes mellitus in relation to ethnicity in Northern Norway. In addition, we discussed different cut-off values for waist circumference (WC) and what impact this has on the prevalence of MetS. Materials and methods SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions in areas home to Sami and non-Sami populations. The survey was carried out in 2003–2004. All eligible residents in specific age groups were invited. In total, 16 538 males and females aged 36–79 years participated and gave informed consent for medical research. Results This study involved a total of 7822 female and 7290 male participants. Sami affiliation was reported by 5141 participants (34%). The prevalence of MetS was high in both ethnic groups independent of which WC cut-off value was used. No ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetes mellitus were demonstrated. However, ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment, which was more prevalent among Sami than non-Sami women. Conclusions In this study, there was no ethnic difference in diabetes prevalence, but ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment. Tablet treatment was more commonly in use among Sami women than among non-Sami women. We demonstrated a high share of negative metabolic components. These metabolic components have important health implications. Therefore, determining preventive initiatives is important in the primary and specialist healthcare system. These initiatives must be made culture and linguistic specific, in order to reduce differences and improve health status in the whole population. PMID:27105711

  3. Conformational Heterogeneity of the SAM-I Riboswitch Transcriptional ON State: A Chaperone-like Role for S-adenosylmethionine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-ela, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are promising targets for the design of novel antibiotics and engineering of portable genetic regulatory elements. There is evidence that variability in riboswitch properties allows tuning of expression for genes involved in different stages of biosynthetic pathways by mechanisms that are not currently understood. Here we explore the mechanism for tuning of SAM-I riboswitch folding. Most SAM-I riboswitches function at the transcriptional level by sensing the cognate ligand— S-adenosyl methionine (SAM). SAM-I riboswitches orchestrate the biosynthetic pathways of cysteine, methionine and SAM, etc. We use base pair probability predictions to examine the secondary structure folding landscape of several SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We predict different folding behaviors for different SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We identify several “decoy” base pairing interactions involving 5’ riboswitch residues that can compete with the formation of a P1 helix, a component of the ligand-bound “transcription OFF” state, in the absence of SAM. We hypothesize that blockage of these interactions through SAM contacts contributes to stabilization of the OFF state in the presence of ligand. We also probe folding patterns for a SAM-I riboswitch RNA using constructs with different 3’ truncation points experimentally. Folding was monitored through fluorescence, susceptibility to base-catalyzed cleavage, nuclear magnetic resonance and indirectly through SAM binding. We identify key decision windows at which SAM can affect the folding pathway toward the OFF state. The presence of decoy conformations and differential sensitivities to SAM at different transcript lengths are crucial for SAM-I riboswitches to modulate gene expression in the context of global cellular metabolism. PMID:22425639

  4. Dietary and nutrient intake of a Sami population living in traditional reindeer herding areas in north Norway: comparisons with a group of Norwegians.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, H; Utsi, E; Bønaa, K H

    1999-04-01

    The Samis are an ethnic minority living in the Northern region of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. Traditionally the Samis made their living from reindeer herding with some fishing and agriculture. Earlier studies have shown that their diet consisted of large amounts of reindeer meat, some fish and wild berries with low intakes of other fruits, vegetables and dairy products. Due to the introduction of technical improvements like snowmobiles and terrain vehicles which makes moving with the herd less necessary, their lifestyle has changed. There is little documentation how this has affected their dietary habits. In this study, the dietary pattern and nutrient intake of a group of Samis (n = 75) living in traditional reindeer herding areas of North Norway were investigated and compared with that of a group of Norwegians (n = 65). Dietary information was obtained through an interview by a nutritionist using the dietary history method. The findings indicate that nutrient content of the Sami diet is adequate except for folic acid. Calcium and iron intake was slightly below recommended levels for Sami females. There seems to be some difference between the diet of the Samis and Norwegians. The Samis consume more meat, fat, table sugar and coffee and less fruits and vegetables. The dietary pattern of the Samis seems, however, to be changing toward a more typically Norwegian diet. PMID:10429341

  5. What can we talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom? Sami patients' experiences of language choice and cultural norms in mental health treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    Background The Sami in Norway have a legal right to receive health services adapted to Sami language and culture. This calls for a study of the significance of language choice and cultural norms in Sami patients’ encounters with mental health services. Objectives To explore the significance of language and cultural norms in communication about mental health topics experienced by Sami patients receiving mental health treatment to enhance our understanding of linguistic and cultural adaptation of health services. Methods Data were collected through individual interviews with 4 Sami patients receiving mental health treatment in Northern Norway. A systematic text reduction and a thematic analysis were employed. Findings Two themes were identified: (I) Language choice is influenced by language competence, with whom one talks and what one talks about. Bilingualism was a resource and natural part of the participants’ lives, but there were limited possibilities to speak Sami in encounters with health services. A professional working relationship was placed on an equal footing with the possibility to speak Sami. (II) Cultural norms influence what one talks about, in what way and to whom. However, norms could be bypassed, by talking about norm-regulated topics in Norwegian with health providers. Conclusion Sami patients’ language choice in different communication situations is influenced by a complexity of social and cultural factors. Sami patients have varying opinions about and preferences for what they can talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom. Bilingualism and knowledge about both Sami and Norwegian culture provide latitude and enhanced possibilities for both patients and the health services. The challenge for the health services is to allow for and safeguard such individual variations within the cultural framework of the patients. PMID:25976741

  6. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: A prototype data archive for Big Science exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Green, A. W.; Foster, C.; Scott, N.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Sweet, S. M.; Hopkins, A. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the data archive and database for the SAMI Galaxy Survey, an ongoing observational program that will cover ≈3400 galaxies with integral-field (spatially-resolved) spectroscopy. Amounting to some three million spectra, this is the largest sample of its kind to date. The data archive and built-in query engine use the versatile Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5), which precludes the need for external metadata tables and hence the setup and maintenance overhead those carry. The code produces simple outputs that can easily be translated to plots and tables, and the combination of these tools makes for a light system that can handle heavy data. This article acts as a contextual companion to the SAMI Survey Database source code repository, samiDB, which is freely available online and written entirely in Python. We also discuss the decisions related to the selection of tools and the creation of data visualisation modules. It is our aim that the work presented in this article-descriptions, rationale, and source code-will be of use to scientists looking to set up a maintenance-light data archive for a Big Science data load. Consistent: A transaction cannot leave the database in an inconsistent state. Isolated: Transactions cannot interfere with each other. Durable: Completed transactions persist, even when servers restart etc. While samiDB  is not a transactional database and therefore not exposed to the risks ACID seeks to mitigate, we have kept its principles in mind while designing our system. This ensures the safety and integrity of our data when the archive is updated by the database work group. samiDB  is made atomic through the methodic catching of exceptions ('Python-try' rather than 'do'), such that transactions can exit cleanly, rather than being aborted. Through a rigorous quality control process we ensure that datasets are qualitatively correct (e.g.  their dimensions and attributes are as expected) and hence ensure consistency

  7. SAMI3/SD-WACCM-X simulations of ionospheric variability during northern winter 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, S. E.; Sassi, F.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    We have performed simulations using the Naval Research Laboratory's physics-based model of the ionosphere, Sami3 is A Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI3), to illustrate how neutral wind dynamics is responsible for day-to-day variability of the ionosphere. We have used neutral winds specified from the extended version of the specified dynamics Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM-X), in which meteorology below 92 km is constrained by atmospheric specifications from an operational weather forecast model and reanalysis. To assess the realism of the simulations against observations, we have carried out a case study during January-February 2009, a dynamically disturbed time characterized by a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) commencing 24 January 2009. Model results are compared with total electron content (TEC) from Jet Propulsion Laboratory global ionospheric maps. We show that SAMI3/SD-WACCM-X captures longitudinal variability in the equatorial ionization anomaly associated with nonmigrating tides, with strongest contributions coming from the diurnal eastward wave number 2 (DE2) and DE3. Both migrating and nonmigrating tides contribute to significant day-to-day variability, with TEC varying up to 16%. Our simulation during the SSW period reveals that at the Jicamarca longitude (285°E) on 27 January 2009 nonmigrating tides contribute to an enhancement of the electron density in the morning followed by a decrease in the afternoon. An enhancement of the semidiurnal eastward wave number 2 (SE2) and SE3 nonmigrating tides, likely associated with the appearance of the SSW, suggests that these tides increase the longitudinal variability of the SSW impact on the ionosphere. The conclusion is that realistic meteorology propagating upward from the lower atmosphere influences the dynamo region and reproduces aspects of the observed variability in the ionosphere.

  8. SAMI Galaxy Survey: Disk and Bar Kinematics, Mass Decompositions with Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Fogarty, Lisa; SAMI Galaxy Survey Team, GAMA Survey Team

    2015-01-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey (SGS, P.I. Scott Croom, U. of Sydney) uses a custom multiple-integral-field feed to the Australian Astronomical Telescope (AAT) AAOmega dual-spectrograph to map the inner 15 arcsec diameter of 3400 galaxies a dozen at a time. The SGS spans environmental densities up to clusters, out to z = 0.1. (See http://sami-survey.org/edr for ~100 galaxies in the public Early Release Data.) We discuss circular speed curves (CSCs) of gas and stars derived from non-parametric fits to a flat disk in ~130 late-type barred and unbarred galaxies across the full mass range of the SGS, and at radii up to 4 r_e. Gas and stellar rotational fields agree well, but can differ substantially in line of nodes. At least 2/3 of the fitted CSCs are compatible with the ``universal rotation curve''. Velocity model residuals are compared to residuals from single-Sersic profile fits to SDSS photometry that highlight light asymmetries. For galaxies where photometry minus model residuals delineate stellar bars, the VIKING Z-band image is fit with a dual-Sersic form, one component addressing the bulge/bar, then gas kinematics are refit to include a bisymmetric (m=2) velocity distortion in the disk. This distortion often aligns with photometric residuals, and has amplitude at most 80 km/s but usually <20 km/s in the disk plane. Thus we debias the CSC from, and map the effects of, gas streaming due to a bar/oval. Because of generally low in-plane velocity distortions, only 2 of 18 barred galaxies have shock-indicating, emission-line flux ratios that correlate with m=2 spatio-kinematical variations and concentrate near the bar ends. Each dual- or single-Sersic fit is mapped into mass using one M/L constant with radius and the non-axisymmetric or axisymmetric CSC to decompose the mass distribution into luminous bulge and disk, and dark halo components. Some fits require a maximal luminous disk, others require a non-negligible or even dominant dark halo within the SAMI aperture. We

  9. Thermospheric tidal effects on the ionospheric midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly using SAMI3 and TIEGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Lin, C. H.; Chang, L. C.; Huba, J. D.; Lin, J. T.; Saito, A.; Liu, J. Y.

    2013-06-01

    This paper is the first study to employ a three-dimensional physics-based ionosphere model, SAMI3, coupled with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and Global Scale Wave Model to simulate the mesospheric and lower thermospheric tidal effects on the development of midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA). Using this coupled model, the diurnal variation of MSNA electron densities at 300 km altitude is simulated on both June solstice (day of year (DOY) 167) and December solstice (DOY 350) in 2007. Results show successful reproduction of the southern hemisphere MSNA structure including the eastward drift feature of the southern MSNA, which is not reproduced by the default SAMI3 runs using the neutral winds provided by the empirical Horizontal Wind Model 93 neutral wind model. A linear least squares algorithm for extracting tidal components is utilized to examine the major tidal component affecting the variation of southern MSNA. Results show that the standing diurnal oscillation component dominates the vertical neutral wind manifesting as a diurnal eastward wave-1 drift of the southern MSNA in the local time frame. We also find that the stationary planetary wave-1 component of vertical neutral wind can cause diurnal variation of the summer nighttime electron density enhancement around the midlatitude ionosphere.

  10. Suicide Attempts among Indigenous Sami Adolescents and Majority Peers in Arctic Norway: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silviken, Anne; Kvernmo, Siv

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide attempts and associated risk factors such as sociodemographic conditions, emotional/behavioural problems and parent-child relationships were examined among 591 indigenous Sami and 2100 majority adolescents in Arctic Norway. There were no significant ethnic differences in prevalence of suicide attempts. In both ethnic…

  11. Modeling the ionospheric impact of tsunami-driven gravity waves with SAMI3: Conjugate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Wu, T.-W.; Makela, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory first-principles ionosphere model SAMI3 is used to study the ionospheric effects associated with tsunami-driven gravity waves. Specifically, the Tohoku-Oki tsunami of 11 March 2011 is modeled. It is shown that gravity wave-induced variations in the neutral wind lead to plasma velocity variations both perpendicular and parallel to the geomagnetic field. Moreover, the electric field induced by the neutral wind perturbations can map to the conjugate hemisphere. Thus, electron density variations can be generated in both hemispheres which impact the total electron content (TEC) and 6300 Šairglow emission. It is found that the TEC exhibits variations of ≲ ±0.1 total electron content unit (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and the 6300 Šairglow emission variation is up to ˜±2.5% relative to the unperturbed background airglow.

  12. The SAMI Pilot Survey: stellar kinematics of galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, L. M. R.; Scott, N.; Owers, M. S.; Croom, S. M.; Bekki, K.; Houghton, R. C. W.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Davies, R. L.; Jones, D. H.; Pracy, M.; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have Mr < -20.25 mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75 per cent of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25 per cent being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The λR parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between λR and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the λR distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, Ψ, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83 per cent) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. discs). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38 per cent are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.

  13. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: gas streaming and dynamical M/L in rotationally supported systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, G.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Richards, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Lange, R.; Moffett, A.; Catinella, B.; Cortese, L.; Ho, I.-T.; Taylor, E. N.; Bryant, J. J.; Allen, J. T.; Sweet, S. M.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Goodwin, M.; Kelvin, L.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Owers, M. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.

    2016-02-01

    Line-of-sight velocities of gas and stars can constrain dark matter (DM) within rotationally supported galaxies if they trace circular orbits extensively. Photometric asymmetries may signify non-circular motions, requiring spectra with dense spatial coverage. Our integral-field spectroscopy of 178 galaxies spanned the mass range of the Sydney-AAO Multi-object integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derived circular speed curves (CSCs) of gas and stars from non-parametric fits out to r ˜ 2re. For 12/14 with measured H I profiles, ionized gas and H I maximum velocities agreed. We fitted mass-follows-light models to 163 galaxies by approximating the radial light profile as nested, very flattened mass homeoids viewed as a Sérsic form. Fitting broad-band spectral energy distributions to Sloan Digital Sky Survey images gave median stellar mass/light 1.7 assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF) versus 2.6 dynamically. Two-thirds of the dynamical mass/light measures were consistent with star+remnant IMFs. One-fifth required upscaled starlight to fit, hence comparable mass of unobserved baryons and/or DM distributed like starlight across the SAMI aperture that came to dominate motions as the starlight CSCs declined rapidly. The rest had mass distributed differently from light. Subtracting fits of Sérsic radial profiles to 13 VIKING Z-band images revealed residual weak bars. Near the bar major axis, we assessed m = 2 streaming velocities, and found deviations usually <30 km s-1 from the CSC; three showed no deviation. Thus, asymmetries rarely influenced the CSC despite colocated shock-indicating, emission-line flux ratios in more than 2/3 of our sample.

  14. Ethnic discrimination and health: the relationship between experienced ethnic discrimination and multiple health domains in Norway's rural Sami population

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ketil Lenert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-reported ethnic discrimination has been associated with a range of health outcomes. This study builds on previous efforts to investigate the prevalence of self-reported ethnic discrimination in the indigenous (Sami) population, and how such discrimination may be associated with key health indicators. Study design The study relies on data from the 2003/2004 (n=4,389) population-based study of adults (aged 36–79 years) in 24 rural municipalities of Central and North Norway (the SAMINOR study). Self-reported ethnic discrimination was measured using the question: “Have you ever experienced discrimination due to your ethnic background?” Health indicators included questions regarding cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic muscle pain, metabolic syndrome and obesity. Logistic regression was applied to examine the relationship between self-reported ethnic discrimination and health outcomes. Results The study finds that for Sami people living in minority areas, self-reported ethnic discrimination is associated with all the negative health indicators included in the study. Conclusion We conclude that ethnic discrimination affects a wide range of health outcomes. Our findings highlight the importance of ensuring freedom from discrimination for the Sami people of Norway. PMID:25683064

  15. Conformational heterogeneity of the SAM-I riboswitch transcriptional ON state: a chaperone-like role for S-adenosyl methionine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-05-18

    Riboswitches are promising targets for the design of novel antibiotics and engineering of portable genetic regulatory elements. There is evidence that variability in riboswitch properties allows tuning of expression for genes involved in different stages of biosynthetic pathways by mechanisms that are not currently understood. Here, we explore the mechanism for tuning of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-I riboswitch folding. Most SAM-I riboswitches function at the transcriptional level by sensing the cognate ligand SAM. SAM-I riboswitches orchestrate the biosynthetic pathways of cysteine, methionine, SAM, and so forth. We use base-pair probability predictions to examine the secondary-structure folding landscape of several SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We predict different folding behaviors for different SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We identify several "decoy" base-pairing interactions involving 5' riboswitch residues that can compete with the formation of a P1 helix, a component of the ligand-bound "transcription OFF" state, in the absence of SAM. We hypothesize that blockage of these interactions through SAM contacts contributes to stabilization of the OFF state in the presence of ligand. We also probe folding patterns for a SAM-I riboswitch RNA using constructs with different 3' truncation points experimentally. Folding was monitored through fluorescence, susceptibility to base-catalyzed cleavage, nuclear magnetic resonance, and indirectly through SAM binding. We identify key decision windows at which SAM can affect the folding pathway towards the OFF state. The presence of decoy conformations and differential sensitivities to SAM at different transcript lengths is crucial for SAM-I riboswitches to modulate gene expression in the context of global cellular metabolism. PMID:22425639

  16. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the link between angular momentum and optical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Bekki, K.; van de Sande, J.; Couch, W.; Catinella, B.; Colless, M.; Obreschkow, D.; Taranu, D.; Tescari, E.; Barat, D.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Cluver, M.; Croom, S. M.; Drinkwater, M. J.; d'Eugenio, F.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.; Mahajan, S.; Scott, N.; Tonini, C.; Wong, O. I.; Allen, J. T.; Brough, S.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Ho, I.-T.; Kelvin, L. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the relationship between stellar and gas specific angular momentum j, stellar mass M★ and optical morphology for a sample of 488 galaxies extracted from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. We find that j, measured within one effective radius, monotonically increases with M★ and that, for M★ > 109.5 M⊙, the scatter in this relation strongly correlates with optical morphology (i.e., visual classification and Sérsic index). These findings confirm that massive galaxies of all types lie on a plane relating mass, angular momentum and stellar light distribution, and suggest that the large-scale morphology of a galaxy is regulated by its mass and dynamical state. We show that the significant scatter in the M★ - j relation is accounted for by the fact that, at fixed stellar mass, the contribution of ordered motions to the dynamical support of galaxies varies by at least a factor of three. Indeed, the stellar spin parameter (quantified via λR) correlates strongly with Sérsic and concentration indices. This correlation is particularly strong once slow-rotators are removed from the sample, showing that late-type galaxies and early-type fast rotators form a continuous class of objects in terms of their kinematic properties.

  17. Discrimination between closely related cellular metabolites by the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Montange, Rebecca K; Mondragón, Estefanía; van Tyne, Daria; Garst, Andrew D; Ceres, Pablo; Batey, Robert T

    2010-02-26

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-A X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA-ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-A improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH. PMID:20006621

  18. Discrimination between Closely Related Cellular Metabolites by the SAM-I Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Montange, R.; Mondragon, E; van Tyne, D; Garst, A; Ceres, P; Batey, R

    2010-01-01

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA-ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-{angstrom} improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH.

  19. Discrimination between Closely Related Cellular Metabolites by the SAM-I Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Montange, Rebecca K.; Mondragón, Estefanía; van Tyne, Daria; Garst, Andrew D.; Ceres, Pablo; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-Å X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA–ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-Å improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH. PMID:20006621

  20. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Scott F.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  1. Comparisons of the NRL SAMI3 Physics-Based Ionospheric Model with Global Ionosonde and GPS Electron Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, C. L.; Tondwalkar, A.; McDonald, S. E.; Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Lean, J.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is conducting an interdisciplinary physics-based Space Weather model development and validation program called the Integrated Sun-Earth System for the Operational Environment (ISES-OE). In contrast to other geospace integration efforts, a key aspect of ISES is determining the extent to which current models capture the climate of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Until now, complementary long-term simulations using physics-based ionosphere models have not been performed. As part of this program, numerous runs of the physics-based SAMI3 model have been made and compared to global measurements of electron density. The data sets includes: 1) Ionosonde NmF2 and hmF2 measurements, 2) GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) measurements and others. This presentation compares electron density data with SAMI3 and other models during much of Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending phase of Cycle 24. Previous work has concentrated on the Whole Heliospheric Interval (WHI) from February 19 - April 19, 2008 [Lean et al., 2014]. This solar minimum period with extremely low solar activity was used to test the validity of the SAMI3 simulations of the base-state ionosphere. Several modifications to SAMI3 were incorporated including updates to the Solar EUV fluxes, the NRL MSIS neutral atmospheric model parameterization at Solar Minimum and compensating for variations in the Sun-to-Earth distance. Data and model comparisons during times of higher solar activity will be presented with an emphasis on understanding the effects of coupling of the neutral atmosphere, neutral winds and driving electric fields on our ability to model the measured global electron density data. We examine responses to solar EUV radiation and geomagnetic activity, and semiannual and annual oscillations that all induce geospace variability. Lean, J. L., S. E. McDonald, J. D. Huba, J. T. Emmert, D. P. Drob, and C. L. Siefring (2014), Geospace variability during the 2008-2009 Whole Heliosphere

  2. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: extraplanar gas, galactic winds and their association with star formation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Dopita, Michael A.; Leslie, Sarah K.; Sharp, Rob; Allen, James T.; Bourne, Nathan; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Dunne, Loretta; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andy W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel; Sweet, Sarah M.; Tescari, Edoardo; Valiante, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a sample of 40 local, main-sequence, edge-on disc galaxies using integral field spectroscopy with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey to understand the link between properties of the extraplanar gas and their host galaxies. The kinematics properties of the extraplanar gas, including velocity asymmetries and increased dispersion, are used to differentiate galaxies hosting large-scale galactic winds from those dominated by the extended diffuse ionized gas. We find rather that a spectrum of diffuse gas-dominated to wind-dominated galaxies exist. The wind-dominated galaxies span a wide range of star formation rates (SFRs; -1 ≲ log (SFR/M⊙ yr-1) ≲ 0.5) across the whole stellar mass range of the sample (8.5 ≲ log (M*/M⊙) ≲ 11). The wind galaxies also span a wide range in SFR surface densities (10- 3-10- 1.5 M⊙ yr- 1 kpc- 2) that is much lower than the canonical threshold of 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1 kpc- 2. The wind galaxies on average have higher SFR surface densities and higher HδA values than those without strong wind signatures. The enhanced HδA indicates that bursts of star formation in the recent past are necessary for driving large-scale galactic winds. We demonstrate with Sloan Digital Sky Survey data that galaxies with high SFR surface density have experienced bursts of star formation in the recent past. Our results imply that the galactic winds revealed in our study are indeed driven by bursts of star formation, and thus probing star formation in the time domain is crucial for finding and understanding galactic winds.

  3. Host galaxies of luminous type II AGN: Winds, shocks, and comparisons to The SAMI Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Rebecca; Croom, Scott; Pracy, Michael; SAMI Galaxy Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    We present IFS observations of luminous (log(L[O III]/L⊙) > 8.7) local (z < 0.11) type II AGN, and demonstrate that winds are ubiquitous within this sample and have a direct influence on the ISM of the host galaxies. We use both non-parametric (e.g. line width and asymmetry) and multi-Gaussian fitting to decompose the complex emission profiles close to the AGN. We find line widths containing 80% flux in the range 400 - 1600 km/s with a mean of 790 ± 90 km/s, such high velocities are strongly suggestive that these AGN are driving ionized outflows. Additionally, multi-Gaussian fitting reveals that 14/17 of our targets require 3 separate kinematic components in the ionized gas in their central regions. The broadest components of these fits have FWHM = 530 - 2520 km/s, with a mean value of 920 ± 50 km/s. By simultaneously fitting both the Hβ/[O III] and Hα/[N II] complexes we construct ionization diagnostic diagrams for each component. 13/17 of our galaxies show a significant (> 95 %) correlation between the [N II]/Hα ratio and the velocity dispersion of the gas. Such a correlation is the natural consequence of a contribution to the ionization from shock excitation and we argue that this demonstrates that the outflows from these AGN are directly impacting the surrounding ISM within the galaxies. In addition, we use stellar absorption features to measure kinematics for these AGN host galaxies and those of a control sample selected from the SAMI Galaxy Survey to search for evidence of these luminous AGN being preferentially hosted by disturbed or merging systems.

  4. Magnesium Fluctuations Modulate RNA Dynamics in the SAM-I Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ryan L.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Mohanty, Udayan; Whitford, Paul C.; Hennelly, Scott P.; Onuchic, José N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments demonstrate that Mg2+ is crucial for structure and function of RNA systems, yet the detailed molecular mechanism of Mg2+ action on RNA is not well understood. We investigate the interplay between RNA and Mg2+ at atomic resolution through ten 2 microsecond explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the SAM-I riboswitch with varying ion concentrations. The structure, including three stemloops, is very stable on this timescale. Simulations reveal that outer sphere coordinated Mg2+ ions fluctuate on the same time scale as the RNA, and that their dynamics couple. Locally, Mg2+ association affects RNA conformation through tertiary bridging interactions; globally, increasing Mg2+ concentration slows RNA fluctuations. Outer sphere Mg2+ ions responsible for these effects account for 80% of Mg2+ in our simulations. These ions are transiently bound to the RNA, maintaining interactions, but shuttled from site to site. Outer sphere Mg2+ are separated from the RNA by a single hydration shell, occupying a thin layer 3-5Å from the RNA. Distribution functions reveal outer sphere Mg2+ are positioned by electronegative atoms, hydration layers, and have a preference for the major groove. Diffusion analysis suggests transient outer sphere Mg2+ dynamics are glassy. Since outer sphere Mg2+ ions account for most of the Mg2+ in our simulations, these ions may change the paradigm of Mg2+-RNA interactions. Rather than a few inner sphere ions anchoring the RNA structure surrounded by a continuum of diffuse ions, we observe a layer of outer sphere coordinated Mg2+ that is transiently bound but strongly coupled to the RNA. PMID:22612276

  5. Magnesium fluctuations modulate RNA dynamics in the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ryan L; Noel, Jeffrey K; Mohanty, Udayan; Whitford, Paul C; Hennelly, Scott P; Onuchic, José N; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2012-07-25

    Experiments demonstrate that Mg(2+) is crucial for structure and function of RNA systems, yet the detailed molecular mechanism of Mg(2+) action on RNA is not well understood. We investigate the interplay between RNA and Mg(2+) at atomic resolution through ten 2-μs explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the SAM-I riboswitch with varying ion concentrations. The structure, including three stemloops, is very stable on this time scale. Simulations reveal that outer-sphere coordinated Mg(2+) ions fluctuate on the same time scale as the RNA, and that their dynamics couple. Locally, Mg(2+) association affects RNA conformation through tertiary bridging interactions; globally, increasing Mg(2+) concentration slows RNA fluctuations. Outer-sphere Mg(2+) ions responsible for these effects account for 80% of Mg(2+) in our simulations. These ions are transiently bound to the RNA, maintaining interactions, but shuttled from site to site. Outer-sphere Mg(2+) are separated from the RNA by a single hydration shell, occupying a thin layer 3-5 Å from the RNA. Distribution functions reveal that outer-sphere Mg(2+) are positioned by electronegative atoms, hydration layers, and a preference for the major groove. Diffusion analysis suggests transient outer-sphere Mg(2+) dynamics are glassy. Since outer-sphere Mg(2+) ions account for most of the Mg(2+) in our simulations, these ions may change the paradigm of Mg(2+)-RNA interactions. Rather than a few inner-sphere ions anchoring the RNA structure surrounded by a continuum of diffuse ions, we observe a layer of outer-sphere coordinated Mg(2+) that is transiently bound but strongly coupled to the RNA. PMID:22612276

  6. Development of criteria for the use of asphalt-rubber as a Stress-Absorbing Membrane Interlayer (SAMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, D. E.; McKeen, R. G.

    1983-12-01

    This report documents over 2 years of research efforts to characterize asphalt-rubber mixtures to be used in Stress-Absorbing Membrane Interlayers (SAMI). The purpose of these SAMIs is to retard or prevent reflection cracking in asphalt-concrete overlays. Several laboratory experiments and one field trial were conducted to define significant test methods and parameters for incorporation into construction design and specification documents. Test methods used in this study included a modified softening point test, force-ductility, and Schweyer viscosity. Variables investigated included (1) Laboratory-mixing temperature; (2) Rubber type; (3) Laboratory storage time; (4) Laboratory storage condition; (5) Laboratory batch replication; (6) Laboratory mixing time; (7) Field mixing time; (8) Laboratory test temperature; (9) Force-Ductility elongation rates; and (10) Asphalt grade. It was found that mixing temperature, mixing time, rubber type, and asphalt grade all have significant effects upon the behavior of asphalt-rubber mixtures. Significant variability was also noticed in different laboratory batch replications. Varying laboratory test temperature and force-ductility elongation rate revealed further differences in asphalt-rubber mixtures.

  7. Micro-Level Language-Planning and Grass-Root Initiatives: A Case Study of Irish Language Comedy and Inari Sami Rap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Mairead; Pietikainen, Sari

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the increased potential for language change from the micro-level, given the new domains in which minority languages are present in the global era. Drawing on the theoretical notion of sociolinguistic scales this paper presents a comparative account of the changing positions of the Irish and Inari Sami languages.…

  8. The Evolution of the Tully-Fisher Relation Since z~1 with KROSS and SAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiley, Alfred; Bureau, Martin; Stott, John; Swinbank, Mark; Bower, Richard; Harrison, Christopher; Bunker, Andrew; Smail, Ian; Magdis, Georgios; Johnson, Helen

    2016-01-01

    manner as with KROSS, at which point a direct comparison may be made. I discuss my work comparing the TFRs of KROSS and the SAMI Galaxy Survey in this manner and its implications on previous measures of the evolution of the TFR since z~1.

  9. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    PubMed

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after

  10. Storm time ionosphere and plasmasphere structuring: SAMI3-RCM simulation of the 31 March 2001 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Sazykin, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first self-consistent modeling study of the ionosphere-plasmasphere system response to a geomagnetic storm. We use the coupled SAMI3-Rice Convention Model (RCM) of the global ionosphere and inner magnetosphere, with self-consistent electrodynamics, to simulate the 31 March 2001 magnetic storm. We find that the penetration electric fields associated with the magnetic storm lead to a storm time-enhanced density (SED) in the low- to middle-latitude ionosphere and that the separation in latitude of the Appleton anomaly peaks increases. The SED exhibits magnetic conjugacy, occurring in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Moreover, mapping the boundary of the SED into the equatorial plane coincides with the development of a "plume-like" structure in the plasmasphere. These preliminary results are consistent with observations.

  11. A Highly Coupled Network of Tertiary Interactions in the SAM-I Riboswitch and Their Role in Regulatory Tuning.

    PubMed

    Wostenberg, Christopher; Ceres, Pablo; Polaski, Jacob T; Batey, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    RNA folding in vivo is significantly influenced by transcription, which is not necessarily recapitulated by Mg(2+)-induced folding of the corresponding full-length RNA in vitro. Riboswitches that regulate gene expression at the transcriptional level are an ideal system for investigating this aspect of RNA folding as ligand-dependent termination is obligatorily co-transcriptional, providing a clear readout of the folding outcome. The folding of representative members of the SAM-I family of riboswitches has been extensively analyzed using approaches focusing almost exclusively upon Mg(2+) and/or S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-induced folding of full-length transcripts of the ligand binding domain. To relate these findings to co-transcriptional regulatory activity, we have investigated a set of structure-guided mutations of conserved tertiary architectural elements of the ligand binding domain using an in vitro single-turnover transcriptional termination assay, complemented with phylogenetic analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry data. This analysis revealed a conserved internal loop adjacent to the SAM binding site that significantly affects ligand binding and regulatory activity. Conversely, most single point mutations throughout key conserved features in peripheral tertiary architecture supporting the SAM binding pocket have relatively little impact on riboswitch activity. Instead, a secondary structural element in the peripheral subdomain appears to be the key determinant in observed differences in regulatory properties across the SAM-I family. These data reveal a highly coupled network of tertiary interactions that promote high-fidelity co-transcriptional folding of the riboswitch but are only indirectly linked to regulatory tuning. PMID:26343759

  12. The use of plants as regular food in ancient subarctic economies: a case study based on Sami use of Scots pine innerbark.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Ingela; Östlund, Lars; Zackrisson, Olle

    2004-01-01

    This study combines ethnological, historical, and dendroecological data from areas north of the Arctic Circle to analyze cultural aspects of Sami use of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) inner bark as regular food. Bark was peeled in June when trees were at the peak of sapping, leaving a strip of undamaged cambium so the tree survived. As a result, it is possible to date bark-peeling episodes using dendrochronology. The paper argues that the use of Scots pine inner bark reflects Sami religious beliefs, ethical concerns, and concepts of time, all expressed in the process of peeling the bark. A well-developed terminology and a set of specially designed tools reveal the technology involved in bark peeling. Consistent patterns with respect to the direction and size of peeling scars found across the region demonstrate common values and standards. Peeling direction patterns and ceremonial meals relating to bark probably reflect ritual practices connected to the sun deity, Biejvve. PMID:21774149

  13. Noise disturbance caused by outdoor activities--a simulated-environment study for Ali Sami Yen Stadium, İstanbul.

    PubMed

    Dal, Zeynep; Akdağ, Neşe Yüğrük

    2011-03-01

    Negative effects of noise on individuals, the inevitable result of urbanization, have become a significant urban problem in our day. Introduction of an approach to the noise problem on an urban-planning scale lightens the burden of measures required to be taken against noise at the stages of regional and developmental planning. Stadiums, which should be also evaluated from the point of noise problem when planning decisions are made on the urban planning scale, may cause very serious problems differing depending on the region they are located in. In this article, various dimensions of the noise problem caused by stadiums have been exemplified by making an assessment on Ali Sami Yen football stadium located in Mecidiyeköy district which is among important residential and commercial centres of İstanbul or Turkey. When the simulation results obtained for ordinary days and match days are evaluated, it has been found out that the people living in the area are exposed to noise levels substantially exceeding the acceptable values. Results of the survey conducted in the area have clearly revealed the existence of noise problem, too. PMID:20424911

  14. Johan Turi’s animal, mineral, vegetable cures and healing practices: an in-depth analysis of Sami (Saami) folk healing one hundred years ago

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The healing knowledge of a Sami (Saami) hunter and reindeer herder was surveyed as a window into the concepts of health, healing, and disease in early twentieth-century Sapmi (Northern Sweden). The two books of Johan Turi (1854–1936)—An Account of the Sami (1910) and Lappish Texts (1918–19) were examined to determine the varieties of recorded zootherapeutic, mineral, chemical, and ethnobotanical lore, as well as the therapeutic acts, identified conditions, and veterinary knowledge included. Methods Tabulation of the materials and species mentioned in Turi’s descriptions (n = 137) permitted analysis of the relative frequency of differing types of healing in Turi’s overall therapeutic repertoire, his relative attention to chronic vs. acute ailments, and the frequency of magic as a component of healing. A qualitative appraisal was made of the degree to which outside influences affected Sami healing of the period. A further assessment of the possible clinical efficacy of the recorded remedies was undertaken. Results Turi’s remedies consist most often of zootherapeutics (31%), followed by physical acts such as massage, moxibustion, or manipulation (22%). Ethnobotanical cures make up a significantly smaller portion of his repertoire (17%), followed by mineral and chemical cures (12%). Magic rituals (including incantations and ritual acts) make up a significant portion of Turi’s repertoire, and could be used alone (17%) or in conjunction with other types of healing (38%). Turi’s healing aimed primarily at acute ailments (65%), with chronic conditions addressed less often (35%). A literature review revealed that Turi’s remedies held a marked frequency of likely efficacy, at least in cases in which it was possible to ascertain the precise species, conditions, or substances described. Although it is possible at times to recognize foreign sources in Turi’s repertoire, it is clear that Turi understood all his healing methods as distinctively

  15. The expression platform and the aptamer: cooperativity between Mg2+ and ligand in the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Hennelly, Scott P; Novikova, Irina V; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-02-01

    Riboswitch operation involves the complex interplay between the aptamer domain and the expression platform. During transcription, these two domains compete against each other for shared sequence. In this study, we explore the cooperative effects of ligand binding and Magnesium interactions in the SAM-I riboswitch in the context of aptamer collapse and anti-terminator formation. Overall, our studies show the apo-aptamer acts as (i) a pre-organized aptamer competent to bind ligand and undergo structural collapse and (ii) a conformation that is more accessible to anti-terminator formation. We show that both Mg(2+) ions and SAM are required for a collapse transition to occur. We then use competition between the aptamer and expression platform for shared sequence to characterize the stability of the collapsed aptamer. We find that SAM and Mg(2+) interactions in the aptamer are highly cooperative in maintaining switch polarity (i.e. aptamer 'off-state' versus anti-terminator 'on-state'). We further show that the aptamer off-state is preferentially stabilized by Mg(2+) and similar divalent ions. Furthermore, the functional switching assay was used to select for phosphorothioate interference, and identifies potential magnesium chelation sites while characterizing their coordinated role with SAM in aptamer stabilization. In addition, we find that Mg(2+) interactions with the apo-aptamer are required for the full formation of the anti-terminator structure, and that higher concentrations of Mg(2+) (>4 mM) shift the equilibrium toward the anti-terminator on-state even in the presence of SAM. PMID:23258703

  16. The expression platform and the aptamer: cooperativity between Mg2+ and ligand in the SAM-I riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Hennelly, Scott P.; Novikova, Irina V.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitch operation involves the complex interplay between the aptamer domain and the expression platform. During transcription, these two domains compete against each other for shared sequence. In this study, we explore the cooperative effects of ligand binding and Magnesium interactions in the SAM-I riboswitch in the context of aptamer collapse and anti-terminator formation. Overall, our studies show the apo-aptamer acts as (i) a pre-organized aptamer competent to bind ligand and undergo structural collapse and (ii) a conformation that is more accessible to anti-terminator formation. We show that both Mg2+ ions and SAM are required for a collapse transition to occur. We then use competition between the aptamer and expression platform for shared sequence to characterize the stability of the collapsed aptamer. We find that SAM and Mg2+ interactions in the aptamer are highly cooperative in maintaining switch polarity (i.e. aptamer ‘off-state’ versus anti-terminator ‘on-state’). We further show that the aptamer off-state is preferentially stabilized by Mg2+ and similar divalent ions. Furthermore, the functional switching assay was used to select for phosphorothioate interference, and identifies potential magnesium chelation sites while characterizing their coordinated role with SAM in aptamer stabilization. In addition, we find that Mg2+ interactions with the apo-aptamer are required for the full formation of the anti-terminator structure, and that higher concentrations of Mg2+ (>4 mM) shift the equilibrium toward the anti-terminator on-state even in the presence of SAM. PMID:23258703

  17. The strength and hemispheric asymmetry of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly during two geomagnetic storms in 2013 from Global Ionosphere Map and SAMI2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weihua; Zhu, Zhengping; Lan, Jiaping

    2016-08-01

    The variations of the strength and the hemispheric asymmetry of EIA were studied by Global Ionosphere Map (GIM) and SAMI2 during two geomagnetic storm periods in March and June 2013. Compared with the 30-days median TEC, the TEC at the two crests of EIA had small variations while the TEC at the trough had a more remarkable variation for the two storms after the SSC. The TEC difference between the two EIA peaks had an increase or decrease several hours after the SSC, the asymmetry between the two crests of EIA represented by the defined asymmetry index has no obvious variations except several hours after the SSC, and EIA strength represented by the Crest-to-Trough Ratio (CTR) had a remarkable increase one day after the SSC day for March storm and decrease several hours after the SSC for June storm. The variations last several hours, with more than 40% variations compared with the value during the quiet period. The EIA peaks were also found to move toward the equator after the SSC during the two storms. The simulation from SAMI2 and HWM07 also shows that EIA crests would move toward the equator during storm time and EIA strength would decrease, which suggests that the disturbed neutral wind and disturbed electric field may be important factors affecting the EIA during the storm periods.

  18. Comparing results of high-resolution palaeoecological analyses with oral histories of land-use of a Sami reindeer herding pen in northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerling, Ilse M.; Edwards, Kevin J.; Schofield, James E.; Aronsson, Kjell-Åke

    2016-04-01

    Reindeer herding is a key component of Sami culture, but much is still unknown about its development both in the recent and more distant past due to the limited availability of historical and archaeological evidence. Pollen analysis provides a potential tool to supplement this lack of evidence through the detection and evaluation of landscape responses to the impact of reindeer pastoralism. In the boreal forests of northern Fennoscandia, localised forest clearance to create space for dwellings and livestock is presented in the palynological record as a decline in arboreal taxa and an increase in herbaceous taxa favoured by the increased light levels, resistance to soil trampling, and/or the increased soil nutrient levels provided by reindeer dung, domestic waste and ash from smudge fires. Oral histories of 20th century forest Sami reindeer herding at an abandoned reindeer herding pen (renvall) at Akkajävi, northern Sweden (66.9° N, 21.1° E), are integrated here with high-resolution palaeoecological reconstructions of the local vegetation to: (i) assess the sensitivity and value of various palynomorphs to the impacts of reindeer pastoralism; (ii) investigate whether the patterns seen in the palaeoecological record match the timing of activity at and abandonment of the site as understood from these oral histories. A peat monolith collected from within an annexe of the renvall was pollen analysed at a high resolution, supplemented with coprophilous fungal spore (livestock grazing/gathering), microscopic charcoal ([anthropogenic] burning) and sedimentological (loss-on-ignition; soil erosion) records. For the first time, this has allowed for the identification of multi-decadal cycles of use and abandonment of a renvall in the pollen record, but more obviously so in its coprophilous fungal spore archive, with the pattern and timing of changes at the site confirming events previously known only from oral histories. A second, paired profile was collected from the fen

  19. 77 FR 39245 - Sami Arshak Yanikian: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Novel natural formulation for atrial fibrillation, Super Nasal Drops, and Sams No Tinnitus Formulation... because they were intended to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease. Mr. Yanikian was informed that... States to hospitals that deal with natural health products. He further noted that his products were...

  20. Self-Reported Internalization Symptoms and Family Factors in Indigenous Sami and Non-Sami Adolescents in North Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bals, Margrethe; Turi, Anne Lene; Vitterso, Joar; Skre, Ingunn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2011-01-01

    Through differences in family socialization between indigenous and non-indigenous youth, there may be cultural differences in the impact of family factors on mental health outcome. Using structural equation modelling, this population-based study explored the relationship between symptoms of anxiety and depression and family factors in indigenous…

  1. The SAMI Pilot Survey: the fundamental and mass planes in three low-redshift clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Owers, Matt S.; Croom, Scott M.; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Roger L.; Brough, S.; Pracy, Michael B.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Jones, D. Heath; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andrew W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Richards, Samuel; Sharp, Rob

    2015-08-01

    Using new integral field observations of 106 galaxies in three nearby clusters, we investigate how the intrinsic scatter of the Fundamental Plane depends on the way in which the velocity dispersion and effective radius are measured. Our spatially resolved spectroscopy, combined with a cluster sample with negligible relative distance errors, allows us to derive a Fundamental Plane with minimal systematic uncertainties. From the apertures we tested, we find that velocity dispersions measured within a circular aperture with radius equal to one effective radius minimizes the intrinsic scatter of the Fundamental Plane. Using simple yet powerful Jeans dynamical models, we determine dynamical masses for our galaxies. Replacing luminosity in the Fundamental Plane with dynamical mass, we demonstrate that the resulting Mass Plane has further reduced scatter, consistent with zero intrinsic scatter. Using these dynamical models, we also find evidence for a possibly non-linear relationship between dynamical mass-to-light ratio and velocity dispersion.

  2. THE SAMI GALAXY SURVEY: TOWARD A UNIFIED DYNAMICAL SCALING RELATION FOR GALAXIES OF ALL TYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Cortese, L.; Glazebrook, K.; Mould, J.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Croom, S. M.; Scott, N.; Allen, J. T.; Bloom, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Ho, I.-T.; Bekki, K.; Colless, M.; Sharp, R.; Couch, W.; Goodwin, M.; Tonini, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, R. L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; and others

    2014-11-10

    We take advantage of the first data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field Galaxy Survey to investigate the relation between the kinematics of gas and stars, and stellar mass in a comprehensive sample of nearby galaxies. We find that all 235 objects in our sample, regardless of their morphology, lie on a tight relation linking stellar mass (M {sub *}) to internal velocity quantified by the S {sub 0.5} parameter, which combines the contribution of both dispersion (σ) and rotational velocity (V {sub rot}) to the dynamical support of a galaxy (S{sub 0.5}=√(0.5 V{sub rot}{sup 2}+σ{sup 2})). Our results are independent of the baryonic component from which σ and V {sub rot} are estimated, as the S {sub 0.5} of stars and gas agree remarkably well. This represents a significant improvement compared to the canonical M {sub *} versus V {sub rot} and M {sub *} versus σ relations. Not only is no sample pruning necessary, but also stellar and gas kinematics can be used simultaneously, as the effect of asymmetric drift is taken into account once V {sub rot} and σ are combined. Our findings illustrate how the combination of dispersion and rotational velocities for both gas and stars can provide us with a single dynamical scaling relation valid for galaxies of all morphologies across at least the stellar mass range 8.5 

  3. Free state conformational sampling of the SAM-I riboswitch aptamer domain.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Colby D; Montange, Rebecca K; Hennelly, Scott P; Rambo, Robert P; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Batey, Robert T

    2010-07-14

    Riboswitches are highly structured elements residing in the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNAs that specifically bind cellular metabolites to alter gene expression. While there are many structures of ligand-bound riboswitches that reveal details of bimolecular recognition, their unliganded structures remain poorly characterized. Characterizing the molecular details of the unliganded state is crucial for understanding the riboswitch's mechanism of action because it is this state that actively interrogates the cellular environment and helps direct the regulatory outcome. To develop a detailed description of the ligand-free form of an S-adenosylmethionine binding riboswitch at the local and global levels, we have employed a series of biochemical, biophysical, and computational methods. Our data reveal that the ligand binding domain adopts an ensemble of states that minimizes the energy barrier between the free and bound states to establish an efficient decision making branchpoint in the regulatory process. PMID:20637415

  4. Free state conformational sampling of the SAM-I riboswitch aptamer domain

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Colby D; Montange, Rebecca K.; Hennelly, Scott P.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Batey, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Riboswitches are highly structured elements residing in the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNAs that specifically bind cellular metabolites to alter gene expression. While there are many structures of ligand bound riboswitches that reveal details of bimolecular recognition, their unliganded structures remain poorly characterized. Characterizing the molecular details of the unliganded state is crucial for understanding the riboswitch's mechanism of action because it is this state that actively interrogates the cellular environment and helps direct the regulatory outcome. To develop a detailed description of the ligand free form of an S-adenosylmethionine binding riboswitch at the local and global levels, we have employed a series of biochemical, biophysical, and computational methods. Our data reveals that the ligand binding domain adopts an ensemble of states that minimizes the energy barrier between the free and bound states to establish an efficient decision making brachpoint in the regulatory process. PMID:20637415

  5. Child Welfare Services for Indigenous Populations: A Comparison of Child Welfare Histories, Policies, Practices and Laws for American Indians and Norwegian Samis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mary Ann; Saus, Merete

    2012-01-01

    This article takes Dixon and Scheurell's framework for understanding colonisation processes within social welfare policies and applies it to child welfare for Indigenous populations in the United States and Norway. While those countries' historical child welfare policies follow Dixon and Scheurell's hypotheses regarding colonisation, each nation…

  6. Listening for the Reindeer's Heartbeat: An Interview with Harald Gaski.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Paula

    1998-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Harald Gaski, a Sami from Arctic Norway, notes similarities and differences in Sami and American-Indian cultures related to forced boarding schools for assimilation purposes, traditional education, religion, "yoiking" (singing) and music, connection to nature, and tribal schools. He advocates the international…

  7. Reindeer Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattila, Jukka O.

    2013-01-01

    In Finnish Lapland, like in other Northern European regions by the Arctic Sea, aboriginal Sami people still base much of their daily income on reindeer. Earlier the Sami people followed their reindeer herds more or less all the year round, in nomadic fashion. Moving to fixed dwellings has created a problem in herding and guarding the property of…

  8. The Development of a Substance Abuse Treatment Program for Forensic Patients with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassmire, David M.; Welsh, Robert K.; Clevenger, Jeanne K.

    2007-01-01

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Illness (SAMI) program combines cognitive rehabilitation and dual-diagnosis substance abuse treatment within a stages of change context. This article describes the development, implementation, and preliminary outcome analysis of the SAMI program in a forensic hospital.

  9. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ..., Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg... CONTACT: Samie Allen, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and......

  10. Reindeer Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, Jukka O.

    2013-01-01

    In Finnish Lapland, like in other Northern European regions by the Arctic Sea, aboriginal Sami people still base much of their daily income on reindeer. Earlier the Sami people followed their reindeer herds more or less all the year round, in nomadic fashion. Moving to fixed dwellings has created a problem in herding and guarding the property of the moving wild packs of hundreds or thousands of reindeer, which Sami families usually possess. Already for decades the mobility provided by Ski-Doos—along with herding dogs—has helped with the job. However, the era of limitless wilderness in reindeer herding is over. Nowadays hundreds of kilometers of reindeer fence separate Sami herding districts from each other.

  11. Update on the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme in England†

    PubMed Central

    Fonagy, Peter; Clark, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Professor Sami Timimi recently expressed concerns about the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. We argue that the concerns are largely unfounded and provide readers with an update on the programme. PMID:26755970

  12. Southern Appalachian Mountains initiative: Regional partnership for air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, P.F.

    1999-07-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) is a voluntary partnership of state and federal agencies, industry, environmental groups, academia, and interested public. SAMI was established to identify and recommend air emissions management strategies to remedy existing and prevent future adverse air quality impacts to natural resources in Southern Appalachia, with particular focus on Class I national park and wilderness areas. SAMI's integrated assessment is focusing simultaneously on ozone, visibility impairment, and acid deposition. Computer models are linking emissions, atmospheric transport, exposures, and environmental and socioeconomic effects. The assessment is considering the impacts of existing and newly enacted federal air regulatory requirements and alternative emissions management strategies that SAMI might recommend for regional, state, or community-based actions.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Gene Expression Data Reveals Novel Targets of Senescence-Associated microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Marco; Comegna, Marika; Succoio, Mariangela; Leggiero, Eleonora; Pastore, Lucio; Faraonio, Raffaella; Cimino, Filiberto; Passaro, Fabiana

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, cellular senescence is viewed as a complex mechanism involved in different processes, ranging from tumor suppression to induction of age-related degenerative alterations. Senescence-inducing stimuli are myriad and, recently, we and others have demonstrated the role exerted by microRNAs in the induction and maintenance of senescence, by the identification of a subset of Senescence-Associated microRNAs (SAmiRs) up-regulated during replicative or stress-induced senescence and able to induce a premature senescent phenotype when over-expressed in human primary cells. With the intent to find novel direct targets of two specific SAmiRs, SAmiR-494 and -486-5p, and cellular pathways which they are involved in, we performed a comparative analysis of gene expression profiles available in literature to select genes down-regulated upon replicative senescence of human primary fibroblasts. Among them, we searched for SAmiR’s candidate targets by analyzing with different target prediction algorithms their 3’UTR for the presence of SAmiR-binding sites. The expression profiles of selected candidates have been validated on replicative and stress-induced senescence and the targeting of the 3’UTRs was assessed by luciferase assay. Results allowed us to identify Cell Division Cycle Associated 2 (CDCA2) and Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation type 4 (ID4) as novel targets of SAmiR-494 and SAmiR-486-5p, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the over-expression of CDCA2 in human primary fibroblasts was able to partially counteract etoposide-induced senescence by mitigating the activation of DNA Damage Response. PMID:24905922

  14. The Influence of the Solar Cycle on Plasmasphere Refilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J.

    2015-12-01

    During refilling, ionospheric plasma streams into the inner magnetosphere from both the northern and southern hemispheres. Plasmasphere refilling rates depend on both the ionospheric sources and on the thermalization of streaming ions. We use the NRL SAMI3 ionosphere/plasmasphere code[1] coupled to the NRLMSIS empirical atmosphere model and the HWM14 empirical wind model, to simulate H+, He+ and O+ populations in the plasmasphere. The SAMI3 ionosphere code includes 7 ion species (H+, He+, O+, N+, O2+, N2+, NO+), each treated as a separate fluid, with temperature equations being solved for H+, He+, O+ and e. Measurements show that refilling rates decrease with increasing solar activity, an effect reproduced by SAMI3 and its two-dimensional cousin, SAMI2. We find that the refilling rate and the resulting the plasmasphere electron content are sensitive to the thermospheric composition and temperature, as well as photoelectron heating and photoproduction rates. Depending on conditions, simulations suggest that the plasmaspheric contribution to the total electron content can either increase or decrease with solar activity, as represented by the daily and 81-day-average F10.7 indices. [1] Huba, J. and J. Krall, 2013, ``Modeling the plasmasphere with SAMI3'', Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 6--10, doi:10.1029/2012GL054300 Research supported by NRL base funds and the NASA HSR program.

  15. Measurement and modeling of the refilling plasmasphere during 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J. D.; Jordanova, V. K.; Denton, R. E.; Carranza, T.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory SAMI3 (Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere) and the RAM-CPL (Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model-Cold PLasma) codes are used to model observed plasmasphere dynamics during 25 November 2001 to 1 December 2001 and 1-5 February 2001. Model results compare well to plasmasphere observations of electron and mass densities. Comparison of model results to refilling data and to each other shows good agreement, generally within a factor of 2. We find that SAMI3 plasmaspheric refilling rates and ion densities are sensitive to the composition and temperature of the thermosphere and exosphere, and to photoelectron heating. Results also support our previous finding that the wind-driven dynamo significantly impacts both refilling rates and plasmasphere dynamics during quiet periods.

  16. Measurement and modeling of the refilling plasmasphere during 2001

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krall, J.; Huba, J. D.; Jordanova, V. K.; Denton, R. E.; Carranza, T.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2016-03-18

    The Naval Research Laboratory SAMI3 (Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere) and the RAM-CPL (Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model-Cold PLasma) codes are used to model observed plasmasphere dynamics during 25 November 2001 to 1 December 2001 and 1–5 February 2001. Model results compare well to plasmasphere observations of electron and mass densities. Comparison of model results to refilling data and to each other shows good agreement, generally within a factor of 2. We find that SAMI3 plasmaspheric refilling rates and ion densities are sensitive to the composition and temperature of the thermosphere and exosphere, and to photoelectron heating.more » Furthermore, results also support our previous finding that the wind-driven dynamo significantly impacts both refilling rates and plasmasphere dynamics during quiet periods.« less

  17. Musculoskeletal pain in Arctic indigenous and non-indigenous adolescents, prevalence and associations with psychosocial factors: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is common in otherwise healthy adolescents. In recent years widespread musculoskeletal pain, in contrast to single site pain, and associating factors has been emphasized. Musculoskeletal pain has not been examined in Arctic indigenous adolescents. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of widespread musculoskeletal pain and its association with psychosocial factors, with emphasis on gender- and ethnic differences (Sami vs. non-Sami), and the influence of pain related functional impairment. Methods This is a cross-sectional study based on The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study; a school-based survey responded by 4,881 10th grade students (RR: 83%) in North Norway, in 2003–2005. 10% were indigenous Sami. Musculoskeletal pain was based on reported pain in the head, shoulder/neck, back and/or arm/knee/leg, measured by the number of pain sites. Linear multiple regression was used for the multivariable analyses. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was high, and significantly higher in females. In total, 22.4% reported 3–4 pain sites. We found a strong association between musculoskeletal pain sites and psychosocial problems, with a higher explained variance in those reporting pain related functional impairment and in females. There were no major differences in the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in Sami and non-Sami, however the associating factors differed somewhat between the indigenous and non-indigenous group. The final multivariable model, for the total sample, explained 21.2% of the variance of musculoskeletal pain. Anxiety/depression symptoms was the dominant factor associated with musculoskeletal pain followed by negative life events and school-related stress. Conclusions Anxiety/depression, negative life events, and school-related stress were the most important factors associated with musculoskeletal pain, especially in those reporting pain related functional impairment. The most important sociocultural aspect

  18. Self-assembled Micelle Interfering RNA for Effective and Safe Targeting of Dysregulated Genes in Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Pyoung Oh; Park, Jin Wook; Lee, Chang-Min; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Han-Na; Ko, Youngho; Bae, Seon Joo; Yun, Sungil; Park, Jun Hong; Kwon, Taewoo; Kim, Woo Seok; Lee, Jiyoung; Lu, Qing; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Won-Kyung; Elias, Jack A; Yang, Joo-Sung; Park, Han-Oh; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chun Geun

    2016-03-18

    The siRNA silencing approach has long been used as a method to regulate the expression of specific target genes in vitro and in vivo. However, the effectiveness of delivery and the nonspecific immune-stimulatory function of siRNA are the limiting factors for therapeutic applications of siRNAs. To overcome these limitations, we developed self-assembled micelle inhibitory RNA (SAMiRNA) nanoparticles made of individually biconjugated siRNAs with a hydrophilic polymer and lipid on their ends and characterized their stability, immune-stimulatory function, and in vivo silencing efficacy. SAMiRNAs form very stable nanoparticles with no significant degradation in size distribution and polydispersity index over 1 year. Overnight incubation of SAMiRNAs (3 μm) on murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not cause any significant elaboration of innate immune cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-12, or IL-6, whereas unmodified siRNAs or liposomes or liposome complexes significantly stimulated the expression of these cytokines. Last, the in vivo silencing efficacy of SAMiRNAs was evaluated by targeting amphiregulin and connective tissue growth factor in bleomycin or TGF-β transgenic animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. Intratracheal or intravenous delivery two or three times of amphiregulin or connective tissue growth factor SAMiRNAs significantly reduced the bleomycin- or TGF-β-stimulated collagen accumulation in the lung and substantially restored the lung function of TGF-β transgenic mice. This study demonstrates that SAMiRNA nanoparticle is a less toxic, stable siRNA silencing platform for efficient in vivo targeting of genes implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26817844

  19. Educating Nomads for Self-Actualization and Development. Literacy Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezeomah, Chimah

    Nomadism is a worldwide phenomenon and its practitioners fall into three categories: (1) hunter/food gatherers, such as the Hadzabe in the United Republic of Tanzania; (2) itinerant workers, including the gypsies in North America; and (3) pastoralists, such as the Masai and Shuaw Arabs in Africa, the Sami in Finland, Norway, and Sweden, and the…

  20. Frozen Actions in the Arctic Linguistic Landscape: A Nexus Analysis of Language Processes in Visual Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietikainen, Sari; Lane, Pia; Salo, Hanni; Laihiala-Kankainen, Sirkka

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the linguistic landscape (LL) of seven villages above the Arctic Circle, in the region called North Calotte. The area forms a complex nexus of contested and changing multilingualism, particularly as regards to endangered indigenous Sami languages and Kven and Meankieli minority languages. Viewing LL as a discursively…

  1. What Are We Seeking to Sustain through Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy? A Loving Critique Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Django; Alim, H. Samy

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Django Paris and H. Samy Alim use the emergence of Paris's concept of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) as the foundation for a respectful and productive critique of previous formulations of asset pedagogies. Paying particular attention to asset pedagogy's failures to remain dynamic and critical in a constantly…

  2. 50 CFR 665.121 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and soles Bothidae, Soleidae. moamoa trunkfishes Ostraciidae. fugafuga, tuitui, sava'e sea cucumbers and sea urchins Echinoderms. amu blue corals Heliopora. amu organpipe corals Tubipora. ahermatypic... species not listed as CHCRT) Zoanthinaria.Mollusca. sisi-sami sea snails Gastropoda. aliao, alili...

  3. 50 CFR 665.121 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and soles Bothidae, Soleidae. moamoa trunkfishes Ostraciidae. fugafuga, tuitui, sava'e sea cucumbers and sea urchins Echinoderms. amu blue corals Heliopora. amu organpipe corals Tubipora. ahermatypic... species not listed as CHCRT) Zoanthinaria.Mollusca. sisi-sami sea snails Gastropoda. aliao, alili...

  4. 50 CFR 665.121 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and soles Bothidae, Soleidae. moamoa trunkfishes Ostraciidae. fugafuga, tuitui, sava'e sea cucumbers and sea urchins Echinoderms. amu blue corals Heliopora. amu organpipe corals Tubipora. ahermatypic... species not listed as CHCRT) Zoanthinaria.Mollusca. sisi-sami sea snails Gastropoda. aliao, alili...

  5. Can Schools Save Indigenous Languages? Policy and Practice on Four Continents: Palgrave Studies in Minority Languages and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, Nancy H., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This volume offers a close look at four cases of indigenous language revitalization: Maori in Aotearoa/New Zealand, Sami in Scandinavia, Hnahno in Mexico and Quechua and other indigenous languages in Latin America. Essays by experts from each case are in turn discussed in international perspective by four counterpart experts. This book is divided…

  6. Simultaneous 2D Doppler backscattering from edge turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Brunner, Kai; Freethy, Simon; Huang, Billy; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Vann, Roddy

    2015-11-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic (previously at MAST and now at NSTX-U) actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (80 degree beam width) and broadband (10-34.5 GHz) beam. It digitizes the phase and amplitude of the Doppler backscattered signal using a receiving array of eight antennas which can be focused in any direction post shot to an angular range of 6-24 degree FWHM. This allows Doppler BackScattering (DBS) experiments to be conducted in every direction within the field of view simultaneously. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. SAMI has measured the magnetic pitch angle in the edge for the first time using a backscattering diagnostic. This is possible with simultaneous 2D DBS because the maximum backscattered power is perpendicular to the turbulence and turbulence is elongated along the magnetic field. SAMI has also studied the effect of NBI and the L-H transition on turbulent velocity, and turbulence suppression in the edge during H-mode. Initial results from all of these studies will be presented. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grants EP/K504178 and EP/H016732.

  7. d-Vision: Seeking Excellence through a Hands on Engineering Multi Discipline Global Internship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suss, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The question is, "What can vision do?" (Fritz, 1989) rather than "What is vision?" Keter's Chairman, Mr. Sami Sagol's vision is to establish an internship program that will strengthen the competitive edge of the Israeli industry, within the international arena. The program will set new standards of excellence for product…

  8. Development of a data-verified ionospheric model with an ionosonde network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Yong Ha; Oh, Seung-June

    2016-06-01

    As a base model for space weather application, we develop an ionospheric model (SAMI2-CNU) by revising the open source SAMI2 model. The revision includes the photoionization of X-rays in the range below 50 Å and photoelectron impact ionization. As a solar flux input to the model, we utilize the real-time solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray (1 ~ 105.0 nm) fluxes of the FISM (flare irradiance spectral model). In order to verify the SAMI2-CNU model, we compare the peak densities of the E and the F2 layers with those from the GIRO (Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory) network for 110 days with the F10.7 range of 70 - 280 in the last solar cycle. The model provides larger values of NmF2 by 30 - 40%, but the NmE values are reasonably close to the ionosonde values. By carrying out a linear correlation analysis between the model and the ionosonde values, we derived scale factors of 0.67 and 0.41 for the photoionization rates in the F2 and the E regions, respectively. With these scale factors, the SAMI2-CNU model allows us to match the ionosonde NmF2 and NmE values within 7% on the average. We also simulated ionospheric changes during eight solar flare events and found averaged 20% and 46% enhancements of NmF2 and NmE, respectively, over the pre-flare values. Although the SAMI2-CNU model has the same problem with matching the NmF2 enhancement as the original SAMI2, it provides reasonable estimates of the NmE increase, as well as reasonable matches of the NmF2 and the NmE values with the ionosonde values. Thus, the SAMI2-CNU model can be used as a physics model in the data-assimilated model that is being developed for the regional ionosphere around the Korea peninsula.

  9. Tracking the Footprints of the People without History - Insect Assemblages and Environmental Change in Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotakopulu, E.

    2014-12-01

    Using palaeocology and in particular palaeoentomology to understand climate, environmental change and impacts by indigenous groups in the North Atlantic Arctic fringe provides the opportunity to obtain refined details about both the rates of impact and the timing of the change from hunting and gathering to farming. In northern Norway and Sweden the Sami coastal fisher-hunters and inland reindeer herders shared the landscape with incoming agriculturalists and were often assimilated or marginalised. While inside their settled areas there is a palaeoentomological record for the Sami and often information about resource use and seasonality is evident from the fossil insect record, their footprint on the wider landscape tends to be slight and difficult to discern. The diverse and often intermittent nature of Sami activities, which may range from reindeer herding, fishing and even some agricultural activities, makes the task of firmly identifying impacts and differentiating these from climate change a complex task. On the other hand, the transition from a diverse subsistence to intensified pastoralism leaves a clear record in the fossil insect assemblages, both from midden deposits and natural profiles. To add to the complexities of the interpretation, farmers in northern Norway for example, were actively involved in fishing and the fur trade, and introduced grain faunas found in the farm mounds attest to the returns on this, but there is no way to be certain whether the occupiers of the farms were Sami or Norse, or a mixture of both. For a group where both archaeological and historical evidence is sparse, the insect record may unfold the poorly known ecological impact of the Sami.

  10. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.; Vann, Roddy G. L.

    2014-08-01

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  11. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.

    2014-08-21

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  12. Chernobyl fallout: internal doses to the Norwegian population and the effect of dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Strand, P; Selnaes, T D; Bøe, E; Harbitz, O; Andersson-Sørlie, A

    1992-10-01

    Dietary studies and whole-body measurements were used to estimate the intake of radiocesium and the radiation dose received by different groups of people in Norway after the Chernobyl accident. Freshwater fish, milk, and reindeer meat were the major sources for radiocesium intake. Dietary advice, together with agricultural decontamination measures, resulted in a considerable reduction in the exposure level of the population. A majority (40-80%) of the specially selected groups (farmers-hunters and Sami reindeer herdsman) changed its diet significantly after the accident. Without dietary changes, specifically a reduction in the consumption of freshwater fish and reindeer meat, the Sami group would have had a 400-700% higher radiocesium intake, and the farmers-hunters' intake would have been up to 50% higher than what they actually had experienced. PMID:1526778

  13. 3D Modeling of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, Joseph; Joyce, Glenn; Krall, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    Post-sunset ionospheric irregularities in the equatorial F region were first observed by Booker and Wells (1938) using ionosondes. This phenomenon has become known as equatorial spread F (ESF). During ESF the equatorial ionosphere becomes unstable because of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability: large scale (10s km) electron density ``bubbles'' can develop and rise to high altitudes (1000 km or greater at times). Understanding and modeling ESF is important because of its impact on space weather: it causes radio wave scintillation that degrades communication and navigation systems. In fact, it is the focus of of the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) mission. We will describe 3D simulation results from the NRL ionosphere models SAMI3 and SAMI3/ESF of this phenomenon. In particular, we will examine the causes of the day-to-day ariability of ESF which is an unresolved problem at this time. Post-sunset ionospheric irregularities in the equatorial F region were first observed by Booker and Wells (1938) using ionosondes. This phenomenon has become known as equatorial spread F (ESF). During ESF the equatorial ionosphere becomes unstable because of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability: large scale (10s km) electron density ``bubbles'' can develop and rise to high altitudes (1000 km or greater at times). Understanding and modeling ESF is important because of its impact on space weather: it causes radio wave scintillation that degrades communication and navigation systems. In fact, it is the focus of of the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) mission. We will describe 3D simulation results from the NRL ionosphere models SAMI3 and SAMI3/ESF of this phenomenon. In particular, we will examine the causes of the day-to-day ariability of ESF which is an unresolved problem at this time. Research supported by ONR.

  14. Estimating Prices of Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.; Chamberlain, R. G.; Zendejas, S. C.; Lee, T. S.; Malhotra, S.

    1986-01-01

    Company-wide or process-wide production simulated. Price Estimation Guidelines (IPEG) program provides simple, accurate estimates of prices of manufactured products. Simplification of SAMIS allows analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform greater number of sensitivity studies. Although developed for photovoltaic industry, readily adaptable to standard assembly-line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG program estimates annual production price per unit. IPEG/PC program written in TURBO PASCAL.

  15. LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting

    2016-07-01

    LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

  16. Synfuels: Hydrocarbons of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Matar, S.

    1982-09-01

    The author reviews Synfuels: Hydrocarbons of the Future by Sami Matar (discusses the important chemical advances made in the synfuels industry and the opportunities available for artificially producing new fuels) and Lighting Energy Management for Colleges and Universities from the National Lighting Bureau and the Energy Task Force (gives information on conducting a lighting energy audit, calculating lighting expenses and savings, and a glossary of terms).

  17. The Affect of the Thermosphere on Quiet-Time Plasmasphere Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The NRL SAMI3 ionosphere/plasmasphere code[1] has shown that the plasmasphere undergoes diurnal oscillations[2] and that those oscillations are consistent with variations found in in situ IMAGE/RPI density measurements during a quiet-time refilling event, 2001 February 1-5[3]. The SAMI3 ionosphere code includes 7 ion species (H+,He+,O+,N+,O+2,N+2,NO+), each treated as a separate fluid, with temperature equations being solved for H+, He+, O+ and e-. We include a Weimer potential at high latitudes, driven by the solar wind, and the self-consistent dynamo potential at mid-to-low latitudes, driven by specified winds, such as the HWM07 or HWM93 empirical model. During this quiet-time event, we find that the shape of the plasmasphere at any given time varies significantly with the wind model. In all cases, however, the diurnal oscillations persist and a similar degree of model-data agreement is found. [1] Huba, J. and J. Krall, 2013, "Modeling the plasmasphere with SAMI3," Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 6-10, doi:10.1029/2012GL054300 [2] Krall, J., and J. D. Huba, 2013, "SAMI3 simulation of plasmasphere refilling," Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 2484-2488, doi:10.1002/GRL.50458 [3] Krall, J, J. D. Huba, R. E. Denton and T.-W. Wu', 2013, "Density oscillations during post-storm plasmasphere refilling: 2001 February 1-5," Geophys. Res. Lett., submitted Research supported by NRL base funds and NASA.

  18. 2dfdr: Data reduction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AAO software Team

    2015-05-01

    2dfdr is an automatic data reduction pipeline dedicated to reducing multi-fibre spectroscopy data, with current implementations for AAOmega (fed by the 2dF, KOALA-IFU, SAMI Multi-IFU or older SPIRAL front-ends), HERMES, 2dF (spectrograph), 6dF, and FMOS. A graphical user interface is provided to control data reduction and allow inspection of the reduced spectra.

  19. Dayside Ionospheric Superfountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Dayside Ionospheric Super-fountain modified SAMI2 code predicts the uplift, given storm-time electric fields, of the dayside near-equatorial ionosphere to heights of over 800 kilometers during magnetic storm intervals. This software is a simple 2D code developed over many years at the Naval Research Laboratory, and has importance relating to accuracy of GPS positioning, and for satellite drag.

  20. Simulation of low-latitude ionospheric response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm using ionosonde-derived PRE vertical drifts over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, L. M.; Sripathi, S.; Singh, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present low-latitude ionospheric response over Indian longitude to the recent super geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015, using the Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI2) model which incorporates ionosonde-derived vertical drift impacted by prompt penetration eastward electric field occurring during the evening prereversal enhancement (PRE) in the vertical drift. The importance of this storm is that (1) Dst reaches as low as -228 nT and (2) prompt penetration of eastward electric field coincided with evening hours PRE. The daytime vertical E × B drifts in the SAMI2 model are, however, considered based on Scherliess-Fejer model. The simulations indicate a significant enhancement in F layer height and equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the post sunset hours on 17 March 2015 vis-a-vis quiet day. The model simulations during recovery phase, considering disturbance dynamo vertical E × B drift along with equatorward disturbance wind, indicate suppression of the daytime EIA. SAMI2 simulations considering the disturbance wind during the recovery phase suggest that equatorward wind enhances the ionospheric density in the low latitude; however, its role in the formation of the EIA depends on the polarity of the zonal electric field. Comparison of model derived total electron content (TEC) with the TEC from ground GPS receivers indicates that model does reproduce enhancement of the EIA during the main phase and suppression of the EIA during the recovery phase of the superstorm. However, peculiarities pertaining to the ionospheric response to prompt penetration electric field in the Indian sector vis-a-vis earlier reports from American sector have been discussed.

  1. IPEG- IMPROVED PRICE ESTIMATION GUIDELINES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG, program provides a simple yet accurate estimate of the price of a manufactured product. IPEG facilitates sensitivity studies of price estimates at considerably less expense than would be incurred by using the Standard Assembly-line Manufacturing Industry Simulation, SAMIS, program (COSMIC program NPO-16032). A difference of less than one percent between the IPEG and SAMIS price estimates has been observed with realistic test cases. However, the IPEG simplification of SAMIS allows the analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform a greater number of sensitivity studies than with SAMIS. Although IPEG was developed for the photovoltaics industry, it is readily adaptable to any standard assembly line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG estimates the annual production price per unit. The input data includes cost of equipment, space, labor, materials, supplies, and utilities. Production on an industry wide basis or a process wide basis can be simulated. Once the IPEG input file is prepared, the original price is estimated and sensitivity studies may be performed. The IPEG user selects a sensitivity variable and a set of values. IPEG will compute a price estimate and a variety of other cost parameters for every specified value of the sensitivity variable. IPEG is designed as an interactive system and prompts the user for all required information and offers a variety of output options. The IPEG/PC program is written in TURBO PASCAL for interactive execution on an IBM PC computer under DOS 2.0 or above with at least 64K of memory. The IBM PC color display and color graphics adapter are needed to use the plotting capabilities in IPEG/PC. IPEG/PC was developed in 1984. The original IPEG program is written in SIMSCRIPT II.5 for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 300K of 8 bit bytes. The original IPEG was developed in 1980.

  2. IPEG- IMPROVED PRICE ESTIMATION GUIDELINES (IBM 370 VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG, program provides a simple yet accurate estimate of the price of a manufactured product. IPEG facilitates sensitivity studies of price estimates at considerably less expense than would be incurred by using the Standard Assembly-line Manufacturing Industry Simulation, SAMIS, program (COSMIC program NPO-16032). A difference of less than one percent between the IPEG and SAMIS price estimates has been observed with realistic test cases. However, the IPEG simplification of SAMIS allows the analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform a greater number of sensitivity studies than with SAMIS. Although IPEG was developed for the photovoltaics industry, it is readily adaptable to any standard assembly line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG estimates the annual production price per unit. The input data includes cost of equipment, space, labor, materials, supplies, and utilities. Production on an industry wide basis or a process wide basis can be simulated. Once the IPEG input file is prepared, the original price is estimated and sensitivity studies may be performed. The IPEG user selects a sensitivity variable and a set of values. IPEG will compute a price estimate and a variety of other cost parameters for every specified value of the sensitivity variable. IPEG is designed as an interactive system and prompts the user for all required information and offers a variety of output options. The IPEG/PC program is written in TURBO PASCAL for interactive execution on an IBM PC computer under DOS 2.0 or above with at least 64K of memory. The IBM PC color display and color graphics adapter are needed to use the plotting capabilities in IPEG/PC. IPEG/PC was developed in 1984. The original IPEG program is written in SIMSCRIPT II.5 for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 300K of 8 bit bytes. The original IPEG was developed in 1980.

  3. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  4. Observations and Modeling of the Nighttime Electron Density Enhancement in the Mid-latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Saito, A.; Lin, C.; Huba, J. D.; Liu, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we compare the observational data from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC and theoretical model results performed by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere) for studying the longitudinal structure of the Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA). In order to study the occurrence of the nighttime electron density enhancement, we defined MSNA index by the ratio of the difference of the nighttime and daytime electron densities. The observational results by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites show that there are three obvious nighttime electron density enhancement areas around South American, European, and Northeast Asian regions during local summer. The SAMI2 model can also successfully reproduce the ionospheric MSNA structure during local summer on both hemispheres, except for Northeast Asian region. This difference between observation and model simulation may be caused by the difference between the neutral wind model and the real winds. The physical mechanisms for the longitudinal structure of the MSNA are investigated in the different model conditions. Results show that the equatorward meridional neutral winds can drive the electron density up to a higher altitude along the magnetic field lines and the longer plasma production rate by solar EUV at higher latitudes in the summer time can provide the electron density source in the nighttime ionosphere. We concluded that the combination effect by the neutral wind and the plasma production rate play the important role of the MSNA longitudinal structure.

  5. Simulation of low latitude ionospheric response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm over Indian longitude sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Joshi, Lalit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle; Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We present low latitude ionospheric response over Indian longitude to the recent super geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015, using the SAMI2 model which incorporates ionosonde derived vertical drift impacted by prompt penetration eastward electric field occurring during the evening Prereversal Enhancement (PRE) in the vertical drift. The importance of this storm is that (a) Dst reaches as low as -228 nT and (b) prompt penetration of eastward electric field coincided with evening hours PRE. The daytime vertical EXB drifts in the SAMI2 model are, however, considered based on Scherliess-Fejer model. The simulations indicate a significant enhancement in F layer height and equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the post sunset hours on 17 March 2015 vis-a-vis quiet day. The model simulations during recovery phase, considering disturbance dynamo vertical EXB drift along with equatorward disturbance wind, indicates suppression of the daytime EIA. SAMI2 simulations considering the disturbance wind during the recovery phase suggests that equatorward wind enhances the ionospheric density in the low latitude, however, its role in the formation of the EIA depends on the polarity of the zonal electric field. Comparison of model derived total electron content (TEC) with the TEC from ground GPS receivers indicate that model does reproduce enhancement of the EIA during the main phase and suppression of the EIA during the recovery phase of the super storm. However, peculiarities pertaining to the ionospheric response to prompt penetration electric field in the Indian sector vis-a-vis earlier reports from American sector will be discussed.

  6. Cancer among circumpolar populations: an emerging public health concern

    PubMed Central

    Young, T. Kue; Kelly, Janet J.; Friborg, Jeppe; Soininen, Leena; Wong, Kai O.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine and compare the incidence of cancer among the 8 Arctic States and their northern regions, with special focus on 3 cross-national indigenous groups – Inuit, Athabaskan Indians and Sami. Methods Data were extracted from national and regional statistical agencies and cancer registries, with direct age-standardization of rates to the world standard population. For comparison, the “world average” rates as reported in the GLOBOCAN database were used. Findings Age-standardized incidence rates by cancer sites were computed for the 8 Arctic States and 20 of their northern regions, averaged over the decade 2000–2009. Cancer of the lung and colon/rectum in both sexes are the commonest in most populations. We combined the Inuit from Alaska, Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Greenland into a “Circumpolar Inuit” group and tracked cancer trends over four 5-year periods from 1989 to 2008. There has been marked increase in lung, colorectal and female breast cancers, while cervical cancer has declined. Compared to the GLOBOCAN world average, Inuit are at extreme high risk for lung and colorectal cancer, and also certain rare cancers such as nasopharyngeal cancer. Athabaskans (from Alaska and Northwest Territories) share some similarities with the Inuit but they are at higher risk for prostate and breast cancer relative to the world average. Among the Sami, published data from 3 cohorts in Norway, Sweden and Finland show generally lower risk of cancer than non-Sami. Conclusions Cancer among certain indigenous people in the Arctic is an increasing public health concern, especially lung and colorectal cancer. PMID:26765259

  7. Assembly-line Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.; Zendejas, Silvino; Malhotra, Shan

    1987-01-01

    Costs and profits estimated for models based on user inputs. Standard Assembly-line Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program generalized so useful for production-line manufacturing companies. Provides accurate and reliable means of comparing alternative manufacturing processes. Used to assess impact of changes in financial parameters as cost of resources and services, inflation rates, interest rates, tax policies, and required rate of return of equity. Most important capability is ability to estimate prices manufacturer would have to receive for its products to recover all of costs of production and make specified profit. Written in TURBO PASCAL.

  8. Photovoltaic-system costing-methodology development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Presented are the results of a study to expand the use of standardized costing methodologies in the National Photovoltaics Program. The costing standards, which include SAMIS for manufacturing costs and M and D for marketing and distribution costs, have been applied to concentrator collectors and power-conditioning units. The M and D model was also computerized. Finally, a uniform construction cost-accounting structure was developed for use in photovoltaic test and application projects. The appendices contain example cases which demonstrate the use of the models.

  9. Investigation of the spatial structure and developmental dynamics of near-Earth plasma perturbations under the action of powerful HF radio waves

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Results of numerical simulations of the near-Earth plasma perturbations induced by powerful HF radio waves from the SURA heating facility are presented. The simulations were performed using a modified version of the SAMI2 ionospheric model for the input parameters corresponding to the series of in-situ SURA–DEMETER experiments. The spatial structure and developmental dynamics of large-scale plasma temperature and density perturbations have been investigated. The characteristic formation and relaxation times of the induced large-scale plasma perturbations at the altitudes of the Earth’s outer ionosphere have been determined.

  10. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  11. Roads not taken: A narrative positioning analysis of older adults' stories about missed opportunities.

    PubMed

    Blix, Bodil Hansen; Hamran, Torunn; Normann, Hans Ketil

    2015-12-01

    The point of departure for this article is narrative gerontology's conceptualization of life as storied and the assumption that identity development and meaning making do not cease at any age, but rather continue throughout life. We suggest that if identity construction is considered to be a lifelong project, narrative gerontology would benefit from applying analytical perspectives focused on the situated activity of narration. In this article, we apply a three-level positioning analysis to segments of interviews with two elderly Sami women concerning missed opportunities or roads not taken and, more specifically, to narrations about missed opportunities for education. We argue that such narrations should not necessarily be considered expressions of regret or processes of reconciliation but rather as pivotal in here-and-now identity constructions. Narrations about missed opportunities demonstrate that what narrators choose to insert into their life stories is chosen for a purpose and for an audience in a specific interpersonal and discursive context. We suggest that narrative gerontology would benefit from a broader focus on the diversity of sites of engagement in which older adults perform identity constructions. This shift implies moving beyond traditional studies of older adults' life stories and biographical narratives as related in the context of qualitative research interviews (of which the present study of Sami older adults' life stories is indeed an example). PMID:26568226

  12. Evolutionary demography of agricultural expansion in preindustrial northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Helle, Samuli; Brommer, Jon E; Pettay, Jenni E; Lummaa, Virpi; Enbuske, Matti; Jokela, Jukka

    2014-11-01

    A shift from nomadic foraging to sedentary agriculture was a major turning point in human evolutionary history, increasing our population size and eventually leading to the development of modern societies. We however lack understanding of the changes in life histories that contributed to the increased population growth rate of agriculturalists, because comparable individual-based reproductive records of sympatric populations of agriculturalists and foragers are rarely found. Here, we compared key life-history traits and population growth rate using comprehensive data from the seventieth to nineteenth century Northern Finland: indigenous Sami were nomadic hunter-fishers and reindeer herders, whereas sympatric agricultural Finns relied predominantly on animal husbandry. We found that agriculture-based families had higher lifetime fecundity, faster birth spacing and lower maternal mortality. Furthermore, agricultural Finns had 6.2% higher annual population growth rate than traditional Sami, which was accounted by differences between the subsistence modes in age-specific fecundity but not in mortality. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the most detailed demonstration yet of the demographic changes and evolutionary benefits that resulted from agricultural revolution. PMID:25232134

  13. On the utility of the ionosonde Doppler-derived EXB drift during the daytime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, L. M.; Sripathi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Vertical EXB drift measured using the ionosonde Doppler sounding during the daytime suffers from an underestimation of the actual EXB drift because the reflection height of the ionosonde signals is also affected by the photochemistry of the ionosphere. Systematic investigations have indicated a fair/good correlation to exist between the C/NOFS and ionosonde Doppler-measured vertical EXB drift during the daytime over magnetic equator. A detailed analysis, however, indicated that the linear relation between the ionosonde Doppler drift and C/NOFS EXB drift varied with seasons. Thus, solar, seasonal, and also geomagnetic variables were included in the Doppler drift correction, using the artificial neural network-based approach. The RMS error in the neural network was found to be smaller than that in the linear regression analysis. Daytime EXB drift was derived using the neural network which was also used to model the ionospheric redistribution in the SAMI2 model. SAMI2 model reproduced strong (weak) equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) for cases when neural network corrected daytime vertical EXB drift was high (low). Similar features were also observed in GIM TEC maps. Thus, the results indicate that the neural network can be utilized to derive the vertical EXB drift from its proxies, like the ionosonde Doppler drift. These results indicate that the daytime ionosonde measured vertical EXB drift can be relied upon, provided that adequate corrections are applied to it.

  14. Structural basis for diversity in the SAM clan of riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Trausch, Jeremiah J.; Xu, Zhenjiang; Edwards, Andrea L.; Reyes, Francis E.; Ross, Phillip E.; Knight, Rob; Batey, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, sulfur metabolism is regulated in part by seven known families of riboswitches that bind S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). Direct binding of SAM to these mRNA regulatory elements governs a downstream secondary structural switch that communicates with the transcriptional and/or translational expression machinery. The most widely distributed SAM-binding riboswitches belong to the SAM clan, comprising three families that share a common SAM-binding core but differ radically in their peripheral architecture. Although the structure of the SAM-I member of this clan has been extensively studied, how the alternative peripheral architecture of the other families supports the common SAM-binding core remains unknown. We have therefore solved the X-ray structure of a member of the SAM-I/IV family containing the alternative “PK-2” subdomain shared with the SAM-IV family. This structure reveals that this subdomain forms extensive interactions with the helix housing the SAM-binding pocket, including a highly unusual mode of helix packing in which two helices pack in a perpendicular fashion. Biochemical and genetic analysis of this RNA reveals that SAM binding induces many of these interactions, including stabilization of a pseudoknot that is part of the regulatory switch. Despite strong structural similarity between the cores of SAM-I and SAM-I/IV members, a phylogenetic analysis of sequences does not indicate that they derive from a common ancestor. PMID:24753586

  15. Evolutionary demography of agricultural expansion in preindustrial northern Finland

    PubMed Central

    Helle, Samuli; Brommer, Jon E.; Pettay, Jenni E.; Lummaa, Virpi; Enbuske, Matti; Jokela, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    A shift from nomadic foraging to sedentary agriculture was a major turning point in human evolutionary history, increasing our population size and eventually leading to the development of modern societies. We however lack understanding of the changes in life histories that contributed to the increased population growth rate of agriculturalists, because comparable individual-based reproductive records of sympatric populations of agriculturalists and foragers are rarely found. Here, we compared key life-history traits and population growth rate using comprehensive data from the seventieth to nineteenth century Northern Finland: indigenous Sami were nomadic hunter-fishers and reindeer herders, whereas sympatric agricultural Finns relied predominantly on animal husbandry. We found that agriculture-based families had higher lifetime fecundity, faster birth spacing and lower maternal mortality. Furthermore, agricultural Finns had 6.2% higher annual population growth rate than traditional Sami, which was accounted by differences between the subsistence modes in age-specific fecundity but not in mortality. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the most detailed demonstration yet of the demographic changes and evolutionary benefits that resulted from agricultural revolution. PMID:25232134

  16. High-Quality Perovskite Films Grown with a Fast Solvent-Assisted Molecule Inserting Strategy for Highly Efficient and Stable Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qiu, Zhiwen; Gao, Chaomin; Zhang, Hailiang; Jiang, Yanan; Li, Cuncheng; Yu, Jinghua; Cao, Bingqiang

    2016-08-31

    The performance of organolead halide perovskites based solar cells has been enhanced dramatically due to the morphology control of the perovskite films. In this paper, we present a fast solvent-assisted molecule inserting (S-AMI) strategy to grow high-quality perovskite film, in which the methylammonium iodide/2-propanol (MAI/IPA) solution is spin-coated onto a dimethylformamide (DMF) wetted mixed lead halide (PbX2) precursor film. The DMF can help the inserting of MAI molecules into the PbX2 precursor film and provide a solvent environment to help the grain growth of the perovskite film. The perovskite film grown by the S-AMI approach shows large and well-oriented grains and long carrier lifetime due to the reduced grain boundary. Solar cells constructed with these perovskite films yield an average efficiency over 17% along with a high average fill factor of 80%. Moreover, these unsealed solar cell devices exhibit good stability in an ambient atmosphere. PMID:27526617

  17. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  18. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  19. On the utility of the ionosonde Doppler derived EXB drift during the daytime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Joshi, Lalit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle

    2016-07-01

    Vertical EXB drift measured using the ionosonde Doppler sounding during the daytime suffers from an underestimation of the actual EXB drift. This is due to the photochemistry that determines the height of the F layer during the daytime, in addition to the zonal electric field. Systematic investigations have indicated a fair/good correlation to exist between the C/NOFS and ionosonde Doppler measured vertical EXB drift during the daytime over magnetic equator. A detailed analysis, however, indicated that the linear relation between the ionosonde Doppler drift and C/NOFS EXB drift varied with seasons. Thus, solar, seasonal and also geomagnetic variables were included in the Doppler drift correction, using the artificial neural network based approach. The RMS error in the neural network was found to be lesser than that in the linear regression analysis. Daytime EXB drift was derived using the neural network which was also used to model the ionospheic redistribution in the SAMI2 model. SAMI2 model reproduced strong (/weak) equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) for cases when neural network corrected daytime vertical EXB drift was high (/low). Similar features were also observed in GIM TEC maps. Thus, the results indicate that the neural network can be utilized to derive the vertical EXB drift from its proxies, like the ionosonde Doppler drift. These results indicate that the daytime ionosonde measured vertical EXB drift can be relied upon, provided adequate corrections are applied to it.

  20. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Rupke, David S. N.; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M.; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.

    2016-09-01

    We present lzifu (LaZy-IFU), an idl toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. lzifu is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. lzifu has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of lzifu, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying lzifu to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line profiles presented in IFS data. The code is made available to the astronomy community through github. lzifu will be further developed over time to other IFS instruments, and to provide even more accurate line and uncertainty estimates.

  1. Ion sources for sealed neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, E.J.T.; Bischoff, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    Fast and thermal neutron activation analysis with sealed neutron generators has been used to detect oil (oil logging), hazardous waste, fissile material, explosives, and contraband (drugs). Sealed neutron generators, used in the above applications, must be small and portable, have good electrical efficiency and long life. The ion sources used in the sealed neutron tubes require high gas utilization efficiencies or low pressure operation with high ionization efficiencies. In this paper, the authors compare a number of gas ion sources that can be used in sealed neutron tubes. The characteristics of the most popular ion source, the axial Penning discharge will be discussed as part of the zetatron neutron generator. Other sources to be discussed include the SAMIS source and RF ion source.

  2. The starfish diagram: Visualising data within the context of survey samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.

    2015-04-01

    As astronomy becomes increasingly invested in large surveys the ample representation of an individual target becomes a significant challenge. Tabulations of basic properties can convey the message in an absolute sense but not within the context of the sample from which the individual is drawn. We present a novel but simple plot that simultaneously visualises the properties of the sample and the individual. Numbers and characters are kept at an absolute minimum to enable the stacking of such plots without introducing too much verbal information. Once the user becomes accustomed to their appearance, a set of starfish diagrams provides a direct representation of the individual within a sample, or between various samples. The utility and versatility of the plot is demonstrated through its application to astrophysical data (SAMI Galaxy Survey) and sports statistics. We provide a brief description of the concept and the source code, which is simple to adapt to any statistical dataset, be it descriptive of physics, demographics, finance, and more.

  3. Assessment of the Potential to Reduce Emissions from Road Transportation, Notably NOx, Through the Use of Alternative Vehicles and Fuels in the Great Smoky Mountains Region

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    2001-08-30

    Air pollution is a serious problem in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may designate non-attainment areas by 2003 for ozone. Pollutants include nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), lead, and particulate matter (PM), which are health hazards, damage the environment, and limit visibility. The main contributors to this pollution are industry, transportation, and utilities. Reductions from all contributors are needed to correct this problem. While improvements are projected in each sector over the next decades, the May 2000 Interim Report issued by the Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) suggests that the percentage of NO{sub x} emissions from transportation may increase.

  4. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: I. New fitting philosophy of FIT3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; González, J. J.; Rosález-Ortega, F. F.; Cano-Dí az, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present an improved version of FIT3D, a fitting tool for the analysis of the spectroscopic properties of the stellar populations and the ionized gas derived from moderate resolution spectra of galaxies. This tool was developed to analyze integral field spectroscopy data and it is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI data. We describe the philosophy and each step of the fitting procedure. We present an extensive set of simulations in order to estimate the precision and accuracy of the derived parameters for the stellar populations and the ionized gas. We report on the results of those simulations. Finally, we compare the results of the analysis using FIT3D with those provided by other widely used packages, and we find that the parameters derived by FIT3D are fully compatible with those derived using these other tools.

  5. Data and Information Exchange System for the "Reindeer Mapper" Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy; Yurchak, Boris

    2005-01-01

    During this past year, the Reindeer Mapper Intranet system has been set up on the NASA system, 8 team members have been established, a Reindeer Mapper reference list containing 696 items has been entered, 6 power point presentations have been put on line for review among team members, 304 satellite images have been catalogued (including 16 Landsat images, 288 NDVI 10-day composited images and an anomaly series- May 1998 to December 2002, and 56 SAR CEOS S A R format files), schedules and meeting dates are being shared, students at the Nordic Sami Institute are experimenting with the system for reindeer herder indigenous knowledge sharing, and an "address book" is being developed. Several documents and presentations have been translated and made available in Russian for our Russian colleagues. This has enabled our Russian partners to utilize documents and presentations for use in their research (e.g., SAR imagery comparisons with Russian GIS of specific study areas) and discussion with local colleagues.

  6. On the decline of ground lichen forests in the Swedish boreal landscape: Implications for reindeer husbandry and sustainable forest management.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Per; Cory, Neil; Svensson, Johan; Hedenås, Henrik; Jougda, Leif; Borchert, Nanna

    2016-05-01

    Lichens are a bottleneck resource for circumpolar populations of reindeer, and as such, for reindeer husbandry as an indigenous Sami land-use tradition in northern Sweden. This study uses ground lichen data and forest information collected within the Swedish National Forest Inventory since 1953, on the scale of northern Sweden. We found a 71 % decline in the area of lichen-abundant forests over the last 60 years. A decline was observed in all regions and age classes and especially coincided with a decrease of >60 year old, open pine forests, which was the primary explanatory factor in our model. The effects of reindeer numbers were inconclusive in explaining the decrease in lichen-abundant forest. The role that forestry has played in causing this decline can be debated, but forestry can have a significant role in reversing the trend and improving ground lichen conditions. PMID:26754169

  7. A coupled ionosphere-raytrace model for high-power HF heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawdie, K. A.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    The first 3-D model of artificial HF ionospheric heating to self-consistently calculate the modification in heating location due to evolving ionospheric gradients has been developed. The model combines the ionosphere model SAMI3/ESF and the HF propagation code MoJo-15. At each time step, the simulated path of the HF wave through the ionosphere is used to determine the HF heating location. These calculations have been used to explain the physical mechanism responsible for the snapback effect observed in an Arecibo HF heating experiment described by Bernhardt et al. (1988). The heater wave is refracted by the density cavity, which causes the heating location to drift in longitude. Eventually, the density cavity convects into the path of the refracted ray, such that only a small portion of the ray is above the threshold for HF heating and the heating location snaps back even though the ray itself is still refracted in longitude.

  8. Dip-coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Gutter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The past quarter demonstrated significant progress in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L sub n from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which we believe to be due to an unidentified source of impurities.

  9. Ionospheric and dayglow responses to the radiative phase of the Bastille Day flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. R.; Warren, H. P.; Nicholas, A. C.; Bishop, J.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Lean, J. L.; Picone, J. M.; Mariska, J. T.; Joyce, G.; Judge, D. L.; Thonnard, S. E.; Dymond, K. F.; Budzien, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    The Sun's Bastille Day flare on July 14, 2000 produced a variety of geoeffective events. This solar eruption consisted of an X-class flare followed by a coronal mass ejection that produced a major geomagnetic storm. We have undertaken a study of this event beginning with an analysis of the effects of the radiative phase of the flare on the dayglow and the ionosphere. The key new enabling work is a novel method of evaluating the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance changes associated with the flare. We find that the solar radiative output enhancements modeled during the flare are consistent with measurements of both solar EUV irradiance and far UV Earth thermospheric dayglow. We use the SAMI2 model to predict global ionospheric changes along a magnetic meridian that show significantly different northern and southern effects, suggesting that flares can be used to study ionospheric dynamics.

  10. Time-series records of pCO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3} during the OMP Field Program: a final report for DOE Grant DE-FG03-96ER62224

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. DeGrandpre

    2000-04-01

    The specific goals of this research are to (1) determine daily and seasonal variability of seawater pCO{sub 2} partial pressure of CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3} in Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) waters; (2) estimate seasonal CO{sub 2} fluxes between the MAB shelf and the atmosphere; and (3) determine the primary controls of surface seawater pCO{sub 2} in this coastal system. During the first phase of the DOE-OMP (1992-1995) we developed the Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for CO{sub 2} (SAMI-CO{sub 2}) which is designed to measure seawater CO{sub 2} on ocean moorings for extended periods.

  11. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-04

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  12. MCMC Analysis of biases in the interpretation of disk galaxy kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation of galaxy surveys like SAMI, CALIFA and MaNGA opens up the possibility of studying simultaneously properties of galaxies such as spiral arms, bars, disk geometry and orientation, stellar and gas mass distribution, 2D kinematics, etc. The previous task involves exploring a complicated multi-dimensional parameter space. Puglielli et al. (2010) introduced Bayesian statistics and MCMC (Monte Carlo Markov Chain) techniques to construct dynamical models of spiral galaxies. In our study we used synthetic velocity fields that include non-circular motions and assume different disk orientations in order to produce mock observations. We apply popular reconstruction techniques in order to estimate the geometrical disk parameters, systemic velocities, rotation curve shape and maximum circular velocity which are crucial to construct the scaling relations. We conclude that a detailed analysis of kinematics in galaxies using MCMC technique will be reflected in accurate estimations of galaxy properties and more robust scalings relations, otherwise physical conclusions may be importantly biased.

  13. Low-latitude ionosphere dynamics as deduced from meridional ionosonde chain: Ionospheric ceiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Uemoto, Junpei; Tsugawa, Takuya; Supnithi, Pornchai; Ishii, Mamoru; Komolmis, Tharadol

    Interest in the equatorial anomaly in the ionosphere has been focused mostly on f_oF_2, and not much attention was paid to h_mF_2 except for the time rate of change of it in connection with the vertical plasma drift velocity. There have been few climatological studies on h_mF_2 variations associated with development of the equatorial anomaly. In this paper, we revisit the equatorial anomaly in terms of height variations. For this purpose, we analyzed scaled ionogram parameters from three stations located along the magnetic meridian that is a primary component of Southeast Asia low-latitude ionospheric network (SEALION); one at the magnetic equator and the others at conjugate off-equatorial latitudes near 10 degrees magnetic latitude. The daytime h_mF_2 was investigated for each season during the solar minimum period, 2006-2007 and 2009. The peak height increased for approximately 3 hr after sunrise at all locations, as expected from the daytime upward E×B drift. The apparent upward drift ceased before noon at the magnetic equator, while the layer continued to increase at the off-equatorial latitudes, reaching altitudes higher than the equatorial height around noon. The noon time restricted layer height at the magnetic equator did not depend much on the season, while the maximum peak height at the off-equatorial latitudes largely varied with season. The daytime specific limiting height of the equatorial ionosphere was termed ionospheric ceiling. Numerical modeling using the SAMI2 code reproduced the features of the ionospheric ceiling quite well. Dynamic parameters provided by the SAMI2 modeling were investigated and it was shown that the ionospheric ceiling is another aspect of the fountain effect, in which increased diffusion of plasma at higher altitudes has a leading role.

  14. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  15. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  16. Enhancing Drought Early Warning System for Sustainable Water Resources and Agricultural Management through Apllication of Space Science - Nigeria in Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okpara, J. N.; Akeh, L. E.; Anuforom, A. C.; Aribo, P. B.; Olayanju, S. O.

    Enhancing Drought Early Warning System for Sustainable Water Resources and Agriculture Management through Application of Space Science - Nigeria in Perspective BY J N Okpara L E Akeh Anuforom P B Aribo and S O Olayanju Directorate of Applied Meteorological Services Nigerian Meteorological Agency NIMET P M B 615 Garki Abuja Nigeria e-mail underline Juddy Okpara yahoo co uk and underline tonycanuforom yahoo com underline Abstract This paper attempts to highlight the importance of drought early warning system in water resources and agricultural management in Nigeria Various studies have shown that the negative impacts of droughts and other forms of extreme weather phenomena can be substantially reduced by providing early warning on any impending weather extremes X-rayed in this study are the various techniques presently used by the Nigerian Meteorological Agency NIMET in generating information for meteorological Early Warning System EWS which are based on models that make use of ground-based raingauge data and sea surface temperatures SST Komuscu standardized precipitation index SPI inclusive These methods are often limited by such factors as network density of stations limited communication infrastructure human inefficiency etc NIMET is therefore embarking on the development of a new Satellite Agrometeorological Information System SAMIS-Nigeria for famine and drought early warning The system combines satellite data with raingauge data to give a range of

  17. [Physicians in Tuzla area in nineteenth century].

    PubMed

    Ibrahimagić, Omer C; Ibrahimagić, Amela; Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman

    2006-01-01

    Initial data about organized health work in Tuzla area comes from nineteenth century. Priest Ivan Kljaie, military physicians Muhidin-bey, Mehmed Said-effendi and Ignatius Gulielmus Petelenz are mentioned in it. In Tuzla, Mehmed Sami Serbić in year 1874, found first hospital named Hastahana. As a physician and humanist he leaves indelible trace. Three female physicians: Anna Bayerova, Teodora Krajewska, and Jadviga Olszewska, after the annexing of Bosnia and Herzegovina by Austria-Hungary monarchy, were engaged to work in Tuzla area. Each of them gave important contribution to development of health care in Tuzla area and broader. Physicians Josip Lymberski and Jozef Foglar worked in so called Miners Hospital. Due to cholera and malaria epidemics during the year 1893, two epidemiologists-bacteriologists came in Tuzla. Their names were Rudolf Fisher and Jozef Katz. We believe, that this work contributes to saving the memory of the work of the physicians from the Tuzla area in nineteenth century. PMID:18173000

  18. Improving small-angle X-ray scattering data for structural analyses of the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Robert P.; Tainer, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Defining the shape, conformation, or assembly state of an RNA in solution often requires multiple investigative tools ranging from nucleotide analog interference mapping to X-ray crystallography. A key addition to this toolbox is small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS provides direct structural information regarding the size, shape, and flexibility of the particle in solution and has proven powerful for analyses of RNA structures with minimal requirements for sample concentration and volumes. In principle, SAXS can provide reliable data on small and large RNA molecules. In practice, SAXS investigations of RNA samples can show inconsistencies that suggest limitations in the SAXS experimental analyses or problems with the samples. Here, we show through investigations on the SAM-I riboswitch, the Group I intron P4-P6 domain, 30S ribosomal subunit from Sulfolobus solfataricus (30S), brome mosaic virus tRNA-like structure (BMV TLS), Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch, the recombinant tRNAval, and yeast tRNAphe that many problems with SAXS experiments on RNA samples derive from heterogeneity of the folded RNA. Furthermore, we propose and test a general approach to reducing these sample limitations for accurate SAXS analyses of RNA. Together our method and results show that SAXS with synchrotron radiation has great potential to provide accurate RNA shapes, conformations, and assembly states in solution that inform RNA biological functions in fundamental ways. PMID:20106957

  19. Transcriptional and epigenetic networks of helper T and innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han-Yu; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Poholek, Amanda C; Vahedi, Golnaz; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Villarino, Alejandro V; Bonelli, Michael; Bosselut, Remy; Kanno, Yuka; Muljo, Stefan A; O'Shea, John J

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the specification of CD4(+) helper T cells to discrete effector 'lineages' represented a watershed event in conceptualizing mechanisms of host defense and immunoregulation. However, our appreciation for the actual complexity of helper T-cell subsets continues unabated. Just as the Sami language of Scandinavia has 1000 different words for reindeer, immunologists recognize the range of fates available for a CD4(+) T cell is numerous and may be underestimated. Added to the crowded scene for helper T-cell subsets is the continuously growing family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), endowed with common effector responses and the previously defined 'master regulators' for CD4(+) helper T-cell subsets are also shared by ILC subsets. Within the context of this extraordinary complexity are concomitant advances in the understanding of transcriptomes and epigenomes. So what do terms like 'lineage commitment' and helper T-cell 'specification' mean in the early 21st century? How do we put all of this together in a coherent conceptual framework? It would be arrogant to assume that we have a sophisticated enough understanding to seriously answer these questions. Instead, we review the current status of the flexibility of helper T-cell responses in relation to their genetic regulatory networks and epigenetic landscapes. Recent data have provided major surprises as to what master regulators can or cannot do, how they interact with other transcription factors and impact global genome-wide changes, and how all these factors come together to influence helper cell function. PMID:25123275

  20. Prompt Ion Outflows and Artificial Ducts during High-Power HF Heating at HAARP: Effect of Suprathermal Electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Milikh, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations from the DMSP and Demeter satellites established that high-power HF heating of the ionosphere F-region results in significant ion outflows associated with 10-30% density enhancements in the topside ionosphere magnetically-conjugate to the heated region. As follows from the SAMI2 two-fluid model calculations, their formation time should exceed 5-7 minutes. However, specially designed DMSP-HAARP experiments have shown that artificial ducts and ion outflows appear on the topside within 2 minutes. We describe the results of these observations and present a semi-quantitative explanation of the fast timescale due to suprathermal electrons accelerated by HF-induced plasma turbulence. There are two possible effects of suprathermal electrons: (1) the increase of the ambipolar electric field over the usual thermal ambipolar diffusion and (2) excitation of heat flux-driven plasma instability resulting in an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange. Both effects result in faster upward ion flows.

  1. Uplift of Ionospheric Oxygen Ions During Extreme Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Huba, Joseph; Lakhina, Gurbax S.

    2013-01-01

    Research reported earlier in literature was conducted relating to estimation of the ionospheric electrical field, which may have occurred during the September 1859 Carrington geomagnetic storm event, with regard to modern-day consequences. In this research, the NRL SAMI2 ionospheric code has been modified and applied the estimated electric field to the dayside ionosphere. The modeling was done at 15-minute time increments to track the general ionospheric changes. Although it has been known that magnetospheric electric fields get down into the ionosphere, it has been only in the last ten years that scientists have discovered that intense magnetic storm electric fields do also. On the dayside, these dawn-to-dusk directed electric fields lift the plasma (electrons and ions) up to higher altitudes and latitudes. As plasma is removed from lower altitudes, solar UV creates new plasma, so the total plasma in the ionosphere is increased several-fold. Thus, this complex process creates super-dense plasmas at high altitudes (from 700 to 1,000 km and higher).

  2. Brightness variations of the 630.0 nm nightglow in the Asia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Yu; Wing-Yee Tam, Sunny; Chang, Tzu-Fang

    2016-04-01

    From the observations by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning) payload onboard the FORMOSAT-2 satellite, the bright airglow emissions are often observed around midnight at equatorial latitudes and show their tendencies of seasonal variations. It is suggested that these emissions are the signature of thermospheric midnight temperature maximum (MTM) effect. In order to understand the consequence of MTM effect, we focus on the Asia region and calculate the volume emission rates of the 630.0 nm nightglow to investigate the influence of neutral temperature and meridional neutral wind. We utilize the SAMI2 model to simulate the charged and neutral species under different temperatures at the 630.0 nm nightglow emission layer. It is found that a turning point shows up as the temperature changes, named turning temperature (Tt). Two kinds of tendencies can be seen: firstly, Tt decreases with the emission rate for the same altitude; secondly, for approximately the same emission rate, Tt increases with the altitudes. From the ISUAL observations, we frequently find patterns similar to our simulation results during the selected seasons. The results of observation and simulation all show that the neutral wind is more efficient to affect the emission rates of the nightglow than temperature variation.

  3. Farley Buneman wave heating: Confirming heuristics with radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Combined observations from the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR) and a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska were made during geomagnetic storms in November 2012 and March 2013. Enhanced electron temperature and density in the E region were measured by the PFISR and strong echoes from field aligned irregularities were measured by the coherent scatter radar. We compare these observations with a heuristic model of Farley Buneman waves based on the formulations of Milikh and Dimant (2002) and the SAMI2 global model of the ionosphere. The model predicts phase speed and magnetic aspect width profiles, as well as profiles of ionospheric state variables as functions of the convective electric field. By accounting for the thickness of the region where Farley Buneman waves exist and weighting the profiles accordingly, the model is capable of estimating the phase velocity and magnetic aspect width that would be observed by a coherent scatter radar. We then use the comparison to assess the empirical relationships of coherent scatter radar observations of Farley Buneman waves.

  4. Reexamining X-mode suppression and fine structure in artificial E region field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; McCarrick, M.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-09-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and observed using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of this ionospheric modification experiment was to measure the threshold pump power required to excite thermal parametric instabilities by O-mode heating and to investigate the suppression of the FAIs by simultaneous X-mode heating. We find that the threshold pump power for irregularity excitation was consistent with theoretical predictions and increased by approximately a factor of 2 when X-mode heating was present. A modified version of the Another Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI2) ionospheric model was used to simulate the threshold experiments and suggested that the increase was entirely due to enhanced D region absorption associated with X-mode heating. Additionally, a remarkable degree of fine structure possibly caused by natural gradient drift instability in the heater-modified volume was observed in experiments performed during geomagnetically active conditions.

  5. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies adopting λRe, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematical classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain λRe from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the λRe-ɛe distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass ≃109 M⊙), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as z = 2; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock λRe-ɛe distribution at z < 0.1 reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS3D/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed λRe-ɛe distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  6. Artificial ducts caused by HF heating of the ionosphere by HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Mishin, E.; Parrot, M.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Huba, J.; Joyce, G.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2012-10-01

    We report on satellite observations of plasma density enhancements (ducts) in the topside ionosphere during four HAARP/BRIOCHE campaigns during 2009-2010. Artificial ducts, caused by high-power HF radio wave injections from the HAARP transmitter toward the magnetic zenith, are detected by the DEMETER and DMSP satellites on a regular basis when there is a perceptible ionospheric F2 peak density. Overall, the plasma density enhancements detected between 0930 and 1230 LT varied from 3-13%, while those during ˜1730-2215 LT were typically 15-40%. We also used a modified SAMI2 model to study the artificial ducts' mechanism driven by HF electron heating in the bottomside F2 region. The heating builds up the plasma pressure, thus pushing plasma along the magnetic field. The simulation results performed for the input parameters similar to the conditions of the heating experiments are in fair agreement with the pertinent observations. The ducts seem to be produced most efficiently for heating frequencies quite close to the critical frequency foF2.

  7. Comparative Sequence and Structure Analysis Reveals the Conservation and Diversity of Nucleotide Positions and Their Associated Tertiary Interactions in the Riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Appasamy, Sri D.; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The tertiary motifs in complex RNA molecules play vital roles to either stabilize the formation of RNA 3D structure or to provide important biological functionality to the molecule. In order to better understand the roles of these tertiary motifs in riboswitches, we examined 11 representative riboswitch PDB structures for potential agreement of both motif occurrences and conservations. A total of 61 unique tertiary interactions were found in the reference structures. In addition to the expected common A-minor motifs and base-triples mainly involved in linking distant regions the riboswitch structures three highly conserved variants of A-minor interactions called G-minors were found in the SAM-I and FMN riboswitches where they appear to be involved in the recognition of the respective ligand’s functional groups. From our structural survey as well as corresponding structure and sequence alignments, the agreement between motif occurrences and conservations are very prominent across the representative riboswitches. Our analysis provide evidence that some of these tertiary interactions are essential components to form the structure where their sequence positions are conserved despite a high degree of diversity in other parts of the respective riboswitches sequences. This is indicative of a vital role for these tertiary interactions in determining the specific biological function of riboswitch. PMID:24040136

  8. Scaling relations for galaxies of all types with CALIFA and MaNGA surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    We used gas and stellar kinematics for the final Data Release of 667 spatially resolved galaxies publicly available from Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey (CALIFA) with the aim of study dynamical scaling relations as Tully & Fisher for rotation velocity, Faber & Jackson for velocity dispersion and also a combination of them through the S_{K} parameter defined as S_{K}^2 = KV_{rot}^2 + σ^2. We found a offset between gas and stellar kinematics in Tully & Fisher and Faber & Jackson relations, however when we used the S_{K} parameter all galaxies regardless of the morphological type lie in this M_{*} vs S_{k} scaling relation with a significant improvement compared with the M_{*} vs V_{rot} and M_{*} vs σ relations, in agreement with previous studies with SAMI survey, however the slope ant zero-point are different with them. We also explored different values of the K parameter, as well as different proxys to estimate V_{rot} in order to understand and characterize the physical source of scatter, slope and zero-point.

  9. Three-dimensional modeling equatorial spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Joyce, G.

    2008-12-01

    Equatorial spread F (ESF) is a low-latitude ionospheric phenomenon that leads to the development of large scale electron density depletions that adversely affect communications and navigation systems. The development of models to understand and predict the onset and evolution of ESF is therefore critically important to a number of space-based systems. To this end, NRL has developed a three-dimensional model of ESF. The global NRL ionosphere model SAMI3 has been modified to simulate a narrow wedge of the post-sunset ionosphere to capture the onset and evolution of ESF. Preliminary results indicate that (1) bubbles can rise to ~ 1600 km, (2) extremely steep ion density gradients can develop in both longitude and latitude, (3) upward plasma velocities approach 1 km/s, and (4) the growth time of the instability is ~eq 15 min. We will also report the effects of meridional and zonal winds on bubble development, as well as ion composition (both atomic and molecular). The simulations will focus on current, low solar activity conditions, and results will be compared to C/NOFS data where available. Research supported by ONR

  10. Dynamics of Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Coster, A. J.; Huba, J.; Ridley, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Baker, J. B. H.; Wolf, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) flow structures are narrow ionospheric channels of fast (in excess of 100 m/s) westward drift just outside the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora in the dusk-to-midnight local time sector. Other terms for this phenomenon include subauroral Ion Drift (SAID) events and Polarization Jets. SAPS structures represent a striking departure from the commonly-used two-cell convection pattern. They are thought to arise from the displacement of the downward region-2 Birkeland currents on the dusk side equatorward of the low-latitude boundary of the auroral oval during times of changing high-latitude convection. In this paper, we will use several event simulations with the SAMI3-RCM numerical model (a self-consistent ionosphere-inner magnetosphere model) and RCM-GITM (a self-consistent model of the ionosphere-thermosphere-inner magnetosphere) to analyze the relative roles of changes in the IMF Bz component, ionospheric electron density depletions, and thermospheric modifications in controlling the dynamics of SAPS. Simulation results will be compared to multi-instrument ionospheric observations.

  11. A Coupled Ionosphere-Raytrace Model for Artificial HF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawdie, K.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The first self-consistent 3D model of artificial HF ionospheric heating has been developed. The model combines the first principles ionosphere model SAMI3/ESF and the ray trace code MoJo-15. The location of HF heating is calculated by simulating the ray path through the ionosphere and determining the average heating location. This new model has been used to successfully simulate the snapback effect discovered in a Arecibo HF heating experiment described by Bernhardt et al. [1988]. The simulations provide new insight into the physical mechanism for snapback. As Bernhardt et al. [1988] hypothesized, the heater wave is refracted by the density cavity, thus causing the location of heating to drift in longitude. The cause of snapback, however, is not that the ray snaps back to its original configuration once the density cavity has convected out of range. Instead, the density cavity convects into the path of the refracted ray such that only a small portion of the ray near the original heating location is above the threshold for HF heating. The heating location thus suddenly snaps back to the original location but the ray itself is still refracted in longitude.

  12. Analysis of the dynamics of thin primary mirrors for large astronomical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Mccann, M.

    1973-01-01

    The NASTRAN structural analysis program was used to investigate the dynamic properties of thin primary mirrors suitable for use in large orbiting astronomical telescopes. An analysis is included of the mode shapes and modal frequencies for several thin, homogeneous, isotropic mirrors. Typical cases include two different mirror diameters, two different diameter-to-thickness ratios, and both a mirror without and a mirror with a central hole that is 22 percent of the mirror diameter. The finite-element structural model is evaluated by comparing the NASTRAN generated results with theoretical values for a simply supported, flat, circular mirror. The same model is then used for evaluating the spherical mirrors. The mode shapes and frequencies of a 0.762-meter-diameter mirror with a 60-to-1 diameter-to-thickness ratio and a three-point rigid kinematic (not overconstrained) mount are calculated and plotted for comparison with results obtained previously from the SAMIS structural analysis program for this same mirror. A static analysis is also shown for comparison with experimentally obtained influence coefficients.

  13. Stochastic evolution of rotations of early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hoseung; Yi, Sukyoung

    2016-01-01

    Recent Integral-Field Spectrograph surveys (SAURON, ATLAS 3D, and SAMI project, for example) have revealed that early type galaxies have wide range of rotational properties even though they share similar photometric properties. High resolution numerical studies have shown that galaxy-galaxy interactions have significant effect on the rotation of early type galaxies, however, with limited number of sample galaxies.We present kinematic analysis of thousands of galaxies in 20 clusters from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations. Although galaxy mergers play an important role, the direction of change in the amount of rotation depends on many merger parameters such as mass ratio, orbital parameters, and relative direction of galaxy rotations. Furthermore, all their merger parameters themselves are results of non-linear galaxy formation and evolution processes. By compiling numerous galaxy merger events, we discuss statistical properties of the evolution of early type galaxy rotation. We present the impacts of various interactions: major and minor mergers, multiple mergers, and flybys.

  14. Regional occurrence, high frequency but low diversity of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup d1 suggests a recent dog-wolf hybridization in Scandinavia

    PubMed Central

    Klütsch, C F C; Seppälä, E H; Fall, T; Uhlén, M; Hedhammar, Å; Lohi, H; Savolainen, P

    2011-01-01

    The domestic dog mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-gene pool consists of a homogenous mix of haplogroups shared among all populations worldwide, indicating that the dog originated at a single time and place. However, one small haplogroup, subclade d1, found among North Scandinavian/Finnish spitz breeds at frequencies above 30%, has a clearly separate origin. We studied the genetic and geographical diversity for this phylogenetic group to investigate where and when it originated and whether through independent domestication of wolf or dog-wolf crossbreeding. We analysed 582 bp of the mtDNA control region for 514 dogs of breeds earlier shown to harbour d1 and possibly related northern spitz breeds. Subclade d1 occurred almost exclusively among Swedish/Finnish Sami reindeer-herding spitzes and some Swedish/Norwegian hunting spitzes, at a frequency of mostly 60–100%. Genetic diversity was low, with only four haplotypes: a central, most frequent, one surrounded by two haplotypes differing by an indel and one differing by a substitution. The substitution was found in a single lineage, as a heteroplasmic mix with the central haplotype. The data indicate that subclade d1 originated in northern Scandinavia, at most 480–3000 years ago and through dog-wolf crossbreeding rather than a separate domestication event. The high frequency of d1 suggests that the dog-wolf hybrid phenotype had a selective advantage. PMID:20497152

  15. Ionospheric and Thermospheric Effects During the Initial Radiative Phase of the Bastille Day Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. R.; Drob, D. P.; Nicholas, A. C.; Bishop, J.; Picone, J. M.; Thonnard, S. E.; Dymond, K. F.; Budzien, S. A.; Lean, J.; Mariska, J. T.; Huba, J. D.; Joyce, G.; Warren, H. P.; Judge, D. L.

    2001-05-01

    Increases in the solar EUV and X-ray irradiance during a solar flare can produce enhanced ionization and heating in the terrestrial ionosphere. The resulting energetic photoelectrons in turn cause increases in the far ultraviolet (FUV) dayglow (100 - 150 nm). Enhancements of some 50 per cent had previously been detected in OGO-4 nadir-viewing data [C B Opal, Space Research XIII, 797, 1973]. Similar enhancements have now been seen in the FUV limb-viewing dayglow observations from the ARGOS satellite during the Bastille Day flare (July 14, 2000). Because extinction of the FUV dayglow by O2 prevents seeing below 140 km tangent altitude on the limb, increases in the dayglow above that altitude must be caused by the component of the flare spectral irradiance which is deposited there, namely at wavelengths greater than 20 nm. This conclusion is corroborated by the observation of the flare at 30.3 nm made by the SEM instrument on the SOHO satellite. We study this solar-ionospheric connection using a modified version of the NRL solar spectrum as input to the SAMI2 ionospheric model, and also calculate thermospheric heating rates for this event.

  16. ISM and dynamical scaling relations in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade we have seen a tremendous progress in our understanding of the life cycle of galaxies. Particularly powerful has been the synergy between representative surveys of cold gas, dust and metals and improved theoretical models able to follow the evolution of the different phases of the ISM in a self-consistent way. At the same time, the advent of optical integral field spectroscopic surveys is finally allowing us to quantify how the kinematical properties of gas and stars vary across the Hubble sequence. In this talk, I will review recent observational work aimed at providing a local benchmark for the study of the star formation cycle in galaxies and dynamical scaling relations in galaxies. By combining observations obtained as part the Herschel Reference Survey, the GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey, the ALFALFA survey and the SAMI Galaxy Survey, I will discuss what nearby galaxies can teach us about the interplay between kinematics, star formation, chemical enrichment and environmental effects in our neighbourhoods.

  17. Summertime pCO2 in the Cumberland Sound in the eastern Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, D.; Vagle, S.; Thomas, H.; Bedard, J.; Burt, W.; Manizza, M.; McGillis, W. R.; Wallace, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is estimated to contribute roughly 10% of the global annual uptake of CO2 in the ocean. Studies show this appears to be particularly sensitive to environmental changes. However this estimate as well as the impact of environmental conditions on the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide is based on limited data currently available in the Arctic. Here, we present the first measurements of water pCO2 in the Cumberland Sound during the summer of 2011. Cumberland Sound is a major inlet, 300 km long, with an average width of 65 km, in the east coast of Baffin Island connected the Labrador Sea and affected by multiple freshwater sources. Measurements were performed during the ice-free season using the a SAMI-pCO2 and collecting profiles of discrete water samples in the upper 40m. The pCO2 measurements are combined with physical observations and satellite chlorophyll estimates, and compared to biogeochemical model results.

  18. RNA Tertiary Interactions in a Riboswitch Stabilize the Structure of a Kink Turn

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Kersten T.; Daldrop, Peter; Lilley, David M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The kink turn is a widespread RNA motif that introduces an acute kink into the axis of duplex RNA, typically comprising a bulge followed by a G⋅A and A⋅G pairs. The kinked conformation is stabilized by metal ions, or the binding of proteins including L7Ae. We now demonstrate a third mechanism for the stabilization of k-turn structure, involving tertiary interactions within a larger RNA structure. The SAM-I riboswitch contains an essential standard k-turn sequence that kinks a helix so that its terminal loop can make a long-range interaction. We find that some sequence variations in the k-turn within the riboswitch do not prevent SAM binding, despite preventing the folding of the k-turn in isolation. Furthermore, two crystal structures show that the sequence-variant k-turns are conventionally folded within the riboswitch. This study shows that the folded structure of the k-turn can be stabilized by tertiary interactions within a larger RNA structure. PMID:21893284

  19. Topside equatorial ionospheric density, temperature, and composition under equinox, low solar flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Varney, R. H.; Huba, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    We present observations of the topside ionosphere made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in March and September 2013, made using a full-profile analysis approach. Recent updates to the methodology employed at Jicamarca are also described. Measurements of plasma number density, electron and ion temperatures, and hydrogen and helium ion fractions up to 1500 km altitude are presented for 3 days in March and September. The main features of the observations include a sawtooth-like diurnal variation in ht, the transition height where the O+ ion fraction falls to 50%, the appearance of weak He+ layers just below ht, and a dramatic increase in plasma temperature at dawn followed by a sharp temperature depression around local noon. These features are consistent from day to day and between March and September. Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation data from the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite are used to help validate the March Jicamarca data. The SAMI2-PE model was able to recover many of the features of the topside observations, including the morphology of the plasma density profiles and the light-ion composition. The model, forced using convection speeds and meridional thermospheric winds based on climatological averages, did not reproduce the extreme temperature changes in the topside between sunrise and noon. Some possible causes of the discrepancies are discussed.

  20. Theoretical study of static magnetic properties for the chiral and reconstructed graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Suk-Young; Rhim, Jun-Won; Moon, Kyungsun

    2013-03-01

    Recent theoretical study of the chiral graphene nanoribbons(CGNR) has demonstrated the magnetic ordering of the edge states below a certain chiral angle1. Based on the Hubbard model for the CGNR, we study the static properties of the magnetic edge states such as the intra-edge and inter-edge spin stiffness, which are the two crucial parameters to control the thermodynamics of the effective magnetic hamiltonian. For the systematic study of the anti-ferromagnetic inter-edge spin correlations, we calculate the inter-edge spin stiffness as a function of ribbon width and transverse electric field. We also attempt to calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for the other edge geometries such as a reconstructed edge geometry, which has been experimentally confirmed as an edge shape other than zigzag or armchair nanoribbon2 1. Oleg V. Yazyev, Rodrigo B. Capaz, and Steven G. Louie, Phys. Rev. B 84, 115406 (2011). 2. Pekka Koskinen, Sami Malola, and Hannu Hakkinen, Phys. Rev. B 80, 073401 (2009). This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology(2012R1A1A2006927).

  1. Hypoalbuminemia and Malnutrition Associated With Cow’s Milk Allergy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Altinel Acoglu, Esma; Akcaboy, Meltem; Melek Oguz, Melahat; Kilic, Mustafa; Zorlu, Pelin; Senel, Saliha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cow’s milk allergy is the most common food allergy in children. Symptoms usually involve the skin and the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Gastrointestinal tract manifestations of cow’s milk allergy are nonspecific, and are the only type that can be diagnosed in all age groups. Here, we report a rare case of cow's milk allergy in an infant with hypoalbuminemia and malnutrition. Case Presentation A nine-month-old girl was admitted to Dr. Sami Ulus maternity and children’s health and diseases training and research hospital, Ankara, Turkey, in September 2013, for weakness and swelling of the legs that had endured for two days. She had bilateral pretibial pitting (+2) edema. Laboratory data revealed albumin at 1.7 g/dL; serum Na, K, urea, creatinin, and alanine-aspartate aminotransferase levels were normal. Her urinary analysis did not reveal proteinuria. Stool samples were normal, and stool steatocrite was negative. Anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies were negative. Cow’s milk allergy was diagnosed due to cow’s milk-specific IgE and skin prick test results. Conclusions On rare occasions, cow’s milk allergy presents with hypoalbuminemia. When diagnosis is delayed, this allergy may impair the growth and quality of life and may even be life-threatening. PMID:27621935

  2. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies adopting λRe, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematical classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain λRe from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the λRe-ɛe distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass ≃109 M⊙), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as z = 2; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock λRe-ɛe distribution at z < 0.1 reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS3D/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed λRe-ɛe distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  3. The Hector Survey: integral field spectroscopy of 100,000 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2015-02-01

    In March 2013, the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) began a major survey of 3400 galaxies at the AAT, the largest of its kind to date. At the time of writing, over a third of the targets have been observed and the scientific impact has been immediate. The Manga galaxy survey has now started at the SDSS telescope and will target an even larger sample of nearby galaxies. In Australia, the community is now gearing up to deliver a major new facility called Hector that will allow integral field spectroscopy of 100 galaxies observed simultaneously. By the close of the decade, it will be possible to obtain integral field spectroscopy of 100,000 galaxies over 3000 square degrees of sky down to r=17 (median). Many of these objects will have HI imaging from the new ASKAP radio surveys. We discuss the motivation for such a survey and the use of new cosmological simulations that are properly matched to the integral field observations. The Hector survey will open up a new and unique parameter space for galaxy evolution studies.

  4. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: II. Analysis sequence and CALIFA dataproducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; García-Benito, R.; Ibarra-Mede, H. J.; González, J. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bitsakis, T.; Law, D.; Cano-Díaz, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Galbany, L.; Mast, D.; Abril-Melgarejo, V.; Roman-Lopes, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present Pipe3D, an analysis pipeline based on the FIT3D fitting tool, developed to explore the properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Pipe3D was created to provide coherent, simple to distribute, and comparable dataproducts, independently of the origin of the data, focused on the data of the most recent IFU surveys (e.g., CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI), and the last generation IFS instruments (e.g., MUSE). In this article we describe the different steps involved in the analysis of the data, illustrating them by showing the dataproducts derived for NGC 2916, observed by CALIFA and P-MaNGA. As a practical example of the pipeline we present the complete set of dataproducts derived for the 200 datacubes that comprises the V500 setup of the CALIFA Data Release 2 (DR2), making them freely available through the network. Finally, we explore the hypothesis that the properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas of galaxies at the effective radius are representative of the overall average ones, finding that this is indeed the case.

  5. Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Moon, Dae-Sik; Zaritsky, Dennis F.; Chou, Richard; Meyer, Elliot; Ma, Ke; Jarvis, Miranda; Eisner, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    We are constructing a novel infrared integral field spectrograph with a large field of view (~50'x20') that will be available on the Kitt Peak 90' Bok telescope this spring. This wide integral field infrared spectrograph (WIFIS) operates over two wavelength ranges, zJ-band (0.9-1.35 microns) and H-band (1.5-1.8 microns), and has moderate spectral resolving power, 3,000 in zJ-band and 2,200 in H-band, respectively. WIFIS' field-of-view is comparable to current optical integral field spectrographs that are carrying out large galaxy surveys, e.g. SAMI, CALIFA, and MaNGA. We are designing a large nearby galaxy survey to complement the data already been taken by these optical integral field spectroscopic surveys. The near-infrared window provides a sensitive probe of the initial mass functions of stellar populations, the OB stellar fractions in massive star forming regions, and the kinematics of and obscured star formation within merging systems. This will be the first large scale infrared integral field spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies.

  6. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies adopting $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematic classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$ from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass $\\simeq$10$^{\\rm 9}$ M$_{\\odot}$), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as $z=2$; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution at $z<0.1$ reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS$^{\\rm 3D}$/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  7. An advanced technique for speciation of organic nitrogen in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, S.; Robinson, J.; Hays, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical composition of organic nitrogen (ON) in the environment is a research topic of broad significance. The topic intersects the branches of atmospheric, aquatic, and ecological science; thus, a variety of instrumentation, analytical methods, and data interpretation tools have evolved for determination of ON. Recent studies that focus on atmospheric particulate nitrogen (N) suggest a significant fraction (20-80%) of total N is bound in organic compounds. The sources, bioavailability and transport mechanisms of these N-containing compounds can differ, producing a variety of environmental consequences. Amino acids (AA) are a key class of atmospheric ON compounds that can contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and potentially influence water cycles, air pollutant scavenging, and the radiation balance. AA are water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) that can significantly alter the acid-base chemistry of aerosols, and may explain the buffering capacity that impacts heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. The chemical transformations that N-containing organic compounds (including AA) undergo can increase the light-absorbing capacity of atmospheric carbon via formation of 'brown carbon'. Suggested sources of atmospheric AA include: marine surface layer transport from bursting sea bubbles, the suspension of bacteria, fungi, algae, pollen, spores, or biomass burning. Methodology for detection of native (underivatized) amino acids (AA) in atmospheric aerosols has been developed and validated (Samy et al., 2011). This presentation describes the use of LC-MS (Q-TOF) and microwave-assisted gas phase hydrolysis for detection of free and combined amino acids in aerosols collected in a Southeastern U.S. forest environment. Accurate mass detection and the addition of isotopically labeled surrogates prior to sample preparation allows for sensitive quantitation of target AA in a complex aerosol matrix. A total of 16 native AA were detected above the reporting

  8. "On the gate of Arctic": Doors open to foreign schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecchiar, Irene

    2015-04-01

    With the increased attention to the changing of the Arctic Region as a consequence of global climate changes, effective science education, outreach and communication need to be higher priorities within the scientific communities. In order to encourage the dissemination of polar research at educational levels Slovene high school students in Trieste were first engaged at school and at the National Museum of Antarctica of Trieste using conferences and laboratory activities to introduce the main polar climate change topics. Then together with three teachers they visited Tromso University (North Norway) for a week. The first aim of this project was to increase awareness of foreign schools on major topics concerning the Arctic issues (from the economic/social to the environmental/climatic point of view). Forty-three high school students were involved in the laboratory activities running at the University of Tromso and participated in seminars. The topics focused on were Ocean Acidification, Global Warming and the combined effects with other anthropogenic stressors. During their stay, students interviewed several scientists in order to allow them to edit a »visiting report«, that was updated every day in their blog and to elaborate all the material collected (photos, videos, data of laboratory work, reports). In Tromso, they were also introduced to the culture and tradition of the Scandinavian indigenous people at the Center of Sami Study. Back in Italy, they published some articles in local newspapers, and then they presented their results at the National Museum of Antarctica of Trieste about all the data elaboration in an open day exhibition with posters, short movies and PowerPoint presentations. All this work was made in order to pass their experience into the world. This was a pilot project, highlighting the role of universities as links between research and outreach. The next step should be to enlarge these kinds of activities to many Schools, Universities and

  9. Recent Results From the Whistler- and Z-mode Radio Sounding From the IMAGE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Mayank, K.; Hazra, S.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler mode radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 2011] was applied to two case studies: (1) daytime and nighttime cases of whistler mode echoes observed on IMAGE inside the plasmasphere (L<4, altitude <5000 km), and (2) cases of whistler mode echoes observed during geomagnetic storm activity. Preliminary results indicate: (i) O+/H+ and O+/ (H+ + He+) transition heights at nighttime are a few hundred kilometers lower than that at daytime. (ii) Electron and ion densities found from whistler mode sounding are consistent with those from the past in situ and radio sounding measurements, but differ from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM. (iii) Electron and ion densities undergo temporal changes as a function of geomagnetic storm activity, and each species has different recovery period. (iv) Major, moderate, and minor storms affect Ne, H+, and O+ densities in a similar manner, but affect He+ density differently-the minor storm did not affect it. By comparing the electron and ion densities measured by whistler mode radio sounding with those predicted by physics based ionospheric models (e.g. SAMI 2) it may be possible to understand how thermospheric winds influence the evolution of the ionospheric electron and ion densities during geomagnetic storms. The application of Sonwalkar et al. [2011] method to nonducted and ducted fast Z mode echoes observed on IMAGE has led to the measurement of field aligned electron density and duct width and enhancement factor from ~1000 km up to the equator. In two cases, ducts with widths of ~0.05-0.1 L and density depletions of ~5-10 % accounted for the observed properties of ducted Z mode echoes. The measurements of both electron density and ducts are consistent with past measurements. The results from the whistler and Z mode sounding will lead to new empirical models of field aligned electron and ion densities and a statistical characterization of ducts in the magnetosphere.

  10. Transcriptional and epigenetic networks that drive helper T cell identities

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Han-Yu; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Poholek, Amanda C; Vahedi, Golnaz; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Villarino, Alejandro V; Bonelli, Michael; Bosselut, Remy; Kanno, Yuka; Muljo, Stefan A; O’Shea, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the specification of CD4+ helper T cells to discrete effector “lineages” represented a watershed event in conceptualizing mechanisms of host defense and immunoregulation. However, our appreciation for the actual complexity of helper T cell subsets continues unabated. Just as the Sami language of Scandinavia has 1000 different words for reindeer, the range of fates available for a CD4+ T cell is numerous and may be underestimated. Added to the crowded scene for helper T cell subsets is the continuously growing family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), endowed with common effector responses and the previously defined “master regulators” for CD4+ helper T cell subsets are also shared by ILC subsets. Within the context of this extraordinary complexity are concomitant advances in the understanding of transcriptomes and epigenomes. So what do terms like “lineage commitment” and helper T cell “specification” mean in the early 21st century? How do we put all of this together in a coherent conceptual framework? It would be arrogant to assume that we have a sophisticated enough understanding to seriously answer these questions. Instead, we will review the current status of the flexibility of helper T cell responses in relation to their genetic regulatory networks and epigenetic landscapes. Recent data have provided major surprises as to what master regulators can or cannot do, how they interact with other transcription factors and impact global genome-wide changes and how all these factors come together to influence helper cell function. PMID:25123275

  11. Characteristics of VLF wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere in the presence of an artificial density duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Demekhov, Andrei

    We study the propagation of VLF waves in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere in the presence of large-scale artificial plasma inhomogeneities which can be created by HF heating facilities like HAARP and ``Sura''. A region with enhanced cold plasma density can be formed due to the action of HF heating. This region is extended along geomagnetic field (up to altitudes of several thousand km) and has rather small size across magnetic field (about 1 degree). The geometric-optical approximation is used to study wave propagation. The plasma density and ion composition are calculated with the use of SAMI2 model, which was modified to take the effect of HF heating into account. We calculate ray trajectories of waves with different initial frequency and wave-normal angles and originating at altitudes of about 100 km in the region near the heating area. The source of such waves could be the lightning discharges, modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, or VLF transmitters. Variation of the wave amplitude along the ray trajectories due to refraction is considered and spatial distribution of wave intensity in the magnetosphere is analyzed. We show that the presence of such a density disturbances can lead to significant changes of wave propagation trajectories, in particular, to efficient guiding of VLF waves in this region. This can result in a drastic increase of the VLF-wave intensity in the density duct. The dependence of wave propagation properties on parameters of heating facility operation regime is considered. We study the variation of the spatial distribution of VLF wave intensity related to the slow evolution of the artificial inhomogeneity during the heating.

  12. Post-midnight occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajith, K. K.; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Tulasiram, S.

    2016-07-01

    The equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs)/equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularities are an important topic of space weather interest because of their impact on transionospheric radio communications, satellite-based navigation and augmentation systems. This local plasma depleted structures develop at the bottom side F layer through Rayleigh-Taylor instability and rapidly grow to topside ionosphere via polarization electric fields within them. The steep vertical gradients due to quick loss of bottom side ionization and rapid uplift of equatorial F layer via prereversal enhancement (PRE) of zonal electric field makes the post-sunset hours as the most preferred local time for the formation of EPBs. However, there is a different class of irregularities that occurs during the post-midnight hours of June solstice reported by the previous studies. The occurrence of these post-midnight EPBs maximize during the low solar activity periods. The growth characteristics and the responsible mechanism for the formation of these post-midnight EPBs are not yet understood. Using the rapid beam steering ability of 47 MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) at Kototabang (0.2°S geographic latitude, 100.3°E geographic longitude, and 10.4°S geomagnetic latitude), Indonesia, the spatial and temporal evolution of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were examined to classify the evolutionary-type EPBs from those which formed elsewhere and drifted into the field of view of radar. The responsible mechanism for the genesis of summer time post-midnight EPBs were discussed in light of growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using SAMI2 model.

  13. Evaluation of Iodine Deficiency in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kanık Yüksek, Saliha; Aycan, Zehra; Öner, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of iodine deficiency (ID) and its effects on mental function in children referred to the Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Children’s Training and Research Hospital with a prospective diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The study was conducted on 89 children referred in the period from September 2009 to June 2010 with a diagnosis of ADHD. A questionnaire was given to all parents. Conners’ rating scales were applied to the parents (CPRS) and teachers (CTRS), and revised Wechsler intelligence scale for children (WISC-R) to the children. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine, thyroglobulin, anti-thyroid peroxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, and urinary iodine levels were measured in all children. Results: Median age was 9.41±1.95 years, and 83.1% of subjects were male. The mean urinary iodine level of the children was 92.56±22.25 μg/L. ID was detected in 71.9% of subjects and all were mild ID. There was no significant relationship between urinary iodine levels with WISC-R subtest scores and CPRS. However, a significant association was found between urinary iodine levels and hyperactivity section of CTRS (p<0.05). Likewise, a significant relationship was found between learning disorder/mental retardation diagnosis and freedom subtest of WISC-R (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study highlights the effects of ID on comprehension, perception, attention, and learning. However, the results need to be supported by new randomized controlled trials. PMID:26758811

  14. Sulfur Solubility In Silicate Melts: A Thermochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.; Ottonello, G.

    A termochemical model for calculating sulfur solubility of simple and complex silicate melts has been developed in the framework of the Toop-Samis polymeric approach combined with a Flood - Grjotheim theoretical treatment of silicate slags [1,2]. The model allows one to compute sulfide and sulfate content of silicate melts whenever fugacity of gaseous sulphur is provided. "Electrically equivalent ion fractions" are needed to weigh the contribution of the various disproportion reactions of the type: MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas MSmelt+1/2O2 ,gas (1) MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas + 3/2O2 ,gas MSO4 ,melt (2) Eqs. 1 and 2 account for the oxide-sulfide and the oxide-sulfate disproportiona- tion in silicate melt. Electrically equivalent ion fractions are computed, in a fused salt Temkin notation, over the appropriate matrixes (anionic and cationic). The extension of such matrixes is calculated in the framework of a polymeric model previously developed [1,2,3] and based on a parameterization of acid-base properties of melts. No adjustable parameters are used and model activities follow the raoultian behavior implicit in the ion matrix solution of the Temkin notation. The model is based on a huge amount of data available in literature and displays a high heuristic capability with virtually no compositional limits, as long as the structural role assigned to each oxide holds. REFERENCES: [1] Ottonello G., Moretti R., Marini L. and Vetuschi Zuccolini M. (2001), Chem. Geol., 174, 157-179. [2] Moretti R. (2002) PhD Thesis, University of Pisa. [3] Ottonello G. (2001) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 282, 72-85.

  15. Direct shear mapping - a new weak lensing tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Burgh-Day, C. O.; Taylor, E. N.; Webster, R. L.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new technique called direct shear mapping (DSM) to measure gravitational lensing shear directly from observations of a single background source. The technique assumes the velocity map of an unlensed, stably rotating galaxy will be rotationally symmetric. Lensing distorts the velocity map making it asymmetric. The degree of lensing can be inferred by determining the transformation required to restore axisymmetry. This technique is in contrast to traditional weak lensing methods, which require averaging an ensemble of background galaxy ellipticity measurements, to obtain a single shear measurement. We have tested the efficacy of our fitting algorithm with a suite of systematic tests on simulated data. We demonstrate that we are in principle able to measure shears as small as 0.01. In practice, we have fitted for the shear in very low redshift (and hence unlensed) velocity maps, and have obtained null result with an error of ±0.01. This high-sensitivity results from analysing spatially resolved spectroscopic images (i.e. 3D data cubes), including not just shape information (as in traditional weak lensing measurements) but velocity information as well. Spirals and rotating ellipticals are ideal targets for this new technique. Data from any large Integral Field Unit (IFU) or radio telescope is suitable, or indeed any instrument with spatially resolved spectroscopy such as the Sydney-Australian-Astronomical Observatory Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph (SAMI), the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  16. Exploring the influence of surface waves in the carbon dioxide transfer velocity between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier; Francisco Herrera, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Osuna, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements have been carried out in order to better understand the possible influence of ocean surface waves in the transfer of carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal zone. The CO2 fluxes are being analysed and results are shown in a contribution by Gutiérrez-Loza et al., in this session. Here we try to highlight the findings regarding the transfer velocity (kCO2) once we have incorporated direct measurements of carbon dioxide concentration in the water side. In this study direct measurements of CO2 fluxes were obtained with an eddy covariance tower located in the shoreline equipped with an infrared open-path gas analyzer (LI-7500, LI-COR) and a sonic anemometer (R3-100 Professional Anemometer, Gill Instruments), both at about 13 m above the mean sea level, and sampling at 20 Hz. For some period of time simultaneous information of waves was recorded with a sampling rate of 2 Hz using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) at 10 m depth and 350 m away from the tower. Besides, recently the concentration of CO2 in water has also been recorded making use of a SAMI-CO2 instrument. A subtle effect of the wave field is detected in the estimated kCO2. Looking into details of the surface currents being detected very near the air-sea interface through an ADPC, a certain association can be found with the gas transfer velocity. Furthermore, some of the possible effects of breaking wave induced turbulence in the coastal zone is to be addressed. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from CB-2011-01-168173 CONACYT project is greatly acknowledged.

  17. QUENCHING DEPENDS ON MORPHOLOGIES: IMPLICATIONS FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET-OPTICAL RADIAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS IN GREEN VALLEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Zhizheng; Lin, Weipeng; Li, Jinrong; Kong, Xu; Wang, Jing E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn

    2014-09-01

    In this Letter, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)+Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images, to investigate how the residual recent star formation is distributed in these galaxies. We find that the dust-corrected u – r colors of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are flat out to R {sub 90}, while the colors monotonously turn blue when r > 0.5 R {sub 50} for late-type galaxies (LTGs). More than half of the ETGs are blue-cored and have remarkable positive NUV – r color gradients, suggesting that their star formations are centrally concentrated. The rest have flat color distributions out to R {sub 90}. The centrally concentrated star formation activity in a large portion of ETGs is confirmed by the SDSS spectroscopy, showing that ∼50% of the ETGs have EW(Hα) >6.0 Å. Of the LTGs, 95% show uniform radial color profiles, which can be interpreted as a red bulge plus an extended blue disk. The links between the two kinds of ETGs, e.g., those objects having remarkable ''blue-cores'' and those having flat color gradients, are less known and require future investigations. It is suggested that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI.

  18. Reduced model captures Mg(2+)-RNA interaction free energy of riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ryan L; Noel, Jeffrey K; Whitford, Paul C; Mohanty, Udayan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Onuchic, José N

    2014-04-01

    The stability of RNA tertiary structures depends heavily on Mg(2+). The Mg(2+)-RNA interaction free energy that stabilizes an RNA structure can be computed experimentally through fluorescence-based assays that measure Γ2+, the number of excess Mg(2+) associated with an RNA molecule. Previous explicit-solvent simulations predict that the majority of excess Mg(2+) ions interact closely and strongly with the RNA, unlike monovalent ions such as K(+), suggesting that an explicit treatment of Mg(2+) is important for capturing RNA dynamics. Here we present a reduced model that accurately reproduces the thermodynamics of Mg(2+)-RNA interactions. This model is able to characterize long-timescale RNA dynamics coupled to Mg(2+) through the explicit representation of Mg(2+) ions. KCl is described by Debye-Hückel screening and a Manning condensation parameter, which represents condensed K(+) and models its competition with condensed Mg(2+). The model contains one fitted parameter, the number of condensed K(+) ions in the absence of Mg(2+). Values of Γ2+ computed from molecular dynamics simulations using the model show excellent agreement with both experimental data on the adenine riboswitch and previous explicit-solvent simulations of the SAM-I riboswitch. This agreement confirms the thermodynamic accuracy of the model via the direct relation of Γ2+ to the Mg(2+)-RNA interaction free energy, and provides further support for the predictions from explicit-solvent calculations. This reduced model will be useful for future studies of the interplay between Mg(2+) and RNA dynamics. PMID:24703312

  19. Ionosphere variations at 700 km altitude observed by the DEMETER satellite during the 29 March 2006 solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Berthelier, J. J.; Lebreton, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    We present an experimental and modeling study of the effects of the 29 March 2006 solar eclipse in the topside ionosphere. Measurements of the densities and temperatures of the thermal electrons and ions were provided by instruments aboard the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales microsatellite DEMETER, which flew over Europe and Africa near the time of maximum solar obscuration. Data from several orbits, either on the same day or on days encompassing the eclipse day, were available to determine a reference state of the ionosphere along the orbit in absence of eclipse. The comparison between this latter and the actual observations along the eclipse orbit reveal a clear thermal effect with a fast drop of about 200 K of the electron and ion temperatures that follows the variations of the solar UV flux in the F region of the ionosphere conjugate to the satellite position. The plasma density decreases by about 30% but with a significant delay and is better correlated with the solar UV flux averaged over the previous 1 to 2 h in the conjugate F region. This delayed and prolonged decrease of density induces an increase of the electron temperature to be higher than the reference ionosphere. We have also performed a modeling of the ionosphere using the SAMI2 code, after having introduced adequate modifications to reproduce fairly realistic eclipse conditions. Applied to the DEMETER conditions of observation, the model reproduces the observations very well. This work shows that the plasma temperature responds very quickly along the magnetic field lines to the variations of the energy available from the photoelectrons while the plasma density variations are controlled by more complex and slower transport processes.

  20. Lifetime of a depression in the plasma density over Jicamarca produced by space shuttle exhaust in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Kudeki, E.; Woodman, R. F.; Condori, L.; Villanueva, F.

    2001-09-01

    When the space shuttle orbiting maneuver subsystem (OMS) engines burn in the ionosphere, a plasma density depression, or "hole," is produced. Charge exchange between the exhaust molecules and the ambient O+ ions yields molecular ion beams that eventually recombine with electrons. The resulting plasma hole in the ionosphere can be studied with ground-based, incoherent scatter radars (ISRs). This type of ionospheric modification is being studied during the Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust (SIMPLEX) series of experiments over ISR systems located around the globe. The SIMPLEX 1 experiment occurred over Jicamarca, Peru, in the afternoon on October 4, 1997, during shuttle mission STS 86. An electron density depression was produced at 359 km altitude at the midpoint of a magnetic field line. The experiment was scheduled when there were no zonal drifts of the plasma so the modified field line remained fixed over the 50 MHz Jicamarca radar. The density depression was filled in by plasma flowing along the magnetic field line with a time constant of 4.5 min. The density perturbation had completely vanished 20 min after the engine burn. The experimental measurements were compared with two models: (1) SAMI2, a fully numerical model of the F region, and (2) an analytic representation of field-aligned transport by ambipolar diffusion. The computed recovery time from each model is much longer than the observed recovery time. The theory of ambipolar diffusion currently used in ionospheric models seems to be inadequate to describe the SIMPLEX 1 observations. Several possible sources for this discrepancy are discussed. The SIMPLEX 1 active experiment is shown to have the potential for testing selected processes in ionospheric models.

  1. An improved coupling model for the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Lee, L. C.; Huba, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    In our previous model for the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling, the background magnetic field was assumed to be perpendicular to the horizontal plane. In the present paper, we improve the calculation of currents in the atmosphere by solving the current density J directly from the current continuity equation ∇ • J = 0. The currents in the atmosphere can be solved for any arbitrary angle of magnetic field, i.e., any magnetic latitude. In addition, a large ratio (~10) of Hall to Pedersen conductivities is used to generate a large Hall electric field. The effects of atmospheric currents and electric fields on the ionosphere with lithosphere current source located at magnetic latitudes of 7.5°, 15°, 22.5°, and 30° are obtained. For upward (downward) atmospheric currents flowing into the ionosphere, the simulation results show that the westward (eastward) electric fields dominate. At magnetic latitude of 7.5° or 15°, the upward (downward) current causes the increase (decrease) of total electron content (TEC) near the source region, while the upward (downward) current causes the decrease (increase) of TEC at magnetic latitude of 22.5°or 30°. The dynamo current density required to generate the same amount of TEC variation in the improved model is found to be smaller by a factor of 30 as compared to that obtained in our earlier paper. We also calculate the ionosphere dynamics with imposed zonal westward and eastward electric field based on SAMI3 code. It is found that the eastward (westward) electric field may trigger one (two) plasma bubble(s) in the nighttime ionosphere.

  2. Norway.

    PubMed

    1992-08-01

    Norway with a territory of 386,000 sq. km or 150,000 sq. miles is slightly larger than New Mexico. In 1991 the population was estimated at 4.3 million with an annual growth rate of .5% and a literacy rate of 100%. The infant mortality rate is 7/1000 live births, and lie expectancy is 73 years for men and 80 years for women. Norway's government is a hereditary constitutional monarchy since independence n 1905. Ethnically, Norwegians are predominantly Germanic, but there are indigenous communities of Sami (Lapps) in the north, and in recent years almost 150,000 immigrants, foreign workers, and asylum-seekers have settled there. Norway's health system includes free hospital care, physicians compensation, cash benefits during illness and pregnancy, and other medical and dental plans. Until the 1981 election, Norway has been governed by Labor Party governments since 1935, except for 3 periods (1963, 1965-71, and 1972-73). Gro Harlem Brundtland is again the prime minister after forming her 3rd government in 10 years. Norway holds national elections in September 1993. Norway's large shipping fleet is modern; metals, pulp and paper products, chemicals, shipbuilding, and fishing are traditional industries, and major oil and gas discoveries in the mid-1970s transformed the economy. High oil prices in the 1983-85 period raised consumer spending, wages, and inflation. Norway is aspiring to restructure its nonoil economy in favor of efficient, nontraditional industry. The prime minister has indicated that Norway may apply for European Community (EC) membership before the end of 1992. Its main trading partners are the EC countries and its Scandinavian neighbors with the US in 5th place. PMID:12178045

  3. Mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green valley galaxies and its depends on morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xu; Pan, Zhizheng; Lian, Jianhui

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies are categorized into two main populations, red quiescent galaxies and blue star-forming galaxies. One of the key questions is which physical mechanisms are responsible for quenching star formation activities in blue galaxies and the resulting transformation? In this talk, we present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of "green valley" galaxies in the COSMOS field and low redshift "green valley" galaxies in SDSS. Our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M* < 10^10.0 Msun blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5. Using image from SDSS and GALEX, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, and investigate how quenching is processing in a galaxy. The early-type "green valley" galaxies (ETGs) have dramatically different radial NUV-r color distributions compared to late-type "green valley" galaxies (LTGs), most of ETGs have blue cores, nearly all LTGs have uniform color profiles that can be well-interpreted as red bulges plus blue disk components. These results suggest that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy; for ETGs, their star formations are centrally concentrated. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI (2013ApJ...776...14P, 2014ApJ...792L...4P, 2015MNRAS.446.1449L).

  4. Quenching Depends on Morphologies: Implications from the Ultraviolet-Optical Radial Color Distributions in Green Valley Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Li, Jinrong; Lin, Weipeng; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xu

    2014-09-01

    In this Letter, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)+Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images, to investigate how the residual recent star formation is distributed in these galaxies. We find that the dust-corrected u - r colors of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are flat out to R 90, while the colors monotonously turn blue when r > 0.5 R 50 for late-type galaxies (LTGs). More than half of the ETGs are blue-cored and have remarkable positive NUV - r color gradients, suggesting that their star formations are centrally concentrated. The rest have flat color distributions out to R 90. The centrally concentrated star formation activity in a large portion of ETGs is confirmed by the SDSS spectroscopy, showing that ~50% of the ETGs have EW(Hα) >6.0 Å. Of the LTGs, 95% show uniform radial color profiles, which can be interpreted as a red bulge plus an extended blue disk. The links between the two kinds of ETGs, e.g., those objects having remarkable "blue-cores" and those having flat color gradients, are less known and require future investigations. It is suggested that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI.

  5. From Outside-in to Inside-out: Galaxy Assembly Mode Depends on Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Li, Jinrong; Lin, Weipeng; Wang, Jing; Fan, Lulu; Kong, Xu

    2015-05-01

    In this Letter, we investigate how galaxy mass assembly mode depends on stellar mass M* using a large sample of ∼10,000 low-redshift galaxies. Our galaxy sample is selected to have SDSS {{R}90}\\gt 5\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 0, which allows the measures of both the integrated and the central NUV–r color indices. We find that in the {{M}*}–(NUV–r) green valley (GV), the {{M}*}\\lt {{10}10} {{M}ȯ } galaxies mostly have positive or flat color gradients, while most of the {{M}*}\\gt {{10}10.5} {{M}ȯ } galaxies have negative color gradients. When their central Dn4000 index values exceed 1.6, the {{M}*}\\lt {{10}10.0} {{M}ȯ } galaxies have moved to the UV red sequence, whereas a large fraction of the {{M}*}\\gt {{10}10.5} {{M}ȯ } galaxies still lie on the UV blue cloud or the GV region. We conclude that the main galaxy assembly mode is transiting from “the outside-in” mode to “the inside-out” mode at {{M}*}\\lt {{10}10} {{M}ȯ } and at {{M}*}\\gt {{10}10.5} {{M}ȯ }. We argue that the physical origin of this is the compromise between the internal and the external processes that drive the star formation quenching in galaxies. These results can be checked with the upcoming large data produced by the ongoing integral field spectroscopic survey projects, such as CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI in the near future.

  6. The effects of spatial resolution on integral field spectrograph surveys at different redshifts - The CALIFA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, D.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vílchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Husemann, B.; Márquez, I.; Marino, R. A.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Galbany, L.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Kehrig, C.; del Olmo, A.; Relaño, M.; Wisotzki, L.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Bekeraitè, S.; Papaderos, P.; Wild, V.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Ziegler, B.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; van de Ven, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Over the past decade, 3D optical spectroscopy has become the preferred tool for understanding the properties of galaxies and is now increasingly used to carry out galaxy surveys. Low redshift surveys include SAURON, DiskMass, ATLAS3D, PINGS, and VENGA. At redshifts above 0.7, surveys such as MASSIV, SINS, GLACE, and IMAGES have targeted the most luminous galaxies to study mainly their kinematic properties. The on-going CALIFA survey (z ~ 0.02) is the first of a series of upcoming integral field spectroscopy (IFS) surveys with large samples representative of the entire population of galaxies. Others include SAMI and MaNGA at lower redshift and the upcoming KMOS surveys at higher redshift. Given the importance of spatial scales in IFS surveys, the study of the effects of spatial resolution on the recovered parameters becomes important. Aims: We explore the capability of the CALIFA survey and a hypothetical higher redshift survey to reproduce the properties of a sample of objects observed with better spatial resolution at lower redshift. Methods: Using a sample of PINGS galaxies, we simulated observations at different redshifts. We then studied the behaviour of different parameters as the spatial resolution degrades with increasing redshift. Results: We show that at the CALIFA resolution, we are able to measure and map common observables in a galaxy study: the number and distribution of H ii regions (Hα flux structure), the gas metallicity (using the O3N2 method), the gas ionization properties (through the [N ii]/Hα and [O iii]/Hβ line ratios), and the age of the underlying stellar population (using the D4000 index). This supports the aim of the survey to characterise the observable properties of galaxies in the Local Universe. Our analysis of simulated IFS data cubes at higher redshifts highlights the importance of the projected spatial scale per spaxel as the most important figure of merit in the design of an integral field survey.

  7. Politicians, Patriots and Plotters: Unlikely Debates Occasioned by Maximilian Hell's Venus Transit Expedition of 1769

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontler, Laszlo

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the cultural and political contexts and reception of the most important by-product of Maximilian Hell's famous Venus transit expedition of 1768-69, the Demonstratio. Idioma Ungarorum et Lapponum idem esse (1770) by Hell's associate Janos Sajnovics. Now considered a landmark in Finno-Ugrian linguistics, the Demonstratio addressed an academic subject that was at that time almost destined to be caught up in an ideological battlefield defined by the shifting relationship between the Habsburg government, the Society of Jesus, and the Hungarian nobility. The "enlightened absolutist" policies of the former aimed at consolidating the Habsburg monarchy as an empire, at the expense of privileged groups, including religious orders as well as the noble estates. In the situation created by the 1773 suppression of the Jesuit order (a signal of declining patronage from the dynasty), the growing preoccupation on the part of ex-Jesuits like Hell and Sajnovics with "things Hungarian" could have been part of an attempt to re-situate themselves on the Central European map of learning. At the same time, the founding document of this interest, the Demonstratio, evoked violent protests from the other target of Habsburg policies, the Hungarian nobility, because its basic assumptions - the kinship of the Hungarian and the Sami (Lappian) language - potentially undermined the noble ideology of social exclusiveness, established on the alleged "Scythian" ancestry of Hungarians. By exploring the complex motives, intentions, reactions and responses of the chief agents in this story, it is possible to highlight the extra-scientific constraints and facilitators for the practice of knowledge in late eighteenth century Central Europe.

  8. Termochemical Models For Slags and Silicate Melts, Review and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottonello, G.

    Thermochemical models devoted to the comprehension of reactive and mixing properties of silicate melts and slags may be roughly grouped into four main classes: 1) fictive chemical; 2) quasi chemical; 3) fictive structural; 4) polymeric. In the first class we may group the fictive regular mixture approach of Ghiorso and Carmichael [1,2]and its extensions [3-5]and the subregular model of Berman and Brown [6]. To the second class belong the modified quasi chemical approach of Pelton and coworkers [7,8] , and the Kapoor - Froberg cellular model and its extensions [9-11]. The third class has much to share with the second one (and indeed the cellular model could be ascribed to this class as well). To this class belong the "central surround model" of Sastri and Lahiri [12] , the associated solution models of Bjorkman [13], Hastie and coworkers [14]and Goel and coworkers [15], the two sublattice model of Hillert and coworkers [16]and the polynomial expansions of Hoch and Arpshofen [17] . The fourth class encompasses the models of Masson[18-20] , Toop-Samis [21,22]and its extensions [23-25] . The phylosophy beyond each one of the four classes is basically different. Benefits and drawbacks are present in any of them, and applications are often limited to simple systems (or to sufficiently complex systems, in the case of arbitrary deconvolutions of type 1) and to limited P-T ranges. The crucial aspects of the various models will be outlined to some extent. It will be shown that, often, model conflictuality is only appartent and that, in some cases, model failure is unperceived by acritical utilizers. New perspectives in the future research devoted to the comprehension of melt reactivity in compositionally complex systems, with special enphasis on the solubility of gaseous components and unmixing, will be finally discussed. References: [1] Ghiorso M.S. and Carmichael I.S.E. (1980) Contrib. Mineral. Petrol., 71, 323-342. [2] Ghiorso M.S., Carmichael I.S.E., Rivers M.L. and Sack

  9. Crystal structures of human 108V and 108M catechol O-methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, K.; Le Trong, I.; Stenkamp, R.E.; Parson, W.W.

    2008-08-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays important roles in the metabolism of catecholamine neurotransmitters and catechol estrogens. The development of COMT inhibitors for use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease has been aided by crystallographic structures of the rat enzyme. However, the human and rat proteins have significantly different substrate specificities. Additionally, human COMT contains a common valine-methionine polymorphism at position 108. The methionine protein is less stable than the valine polymorph, resulting in decreased enzyme activity and protein levels in vivo. Here we describe the crystal structures of the 108V and 108M variants of the soluble form of human COMT bound with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and a substrate analog, 3,5-dinitrocatechol. The polymorphic residue 108 is located in the {alpha}5-{beta}3 loop, buried in a hydrophobic pocket {approx}16 {angstrom} from the SAM-binding site. The 108V and 108M structures are very similar overall [RMSD of C{sup {alpha}} atoms between two structures (C{sup {alpha}} RMSD) = 0.2 {angstrom}], and the active-site residues are superposable, in accord with the observation that SAM stabilizes 108M COMT. However, the methionine side chain is packed more tightly within the polymorphic site and, consequently, interacts more closely with residues A22 ({alpha}2) and R78 ({alpha}4) than does valine. These interactions of the larger methionine result in a 0.7-{angstrom} displacement in the backbone structure near residue 108, which propagates along {alpha}1 and {alpha}5 toward the SAM-binding site. Although the overall secondary structures of the human and rat proteins are very similar (C{sup {alpha}} RMSD = 0.4 {angstrom}), several nonconserved residues are present in the SAM-(I89M, I91M, C95Y) and catechol- (C173V, R201M, E202K) binding sites. The human protein also contains three additional solvent-exposed cysteine residues (C95, C173, C188) that may contribute to intermolecular disulfide bond

  10. New York City International Polar Weekend at the American Museum of Natural History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S.; Turrin, M.; Macphee, R.

    2008-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, in partnership with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Earth Institute of Columbia University and Barnard College, is featuring the International Polar Year through a New York City International Polar Weekend (NYC-IPW) in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The event showcases current polar research, polar environmental changes, history and culture during two days of family programs and activities, performances, and lectures. The goal of the NYC-IPW is to engage diverse audiences and enhance the public understanding of polar science, in particular IPY research, through close interactions with polar experts. Activities for the public include many disciplines, ranging from the physical sciences and cultural anthropology to music and art, and are presented in many forms, from lectures, panels and films to posters and play. Highlights of the NYC-IPW include: 1) A polar fair for youth and adults, showcasing scientists, artists, and educators who have worked at one or both poles and including many interactive exhibits featuring such topics as life in New York at the end of the last Ice Age, how Arctic sea ice is changing, and life on and under the ice. 2) Performances and presentations oriented towards children and families, including Inuit Throat Singers, Central Park Zoo Theater Group, and a northern lights show. 3) Lectures showcasing current IPY research and addressing such issues as the possible effects of climate change on the poles and the rest of the world, as well as polar poetry, art and film. 4) A partnership with New York City Urban Advantage program for Middle School students in the city to meet with scientists, teachers and students who had participated in polar research and travel. 5) Norwegian Consulate sponsorship of science presenters and Sami performers. The March 2007 event involved 85 presenters and volunteers from 22 institutions, and attracted ca. 3,500 visitors. Approximately 5,000 visitors attended the February 2008

  11. Hour-Scale Variability in NGC 663 and NGC 1960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Garcia Soto, Aylin; Wong, Hallee

    2016-06-01

    Since 2010 we have been monitoring massive emission-line (mainly Be) stars in young open clusters using narrowband imaging at Hα (656nm) and the nearby continuum (645nm) (Souza, Davis, and Teich 2013, BAAS. 45, PM354.22; Souza, Beltz-Mohrmann, and Sami 2014. JAAVSO, 42, 154). To supplement longer-timescale data taken at Williams College we obtained high-cadence observations, in both filters, of NGC 663 on the night of 12/10/15, and of NGC 1960 on the nights of 12/10/14, 1/23/15, 1/25/15, 11/11/15, and 12/13/15 at the 0.5m ARCSAT at Apache Point Observatory. After raw magnitude extraction using Aperture Photometry Tool (Laher et al. 2012, PASP, 124, 737), we used inhomogeneous ensemble photometry (Bhatti et al., 2010, ApJ Supp., 186, 233) to correct for transparency and seeing variations. The NGC 663 field is crowded; of 29 known Be stars in the observed field, 10 have nearby interferers. None of the remaining 19 Be stars showed significant variation during ~5.5 hours of observation. 1σ uncertainty estimates range from 0.02mag at R~10 to 0.15mag at R~14. To verify the observing and reduction procedure, we recovered hour-scale variability in known variables BY Cas (δ Cephei type, ~0.05mag decline) and V1155 Cas (β Cephei type, ~0.04mag amplitude). In NGC 1960, of 5 known and suspect Be stars observed, two not previously reported as variable (BD+34 1110 and USNOB1.0 1241-0103450) showed irregular variation on timescales of hours. In NGC 1960 we also report the incidental discovery of two non-Be suspect variables: a likely eclipsing binary (0.07mag), and a possible δ Scuti star (maximum amplitude ~0.02mag). We gratefully acknowledge support for student research from NSF grant AST-1005024 to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium, and the Office of the Dean of Faculty and the DIII Research Funding Committee of Williams College. Based on observations obtained with Apache Point Observatory's 0.5-m Astrophysical Research Consortium Small Aperture Telescope.

  12. 50 years of snow stratigraphy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C.; Pohjola, V.; Jonasson, C.; Challagan, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    With start in autumn 1961 the Abisko Scientific Research Station (ASRS) located in the Swedish sub Arctic has performed snow stratigraphy observations, resulting in a unique 50 year long time series of data. The data set contains grain size, snow layer hardness, grain compactness and snow layer dryness, observed every second week during the winter season. In general snow and snow cover are important factors for the global radiation budget, and the earth's climate. On a more local scale the layered snowpack creates a relatively mild microclimate for Arctic plants and animals, and it also determines the water content of the snowpack (snow water equivalent) important for e.g. hydrological applications. Analysis of the snow stratigraphy data, divided into three consecutive time periods, show that there has been a change in the last time period. The variable most affected is the snow layer hardness, which shows an increase in hardness of the snowpack. The number of observations with a very hard snow layer/ice at ground level increased three-fold between the first two time periods and the last time period. The thickness of the bottom layer in the snowpack is also highly affected. There has been a 60% increase in layers thinner than 10 cm in the last time period, resulting in a mean reduction in the thickness of the bottom layer from 14 cm to 11 cm. Hence the living conditions for plants and animals at the ground surface have been highly changed. The changes in the snowpack are correlated to an increased mean winter air temperature. Thus, continued increasing, or temperatures within the same ranges as in the last time period, is likely to create harder snow condition in the future. These changes are likely to affect animals that live under the snow such as lemmings and voles or animals that graze sub-Arctic vegetation in winter (e.g. reindeer that would potentially require increased supplementary feeding that incurs financial costs to Sami reindeer herders). Any decrease

  13. On the behavior of redox pairs in anhydrous and hydrous silicate melts: from the oxygen electrode to the mutual interactions of Fe and S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.

    2005-12-01

    The need of techniques for determining the oxidation state of magmas from iron and/or sulfur redox ratios has pushed scientists to yield composition-based semi-empirical equations, without much interest for the understanding of how electron transfer takes place, thus disregarding true, or at least most plausible, redox exchanges occurring in melts. Not secondary, it has generated notations (i.e., chemical equilibria) in which standard states, species and components are mixed. Let us then go back to basics, by taking the most geologically important element having multiple oxidation states: iron. In order to model redox exchanges we need i) a formalism for acid-base reactions in silicate melts, ii) a reference electrode, iii) a model for computing proportions and activities of species intervening in acid-base exchanges and redox electrodes, including that of reference. Briefly, the above requirements converge in the adoption of the normal oxygen electrode plus the Toop-Samis polymeric approach, which is based on the ionic Temkin notation (Ottonello et al., 2001). Therefore, in silicate melts redox processes and polymerization are intimately related. Under certain conditions, some unexpected features can be explored, such as the oxidation of iron in closed system with decreasing temperature. Let us now complicate the things by introducing the most geologically important volatile: water. Processing of data on the iron redox ratio in hydrous glasses allows one to model the role of composition, temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity i) by assessing the acid-base properties of the water component in a notation consistent with the above and ii) by introducing volume terms of interest. The central role of water speciation can be then discussed in terms of its amphoteric behavior, in line with the earlier prediction of Fraser (1977) and the recent NMR findings of Xue and Kanzaki (2004). Finally, let us add another multiple valence state element such as S and investigate

  14. Selected papers from the 23rd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2012) (Ilmenau, Germany, September 9-12, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Martin

    2013-07-01

    In September 2012, the 23rd MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME) took place in Ilmenau, Germany. With about 120 participants from 20 countries and 76 accepted presentations, the workshop series turned out to be a successful platform for young scientists to present their work to our scientific community. Traditionally, the interaction is an important aspect of this workshop: while short presentations introduce the posters, an extended poster session allows intensive discussion which is quite useful to the participants. The discussion very often extends into the breaks and the evening events. It is also encouraging for them that the best presentations are selected and invited to submit a full paper to this journal. Thanks to the support of IOP Publishing, this next logical step to present work to the scientific world is made possible. In this issue, you can find the best papers that have been selected by a committee during the workshop taking the written workshop contribution, the poster and the presentation into account. Again, all areas of micromechanics from new technology developments up to systems integration were presented at the workshop at different levels of completion. The selected papers present those results which are almost complete. Nevertheless, it is nice to see that in some cases topics grow over the years from 'nice ideas' to realized system concepts. And although this is the 23rd workshop, it is clear that micromechanics is a topic that is not running short of new ideas. First, I would like to thank the authors of the selected papers for each of their individual excellent contributions. My gratitude also goes to my fellow members in the programme committee (Per Ohlckers, Martin Hill and Sami Franssila) for their cooperation in the selection of invited speakers and submitted papers, as well as the anonymous Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) reviewers for their careful selection of the final papers presented here. Last, but not

  15. Interplay of Periodic, Cyclic and Stochastic Variability in Selected Areas of the H-R Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    models, and a session on very long waves. The leading idea throughout the meeting was to discuss the interplay between all kinds of cycles that produce the data obtained when observing stars of the groups mentioned above. In order to provide the participants with a view much broader than the one they encounter when analysing the cyclic data of their pet stars, two lectures on periodicities, cycles and waves in totally different fields of variability were given at the beginning of the workshop: one talk on climate and weather variations by Lennart Bengtsson, and a review on cyclicities in the Sun by Sami Solanki.

  16. On the Formation of Elliptical Galaxies via Mergers in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan; Dubinski, John; Yee, Howard K. C.

    2015-08-01

    gas-rich disks and compact spheroids) and cosmological merger trees, and discuss prospects for comparisons with data from the new generation of IFU surveys like SAMI.

  17. A study of 3D structure of nighttime electron density enhancement in the mid-latitude ionosphere by GPS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Saito, A.

    2011-12-01

    The mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is a feature that the nighttime electron density larger than that in the daytime mid-latitude ionosphere. This anomaly was first detected in the southern hemisphere five decades ago and observed in the northern hemisphere recently by ionosondes and satellites. Previous studies presented the electron density structure of MSNA by using COSMIC occultation data and found that MSNA is clearly seen around 300 km altitude during local summer. However, due to lack of observation, the day-to-day variation of MSNA was not investigated. A GPS tomography method by SPEL of Kyoto University using the total electron content (TEC) data measured by the ground-based GPS receiver network is employed in this study. The wide coverage and continuous observation of GPS receivers are suitable for investigating the spatial and day-to-day variations of ionospheric electron densities. The algorithm of the GPS tomography developed by SPEL of Kyoto University use a constraint condition that the gradient of election density tends to be smooth in the horizontal direction and steep in the vicinity of the F2 peak, instead of inputting the initial conditions. Therefore, the algorithm is independent of any ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron density distribution models. The dense ground-based GPS receiver network around European region is used to study the three dimensional (3D) structure of MSNA with GPS tomography. Results show that the MSNA usually appear around the geomagnetic mid-latitude region during local summer nighttime. The feature of MSNA is most obvious at the ionospheric F2-peak altitudes. The result also shows a day-to-day variation in the formation of MSNA, in terms of the occurrence time, intensity, and spatial extent. The tomographic results are compared with the ionosondes, satellites, and radar measurements. A theoretical model simulation, SAMI2, is also used to further discuss the mechanism of MSNA. The comparison with other

  18. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2004-05-01

    Physics Laboratory, Sciences Faculty of Sfax (Tunisia) and the Co-Chairmen were Professor Sami Mahmood, Dean of Sciences at Yarmouk University (Jordan) and Professor Mohamed Akhavan from the Sharif University of Technology (Iran). The four-day conference consisted of several oral and poster sessions, followed by social programs in the evenings. The success of the event could be measured during the closing session on the last day, when several delegates emphasized the high-quality science that had been evident at the conference. A post conference three-day tour to the south of Tunisia (Matmata, Douz City: the gate of desert and the mountains oasis: Tamerza, Mides and Chebika) was also arranged. The conference was generously sponsored by: - The Tunisian Ministry of High Education, Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian Secretary of State for Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian National Office of Tourism - The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - French Institute for Cooperation in Tunisia - Tunisian-Italian Scientific Partnership - British Gas - Tunisian Society for Electricity and Gas - Imex Olive Oil -Confiserie TRIKI Le Moulin The next MSM conference in 2005 will be held in Morocco.

  19. FOREWORD: HELAS II International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Roth, Markus

    2008-07-01

    . Also available in the online edition are (i) an interactive conference picture, (ii) the abstract book, and (iii) material on the special session `Waves, Waves and Waves'. Additional articles related to both the HELAS II and the SOHO 19/GONG 2007 conferences can be found in a topical issue of Solar Physics, volume 251, nos 1-2. Financial support was provided by the HELAS Network, the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (through Ulrich Christensen and Sami Solanki) and the University of Göttingen (through Stefan Dreizler). We thank the local organizers, and in particular Sabine Deutsch, for their outstanding efforts in making the conference a success. We are also grateful to Graham Douglas and Jacky Mucklow of IoP Publishing for their help in the production of this volume. Laurent Gizon and Markus Roth Editors Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany

  20. Impact of solar activity on the relation of vertical ExB drift over equator, low latitude electron density and TEC: Model v/s observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar

    2012-07-01

    Ionospheric models are of prime interest for applications like satellite based navigation and a near real time forecasting of grid based ionospheric delays. The physical processes that govern low latitude ionospheric variability are, at large, known, however, there remains a certain degree of uncertainty in many variables that are not measurable in each longitude sector on day-to-day basis like thermospheric neutral winds and drifts, diffusion and conductivity distribution etc. To study the day-to-day and seasonal variation of peak electron density and TEC in low latitude we used a physics based model, SAMI2, for three years 2001, 2005 and 2009 representing respectively the peak, moderate and lowest levels of solar activity in past solar cycle, besides for some geomagnetic storms. The model is run for Indian longitude sector under various controlled conditions like meridional winds and equatorial ExB drifts. The diurnal and seasonal variations of various quantities have been obtained as 2D meridional cross-section of ionosphere. There is a renewed interest in the variable nature of relation between time of maximization of equatorial ionization anomaly in terms of electron density (and TEC) and the time of maximization of ExB drift over equator. A dramatic variation is found in the time-lag between the maximization of ExB drift over equator and peak density occurrence in low latitudes (even in case of zero meridional winds). We found that single linear relation neither exists for any season nor for any year during any epoch of solar cycle. Specifically, equinoctial months exhibit greater day-to-day variability than other seasons, the reasons to be still quantified. Simulations for geomagnetic storms were separately performed. TEC observations show a direct response to penetration electric fields. The model results under disturbed ExB conditions show that the imminent enhancements in low latitude TEC are result of enhanced density due to mechanical up-lifting of F

  1. Experimental Study on Steel Tank Model Using Shaking Table/ Badania Eksperymentalne Modelu Zbiornika Stalowego Na Stole Sejsmicznym

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkacki, Daniel; Jankowski, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Cylindrical steel tanks are very popular structures used for storage of products of chemical and petroleum industries. Earthquakes are the most dangerous and also the most unpredictable dynamic loads acting on such structures. On the other hand, mining tremors are usually considered to be less severe due to lower acceleration levels observed. The aim of the present paper is to show the results of the experimental study which has been conducted on a scaled model of a real tank located in Poland. The investigation has been carried out under different dynamic excitations (earthquakes and mining tremors) using the shaking table. The results of the study indicate that stored product may significantly influence the values of dynamic parameters and confirm that the level of liquid filling is really essential in the structural analysis. The comparison of the response under moderate earthquakes and mining tremors indicate that the second excitation may be more severe in some cases. Stalowe zbiorniki walcowe są bardzo popularnymi konstrukcjami używanymi do magazynowania produktów przemysłu chemicznego i naftowego. Ich bezpieczeństwo i niezawodność są kluczowe, ponieważ każde uszkodzenie może nieść za sobą bardzo poważne konsekwencje. Trzęsienia ziemi są najbardziej niebezpiecznymi, a zarazem najbardziej nieprzewidywalnymi obciążeniami dynamicznymi, które mogą oddziaływać na tego typu konstrukcje. Z drugiej strony ruchy podłoża związane ze wstrząsami górniczymi są uważane za mniej groźne z powodu osiągania niższych poziomów wartości przyspieszeń. Celem niniejszego artykułu jest przedstawienie wyników badań eksperymentalnych, które przeprowadzono na wykonanym w skali modelu rzeczywistego zbiornika zlokalizowanego na terenie Polski. Badania wykonano przy użyciu stołu sejsmicznego. Zakres badań obejmował testy harmoniczne właściwości dynamicznych oraz zachowanie się stalowego zbiornika walcowego podczas trzęsień ziemi oraz wstrz

  2. Optimizing Communications Between Arctic Residents and IPY Scientific Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, M.; Carpenter, L.

    2007-12-01

    in San Francisco on December 10 to 14, 2007. One component of this conference is entitled « Education, Outreach and Communications During IPY and Beyond ». ACIC proposes to present a discussion paper, « Optimizing Communications Between Arctic Residents and IPY Scientific Researchers », describing the status of IPY outreach and communications in the Arctic at this time. The paper will be complemented by photographs which illustrate the context of communication activity in these regions. ACIC has an existing international network of indigenous northern communicators. The IPY Northern Coordination Offices in Canada, and key informants in Alaska, RAIPON in the Russian Federation, and the Association of Sami Journalists, will be interviewed to determine involvement in IPY activities planned and/or undertaken. The level of community and professional awareness will be surveyed through interviews with community radio personnel. Aspirations and expectations for further cooperation with IPY reseearchers will be determined. Barriers and shortfalls will be identified. The usability and potential of current communications will be assessed. Endorsed IPY projects will be contacted to determine their Arctic communication plans and activities, barriers and opportunities. Information gained from the Joint Committee Assessment in October will be considered in the context of northern informant input. Conclusions and recommendations will reported, with the goal of optimizing opportunities to connect indigenous Arctic residents and IPY scientific research centres.

  3. PREFACE: The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N.

    2012-07-01

    interface tension of flat and curved interfaces from Monte Carlo simulationsA Tröster and K Binder Phase diagrams of particles with dissimilar patches: X-junctions and Y-junctionsJ M Tavares and P I C Teixeira The unbearable heaviness of colloids: facts, surprises, and puzzles in sedimentationRoberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro and Eleonora Secchi Exploring water and other liquids at negative pressureFrédéric Caupin, Arnaud Arvengas, Kristina Davitt, Mouna El Mekki Azouzi, Kirill I Shmulovich, Claire Ramboz, David A Sessoms and Abraham D Stroock The configurational space of colloidal patchy polymers with heterogeneous sequencesIvan Coluzza and Christoph Dellago Repeated sorption of water in SBA-15 investigated by means of in situ small-angle x-ray scatteringM Erko, D Wallacher, G H Findenegg and O Paris Transition of the hydration state of a surfactant accompanying structural transitions of self-assembled aggregatesM Hishida and K Tanaka The effects of topology on the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of network-forming materialsMark Wilson Surface tension of an electrolyte-air interface: a Monte Carlo studyAlexandre Diehl, Alexandre P dos Santos and Yan Levin Water and other tetrahedral liquids: order, anomalies and solvationB Shadrack Jabes, Divya Nayar, Debdas Dhabal, Valeria Molinero and Charusita Chakravarty Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water modelsSami Tazi, Alexandru Boţan, Mathieu Salanne, Virginie Marry, Pierre Turq and Benjamin Rotenberg Phase behaviour of colloidal assemblies on 2D corrugated substratesSamir El Shawish, Emmanuel Trizac and Jure Dobnikar Structural properties of dendrimer-colloid mixturesDominic A Lenz, Ronald Blaak and Christos N Likos Fluid-fluid demixing of off-critical colloid-polymer systems confined between parallel platesE A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Simulations of nematic homopolymer melts using particle-based models with interactions expressed through collective variablesKostas Ch

  4. PREFACE: 16th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétur Gíslason, Hafliði; Guðmundsson, Viðar

    1994-01-01

    including both basic and applied physics was also organized. Most of the oral sessions included an invited lecture. The invited speakers were all of high international class, five of them working in the Nordic countries, Sami Franssila, Finland, Jostein Grepstad, Norway, Jam Hvam, Denmark, Erik Janzén and Lars Samuelson, Sweden. The other five represented a wider geographical spread, Klaus von Klitzing and Detlef Heitmann, Germany, Gordon Davies, United Kingdom, Markus Büttiker and Chris Palmstrøm, U.S.A. Attendees from China, Japan, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Lithuania also participated in the conference. In addition to the invited lectures some 100 oral papers and 25 posters were contributed. Another novelty of the conference is the fact that the proceedings of the conference are being published in a refereed journal. These proceedings contain all the invited and contributed papers the authors of which complied with the deadline of submission of the manuscripts. The editors paid special attention to prompt publication of the proceedings in order to promote the actuality of the results presented at the conference. Therefore, the deadline was strict, all of the papers were refereed during the conference. Changes suggested by the referees were either made at Laugarvatn or within three weeks from the conference. We are grateful to the international crowd of session chairmen who assumed the task of refereeing the papers, either themselves or with the help of colleagues. Without their impressive qualifications this procedure would not have been as reliable as the quality of the papers deserved. We also want to thank the editorial staff of Physica Scripta for their help and cooperation. It is our hope that the 16th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting succeeded in keeping the tradition of a popular conference series at the same time as mowing slightly the emphasis which may strengthen future meetings. Time will tell. In the meantime, we thank all the participants for their

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on the Use of X-ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Nasser; El-Khatib, Sami

    2012-07-01

    ), Raman measurements, as well as other sample preparation techniques. The training course concluded with a series of presentations of the results by the participants, attended by the NXFL team and experts from the IAEA. This training course was organized as part of the activities of the IAEA technical cooperation RAS1011 Project: Using Ion Beam Analysis and Complementary Nuclear Techniques for Material Characterization in ARASIA State Parties. The course was attended by participants from Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Syria, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen. We would like to thank the conference sponsors: Tashkeel, Sharjah Museums, and Sharjah Department of Culture and Information (Directorate on Antiquities). We would also like to thank our invited speakers, the international advisory committee, the referees and the participants. It has been a pleasure working with them all. Organizing Committee Nasser Hamdan AUS, NXFL Members Pia Anderson AUS Hussain Al-Awadhi UoS & NXFL Sami El Khatib AUS Attaelmanan Gaffar UoS & NXFL Johannes Giesen AUS Sabah Jasim Directory of Antiquities Sharjah Najeh Jisrawi UoS & NXFL Adil Tamimi AUS International Advisory Committee Zaki Aslan ATHAR, ICCROM, Italy Mark Beech Abu Dhabi Culture & Heritage, UAE Rene Van Grieken University of Antwerp, Belgium Gene Hall Rutgers, The State University of N.J. Peter Jackson Office of the Ruler of Sharjah Andreas Karydas IAEA Laboratories, Seiberdorf, Austria Giacinto Porco The Italian Association of Non-Destructive Testing, Italy Mohammad Roumie (CNRS) Lebanese Atomic Energy, Commission, Lebanon Acknowledgments The organizers gratefuly acknowledge the support received from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Provosts office at the American University of Sharjah. The support of the Physics Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences at the IAEA is greatly appreciated. We would like to give special thanks to Dr Francoise Muelhauser from the IAEA. We would like also to thank the conference

  6. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-12-01

    accuracy. They expect to measure the probe's position within two-thirds of a mile (1 kilometer) at a distance of nearly 750 million miles. "That's like being able to sit in your back yard and watch the ball in a ping-pong game being played on the Moon," said Leonid Gurvits of JIVE. Both the JPL and JIVE teams will record the data collected by the radio telescopes and process it later. In the case of the Doppler measurements, some real-time information may be available, depending on the strength of the signal, but the scientists on this team also plan to do their detailed analysis on recorded data. The JPL team is utilizing special instrumentation from the Deep Space Network called Radio Science Receivers. One will be loaned to the GBT and another to the Parkes radio observatory. "This is the same instrument that allowed us to support the challenging communications during the landing of the Spirit and Opportunity Mars rovers as well as the Cassini Saturn Orbit Insertion when the received radio signal was very weak," said Sami Asmar, the JPL scientist responsible for the data recording. When the Galileo spacecraft's probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere in 1995, a JPL team used the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico to directly track the probe's signal. Adding the data from the VLA to that experiment dramatically improved the accuracy of the wind-speed measurements. "The Galileo probe gave us a surprise. Contrary to some predictions, we learned that Jupiter's winds got stronger as we went deeper into its atmosphere. That tells us that those deeper winds are not driven entirely by sunlight, but also by heat coming up from the planet's core. If we get lucky at Titan, we'll get surprises there, too," said Robert Preston, another JPL scientist. The Huygens probe is a spacecraft built by the European Space Agency (ESA). In addition to the NRAO telescopes, the JPL Doppler Wind Experiment will use the Australia Telescope National Facility and other radio

  7. Welcome to the 2014 volume of Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-01-01

    time, the energy harvesting symposium. (2) A special issue called 'Electromechanically active polymer (EAP) transducers: research in Europe', a collection of articles from the European Scientific Network for Artificial Muscles—ESNAM group. This year, look out for focus issues put together by the editorial board on 'fluidic artificial muscles' and 'active materials and structures for origami engineering'. We will also continue to run a busy program of Topical Reviews, which are often among the most cited and most downloaded articles in the journal. Congratulations to Ganesh Raghunath and his team (University of Maryland) who won the Smart Materials and Structures prize for the best paper at SMASIS 2013, and to Kyle Mulligan and his team (University of Sherbrooke) who won our best student paper prize at Cansmart 2013. We were delighted with the news last year that ASME awarded two of its prestigious annual best paper awards to articles published in SMS: the 2013 ASME 'Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Best Paper Award in Adaptive Materials and Material Systems' went to Donghyeon Ryu and Kenneth J Loh for their article 'Strain sensing using photocurrent generated by photoactive P3HT-based nanocomposites'. The 2013 ASME 'Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Best Paper Award in Structural Dynamics and Control' went to Julianna Abel, Jonathan Luntz and Diann Brei for their article 'A two-dimensional analytical model and experimental validation of garter stitch knitted shape memory alloy actuator architecture'. Finally, may I take this opportunity to thank our fantastic Editorial board of Associate Editors who tirelessly oversee the review of each submitted article and give their invaluable advice, helping to develop and shape the journal. Welcome to Professor Alper Erturk who has recently joined us. We also acknowledge and thank Professor Andrea Del Grosso, Professor Sami Masri, Professor Seung Jo Kim and Professor Christian Boller who retired from the Board