Science.gov

Sample records for mri implants causing

  1. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  2. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  3. Tracking cells implanted into cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) using MRI.

    PubMed

    Ito-Fujishiro, Yasuyo; Koie, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroaki; Okabayashi, Sachi; Katakai, Yuko; Ohno, Chieko; Kanayama, Kiichi; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ageyama, Naohide

    2016-07-29

    Regenerative therapy with stem cell transplantation is used to treat various diseases such as coronary syndrome and Buerger's disease. For instance, stem-cell transplantation into the infarcted myocardium is an innovative and promising strategy for treating heart failure due to ischemic heart disease. Basic studies using small animals have shown that transplanted cells improve blood flow in the infarcted region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can noninvasively identify and track transplanted cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). Although clinical regenerative therapies have been clinically applied to patients, the fate of implanted cells remains unknown. In addition, follow-up studies have shown that some adverse events can occur after recovery. Therefore, the present study evaluated the ability of MRI using a 3T scanner to track implanted peripheral blood mononuclear cells labeled with SPIO on days 0 and 7 after intramuscular (i.m.) and intravenous (i.v.) injection into a cynomolgus monkey. Labeled cells were visualized at the liver and triceps surae muscle on MR images using T1- and T2-weighted sequences and histologically localized by Prussian blue staining. The transplanted cells were tracked without abnormal clinical manifestations throughout this study. Hence, MRI of cynomolgus monkey transplanted SPIO-labeled cells is a safe and efficient method of tracking labeled cells that could help to determine the mechanisms involved in regenerative therapy. PMID:27062993

  4. Tracking cells implanted into cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Fujishiro, Yasuyo; Koie, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroaki; Okabayashi, Sachi; Katakai, Yuko; Ohno, Chieko; Kanayama, Kiichi; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ageyama, Naohide

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative therapy with stem cell transplantation is used to treat various diseases such as coronary syndrome and Buerger’s disease. For instance, stem-cell transplantation into the infarcted myocardium is an innovative and promising strategy for treating heart failure due to ischemic heart disease. Basic studies using small animals have shown that transplanted cells improve blood flow in the infarcted region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can noninvasively identify and track transplanted cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). Although clinical regenerative therapies have been clinically applied to patients, the fate of implanted cells remains unknown. In addition, follow-up studies have shown that some adverse events can occur after recovery. Therefore, the present study evaluated the ability of MRI using a 3T scanner to track implanted peripheral blood mononuclear cells labeled with SPIO on days 0 and 7 after intramuscular (i.m.) and intravenous (i.v.) injection into a cynomolgus monkey. Labeled cells were visualized at the liver and triceps surae muscle on MR images using T1- and T2-weighted sequences and histologically localized by Prussian blue staining. The transplanted cells were tracked without abnormal clinical manifestations throughout this study. Hence, MRI of cynomolgus monkey transplanted SPIO-labeled cells is a safe and efficient method of tracking labeled cells that could help to determine the mechanisms involved in regenerative therapy. PMID:27062993

  5. Osseointegrated implant fracture: causes and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gealh, Walter Cristiano; Mazzo, Valéria; Barbi, Francisco; Camarini, Edevaldo Tadeu

    2011-08-01

    Despite its high success rate, therapy with osseointegrated dental implants is not free of complications. Among the problems that may occur is fracture of implants, which, albeit a rare phenomenon, may lead to unpleasant clinical outcomes for the patient, as well as for the clinician. Thus, it is paramount to know the factors related to the biological processes involved in maintenance of osseointegration and biomechanics applied to dental implants to prevent such complications, as well as treatment options available to deal with the problem. Therefore, the objectives of this work were to investigate the literature to identify causative factors that may lead to fracture of dental implants and to discuss available procedures. PMID:20553152

  6. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-21

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient's anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant's RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B(1)(+) field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient's anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty. PMID:26350025

  7. Silicone Breast Implants: A Rare Cause of Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Imam H.; Gandrapu, Bindu; Flores, David; Matta, Jyoti; Syed, Amer K.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusions are one of the rarest complications reported in patients with silicone gel filled breast implants. The silicone implants have potential to provoke chronic inflammation of pleura and subsequent pulmonary complications such as pleural effusion. Herein, we report a 44-year-old female who presented with left sided pleural effusion, six weeks after a silicone breast implantation surgery. The most common infectious, inflammatory, and malignant causes of pleural effusion were excluded with pleural fluid cytology and cultures. With recurrent effusion in the setting of recent surgery, the chemical reaction to silicone breast implants was sought and exploration was performed which revealed foreign body reaction (FBR) to silicone material. The symptoms dramatically improved after the explantation. PMID:26693375

  8. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  9. MRI evaluation prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): When to acquire and how to interpret.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Hobbs, Susan K; Ling, Fred S; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Knight, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is increasingly being used in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery. ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in the preoperative planning for these devices. As the number of patients undergoing these procedures increases, a subset of patients is being recognized who have contraindications to iodinated contrast medium, either due to a prior severe allergic type reaction or poor renal function. Another subgroup of patients with low flow and low gradient aortic stenosis is being recognized that are usually assessed for severity of aortic stenosis by stress echocardiography. There are contraindications to stress echocardiography and some of these patients may not be able to undergo this test. Non-contrast MRI can be a useful emerging modality for evaluating these patients. In this article, we discuss the emerging indications of non-contrast MRI in preoperative assessment for TAVI and describe the commonly used MRI sequences. A comparison of the most important measurements obtained for TAVI assessment on CTA and MRI from same subjects is included. Teaching Points • MRI can be used for preoperative assessment of aortic annulus. • MRI is an alternate to CTA when iodinated contrast is contraindicated. • Measurements obtained by non-contrast MRI are similar to contrast enhanced CTA. • MRI can be used to assess severity of aortic stenosis. PMID:26911969

  10. An implanted 8-channel array coil for high-resolution macaque MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, T.; Keil, B.; Farivar, R.; McNab, J.A.; Polimeni, J. R.; Gerits, A.; Arsenault, J.T.; Wald, L. L.; Vanduffel, W.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-channel receive coil array was constructed and implanted adjacent to the skull in a male rhesus monkey in order to improve the sensitivity of (functional) brain imaging. The permanent implant was part of an acrylic headpost assembly and only the coil element loop wires were implanted. The tuning, matching, and preamplifier circuitry was connected via a removable external assembly. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared to a single-, 4-, and 8-channel external receive-only coil routinely used for macaque fMRI. In vivo measurements showed significantly improved SNR within the brain for the implanted versus the external coils. Within a region-of-interest covering the cerebral cortex, we observed a 5.4-, 3.6-fold, and 3.4-fold increase in SNR compared to the external single-, 4-, and 8-channel coil, respectively. In the center of the brain, the implanted array maintained a 2.4×, 2.5×, and 2.1× higher SNR, respectively compared to the external coils. The array performance was evaluated for anatomical, diffusion tensor and functional brain imaging. This study suggests that a stable implanted phased-array coil can be used in macaque MRI to substantially increase the spatial resolution for anatomical, diffusion tensor, and functional imaging. PMID:22609793

  11. MRI compatibility and visibility assessment of implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Schueler, B A; Parrish, T B; Lin, J C; Hammer, B E; Pangrle, B J; Ritenour, E R; Kucharczyk, J; Truwit, C L

    1999-04-01

    We have developed a protocol to evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of implantable medical devices. The testing protocol consists of the evaluation of magnetic field-induced movement, electric current, heating, image distortion, and device operation. In addition, current induction is evaluated with a finite element analysis simulation technique that models the effect of radiofrequency fields on each device. The protocol has been applied to several implantable infusion pumps and neurostimulators with associated attachments. Experiments were performed using a 1.5-T whole-body MR system with parameters selected to approximate the intended clinical and worst case configuration. The devices exhibited moderate magnetic field-induced deflection and torque but had significant image artifacts. No heating was detected for any of the devices. Pump operation was halted in the magnetic field, but resumed after removed. Exposure to the magnetic field activated some of the neurostimulators. PMID:10232520

  12. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  13. Tracking the Fate of Stem Cell Implants with Fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Ribot, Emeline J.; Chen, Yuhua; Gilbert, Kyle M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study we used cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) labeled with a Fluorine-19 (19F) agent. 19F-MRI offers unambiguous detection and in vivo quantification of labeled cells. Methods We investigated two common stem cell transplant mouse models: an immune competent, syngeneic transplant model and an immune compromised, xenograft transplant model. 19F labelled stem cells were implanted intramuscularly into the hindlimb of healthy mice. The transplant was then monitored for up to 17 days using 19F-MRI, after which the tissue was excised for fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemisty. Results Immediately following transplantation, 19F-MRI quantification correlated very well with the expected cell number in both models. The 19F signal decreased over time in both models, with a more rapid decrease in the syngeneic model. By endpoint, only 2/7 syngeneic mice had any detectable 19F signal. In the xenograft model, all mice had detectable signal at endpoint. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to show that the 19F signal was related to the presence of bystander labeled macrophages, and not original MSC. Conclusions Our results show that 19F-MRI is an excellent tool for verifying the delivery of therapeutic cells early after transplantation. However, in certain circumstances the transfer of cellular label to other bystander cells may confuse interpretation of the long-term fate of the transplanted cells. PMID:25767871

  14. Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess.

    PubMed

    Jafarian, Mohammad; Rayati, Farshid; Najafi, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion (IPL) that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess. IPL is a pathologic phenomenon that rarely involves implants. This event first described in 1992 with an incidence rate of 0.26-9.9% and the origin is not well known. The most likely suggested causes are presence of preexisting bone pathology, contamination of implant surface, bone overheating during implant surgery, vascular ischemia, excessive tightening of the implant, fenestration of the buccal plate and different implant surface designs. In the present case report, we describe relatively large periapical lesions involving several implants caused severe abscess accompanied by transient inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia and its successful management. A brief review of the literature and a discussion of possible causes and different treatment plans are also included. PMID:27076835

  15. Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, Mohammad; Rayati, Farshid; Najafi, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion (IPL) that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess. IPL is a pathologic phenomenon that rarely involves implants. This event first described in 1992 with an incidence rate of 0.26-9.9% and the origin is not well known. The most likely suggested causes are presence of preexisting bone pathology, contamination of implant surface, bone overheating during implant surgery, vascular ischemia, excessive tightening of the implant, fenestration of the buccal plate and different implant surface designs. In the present case report, we describe relatively large periapical lesions involving several implants caused severe abscess accompanied by transient inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia and its successful management. A brief review of the literature and a discussion of possible causes and different treatment plans are also included. PMID:27076835

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve injury in implant dentistry: diagnosis, causes, prevention, and management.

    PubMed

    Alhassani, Ahmed Ali; AlGhamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2010-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve injury is one of the most serious complications in implant dentistry. This nerve injury can occur during local anesthesia, implant osteotomy, or implant placement. Proper understanding of anatomy, surgical procedures, and implant systems and proper treatment planning is the key to reducing such an unpleasant complication. This review discusses the causes of inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis, prevention, and management. PMID:20545547

  17. Positive Contrast MRI Techniques for Visualization of Iron-Loaded Hernia Mesh Implants in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ciritsis, Alexander; Truhn, Daniel; Hansen, Nienke L.; Otto, Jens; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Kraemer, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Object In MRI, implants and devices can be delineated via susceptibility artefacts. To discriminate susceptibility voids from proton-free structures, different positive contrast techniques were implemented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pulse sequence-based positive contrast technique (PCSI) and a post-processing susceptibility gradient mapping algorithm (SGM) for visualization of iron loaded mesh implants in patients. Material and Methods Five patients with iron-loaded MR-visible inguinal hernia mesh implants were examined at 1.5 Tesla. A gradient echo sequence (GRE; parameters: TR: 8.3ms; TE: 4.3ms; NSA:2; FA:20°; FOV:350mm²) and a PCSI sequence (parameters: TR: 25ms; TE: 4.6ms; NSA:4; FA:20°; FOV:350mm²) with on-resonant proton suppression were performed. SGM maps were calculated using two algorithms. Image quality and mesh delineation were independently evaluated by three radiologists. Results On GRE, the iron-loaded meshes generated distinct susceptibility-induced signal voids. PCSI exhibited susceptibility differences including the meshes as hyperintense signals. SGM exhibited susceptibility differences with positive contrast. Visually, the different algorithms presented no significant differences. Overall, the diagnostic value was rated best in GRE whereas PCSI and SGM were barely “sufficient”. Conclusion Both “positive contrast” techniques depicted implanted meshes with hyperintense signal. SGM comes without additional acquisition time and can therefore be utilized in every patient. PMID:27192201

  18. Penile Implants among Prisoners—A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Lorraine; Butler, Tony; Richters, Juliet; Malacova, Eva; Wand, Handan; Smith, Anthony M. A.; Grant, Luke; Richards, Alun; Donovan, Basil

    2013-01-01

    Background We report the prevalence of penile implants among prisoners and determine the independent predictors for having penile implants. Questions on penile implants were included in the Sexual Health and Attitudes of Australian Prisoners (SHAAP) survey following concerns raised by prison health staff that increasing numbers of prisoners reported having penile implants while in prison. Methods Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) of a random sample of prisoners was carried out in 41 prisons in New South Wales and Queensland (Australia). Men were asked, “Have you ever inserted or implanted an object under the skin of your penis?” If they responded Yes: “Have you ever done so while you were in prison?” Univariate logistic regression and logistic regression were used to determine the factors associated with penile implants. Results A total of 2,018 male prisoners were surveyed, aged between 18 and 65 years, and 118 (5.8%) reported that they had inserted or implanted an object under the skin of their penis. Of these men, 87 (73%) had this done while they were in prison. In the multivariate analysis, a younger age, birth in an Asian country, and prior incarceration were all significantly associated with penile implants (p<0.001). Men with penile implants were also more likely to report being paid for sex (p<0.001), to have had body piercings (p<0.001) or tattoos in prison (p<0.001), and to have taken non-prescription drugs while in prison (p<0.05). Conclusions Penile implants appear to be fairly common among prisoners and are associated with risky sexual and drug use practices. As most of these penile implants are inserted in prison, these men are at risk of blood borne viruses and wound infection. Harm reduction and infection control strategies need to be developed to address this potential risk. PMID:23326383

  19. Lethal Hemorrhage Caused by Aortoenteric Fistula Following Endovascular Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlke, Volker; Brossmann, Joachim; Klomp, Hans-Juergen

    2002-06-15

    A 55-year-old women developed an aortointestinal fistula between the bifurcation of the aorta and the distal ileum following implantation of multiple endovascular stents into both common iliac arteries for treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Ten months before the acute onset of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage two balloon-expandable steel stents had been implanted into both common iliac arteries. Due to restenosis and recurrent intermittent claudication, three balloon-expandable covered stents were implanted 4 months later on reintervention. The patient presented with abdominal pain and melena, and fell into hemorrhagic shock with signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After transfer to our hospital, she again developed hemorrhagic shock with massive upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding and died during emergency laparotomy. The development of aortoenteric fistulas following endovascular surgery/stent implantation is very rare and has to be considered in cases of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  20. Peri-implant bony overgrowth as a cause of revision surgery in auditory osseointegrated implantation.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Jared J; Petersen, Dana K; Sharbel, Daniel D; McKinnon, Brian J; MacDonald, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Implantation of auditory osseointegrated implants, also known as bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS), represents a surgical option for select pediatric patients aged 5 years or older with hearing loss. Functional indications in this patient population include conductive or mixed hearing loss. Common complications of implantation include skin infections, chronic skin irritation, hypertrophic skin overgrowth, and loose abutments. In a case series of 15 pediatric patients, we discovered an unexpectedly high skin-related complication rate requiring surgical revision of 53%. During revision surgery, we discovered 5 patients who exhibited significant bony overgrowth at the abutment site, a complication infrequently noted in past literature. PMID:27260587

  1. SU-C-17A-02: Sirius MRI Markers for Prostate Post-Implant Assessment: MR Protocol Development

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T; Wang, J; Kudchadker, R; Stafford, R; Bathala, T; Pugh, T; Ibbott, G; Frank, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently, CT is used to visualize prostate brachytherapy sources, at the expense of accurate structure contouring. MRI is superior to CT for anatomical delineation, but the sources appear as voids on MRI images. Previously we have developed Sirius MRI markers (C4 Imaging) to replace spacers to assist source localization on MRI images. Here we develop an MRI pulse sequence protocol that enhances the signal of these markers to enable MRI-only post-implant prostate dosimetric analysis. Methods: To simulate a clinical scenario, a CIRS multi-modality prostate phantom was implanted with 66 markers and 86 sources. The implanted phantom was imaged on both 1.5T and 3.0T GE scanners under various conditions, different pulse sequences (2D fast spin echo [FSE], 3D balanced steadystate free precession [bSSFP] and 3D fast spoiled gradient echo [FSPGR]), as well as varying amount of padding to simulate various patient sizes and associated signal fall-off from the surface coil elements. Standard FSE sequences from the current clinical protocols were also evaluated. Marker visibility, marker size, intra-marker distance, total scan time and artifacts were evaluated for various combinations of echo time, repetition time, flip angle, number of excitations, bandwidth, slice thickness and spacing, fieldof- view, frequency/phase encoding steps and frequency direction. Results: We have developed a 3D FSPGR pulse sequence that enhances marker signal and ensures the integrity of the marker shape while maintaining reasonable scan time. For patients contraindicated for 3.0T, we have also developed a similar sequence for 1.5T scanners. Signal fall-off with distance from prostate to coil can be compensated mainly by decreasing bandwidth. The markers are not visible using standard FSE sequences. FSPGR sequences are more robust for consistent marker visualization as compared to bSSFP sequences. Conclusion: The developed MRI pulse sequence protocol for Sirius MRI markers assists source

  2. Technical complications of implant-causes and management: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Gupta, Hemant; Tandan, Amrit

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing popularity of dental implants, the number of failures due to late implant fracture is also expected to increase. Hence, the scope for prevention and management needs to be emphasized. The objective of this review article is to analyze the various causes of failure of dental implants due to implant fixture/abutment screw fractures and also to enumerate the management and the preventive options for these failures, thereby aiming to help the clinicians to properly plan the implant-supported prosthesis treatment by considering the important biomechanical aspects of this type of rehabilitation. The present review emphasizes the causes and management of technical complications and not the incidence of such complications. PMID:26668445

  3. Atrial Fibrosis Quantified Using Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI is Associated With Sinus Node Dysfunction Requiring Pacemaker Implant

    PubMed Central

    Akoum, Nazem; Mcgann, Christopher; Vergara, Gaston; Badger, Troy; Ranjan, Ravi; Mahnkopf, Christian; Kholmovski, Eugene; Macleod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sinus node dysfunction (SND) commonly manifests with atrial arrhythmias alternating with sinus pauses and sinus bradycardia. The underlying process is thought to be because of atrial fibrosis. We assessed the value of atrial fibrosis, quantified using Late Gadolinium Enhanced-MRI (LGE-MRI), in predicting significant SND requiring pacemaker implant. Methods Three hundred forty-four patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) presenting for catheter ablation underwent LGE-MRI. Left atrial (LA) fibrosis was quantified in all patients and right atrial (RA) fibrosis in 134 patients. All patients underwent catheter ablation with pulmonary vein isolation with posterior wall and septal debulking. Patients were followed prospectively for 329 ± 245 days. Ambulatory monitoring was instituted every 3 months. Symptomatic pauses and bradycardia were treated with pacemaker implantation per published guidelines. Results The average patient age was 65 ± 12 years. The average wall fibrosis was 16.7 ± 11.1% in the LA, and 5.3 ± 6.4% in the RA. RA fibrosis was correlated with LA fibrosis (R2 = 0.26; P < 0.01). Patients were divided into 4 stages of LA fibrosis (Utah I: <5%, Utah II: 5–20%, Utah III: 20–35%, Utah IV: >35%). Twenty-two patients (mean atrial fibrosis, 23.9%) required pacemaker implantation during follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified LA fibrosis stage (OR, 2.2) as a significant predictor for pacemaker implantation with an area under the curve of 0.704. Conclusions In patients with AF presenting for catheter ablation, LGE-MRI quantification of atrial fibrosis demonstrates preferential LA involvement. Significant atrial fibrosis is associated with clinically significant SND requiring pacemaker implantation. PMID:21806700

  4. Assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for metallic surgical implants: findings applied to 61 additional skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Metallic skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips should be tested at 3-Tesla to characterize MRI issues in order to ensure patient safety. Therefore, metallic surgical implants were assessed at 3-Tesla for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts. Methods A skin closure staple (Visistat Skin Stapler, staple, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, coated 316L/316LVM stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) and a vessel ligation clip (Hemoclip Traditional, stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) that represented the largest metallic sizes made from materials with the highest magnetic susceptibilities (i.e., based on material information) among 61 other surgical implants (52 metallic implants, 9 nonmetallic implants) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating was assessed by placing each implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged SAR of 2.9-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, SE and GRE pulse sequences. Results Each surgical implant showed minor magnetic field interactions (20- and 27-degrees, which is acceptable from a safety consideration). Heating was not substantial (highest temperature change, ≤ 1.6°C). Artifacts may create issues if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the respective surgical implant. Conclusions The results demonstrated that it would be acceptable for patients with these metallic surgical implants to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Because of the materials and dimensions of the surgical implants that underwent testing, these findings pertain to 61 additional similar implants. PMID:22230200

  5. Modified Wideband Three-Dimensional Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI for Patients with Implantable Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shams; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Plotnik, Adam; Finn, J. Paul; Hu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of cardiac devices on three-dimensional (3D) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI and to develop a 3D LGE protocol for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients with reduced image artifacts. Theory and Methods The 3D LGE sequence was modified by implementing a wideband inversion pulse, which reduces hyperintensity artifacts, and by increasing bandwidth of the excitation pulse. The modified wideband 3D LGE sequence was tested in phantoms and evaluated in six volunteers and five patients with ICDs. Results Phantom and in vivo studies results demonstrated extended signal void and ripple artifacts in 3D LGE that were associated with ICDs. The reason for these artifacts was slab profile distortion and the subsequent aliasing in the slice-encoding direction. The modified wideband 3D LGE provided significantly reduced ripple artifacts than 3D LGE with wideband inversion only. Comparison of 3D and 2D LGE images demonstrated improved spatial resolution of the heart using 3D LGE. Conclusion Increased bandwidth of the inversion and excitation pulses can significantly reduce image artifacts associated with ICDs. Our modified wideband 3D LGE protocol can be readily used for imaging patients with ICDs given appropriate safety guidelines are followed. PMID:25772155

  6. A prospective audit of pacemaker function, implant lifetime, and cause of death in the patient.

    PubMed Central

    Suvarna, S K; Start, R D; Tayler, D I

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To audit prospectively the reasons for pacemaker implantation, the duration of the pacemaker use, the cause of death, and pacemaker function after removal from the patient. METHODS: Pacemakers were removed at necropsy, or from the bodies of patients awaiting cremation, in three hospitals over a three year period. The cause of death was taken from the results of the necropsy or from the certified cause of death. Demographic data, including the time of implant and reasons for implantation, were checked. The pacemakers were analysed in terms of battery status, program, and output under a standard 470 ohm load. RESULTS: 69 patients were studied. Average age at death was 78 and 80 years for men and women, respectively. The average duration since pacemaker implantation was 46 months. Eleven patients had necropsies, showing that three died from ischaemic heart disease, six from cardiomyopathy, one from an aortic aneurysm, and one from disseminated neoplasia. From the necropsy results and death certificates, the distribution of causes of death in the group as a whole were ischaemic heart disease (21), cardiomyopathy (8), cerebrovascular disease (11), neoplasia (11), chest infection/chronic obstructive airways disease (8), and other causes (10). In all cases the pacemaker box function was within normal limits. CONCLUSIONS: Neither primary nor secondary pacemaker dysfunction was found. The study highlights the impact of arrhythmias in cardiomyopathy, and raises questions about the true role of ischaemic heart disease in these pacemaker requiring patients. The relatively short gap between pacemaker implantation and death requires further study. Images PMID:10655989

  7. Ring-type ESD damage caused by electrostatic chuck of ion implanter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Mingchu; Hsu, Chun-Keng; Fu, Chiang; Huang, Hsin-Chie; Yang, Shih-Yi; Liu, Yuan-Lung; Hsu, Kuo-chin

    1999-04-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) due to electrostatic chuck (ESC) during ion implantation was observed in our fab. This defect could burn out the inter-layer dielectric and jeopardize the circuit performance. the yield impact on 0.35 micrometers product could be 40 percent. The defect distributed around the wafer edge and has a ring-type map. This defect occurred right after ESD implantation. The fringe field of the electrostatic chuck is the key reason why ring-type electrostatic discharge damage happened right after ion implantation. Our experimental result also showed that the junction characterization and surface conductivity will influence the probability of ESD damage caused by electrostatic chuck of ion implanter.

  8. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case. We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  9. Hepatic Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome Caused by Herbal Medicine: CT and MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Lou, Hai-yan; Xu, Xiao-jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the CT and MRI features of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) caused by herbal medicine Gynura segetum. Materials and Methods The CT and MRI features of 16 consecutive Gynura segetum induced HSOS cases (12 men, 4 women) were analyzed. Eight patients had CT; three patients had MRI, and the remaining five patients had both CT and MRI examinations. Based on their clinical presentations and outcomes, the patients were classified into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe. The severity of the disease was also evaluated radiologically based on the abnormal hepatic patchy enhancement in post-contrast CT or MRI images. Results Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and main right hepatic vein narrowing or occlusion were present in all 16 cases. Hepatomegaly and gallbladder wall thickening were present in 14 cases (87.5%, 14/16). Periportal high intensity on T2-weighted images was present in 6 cases (75%, 6/8). Normal liver parenchymal enhancement surrounding the main hepatic vein forming a clover-like sign was observed in 4 cases (25%, 4/16). The extent of patchy liver enhancement was statistically associated with clinical severity classification (kappa = 0.565). Conclusion Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and the main hepatic veins narrowing were the most frequent signs of herbal medicine induced HSOS. The grade of abnormal patchy liver enhancement was associated with the clinical severity. PMID:24643319

  10. Costal bone abnormalities: an unusual cause of spontaneous bilateral breast implant deflation†.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Jack E; Gusenoff, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Augmentation mammoplasty is the most common aesthetic surgical procedure performed in the USA. Prosthetic failure is a major reason for surgical reintervention. A number of causes for this have been documented, but costal bone abnormalities leading to perforation of the prosthesis are very unusual. We present the case of a woman who experienced spontaneous deflation of both saline implants in close succession, and who was found to have sharp bony spicules on both sides of her chest. Pathology examination reported reactive changes, suggestive of heterotopic bone. Examination of the implants showed no defects besides small punctures on the back wall, which coincided with the position of the spicules of bone. There are a number of possible causes for these bony growths which we examine in turn. The chest wall should be examined in all cases where unexplained implant deflation has occurred. PMID:25535321

  11. Screw insertion in trabecular bone causes peri-implant bone damage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Juri A; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2016-04-01

    Secure fracture fixation is still a major challenge in orthopedic surgery, especially in osteoporotic bone. While numerous studies have investigated the effect of implant loading on the peri-implant bone after screw insertion, less focus has been put on bone damage that may occur due to the screw insertion process itself. Therefore, the aim of this study was to localize and quantify peri-implant bone damage caused by screw insertion. We used non-invasive three-dimensional micro-computed tomography to scan twenty human femoral bone cores before and after screw insertion. After image registration of the pre- and post-insertion scans, changes in the bone micro-architecture were identified and quantified. This procedure was performed for screws with a small thread size of 0.3mm (STS, N=10) and large thread size of 0.6mm (LTS, N=10). Most bone damage occurred within a 0.3mm radial distance of the screws. Further bone damage was observed up to 0.6mm and 0.9mm radial distance from the screw, for the STS and LTS groups, respectively. While a similar amount of bone damage was found within a 0.3mm radial distance for the two screw groups, there was significantly more bone damage for the LTS group than the STS group in volumes of interest between 0.3-0.6mm and 0.6-0.9mm. In conclusion, this is the first study to localize and quantify peri-implant bone damage caused by screw insertion based on a non-invasive, three-dimensional, micro-CT imaging technique. We demonstrated that peri-implant bone damage already occurs during screw insertion. This should be taken into consideration to further improve primary implant stability, especially in low quality osteoporotic bone. We believe that this technique could be a promising method to assess more systematically the effect of peri-implant bone damage on primary implant stability. Furthermore, including peri-implant bone damage due to screw insertion into patient-specific in silico models of implant-bone systems could improve the

  12. Erroneous discharge of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator caused by an electric razor.

    PubMed

    Seifert, T; Block, M; Borggrefe, M; Breithardt, G

    1995-08-01

    We report an unusual case of the erroneous discharge of a third-generation multiprogrammable implantable cardioverter defibrillator in a 64-year-old patient with a history of recurrent ventricular tachycardias caused by electromagnetic interference while shaving with an electric razor. Electromagnetic interference was related to a defect in the electrode's insulation and could not be provoked in an intact electrode. PMID:7479183

  13. FUNCTIONAL BRAIN MAPPING AT 9.4T USING A NEW MRI COMPATIBLE ELECTRODE CHRONICALLY IMPLANTED IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Jeff F.; Tuor, Ursula I.; Kmech, Jonn; Young, Nicole A.; Henderson, Amy K.; Jackson, Jesse C.; Valentine, Pamela A.; Teskey, G. Campbell

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for acute and chronic stimulation of the brain within the MRI for studies of epilepsy, as well as of deep brain stimulation for movement and behavioral disorders. This paper describes the production and characteristics of carbon fiber based electrodes for acute and chronic stimulation in the brain. Increasing MRI field strengths are making it increasingly difficult to introduce foreign objects without a susceptibility artifact. This paper describes the production of, and the characteristics of carbon fiber based electrodes. These are biocompatible and can be implanted for chronic studies. We show the use of these electrodes at 9.4T for studying functional activation. Data are presented showing regional connectivity. Activation not only occurs near the electrode, but at sites distant and often contralateral to the electrode. In addition, there were sites showing strong negative activation to stimulation both with direct stimulation and during a kindling associated seizure. PMID:19097225

  14. Thymoma of the left thymic lobe with a contralateral small pleural implant successfully detected with diffusion-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common primary neoplasm of the anterior mediastinum. At diagnosis, up to 40% of patients present with advanced disease. Because advanced thymomas receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, diagnostic imaging is crucial to plan the correct treatment. For characterizing thymomas, CT is the first choice modality, whereas 18F-FDG/PET is reserved for questionable cases and MRI is not routinely employed. Hereby, we describe a case of thymoma with a single contralateral pleural implant in a 30-year-old woman. The small pleural thickening detected at CT was correctly interpreted as pleural seeding related to thymoma at diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI after a negative 18F-FDG/PET scan, and was subsequently confirmed at surgery. Precise diagnosis and accurate preoperative staging are crucial in managing thymic epithelial tumours in order to design the appropriate treatment and improve prognosis. Indeed, when stage IVa for pleural seeding is diagnosed preoperatively, a multimodality approach including primary chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy is recommended. This is the first report that used DW-MRI for the characterization of pleural seeding in thymoma and demonstrates that DW-MRI could be useful for the correct pre-operatory staging in thymoma patients, especially in cases with indeterminate pleural thickenings at CT, in order to define the correct management. PMID:25702681

  15. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  16. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  17. Causes of elevated intraocular pressure following implantation of phakic intraocular lenses for myopia.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Salem; Abubaker, Abdullah; Alsabaani, Nasser A; Edward, Deepak P

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the causes and visual acuity outcomes in patients with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) following implantable collamer lens (ICL) implantation. A chart review identified patients who developed high IOP at any postoperative examination and a minimum follow-up period of 3 months after ICL implantation. Data are reported out to 6 months postoperatively. Outcome measures included causes of elevated IOP, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at last visit, number of glaucoma medications, other interventions, and glaucomatous damage. Elevated IOP occurred in 58 (10.8 %) of 534 eyes that received ICL. The mean age was 28 ± 7.2 years. The preoperative IOP was 16.3 ± 1.2 mmHg. Elevated IOP most commonly occurred on the first postoperative day (23/58 (39.7 %) eyes) due to retained viscoelastic. This was followed by steroid response in 22/58 (37.9 %) eyes at 2-4 weeks postoperatively. IOP elevation in 6 (10.3 %) eyes was related to high ICL vault and pupillary block, and in 4 (6.9 %) eyes due to synechial angle closure. At last visit, BCVA was 20/40 or better in 56/58 (96.6 %) eyes, and 5/58 (8.6 %) eyes remained on glaucoma medications due to persistent steroid response (2 eyes), synechial angle closure glaucoma (1 eye), and other causes (2 eyes). One eye showed glaucomatous damage. Two eyes with high vault and elevated IOP underwent ICL explantation. There is a moderate risk of transiently developing elevated IOP after ICL implantation. Thorough removal of viscoelastic and use of anti-glaucoma medications during steroid use will reduce the majority of cases with postoperative IOP elevation. PMID:26265323

  18. Surgical repair of root perforation caused by an orthodontic miniscrew implant.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yun-Chan; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik

    2011-03-01

    Root damage is a significant complication of orthodontic miniscrew implant placement. Although root damage is rare, its proper management should be clearly understood by practitioners. This article reports the iatrogenic root perforation of a mandibular lateral incisor caused by the placement of a miniscrew. Despite a large radiolucent area caused by chronic apical periodontitis, the perforation was successfully repaired by using a recently developed material, mineral trioxide aggregate. The treatment, clinical implications, and clinical guidelines for preventing root damage during miniscrew placement in orthodontic practice are discussed. PMID:21392697

  19. Implanted depleted uranium fragments cause soft tissue sarcomas in the muscles of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Fletcher F; Guilmette, Raymond A; Hoover, Mark D

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we determined the carcinogenicity of depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments containing 0.75% titanium in muscle tissues of rats. The results have important implications for the medical management of Gulf War veterans who were wounded with DU fragments and who retain fragments in their soft tissues. We compared the tissue reactions in rats to the carcinogenicity of a tantalum metal (Ta), as a negative foreign-body control, and to a colloidal suspension of radioactive thorium dioxide ((232)Th), Thorotrast, as a positive radioactive control. DU was surgically implanted in the thigh muscles of male Wistar rats as four squares (2.5 x 2.5 x 1.5 mm or 5.0 x 5.0 x 1.5 mm) or four pellets (2.0 x 1.0 mm diameter) per rat. Ta was similarly implanted as four squares (5.0 x 5.0 x 1.1 mm) per rat. Thorotrast was injected at two sites in the thigh muscles of each rat. Control rats had only a surgical implantation procedure. Each treatment group included 50 rats. A connective tissue capsule formed around the metal implants, but not around the Thorotrast. Radiographs demonstrated corrosion of the DU implants shortly after implantation. At later times, rarifactions in the radiographic profiles correlated with proliferative tissue responses. After lifetime observation, the incidence of soft tissue sarcomas increased significantly around the 5.0 x 5.0 mm squares of DU and the positive control, Thorotrast. A slightly increased incidence occurred in rats implanted with the 2.5 x 2.5 mm DU squares and with 5.0 x 5.0 mm squares of Ta. No tumors were seen in rats with 2.0 x 1.0 mm diameter DU pellets or in the surgical controls. These results indicate that DU fragments of sufficient size cause localized proliferative reactions and soft tissue sarcomas that can be detected with radiography in the muscles of rats. PMID:11781165

  20. Implanted, inductively-coupled, radiofrequency coils fabricated on flexible polymeric material: Application to in vivo rat brain MRI at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginefri, J.-C.; Rubin, A.; Tatoulian, M.; Woytasik, M.; Boumezbeur, F.; Djemaï, B.; Poirier-Quinot, M.; Lethimonnier, F.; Darrasse, L.; Dufour-Gergam, E.

    2012-11-01

    Combined with high-field MRI scanners, small implanted coils allow for high resolution imaging with locally improved SNR, as compared to external coils. Small flexible implantable coils dedicated to in vivo MRI of the rat brain at 7 T were developed. Based on the Multi-turn Transmission Line Resonator design, they were fabricated with a Teflon substrate using copper micromolding process and a specific metal-polymer adhesion treatment. The implanted coils were made biocompatible by PolyDimethylSiloxane (PDMS) encapsulation. The use of low loss tangent material achieves low dielectric losses within the substrate and the use of the PDMS layer reduces the parasitic coupling with the surrounding media. An implanted coil was implemented in a 7 T MRI system using inductive coupling and a dedicated external pick-up coil for signal transmission. In vivo images of the rat brain acquired with in plane resolution of (150 μm)2 thanks to the implanted coil revealed high SNR near the coil, allowing for the visualization of fine cerebral structures.

  1. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, George C.; Rees, Howard D.; Levey, Allan I.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  2. [Use of gold radionuclide markers implanted into the prostate for image-guided radiotherapy in prostate cancer: side effects caused by the marker implantation].

    PubMed

    Kliton, Jorgo; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to introduce the use of the gold radiopaque markers implanted into the prostate for image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer patients and to present the side effects caused by the marker implantation. Between November 2011 and November 2013, three radiopaque, gold-plated markers (Best Medical International, Springfield, VA, USA, 1.0 mm x 3.0 mm) were implanted transperineally into the prostate of 60 patients under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Local anaesthesia was performed in all patients. A week after the procedure the patients filled in a questionnaire regarding the pain, dysuria, urinary frequency, nycturia, rectal bleeding, haematuria, haematospermia or fever symptoms caused by the implantation. The pain caused by the intervention was scored on a 1-10 scale, where 1 was a very weak and 10 was an unbearable pain. Ten days after the implantation a treatment planning CT was performed and subsequently patients started intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) within one week. During the treatments markers were used for daily verification and correction of patient's setup. No patients experienced fever or infection. Based on the questionnaires nobody experienced dysuria or rectal bleeding after implantation. Among the 60 patients studied, five (8 %) had haematospermia, nine (15 %) haematuria, which lasted in average of 3.4 and 1.8 days, respectively. The average pain score on 1-10 scale was 4.2 (range: 0-9). After the marker implantation 18 patients (30%) reported less, 10 patients (17%) more, and 27 patients (45%) equal amount of pain compared to biopsy. Five patients, who had a biopsy performed under general anaesthesia, did not answer this question. None of the patients needed analgesics after implantation. The gold marker implantation implemented for image-guided radiotherapy was well tolerated under a local anaesthesia. The complications were limited, rate and frequency of perioperative pain was comparable to the pain

  3. Visual fatigue caused by watching 3DTV: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunxiao; Wang, Jing; Li, Kun; Liu, Yuping; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the visual fatigue caused by watching 3DTV using the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The data of fMRI during three kinds of visual stimulation tasks were obtained from twenty subjects. At first, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes during stimuli of checkerboard task were compared before and after one-hour watching 3D/2DTV, and subjective evaluation was conducted based on the questionnaire simultaneously. Then 3D and 2D images were used to stimulate healthy individuals to measure brain activities that correlated with stereoscopic vision. Finally, the relationship between front or back depth of field images and visual fatigue was investigated. The results reveal that the 3D group shows more significant differences of brain activities in BA8, BA17, BA18 and BA19 than the 2D group during the checkerboard stimulation. BA5, BA6, BA7 and BA8 were testified to have close relationship with stereoscopic perception via the 2D/3D images stimulation. Furthermore, the front depth of field image was proven to impose a more serious impact on visual fatigue than the back one. These conclusions are useful for healthy and reasonable 3DTV watching as well as properly designing of 3D scenes. PMID:25603496

  4. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shock Caused by Uncommon Variety of Nonreentrant Atrioventricular Nodal Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Singh, David K; Badhwar, Nitish

    2016-03-01

    This article reports a typical case of incessant double-fire tachycardia resulting in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge caused by the device's misdiagnosis of ventricular tachycardia. At electrophysiology study, the presence of double-fire physiology was confirmed, and modification of the slow pathway resulted in elimination of repetitive double fires. Although this is an unusual entity, it is important to recognize, because it may be misdiagnosed as atrial fibrillation, resulting in inappropriate anticoagulation and/or antiarrhythmic therapy. Modification of the slow pathway and elimination of double-fire physiology can result in marked improvement in quality of life and reversal of tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26920170

  5. Electromagnetic Interference with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Causing Inadvertent Shock: Case Report and Review of Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Bhat, Tariq; Tantray, Mohmad; Lafferty, Chris; Faisal, Saiful; Teli, Sumaya; Bhat, Hilal; Raza, Muhammad; Khalid, Mariam; Biekht, Soad

    2014-01-01

    As the number of patients having implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) devices is increasing, it is important for the physicians and patients to be aware of situations and conditions that can result in interference with normal functioning of these devices. There are multiple cases of malfunction of ICDs reported in literature and it may be of great significance to have an overview of these incidents for appropriate recognition and future prevention. Here we are reviewing the available literature as well as reporting an interesting case of electromagnetic interference (EMI) resulting from leak of current in pool water causing firing of ICD. PMID:25093004

  6. Review of the principal extra spinal pathologies causing sciatica and new MRI approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ailianou, A; Fitsiori, A; Syrogiannopoulou, A; Toso, S; Viallon, M; Merlini, L; Beaulieu, J Y; Vargas, M I

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate the principal extraspinal pathologies causing sciatica and new approaches for the study of structures such as the lumbosacral plexus (LSP). Visualisation of the LSP in its entirety is difficult with conventional two-dimensional MRI sequences owing to its oblique orientation. In our institution, we have found that the utilisation of three-dimensional short tau inversion-recovery sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolutions sequence is helpful, allowing multiplanar and maximum intensity projection reconstructions in the coronal oblique plane and curvilinear reformats through the plexus. Diffusion tensor imaging enables the observation of microstructural changes and can be useful in surgical planning. The normal anatomy of the LSP, its different extraspinal pathologies and differential diagnoses are thoroughly presented. PMID:22374280

  7. A novel POMT2 mutation causes mild congenital muscular dystrophy with normal brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Terumi; HAYASHI, Yukiko K.; OGAWA, Megumu; NOGUCHI, Satoru; CAMPBELL, Kevin P.; TOGAWA, Masami; INOUE, Takehiko; OKA, Akira; OHNO, Kousaku; NONAKA, Ikuya; NISHINO, Ichizo

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient harboring a novel homozygous mutation of c.604T>G (p.F202V) in POMT2. He showed delayed psychomotor development but acquired the ability to walk at the age of 3 years and 10 months. His brain MRI was normal. No ocular abnormalities were seen. Biopsied skeletal muscle revealed markedly decreased but still detectable glycosylated forms of alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG). Our results indicate that mutations in POMT2 can cause a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes as observed in other genes associated with alpha-dystroglycanopathy. Presence of small amounts of partly glycosylated α-DG may have a role in reducing the clinical symptoms of alpha-dystroglycanopathy. PMID:18804929

  8. Safe use of MRI in people with cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Martin D; Plummer, Christopher J; Manisty, Charlotte H; Linker, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    MR scanning in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) was formerly felt to be contraindicated, but an increasing number of patients have an implanted MR conditional device, allowing them to safely undergo MR scanning, provided the manufacturer's guidance is adhered to. In addition, some patients with non-MR conditional devices may undergo MR scanning if no other imaging modality is deemed suitable and there is a clear clinical indication for scanning which outweighs the potential risk. The following guidance has been formulated by the British Heart Rhythm Society and endorsed by the British Cardiovascular Society and others. It describes protocols that should be followed for patients with CIEDs undergoing MR scanning. The recommendations, principles and conclusions are supported by the Royal College of Radiologists. PMID:26420818

  9. HAX1 Mutations causing SCN and Neurological Disease Lead to Microstructural Abnormalities Revealed by Quantitative MRI

    PubMed Central

    Boztug, Kaan; Ding, Xiao-Qi; Hartmann, Hans; Ziesenitz, Lena; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Diestelhorst, Jana; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Appaswamy, Giridharan; Kehbel, Sonja; Simon, Thorsten; Jefri, Abdullah Al; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Klein, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in the gene encoding HCLS-associated protein X-1 (HAX1) cause autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia. Some of these patients display neurological abnormalities including developmental delay, cognitive impairment and/or epilepsy. Recent genotype-phenotype studies have shown that mutations in HAX1 affecting transcripts A (NM_006118.3) and B (NM_001018837.1) cause the phenotype of SCN with neurological impairment, while mutations affecting isoform A but not B lead to SCN without neurological aberrations. In this study, we identified a consanguineous family with two patients suffering from SCN and neurological disease caused by a novel, homozygous genomic deletion including exons 4–7 of the HAX1 gene. Quantitative MRI analyses revealed general alterations in cerebral proton density in both of the patients, as well as in an additional unrelated patient with another HAX1 mutation (Arg86X) known to be associated with neurological manifestations. This study provides first in vivo evidence of general neurodegeneration associated with HAX1 deficiency in SCN patients. PMID:21108402

  10. Implantation-caused open volume defects in Ge after flash lamp annealing (FLA) probed by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwand, W.; Skorupa, W.; Schumann, Th.; Posselt, M.; Schmidt, B.; Grötzschel, R.; Brauer, G.

    2008-10-01

    B + and P + ions were implanted into Ge wafers covered with a pre-amorphised surface layer of 150 nm. After this, flash lamp annealing (FLA) in Ar atmosphere was used as post-implantation heat treatment. Radiation with Xenon flash lamps, having a spectrum in the visible range of light and a pulse length of 3 ms or 20 ms, allowed an ultra-short heating up of the near surface region. In this way, a modification of the structure of the as-implanted amorphous Ge layer was possible. Depth profiles of defects, especially those of the vacancy-type, were investigated by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) before and after FLA. It was found that the remaining vacancy-type defect structure depends on the parameters of the process of heat treatment, and that these defects could not be completely removed by FLA. Results are compared with such from SRIM 2006 calculations (stopping and range of ions in matter) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS).

  11. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls usually between 2 and 8 years of age ... MRI scans (radiology techniques designed to show the images of body structures) to find the implant when ...

  12. Sleeping with the fishes: electromagnetic interference causing an inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Hui Min; Cakebread, Holly Elizabeth; Gajendragadkar, Parag Ravindra; Duehmke, Rudolf Martin

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with a cardiac defibrillator implanted due to previous ventricular fibrillation arrest and ischaemic cardiomyopathy received a shock while cleaning his fish pond. At the time, his immersed arm was close to a submersed water pump, but the patient was asymptomatic. As a result of the shock he lost consciousness, but collapsed backwards, away from the pond. Interrogation of the device revealed a high-frequency artefact that was sensed by the device and triggered a shock. Device parameters were otherwise normal. Subsequently, the submersed water pump was found to be the source of an external alternating current leak and was identified as the likely cause of the inappropriate shock due to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Awareness of potential sources of EMI along with evaluation of data with a detailed clinical history is warranted in all cases. PMID:24879728

  13. Re-implantation of a degloving amputation of distal index finger caused by fireworks: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Cao, X C

    2013-07-01

    Amputations associated with fireworks are customarily treated by stump revision resulting in permanent disability. In this case report, we present an eight-year old boy who suffered an amputation of his right distal index finger at the level of the epiphyseal disk with degloving injury of the amputated finger caused by fireworks. Successful re-implantation was achieved. Two-year follow-up revealed fair cosmesis and acceptable functional and aesthetic recovery though the free distal phalanx had been absorbed completely. Re-implantation of a degloving amputation finger caused by fireworks is possible and can provide good distal soft tissue coverage and recovery of sensory and motor functions. PMID:24756749

  14. Effect of age on survival and causes of death after primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation.

    PubMed

    Fauchier, Laurent; Marijon, Eloi; Defaye, Pascal; Piot, Olivier; Sadoul, Nicolas; Perier, Marie-Cecile; Gras, Daniel; Klug, Didier; Algalarrondo, Vincent; Bordachar, Pierre; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Leclercq, Christophe; Babuty, Dominique; Boveda, Serge

    2015-05-15

    The benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) remains controversial in elderly patients and may be attenuated by a greater risk of nonarrhythmic death. We examined the effect of age on outcomes after prophylactic ICD implantation. All patients with coronary artery disease or dilated cardiomyopathy implanted with an ICD for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in 12 French medical centers were included in a retrospective observational study. The 5,534 ICD recipients were divided according to age: 18 to 59 years (n = 2,139), 60 to 74 years (n = 2,693), and ≥75 years (n = 702). Greater prevalences of coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation at the time of implant were observed with increasing age (both p <0.0001). During a mean follow-up of 3.1 ± 2.0 years, the annual mortality rate increased with age: 3.1% per year for age 18 to 59 years, 5.7% per year for age 60 to 74 years, and 7.5% per year for age ≥75 years (p <0.001). Older age was independently associated with a greater risk of death (adjusted odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.80 for age 60 to 74 years; and adjusted odds ratio 1.65, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.22 for age >75 years). Proportions of cardiac deaths (55.2%, 57.6%, and 57.0%, p = 0.84), including ICD-unresponsive sudden death (9.9%, 6.0%, and 10.6%, p = 0.08), and rates of appropriate ICD therapies were similar in the 3 age groups. Older age was independently associated with a higher rate of early complications and a lower rate of inappropriate therapies. In conclusion, older patients exhibited higher global mortality after ICD implantation for primary prevention, whereas rates of sudden deaths and of appropriate device therapies were similar across age groups. PMID:25784518

  15. False-positive Extra-Mammary Findings in Breast MRI: Another Cause for Concern.

    PubMed

    Padia, Shilpa A; Freyvogel, Mary; Dietz, Jill; Valente, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Colin; Grobmyer, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been repeatedly shown to have a high false-positive rate for additional findings in the breast resulting in additional breast imaging and biopsies. We hypothesize that breast MRI is also associated with a high rate of false-positive findings outside of the breast requiring additional evaluation, interventions, and delays in treatment. We performed a retrospective review of all breast MRIs performed on breast cancer patients in 2010 at a single institution. MRI reports were analyzed for extra-mammary findings. The timing and yield of the additional procedures was also analyzed. Three hundred and twenty-seven breast cancer patients (average age = 53.53 ± 11.08 years) had a breast MRI. Incidental, extra-mammary findings were reported in 35/327 patients (10.7%) with a total of 38 incidental findings. The extra-mammary findings were located in the liver (n = 21, 60.0%), thoracic cavity (n = 12, 34.3%), kidneys (n = 1, 2.9%), musculoskeletal system (n = 3, 8.6%), and neck (n = 1, 2.9%). Eighteen of the 35 patients (51.4%) received additional radiographic imaging, 3 (8.6%) received additional laboratory testing, 2 (5.7%) received additional physician referrals and 2 (5.7%) received a biopsy of the finding. The average time to additional procedures in these patients was 14.5 days. None of the incidental, extra-mammary findings were associated with breast cancer or other malignancy. Breast MRI was associated with a high rate (10.7%) of extra-mammary findings, which led to costly additional imaging studies, referrals, and tests. These findings were not associated with breast cancer or other malignancies. Extra-mammary findings highlight an unrecognized adverse consequence of breast MRI. PMID:26511429

  16. Migration of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patch causing massive hemothorax.

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, R L; Hamer, M E; Swiryn, S

    1996-01-01

    The automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is composed of shocking electrodes (patches or coils), sensing electrodes, and a generator implanted in the abdominal wall. A number of complications with defibrillators have been reported, including migration of the various components. We describe a patient in whom one of the patches, originally sutured extrapericardially, migrated in the right hemithorax and eroded into the ipsilateral lung. The resultant massive hemothorax necessitated urgent thoracotomy, patch removal, and hematoma evacuation. A hybrid implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system was created as a replacement to minimize surgery while protecting the patient from sudden death. Images PMID:8680276

  17. Preliminary investigation of a biological augmentation of rotator cuff repairs using a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the inability to restore the normal tendon footprint and limit strains on the repair site are thought to contribute to re-tearing following rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to use a collagen implant to augment rotator cuff repairs through the restoration of the native tendon footprint and the induction of new tissue to decrease overall tendon strain. Methods repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff lesions in 9 adult patients were augmented with a novel collagen implant placed over the bursal surface of the repair. Tendon thickness and footprint anatomy were evaluated using MRI at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Clinical results were assessed using standard outcome metrics. Mean follow-up for all patients was 25.8 months. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months. This tissue matured over time and became indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. At 24 months all repairs remained intact and normal footprint anatomy of the tendon was restored in all patients. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. Conclusion the ability of a collagen implant to induce new host tissue formation and restore the normal footprint anatomy may represent a significant advancement in the biological augmentation and ultimate durability of rotator cuff repairs. PMID:26605186

  18. Experimental Evaluation of SAR around an Implanted Cardiac Pacemaker Caused by Mobile Radio Terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yuta; Saito, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Soichi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    Although the effect of electromagnetic interference on an implanted cardiac pacemaker due to a nearby mobile phone has been investigated, there have been few studies on the enhancement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) around an implanted cardiac pacemaker due to a nearby mobile phone. In this study, the SAR distribution around a pacemaker model embedded in a parallelepiped torso phantom when a mobile phone was nearby was numerically calculated and experimentally measured. The results of both investigations showed a characteristic SAR distribution. The system presented can be used to estimate the effects of electromagnetic interference on implanted electric circuits and thus could lead to the development of guidelines for the safe use of mobile radio terminals near people with medical implants.

  19. iPad2® Use in Patients With Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Causes Electromagnetic Interference: The EMIT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kozik, Teri M.; Chien, Gianna; Connolly, Therese F.; Grewal, Gurinder S.; Liang, David; Chien, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 140 million iPads® have been sold worldwide. The iPad2®, with magnets embedded in its frame and Smart Cover and 3G cellular data capability, can potentially cause electromagnetic interference in implantable cardioverter defibrillators. This can lead to potentially life‐threatening situations in patients. The goal of this study was to determine whether the iPad2® can cause electromagnetic interference in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Methods and Results Twenty‐seven patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators were studied. The iPad2® was held at reading distance and placed directly over the device with cellular data capability activated and deactivated. The manufacturers/models of devices and the patients' body mass index were noted. The presence of electromagnetic interference was detected by using a programmer supplied by each manufacturer. Magnet mode with suspension of anti‐tachycardia therapy was triggered in 9 (33%) patients. All occurred when the iPad2® was placed directly over the device. The cellular data status did not cause interference and no noise or oversensing was noted. There was no significant difference between the mean body mass index of the groups with or without interference. Conclusions The iPad2® can trigger magnet mode in implantable cardioverter defibrillators when laid directly over the device. This is potentially dangerous if patients should develop life‐threatening arrhythmias at the same time. As new electronic products that use magnets are produced, the potential risk to patients with implantable defibrillators needs to be addressed. PMID:24721802

  20. Adenomyosis is a potential cause of recurrent implantation failure during IVF treatment.

    PubMed

    Tremellen, Kelton; Russell, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Four women, who previously had undergone multiple unsuccessful in vitro fertilisation (IVF) cycles because of failure of implantation of good quality embryos, were identified as having coexisting uterine adenomyosis. Endometrial biopsies showed that adenomyosis was associated with a prominent aggregation of macrophages within the superficial endometrial glands, potentially interfering with embryo implantation. The inactivation of adenomyosis by an ultra-long pituitary downregulation regime promptly resulted in successful pregnancy for all women in this case series. PMID:21631453

  1. A gender based analysis of predictors of all cause death after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Federico; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Salizzoni, Stefano; Presbitero, Patrizia; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Tamburino, Corrado; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Bedogni, Francesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Gasparetto, Valeria; Napodano, Massimo; Ferrante, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco Luciano; Stella, Pieter; Brambilla, Nedy; Barbanti, Marco; Giordana, Francesca; Grasso, Costanza; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; D'Amico, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Marra, Sebastiano

    2014-10-15

    The impact of gender-related pathophysiologic features of severe aortic stenosis on transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) outcomes remains to be determined, as does the consistency of predictors of mortality between the genders. All consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at 6 institutions were enrolled in this study and stratified according to gender. Midterm all-cause mortality was the primary end point, with events at 30 days and at midterm as secondary end points. All events were adjudicated according to Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. Eight hundred thirty-six patients were enrolled, 464 (55.5%) of whom were female. At midterm follow-up (median 365 days, interquartile range 100 to 516) women had similar rates of all-cause mortality compared with men (18.1% vs 22.6%, p = 0.11) and similar incidence of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. Gender did not affect mortality also on multivariate analysis. Among clinical and procedural features, glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36 to 4.79) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure >50 mm Hg (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.26 to 4.02) independently predicted mortality in women, while insulin-treated diabetes (HR 3.45, 95% CI 1.47 to 8.09), previous stroke (HR 3.42, 95% CI 1.43 to 8.18), and an ejection fraction <30% (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41 to 10.37) were related to mortality in men. Postprocedural aortic regurgitation was independently related to midterm mortality in the 2 groups (HR 11.19, 95% CI 3.3 to 37.9). In conclusion, women and men had the same life expectancy after TAVI, but different predictors of adverse events stratified by gender were demonstrated. These findings underline the importance of a gender-tailored clinical risk assessment in TAVI patients. PMID:25159239

  2. FEF-microstimulation causes task-dependent modulation of occipital fMRI activity.

    PubMed

    Premereur, Elsie; Janssen, Peter; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-02-15

    Electrical microstimulation of FEF (FEF-EM) modulates neuronal activity in area V4 (Moore and Armstrong, 2003) and elicits functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations in visual cortex in a bottom-up dependent manner (Ekstrom et al., 2008). Here we test the hypothesis that FEF-EM-induced modulations of fMRI activity are also function of task demands, which would suggest top-down dependent gating of FEF signals in early visual cortex. We scanned two monkeys performing a visually guided saccade task; a passive fixation task with a very similar visual display; and a passive fixation task without peripheral dots. We found increased effects of FEF-EM on fMRI-activity in visual cortex during saccades compared to fixation, indicating that the FEF-EM induced modulation is task-dependent. Finally, the effect of FEF-EM is mainly present in voxels which were less activated by visual stimuli in the absence of electrical stimulation. Our results show that the FEF-EM-induced pattern of activation in early visual cortex is topographically specific and more pronounced during increased task demands. These results fit with models suggesting that FEF is an important source modulating activity in early sensory cortex and that these influences can be enhanced by coincident bottom-up or top-down signals. PMID:23186918

  3. SU-E-J-214: MR Protocol Development to Visualize Sirius MRI Markers in Prostate Brachytherapy Patients for MR-Based Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T; Wang, J; Frank, S; Stafford, R; Bruno, T; Bathala, T; Mahmood, U; Pugh, T; Ibbott, G; Kudchadker, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current CT-based post-implant dosimetry allows precise seed localization but limited anatomical delineation. Switching to MR-based post-implant dosimetry is confounded by imprecise seed localization. One approach is to place positive-contrast markers (Sirius) adjacent to the negative-contrast seeds. This patient study aims to assess the utility of a 3D fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) sequence to visualize Sirius markers for post-implant dosimetry. Methods: MRI images were acquired in prostate implant patients (n=10) on Day 0 (day-of-implant) and Day 30. The post-implant MR protocol consisted of 3D T2-weighted fast-spin-echo (FSE), T2-weighted 2D-FSE (axial) and T1-weighted 2D-FSE (axial/sagittal/coronal). We incorporated a 3D-FSPGR sequence into the post-implant MR protocol to visualize the Sirius markers. Patients were scanned with different number-of-excitations (6, 8, 10), field-of-view (10cm, 14cm, 18cm), slice thickness (1mm, 0.8mm), flip angle (14 degrees, 20 degrees), bandwidth (122.070 Hz/pixel, 325.508 Hz/pixel, 390.625 Hz/pixel), phase encoding steps (160, 192, 224, 256), frequency-encoding direction (right/left, anterior/posterior), echo-time type (minimum-full, out-of-phase), field strength (1.5T, 3T), contrast (with, without), scanner vendor (Siemens, GE), coil (endorectal-coil only, endorectal-and-torso-coil, torsocoil only), endorectal-coil filling (30cc, 50cc) and endorectal-coil filling type (air, perfluorocarbon [PFC]). For post-implant dosimetric evaluation with greater anatomical detail, 3D-FSE images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. For comparison with CT-based post-implant dosimetry, CT images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. Results: The 3D-FSPGR sequence facilitated visualization of markers in patients. Marker visualization helped distinguish signal voids as seeds versus needle tracks for more definitive MR-based post-implant dosimetry. On the CT-MR fused images, the distance between the seed on CT to MR images was 3

  4. A Novel Operative Procedure for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Utilizing a MRI-Visible Mesh Implant: Safety and Outcome of Modified Laparoscopic Bilateral Sacropexy

    PubMed Central

    Meyberg-Solomayer, Gabriele; Radosa, Julia; Bader, Werner; Schneider, Guenther; Solomayer, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sacropexy is a generally applied treatment of prolapse, yet there are known possible complications of it. An essential need exists for better alloplastic materials. Methods. Between April 2013 and June 2014, we performed a modified laparoscopic bilateral sacropexy (MLBS) in 10 patients using a MRI-visible PVDF mesh implant. Selected patients had prolapse POP-Q stages II-III and concomitant OAB. We studied surgery-related morbidity, anatomical and functional outcome, and mesh-visibility in MRI. Mean follow-up was 7.4 months. Results. Concomitant colporrhaphy was conducted in 1/10 patients. Anatomical success was defined as POP-Q stage 0-I. Apical success rate was 100% and remained stable. A recurrent cystocele was seen in 1/10 patients during follow-up without need for intervention. Out of 6 (6/10) patients with preoperative SUI, 5/6 were healed and 1/6 persisted. De-novo SUI was seen in 1/10 patients. Complications requiring a relaparoscopy were seen in 2/10 patients. 8/10 patients with OAB were relieved postoperatively. The first in-human magnetic resonance visualization of a prolapse mesh implant was performed and showed good quality of visualization. Conclusion. MLBS is a feasible and safe procedure with favorable anatomical and functional outcome and good concomitant healing rates of SUI and OAB. Prospective data and larger samples are required. PMID:25961042

  5. Measurement of lattice damage caused by ion-implantation doping of semiconductors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunsperger, R. G.; Wolf, E. D.; Shifrin, G. A.; Marsh, O. J.; Jamba, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of two new techniques used to measure the lattice damage produced in GaAs by the implantation of 60 keV cadmium ions. In the first method, optical reflection spectra of the ion-implanted samples were measured in the wavelength range from 2000 to 4600 A. The decrease in reflectivity resulting from ion-implantation was used to determine the relative amount of lattice damage as a function of ion dose. The second technique employed the scanning electron microscope. Patterns very similar in appearance to Kikuchi electron diffraction patterns are obtained when the secondary and/or backscattered electron intensity is displayed as a function of the angle of incidence of the electron beam on a single crystal surface. The results of measurements made by both methods are compared with each other and with data obtained by the method of measuring lattice damage by Rutherford scattering of 1 MeV helium ions.

  6. How MRI Compatible is 'MRI Compatible'? A Systematic Comparison of Artifacts Caused by Biopsy Needles at 3.0 and 1.5 T

    SciTech Connect

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Peykan, Nilufar; Schmidt, Katja; Krombach, Gabriele; Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to systematically investigate artifacts caused by interventional needles recommended for use in MRI, with focus on field strength, needle/mandrin type, orientation and sequence. Methods: Eight different MRI compatible needles were placed in porcine tissue and examined at 1.5 and 3.0 T with balanced-steady-state-free-precession (B-SSFP) and T1-weighted-spoiled-gradient-echo (T1-SPGR) sequences in different orientations to B{sub 0}. Artifact diameters with regards to the primary, inner, and secondary, outer artifacts were assessed and statistically evaluated. Results: The types and degree of artifacts varied considerably, especially between different mandrin types even for the same needles. Orientation of the needle in the magnetic field was another main contributor to the artifact dimensions. Less important factors were the type of pulse sequence and field strength. Artifacts ranged from 0.7 mm (steel, 0 Degree-Sign , B-SSFP, 3.0 T, inner) to 71.4 mm (nitinol, 90 Degree-Sign , B-SSFP, 1.5 T, outer). Inner artifact diameters in B-SSFP were slightly larger (8.2 {+-} 5.7 mm) than those in T1-SPGR (7.6 {+-} 5.4 mm) and comparable between 1.5 and 3.0 T (e.g., 8.0 vs. 8.4 mm, B-SSFP). Conclusions: Although all were sold as 'MR compatible,' the artifacts differed greatly between needle types, and even more so for different mandrins. The results suggest an empirical approach to the needle choice based on lesion type and approach angle.

  7. Ganglion causing paralysis of the suprascapular nerve. Diagnosis by MRI and ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, K; Maeda, K; Ikeda, T; Itoman, M; Yamamoto, M

    1991-08-01

    A 26-year-old man had a right infraspinatus muscle weakness and aching of the shoulder due to suprascapular nerve entrapment confirmed by electromyography. MRI revealed a well-defined area of increased signal intensity over the suprascapular notch. An ultrasonogram showed a homogeneous hypoechogenic area at the base of the scapular spine. A diagnosis was made of a ganglion compressing the inferior branch of the suprascapular nerve. After removal of several ganglia, the patient had immediate pain relief, and normal electromyographic findings were obtained 5 months postoperatively. PMID:1882686

  8. Bacterial Biofilms on Implanted Suture Material Are a Cause of Surgical Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nistico, Laura; Tower, Irene; Lasko, Leslie-Ann; Stoodley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) has been estimated to occur in up to 5% of all procedures, accounting for up to 0.5% of all hospital costs. Bacterial biofilms residing on implanted foreign bodies have been implicated as contributing or causative factors in a wide variety of infectious scenarios, but little consideration has been given to the potential for implanted, submerged suture material to act as a host for biofilm and thus serve as a nidus of infection. Methods: We report a series of 15 patients who underwent open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (with musculofascial closure with permanent, multifilament sutures) who developed longstanding and refractory SSIs in the abdominal wall. Explanted suture material at subsequent exploration was examined for biofilm with confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: All 15 patients at re-exploration were found to have gross evidence of a “slimy” matrix or dense reactive granulation tissue localized to the implanted sutures. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy revealed abundant biofilm present on all sutures examined; FISH was able to identify the presence of specific pathogens in the biofilm. Complete removal of the foreign bodies (and attendant biofilms) resulted in all cases in cure of the SSI. Conclusion: Bacterial biofilms on implanted suture material can manifest as persistent surgical site infections that require complete removal of the underlying foreign body substrata for resolution. PMID:24833403

  9. Bruxism: its multiple causes and its effects on dental implants - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Van Der Zaag, J; Naeije, M

    2006-04-01

    There is a growing interest in bruxism, as evidenced by the rapidly increasing number of papers about this subject during the past 5 years. The aim of the present review was to provide an update of two previous reviews from our department (one about the aetiology of bruxism and the other about the possible role of this movement disorder in the failure of dental implants) and to describe the details of the literature search strategies used, thus enabling the readers to judge the completeness of the review. Most studies that were published about the etiology during the past 5 years corroborate the previously drawn conclusions. Similarly, the update of the review about the possible causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure reveals no new points of view. Thus, there is no reason to assume otherwise than that bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally, and that there is still insufficient evidence to support or refute a causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure. This illustrates that there is a vast need for well-designed studies to study both the aetiology of bruxism and its purported relationship with implant failure. PMID:16629884

  10. Serratia marcescens: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, S.; Choy, AM.

    2015-01-01

    We present a unique case of a patient who experienced recurrent infections of his implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) site with the bacterium Serratia marcescens. This report highlights the virulence of this bacterium, its resistance to antibiotic therapy, and its ability to remain latent for prolonged periods between episodes of sepsis. It also demonstrates the merits of reimplanting devices at different sites in the context of Serratia marcescens infection. PMID:26605092

  11. Diffusional kurtosis MRI of the lower leg: changes caused by passive muscle elongation and shortening.

    PubMed

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C; Boss, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Diffusional kurtosis MRI (DKI) quantifies the deviation of water diffusion from a Gaussian distribution. We investigated the influence of passive elongation and shortening of the lower leg muscles on the DKI parameters D (diffusion coefficient) and K (kurtosis). After approval by the local ethics committee, eight healthy volunteers (age, 29.1 ± 2.9 years) underwent MRI of the lower leg at 3 T. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with 10 different b values at three ankle positions (passive dorsiflexion 10°, neutral position 0°, passive plantar flexion 40°). Parametrical maps of D and K were obtained by voxel-wise fitting of the signal intensities using a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. D and K were measured in the tibialis anterior, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. In the neutral position, D and K values were in the range between 1.66-1.79 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s and 0.21-0.39, respectively. D and K increased with passive shortening, and decreased with passive elongation, which could also be illustrated on the parametrical maps. In dorsiflexion, D (p < 0.01) and K (p = 0.036) were higher in the tibialis anterior than in the medial gastrocnemius. In plantar flexion, the opposite was found for K (p = 0.035). DKI parameters in the lower leg muscles are significantly influenced by the ankle joint position, indicating that the diffusion of water molecules in skeletal muscle deviates from a Gaussian distribution depending on muscle tonus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061811

  12. Late migration of an orbital implant causing orbital hemorrhage with sudden proptosis and diplopia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, C E

    1996-12-01

    A 31-year-old woman complained of sudden diplopia and proptosis associated with a headache. Approximately 10 years earlier, she had sustained a right orbital blowout fracture during a snow machine accident that was repaired using a Supramid implant. She presented with 4 mm of right-sided proptosis by Hertel exophthalmometry, with limitation of up and down gaze. She manifested a right gaze preference with a left head turn to achieve fusion. Visual acuity was 20/20 on both sides; however, there was 20% red desaturation and a subtle afferent pupillary defect on the right side. Goldmann visual fields were full and the retinal examination was normal. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the orbits with and without contrast demonstrated a large right posterior inferior orbital mass. Once the periorbita was breached during orbitotomy, a burgundy serosanguinous material emerged. Gram staining revealed red cells without organisms. The implant had not been fixed by wires or screws. Upon removal, the implant appeared oversized, encompassing the orbital floor, medial and lateral walls. Postoperatively, the proptosis, gaze preference with face turn, afferent pupillary defect, desaturation abnormality, and diplopia resolved. PMID:8944386

  13. Capsular contracture by silicone breast implants: possible causes, biocompatibility, and prophylactic strategies.

    PubMed

    Steiert, Andreas E; Boyce, Maria; Sorg, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The most common implanted material in the human body consists of silicone. Breast augmentation and breast reconstruction using silicone-based implants are procedures frequently performed by reconstructive and aesthetic surgeons. A main complication of this procedure continues to be the development of capsular contracture (CC), displaying the result of a fibrotic foreign body reaction after the implantation of silicone. For many years, experimental and clinical trials have attempted to analyze the problem of its etiology, treatment, and prophylaxis. Different theories of CC formation are known; however, the reason why different individuals develop CC in days or a month, or only after years, is unknown. Therefore, we hypothesize that CC formation, might primarily be induced by immunological mechanisms along with other reasons. This article attempts to review CC formation, with special attention paid to immunological and inflammatory reasons, as well as actual prophylactic strategies. In this context, the word "biocompatibility" has been frequently used to describe the overall biological innocuousness of silicone in the respective studies, although without clear-cut definitions of this important feature. We have therefore developed a new five-point scale with distinct key points of biocompatibility. Hence, this article might provide the basis for ongoing discussion in this field to reduce single-publication definitions as well as increase the understanding of biocompatibility. PMID:24324348

  14. Interference from a hand held radiofrequency remote control causing discharge of an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Man, K C; Davidson, T; Langberg, J J; Morady, F; Kalbfleisch, S J

    1993-08-01

    A 46-year-old man with a history of sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia underwent an implantation of a third generation multiprogrammable implantable cardioverter defibrillator. One year post implant, while manipulating a remote control to a radiofrequency modulated toy car, the patient experienced a defibrillator discharge not preceded by an arrhythmia prodrome. Subsequent interrogation of the defibrillator revealed that a 34-joule shock had been delivered and had been preceded by RR intervals ranging from 141-406 msec, consistent with sensing lead noise. The remote control utilizes a 12-volt battery and has a carrier frequency of 75.95 MHz and a modulating frequency of 50 Hz. Evaluation of the remote control and defibrillator interaction revealed that the remote control was able to trigger tachyarrhythmia sensing and reproduce the clinical episode. Interference was present only when the remote control was within 8 cm of the pulse generator and at specific angles relative to the device and only when the antenna length was > 45 cm. Interference was eliminated when a ground wire was attached to the antenna and when an aluminium shield was placed between the pulse generator and the remote control. This case report suggests that patients with third generation multiprogrammable defibrillators should be cautioned against close contact with potential sources of electromagnetic interference, such as remote control units. PMID:7690947

  15. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  16. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations.

    PubMed

    Saetrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between "substitution processes," which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and "exclusion processes," which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees. PMID:25352319

  17. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations

    PubMed Central

    Sætrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between “substitution processes,” which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and “exclusion processes,” which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees. PMID:25352319

  18. Mast cells rescue implantation defects caused by c-kit deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Woidacki, K; Popovic, M; Metz, M; Schumacher, A; Linzke, N; Teles, A; Poirier, F; Fest, S; Jensen, F; Rabinovich, G A; Maurer, M; Zenclussen, A C

    2013-01-01

    Various physiologically relevant processes are regulated by the interaction of the receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) and its ligand stem cell factor (SCF), with SCF known to be the most important growth factor for mast cells (MCs). In spite of their traditional role in allergic disorders and innate immunity, MCs have lately emerged as versatile modulators of a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes. Here we show that MCs are critical for pregnancy success. Uterine MCs presented a unique phenotype, accumulated during receptivity and expanded upon pregnancy establishment. KitW-sh/W-sh mice, whose MC deficiency is based on restricted c-Kit gene expression, exhibited severely impaired implantation, which could be completely rescued by systemic or local transfer of wild-type bone marrow-derived MCs. Transferred wild-type MCs favored normal implantation, induced optimal spiral artery remodeling and promoted the expression of MC proteases, transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor. MCs contributed to trophoblast survival, placentation and fetal growth through secretion of the glycan-binding protein galectin-1. Our data unveil unrecognized roles for MCs at the fetomaternal interface with critical implications in reproductive medicine. PMID:23328669

  19. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator dysfunction during and after magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar; Berntsen, Rolf Franck; Aass, Halfdan; Kongsgaard, Erik; Amlie, Jan Peder

    2002-09-01

    This report describes a patient in whom a MRI of the brain was performed without realizing that an ICD had been implanted 8 days previously. Electromagnetic noise induced during the MRI was detected as ventricular fibrillation and nearly caused inappropriate shocks. Charge time during MRI was prolonged. The battery indicator switched to "end of life," but this was reversed by capacitor reformation. These problems could have been avoided by inactivating the ICD prior to MRI. Three months later, the pacing threshold increased from 0.4 V per 0.5 ms at implantation to 2.8 V per 0.5. It is still uncertain whether radiofrequency current heating at the electrode tip caused the increased pacing threshold or if this would have occurred independently of the MRI. MRI of patients with an active ICD may cause life-threatening complications, and it is unknown if MRI may be safely performed if the ICD is inactivated. Therefore, MRI of patients with an ICD remains contraindicated. PMID:12380781

  20. Clostridium novyi-NT can cause regression of orthotopically implanted glioblastomas in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weiyun; Huang, Judy; Kibler, Kathleen Kazuko; Tyler, Betty M.; Gallia, Gary L.; Kinzler, Kenneth; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor that is especially difficult to treat. The tumor's ability to withstand hypoxia leads to enhanced cancer cell survival and therapy resistance, but also yields a microenvironment that is in many aspects unique within the human body, thus offering potential therapeutic opportunities. The spore-forming anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi-NT(C. novyi-NT) has the ability to propagate in tumor-generated hypoxia, leading to oncolysis. Here, we show that intravenously injected spores of C. novyi-NT led to dramatic tumor destructions and significant survival increases in implanted, intracranial syngeneic F98 and human xenograft 060919 rat GBM models. C. novyi-NT germination was specific and confined to the neoplasm, with sparing of the normal brain parenchyma. All animals tolerated the bacteriolytic treatment, but edema and increased intracranial pressure could quickly be lethal if not monitored and medically managed with hydration and antibiotics. These results provide pre-clinical data supporting the development of this therapeutic approach for the treatment of patients with GBM. PMID:25849940

  1. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI. PMID:27296559

  2. A Biodistribution and Toxicity Study of Cobalt Dichloride-N-Acetyl Cysteine in an Implantable MRI Marker for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Johansen, Mary J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Gagea, Mihai; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Borne, Agatha; Carmazzi, Yudith; Madden, Timothy

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: C4, a cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl cysteine complex, is being developed as a positive-signal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marker to localize implanted radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy. We evaluated the toxicity and biodistribution of C4 in rats with the goal of simulating the systemic effects of potential leakage from C4 MRI markers within the prostate. Methods and Materials: 9-μL doses (equivalent to leakage from 120 markers in a human) of control solution (0.9% sodium chloride), 1% (proposed for clinical use), and 10% C4 solution were injected into the prostates of male Sprague-Dawley rats via laparotomy. Organ toxicity and cobalt disposition in plasma, tissues, feces, and urine were evaluated. Results: No C4-related morbidity or mortality was observed in the biodistribution arm (60 rats). Biodistribution was measurable after 10% C4 injection: cobalt was cleared rapidly from periprostatic tissue; mean concentrations in prostate were 163 μg/g and 268 μg/g at 5 and 30 minutes but were undetectable by 60 minutes. Expected dual renal-hepatic elimination was observed, with percentages of injected dose recovered in tissues of 39.0 ± 5.6% (liver), >11.8 ± 6.5% (prostate), and >5.3 ± 0.9% (kidney), with low plasma concentrations detected up to 1 hour (1.40 μg/mL at 5-60 minutes). Excretion in urine was 13.1 ± 4.6%, with 3.1 ± 0.54% recovered in feces by 24 hours. In the toxicity arm, 3 animals died in the control group and 1 each in the 1% and 10% groups from surgical or anesthesia-related complications; all others survived to scheduled termination at 14 days. No C4-related adverse clinical signs or organ toxicity were observed. Conclusion: C4-related toxicity was not observed at exposures at least 10-fold the exposure proposed for use in humans. These data demonstrating lack of systemic toxicity with dual routes of elimination in the event of in situ rupture suggest that C4 warrants further investigation as an MRI marker for prostate

  3. A Biodistribution and Toxicity Study of Cobalt Dichloride–N-Acetyl Cysteine (C4) as an Implantable MRI Marker for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven J.; Johansen, Mary J.; Martirosyan, Karen; Gagea, Mihai; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Borne, Agatha; Carmazzi, Yudith; Madden, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose C4, a cobalt dichloride–N-acetyl cysteine complex, is being developed as a positive-signal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marker to localize implanted radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy. We evaluated the toxicity and biodistribution of C4 in rats with the goal of simulating systemic effects of potential leakage from C4 MRI markers within the prostate. Methods 9 µl doses (equivalent to leakage from 120 markers in a human) of control (0.9% sodium chloride), 1% (proposed for clinical use) and 10% C4 solution were injected into the prostates of male Sprague-Dawley rats via laparotomy. Organ toxicity and cobalt disposition in plasma, tissues, feces and urine were evaluated. Results No C4-related morbidity or mortality was observed in the biodistribution arm (60 rats). Biodistribution was measurable following 10% C4 injection: cobalt was cleared rapidly from periprostatic tissue; mean concentrations in prostate were 163 µg/g and 268 µg/g at 5 and 30 minutes but were undetectable by 60 minutes. Expected dual renal-hepatic elimination was observed with % injected dose recovered in tissues of 39.0 ±5.6% (liver) > 11.8 ±6.5% (prostate) > 5.3 ±0.9% (kidney) with low plasma concentrations detected up to 1 hr (1.40 µg/ml at 5–60 minutes). Excretion in urine was 13.1 ±4.6 % with 3.1 ±0.54 % recovered in feces by 24 hours. In the toxicity arm, three animals died in the control group and 1 each in the 1% and 10% groups from surgical or anesthesia-related complications; all others survived to scheduled termination at 14 days. No C4-related adverse clinical signs or organ toxicity was observed. Conclusion C4-related toxicity was not observed at exposures at least 10-fold that proposed for human use. This data demonstrating lack of systemic toxicity with dual routes of elimination in the event of in-situ rupture suggests C4 warrants further investigation as an MRI marker for prostate brachytherapy. PMID:23092727

  4. Classifying late-onset dementia with MRI: Is arteriosclerotic brain degeneration the most common cause of Alzheimer’s syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Feugeas, Marie Cécile; Onen, Fannie; Claeys, Elisabeth Schouman

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to use early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the causes of cognitive decline in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Baseline structural and flow quantification MR sequences, and clinical and neuropsychological follow-up for at least two years, were performed on 62 elderly subjects with MCI. Of these subjects, 17 progressed to dementia, and 15 of these progressed to dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). Conversion to clinically diagnosed DAT was related to six distinct MR profiles, including one profile suggesting severe AD (20% of these converters) and five profiles suggesting severe cerebrovascular dysfunction. Two profiles suggested arteriosclerotic brain degeneration, one profile suggested severe venous windkessel dysfunction, and two suggested marked cerebral hypoperfusion associated with very low craniospinal compliance or marked brain atrophy. As compared with vascular MR type converters, AD MR type converters showed high executive and mobility predementia performances. Severe whole anteromesial temporal atrophy and predominantly left brain atrophy on visual MR analysis was only observed in AD MR type converters. In conclusion, these observations enhance the pathogenic complexity of the Alzheimer syndrome, and suggest that the role of arteriosclerotic brain degeneration in late life dementia is underestimated. PMID:18488889

  5. Unusual cause of hypoxemia after automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillatorleads extraction

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Dinesh; Roysam, Chandrika; Singh, Rajendra; Clark, Stephen C.; Plummer, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The indication of pacemaker/AICD removal are numerous. Serious complication can occur during their removal, severe tricuspid regurgitation is one of the complication. The occurrence of PFO is not uncommon among adult population. Shunting across PFO in most circumstance is negligible, but in some necessitates closure due to hypoxemia. We report a case of 62 year old man, while undergoing AICD removal, had an emergency sternotomy for cardiac tamponade. Postoperatively, he experienced profound hypoxemia refractory to oxygen therapy. Transthoracic Echocardiogram was performed to rule out intracardiac shunts at an early stage, but it was difficult to obtain an good imaging windows poststernotomy. A small pulmonary emboli was noted on CTPA, but was not sufficient to account for the level of hypoxemia and did not resolve with anticoagulation. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed flail septal tricuspid valve with severe TR and bidirectional shunt through large PFO. Patient was posted for surgery, tricuspid valve was replaced and PFO surgically closed. Subsequently, patient recovered well ad was discharged to home. Cause of hypoxemia might be due to respiratory or cardiac dysfunction. But for hypoxemia refractory to oxygen therapy, transoesophageal echocardiogram should be always considered and performed early as an diagnostic tool in post cardiac surgical patients. PMID:26440254

  6. CUSTOM-FIT RADIOLUCENT CRANIAL IMPLANTS FOR NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL RECORDING AND STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H; Bichot, Narcisse P; Ghadooshahy, Azriel; Sharma, Jitendra; Kornblith, Simon; Philcock, Michael; Desimone, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Recording and manipulating neural activity in awake behaving animal models requires long-term implantation of cranial implants that must address a variety of design considerations, which include preventing infection, minimizing tissue damage, mechanical strength of the implant, and MRI compatibility. New Method Here we address these issues by designing legless, custom-fit cranial implants using structural MRI-based reconstruction of the skull and that are made from carbon-reinforced PEEK. Results We report several novel custom-fit radiolucent implant designs, which include a legless recording chamber, a legless stimulation chamber, a multi-channel microdrive and a head post. The fit to the skull was excellent in all cases, with no visible gaps between the base of the implants and the skull. The wound margin was minimal in size and showed no sign of infection or skin recession. Comparison with Existing Methods Cranial implants used for neurophysiological investigation in awake behaving animals often employ methyl methacrylate (MMA) to serve as a bonding agent to secure the implant to the skull. Other designs rely on radially extending legs to secure the implant. Both of these methods have significant drawbacks. MMA is toxic to bone and frequently leads to infection while radially extending legs cause the skin to recede away from the implant, ultimately exposing bone and proliferating granulation tissue. Conclusions These radiolucent implants constitute a set of technologies suitable for reliable long-term recording, which minimize infection and tissue damage. PMID:25542350

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Jiří; Neužil, Petr; Vymazal, Josef; Janotka, Marek; Brada, Jiří; Žáček, Radovan; Vopálka, Roman; Weichet, Jiří; Reddy, Vivek Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our aim was to evaluate the potential for safely imaging patients with a new type of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator called the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. With the increasing number of patients with cardiac implantable devices who are indicated for MRI, there is a growing need for establishing MRI compatibility of cardiac implantable devices. Methods and Results Patients with implanted S-ICD systems underwent one or more types of anatomical MRI scans. The S-ICD was programmed off and patients were monitored throughout the imaging procedure. Device function was evaluated pre- and post-scan. Patients were asked to report immediately any pain, torqueing movement, or heating sensation in the area of the pocket or electrode. Fifteen patients underwent a total of 22 examinations at 1.5 T. Scans included brain, spine, knee, and heart. Two patients were re-scanned due to complaints of heating over the can during lumbar scans, which was caused by a thermistor probe placed on the skin to measure skin temperature. All the remaining scans occurred without incident. No evidence of device malfunction was observed. Conclusion This study is the first to domonstrate the feasibility of exposing S-ICD patients to MRI using the scanning and monitoring protocol described. More data are required to support S-ICD as a MRI conditional device. PMID:25687749

  8. Endovascular Repair of a Perforation of the Vena Caval Wall Caused by the Retrieval of a Gunther Tulip Filter After Long-Term Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Hiroyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    Symptomatic penetration of the inferior vena cava (IVC) wall reportedly occurs in 0.3% of patients in whom a filter has been implanted, and it causes injury to the adjacent structures (Bogue et al. in Pediatr Radiol 39(10):1110-1113, 1; Brzezinski et al. in Burns 32(5):640-643, 2). We succeeded in the endovascular repair of perforation of the IVC wall occurring during the retrieval of a penetrated Gunther tulip vena cava filter (Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) after long-term implantation.

  9. Delayed low frequency hearing loss caused by cochlear implantation interventions via the round window but not cochleostomy.

    PubMed

    Rowe, David; Chambers, Scott; Hampson, Amy; Eastwood, Hayden; Campbell, Luke; O'Leary, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear implant recipients show improved speech perception and music appreciation when residual acoustic hearing is combined with the cochlear implant. However, up to one third of patients lose their pre-operative residual hearing weeks to months after implantation, for reasons that are not well understood. This study tested whether this "delayed" hearing loss was influenced by the route of electrode array insertion and/or position of the electrode array within scala tympani in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation. Five treatment groups were monitored over 12 weeks: (1) round window implant; (2) round window incised with no implant; (3) cochleostomy with medially-oriented implant; (4) cochleostomy with laterally-oriented implant; and (5) cochleostomy with no implant. Hearing was measured at selected time points by the auditory brainstem response. Cochlear condition was assessed histologically, with cochleae three-dimensionally reconstructed to plot electrode paths and estimate tissue response. Electrode array trajectories matched their intended paths. Arrays inserted via the round window were situated nearer to the basilar membrane and organ of Corti over the majority of their intrascalar path compared with arrays inserted via cochleostomy. Round window interventions exhibited delayed, low frequency hearing loss that was not seen after cochleostomy. This hearing loss appeared unrelated to the extent of tissue reaction or injury within scala tympani, although round window insertion was histologically the most traumatic mode of implantation. We speculate that delayed hearing loss was related not to the electrode position as postulated, but rather to the muscle graft used to seal the round window post-intervention, by altering cochlear mechanics via round window fibrosis. PMID:26739790

  10. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719

  11. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  12. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  13. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  14. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  15. Optogenetic Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  16. SU-E-J-205: Dose Distribution Differences Caused by System Related Geometric Distortion in MRI-Guided Radiation Treatment System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, J; Wen, Z; Marshall, S; Court, L; Ibbott, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has superb soft tissue contrast but is also known for geometric distortions. The concerns and uncertainty about MRI’s geometric distortion have contributed to the hesitation of using only MRI for simulation in radiation therapy. There are two major categories of geometric distortion in MRI; system related and patient related. In this presentation, we studied the impact of system-related geometric distortion on dose distribution in a digital body phantom under an MR-Linac environment. Methods: Residual geometric distortion (after built-in geometric correction) was modeled based on phantom measurements of the system-related geometric distortions of a MRI scanner of a combined MR guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) system. A digital oval shaped phantom (40×25 cm) as well as one ellipsoid shaped tumor volume was created to simulate a simplified human body. The simulated tumor volume was positioned at several locations between the isocenter and the body surface. CT numbers in HUs that approximate soft tissue and tumor were assigned to the respective regions in the digital phantom. To study the effect of geometric distortion caused by system imperfections, an IMRT plan was optimized with the distorted image set with the B field. Dose distributions were re-calculated on the undistorted image set with the B field (as in MR-Linac). Results: The maximum discrepancies in both body contour and tumor boundary was less than 2 mm, which leads to small dose distribution change. For the target in the center, coverage was reduced from 98.8% (with distortion) to 98.2%; for the other peripheral target coverage was reduced from 98.4% to 95.9%. Conclusion: System related geometric distortions over the 40×25 area were within 2mm and the resulted dosimetric effects were minor for the two tumor locations in the phantom. Patient study will be needed for further investigation. The authors received a corporate research grant from Elekta.

  17. Removal of the broken part of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator's electrode causing pulmonary embolism via femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Zencir, Cemil; Selvi, Mithat; Elbi, Huseyin; Cetin, Mustafa; Gungor, Hasan; Akgullu, Cagdas; Badak, Muharrem Ismail

    2015-12-01

    A 66-year-old patient with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent transvenous extraction of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The distal part of the electrode was broken during manual traction through the left subclavian vein. In the present case, we showed a rare complication of transvenous lead extraction and its management. PMID:26995444

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Compatibility of the Polymer-based Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Ho; Min, Kyou Sik; An, Soon Kwan; Jeong, Joon Soo; Jun, Sang Beom; Cho, Min Hyoung; Son, Young-Don; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we compared the magnetic resonance (MR) image artifacts caused by a conventional metal-based cochlear implant and a newly developed liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based device. Methods The metal-based cochlear implant system (Nurobiosys Co.) was attached to side of the head of a subject and the LCP-based device was attached to opposite side. In both devices, alignment magnets were removed for safety. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a widely used 3.0 T and an ultra-high 7.0 T MRI machine. 3.0 and 7.0 T MR images were acquired using T1- and T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences, respectively. Results In the 3.0 T images, the metal-based device on the left side generated the significant amount of artifacts. The MR images in the proximity of the metal package were obscured by the artifacts in both axial and sagittal views. On the other hand, the MR images near the LCP-based device were relatively free from the artifacts and clearly showed the brain structures. 7.0 T MR images showed the more severe distortion in the both sides but the metal-based cochlear implant system caused a much larger obscure area than the LCP-based system. Conclusion The novel LCP-based cochlear implant provides a good MRI compatibility beyond present-day cochlear implants. Thus, MR images can be obtained from the subjects even with the implanted LCP-based neural prosthetic systems providing useful diagnostic information. Furthermore, it will be also useful for functional MRI studies of the auditory perception mechanism after cochlear implantations as well as for positron emission tomography-MRI hybrid imaging. PMID:22701769

  19. Significant Artifact Reduction at 1.5T and 3T MRI by the Use of a Cochlear Implant with Removable Magnet: An Experimental Human Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franca; Wimmer, Wilhelm; Leidolt, Lars; Vischer, Mattheus; Weder, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implants (CIs) are standard treatment for postlingually deafened individuals and prelingually deafened children. This human cadaver study evaluated diagnostic usefulness, image quality and artifacts in 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance (MR) brain scans after CI with a removable magnet. Methods Three criteria (diagnostic usefulness, image quality, artifacts) were assessed at 1.5T and 3T in five cadaver heads with CI. The brain magnetic resonance scans were performed with and without the magnet in situ. The criteria were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists, with focus on image distortion and limitation of the diagnostic value of the acquired MR images. Results MR images with the magnet in situ were all compromised by artifacts caused by the CI. After removal of the magnet, MR scans showed an unequivocal artifact reduction with significant improvement of the image quality and diagnostic usefulness, both at 1.5T and 3T. Visibility of the brain stem, cerebellopontine angle, and parieto-occipital lobe ipsilateral to the CI increased significantly after magnet removal. Conclusions The results indicate the possible advantages for 1.5T and 3T MR scanning of the brain in CI carriers with removable magnets. Our findings support use of CIs with removable magnets, especially in patients with chronic intracranial pathologies. PMID:26200775

  20. Peri-implantation lethality in mice carrying megabase-scale deletion on 5qc3.3 is caused by Exoc1 null mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Seiya; Takami, Kohei; Daitoku, Yoko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Dinh, Tra Thi Huong; Mizuno-Iijima, Saori; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We found a novel spontaneous mouse mutant with depigmentation in the ventral body, which we called White Spotting (WS) mouse. Genetic investigation revealed deletion of a > 1.2-Mb genomic region containing nine genes (Kit, Kdr, Srd5a3, Tmeme165, Clock, Pdcl2, Nmu, Exoc1, and Cep135). We designated this mutant allele KitWS. Interestingly, homozygous mutants (KitWS/WS) showed a peri-implantation lethal phenotype. Expression analyses of these nine genes in blastocysts suggested that Exoc1 was a prime candidate for this phenotype. We produced Exoc1 knockout mice, and the same peri-implantation lethal phenotype was seen in Exoc1−/− embryos. In addition, the polygenic effect without Exoc1 was investigated in genome-edited KitWE mice carrying the Mb-scale deletion induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As KitWE/WE embryos did not exhibit the abnormal phenotype, which was seen in KitWS/WS. We concluded that peri-implantation lethality in KitWS/WS was caused by a monogenic defect of Exoc1. PMID:26346620

  1. A Novel Brain Stimulation Technology Provides Compatibility with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Serano, Peter; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Katnani, Husam; Eskandar, Emad; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical electrical stimulation systems — such as pacemakers and deep brain stimulators (DBS) — are an increasingly common therapeutic option to treat a large range of medical conditions. Despite their remarkable success, one of the significant limitations of these medical devices is the limited compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a standard diagnostic tool in medicine. During an MRI exam, the leads used with these devices, implanted in the body of the patient, act as an electric antenna potentially causing a large amount of energy to be absorbed in the tissue, which can lead to serious heat-related injury. This study presents a novel lead design that reduces the antenna effect and allows for decreased tissue heating during MRI. The optimal parameters of the wire design were determined by a combination of computational modeling and experimental measurements. The results of these simulations were used to build a prototype, which was tested in a gel phantom during an MRI scan. Measurement results showed a three-fold decrease in heating when compared to a commercially available DBS lead. Accordingly, the proposed design may allow a significantly increased number of patients with medical implants to have safe access to the diagnostic benefits of MRI. PMID:25924189

  2. Microfractures in metal-ceramic and all-ceramic implant-supported fixed dental prostheses caused by superstructure fixation.

    PubMed

    Karl, Matthias; Graef, Friedrich; Wichmann, Manfred; Beck, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ceramic veneering on the passivity of fit of cast metal and CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia ceramic implant-supported three-unit cement-retained restorations was investigated, as well as the effect of misfit stress on the marginal integrity of ceramic veneers. Superstructures were fabricated using cast metal or by CAD/CAM milling of presintered or HIP zirconia ceramic (n=10). Before and after veneering, strain gages were used to measure in vitro the strain developed in all the restorations as a result of superstructure fixation. Fluorescent penetrant method was used to detect microcracks developed in ceramic veneers. Cast frameworks showed significantly higher strain values than CAD/CAM frameworks (p=0.000). Veneering significantly increased strain development in all CAD/CAM frameworks (p=0.000). Compared to zirconia ceramic restorations, significantly more microcracks were observed in cast restorations (p=0.000) both before and after superstructure fixation. PMID:22673463

  3. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age. PMID:23462803

  4. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  5. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20-50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  6. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  7. [Actuality with the breast implants].

    PubMed

    Duchateau, J

    2013-09-01

    The author presents the history of breast implants, and the modern evolution where breast implants are largely used in both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. Breast augmentation is one of the most performed cosmetic procedures, with a high satisfaction rate. However, one needs to remind that breast implants have a limited duration of life. The estimated rate of breast implant rupture after 10 years is of 10% in the current literature, This rate will probably become lower with the new more cohesive implants recently available on the market. It is therefore essential to propose a regular follow-up to all patients having breast implants. This follow-up is performed using a combination of physical examination, mammograms, ultrasound and MRI. The more specific therapeutic approach for patients having a PIP prosthesis will also be discussed. PMID:24195240

  8. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  9. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  10. Continuous EEG-fMRI in Pre-Surgical Evaluation of a Patient with Symptomatic Seizures: Bold Activation Linked to Interictal Epileptic Discharges Caused by Cavernoma.

    PubMed

    Avesani, M; Formaggio, E; Milanese, F; Baraldo, A; Gasparini, A; Cerini, R; Bongiovanni, L G; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Fiaschi, A; Manganotti, P

    2008-04-01

    We used continuous electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) to identify the linkage between the "epileptogenic" and the "irritative" area in a patient with symptomatic epilepsy (cavernoma, previously diagnosed and surgically treated), i.e. a patient with a well known "epileptogenic area", and to increase the possibility of a non invasive pre-surgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsies. A compatible MRI system was used (EEG with 29 scalp electrodes and two electrodes for ECG and EMG) and signals were recorded with a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. After the recording session and MRI artifact removal, EEG data were analyzed offline and used as paradigms in fMRI study. Activation (EEG sequences with interictal slow-spiked-wave activity) and rest (sequences of normal EEG) conditions were compared to identify the potential resulting focal increase in BOLD signal and to consider if this is spatially linked to the interictal focus used as a paradigm and to the lesion. We noted an increase in the BOLD signal in the left neocortical temporal region, laterally and posteriorly to the poro-encephalic cavity (residual of cavernoma previously removed), that is around the "epileptogenic area". In our study "epileptogenic" and "irritative" areas were connected with each other. Combined EEG-fMRI may become routine in clinical practice for a better identification of an irritative and lesional focus in patients with symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:24256824

  11. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  12. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  13. Feasibility and limitations of bulk density assignment in MRI for head and neck IMRT treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alexander L; Lin, Alexander; Anamalayil, Shibu; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers centered at the base of skull are better visualized on MRI than on CT. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the accuracy of bulk density assignment in head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization. Our study investigates dose calculation differences between density-assigned MRI and CT, and identifies potential limitations related to dental implants and MRI geometrical distortion in the framework of MRI-only-based treatment planning. Bulk density assignment was performed and applied onto MRI to generate three MRI image sets with increasing levels of heterogeneity for seven patients: 1) MRIW: all water-equivalent; 2) MRIW+B: included bone with density of 1.53 g/cm3; and 3) MRIW+B+A: included bone and air. Using identical planning and optimization parameters, MRI-based IMRT plans were generated and compared to corresponding, forward-calculated, CT-based plans on the basis of target coverage, isodose distributions, and dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Phantom studies were performed to assess the magnitude and spatial dependence of MRI geometrical distortion. MRIW-based dose calculations overestimated target coverage by 16.1%. Segmentation of bone reduced differences to within 2% of the coverage area on the CT-based plan. Further segmentation of air improved conformity near air-tissue interfaces. Dental artifacts caused substantial target coverage overestimation even on MRIW+B+A. Geometrical distortion was less than 1 mm in an imaging volume 20 × 20 × 20 cm3 around scanner isocenter, but up to 4 mm at 17 cm lateral to isocenter. Bulk density assignment in the framework of MRI-only IMRT head and neck treatment planning is a feasible method with certain limitations. Bone and teeth account for the majority of density heterogeneity effects. While soft tissue is well visualized on MRI compared to CT, dental implants may not be visible on MRI and must be identified by other means and assigned

  14. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  15. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  16. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  17. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  18. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  19. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  20. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

  1. The cause of 2S Diapason screw breakage after internal lumbar fixation: studies of the mechanical and material properties of the implant.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, P; Grabarczyk, J; Depczyk, T

    2002-08-30

    In the years 1994-99, unstable fractures of the lumbar spine were surgically treated with interbody fixation in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Nicholas Copernicus Voivodeship Specialized Hospital in Łódź, using stabilizers manufactured by various companies. Complications in the form of stabilizer breakage were observed in 1 case out of 22. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the reason why the Stryker 2S Diapason screws broke. Tests performed to measure the material and mechanical properties of the implant did not show any signs of material fatigue, nor were any material defects discovered. However, a scanning microscope investigation confirmed the hypothesis that the material had crumbled due to overload. This discovery led to the decision that screws would be mounted in the bodies of the vertebrae in a manner decreasing implant load. PMID:17679886

  2. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  3. Pleomorphic structural imperfections caused by pulsed Bi-implantation in the bulk and thin-film morphologies of TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Kim, S. S.; Zhidkov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The results of combined experimental and theoretical study of pleomorphic substitutional and clustering effects in Bi-doped TiO2 hosts (bulk and thin-film morphologies) are presented. Bi-doping of the bulk and thin-film titanium dioxide was made with help of pulsed ion-implantation (EBi+ = 30 keV, D = 1 × 1017 cm-2) without posterior tempering. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) qualification (core-levels and valence bands) and Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were employed in order to study the electronic structure of Bi-ion implanted TiO2 samples. According to XPS data obtained and DFT calculations, the Bi → Ti cation substitution occurs in Bi-implanted bulk TiO2, whereas in the thin-film morphology of TiO2:Bi the Bi-atoms have metal-like clusters segregation tendency. Based on the combined XPS and DFT considerations the possible reasons and mechanism for the observed effects are discussed. It is believed that established peculiarities of bismuth embedding into employed TiO2 hosts are mostly the sequence of pleomorphic origin for the formed "bismuth-oxygen" chemical bonding.

  4. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging method that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the heart. It does ... radiation involved in MRI. The magnetic fields and radio waves used during the scan have not been shown ...

  5. Obstetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for pregnant patients. However, MRI is increasingly utilized in patients in whom the sonographic diagnosis is unclear. These include maternal conditions unique to pregnancy such as ectopic pregnancy, placenta accreta, and uterine dehiscence. MRI is also being increasingly utilized in the assessment of abdominopelvic pain in pregnancy, in particular in assessment for appendicitis. Fetal MRI is performed to assess central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and patients who are considering fetal surgery for conditions such as neural tube defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and masses that obstruct the airway. In the future, functional MRI and fetal volumetry may provide additional information that can aid in our care of complicated pregnancies. PMID:16736491

  6. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  7. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  8. Immune activation during the implantation phase causes preeclampsia-like symptoms via the CD40-CD40 ligand pathway in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Keiichi; Matsubara, Yuko; Mori, Miki; Uchikura, Yuka; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Fujioka, Toru; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is expressed by T cells and has a critical role in immune system regulation. Interventions targeting CD40L interactions following embryo implantation represent an approach to preventing preeclampsia (PE). To better understand the role of CD40L in PE, we developed a PE mouse model in which we examined how CD40L-induced immune activation affects embryo implantation. Blastocysts were incubated with CD40L-expressing adenovirus and then were transferred into the uterine horns of pseudopregnant ICR mice. Histology, biochemistry and flow cytometry experiments were performed to examine the characteristics of the mouse model. In early pregnancy, decidualization and spiral artery remodeling were reduced in CD40L-transfected mice (CD40L mice) compared with control mice. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining revealed hemorrhaging and excess fibrin deposition at the labyrinth layer-junctional zone interface of the placenta, and PAS staining demonstrated prominent focal and segmental sclerosis with collapsed glomerular capillaries in the kidneys of the CD40L mice. Flow cytometry data showed that interferon-γ production derived from CD4(+) T cells was elevated in the splenic cells of CD40L mice. Blood pressure (measured by the tail-cuff method) and urine albumin concentrations were significantly increased in CD40L mice compared with control mice. Furthermore, the plasma concentrations of soluble Flt-1 and soluble endoglin were increased in CD40L mice, as occurs in human patients with PE. Thus, CD40L-induced T-helper cell type 1 differentiation during embryo implantation may have a critical role in the pathogenesis of a PE-like presentation in a novel mouse model of PE. PMID:26763855

  9. Poly implant breast implants (PIP) and the rupture risk in asymptomatic patients: a warning for greater clinician suspicion in assessment and counselling.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, Senthurun; Taylor, Rebecca; Thrush, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Poly implant prostheses (PIP) implants have raised concern due to the increased reporting of ruptures prompting a UK review in 2012 recommending that symptomatic patients only undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and explantation as necessary. Literature suggests two of three implant ruptures are asymptomatic. In this case, a 45-year-old woman with bilateral breast implants for cosmesis presented due to publicity of PIP implants. She was asymptomatic with no clinical signs suggestive of rupture. Due to patient intention for explanation of rupture, an MRI scan was undertaken which showed extensive silicone between the chest wall and lung bilaterally. The lung multidisciplinary team did not recommend removal of the lung silicone infiltrate. The implants were removed confirming rupture. Symptoms and signs cannot be relied upon to diagnose implant ruptures. Where patient concern exists with expressed intent for explantation if proven rupture, MRI assessment is a reliable tool where clinical uncertainty over rupture is present. PMID:24964409

  10. Poly implant breast implants (PIP) and the rupture risk in asymptomatic patients: a warning for greater clinician suspicion in assessment and counselling

    PubMed Central

    Mylvaganam, Senthurun; Taylor, Rebecca; Thrush, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Poly implant prostheses (PIP) implants have raised concern due to the increased reporting of ruptures prompting a UK review in 2012 recommending that symptomatic patients only undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and explantation as necessary. Literature suggests two of three implant ruptures are asymptomatic. In this case, a 45-year-old woman with bilateral breast implants for cosmesis presented due to publicity of PIP implants. She was asymptomatic with no clinical signs suggestive of rupture. Due to patient intention for explanation of rupture, an MRI scan was undertaken which showed extensive silicone between the chest wall and lung bilaterally. The lung multidisciplinary team did not recommend removal of the lung silicone infiltrate. The implants were removed confirming rupture. Symptoms and signs cannot be relied upon to diagnose implant ruptures. Where patient concern exists with expressed intent for explantation if proven rupture, MRI assessment is a reliable tool where clinical uncertainty over rupture is present. PMID:24964409

  11. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board

    PubMed Central

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine-bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi-A13-Board) in two operating modes “power transfer” and “pinging”. With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi-A13-Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi-A13-Board exceed the performance limits. PMID:26024360

  12. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board.

    PubMed

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine‑bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi‑A13‑Board) in two operating modes "power transfer" and "pinging". With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi‑A13‑Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi‑A13‑Board exceed the performance limits. PMID:26024360

  13. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  14. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  15. Allergic reaction to platinum in silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Arepalli, Sambasiva R; Bezabeh, Shewit; Brown, S Lori

    2002-01-01

    Platinum is used as a catalyst in the manufacture of silicone breast implants. Because platinum is recognized as a potent sensitizer in certain circumstances, some have expressed concern that women with silicone breast implants are exposed to platinum, which is causing allergic reactions. We searched the literature for information on the level of platinum in breast implants and reports of sensitization that clearly related to platinum in women with breast implants. We found no published report with convincing evidence that platinum causes allergic reactions in women with breast implants or that women with breast implants are any more likely to have allergic reactions than women without breast implants. PMID:12627791

  16. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  17. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... which the type of tissue that lines the uterus [womb] grows in other areas of the body ... with the treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications ...

  18. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  19. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  20. Imaging for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Annis, J A; Robinson, P J

    1990-07-01

    Insertion of a sound amplification device into the round window niche (extracochlear implant) or into the coils of the cochlea (intracochlear implant) can give significant benefits to some carefully selected, severely deaf patients. Imaging has an essential role in selective and pre-operative assessment. Severe otosclerosis and post-meningitic labyrinthitis ossificans are common causes of deafness in these patients and can be demonstrated by computed tomography (CT). The most suitable side for operation can be assessed. We describe our experiences with 165 patients, 69 of whom were found suitable for implants. Thin (1 mm) section CT in axial and coronal planes is the best imaging investigation of the petrous temporal bones but the place of magnetic resonance scanning to confirm that the inner ear is fluid-filled and polytomography to show a multichannel implant in the cochlea is discussed. No implants were used for congenital deformities, but some observations are made of this type of structural deformity of the inner ear. PMID:2390686

  1. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration in the presurgical evaluation of refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Donaire, A; Serès, E; Setoain, X; Bargalló, N; Falcón, C; Sanmartí, F; Maestro, I; Rumià, J; Pintor, L; Boget, T; Aparicio, J; Carreño, M

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the usefulness of coregistration of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (PET/MRI) and of coregistration of PET/MRI with subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) (PET/MRI/SISCOM) in localizing the potential epileptogenic zone in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. We prospectively included 35 consecutive patients with refractory focal epilepsy whose presurgical evaluation included a PET study. Separately acquired PET and structural MRI images were coregistered for each patient. When possible, ictal SPECT and SISCOM were obtained and coregistered with PET/MRI. The potential location of the epileptogenic zone determined by neuroimaging was compared with the seizure onset zone determined by long-term video-EEG monitoring and with invasive EEG studies in patients who were implanted. Structural MRI showed no lesions in 15 patients. In these patients, PET/MRI coregistration showed a hypometabolic area in 12 (80%) patients that was concordant with seizure onset zone on EEG in 9. In 7 patients without MRI lesions, PET/MRI detected a hypometabolism that was undetected on PET alone. SISCOM, obtained in 25 patients, showed an area of hyperperfusion concordant with the seizure onset zone on EEG in 7 (58%) of the 12 of these patients who had normal MRI findings. SISCOM hyperperfusion was less extensive than PET hypometabolism. A total of 19 patients underwent surgery; 11 of these underwent invasive-EEG monitoring and the seizure onset zone was concordant with PET/MRI in all cases. PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration, performed in 4 of these patients, was concordant in 3 (75%). After epilepsy surgery, 13 (68%) patients are seizure-free after a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration are useful for determining the potential epileptogenic zone and thus for planning invasive EEG studies and surgery more precisely, especially in

  2. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  3. Implant fractures: Rare but not exceptional.

    PubMed

    Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kuntcham, Rupa Sruthi; Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of dentures aided with implants has become a preferred treatment option for rehabilitation of completely and partially edentulous patients when durability is concerned. Simulation to natural teeth in terms of esthetics and to a greater extent in function can be considered as key elements in the raise of implant dentistry worldwide. Despite its high success rate, therapy with osseointegrated dental implants is not free of complications. Implant failure can occur for other reasons, with implant fracture being one of the major reasons for late failure. Although the incidence of implant fractures may be low, it invariably effects the patient and also clinician. Thus, sound evidence based knowledge of cause of fracture is mandatory for that careful treatment that can reduce the incidence of fracture helping in a better treatment plan. The aim of this review is to enlighten the various causes of implant fracture. PMID:27041830

  4. Implant fractures: Rare but not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kuntcham, Rupa Sruthi; Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of dentures aided with implants has become a preferred treatment option for rehabilitation of completely and partially edentulous patients when durability is concerned. Simulation to natural teeth in terms of esthetics and to a greater extent in function can be considered as key elements in the raise of implant dentistry worldwide. Despite its high success rate, therapy with osseointegrated dental implants is not free of complications. Implant failure can occur for other reasons, with implant fracture being one of the major reasons for late failure. Although the incidence of implant fractures may be low, it invariably effects the patient and also clinician. Thus, sound evidence based knowledge of cause of fracture is mandatory for that careful treatment that can reduce the incidence of fracture helping in a better treatment plan. The aim of this review is to enlighten the various causes of implant fracture. PMID:27041830

  5. [Implant fracture: a complication of treatment with dental implants--review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Tagger-Green, N; Horwitz, J; Machtei, E E; Peled, M

    2002-10-01

    Dental implants are a functional and esthetic solution to partial and total edentulism. The initial success rate of this treatment modality is 90-95%. But, that treatment modality is not free of complications. One of the rare complications yet, with severe clinical results is fracture of dental implants. The current literature review presents the various causative factors that may lead to implant fracture. Implant failures may be sorted into groups by the timing of their appearance, or by the origin of failure. Fractures belong to the group of late complications, caused by a biomechanical overload. Overload may be caused by inappropriate seat of the superstructure, in-line arrangement of the implants, leverage, heavy occlusal forces (bruxing, clenching), location of the implant and the size of the implant or metal fatigue. Good clinical examinations and correct treatment plans may reduce the risk of implant fracture. PMID:12510252

  6. MR imaging of ectopic pregnancy with an emphasis on unusual implantation sites.

    PubMed

    Köroğlu, Mert; Kayhan, Arda; Soylu, Fatma Nur; Erol, Bekir; Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Gürses, Cemil; Karademir, İbrahim; Ernst, Randy; Yousuf, Ambereen; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-02-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is a life-threatening condition and remains the leading cause of death in the first trimester of pregnancy, although the mortality rate has significantly decreased over the past few decades because of earlier diagnoses and great improvements in treatment. EP is most commonly located in the ampullary portion of the fallopian tube and rarely in unusual sites such as the interstitium, cervix, cesarean scar, anomalous rudimentary horn of the uterus and peritoneal abdominal cavity. MRI may confirm or give additional information to ultrasonography, which is the most user-dependent imaging modality. Magnetic resonance imaging can accurately localize the site of abnormal implantation. It could be helpful for EP patient treatment by distinguishing the ruptured and unruptured cases before methotrexate treatment. MRI is quite sensitive to blood and can identify the hemorrhage phase. PMID:23132557

  7. Injury to the coronary arteries and related structures by implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Pang, Benjamin J; Barold, S Serge; Mond, Harry G

    2015-04-01

    Damage to the coronary arteries and related structures from pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead implantation is a rarely reported complication that can lead to myocardial infarction and pericardial tamponade that may occur acutely or even years later. We summarize the reported cases of injury to coronary arteries and related structures and review the causes of troponin elevation in the setting of cardiac implantable electronic device implantation. PMID:25564549

  8. MRI compatible optrodes for simultaneous LFP and optogenetic fMRI investigation of seizure-like afterdischarges.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Ben A; Choy, ManKin; Chuapoco, Miguel R; Madsen, Michael; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-12-01

    In preclinical studies, implanted electrodes can cause severe degradation of MRI images and hence are seldom used for chronic studies employing functional magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, we developed carbon fiber optrodes (optical fiber and electrode hybrid devices), which can be utilised in chronic longitudinal studies aiming to take advantage of emerging optogenetic technologies, and compared them with the more widely used tungsten optrodes. We find that optrodes constructed using small diameter (~130 μm) carbon fiber electrodes cause significantly reduced artifact on functional MRI images compared to those made with 50 μm diameter tungsten wire and at the same time the carbon electrodes have lower impedance, which leads to higher quality LFP recordings. In order to validate this approach, we use these devices to study optogenetically-induced seizure-like afterdischarges in rats sedated with dexmedetomidine and compare these to sub (seizure) threshold stimulations in the same animals. The results indicate that seizure-like afterdischarges involve several extrahippocampal brain regions that are not recruited by subthreshold optogenetic stimulation of the hippocampus at 20 Hz. Subthreshold stimulation led to activation of the entire ipsilateral hippocampus and septum, whereas afterdischarges additionally produced activations in the contralateral hippocampal formation, neocortex, cerebellum, nucleus accumbens, and thalamus. Although we demonstrate just one application, given the ease of fabrication, we anticipate that carbon fiber optrodes could be utilised in a variety of studies that could benefit from longitudinal optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26208873

  9. MRI analyses show that kinesio taping affects much more than just the targeted superficial tissues and causes heterogeneous deformations within the whole limb.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Yucesoy, Can A

    2015-12-16

    Kinesio taping (KT) is widely used in the treatment of sports injuries and various neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. However, it is considered as selectively effective on targeted tissues and its mechanical effects have not been quantified objectively. Ascribed to continuity of muscular and connective tissues, mechanical loading imposed can have widespread heterogeneous effects. The aim was to characterize the mechanical effects of KT objectively and to test the hypotheses that KT causes acutely, local deformations not necessarily (I) in agreement with tape adhering direction and (II) limited to the directly targeted tissues. High-resolution 3D magnetic resonance image sets were acquired in healthy human subjects (n=5) prior to and acutely after KT application over the skin along m. tibialis anterior (TA). Hip, knee and ankle angles were kept constant. Demons image registration algorithm was used to calculate local tissue deformations within the lower leg, in vivo. Mean peak tissue strains were significantly higher than strain artifacts. Only KT-to-TA region in part shows local deformations in agreement with tape adhering direction whereas, superficial skin, the rest of KT-to-TA and TA regions show deformations (up to 51.5% length change) in other directions. Non-targeted tissues also show sizable heterogeneous deformations, but in smaller amplitudes. Inter-subject variability is notable. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for a detailed assessment of local tissue deformation occurring acutely after KT application. The findings confirm our hypotheses and characterize how KT affects the underlying tissues, both immediately targeted and distant. This allows revealing mechanisms that can affect clinical outcomes of KT objectively. PMID:26556717

  10. Application of 23Na MRI to Monitor Chemotherapeutic Response in RIF-1 Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Babsky, Andriy M; Hekmatyar, Shahryar K; Zhang, Hong; Solomon, James L; Bansal, Navin

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Effects of an alkylating anticancer drug, cyclophosphamide (Cp), on 23Na signal intensity (23Na SI) and water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were examined in subcutaneously-implanted radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors by in vivo 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI experiments were performed on untreated control (n = 5) and Cp-treated (n = 6) C3H mice, once before Cp injection (300 mg/kg) then daily for 3 days after treatment. Tumor volumes were significantly lower in treated animals 2 and 3 days posttreatment. At the same time points, MRI experiments showed an increase in both 23Na SI and water ADC in treated tumors, whereas control tumors did not show any significant changes. The correlation between 23Na SI and water ADC changes was dramatically increased in the Cp-treated group, suggesting that the observed increases in 23Na SI and water ADC were caused by the same mechanism. Histologic sections showed decreased cell density in the regions of increased 23Na and water ADC SI. Destructive chemical analysis showed that Cp treatment increased the relative extracellular space and tumor [Na+]. We conclude that the changes in water ADC and 23Na SI were largely due to an increase in extracellular space. 23Na MRI and 1H water ADC measurements may provide valuable noninvasive techniques for monitoring chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:16026645

  11. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  12. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor wants to perform a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam, there is a possibility that your ...

  13. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  14. Hip Implant Modified To Increase Probability Of Retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canabal, Francisco, III

    1995-01-01

    Modification in design of hip implant proposed to increase likelihood of retention of implant in femur after hip-repair surgery. Decreases likelihood of patient distress and expense associated with repetition of surgery after failed implant procedure. Intended to provide more favorable flow of cement used to bind implant in proximal extreme end of femur, reducing structural flaws causing early failure of implant/femur joint.

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  16. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  17. MRI Findings in Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Emiko; Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a neurodegenerative disease which demonstrates brain iron accumulation caused by the mutations in the ferritin light chain gene. On brain MRI in neuroferritinopathy, iron deposits are observed as low-intensity areas on T2WI and as signal loss on T2∗WI. On T2WI, hyperintense abnormalities reflecting tissue edema and gliosis are also seen. Another characteristic finding is the presence of symmetrical cystic changes in the basal ganglia, which are seen in the advanced stages of this disorder. Atrophy is sometimes noted in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The variety in the MRI findings is specific to neuroferritinopathy. Based on observations of an excessive iron content in patients with chronic neurologic disorders, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease, the presence of excess iron is therefore recognized as a major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. The future development of multimodal and advanced MRI techniques is thus expected to play an important role in accurately measuring the brain iron content and thereby further elucidating the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21808735

  18. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD)

    PubMed Central

    Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment). PMID:24089662

  19. An assessment of hazards caused by electromagnetic interaction on humans present near short-wave physiotherapeutic devices of various types including hazards for users of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMD).

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both-GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment). PMID:24089662

  20. Complications of Poly Implant Prothèse breast implants: the current discussion.

    PubMed

    Kolios, Leila; Hirche, Christoph; Spiethoff, Alexander; Daigeler, Adrien; Lehnhardt, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Against the background of the current discussion about Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne-sur-mer, France) breast implants, we want to present a case demonstrating the complications such as implant rupture, silicone dissemination and level III silicone lymphadenopathy. A 29-year-old woman with cosmetic breast augmentation with PIP implants 5 years previously showed a sensitive swelling in her right axilla and neck region. All tests to detect an infectious or lymphomatous lymphadenopathy were negative. After ultrasound and MRI, rupture of the right implant was assumed and multiple pathologically enlarged lymph nodes up to supraclavicular region were shown. An excision biopsy of one axillary lymph node was performed; the histological examination detected a strong silicone lymphadenopathy. Surgical removal of both implants as well as capsulectomy was performed and 14 axillary lymph nodes up to level II were resected. Histologic evaluation confirmed the previous results. Our case underlines the actual discussion concerning increased rupture rate and massive silicone lymphadenopathy by PIP implants. The Agence Francaise de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (AFSSAPS) recommends clinical and ultrasound examination every 6 months for women with PIP implants. Any rupture, suspected rupture or leakage of prosthesis should lead to its explantation as well as that of the contralateral implant. In cases of unusual signs of inflammation, histological and immunohistochemical samples are to be taken. PMID:23480085

  1. Dual-Energy CT for Evaluation of Intra- and Extracapsular Silicone Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Leng, Shuai; Jacobson, Steven R.; McCollough, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicone implants are commonly used for both breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. With aging of the implant, the silicone envelope may become weak or may rupture. The technique of choice for evaluation of implant integrity is breast MRI; however this may be contraindicated in some patients or the cost may be prohibitive. Dual-energy CT allows determination of density and atomic number of tissue and can provide material composition information. We present a case of extracapsular implant rupture with MRI and dual-energy CT imaging and surgical correlation. PMID:26942031

  2. Dual-Energy CT for Evaluation of Intra- and Extracapsular Silicone Implant Rupture.

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, Katrina N; Leng, Shuai; Jacobson, Steven R; McCollough, Cynthia M

    2016-01-01

    Silicone implants are commonly used for both breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. With aging of the implant, the silicone envelope may become weak or may rupture. The technique of choice for evaluation of implant integrity is breast MRI; however this may be contraindicated in some patients or the cost may be prohibitive. Dual-energy CT allows determination of density and atomic number of tissue and can provide material composition information. We present a case of extracapsular implant rupture with MRI and dual-energy CT imaging and surgical correlation. PMID:26942031

  3. [Metal implant sensitivity: clinical and histological presentation].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, D; Letulé, V; Schneider, J J; Flaig, M J

    2016-05-01

    Metal implant sensitivity (intolerance) can cause pain, reduced mobility, loosening of the implant and skin rashes. Knowledge of differential diagnoses, histology and appropriate diagnostics are essential for proper diagnosis. To outline typical clinical signs and histology in metal-implant-associated skin lesions we present three exemplary patients from our implant allergy outpatient department and give an overview of the current literature regarding metal implant sensitivity. In patients with a negative patch test the lymphocyte transformation test may reveal metal sensitization. Even "pure" titanium alloys may contain traces of nickel. The histology of implant-associated skin reactions goes from teleangiectatic postimplantation erythema to eczema and vasculitis. Based on the synopsis of history, clinical picture, allergological testing and histology, metal implant sensitivity can be diagnosed more precisely. PMID:27090521

  4. MRI-compatible micromanipulator; design and implementation and MRI-compatibility tests.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Yoshihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible micromanipulator, which can be employed to provide medical and biological scientists with the ability to concurrently manipulate and observe micron-scale objects inside an MRI gantry. The micromanipulator formed a two-finger micro hand, and it could handle a micron-scale object using a chopstick motion. For performing operations inside the MRI gantry in a manner such that the MRI is not disturbed, the system was designed to be nonmagnetic and electromagnetically compatible with the MRI. The micro-manipulator was implemented with piezoelectric transducers (PZT) as actuators for micro-motion, strain gauges as sensors for closed-loop control, and a flexure parallel mechanism made of acrylic plastic. Its compatibility with a 2-Tesla MRI was preliminarily tested by checking if the MRI obtained with the micromanipulator were similar to those obtained without the micromanipulator. The tests concluded that the micromanipulator caused no distortion but small artifacts on the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MRI significantly deteriorated mainly due to the wiring of the micromanipulator. The MRI caused noise of the order of ones of volts in the strain amplifier. PMID:18001990

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  6. Stability, Visibility, and Histologic Analysis of a New Implanted Fiducial for Use as a Kilovoltage Radiographic or Radioactive Marker for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadter, David; Tune, Michal; Zaretsky, Asaph; Shofti, Rona; Kushnir, Arnon; Harel, Tami; Carmi-Yinon, Dafna; Corn, Ben M.S.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the stability, visibility, and histology of a novel implantable soft-tissue marker (nonradioactive and radioactive) implanted in dog prostate and rabbit liver. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 nonradioactive and 35 radioactive markers were implanted in 1 dog and 16 rabbits. Stability was assessed by measuring intermarker distance (IMD) variation relative to IMDs at implantation. The IMDs were measured weekly for 4 months in the dog and biweekly for 2-4 weeks in the rabbits. Ultrasound and X-ray imaging were performed on all subjects. Computed tomography and MRI were performed on the dog. Histologic analysis was performed on the rabbits after 2 or 4 months. Results: A total of 139 measurements had a mean ({+-} SD) absolute IMD variation of 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm. These IMD variations are consistent with those reported in the literature as due to random organ deformation. The markers were visible, identifiable, and induced minimal or no image artifacts in all tested imaging modalities. Histologic analysis revealed that all pathologic changes were highly localized and not expected to be clinically significant. Conclusions: The markers were stable from the time of implantation. The markers were found to be compatible with all common medical imaging modalities. The markers caused no significant histologic effects. With respect to marker stability, visibility, and histologic analysis these implanted fiducials are appropriate for soft-tissue target positioning in radiotherapy.

  7. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  8. Advances in implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, John; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2016-03-01

    Since the first implant in 1980, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) technology has progressed rapidly. Modern ICD's have hundreds of programmable options with the general goal of preventing inappropriate shocks and providing shocks for truly life threatening symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias. New studies on ICD programming have shown the benefits of prolonged detection intervals in reaching this goal. Anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) therapy has become an important adjunct to defibrillator shocks. Remote monitoring technologies have surfaced which have been shown to identify arrhythmias and problems with the device in an expedient fashion. The subcutaneous ICD offers the advantage of avoiding intravascular leads and their inherent risks. Lastly, the current understanding of the effects of MRI in ICD patients has advanced creating new opportunities to provide MRI safely to such patients. PMID:26653411

  9. The Clinical Implications of Poly Implant Prothèse Breast Implants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wazir, Umar; Kasem, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Mammary implants marketed by Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) were found to contain industrial grade silicone and this caused heightened anxiety and extensive publicity regarding their safety in humans. These implants were used in a large number of patients worldwide for augmentation or breast reconstruction. We reviewed articles identified by searches of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2014 using the terms: "PIP", "Poly Implant Prothèse", "breast implants" and "augmentation mammoplasty" "siloxanes" or "silicone". In addition the websites of regulating bodies in Europe, USA, and Australia were searched for reports related to PIP mammary implants. PIP mammary implants are more likely to rupture than other implants and can cause adverse effects in the short to the medium term related to the symptoms of rupture such as pain, lumps in the breast and axilla and anxiety. Based on peer-reviewed published studies we have calculated an overall rupture rate of 14.5% (383/2,635) for PIP implants. However, there is no evidence that PIP implant rupture causes long-term adverse health effects in humans so far. Silicone lymphadenopathy represents a foreign body reaction and should be treated conservatively. The long-term adverse effects usually arise from inappropriate extensive surgery, such as axillary lymph node dissection or extensive resection of breast tissue due to silicone leakage. PMID:25606483

  10. The clinical implications of poly implant prothèse breast implants: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Kasem, Abdul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-01-01

    Mammary implants marketed by Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) were found to contain industrial grade silicone and this caused heightened anxiety and extensive publicity regarding their safety in humans. These implants were used in a large number of patients worldwide for augmentation or breast reconstruction. We reviewed articles identified by searches of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2014 using the terms: "PIP", "Poly Implant Prothèse", "breast implants" and "augmentation mammoplasty" "siloxanes" or "silicone". In addition the websites of regulating bodies in Europe, USA, and Australia were searched for reports related to PIP mammary implants. PIP mammary implants are more likely to rupture than other implants and can cause adverse effects in the short to the medium term related to the symptoms of rupture such as pain, lumps in the breast and axilla and anxiety. Based on peer-reviewed published studies we have calculated an overall rupture rate of 14.5% (383/2,635) for PIP implants. However, there is no evidence that PIP implant rupture causes long-term adverse health effects in humans so far. Silicone lymphadenopathy represents a foreign body reaction and should be treated conservatively. The long-term adverse effects usually arise from inappropriate extensive surgery, such as axillary lymph node dissection or extensive resection of breast tissue due to silicone leakage. PMID:25606483

  11. Research on Blastocyst Implantation Essential Factors (BIEFs).

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Blastocyst implantation is a process of interaction between embryo and the uterus. To understand this process, this review tries to summarize what blastocyst implantation essential factors (BIEFs) play what roles, as well as where in the uterus and at what stage of implantation process. Addition of more new data to this kind of compilation of information will help the development of diagnosis and treatment of infertility caused by implantation failure. The major, important cells of the endometrial cells that interact with invading blastocyst (trophoblast) are luminal epithelial cells, stromal cells (decidual cells) and resident immune cells. BIEFs regulate these cells to successfully maintain pregnancy. PMID:20455874

  12. PIP breast implants: rupture rate and correlation with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    MOSCHETTA, M.; TELEGRAFO, M.; CORNACCHIA, I.; VINCENTI, L.; RANIERI, V.; CIRILLI, A.; RELLA, L.; IANORA, A.A. STABILE; ANGELELLI, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence of Poly Implant Prosthése (PIP) rupture as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the prevalence of the detected signs and the potential correlation with breast carcinoma. Patients and methods 67 patients with silicone breast implants and clinical indications for breast MRI were evaluated for a total of 125 implants: 40 (32%) PIP in 21 patients and 85 non-PIP in 46 patients (68%), the latest considered as control group. A 1.5-T MR imaging device was used in order to assess implant integrity with dedicated sequences and in 6 cases a dynamic study was performed for characterizing breast lesions. Two radiologists with more than 5 years’ experience in the field of MRI evaluated in consensus all MR images searching for the presence of clear signs of intra or extra-capsular implant rupture. Results 20/40 (50%) PIP implants presented signs of intra-capsular rupture: linguine sign in 20 cases (100%), tear-drop sign in 6 (30%). In 12/20 cases (60%), MRI signs of extra-capsular rupture were detected. In the control group, an intra-capsular rupture was diagnosed in 12/85 cases (14%) associated with extra-capsular one in 5/12 cases (42%). Among the six cases with suspected breast lesions, in 2/21 patients with PIP implants (10%) a breast carcinoma was diagnosed (mucinous carcinoma, n=1; invasive ductal carcinoma, n=1). In 4/46 patients (9%) with non-PIP implants, an invasive ductal carcinoma was diagnosed. Conclusion The rupture rate of PIP breast implants is significantly higher than non-PIP (50% vs 14%). MRI represents the most accurate imaging tool for evaluating breast prostheses and the linguine sign is the most common MRI sign to be searched. The incidence of breast carcinoma does not significantly differ between the PIP and non-PIP implants and a direct correlation with breast cancer can not been demonstrated. PMID:25644728

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  14. Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Song, Zhiyang; Nilsson, David; Meyerson, Björn A.; Simon, Daniel T.; Linderoth, Bengt; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. PMID:26601181

  15. Dental implants in patients with bruxing habits.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E I G; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2006-02-01

    Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly because of the large variation in the literature in terms of both the technical aspects and the biological aspects of the study material. Although there is still no proof for the suggestion that bruxism causes an overload of dental implants and of their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. There are a few practical guidelines as to minimize the chance of implant failure. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these guidelines concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the protection of the final result with a hard occlusal stabilization splint (night guard). PMID:16457676

  16. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  17. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  18. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast MRI may be done in combination with mammography or ultrasound . It is not a replacement for mammography. ... breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography. CA Cancer J Clin . 2007;57:75-89. ...

  19. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... The table slides into the middle of the MRI machine. Small devices, called coils, may be placed around ... anxious. Or your provider may suggest an open MRI in which the machine is not as close to the body. Before ...

  20. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  1. Osteochondritis Dessicans- Primary Fixation using Bioabsorbable Implants

    PubMed Central

    Galagali, Anand; Rao, Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) is a localized condition where a section of articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone separate from the joint surface. It is important to diagnose unstable OCD early and fix the fragments primarily as the results of any surgical management at late presentations are guarded. Use of bioabsorbable implants for fixing OCD is recent and we report one such case in grade IV OCD. Case Report: We present a 14 year old girl who came with a history of acute pain, swelling, inability to bear weight on the right knee following a dance practice. MRI showed stage IV osteochondral fragment measuring 20x 8mm lying free. This was primarily fixed with bioabsorbable implants. 10 months follow up showed excellent clinical and functional results. Conclusion: This case highlights the advantages of early primary fixation whenever possible. By far, to our knowledge, this is the first case of successful treatment of stage IV OCD using bioabsorbable implants.

  2. MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy.

    PubMed

    Gulko, Edwin; Collins, Lee K; Murphy, Robyn C; Thornhill, Beverly A; Taragin, Benjamin H

    2015-02-01

    In modern times scurvy is a rarely encountered disease caused by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) deficiency. However, sporadic cases of scurvy persist, particularly within the pediatric population. Recent individual case reports highlight an increased incidence of scurvy among patients with autism or developmental delay, with isolated case reports detailing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of scurvy in these pediatric populations. We present the MRI findings of scurvy in four patients with autism or developmental delay, and review the literature on MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Despite its rarity, the radiologist must consider scurvy in a pediatric patient with a restricted diet presenting with arthralgia or myalgia. PMID:25109378

  3. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  4. Background parenchymal enhancement in preoperative breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Satoko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Akiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Kikumori, Toyone; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We aimed to assess the influence of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on surgical planning performed using preoperative MRI for breast cancer evaluation. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 91 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (mean age, 55.5 years; range, 30−88 years) who underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI followed by planned breast conservation therapy were retrospectively enrolled. MRI was performed to assess the tumor extent in addition to mammography and breast ultrasonography. BPE in the contralateral normal breast MRI at the early dynamic phase was visually classified as follows: minimal (n=49), mild (n=27), moderate (n=7), and marked (n=8). The correlations between the BPE grade and age, menopausal status, index tumor size, changes in surgical management based on MRI results, positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI, and surgical margins were assessed. Patients in the strong BPE groups were significantly younger (p=0.002) and generally premenopausal (p<0.001). Surgical treatment was not changed in 67 cases (73.6%), while extended excision and mastectomy were performed in 12 cases (13.2%), each based on additional lesions on MRI. Six of 79 (7.6%) patients who underwent breast conservation therapy had tumor-positive resection margins. In cases where surgical management was changed, the PPV for MRI-detected foci was high in the minimal (91.7%) and mild groups (66.7%), and 0% in the moderate and marked groups (p=0.002). Strong BPE causes false-positive MRI findings and may lead to overly extensive surgery, whereas MRI may be beneficial in select patients with weak BPE. PMID:26412883

  5. Effects of pore size, implantation time, and nano-surface properties on rat skin ingrowth into percutaneous porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Brad J; Prilutsky, Boris I; Ritter, Jana M; Kelley, Sean; Popat, Ketul; Pitkin, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The main problem of percutaneous osseointegrated implants is poor skin-implant integration, which may cause infection. This study investigated the effects of pore size (Small, 40-100 μm and Large, 100-160 μm), nanotubular surface treatment (Nano), and duration of implantation (3 and 6 weeks) on skin ingrowth into porous titanium. Each implant type was percutaneously inserted in the back of 35 rats randomly assigned to seven groups. Implant extrusion rate was measured weekly and skin ingrowth into implants was determined histologically after harvesting implants. It was found that all three types of implants demonstrated skin tissue ingrowth of over 30% (at week 3) and 50% (at weeks 4-6) of total implant porous area under the skin; longer implantation resulted in greater skin ingrowth (p < 0.05). Only one case of infection was observed (infection rate 2.9%). Small and Nano groups showed the same implant extrusion rate which was lower than the Large group rate (0.06 ± 0.01 vs. 0.16 ± 0.02 cm/week; p < 0.05). Ingrowth area was comparable in the Small, Large, and Nano implants. However, qualitatively, the Nano implants showed greatest cellular inhabitation within first 3 weeks. We concluded that percutaneous porous titanium implants allow for skin integration with the potential for a safe seal. PMID:23703928

  6. Effects of pore size, implantation time and nano-surface properties on rat skin ingrowth into percutaneous porous titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Ritter, Jana M.; Kelley, Sean; Popat, Ketul; Pitkin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The main problem of percutaneous osseointegrated implants is poor skin-implant integration, which may cause infection. This study investigated the effects of pore size (Small, 40–100 microns and Large, 100–160 microns), nanotubular surface treatment (Nano), and duration of implantation (3 and 6 weeks) on skin ingrowth into porous titanium. Each implant type was percutaneously inserted in the back of 35 rats randomly assigned to 7 groups. Implant extrusion rate was measured weekly and skin ingrowth into implants was determined histologically after harvesting implants. It was found that all 3 types of implants demonstrated skin tissue ingrowth of over 30% (at week 3) and 50% (at weeks 4–6) of total implant porous area under the skin; longer implantation resulted in greater skin ingrowth (p<0.05). Only one case of infection was observed (infection rate 2.9%). Small and Nano groups showed the same implant extrusion rate which was lower than the Large group rate (0.06±0.01 vs. 0.16 ± 0.02 cm/week; p<0.05). Ingrowth area was comparable in the Small, Large and Nano implants. However, qualitatively, the Nano implants showed greatest cellular inhabitation within first three weeks. We concluded that percutaneous porous titanium implants allow for skin integration with the potential for a safe seal. PMID:23703928

  7. Live nephron imaging by MRI.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunqi; Yu, Xin; Pothayee, Nikorn; Dodd, Stephen; Bouraoud, Nadia; Star, Robert; Bennett, Kevin; Koretsky, Alan

    2014-11-15

    The local sensitivity of MRI can be improved with small MR detectors placed close to regions of interest. However, to maintain such sensitivity advantage, local detectors normally need to communicate with the external amplifier through cable connections, which prevent the use of local detectors as implantable devices. Recently, an integrated wireless amplifier was developed that can efficiently amplify and broadcast locally detected signals, so that the local sensitivity was enhanced without the need for cable connections. This integrated detector enabled the live imaging of individual glomeruli using negative contrast introduced by cationized ferritin, and the live imaging of renal tubules using positive contrast introduced by gadopentetate dimeglumine. Here, we utilized the high blood flow to image individual glomeruli as hyperintense regions without any contrast agent. These hyperintense regions were identified for pixels with signal intensities higher than the local average. Addition of Mn(2+) allowed the simultaneous detection of both glomeruli and renal tubules: Mn(2+) was primarily reabsorbed by renal tubules, which would be distinguished from glomeruli due to higher enhancement in T1-weighted MRI. Dynamic studies of Mn(2+) absorption confirmed the differential absorption affinity of glomeruli and renal tubules, potentially enabling the in vivo observation of nephron function. PMID:25186296

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With 'MR-conditional' devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  10. In-vitro Assessment of Knee MRI in the Presence of Metal Implants Comparing MAVRIC-SL and Conventional FSE Sequences at 1.5 and 3 Tesla Field Strength

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Hans; Heilmeier, Ursula; Lee, Sonia; Nardo, Lorenzo; Patsch, Janina; Schuppert, Christopher; Han, Misung; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Koch, Kevin; Link, Thomas M.; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess lesion detection and artifact size reduction of a MAVRIC-SEMAC hybrid sequence (MAVRIC-SL) compared to standard sequences at 1.5T and 3T in porcine knee specimens with metal hardware. METHODS Artificial cartilage and bone lesions of defined size were created in the proximity of titanium and steel screws with 2.5 mm diameter in 12 porcine knee specimens and were imaged at 1.5T and 3T MRI with MAVRIC-SL PD and STIR, standard FSE T2 PD and STIR and fat-saturated T2 FSE sequences. Three radiologists blinded to the lesion locations assessed lesion detection rates on randomized images for each sequence using ROC. Artifact length and width were measured. RESULTS Metal artifact sizes were largest in the presence of steel screws at 3T (FSE T2 FS: 28.7cm2) and 1.5T (16.03cm2). MAVRIC-SL PD and STIR reduced artifact sizes at both 3T (1.43cm2; 2.46cm2) and 1.5T (1.16cm2; 1.59cm2) compared to FS T2 FSE sequences (27.57cm2; 13.20cm2). At 3T, ROC derived AUC values using MAVRIC-SL sequences were significantly higher compared to standard sequences (MAVRIC-PD: 0.87, versus FSE-T2-FS: 0.73 (p=0.025); MAVRIC- STIR: 0.9 versus T2-STIR: 0.78 (p=0.001) and versus FSE-T2-FS: 0.73 (p=0.026)). Similar values were observed at 1.5T. Comparison of 3T and 1.5T showed no significant differences (MAVRIC-SL PD: p=0.382; MAVRIC-SL STIR: p=0.071. CONCLUSION MAVRIC-SL sequences provided superior lesion detection and reduced metal artifact size at both 1.5T and 3T compared to conventionally used FSE sequences. No significant disadvantage was found comparing MAVRIC-SL at 3T and 1.5T, though metal artifacts at 3T were larger. PMID:24912802

  11. Treatment of Infected Facial Implants.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Kriti; Cox, Joshua A; Dickey, Ryan M; Gravina, Paula; Echo, Anthony; Izaddoost, Shayan A; Nguyen, Anh H

    2016-05-01

    Alloplastic facial implants have a wide range of uses to achieve the appropriate facial contour. A variety of materials such as metals, polymers, ceramics and synthetic injectable fillers are available to the reconstructive and aesthetic surgeon. Besides choosing the right surgical technique and the adequate material, the surgeon must be prepared to treat complications. Infection is an uncommon but serious complication that can cause displeasing consequences for the patient. There are few references in literature regarding treatment and management of facial implant-related infections. This study aims to discuss the role of biofilm in predisposing alloplastic materials to infection, to provide a review of literature, to describe our own institutional experience, and to define a patient care pathway for facial implant-associated infection. PMID:27152100

  12. Ex-PRESS glaucoma filter: an MRI compatible metallic orbital foreign body imaged at 1.5 and 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, M.C.; Uzelac, A.; Talbott, J.F.; Lin, S.C.; Gean, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To report on the MRI compatibility of the Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration device, a tiny metallic implant placed into the anterior chamber of the eye that is much smaller than traditional glaucoma shunts, and to educate the radiology community regarding its appearance. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven patients with Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration devices were identified that had undergone MRI at San Francisco General Hospital/University of California San Francisco Medical Center by searching and cross-referencing the radiology reporting system and the electronic medical record. MRI images were reviewed for artefact interfering with interpretation. Ophthalmology examinations were reviewed for evidence of complications. RESULTS Eighteen individual MRI examinations were performed during 12 unique MRI events on these 7 patients. 13/18 individual MRI examinations and 7/12 MRI events were performed at 3 T with the others performed at 1.5 T. Mean time from Ex-PRESS implantation to MRI was 17.5 months. Mean time from MRI to first ophthalmology examination was 1.1 months and from MRI to latest ophthalmology examination was 6.6 months. Susceptibility artefact did not interfere with image interpretation and no complications related to MRI were encountered. CONCLUSION The Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration device appears to be safe for MRI at 1.5 and 3 T and does not produce significant susceptibility artefact to affect diagnostic interpretation adversely. PMID:25735675

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging, pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: current situation and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Götte, M.J.W.; Rüssel, I.K.; de Roest, G.J.; Germans, T.; Veldkamp, R.F.; Knaapen, P.; Allaart, C.P.; van Rossum, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    New developments and expanding indications have resulted in a significant increase in the number of patients with pacemakers and internal cardioverterdefibrillators (ICDs). Because of its unique capabilities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important imaging modalities for evaluation of the central nervous system, tumours, musculoskeletal disorders and some cardiovascular diseases. As a consequence of these developments, an increasing number of patients with implanted devices meet the standard indications for MRI examination. Due to the presence of potential life-threatening risks and interactions, however, pacemakers and ICDs are currently not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in an MRI scanner. Despite these limitations and restrictions, a limited but still growing number of studies reporting on the effects and safety issues of MRI and implanted devices have been published. Because physicians will be increasingly confronted with the issue of MRI in patients with implanted devices, this overview is given. The effects of MRI on an implanted pacemaker and/or ICDs and vice versa are described and, based on the current literature, a strategy for safe performance of MRI in these patients is proposed. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:31-7.) PMID:20111641

  14. Multisite Infection with Mycobacterium abscessus after Replacement of Breast Implants and Gluteal Lipofilling

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, Eva; Cheretakis, Alexandre; Modarressi, Ali; Harbarth, Stephan; Pittet-Cuénod, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medical tourism for aesthetic surgery is popular. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) occasionally cause surgical-site infections. As NTM grow in biofilms, implantations of foreign bodies are at risk. Due to late manifestation, infections occur when patients are back home, where they must be managed properly. Case Report. A 39-year-old healthy female was referred for acute infection of the right gluteal area. Five months before, she had breast implants replacement, abdominal liposuction, and gluteal lipofilling in Mexico. Three months postoperatively, implants were removed for NTM-infection in Switzerland. Adequate antibiotic treatment was stopped after seven days for drug-related hepatitis. At entrance, gluteal puncture for bacterial analysis was performed. MRI showed large subcutaneous collection. Debridement under general anaesthesia was followed by open wound management. Total antibiotic treatment was 20 weeks. Methods. Bacterial analysis of periprosthetic and gluteal liquids included Gram-stain plus acid-fast stain, and aerobic, anaerobic and mycobacterial cultures.  Results. In periprosthetic fluid, Mycobacterium abscessus, Propionibacterium, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were identified. The same M. abscessus strain was found gluteally. The gluteal wound healed within six weeks. At ten months' follow-up, gluteal asymmetry persists for deep scarring. Conclusion. This case presents major complications of multisite aesthetic surgery. Surgical-site infections in context of medical tourism need appropriate bacteriological investigations, considering potential NTM-infections. PMID:25893122

  15. Rat model of cholelithiasis with human gallstones implanted in cholestasis-induced virtual gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Chen, Feng; Mulier, Stefaan; Li, Yue; Zhang, Jian; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To facilitate translational research on cholelithiasis, we have developed a rat model of human gallstones by exploiting the unique biliopancreatic features of this species. METHODS: Under anesthesia, 16 adult rats of equal genders underwent two times of abdominal surgery. First, their common bile duct (CBD) was ligated to cause cholestasis by total biliary obstruction (TBO). On day 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after TBO, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted to monitor the dilatation of the CBD, and blood was sampled to analyze total serum bilirubin (TSB). Secondly, on day 30, the abdomen was re-opened and gallstone(s) collected from human patients were implanted in the dilated CBD as a virtual gallbladder (VGB), which was closed by suture ligation. This rat cholelithiasis model was examined by MRI, clinical observation, microcholangiography and histology. RESULTS: All rats survived two laparotomies. After ligation, the CBD was dilated to a stable size of 4 to 30 mm in diameter on day 21-28, which became a VGB. The rats initially showed signs of jaundice that diminished over time, which paralleled with the evolving TSB levels from 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/dL before ligation, through a peak of 10.9 ± 1.9 mg/dL on day 14, until a nearly normalized value after day 28. The dilated CBD with thickened wall allowed an incision for implantation of human gallstones of 1-10 mm in diameter. The rat cholelithiasis was proven by in vivo MRI and postmortem microcholangiography and histomorphology. CONCLUSION: A rat model cholelithiasis with human gallstones has been established, which proves feasible, safe, reliable, nontoxic and cost-effective. Given the gallstones of human origin, applications of this model may be of help in translational research such as optical detection and lysis of gallstones by systemic drug administration. PMID:27376020

  16. Implant failure associated with actinomycosis in a medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chun-Xiao; Henkin, Jeffrey M; Ririe, Craig; Javadi, Elham

    2013-04-01

    Oral actinomycosis is not a common disease, but it can cause massive destruction. This article reports a case of implant failure associated with actinomycosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian male patient had tooth #20 extracted years ago and an implant placed 3 years ago. The #20 implant area developed an abscess about 1½ years after implant placement. Radiographic findings revealed a large radiolucency on the mesial aspect of the #20 implant. The implant was surgically removed and the lesion thoroughly debrided. The patient experienced severe pain when the apical soft tissue was curreted following implant removal. A periapical radiograph revealed that the lesion approached the mental foramen. A short course of antibiotics was prescribed. Histological observation found sulfur granules, which were found to be actinomycotic colonies. Peri-implant actinomycosis was diagnosed. No recurrence had occurred at the 1-year follow-up. PMID:21767210

  17. The effect of co-implantation on the electrical activity of implanted carbon in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, A.J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1991-11-01

    We have undertaken a systematic study of the effect of co- implantation on the electrical properties of C implanted in GaAs. Two effects have been studied, the additional damage caused by co- implantation and the stoichiometry in the implanted layer. A series of co-implant ions were used: group III (B, Al, Ga), group V (N, P, As) and noble gases (Ar, Kr). Co-implantation of ions which create an amorphous layer was found to increase the electrical activity of C. Once damage was created, maintaining stoichiometric balance by co-implantation of a group III further increased the fraction of electrically active carbon impurities. Co-implantation of Ga and rapid thermal annealing at 950{degree}C for 10s resulted in carbon activation as high as 68%, the highest value ever reported.

  18. Structural brain MRI studies in eye diseases: are they clinically relevant? A review of current findings.

    PubMed

    Prins, Doety; Hanekamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2016-03-01

    Many eye diseases reduce visual acuity or are associated with visual field defects. Because of the well-defined retinotopic organization of the connections of the visual pathways, this may affect specific parts of the visual pathways and cortex, as a result of either deprivation or transsynaptic degeneration. For this reason, over the past several years, numerous structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have examined the association of eye diseases with pathway and brain changes. Here, we review structural MRI studies performed in human patients with the eye diseases albinism, amblyopia, hereditary retinal dystrophies, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma. We focus on two main questions. First, what have these studies revealed? Second, what is the potential clinical relevance of their findings? We find that all the aforementioned eye diseases are indeed associated with structural changes in the visual pathways and brain. As such changes have been described in very different eye diseases, in our view the most parsimonious explanation is that these are caused by the loss of visual input and the subsequent deprivation of the visual pathways and brain regions, rather than by transsynaptic degeneration. Moreover, and of clinical relevance, for some of the diseases - in particular glaucoma and AMD - present results are compatible with the view that the eye disease is part of a more general neurological or neurodegenerative disorder that also affects the brain. Finally, establishing structural changes of the visual pathways has been relevant in the context of new therapeutic strategies to restore retinal function: it implies that restoring retinal function may not suffice to also effectively restore vision. Future structural MRI studies can contribute to (i) further establish relationships between ocular and neurological neurodegenerative disorders, (ii) investigate whether brain degeneration in eye diseases is reversible, (iii) evaluate the use

  19. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, B; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2010-01-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts. PMID:20071754

  20. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  1. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Balaguer-Martínez, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants published in English up until May 2014. Inclusion criteria: studies in humans subjects with severe bleeding immediately secondary to implant placement, which reported the time until the hemorrhage, the implant lenght, the possible cause of bleeding and the treatment. Exclusion criteria: patients receiving anticoagulation treatment. Results: Fifteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The area with the largest number of bleeding complications corresponded to the mandibular canine. The cause of bleeding was lingual cortical bone perforation during implant placement, with damage to the sublingual artery. The implants associated with bleeding were those measuring 15 mm in length or more. Management focused on securing the airway (with intubation or tracheostomy if necessary), with bleeding control. Conclusions: It’s important to pay special attention when the implants are placed in the mandibular anterior zone, especially if long implants are used. The most frequently cause of bleeding was the perforation of the lingual plate. Treatment involves securing the airway, with bleeding control. Key words:Hemorrhage, complications, immediate, bleeding, dental implants. PMID:25475779

  2. A technique for removal of a fractured implant abutment screw.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Murat; Güler, Ahmet Umut; Duran, İbrahim

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this technique report was to present a procedure for removal of a fractured implant abutment screw. Whatever the cause, when an abutment fracture has occurred, the fractured screw segment inside the implant must be removed. The methods used by the clinicians may include the use of an endo-explorer self-made screwdriver and the use of implant repair kit available for some implant systems. The advantage of the presented method is that it may be extended to other implant systems that do not have a special repair kit and also that the technique is simple and does not require special equipment. PMID:21905898

  3. Learning distance function for regression-based 4D pulmonary trunk model reconstruction estimated from sparse MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Tsymbal, Alexey; Ionasec, Razvan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-03-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common birth defect and a frequent cause of death for children. Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) is the most often occurring CHD which affects in particular the pulmonary valve and trunk. Emerging interventional methods enable percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, which constitute an alternative to open heart surgery. While minimal invasive methods become common practice, imaging and non-invasive assessment tools become crucial components in the clinical setting. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) are techniques with complementary properties and ability to acquire multiple non-invasive and accurate scans required for advance evaluation and therapy planning. In contrary to CT which covers the full 4D information over the cardiac cycle, cMRI often acquires partial information, for example only one 3D scan of the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase and two 2D planes (long and short axes) over the whole cardiac cycle. The data acquired in this way is called sparse cMRI. In this paper, we propose a regression-based approach for the reconstruction of the full 4D pulmonary trunk model from sparse MRI. The reconstruction approach is based on learning a distance function between the sparse MRI which needs to be completed and the 4D CT data with the full information used as the training set. The distance is based on the intrinsic Random Forest similarity which is learnt for the corresponding regression problem of predicting coordinates of unseen mesh points. Extensive experiments performed on 80 cardiac CT and MR sequences demonstrated the average speed of 10 seconds and accuracy of 0.1053mm mean absolute error for the proposed approach. Using the case retrieval workflow and local nearest neighbour regression with the learnt distance function appears to be competitive with respect to "black box" regression with immediate prediction of coordinates, while providing transparency to the

  4. The effect of implant angulation and splinting on stress distribution in implant body and supporting bone: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Behnaz, Ebadian; Ramin, Mosharraf; Abbasi, Samaneh; Pouya, Memar Ardestani; Mahmood, Farzin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of implant crown splinting and the use of angulated abutment on stress distribution in implant body and surrounding bone by three-dimensional finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: For this study, three models with two implants at the site of mandibular right second premolar and first molar were designed (1): Both implants, parallel to adjacent teeth, with straight abutments (2): Anterior implant with 15 mesial angulations and posterior implant were placed parallel to adjacent tooth, (3): Both implants with 15 mesial angulations and parallel to each other with 15° angulated abutments. Restorations were modeled in two shapes (splinted and nonsplinted). Loading in tripod manner as each point 50 N and totally 300 N was applied. Stress distribution in relation to splinting or nonsplinting restorations and angulations was done with ABAQUS6.13. Results: Splinting the restorations in all situations, led to lower stresses in all implant bodies, cortical bone and spongy bone except for the spongy bone around angulated first molar. Angulated implant in nonsplinted restoration cause lower stresses in implant body and bone but in splinted models more stresses were seen in implant body in comparison with straight abutment (model 2). Stresses in nonsplinted and splinted restorations in cortical bone of angulated molar region were more than what was observed in straight molar implant (model 3). Conclusion: Implant restorations splinting lead to a better distribution of stresses in implant bodies and bone in comparison with nonsplinted restorations, especially when the load is applied off center to implant body. Angulations of implant can reduce stresses when the application of the load is in the same direction as the implant angulation. PMID:26430356

  5. MRI of the shoulder

    SciTech Connect

    Zlatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Schnall, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating shoulder disorders. The book gives detailed information on MRI techniques and shoulder anatomy, describes and illustrates MRI findings for a wide range of shoulder disorders, and explains how abnormalities seen on MIR images relate to pathophysiology and clinical signs. Special attention is given to imaging of rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability conditions for which MRI is the imaging procedure of choice. Complementing the text are 365 high-quality scans depicting normal shoulder anatomy and showing the wide variety of pathologic findings encountered in practice.

  6. Implant Site Development for Enhancing Esthetics of Soft and Hard Tissue and Simplification of Implant Surgery Using a Forced Eruption.

    PubMed

    Joo, Ji-Young; Son, Sieun; Lee, Ju-Youn

    2016-01-01

    The keys to successful esthetic implant therapy in the anterior region are natural-looking implant restorations and an adequate alveolar ridge volume. Destruction of periodontal tissue resulting from periodontal and/or endodontic inflammation causes esthetic problems. Forced eruption is a valuable adjunct to augmenting the soft and hard tissue where the alveolar ridge is insufficient for esthetics. In this article, forced eruption was adopted for implant site development prior to implant placement and the periodontal tissue was augmented vertically using this technique. This technique simplified the surgical implant procedure without a need for advanced augmentation. PMID:27333017

  7. Photodynamic therapy in peri-implantitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leretter, Marius; Cândea, Adrian; Topala, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is like Damocles sword, threatening over our final results as is the most common cause of implant failure. It is, was and will be one of the most challenging tasks for the practitioner to deal with. The rough implant surface offers the ideal conditions for the pathogenic bacteria to stick and multiply. Even more, the growing mature biofilm is harder to eliminate. Mechanical cleaning and rinsing is not capable to destroy it entirely. Most treatment protocols include strong antibiotics, disregarding their side effects and interactions with other medications.

  8. Atraumatic extraction, implant placement and immediate provisionalization.

    PubMed

    Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Calixto, Amanda Martins; Maia Filho, Etevaldo Matos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Gomes, Mario Gilson Nina; Malheiros, Adriana Santos

    2014-01-01

    Front tooth extraction typically results in significant loss of hard and soft tissue volume, both in the vestibular-lingual and mesiodistal directions. As these changes can compromise the esthetic results of prosthetic rehabilitation, extraction techniques that cause minimal trauma to the remnant tissues are applied in combination with immediate implant placement to minimize such alterations. The case reported in the present article illustrates a therapeutic plan consisting of atraumatic extraction followed by immediate implant placement and provisionalization. When carefully indicated and planned, our results indicate that this technique may provide promising immediate results relative to the maintenance and stability of the peri-implanted tissues. PMID:25576122

  9. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  10. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  11. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  12. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants.

    PubMed

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  13. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants

    PubMed Central

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  14. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  15. Chimeric peptides as implant functionalization agents for titanium alloy implants with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMP’s), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host- and bacterial- cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with antimicrobial peptides can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, S. mutans, S. epidermidis, and E. coli. In biological interactions such as occurs on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore open up

  16. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B; Hricak, Hedvig

    2013-09-16

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot's accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  17. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot’s accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  18. Effect of Healing Time on Bone-Implant Contact of Orthodontic Micro-Implants: A Histologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Fatemi, Kazem; Dehghani, Mahboobe; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed loading of orthodontic micro-implants on bone-implant contact. Materials and Methods. Sixty four micro-implants were implanted in dog's jaw bone. The micro-implants were divided into loaded and unloaded (control) groups. The control group had two subgroups: four and eight weeks being implanted. The loaded group had two subgroups of immediate loading and delayed (after four weeks healing) loading. Loaded samples were subjected to 200g load for four weeks. After sacrificing the animals micro-implants and surrounding tissues were observed histologically. Bone-implant contact ratios (BIC) were calculated and different groups' results were compared by three-way ANOVA. Results. Mean survival rate was 96.7% in general. Survival rates were 96.7%, 94.4% and 100% for control, immediate and delayed loaded groups, respectively. BIC values were not significantly different in loaded and control groups, immediate and delayed loading groups, and pressure and tension sides. Mandibular micro-implants had significantly higher BIC than maxillary ones in immediate loading, 4-weeks control, and 8-weeks control groups (P = 0.021, P = 0.009, P = 0.003, resp.). Conclusion Immediate or delayed loading of micro-implants in dog did not cause significant difference in Bone-implant contact which could be concluded that healing time had not significant effect on micro-implant stability. PMID:25006463

  19. Sea urchin puncture resulting in PIP joint synovial arthritis: case report and MRI study.

    PubMed

    Liram, N; Gomori, M; Perouansky, M

    2000-01-01

    Of the 600 species of sea urchins, approximately 80 may be venomous to humans. The long spined or black sea urchin, Diadema setosum may cause damage by the breaking off of its brittle spines after they penetrate the skin. Synovitis followed by arthritis may be an unusual but apparently not a rare sequel to such injury, when implantation occurs near a joint. In this case report, osseous changes were not seen by plain x-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to expose the more salient features of both soft tissue and bone changes of black sea urchin puncture injury 30 months after penetration. In all likelihood, this type of injury may be more common than the existing literature at present suggests. It is believed to be the first reported case in this part of the world as well as the first MRI study describing this type of joint pathology. Local and systemic reactions to puncture injuries from sea urchin spines have been described previously. These may range from mild, local irritation lasting a few days to granuloma formation, infection and on occasions systemic illness. The sea urchin spines are composed of calcium carbonate with proteinaceous covering. The covering tends to cause immune reactions of variable presentation. There are only a handful of reported cases with sea urchin stings on record, none of them from the Red Sea. However, this condition is probably more common than is thought and can present difficulty in diagnosis. In this case report, the inflammation responded well to heat treatment, mobilization and manipulation of the joint in its post acute and chronic stages. As some subtle changes in soft tissues and the changes in bone were not seen either on plain x-rays or ultrasound scan, gadolinium-enhanced MRI was used to unveil the marked changes in the joint. PMID:10689244

  20. An organized start to implant-supported prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Karthigeyan, Suma; Ali, Seyed Ashraff; Mohan, Kalarani; Deivanai, Mangala

    2013-01-01

    Various treatment options are available for rehabilitating the complete edentulous patients with implants. However, due consideration for the prosthesis is not given prior to implant surgery. This can result in implant being placed in locations that do not provide the best esthetic and functional result. Incorrect implant localization and angle are the primary cause of non-axial loading and may contribute to loss of Osseo-integration. For predictable outcome, the treatment should begin with visualizing the end result. A step-wise pre-implant surgery evaluation is necessary to achieve the objectives. This is a case report of a completely edentulous patient who was treated with fixed implant prosthesis following various steps in the pre-implant surgery evaluation. PMID:23853462

  1. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM). PMID:19381963

  2. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  3. MRI-Related Heating near Deep Brain Stimulation Electrodes: More Data Are Needed

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Akshay A.; Shrivastava, Devashish; Spaniol, Maggie A.; Abosch, Aviva

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with implanted deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices poses a challenge for healthcare providers. As a consequence of safety concerns about magnetic field interactions with the device, induced electrical currents and thermal damage due to radiofrequency heating, a number of stringent guidelines have been proposed by the device manufacturer. Very few detailed investigations of these safety issues have been published to date, and the stringent manufacturer guidelines have gone unchallenged, leading some hospitals and imaging centers around the world to ban or restrict the use of MRI in DBS patients. The purpose of this review is to stimulate research towards defining appropriate guidelines for the use of MRI in patients with DBS. Additionally, this review is intended to help healthcare providers and researchers make sound clinical judgments about the use of MRI in the setting of implanted DBS devices. PMID:21494064

  4. Evaluation of implant sonication as a diagnostic tool in implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Lehner, Burkhard; Burckhardt, Irene; Zimmermann, Stefan; Hänsch, Gertrud M; Ewerbeck, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Infections of implants pose a severe problem in the field of orthopedic surgery, because they can cause bone degradation with subsequent loosening of the implant. The discrimination between septic implant loosening and aseptic loosening can be a challenge, and hence novel diagnostic methods have been introduced to improve the detection of bacteria. Because a major problem is their firm adherence to implants due to biofilm formation, sonication has been introduced, followed by identification of bacteria by culture or genetic methods. In this study, we compared the results obtained after sonication pretreatment with those of microbiological testing of tissue samples and histopathological evaluation of the same tissue. Furthermore, we related the results obtained following sonication to the clinical diagnosis of septic or aseptic implant loosening, respectively. Sonication of explanted devices also enhances the likelihood of detecting bacterial growth in patients who were considered "aseptic" based on the clinical evaluation. PMID:25199070

  5. MRI Mode Programming for Safe Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With a Magnetic Resonance Conditional Cardiac Device.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Toshiko; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Ikeya, Yukitoshi; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Ashino, Sonoko; Okubo, Kimie; Okumura, Yasuo; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although diagnostically indispensable, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been, until recently, contraindicated in patients with an implantable cardiac device. MR conditional cardiac devices are now widely used, but the mode programming needed for safe MRI has yet to be established. We reviewed the details of 41 MRI examinations of patients with a MR conditional device. There were no associated adverse events. However, in 3 cases, paced beats competed with the patient's own beats during the MRI examination. We describe 2 of the 3 specific cases because they illustrate these potentially risky situations: a case in which the intrinsic heart rate increased and another in which atrial fibrillation occurred. Safe MRI in patients with an MR conditional device necessitates detailed MRI mode programming. The MRI pacing mode should be carefully and individually selected. PMID:26973263

  6. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  7. Cochlear re-implantation: lessons learnt and the way ahead.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Uma; Sikka, Kapil; Agarwal, Shivani; Kumar, Rakesh; Thakar, Alok; Sharma, Suresh C

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion A cochlear re-implantation procedure is undesirable; however, the cochlear implant surgeon may have to perform a re-implantation procedure occasionally for various reasons. Following standard techniques, implant performance comparable with primary implantation may be achieved. Objective To study the causes and outcomes of cochlear re-implantation in an Asian Indian population. Study design Retrospective analysis of clinical charts over an 18-year period with prospective follow-up of patients. Methods The charts of 534 patients, who underwent cochlear implant, at an Otorhinolaryngology institutional Centre, from January 1997 to January 2015 were studied. Of these, the charts of 18 patients who underwent cochlear re-implantation were studied. The causes and audiological and speech outcomes were analysed. Results Eighteen patients (3.4%) underwent cochlear re-implantation for various reasons. The commonest indication was device failure in seven patients (39%), followed by electrode extrusion in five (28%), trauma in three (11%), electrode migration in two (11%) and improper electrode placement in one (6%) patient. The audiological performance tests and speech tests either remained the same or improved from those achieved for patients undergoing primary implantation, in 87% patients. PMID:26898701

  8. Silicone breast implant materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U

    2012-01-01

    This opinion article has been written on request because of the recent public controversy over silicone breast implants produced by a now-defunct company, Poly Implant Prosthese (PIP) in France. More than 300,000 PIP devices have been implanted. The purposes of my article are to (1.) provide a general overview of silicone breast implant materials, (2.) to describe the general safety of these materials as reported to date, and (3.) to summarise current publicly available information about these aspects of the PIP prostheses. The materials covered are the silicone rubber from which the implant shells are made and the silicone gel used to fill the shell. The materials safety issues are biocompatibility (especially of the gel) and biodurability of the shell. The literature reviewed indicates that biocompatibility is not an issue with other current generation implants. However, biodurability is. A rough estimate of implant shell rupture rate is ~10+% at 10 years. Information is still emerging about the PIP implants. Initial regulatory disclosures suggest the PIP implants may have both biocompatibility and biodurability problems. They also suggest that PIP implants may have been produced using silicone materials not certified as medical grade. Governmental health and regulatory agencies are just now in the process of deciding what actions should be taken to protect patients. PMID:22826101

  9. Bolus-tracking MRI with a simultaneous T1- and T2*-measurement.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, S; Heilmann, M; Biffar, A; Walczak, C; Vautier, J; Volk, A; Peller, M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and evaluate a methodology to analyze simultaneously acquired T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Two generalized models of T2*-relaxation are proposed to account for tracer leakage, and a two-compartment exchange model is used to separate tracer in intra- and extravascular spaces. The methods are evaluated using data extracted from ROIs in three mice with subcutaneously implanted human colorectal tumors. Comparing plasma flow values obtained from DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI data defines a practical experimental paradigm to measure T2*-relaxivities, and reveals a factor of 15 between values in tissue and blood. Comparing mean transit time values obtained from DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI without leakage correction, indicates a significant reduction of susceptibility weighting in DSC-MRI during tracer leakage. A one-parameter gradient correction model provides a good approximation for this susceptibility loss, but redundancy of the parameter limits the practical potential of this model for DSC-MRI. Susceptibility loss is modeled more accurately with a variable T2*-relaxivity, which allows to extract new parameters that cannot be derived from DSC-MRI or DCE-MRI alone. They reflect the cellular and vessel geometry, and thus may lead to a more complete characterization of tissue structure. PMID:19585599

  10. Immediate implant post-surgical complications.

    PubMed

    Ibbott, C G; Oles, R D

    1995-03-01

    Immediate surgical implants provide a convenient means of replacing missing teeth without requiring hard tissue reduction of restoration-free potential fixed partial denture abutments. Although the procedure is described as "predictable," complications and failures do occur. This report presents four cases of immediate implant complications and their management, and discusses possible causes of the untoward results. Careful pre-operative planning, adequate surgical technique and post-surgical management, timely and suitable loading, and meticulous hygiene maintenance can serve to minimize implant complications and failures. The prospective immediate implant patient must be provided with sufficient information to allow informed consent to be given. Minimal requirements are a description of the procedures in terms the patient can understand, an explanation of potential risks and complications, and adequate disclosure of information about alternative therapies. PMID:7773849

  11. [Bone Conduction and Active Middle Ear Implants].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Thomas, J P; Dazert, S

    2016-05-01

    The majority of patients with moderate to severe hearing loss can be supplied with conventional hearing aids depending on severity and cause for hearing loss in a satisfying way. However, some patients either do not benefit enough from conventional hearing aids or cannot wear them due to inflammatory reactions and chronic infections of the external auditory canal or due to anatomical reasons. For these patients there are fully- and semi-implantable middle ear and bone conduction implants available. These devices either directly stimulate the skull (bone conduction devices), middle ear structures (active middle ear implants) or the cochlea itself (direct acoustic stimulation). Patients who failed surgical hearing rehabilitation or do not benefit from conventional hearing aids may achieve a significant better speech understanding and tremendous improvement in quality of life by implantable hearing devices with careful attention to the audiological and anatomical indication criteria. PMID:27135430

  12. Economic Analysis of Screening Strategies for Rupture of Silicone Gel Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Malay, Sunitha; Shauver, Melissa J.; Kim, H. Myra

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended screening of all women with silicone gel breast implants with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) three years after implantation and every two years thereafter to assess their integrity. The cost for these serial examinations over the lifetime of the breast implants is an added burden to insurance payers and to women. We perform an economic analysis to determine the most optimal screening strategies by considering the diagnostic accuracy of the screening tests, the costs of the tests and subsequent implant removal. Methods We determined aggregate/pooled values for sensitivity and specificity of the screening tests ultrasound (US) and MRI in detecting silicone breast implant ruptures from the data obtained from published literature. We compiled costs, based on Medicare reimbursements for 2011, for the following elements: imaging modalities, anesthesia and 3 surgical treatment options for detected ruptures. We used decision tree to compare three alternate screening strategies of US only, MRI only and US followed by MRI in asymptomatic and symptomatic women. Results The cost per rupture of screening and management of rupture with US in asymptomatic women was $1,090, whereas in symptomatic women it was $1,622. Similar cost for MRI in asymptomatic women was $2,067, whereas in symptomatic women it was $2,143. Similar cost for US followed by MRI in asymptomatic women was $637, whereas in symptomatic women it was $2,908. Conclusion Screening with US followed by MRI was optimal for asymptomatic women and screening with US was optimal for symptomatic women. PMID:22743887

  13. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  14. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  15. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  16. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  17. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  18. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  19. Towards MRI microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids. PMID:20379545

  20. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thomsen HS, Reimer P. Intravascular contrast media for radiology, CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, ... JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  1. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  2. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  3. Larynx: implants and stents

    PubMed Central

    Sittel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In the human larynx, implants a primarily used for the correction of glottis insufficiency. In a broader sense laryngeal stents may be considered as implants as well. Laryngeal implants can be differentiated into injectable and solid. The most important representatives of both groups are discussed in detail along with the respective technique of application. Laryngeal stents are primarily used perioperatively. Different types and their use are presented. PMID:22073097

  4. Unusual cause of acute low-back pain: sudden annulus fibrosus rupture.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ali Fahir; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Sasani, Mehdi; Kaner, Tuncay; Ercelen, Omur; Canbulat, Nazan

    2012-05-01

    Low-back pain is a common problem in neu-rosurgery practice, and an algorithm has been developed for assessing these cases. However, one subgroup of these patients shares several clinical features and these individuals are not easy to categorize and diagnose. We present our observations for 8 of these patients, individuals with low-back pain caused by atypical annulus fibrosus rupture (AAR). The aim of this study is to show the consequences of overlooked annular tears on acute onset of low back pain. Eight patients with acute-onset severe low-back pain were admitted. Physical examinations were normal and each individual was examined neurologically and assessed with neuroradiologic studies [plain x-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), discography and computed tomography (CT) discography]. AAR was ultimately diagnosed with provocative discography. In all cases, MRI showed a healthy disc or mild degeneration, whereas discography and CT discography demonstrated disc disease. Anterior interbody cage implantation was performed in 3 of the 8 cases and posterior dynamic stabilization was carried out in 3 cases. The other 2 individuals refused surgery, and we were informed that one of them developed disc herniation at the affected level 1 year after our diagnosis. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated. In cases where AAR is suspected, MRI, discography, and CT discography should be performed in addition to routine neuroradiologic studies. PMID:22802990

  5. Pre-, Intra- and Post-Operative Imaging of Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Tawfik, A; Emam, A; Naguib, N N N; Nour-Eldin, A; Burck, I; Stöver, T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to present essential imaging aspects in patients who are candidates for a possible cochlear implant as well as in postsurgical follow-up. Imaging plays a major role in providing information on preinterventional topography, variations and possible infections. Preoperative imaging using DVT, CT, MRI or CT and MRI together is essential for candidate selection, planning of surgical approach and exclusion of contraindications like the complete absence of the cochlea or cochlear nerve, or infection. Relative contraindications are variations of the cochlea and vestibulum. Intraoperative imaging can be performed by fluoroscopy, mobile radiography or DVT. Postoperative imaging is regularly performed by conventional X-ray, DVT, or CT. In summary, radiological imaging has its essential role in the pre- and post-interventional period for patients who are candidates for cochlear implants. PMID:26327670

  6. Raman scattering of hydrogen- and deuterium-implanted cadmium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Stutzmann, M.; Tatarkiewicz, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effects of proton and deuteron implantation on the Raman spectra of CdF/sub 2/ crystals have been investigated. It is found that Raman scattering can provide a quantitative measure for the structural damage caused by the implantation procedure. These results also elucidate the intrinsic or extrinsic origin of Raman peaks observed in semiconducting CdF/sub 2/.

  7. Protein composition alters in vivo resorption of PEG-based hydrogels as monitored by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Berdichevski, Alexandra; Shachaf, Yonatan; Wechsler, Roni; Seliktar, Dror

    2015-02-01

    We report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based non-invasive monitoring to document the role of protein adjuvants in hydrogel implant integration in vivo. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels were formed with different protein constituents, including albumin, fibrinogen and gelatin. The hydrogels were designed to exhibit similar material properties, including modulus, swelling and hydrolytic degradation kinetics. The in vivo resorption properties of these PEG-based hydrogels, which contained a tethered gadolinium contrast agent, were characterized by MRI and histology, and compared to their in vitro characteristics. MRI data revealed that PEG-Albumin implants remained completely intact throughout the experiments, PEG-Fibrinogen implants lost about 10% of their volume and PEG-Gelatin implants underwent prominent swelling and returned to their initial volume by day 25. Fully synthetic PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA) control hydrogels lost about half of their volume after 25 days in vivo. Transverse MRI cross-sections of the implants revealed distinct mechanisms of the hydrogel's biodegradation: PEG-Fibrinogen and PEG-Albumin underwent surface erosion, whereas PEG-Gelatin and PEG-DA hydrogels mainly underwent bulk degradation. Histological findings substantiated the MRI data and demonstrated significant cellular response towards PEG-DA and PEG-Gelatin scaffolds with relatively low reaction towards PEG-Fibrinogen and PEG-Albumin hydrogels. These findings demonstrate that PEG-protein hydrogels can degrade via a different mechanism than PEG hydrogels, and that this difference can be linked to a reduced foreign body response. PMID:25542788

  8. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not be able to ... artificial joints Certain types of vascular stents Worked with ...

  9. Peri-implant diseases: Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology.

    PubMed

    Lindhe, Jan; Meyle, Joerg

    2008-09-01

    Issues related to peri-implant disease were discussed. It was observed that the most common lesions that occur, i.e. peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are caused by bacteria. While the lesion of peri-implant mucositis resides in the soft tissues, peri-implantitis also affects the supporting bone. Peri-implant mucositis occurs in about 80% of subjects (50% of sites) restored with implants, and peri-implantitis in between 28% and 56% of subjects (12-40% of sites). A number of risk indicators were identified including (i) poor oral hygiene, (ii) a history of periodontitis, (iii) diabetes and (iv) smoking. It was concluded that the treatment of peri-implant disease must include anti-infective measures. With respect to peri-implant mucositis, it appeared that non-surgical mechanical therapy caused the reduction in inflammation (bleeding on probing) but also that the adjunctive use of antimicrobial mouthrinses had a positive effect. It was agreed that the outcome of non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was unpredictable. The primary objective of surgical treatment in peri-implantitis is to get access to the implant surface for debridement and decontamination in order to achieve resolution of the inflammatory lesion. There was limited evidence that such treatment with the adjunctive use of systemic antibiotics could resolve a number of peri-implantitis lesions. There was no evidence that so-called regenerative procedures had additional beneficial effects on treatment outcome. PMID:18724855

  10. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  11. Objective Clinical Assessment of Posture Patterns after Implant Breast Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mandrini, Silvia; Finotti, Valentina; Dall’Angelo, Anna; Malovini, Alberto; Chierico, Simona; Faga, Angela; Dalla Toffola, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increased weight of the breasts causes several spinal postural alterations that reduce the ability to perform dynamic tasks requiring a stable balance. The effects of the increased weight of the breasts on static posture after implant breast augmentation have not been investigated yet. Methods: Forty volunteer healthy women were asked to wear different sized breast implants (800, 400, and 300 g) inside a dedicated sports bra for 6½ consecutive hours during their everyday life activities, 1 day for every implant size. Posture changes were assessed with the association of a physiatric clinical examination with a static force platform analysis. Results: A significant increase in cervical lordosis after the use of 400-g breast implants and upward was demonstrated. This alteration was stable between the 400-g and 800-g breast implants. The 400-g (per breast) implant might therefore be the load threshold that breaks the cervical postural physiologic balance. A significant increase in lumbar lordosis was demonstrated only after the use of the 800-g breast implants. The static force platform assessment demonstrated a worsening of the balance independent from the visual control with the use of 400-g and 800-g implants. Conclusions: Heavy breast implants proved to induce reversible alterations in the spinal curve, and 400 g is the cutoff for functional physiologic compensation in the short term. Such a weight might be considered the safety limit for the use of breast implants for cosmetic purposes. PMID:26218390

  12. Peri-implant infections of oral biofilm etiology.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Charalampakis, Georgios; Bostanci, Nagihan; Stadlinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that grow on various surfaces in nature. The oral micobiota tend to form polymicrobial biofilms, particularly on the hard mineralized surfaces of teeth, which may impact on oral health and disease. They can cause inflammation of the adjacent tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, leading to destructive periodontal disease and tooth loss. The emergence of osseointegrated dental implants as a restorative treatment option for replacing missing teeth has also brought along new artificial surfaces within the oral cavity, on which oral bacteria can form biofilms. As in the case of natural teeth, biofilms on implant surfaces may also trigger infection and cause inflammatory destruction of the peri-implant tissue (i.e. peri-implantitis). While there are strong similarities in the composition of the mixed microbial flora between periodontal and peri-implant infections, there are also a few distinctive differences. The immunological events underlying the pathogenesis of peri-implant infections are qualitatively similar, yet more extensive, compared to periodontal infections, resulting in a faster progression of tissue destruction. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on the microbiology and immunology of peri-implant infections, including findings from the peri-implant crevicular fluid, the inflammatory exudate of the peri-implant tissue. Moreover, it discusses the diagnosis and current approaches for the treatment of oral infections. PMID:25366221

  13. NH2 + implantations induced superior hemocompatibility of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Meixian; Li, Dejun; Zhao, Mengli; Zhang, Yiteng; Deng, Xiangyun; Geng, Dongsheng; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Gu, Hanqing; Wan, Rongxin

    2013-05-01

    NH2 + implantation was performed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The hemocompatibility of MWCNTs and NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs was evaluated based on in vitro hemolysis, platelet adhesion, and kinetic-clotting tests. Compared with MWCNTs, NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs displayed more perfect platelets and red blood cells in morphology, lower platelet adhesion rate, lower hemolytic rate, and longer kinetic blood-clotting time. NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs with higher fluency of 1 × 1016 ions/cm2 led to the best thromboresistance, hence desired hemocompatibility. Fourier transfer infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that NH2 + implantation caused the cleavage of some pendants and the formation of some new N-containing functional groups. These results were responsible for the enhanced hemocompatibility of NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs.

  14. NH2+ implantations induced superior hemocompatibility of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    NH2+ implantation was performed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The hemocompatibility of MWCNTs and NH2+-implanted MWCNTs was evaluated based on in vitro hemolysis, platelet adhesion, and kinetic-clotting tests. Compared with MWCNTs, NH2+-implanted MWCNTs displayed more perfect platelets and red blood cells in morphology, lower platelet adhesion rate, lower hemolytic rate, and longer kinetic blood-clotting time. NH2+-implanted MWCNTs with higher fluency of 1 × 1016 ions/cm2 led to the best thromboresistance, hence desired hemocompatibility. Fourier transfer infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that NH2+ implantation caused the cleavage of some pendants and the formation of some new N-containing functional groups. These results were responsible for the enhanced hemocompatibility of NH2+-implanted MWCNTs. PMID:23634977

  15. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  16. Update of intraocular lens implantation in children

    PubMed Central

    Al Shamrani, Mohammed; Al Turkmani, Shahira

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is a common problem that affects the vision in children and a major cause of amblyopia in children. However, the management of childhood cataract is tenuous and requires special considerations especially with regard to intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Age at which an IOL can be implanted is a controversial issue. Implanting an IOL in very young children carries the risk of severe postoperative inflammation and posterior capsule opacification that may need other surgeries and may affect the vision permanently. Accuracy of the calculated IOL power is affected by the short eyes and the steep keratometric values at this age. Furthermore, choosing an appropriate IOL power is not a straight forward decision as future growth of the eye affects the axial length and keratometry readings which may result in an unexpected refractive error as children age. The aim of this review is to cover these issues regarding IOL implantation in children; indications, timing of implantation, types of IOLs, site of implantation and the power calculations. PMID:23961005

  17. Tissue-point motion tracking in the tongue from cine MRI and tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Suo, Yuanming; Murano, Emi Z; Prince, Jerry L

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE Accurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help professionals diagnose and treat vocal tract-related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. The authors compared tissue tracking results from 4 widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with harmonic phase (HARP)-based tracking applied to tagged MRI. METHOD Ten subjects repeated the phrase "a geese" multiple times while sagittal images of the head were collected at 26 Hz, first in a tagged MRI data set and then in a cine MRI data set. HARP tracked the motion of 8 specified tissue points in the tagged data set. Four DR methods including diffeomorphic demons and free-form deformations based on cubic B-spline with 3 different similarity measures were used to track the same 8 points in the cine MRI data set. Individual points were tracked and length changes of several muscles were calculated using the DR- and HARP-based tracking methods. RESULTS The results showed that the DR tracking errors were nonsystematic and varied in direction, amount, and timing across speakers and within speakers. Comparison of HARP and DR tracking with manual tracking showed better tracking results for HARP except at the tongue surface, where mistracking caused greater errors in HARP than DR. CONCLUSIONS Tissue point tracking using DR tracking methods contains nonsystematic tracking errors within and across subjects, making it less successful than tagged MRI tracking within the tongue. However, HARP sometimes mistracks points at the tongue surface of tagged MRI because of its limited bandpass filter and tag pattern fading, so that DR has better success measuring surface tissue points on cine MRI than HARP does. Therefore, a hybrid method is being explored. PMID:24686470

  18. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  19. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  20. Synthetic facial implants.

    PubMed

    Quatela, Vito C; Chow, Jen

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a range of synthetic implant materials for use in facial plastic surgery. The authors discuss alternatives to autogenous tissue transfer in terms of biocompatibility, technique, complications, controversies, and cautions. The reader is presented information about a range of synthetic implant materials such as silicone, polyester fiber, polyamide mesh, metal, polyethylene, polyacrylamide gel, hydroxyapatite, polylactic acid, collagen, and others. PMID:18063244

  1. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  2. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  3. Gold bead implants.

    PubMed

    Durkes, T E

    1992-03-01

    Gold bead implantation is an experimental area of study in the acupuncture field dealing with chronic diseases. Special acupuncture techniques are required to implant the gold beads successfully in the proper location. Gold beads are used to treat degenerative joint disease, osteochondritis, osteochondritis dessicans, ventral spondylosis, and seizures. PMID:1581658

  4. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  5. Incorporating MRI structural information into bioluminescence tomography: system, heterogeneous reconstruction and in vivo quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Xue, Huadan; Lei, Jing; Wang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Ming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Combining two or more imaging modalities to provide complementary information has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic biomedical research. By incorporating the structural information provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the ill poseness nature of bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be reduced significantly, thus improve the accuracies of reconstruction and in vivo quantification. In this paper, we present a small animal imaging system combining multi-view and multi-spectral BLT with MRI. The independent MRI-compatible optical device is placed at the end of the clinical MRI scanner. The small animal is transferred between the light tight chamber of the optical device and the animal coil of MRI via a guide rail during the experiment. After the optical imaging and MRI scanning procedures are finished, the optical images are mapped onto the MRI surface by interactive registration between boundary of optical images and silhouette of MRI. Then, incorporating the MRI structural information, a heterogeneous reconstruction algorithm based on finite element method (FEM) with L 1 normalization is used to reconstruct the position, power and region of the light source. In order to validate the feasibility of the system, we conducted experiments of nude mice model implanted with artificial light source and quantitative analysis of tumor inoculation model with MDA-231-GFP-luc. Preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of the prototype system. PMID:24940545

  6. Number of implants for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Kim, Ha-Young; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review is to address treatment outcomes of Mandibular implant overdentures relative to implant survival rate, maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by a PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) and comparative clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected. Eleven studies from 1098 studies were finally selected and data were analyzed relative to number of implants. RESULTS Six studies presented the data of the implant survival rate which ranged from 95% to 100% for 2 and 4 implant group and from 81.8% to 96.1% for 1 and 2 implant group. One study, which statistically compared implant survival rate showed no significant differences relative to the number of implants. The most common type of prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement or reattaching of loose clips for 2 and 4 implant group, and denture repair due to the fracture around an implant for 1 and 2 implant groups. Most studies showed no significant differences in the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complication, and patient satisfaction regardless the number of implants. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures is high regardless of the number of implants. Denture maintenance is likely not inflenced substantially by the number of implants and patient satisfaction is typically high again regardless os the number of implants. PMID:23236572

  7. In vitro assessment of tissue heating near metallic medical implants by exposure to pulsed radio frequency diathermy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggera, P. S.; Witters, D. M.; von Maltzahn, G.; Bassen, H. I.

    2003-09-01

    A patient with bilateral implanted neurostimulators suffered significant brain tissue damage, and subsequently died, following diathermy treatment to hasten recovery from teeth extraction. Subsequent MRI examinations showed acute deterioration of the tissue near the deep brain stimulator (DBS) lead's electrodes which was attributed to excessive tissue heating induced by the diathermy treatment. Though not published in the open literature, a second incident was reported for a patient with implanted neurostimulators for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. During a diathermy treatment for severe kyphosis, the patient had a sudden change in mental status and neurological deficits. The diathermy was implicated in causing damage to the patient's brain tissue. To investigate if diathermy induced excessive heating was possible with other types of implantable lead systems, or metallic implants in general, we conducted a series of in vitro laboratory tests. We obtained a diathermy unit and also assembled a controllable laboratory exposure system. Specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements were performed using fibre optic thermometry in proximity to the implants to determine the rate of temperature rise using typical diathermy treatment power levels. Comparisons were made of the SAR measurements for a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) lead, a pacemaker lead and three types of bone prosthesis (screws, rods and a plate). Findings indicate that temperature changes of 2.54 and 4.88 °C s-1 with corresponding SAR values of 9129 and 17 563 W kg-1 near the SCS and pacemaker electrodes are significantly higher than those found in the proximity of the other metallic implants which ranged from 0.04 to 0.69 °C s-1 (129 to 2471 W kg-1). Since the DBS leads that were implanted in the reported human incidents have one-half the electrode surface area of the tested SCS lead, these results imply that tissue heating at rates at least equal to or up to twice as much as those reported here for

  8. Systemic IFNγ predicts local implant macrophage response.

    PubMed

    Hoene, Andreas; Patrzyk, Maciej; Walschus, Uwe; Finke, Birgit; Lucke, Silke; Nebe, Barbara; Schröder, Karsten; Schlosser, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Implantation of biomaterials can cause complications often associated with inflammatory reactions. However, repeated evaluation of the implant site would be burdening for patients. Alternatively, blood examinations with analysis of inflammatory serum markers could potentially be useful to reflect the local cellular response for detection and/or prediction of inflammation-related complications. Therefore, following intramuscular implantation of surface-modified Ti implants in rats, this study aimed at examining possible associations between the post-implantation time course of pro-inflammatory (INFγ, IL-2) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokine serum concentrations and the local peri-implant tissue response after 56 days (pro-inflammatory CD68-positive monocytes/macrophages, anti-inflammatory CD163-positive macrophages, MHC class II-positive cells, activated natural killer cells and mast cells). Multivariate correlation analysis revealed a significant interaction between serum IFNγ and peri-implant tissue CD68-positive monocytes/macrophages (p = 0.001) while no interactions were found for other cytokines and cell types. Additional Pearson correlation analysis of IFNγ serum concentrations on each experimental day vs. the CD68-positive monocytes/macrophages response on day 56 demonstrated a consistently positive correlation that was strongest during the first three weeks. Thus, high early pro-inflammatory IFNγ serum concentration was associated with high late number of pro-inflammatory CD68-positive monocyte/macrophages and low early serum IFNγ with low late CD68-positive monocyte/macrophage numbers. Further studies aimed at examination of patient samples could establish the relevance of this association to predict clinical complications. After implantation of titanium samples, high early IFNγ serum concentrations were associated with a pronounced late pro-inflammatory CD68-positive monocyte/ macrophage (red circle) response, while no correlation was found

  9. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  10. Cochlear implants in children.

    PubMed

    Young, N M

    1994-04-01

    Children with such profound deafness that they are not helped by hearing aids are now candidates for cochlear implantation. This technology permits us to provide these children with a significant degree of useful hearing. The degree of improvement in speech perception and spoken language in pediatric cochlear implant recipients varies. However, the younger the children and the less time they have been completely deprived of auditory stimuli, the more likely they are to make significant progress. The evaluation of the deaf child for implantation is best done by a multidisciplinary team who understands the needs of hearing-impaired children and who can work with the family, the child, and classroom teachers, as well as other school professionals. The decision to proceed with cochlear implantation in a child is one that requires long-term commitment on the part of the family and the cochlear implant team. PMID:8039409

  11. [Implantable medical devices].

    PubMed

    Crickx, B; Arrault, X

    2008-01-01

    Medical devices have been individualized to include a category of implantable medical devices, "designed to be totally implanted in the human body or to replace an epithelial surface or a surface of the eye, through surgery, and remain in place after the intervention" (directive 93/42/CEE and decree of 20 April 206). Each implantable medical device has a common name and a commercial name for precise identification of the model (type/references). The users' service and the implanting physician should be clearly identified. There are a number of rules concerning health traceability to rapidly identify patients exposed to risks in which the implantable medical devices of a particular batch or series were used and to monitor the consequences. The traceability data should be preserved 10 years and the patient's medical file for 20 years. PMID:18442666

  12. Evaluation of the Etiologies of Implant Fracture in Patients With Fractures of the Implants of Lower Limbs’ Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Ali; Otoukesh, Babak; Kaghazian, Peyman; Yeganeh, Nima; Boddohi, Bahram; Moghtadaei, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Orthopedics implants are important tools for treatment of bone fractures. Despite available recommendations for designing and making the implants, there are multiple cases of fracture of these implants in the body. Hence, in this study the frequency of failure of implants in long bones of lower extremities was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this cross-sectional study, two types of fractured implants in the body were analyzed and underwent metalogical, mechanical, and modeling and stress-bending analysis. Results: The results revealed that the main cause of fractures was decreased mechanical resistance due to inappropriate chemical composition (especially decreased percentages of Nickel and Molybdenum). Conclusions: It may be concluded that following the standard chemical composition and use of optimal making method are the most important works for prevention of failure of implants. PMID:26843735

  13. Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 and Patients with Vestibular Schwannoma in the Only Hearing Ear

    PubMed Central

    Celis-Aguilar, Erika; Lassaletta, Luis; Gavilán, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a new surgical option in the hearing rehabilitation of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) in the only hearing ear. Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) has been the standard surgical treatment for these patients. We performed a literature review of patients with NF2 and patients with VS in the only hearing ear. Cochlear implantation (CI) provided some auditory benefit in all patients. Preservation of cochlear nerve integrity is crucial after VS resection. Results ranged from environmental sound awareness to excellent benefit with telephone use. Promontory stimulation is recommended although not crucial. MRI can be performed safely in cochlear implanted patients. PMID:22518152

  14. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Jr, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Peri-implantitis is one of the major causes of implant failure. The detoxification of the implant surface is necessary to obtain reosseointegration. The aim of this review was to summarize in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials that have evaluated surgical approaches for detoxification of the implant body surfaces. Materials and Methods. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1966 to 2013. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters, radiographic bone fill, and histological reosseointegration. Results. From 574 articles found, 76 were analyzed. The findings, advantages, and disadvantages of using mechanical, chemical methods and lasers are discussed. Conclusions. Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Partial reosseointegration after detoxification has been reported in animals. Combination protocols for surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical and radiographic results, but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:23983691

  15. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  16. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  17. Specific Language Impairment, Nonverbal IQ, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Cochlear Implants, Bilingualism, and Dialectal Variants: Defining the Boundaries, Clarifying Clinical Conditions, and Sorting Out Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this research forum article is to provide an overview of a collection of invited articles on the topic “specific language impairment (SLI) in children with concomitant health conditions or nonmainstream language backgrounds.” Topics include SLI, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, cochlear implants, bilingualism, and dialectal language learning contexts. Method The topic is timely due to current debates about the diagnosis of SLI. An overarching comparative conceptual framework is provided for comparisons of SLI with other clinical conditions. Comparisons of SLI in children with low-normal or normal nonverbal IQ illustrate the unexpected outcomes of 2 × 2 comparison designs. Results Comparative studies reveal unexpected relationships among speech, language, cognitive, and social dimensions of children's development as well as precise ways to identify children with SLI who are bilingual or dialect speakers. Conclusions The diagnosis of SLI is essential for elucidating possible causal pathways of language impairments, risks for language impairments, assessments for identification of language impairments, linguistic dimensions of language impairments, and long-term outcomes. Although children's language acquisition is robust under high levels of risk, unexplained individual variations in language acquisition lead to persistent language impairments. PMID:26502218

  18. Tolerance and Long-Term MRI Imaging of Gadolinium-Modified Meshes Used in Soft Organ Repair

    PubMed Central

    Letouzey, Vincent; Huberlant, Stéphanie; Cornille, Arnaud; Blanquer, Sébastien; Guillaume, Olivier; Lemaire, Laurent; Garric, Xavier; de Tayrac, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Background Synthetic meshes are frequently used to reinforce soft tissues. The aim of this translational study is to evaluate tolerance and long-term MRI visibility of two recently developed Gadolinium-modified meshes in a rat animal model. Materials and Methods Gadolinium-poly-ε-caprolactone (Gd-PCL) and Gadolinium-polymethylacrylate (Gd-PMA) modified meshes were implanted in Wistar rats and their tolerance was assessed daily. Inflammation and biocompatibility of the implants were assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry after 30 days post implantation. Implants were visualised by 7T and 3T MRI at day 30 and at day 90. Diffusion of Gadolinium in the tissues of the implanted animals was assessed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results Overall Gd-PMA coated implants were better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL. In fact, Gd-PMA implants were characterised by a high ratio collagen I/III and good vascularisation of the integration tissues. High resolution images of the coated mesh were obtained in vivo with experimental 7T as well as 3T clinical MRI. Mass spectrometry analyses showed that levels of Gadolinium in animals implanted with coated mesh were similar to those of the control group. Conclusions Meshes coated with Gd-PMA are better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL as no signs of erosion or significant inflammation were detected at 30 days post implantation. Also, Gd-PMA coated meshes were clearly visualised with both 7T and 3T MRI devices. This new technique of mesh optimisation may represent a valuable tool in soft tissue repair and management. PMID:25811855

  19. Why We Need Postmortem Analysis of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Mauf, Sabrina; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Laberke, Patrick J; Thali, Michael J; Bartsch, Christine

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is increasing. However, postmortem analysis of CIEDs is not performed routinely. Fourteen consecutive CIEDs were analyzed. The indication for and date of implantation, technical data, CIED reprogramming, heart rhythm disturbances, patient demographics and medical consultations were investigated. Death during the first year after implantation was seen in 54%, whereof 71% consulted a physician within 10 days before death. The time of death was attributed to a particular day in 29%. There was a relationship between CIEDs and cause/manner of death in 50%. Although limited by a small sample size, this study advocates the routine postmortem CIED analysis for forensic and clinical purposes in selected cases. Patients with CIEDs seem to show an increased risk of death during the first year after implantation. The analysis of CIEDs can be helpful in evaluating the time/cause/manner of death. PMID:27364278

  20. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  1. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  2. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  3. NONSURGICAL PERIODONTAL MANAGEMENT OF IATROGENIC PERI-IMPLANTITIS: A CLINICAL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Roncati, M; Lauritano, D; Tagliabue, A; Tettamanti, L

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have emerged as a first line of treatment to replace missing teeth for both the edentulous and partially dentate patients. The anticipated high degree of success is somewhat challenged by the onset of peri-implantitis. Peri-implant diseases are a cluster of “contemporary” oral infections in humans; they are characterized by the inflammatory destruction of the implant-supporting tissues, as a result of biofilm formation on the implant surface. It is still not clear how the roles of its etiologic agents work. A history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, and smoking are considered as risk factors for peri-implant diseases. Occasionally failing implants are associated with iatrogenic factors, that, only recently, have been acknowledged as direct cause of peri-implant complications, i.e.: non-parallel adjacent implants or the presence of a gap, between fixture and prosthetic components. The use both of traditional protocols of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and the diode laser seems to be an effective alternative treatment modality for peri-implantitis. By the application of laser-assisted non-surgical peri-implant therapy the periodontal pocket depth was reduced. Intraoral periapical radiographs, taken at 6 months and 1 year post nonsurgical treatment, seemed to provide evidence of some improvement of the bone level. The present article illustrates the nonsurgical management of one case, where failure to remove residual cement, from an implant-supported dental prosthesis, seemed to cause peri-implant inflammation. PMID:26511197

  4. Reprint of "Hypomyelinating disorders: An MRI approach.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A James; Deon, Sean

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of hypomyelinating disorders has been proposed as a group of disorders with varying systemic manifestations that are identified by MR findings of absence or near absence of the T2 hypointensity that develops in white matter as a result of myelination. Initially proposed as a separate group because they were the largest single category of undiagnosed leukodystrophies, their separation as a distinct group that can be recognized by looking for a specific MRI feature has resulted in a marked increase in their diagnosis and a better understanding of the different causes of hypomyelination. This review will discuss the clinical presentations, imaging findings on standard MRI, and new MRI-related techniques that allow a better understanding of these disorders and proposed methods for quantifying the myelination as a potential means of assessing disease course and the effects of proposed treatments. Disorders with hypomyelination of white matter, or hypomyelinating disorders (HMDs), represent the single largest category among undiagnosed genetic leukoencephalopathies (Schiffmann and van der Knaap, 2009; Steenweg et al., 2010). This group of inborn errors of metabolism is characterized by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of reduced or absent myelin development: delay in the development of T2 hypointensity and, often, T1 hyperintensity in the white matter of the brain. The concept of hypomyelination was first conceptualized by (Schiffmann and van der Knaap, 2009; Steenweg et al., 2010; Schiffmann et al., 1994) in a series of papers that showed that these MRI characteristics were easily recognized, were different from the MRI characteristics of dysmyelinating and demyelinating disorders, and that the combination of these imaging findings with specific other clinical and imaging features could be used to make diagnoses with some confidence. In this manuscript, we will discuss the physiologic and genetic bases of hypomyelinating

  5. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  6. [Implantable hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Luers, J C; Beutner, D; Hüttenbrink, K-B

    2011-10-01

    Strictly speaking, implantable hearing aids are technical systems that process audiological signals and convey these by direct mechanical stimulation of the ossicular chain or cochlea. They have certain benefits over conventional hearing aids in terms of wearing comfort and general acceptance. As current studies lack convincing audiological results, the indications for implantable hearing aids are primarily of medical or cosmetic nature. To date, three systems are available in Germany: Vibrant Soundbridge®, Carina®, and Esteem®. Because the performance of the different implantable and nonimplantable hearing systems together with various surgical procedures are currently undergoing major changes, audiological indications may also develop in the future. PMID:21956678

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  8. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  9. Bilateral Cutaneous Fistula After the Placement of Zygomatic Implants.

    PubMed

    Garcia Garcia, Blas; Ruiz Masera, Juan Jose; Insert Last Name, Insert First Name Insert Middle Name; Zafra Camacho, Francisco Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Zygomatic implants are used to restore function in patients with highly edentulous atrophic maxillae, in which it is not possible to place conventional implants. The aim of this paper is to present a case of bilateral cutaneous fistula after placement of zygomatic implants and the treatment performed to resolve the condition, as well as to establish a hypothesis regarding the etiology of these lesions. Presented is a 59-year-old woman with an atrophic edentulous maxilla who received four zygomatic implants. At 8 months and 31 months after implant placement on the right and left sides, respectively, the patient developed inflammatory lesions in the lateral aspect of both orbits that evolved toward developing a fistula within weeks. The patient underwent surgery in both cases. Complications of zygomatic implants are relatively common but rarely involve the loss or removal of implants. In this case, the patient retained her implants, and several months after resection of both fistulae, the patient is asymptomatic without recurrence of the lesions. The probable cause of the occurrence of the fistula could be an accumulation of sinus mucosa remnants, periosteum, and bone particles at the malar level as a result of poor irrigation at the time of implant placement. PMID:26478973

  10. Dental implants inserted in native bone: Cases series analyses

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Riccardo; Viscioni, Alessandro; Dattola, Frencesco; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concept of osseointegration, i.e., the direct anchorage of endosseous implants made of commercially pure or titanium alloy to the bone caused a breakthrough in oral rehabilitation. The identification of factors for long-term survival and success rate are the main goal of the recent literature. Several variables can influence the final result, and in general they are grouped in surgery-, host-, implant-, and occlusion-related factors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis on a large series of dental implants was performed to detect those variables influencing the clinical outcome. In the period between January 2007 and December 2009, 157 patients were operated. A total of 429 implants were inserted. Dental implants are reliable devices to be used in oral rehabilitation. Results: Globally, very few implants were lost at the end of the follow-up period. Slight but significant differences existed among different implants types with regard to peri-implant bone resorption. Conclusion: A better clinical outcome was revealed for Sweden and Martina global implant. PMID:23814579

  11. Regaining venous access for implantation of a new lead

    PubMed Central

    Syska, Paweł; Maciąg, Aleksander; Oręziak, Artur; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Przybylski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Venous occlusion is a relatively common complication of endocardial lead implantation. It may cause a critical problem when implantation of a new lead is needed. Traditional methods result in leaving abandoned leads. The optimal approach seems to be the extraction of the damaged or abandoned lead, regaining venous access and implantation of a new lead. Aim To assess the efficacy and safety of new lead implantation by the method of lead extraction. Material and methods All transvenous lead extraction procedures (203 patients) between 1 August 2008 and 15 October 2012 were assessed. The analysis included cases with leads implanted for at least 6 months prior to extraction. Results Regaining venous access was the main indication for lead extraction in 5 patients (4.9%). The reason for new lead implantation was lead damage (n = 7) and system up-grade to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) (n = 3). In total, 23 leads were extracted (9 defibrillation leads, 12 pacing leads and 2 left ventricular leads). The mean time from the implantation was 92.2 ±43.2 (48-152) months. In all cases Cook mechanical sheaths were applied. The use of the Evolution system was necessary to extract 3 leads. In all cases the new leads were successfully implanted as planned. No serious complications occurred. Conclusions Diagnosis of venous occlusion should not be a contraindication for ipsilateral implantation of the new lead, because the techniques of transvenous lead extraction enable successful regaining of venous access. PMID:24570688

  12. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  13. Effect of model parameters on finite element analysis of micromotions in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Winter, Werner; Klein, Daniel; Karl, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Micromotion between dental implant and bony socket may occur in immediate-loading scenarios. Excessive micromotion surpassing an estimated threshold of approximately 150 μm may result in fibrous encapsulation instead of osseointegration of the implant. As finite element analysis (FEA) has been applied in this field, it was the aim of this study to evaluate the effect of implant-related variables and modeling parameters on simulating micromotion phenomena. Three-dimensional FEA models representing a dental implant within a bony socket were constructed and used for evaluating micromotion (global displacement) and stress transfer (von Mises equivalent stress) at the implant-bone interface when static loads were applied. A parametric study was conducted altering implant geometry (cylinder, screw), direction of loading (axial, horizontal), healing status (immediate implant, osseointegrated implant), and contact type between implant and bone (friction free, friction, rigid). Adding threads to a cylindrically shaped implant as well as changing the contact type between implant and bone from friction free to rigid led to a reduction of implant displacement. On the other hand, reducing the elastic modulus of bone for simulating an immediate implant caused a substantial increase in displacement of the implant. Altering the direction of loading from axial to horizontal caused a change in loading patterns from uniform loading surrounding the whole implant to localized loading in the cervical area. Implant-related and bone-related factors determine the degree of micromotion of a dental implant during the healing phase, which should be considered when choosing a loading protocol. PMID:23402356

  14. [Silicone breast implants].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M; Brandt, B; Breiting, V B; Christensen, L H; Thomsen, J L

    1989-12-18

    A brief review of the use of silicone breast implants, their structure, methods of implantation and complications is presented. Acute complications are rare, being mainly infection and hematoma. Long-term complications, on the contrary, are common, consisting mainly of capsular contracture around the prosthesis with subsequent pain and deformation of the breast. More rarely silicone granulomas form, and prosthesis rupture or herniation occurs. The importance of silicone leakage for these complications is discussed separately as well as the treatment of and prevention of capsular contracture and demonstration of silicone in tissue. A critical attitude towards the use of silicone breast implants, when these are used for purely cosmetic purposes, is recommended at present. New improved types of silicone breast implants are currently being tested clinically. PMID:2692262

  15. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  16. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  17. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  18. Clinically based implant selection.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    A hierarchy of implant selection is presented, based on overcoming specific clinical challenges in a variety of situations, including maximization of the esthetic, comfort, and functional potentials of therapy. PMID:10709488

  19. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... stages, or surgeries. During the first stage, a tissue expander is used. An implant is placed during the ... a pouch under your chest muscle. A small tissue expander is placed in the pouch. The expander is ...

  20. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  1. Implantable microscale neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C

    2007-12-01

    Implantable neural microsystems provide an interface to the nervous system, giving cellular resolution to physiological processes unattainable today with non-invasive methods. Such implantable microelectrode arrays are being developed to simultaneously sample signals at many points in the tissue, providing insight into processes such as movement control, memory formation, and perception. These electrode arrays have been microfabricated on a variety of substrates, including silicon, using both surface and bulk micromachining techniques, and more recently, polymers. Current approaches to achieving a stable long-term tissue interface focus on engineering the surface properties of the implant, including coatings that discourage protein adsorption or release bioactive molecules. The implementation of a wireless interface requires consideration of the necessary data flow, amplification, signal processing, and packaging. In future, the realization of a fully implantable neural microsystem will contribute to both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as a neuroprosthetic interface to restore motor functions in paralyzed patients. PMID:17252207

  2. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  3. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  4. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Fogg, P; Trapp, J V

    2013-06-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3-9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations. PMID:23760920

  5. Indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Chinushi, Masaomi; Washizuka, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Since the first clinical use of implantable defibrillator in human, the technology and the function of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) have been much improved and now, ICD can be implanted within the chest wall. ICD is the most reliable therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with documented VT/VF and the efficacy is most clear in patients with depressed heart function. It is now extended as a tool of the primary prevention of SCD in high risk patients after myocardial infarction. However, such beneficial effect is not applicable to DCM though patients might have depressed heart function. ICD is not free from procedure- or device-related problems which need to be resolved. From unknown causes, VT/VF might recur in an incessant form and an emergency admission is needed. Therefore, even during ICD therapy, patients often require antiarrhythmic drugs or catheter ablation. PMID:15206546

  6. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  7. Complications of Cardiac Perforation and Lead Dislodgement with an MRI-Conditional Pacing Lead: a Korean Multi-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Choi, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun; Jo, Uk; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Woo Seok; Kim, Yoo Ri; Lee, Soo Yong; Whang, Ki Won; Yang, Jihyun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Oh, Yong Seog; Park, Kyoung Min; Nam, Gi Byoung; Choi, Kee Joon; Kim, You Ho

    2016-09-01

    Medtronic CapSureFix MRI 5086 pacing lead (5086; Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) has been reported to be associated with increased cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement. This study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement within 30 days after pacemaker implantation between 5086 MRI lead and previous Medtronic CapSureFix Novus 5076 non-MRI pacing lead. This was a nationwide, multicenter retrospective study in which we compared the incidence of adverse events between 277 patients implanted with 5086 lead and 205 patients implanted with 5076 lead between March 2009 and September 2014. Cardiac perforation within 30 days of pacemaker implantation occurred in 4 patients (1.4%) with the 5086 lead and in no patient with the 5076 lead (P = 0.084). Lead dislodgement occurred in 8 patients (2.9%) with the 5086 lead and in 5 patients (2.4%) with the 5076 lead (P = 0.764). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age was significantly associated with cardiac perforation. Congestive heart failure and implantation of right atrial (RA) lead at RA free wall or septum were significant factors for the incidence of lead dislodgement and lead revision. The incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement were not statistically different between the patients with 5086 lead and the patients with 5076 lead. However, careful attention for cardiac perforation may be needed when using the 5086 MRI lead, especially in elderly patients. PMID:27510382

  8. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ˜150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 1016 cm-2, close to the depth ˜250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  9. Effect of cantilever length on stress distribution around implants in mandibular overdentures supported by two and three implants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Mosharraf, Ramin; Khodaeian, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is no definitive study comparing stress distribution around two versus three implants in implant-retained overdentures with different cantilever length. The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate stress pattern around the implants of the 2 or 3 implant- supported mandibular overdenture with different cantilevered length. Materials and Methods: The models used in this study were 2 and 3 implant-supported overdenture with bar and clip attachment system on an edentulous mandibular arch. Each model was modified according to cantilever length (0 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm); thus, 6 models were obtained. The vertical load of 15 and 30 pounds were applied unilaterally to the first molar and 15 pounds to the first premolar, and the stress in bone was analyzed. Results: With increasing cantilever length, no similar stress pattern changes were observed in different areas, but in most instances, an increase in cantilever length did not increase the stress around the implant adjacent to cantilever. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increasing of cantilever length in mandibular overdentures retained by 2–3 implants did not cause distinct increasing in stress, especially around the implant adjacent to cantilever, it may be helpful to use cantilever in cases of mandibular overdenture supported by splinted implants with insufficient retention and stability. Based on the findings of this study, optimal cantilever length in mandibular overdenture cannot be determined. PMID:27403049

  10. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  11. [Implantable materials (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schaldach, M

    1975-11-01

    There is a steadily increasing importance of implants used as substitutions for body functions which have been impaired due to disease, natural abrasion or accident. With the present state of the art, the limitations for the application of surgical substitutions are due to insufficient properties of biomaterials with regard to specific applications as well as to deficiencies in design and function of the implants used. The basis for the improvement and new development of implants is therefore a functionally adequate design in which the specific properties of the material are taken into account with regard to the individual requirements of the implantation site. For orthopedic implants, materials have to be developed which are to a large extent corrosion and degradation resistant, and withstand high mechanical stress. For implants in the cardiovascular system, compatibility with blood is most significant. Present research in this field is concentrated on efforts to improve the thromboresistivity of conventional polymers by different kinds of surface treatments. One possibility is to influence actively the electrochemical interactions between material and blood components, e.g. by the use of redox catalysts. PMID:1107653

  12. Multispectral MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Zhu, Hongbin; Wang, Su; Wei, Xinzhou; Liang, Zhengrong

    2010-08-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Virtual cystoscopy (VC) can be a screening means for early detection of the cancer using non-invasive imaging and computer graphics technologies. Previous researches have mainly focused on spiral CT (computed tomography), which invasively introduces air into bladder lumen for a contrast against bladder wall via a small catheter. However, the tissue contrast around bladder wall is still limited in CT-based VC. In addition, CT-based technique carries additional radiation. We have investigated a procedure to achieve the screening task by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). It utilizes the unique features of MRI: (1) the urine has distinct T1 and T2 relaxation times as compared to its surrounding tissues, and (2) MRI has the potential to obtain good tissue contrast around bladder wall. The procedure is fully non-invasive and easy in implementation. In this paper, we proposed a MRI-based VC system for computer aided detection (CAD) of bladder tumors. The proposed VC system is an integration of partial volume-based segmentation containing texture information and fast marching-based CAD employing geometrical features for detecting of bladder tumors. The accuracy and efficiency of the integrated VC system are evaluated by testing the diagnoses against a database of patients.

  13. Development and Evaluation of an Actuated MRI-Compatible Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Axel; Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B; Iordachita, Iulian; Guion, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L

    2012-09-12

    This paper reports the design, development, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility evaluation of an actuated transrectal prostate robot for MRI-guided needle intervention in the prostate. The robot performs actuated needle MRI-guidance with the goals of providing (i) MRI compatibility, (ii) MRI-guided needle placement with accuracy sufficient for targeting clinically significant prostate cancer foci, (iii) reducing interventional procedure times (thus increasing patient comfort and reducing opportunity for needle targeting error due to patient motion), (iv) enabling real-time MRI monitoring of interventional procedures, and (v) reducing the opportunities for error that arise in manually actuated needle placement. The design of the robot, employing piezo-ceramic-motor actuated needle guide positioning and manual needle insertion, is reported. Results of a MRI compatibility study show no reduction of MRI signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) with the motors disabled. Enabling the motors reduces the SNR by 80% without RF shielding, but SNR is only reduced by 40% to 60% with RF shielding. The addition of radio-frequency shielding is shown to significantly reduce image SNR degradation caused by the presence of the robotic device. An accuracy study of MRI-guided biopsy needle placements in a prostate phantom is reported. The study shows an average in-plane targeting error of 2.4 mm with a maximum error of 3.7 mm. These data indicate the system's needle targeting accuracy is similar to that obtained with a previously reported manually actuated system, and is sufficient to reliably sample clinically significant prostate cancer foci under MRI-guidance. PMID:23326181

  14. Development and Evaluation of an Actuated MRI-Compatible Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Iordachita, Iulian; Guion, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the design, development, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility evaluation of an actuated transrectal prostate robot for MRI-guided needle intervention in the prostate. The robot performs actuated needle MRI-guidance with the goals of providing (i) MRI compatibility, (ii) MRI-guided needle placement with accuracy sufficient for targeting clinically significant prostate cancer foci, (iii) reducing interventional procedure times (thus increasing patient comfort and reducing opportunity for needle targeting error due to patient motion), (iv) enabling real-time MRI monitoring of interventional procedures, and (v) reducing the opportunities for error that arise in manually actuated needle placement. The design of the robot, employing piezo-ceramic-motor actuated needle guide positioning and manual needle insertion, is reported. Results of a MRI compatibility study show no reduction of MRI signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) with the motors disabled. Enabling the motors reduces the SNR by 80% without RF shielding, but SNR is only reduced by 40% to 60% with RF shielding. The addition of radio-frequency shielding is shown to significantly reduce image SNR degradation caused by the presence of the robotic device. An accuracy study of MRI-guided biopsy needle placements in a prostate phantom is reported. The study shows an average in-plane targeting error of 2.4 mm with a maximum error of 3.7 mm. These data indicate the system’s needle targeting accuracy is similar to that obtained with a previously reported manually actuated system, and is sufficient to reliably sample clinically significant prostate cancer foci under MRI-guidance. PMID:23326181

  15. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  16. Temporal Cortex Activation to Audiovisual Speech in Normal-Hearing and Cochlear Implant Users Measured with Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    van de Rijt, Luuk P. H.; van Opstal, A. John; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Straatman, Louise V.; Hu, Hai Yin; Snik, Ad F. M.; van Wanrooij, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Speech understanding may rely not only on auditory, but also on visual information. Non-invasive functional neuroimaging techniques can expose the neural processes underlying the integration of multisensory processes required for speech understanding in humans. Nevertheless, noise (from functional MRI, fMRI) limits the usefulness in auditory experiments, and electromagnetic artifacts caused by electronic implants worn by subjects can severely distort the scans (EEG, fMRI). Therefore, we assessed audio-visual activation of temporal cortex with a silent, optical neuroimaging technique: functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Methods: We studied temporal cortical activation as represented by concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in four, easy-to-apply fNIRS optical channels of 33 normal-hearing adult subjects and five post-lingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users in response to supra-threshold unisensory auditory and visual, as well as to congruent auditory-visual speech stimuli. Results: Activation effects were not visible from single fNIRS channels. However, by discounting physiological noise through reference channel subtraction (RCS), auditory, visual and audiovisual (AV) speech stimuli evoked concentration changes for all sensory modalities in both cohorts (p < 0.001). Auditory stimulation evoked larger concentration changes than visual stimuli (p < 0.001). A saturation effect was observed for the AV condition. Conclusions: Physiological, systemic noise can be removed from fNIRS signals by RCS. The observed multisensory enhancement of an auditory cortical channel can be plausibly described by a simple addition of the auditory and visual signals with saturation. PMID:26903848

  17. MRI-Based Nonrigid Motion Correction in Simultaneous PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Se Young; Reese, Timothy G.; Ouyang, Jinsong; Guerin, Bastien; Catana, Ciprian; Zhu, Xuping; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion is the most serious limitation to whole-body PET, resulting in spatial resolution close to 1 cm. Furthermore, motion-induced inconsistencies in the attenuation measurements often lead to significant artifacts in the reconstructed images. Gating can remove motion artifacts at the cost of increased noise. This paper presents an approach to respiratory motion correction using simultaneous PET/MRI to demonstrate initial results in phantoms, rabbits, and nonhuman primates and discusses the prospects for clinical application. Methods Studies with a deformable phantom, a free-breathing primate, and rabbits implanted with radioactive beads were performed with simultaneous PET/MRI. Motion fields were estimated from concurrently acquired tagged MR images using 2 B-spline nonrigid image registration methods and incorporated into a PET list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm. Using the measured motion fields to transform both the emission data and the attenuation data, we could use all the coincidence data to reconstruct any phase of the respiratory cycle. We compared the resulting SNR and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detection signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the motion-corrected reconstruction with the results obtained from standard gating and uncorrected studies. Results Motion correction virtually eliminated motion blur without reducing SNR, yielding images with SNR comparable to those obtained by gating with 5–8 times longer acquisitions in all studies. The CHO study in dynamic phantoms demonstrated a significant improvement (166%–276%) in lesion detection SNR with MRI-based motion correction as compared with gating (P < 0.001). This improvement was 43%–92% for large motion compared with lesion detection without motion correction (P < 0.001). CHO SNR in the rabbit studies confirmed these results. Conclusion Tagged MRI motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI significantly improves lesion detection

  18. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  19. Application of uniform design to improve dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of uniform experimental design to improve dental implant systems subjected to dynamic loads. The dynamic micromotion of the Zimmer dental implant system is calculated and illustrated by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. Endogenous and exogenous factors influence the success rate of dental implant systems. Endogenous factors include: bone density, cortical bone thickness and osseointegration. Exogenous factors include: thread pitch, thread depth, diameter of implant neck and body size. A dental implant system with a crest module was selected to simulate micromotion distribution and stress behavior under dynamic loads using conventional and proposed methods. Finally, the design which caused minimum micromotion was chosen as the optimal design model. The micromotion of the improved model is 36.42 μm, with an improvement is 15.34% as compared to the original model. PMID:26406045

  20. The effect of metallic implants on radiation therapy in spinal tumor patients with metallic spinal implants

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Seok Hyun; Kang, Young Nam; Ryu, Mi-Ryeong

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metallic implants on the dose calculation for radiation therapy in patients with metallic implants and to find a way to reduce the error of dose calculation. We made a phantom in which titanium implants were inserted into positions similar to the implant positions in spinal posterior/posterolateral fusion. We compared the calculated dose of the treatment planning systems with the measured dose in the treatment equipment. We used 3 kinds of computed tomography (CT) (kilovoltage CT, extended-scaled kilovoltage CT, and megavoltage CT) and 3 kinds of treatment equipment (ARTISTE, TomoTherapy Hi-Art, and Cyberknife). For measurement of doses, we used an ionization chamber and Gafchromic external beam therapy film. The absolute doses that were measured using an ionization chamber at the isocenter in the titanium phantom were on average 1.9% lower than those in the reference phantom (p = 0.002). There was no statistically significant difference according to the kinds of CT images, the treatment equipment, and the size of the targets. As the distance from the surface of the titanium implants became closer, the measured doses tended to decrease (p < 0.001), and this showed a statistically significant difference among the kinds of CT images: the effect of metallic implants was less in the megavoltage CT than in the kilovoltage CT or the extended-scaled kilovoltage CT. The error caused by the titanium implants was beyond a clinically acceptable range. To reduce the error of dose calculation, we suggest that the megavoltage CT be used for planning. In addition, it is necessary to consider the distance between the titanium implants and the targets or the organs at risk to prescribe the dose for the target and the dose constraint for the organs at risk.

  1. MRI of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis. PMID:23118102

  2. Occupational exposure in MRI.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, D W

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B(0), imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B(0) fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2-0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42 ± 24% of B(0), with time-averaged exposures of 5.2 ± 2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6-4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B(0) fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s(-1). Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  3. [MRI in coma survivors].

    PubMed

    Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Bruno, M A; Boly, M; Soddu, A; Laureys, S; Moonen, G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injured disorders of consciousness patients are still challenging for diagnosis, prognosis, ethical and socio-economic reasons. Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers, et al. 2009). Recent advances in MRI techniques (diffusion tensor, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional imaging) provide data that could improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:20085015

  4. MRI Anatomy of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    McCarley, Robert W.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Frumin, Melissa; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Levitt, James J.; Fischer, Iris A.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2010-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data have provided much evidence in support of our current view that schizophrenia is a brain disorder with altered brain structure, and consequently involving more than a simple disturbance in neurotransmission. This review surveys 118 peer–reviewed studies with control group from 1987 to May 1998. Most studies (81%) do not find abnormalities of whole brain/intracranial contents, while lateral ventricle enlargement is reported in 77%, and third ventricle enlargement in 67%. The temporal lobe was the brain parenchymal region with the most consistently documented abnormalities. Volume decreases were found in 62% of 37 studies of whole temporal lobe, and in 81% of 16 studies of the superior temporal gyrus (and in 100% with gray matter separately evaluated). Fully 77% of the 30 studies of the medial temporal lobe reported volume reduction in one or more of its constituent structures (hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus). Despite evidence for frontal lobe functional abnormalities, structural MRI investigations less consistently found abnormalities, with 55% describing volume reduction. It may be that frontal lobe volume changes are small, and near the threshold for MRI detection. The parietal and occipital lobes were much less studied; about half of the studies showed positive findings. Most studies of cortical gray matter (86%) found volume reductions were not diffuse, but more pronounced in certain areas. About two thirds of the studies of subcortical structures of thalamus, corpus callosum and basal ganglia (which tend to increase volume with typical neuroleptics), show positive findings, as do almost all (91%) studies of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP). Most data were consistent with a developmental model, but growing evidence was compatible also with progressive, neurodegenerative features, suggesting a “two– hit” model of schizophrenia, for which a cellular hypothesis is discussed. The relationship of

  5. Mapping of cerebral oxidative metabolism with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Beesam, R. Shashank; Elliott, Mark A.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    Using a T1ρ MRI based indirect detection method, we demonstrate the detection of cerebral oxidative metabolism and its modulation by administration of the mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) in a large animal model with minimum utilization of gas. The study was performed by inhalation in swine during imaging on clinical MRI scanners. Metabolic changes in swine were determined by two methods. First, in a series of animals, increased metabolism caused by DNP injection was measured by exhaled gas analysis. The average whole-body metabolic increase in seven swine was 11.9%+/-2.5% per mg/kg, stable over three hours. Secondly, hemispheric brain measurements of oxygen consumption stimulated by DNP injection were made in five swine using T1ρ MRI following administration of gas. Metabolism was calculated from the change in the T1ρ weighted MRI signal due to H217O generated from inhalation before and after doubling of metabolism by DNP. These results were confirmed by direct oxygen-17 MR spectroscopy, a gold standard for in vivo H217O measurement. Overall, this work underscores the ability of indirect oxygen-17 imaging to detect oxygen metabolism in an animal model with a lung capacity comparable to the human with minimal utilization of expensive gas. Given the demonstrated high efficiency in use of and the proven feasibility of performing such measurements on standard clinical MRI scanners, this work enables the adaption of this technique for human studies dealing with a broad array of metabolic derangements. PMID:20547874

  6. Electrochemical Disinfection of Dental Implants – a Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Dirk; Zehnder, Matthias; Stark, Wendelin J.; Imfeld, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis has gained significant clinical attention in recent years. This disease is an inflammatory reaction to microorganisms around dental implants. Due to the limited accessibility, non-invasive antimicrobial strategies are of high interest. An unexpected approach to implant disinfection may evolve from electrolysis. Given the electrical conductivity of titanium implants, alkalinity or active oxidants can be generated in body fluids. We investigated the use of dental titanium implants as electrodes for the local generation of disinfectants. Our hypothesis was that electrolysis can reduce viable counts of adhering bacteria, and that this reduction should be greater if active oxidative species are generated. Methodology/Principal Findings As model systems, dental implants, covered with a mono-species biofilm of Escherichia coli C43, were placed in photographic gelatin prepared with physiological saline. Implants were treated by a continuous current of 0 - 10 mA for 15 minutes. The reduction of viable counts was investigated on cathodes and anodes. In separate experiments, the local change in pH was visualized using color indicators embedded in the gelatin. Oxidative species were qualitatively detected by potassium iodide-starch paper. The in situ generated alkaline environment around cathodic implants caused a reduction of up to 2 orders of magnitude in viable E. coli counts. On anodic implants, in contrast to cathodic counterparts, oxidative species were detected. Here, a current of merely 7.5 mA caused complete kill of the bacteria. Conclusions/Significance This laboratory study shows that electrochemical treatment may provide access to a new way to decontaminate dental implants in situ. PMID:21264247

  7. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  8. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  9. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance. PMID:26583117

  10. Nerve damage related to implant dentistry: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Gary; Carpentieri, Joseph R; Cavallaro, John

    2015-10-01

    Proper patient selection and treatment planning with respect to dental implant placement can preclude nerve injuries. Nevertheless, procedures associated with implant insertion can inadvertently result in damage to branches of the trigeminal nerve. Nerve damage may be transient or permanent; this finding will depend on the cause and extent of the injury. Nerve wounding may result in anesthesia, paresthesia, or dysesthesia. The type of therapy to ameliorate the condition will be dictated by clinical and radiographic assessments. Treatment may include monitoring altered sensations to see if they subside, pharmacotherapy, implant removal, reverse-torquing an implant to decompress a nerve, combinations of the previous therapies, and/or referral to a microsurgeon for nerve repair. Patients manifesting altered sensations due to various injuries require different therapies. Transection of a nerve dictates immediate referral to a microsurgeon for evaluation. If a nerve is compressed by an implant or adjacent bone, the implant should be reverse-torqued away from the nerve or removed. When an implant is not close to a nerve, but the patient is symptomatic, the patient can be monitored and treated pharmacologically as long as symptoms improve or the implant can be removed. There are diverse opinions in the literature concerning how long an injured patient should be monitored before being referred to a microsurgeon. PMID:26448148

  11. Recurrent Pyogenic Granuloma Around Dental Implants: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gefrerer, Lidia; Popowski, Wojciech; Perek, Jan Nikodem; Wojtowicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a rare case of a bilateral recurring pyogenic granuloma around dental implants supported by autogenic bone graft. A 55-year-old woman was treated with vertical bone augmentation and dental implants on both sides in the mandible. The patient was followed up for 2 years. Growing granuloma was observed 3 weeks after implants were loaded with splinted porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns. The granulomatous tissue was removed and samples were evaluated histologically and microbiologically with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The pathologic lesion recurred four times on one side and three times on the other side and was removed after each recurrence. Finally, the patient decided to have the implants removed due to the aggressive, permanent, and relapsing nature of the proliferative lesions associated with exposed implant threads. After implant removal, no hyperplasia was seen. Microbiologic contamination was excluded as a cause of this recurring granuloma, and it was presumed that the lesion could have been associated with an insufficient zone of attached gingiva around the implants and exposure of implant threads. However, the etiology of this pyogenic granuloma remains unknown. Due to the high recurrence rate of reactive hyperplastic lesions, a long-term follow-up is necessary. PMID:27333016

  12. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room. PMID:27546081

  13. MRI of perianal fistulae: a pictorial kaleidoscope.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Agarwal, Y; Chawla, A Singh; Jain, R; Thukral, B Bhushan

    2015-12-01

    Perianal fistulae are an abnormal communication between the anorectum and the perianal skin. A seemingly benign condition, it can be a cause of considerable distress to the patient if it is not mapped out adequately before embarking upon surgical correction. The persistence of residual disease complicates and up-stages the grade of the remnant fistula with increased risk of anal incontinence following surgery secondary to damage to the anal sphincter complex. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can play a critical role in mapping the fistulae tract in relation to the anal sphincter complex and hence, act as a reliable guide for the surgeon to chart the optimised management of perianal fistulae. This review illustrates the role of MRI in the imaging evaluation of perianal fistulae, to facilitate a well-planned surgical course. PMID:26455651

  14. Cardiac MRI of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz; Khan, Shamruz Akarem; Williamson, Eric E; Foley, Thomas A; Cullen, Ethany L; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New serological biomarkers, such as troponins, have improved the diagnosis of ACS; however, the diagnosis of ACS can still be difficult as there is marked heterogeneity in its presentation and significant overlap with other disorders presenting with chest pain. Evidence is accumulating that cardiac MRI provides information that can aid the detection and differential diagnosis of ACS, guide clinical decision-making and improve risk-stratification after an event. In this review, we present the relevant cardiac MRI techniques that can be used to detect ACS accurately, provide differential diagnosis, identify the sequelae of ACS, and determine prognostication after ACS. PMID:23668741

  15. Use of low-energy hydrogen ion implants in high-efficiency crystalline-silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.; Sigh, R.; Mu, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of low-energy hydrogen implants in the fabrication of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells was investigated. Low-energy hydrogen implants result in hydrogen-caused effects in all three regions of a solar cell: emitter, space charge region, and base. In web, Czochralski (Cz), and floating zone (Fz) material, low-energy hydrogen implants reduced surface recombination velocity. In all three, the implants passivated the space charge region recombination centers. It was established that hydrogen implants can alter the diffusion properties of ion-implanted boron in silicon, but not ion-implated arsenic.

  16. Metal levels in corrosion of spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Beguiristain, Jose; Duart, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion affects spinal instrumentations and may cause local and systemic complications. Diagnosis of corrosion is difficult, and nowadays it is performed almost exclusively by the examination of retrieved instrumentations. We conducted this study to determine whether it is possible to detect corrosion by measuring metal levels on patients with posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Eleven asymptomatic patients, with radiological signs of corrosion of their stainless steel spinal instrumentations, were studied by performing determinations of nickel and chromium in serum and urine. Those levels were compared with the levels of 22 patients with the same kind of instrumentation but without evidence of corrosion and to a control group of 22 volunteers without any metallic implants. Statistical analysis of our results revealed that the patients with spinal implants without radiological signs of corrosion have increased levels of chromium in serum and urine (P < 0.001) compared to volunteers without implants. Corrosion significantly raised metal levels, including nickel and chromium in serum and urine when compared to patients with no radiological signs of corrosion and to volunteers without metallic implants (P < 0.001). Metal levels measured in serum have high sensibility and specificity (area under the ROC curve of 0.981). By combining the levels of nickel and chromium in serum we were able to identify all the cases of corrosion in our series of patients. The results of our study confirm that metal levels in serum and urine are useful in the diagnosis of corrosion of spinal implants and may be helpful in defining the role of corrosion in recently described clinical entities such as late operative site pain or late infection of spinal implants. PMID:17256156

  17. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  18. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  19. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  20. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  1. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  2. Sodium MRI: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-05-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges, limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  3. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  4. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  5. Rehabilitation using single stage implants

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jumshad B.; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K. V.; Shivakumar, B.

    2009-01-01

    Implant related prosthesis has become an integral part of rehabilitation of edentulous areas. Single stage implant placement has become popular because of its ease of use and fairly predictable results. In this paper, we present a series of cases of single stage implants being used to rehabilitate different clinical situations. All the implants placed have been successfully restored and followed up for up to one year. PMID:20376239

  6. Prosthetic failure in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Kutkut, Ahmad; Kim, Hyeongil

    2015-01-01

    Although osseointegrated dental implants have become a predictable and effective modality for the treatment of single or multiple missing teeth, their use is associated with clinical complications. Such complications can be biologic, technical, mechanical, or esthetic and may compromise implant outcomes to various degrees. This article presents prosthetic complications accompanied with implant-supported single and partial fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25434566

  7. Single lead catheter of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator with floating atrial sensing dipole implanted via persistent left superior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Malagù, Michele; Toselli, Tiziano; Bertini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a congenital anomaly with 0.3%-1% prevalence in the general population. It is usually asymptomatic but in case of transvenous lead positioning, i.e., for pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), may be a cause for significant complications or unsuccessful implantation. Single lead ICD with atrial sensing dipole (ICD DX) is a safe and functional technology in patients without congenital abnormalities. We provide a review of the literature and a case report of successful implantation of an ICD DX in a patient with LSVC and its efficacy in treating ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:27152145

  8. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  9. Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) incidence of rupture: a retrospective MR analysis in 64 patients

    PubMed Central

    Scotto di Santolo, Mariella; Cusati, Bianca; Ragozzino, Alfonso; Dell’Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Altiero, Michele; Accurso, Antonello; Riccardi, Albina

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) hydrogel implants in a group of 64 patients and to assess the incidence of rupture, compared to other clinical trials. Material and methods In this double-center study, we retrospectively reviewed the data sets of 64 consecutive patients (mean age, 43±9 years, age range, 27-65 years), who underwent breast MRI examinations, between January 2008 and October 2013, with suspected implant rupture on the basis of clinical assessment or after conventional imaging examination (either mammography or ultrasound). All patients had undergone breast operation with bilateral textured cohesive gel PIP implant insertion for aesthetic reasons. The mean time after operation was 8 years (range, 6-14 years). No patients reported history of direct trauma to their implants. Results At the time of clinical examination, 41 patients were asymptomatic, 16 complained of breast tenderness and 7 had clinical evidence of rupture. Normal findings were observed in 15 patients. In 26 patients there were signs of mild collapse, with associated not significant peri-capsular fluid collections and no evidence of implant rupture; in 23 patients there was suggestion of implant rupture, according to breast MRI leading to an indication for surgery. In particular, 14 patients showed intra-capsular rupture, with associated evidence of the linguine sign in all cases; the keyhole sign and the droplet signs were observed in 6 cases. In 9 patients there was evidence of extra-capsular rupture, with presence of axillary collections (siliconomas) in 7 cases and peri-prosthetic and mediastinal cavity siliconomas, in 5 cases. Conclusions The results of this double center retrospective study, confirm the higher incidence (36%) of prosthesis rupture observed with the PIP implants, compared to other breast implants. PMID:25525578

  10. Frontoethmoidal Mucoceles: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Michaelides, M; Bintoudi, A; Kyriakou, V

    2007-10-31

    Paranasal sinus mucocele is an expanded, airless, mucus-filled sinus caused by obstruction of the sinus ostium. It is a benign slow growing epithelial lined lesion, bulging against adjacent anatomical structures, without infiltrating them. The purpose of our study is to describe the CT and MR findings in 19 patients (ten women, nine men, 18-72 years, mean age: 48.1) with surgically confirmed frontoethmoidal mucoceles between 1999-2005. CT scans displayed mucoceles as non enhancing soft tissue density lesions, generally isodense to the brain parenchyma, expanding the sinuses in most cases, eroding adjacent bones and extending intraorbitally or intracranially. Signal intensity in T2WI and T1WI MR images varied, but generally lesions had high signal intensity in T2WI and low to intermediate signal intensity in T1WI. Some of the lesions demonstrated regular linear peripheral enhancement after administration of contrast medium. The causes of mucoceles included mucosal thickening from chronic sinusitis, adhesions from previous operation in the nasal cavity, previous trauma, small nasal polyps and a small osteoma, while in six patients (31.5%) the cause of the mucocele remained unrecognized even after surgery. No underlying malignant tumor was found in any of the cases as the cause of obstruction. CT and MRI established the correct diagnosis in all patients. CT was more sensitive in determining bone erosions, while MRI had the advantage of multiplanar imaging and was much more sensitive for differentiating mucocele from a tumor on the basis of MR signal intensity characteristics. In conclusion, CT and MRI are the methods of choice for diagnosing mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses and are of major importance for the treatment plan. Each method seems to have its own advantages and should be used as complementary investigations of sinonasal pathology. Enhanced CT scan should only be performed in the absence or contraindication for enhanced MR imaging. PMID:24299951

  11. Factors affecting retention of estradiol-17 beta silicone rubber implants in ears of steers.

    PubMed

    Parrott, J C; Basson, R P; Carroll, L H; Elliston, N G; Ferguson, T H; Gorham, P E; Grueter, H P; McAskill, J W; Wagner, J F

    1985-10-01

    A series of trials were conducted to identify the factors causing loss of estradiol-17 beta (E2-beta) silicone rubber implants from the ears of cattle and to evaluate methods of reducing this loss. Surface application of cattle feces to the ears before implanting resulted in an increase in loss of implants compared with the loss from dry, clean ears (30.6 vs 8.6%; P less than .05). Washing ears with a povidone-iodine antiseptic solution before implanting or treating implant sites with an antibiotic after implanting reduced (P less than .05) implant loss when ears were coated with the fecal slurry. Coating silicone rubber implants with .5 to 2 mg of oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC) reduced (P less than .0001) implant loss from 39.8 to 13.8% when ears were coated with fecal slurry. When silicone rubber implants with a 1.5-mg coating of OTC were implanted in cattle before submerging in a dipping vat, implant loss was reduced from 6.2 to 2.7%. In studies designed to evaluate mechanical factors affecting implant loss, implants that were placed in the middle of the ear in tight skin moved .79 cm toward the insertion site during a 14-d period after administration compared with 2.82 cm when placed in the base of the ear. When placed in the middle of the ear in tight skin, only 2 of 399 (.5%) implants were lost from steers submerged in a dipping vat immediately following implantation compared with 42 of 394 (10.7%) when placed in the base of the ear (P less than .0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3934122

  12. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  13. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  14. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  15. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  16. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  17. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  18. Allergy to Surgical Implants.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Karin A

    2015-01-01

    Surgical implants have a wide array of therapeutic uses, most commonly in joint replacements, but also in repair of pes excavatum and spinal disorders, in cardiac devices (stents, patches, pacers, valves), in gynecological implants, and in dentistry. Many of the metals used are immunologically active, as are the methacrylates and epoxies used in conjunction with several of these devices. Allergic responses to surgical components can present atypically as failure of the device, with nonspecific symptoms of localized pain, swelling, warmth, loosening, instability, itching, or burning; localized rash is infrequent. Identification of the specific metal and cement components used in a particular implant can be difficult, but is crucial to guide testing and interpretation of results. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium remain the most common metals implicated in implant failure due to metal sensitization; methacrylate-based cements are also important contributors. This review will provide a guide on how to assess and interpret the clinical history, identify the components used in surgery, test for sensitization, and provide advice on possible solutions. Data on the pathways of metal-induced immune stimulation are included. In this setting, the allergist, the dermatologist, or both have the potential to significantly improve surgical outcomes and patient care. PMID:26362550

  19. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  20. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  1. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  2. The Effect of Study Design Biases on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae W.; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Bellfi, Lillian T.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Background All silicone breast implant recipients are recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration to undergo serial screening to detect implant rupture with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the quality of diagnostic accuracy studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture and conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of study design biases on the estimation of MRI diagnostic accuracy measures. Method Studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of MRI and ultrasound in evaluating ruptured silicone breast implants were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases. Two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion and extracted data. Study design biases were assessed using the QUADAS tool and the STARDS checklist. Meta-analyses estimated the influence of biases on diagnostic odds ratios. Results Among 1175 identified articles, 21 met the inclusion criteria. Most studies using MRI (n= 10 of 16) and ultrasound (n=10 of 13) examined symptomatic subjects. Meta-analyses revealed that MRI studies evaluating symptomatic subjects had 14-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using an asymptomatic sample (RDOR 13.8; 95% CI 1.83–104.6) and 2-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using a screening sample (RDOR 1.89; 95% CI 0.05–75.7). Conclusion Many of the published studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture are flawed with methodological biases. These methodological shortcomings may result in overestimated MRI diagnostic accuracy measures and should be interpreted with caution when applying the data to a screening population. PMID:21364405

  3. [Treatment of implant-induced pain conditions in the maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, M; Riediger, D; Schwenzer, N; Eichhorst, U

    1990-01-01

    The implantation of dental implants may lead to severe pain syndromes (not reckoning postoperative pain and discomfort). Pain in the upper jaw is usually caused by inflammations like sinusitis, often in combination with an oroantral communication, rhinitis and osteitis, whereas pain in the lower jaw is often caused by injuries of sensitive branches of the mandibular nerve, mostly the inferior alveolar nerve. In these cases the therapy of pain should be causal, which means removal of the implant and treatment of the pathologic consequences of implantation. Especially the possibilities of micronerval surgery are emphasized within this article. PMID:2257804

  4. Role of implants in the treatment of diabetic macular edema: focus on the dexamethasone intravitreal implant

    PubMed Central

    Cebeci, Zafer; Kir, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the leading cause of sight-threatening complication in diabetic patients, and several treatment modalities have been developed and evaluated to treat this pathology. Intravitreal agents, such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF) or corticosteroids, have become more popular in recent years and are widely used for treating DME. Sustained release drugs appear to be mentioned more often nowadays for extending the period of intravitreal activity, and corticosteroids play a key role in inhibiting the inflammatory process in DME. A potent corticosteroid, dexamethasone (Ozurdex®), in the form of an intravitreal implant, has been approved for various ocular etiologies among which DME is also one. This review evaluates the role of implants in the treatment of DME, mainly focusing on the dexamethasone intravitreal implant. PMID:26604809

  5. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  6. Approaches to USJ Formation Beyond Molecular Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatem, C.; Renau, A.; Godet, L.; Kontos, A.; Papasouliotis, G.; England, J.; Arevalo, E.

    2008-11-03

    As junction depth requirements approach sub 10 nm and the sensitivity to residual implant damage continues to increase, the capability to produce abrupt, shallow profiles while maintaining low residual damage becomes a difficult challenge. Implantation induced amorphization has been widely applied to reduce channeling tails of implanted dopant profiles for integrated circuit manufacturing. This has been required to meet aggressive junction depth targets. The problem, however, is that pre-amorphization creates high defect densities that remain near the former amorphous-crystalline interface post anneal. These end of range (EOR) defects become of greater concern as the industry begins to move towards millisecond anneal technologies. Millisecond anneal, while capable of close to diffusionless activation and abrupt junctions, has caused concern for its inability to fully repair these EOR defects. There has been a recent focus on removing traditional PAI through molecular implantation with limited success. Towards this end we have investigated alternative techniques to reduce EOR damage while maintaining the junction depth, sheet resistance and abruptness. Here we describe the results of two of these techniques. The subsequent reduction in EOR through the use of each process and the resultant Rs, junction depth and abruptness are detailed.

  7. Approaches to USJ Formation Beyond Molecular Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, C.; Renau, A.; Godet, L.; Kontos, A.; Papasouliotis, G.; England, J.; Arevalo, E.

    2008-11-01

    As junction depth requirements approach sub 10 nm and the sensitivity to residual implant damage continues to increase, the capability to produce abrupt, shallow profiles while maintaining low residual damage becomes a difficult challenge. Implantation induced amorphization has been widely applied to reduce channeling tails of implanted dopant profiles for integrated circuit manufacturing. This has been required to meet aggressive junction depth targets. The problem, however, is that pre-amorphization creates high defect densities that remain near the former amorphous-crystalline interface post anneal. These end of range (EOR) defects become of greater concern as the industry begins to move towards millisecond anneal technologies. Millisecond anneal, while capable of close to diffusionless activation and abrupt junctions, has caused concern for its inability to fully repair these EOR defects. There has been a recent focus on removing traditional PAI through molecular implantation with limited success. Towards this end we have investigated alternative techniques to reduce EOR damage while maintaining the junction depth, sheet resistance and abruptness. Here we describe the results of two of these techniques. The subsequent reduction in EOR through the use of each process and the resultant Rs, junction depth and abruptness are detailed.

  8. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient’s body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment. PMID:25279540

  9. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-10-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient's body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  10. Endometrial LGR7 expression and implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Campitiello, Maria Rosaria; Caprio, Francesca; Mele, Daniela; D'eufemia, Diletta; Colacurci, Nicola; De Franciscis, Pasquale

    2016-06-01

    Implantation failure is considered as a major cause of infertility in women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and in otherwise healthy women with unexplained infertility. Preliminary data in primates suggested that relaxin (RLX) is involved in endometrial preparation for implantation. In a prospective observational study, the endometrial RLX receptor (LGR7) expression was assessed in three groups of patients with regular ovulatory cycle and normal uterine cavity: 23 with RPL (Group A), 23 with unexplained infertility undergone at least three cycles of failed in vitro fertilization (IVF) reporting good oocyte and embryo quality (Group B), 23 with proven fertility (Group C). Assessment of LGR7 expression was performed with both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and immunohistochemistry on endometrial samples obtained with hysteroscopic biopsy performed in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. Endometrial LGR7 was less expressed in group A and B versus C, both by PCR analysis (p = 0.024) and immunohistochemistry. The decreased expression of the endometrial RLX receptor in women with implantation failures, both in vitro fertilization failure and recurrent pregnancy loss, suggests that RLX may play a crucial role in the structural and functional changes of the endometrium during the window of implantation. PMID:26761440

  11. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements. PMID:24286654

  12. Integration of High Dose Boron Implants--Modification of Device Parametrics through Implant Temperature Control

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeide, Matthias; Ameen, M. S.; Kondratenko, Serguei; Krimbacher, Bernhard; Reece, Ronald N.

    2011-01-07

    In the present study, we have extended a previously reported 250 nm logic p-S/D implant (7 keV B 4.5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}) process matching exercise [5] to include wafer temperature, and demonstrate that matching can be obtained by increasing the temperature of the wafer during implant. We found that the high dose rate delivered by the single wafer implanter caused the formation of a clear amorphous layer, which upon subsequent annealing altered the diffusion, activation, and clustering properties of the boron. Furthermore, increasing the temperature of the wafer during the implant was sufficient to suppress amorphization, allowing profiles and device parameters to become matched. Figure 5 shows a representative set of curves indicating the cluster phenomena observed for the lower temperature, high flux single wafer implanter, and the influence of wafer temperature on the profiles. The results indicate the strong primary effect of dose rate in determining final electrical properties of devices, and successful implementation of damage engineering using wafer temperature control.

  13. TH-C-19A-09: Quantification of Transmission and Backscatter Factors as a function of Distance to Inhomogeneity Interface for Three Types of Surgical Implant Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D; Mills, M; Wang, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Carbon fiber materials have been increasingly used clinically, mainly in orthopedics, as an alternative to metallic implants because of their minimal artifacts on CT and MRI images. This study characterizes the transmission and backscatter property of carbon fiber plates (CarboFix Orthopedics, Herzeliya, Israel) with measurements for radiation therapy applications, and compares them to traditional Stainless Steel (SS) and Titanium (Ti) metal materials. Methods: For the transmission measurements, 1-mm-thick test plate was placed upstream from a plane parallel Markus chamber, separated by various thicknesses of polystyrene plates in 0.5 cm increments between 0 and 5 cm. With this setup, we quantified the radiation transmission as a function of distance to the inhomogeneity interface. The LINAC source to detector distance was maintained at 100 cm and 200 MU was delivered for each measurement. Two 3-cm solid water phantoms were placed at the top and bottom to provide build up. All the measurements were performed for 6 MV and 18 MV photons. The backscatter measurements had the identical setup, except that the test plate was downstream of the chamber from radiation. Results: The carbon fiber plates did not introduce any measureable inhomogeneity effect on the transmission and backscatter factor because of its low atomic number. In contrast, traditional metal implant materials caused up to 15% dose difference at upstream and 25% backscatter at downstream from radiation. Such differences decrease as the distance to the inhomogeneity interface increases and become unmeasurable at distance of 3 cm and 1 cm for upstream and downstream, respectively. Conclusion: A new type of carbon fiber implant plate was evaluated and found to have minimal inhomogeneity effect in MV radiation beams. Patients would benefit from a carbon based implant over metal for radiation therapy due to their minimal backscatter and imaging artifacts.

  14. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment.

    PubMed

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2016-02-29

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a carotid plaque, but new developments in MRI enable more functional assessment of carotid plaques. In this review, MRI based biomechanical parameters are evaluated on their current status, clinical applicability, and future developments. Blood flow related biomechanical parameters, including endothelial wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index, have been shown to be related to plaque formation. Deriving these parameters directly from MRI flow measurements is feasible and has great potential for future carotid plaque development prediction. Blood pressure induced stresses in a plaque may exceed the tissue strength, potentially leading to plaque rupture. Multi-contrast MRI based stress calculations in combination with tissue strength assessment based on MRI inflammation imaging may provide a plaque stress-strength balance that can be used to assess the plaque rupture risk potential. Direct plaque strain analysis based on dynamic MRI is already able to identify local plaque displacement during the cardiac cycle. However, clinical evidence linking MRI strain to plaque vulnerability is still lacking. MRI based biomechanical parameters may lead to improved assessment of carotid plaque development and rupture risk. However, better MRI systems and faster sequences are required to improve the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as increase the image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:26791734

  15. Low-cost ion implantation and annealing technology for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. H.; Minnucci, J. A.; Greenwald, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ion implantation and thermal annealing techniques for processing junctions and back surface layers in solar cells are discussed. Standard 10 keV (31)p(+) junction implants and 25 keV (11)B(+) back surface implants in combination with three-step furnace annealing are used for processing a range of silicon materials and device structures. Cells with efficiencies up to 16.5% AM1 are being produced, and large-area terrestrial cells with implanted junctions and back fields being fabricated in pilot production exhibit average efficiencies in excess of 15% AM1. Thermal annealing methods for removal of the radiation damage caused by implantation should be replaced by transient processing techniques in future production. Design studies have been completed for solar cell processing implanters to support 10 MW/yr and 100 MW/yr production lines, and analyses indicate that implantation costs can be reduced to approximately 1 cent/watt.

  16. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol.

    PubMed

    Finn, J P; Nguyen, K-L; Han, F; Zhou, Z; Salusky, I; Ayad, I; Hu, P

    2016-08-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications. PMID:27221526

  17. A technique to consider mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources for fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging: a preliminary simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2006-12-01

    fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging can be a powerful tool in studying human brain functions with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions. Recent studies on the combination of fMRI and EEG/MEG have suggested that fMRI prior information could be readily implemented by simply imposing different weighting factors to cortical sources overlapping with the fMRI activations. It has been also reported, however, that such a hard constraint may cause severe distortions or elimination of meaningful EEG/MEG sources when there are distinct mismatches between the fMRI activations and the EEG/MEG sources. If one wants to obtain the actual EEG/MEG source locations and uses the fMRI prior information as just an auxiliary tool to enhance focality of the distributed EEG/MEG sources, it is reasonable to weaken the strength of fMRI constraint when severe mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources are observed. The present study suggests an efficient technique to automatically adjust the strength of fMRI constraint according to the mismatch level. The use of the proposed technique rarely affects the results of conventional fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging if no major mismatch between the two modalities is detected; while the new results become similar to those of typical EEG/MEG source imaging without fMRI constraint if the mismatch level is significant. A preliminary simulation study using realistic EEG signals demonstrated that the proposed technique can be a promising tool to selectively apply fMRI prior information to EEG/MEG source imaging.

  18. Implantable rhythm devices and electromagnetic interference: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Katia; Khairy, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Current medical guidelines have prompted implementation of increasing numbers of implantable rhythm devices, be they pacemakers, internal cardioverter-defibrillators or loop recorders. These devices rely on complex microcircuitry and use electromagnetic waves for communication. They are, therefore, susceptible to interference from surrounding electromagnetic radiation and magnetic energy. Hermetic shielding in metallic cases, filters, interference rejection circuits and bipolar sensing have contributed to their relative resistance to electromagnetic interference (EMI) in household and workplace environments. Device interactions have occurred in hospitals where EMI sources are ubiquitous, including radiation, electrocautery and MRI exposures. However, with rapidly evolving technology, devices and potential sources of EMI continue to change. This review provides a contemporary overview of the current state of knowledge regarding risks attributable to EMI; highlights current limitations of implantable rhythm devices; and attempts to distinguish myths from realities. PMID:18570620

  19. Unusual MRI Findings in a Polio Survivor

    PubMed Central

    Kubosawa, Hitoshi; Ishii, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old male consulted our institution due to worsening of right hip pain for approximately one month. The patient had no apparent functional disorders besides rigidity of the right ankle secondary to childhood poliomyelitis. Plain radiographs demonstrated narrowing of the right hip joint space. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed unusual findings in the right gluteus medius muscle, suspecting a malignant musculoskeletal tumor. Further examinations clarified acute inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus with no atypia. After treatment, serum inflammatory markers normalized and MRI showed homogeneous fat signal intensity in the muscle, which was consistent with poliomyelitis. Total hip arthroplasty was performed due to progression of osteoarthritis. Intraoperative findings showed flaccidity of the gluteus medius muscle, and histological examination of the specimen also was compatible with poliomyelitis. Postoperatively there was no hip instability and the patient has been able to resume his previous physical activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding polio survivors combined with septic arthritis, and sole MRI examination was unable to lead to the diagnosis. The current patient demonstrates the possibility that the involved muscles in poliomyelitis exist even in asymptomatic regions, which will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and life guidance in polio survivors. PMID:27069705

  20. Unusual MRI Findings in a Polio Survivor.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Kubosawa, Hitoshi; Ishii, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old male consulted our institution due to worsening of right hip pain for approximately one month. The patient had no apparent functional disorders besides rigidity of the right ankle secondary to childhood poliomyelitis. Plain radiographs demonstrated narrowing of the right hip joint space. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed unusual findings in the right gluteus medius muscle, suspecting a malignant musculoskeletal tumor. Further examinations clarified acute inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus with no atypia. After treatment, serum inflammatory markers normalized and MRI showed homogeneous fat signal intensity in the muscle, which was consistent with poliomyelitis. Total hip arthroplasty was performed due to progression of osteoarthritis. Intraoperative findings showed flaccidity of the gluteus medius muscle, and histological examination of the specimen also was compatible with poliomyelitis. Postoperatively there was no hip instability and the patient has been able to resume his previous physical activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding polio survivors combined with septic arthritis, and sole MRI examination was unable to lead to the diagnosis. The current patient demonstrates the possibility that the involved muscles in poliomyelitis exist even in asymptomatic regions, which will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and life guidance in polio survivors. PMID:27069705

  1. Determining the risks of magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 tesla for patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jennifer D; Costa, Heather S; Russo, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Conventional pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator product labeling currently cautions against exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there is a growing clinical need for MRI, without an acceptable alternative imaging modality in many patients with cardiac devices. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of MRI at 1.5 T for patients with cardiac devices by measuring the frequency of device failures and clinically relevant device parameter changes. Data from a single-center retrospective review of 109 patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (the MRI group) who underwent 125 clinically indicated MRI studies were compared to data from a prospective cohort of 50 patients with cardiac devices who did not undergo MRI (the control group). In the MRI group, there were no deaths, device failures requiring generator or lead replacement, induced arrhythmias, losses of capture, or electrical reset episodes. Decreases in battery voltage of ≥0.04 V occurred in 4%, pacing threshold increases of ≥0.5 V in 3%, and pacing lead impedance changes of ≥50 Ω in 6%. Although there were statistically significant differences between the MRI and control groups for the mean change in pacing lead impedance (-6.2 ± 23.9 vs 3.0 ± 22.1 Ω) and left ventricular pacing threshold (-0.1 ± 0.3 vs 0.1 ± 0.2 V), these differences were not clinically important. In conclusion, MRI in patients with cardiac devices resulted in no device or lead failures. A small number of clinically relevant changes in device parameter measurements were noted. However, these changes were similar to those in a control group of patients who did not undergo MRI. PMID:22921995

  2. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y; Tward, J; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Huang, L; Szegedi, M; Kokeny, K; Salter, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  3. Chronic Inflammation in an Anophthalmic Socket due to a Room Temperature Vulcanized Silicone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; AlGhafri, Laila; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Maktabi, Azza; Gálvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Alonso, Julio; Schellini Proff, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Two case reports are used to illustrate the signs and symptoms, complications and treatments of chronic socket inflammation due to intraorbital implants. The ophthalmic examination, surgeries and treatments are documented. Two anophthalmic cases that underwent enucleation and multiple orbital surgeries to enhance the anophthalmic socket volume developed pain, intense discharge and contracted cavities with chronic inflammation in the socket which was nonresponsive to medical therapy. Computed tomography indicated a hypodense foreign body in both cases causing an intense inflammatory reaction. The implants were removed by excisional surgery and a room temperature vulcanized silicone implant was retrieved in both cases. Socket inflammation resolved in both cases after implant removal. An intraorbital inflammatory reaction against an intraorbital implant can cause chronic socket inflammation in patients with a history of multiple surgeries. Diagnosis requires imaging and the definitive treatment is implant removal. PMID:27462246

  4. Remote electrical stimulation by means of implanted rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of active implantable medical devices is currently compromised by the available means for electrically powering them. Most common energy supply techniques for implants--batteries and inductive couplers--comprise bulky parts which, in most cases, are significantly larger than the circuitry they feed. Here, for overcoming such miniaturization bottleneck in the case of implants for electrical stimulation, it is proposed to make those implants act as rectifiers of high frequency bursts supplied by remote electrodes. In this way, low frequency currents will be generated locally around the implant and these low frequency currents will perform stimulation of excitable tissues whereas the high frequency currents will cause only innocuous heating. The present study numerically demonstrates that low frequency currents capable of stimulation can be produced by a miniature device behaving as a diode when high frequency currents, neither capable of thermal damage nor of stimulation, flow through the tissue where the device is implanted. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided by an in vivo proof of concept model consisting of an anesthetized earthworm in which a commercial diode was implanted. With currently available microelectronic techniques, very thin stimulation capsules (diameter <500 µm) deliverable by injection are easily conceivable. PMID:21850274

  5. Influence of hernioplastic implants on male fertility in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, T; Lechner, W

    2007-05-01

    This study explored the vulnerability of the ductus deferens due to mesh induced inflammation and shrinkage after hernia repair in the rodent model. Two commonly used types of hernioplastic implants (Prolene and Vypro II) were surgically wrapped around the ductus deferentes on both sides in 20 juvenile and 20 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Twenty male rats underwent sham surgeries as controls. After 3 months, each male was mated with 2-3 adult females, which were subsequently sacrificed and oocytes or embryos were flushed and counted. Histochemical investigations of the implants and the ductus recovered surgically 4 weeks after implantation (one side) and after the fertility test (second side) were conducted. All groups exhibited 1-3 males with decreased or restricted fertility but there was no difference between groups. Histochemical analysis of the implants and the ductus recovered 4 weeks and 4 months after implantation revealed some sperm granulomes due to lesions of the spermatic cord caused by the implant in the Prolene group. There was no inflammatory reaction in the mucosa or blockage of the spermatic cord visible. Both types of hernioplastic implants tested in this investigation do not give an indication of a negative influence on male fertility in juvenile or adult rats. PMID:17022062

  6. Remote Electrical Stimulation by Means of Implanted Rectifiers

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of active implantable medical devices is currently compromised by the available means for electrically powering them. Most common energy supply techniques for implants – batteries and inductive couplers – comprise bulky parts which, in most cases, are significantly larger than the circuitry they feed. Here, for overcoming such miniaturization bottleneck in the case of implants for electrical stimulation, it is proposed to make those implants act as rectifiers of high frequency bursts supplied by remote electrodes. In this way, low frequency currents will be generated locally around the implant and these low frequency currents will perform stimulation of excitable tissues whereas the high frequency currents will cause only innocuous heating. The present study numerically demonstrates that low frequency currents capable of stimulation can be produced by a miniature device behaving as a diode when high frequency currents, neither capable of thermal damage nor of stimulation, flow through the tissue where the device is implanted. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided by an in vivo proof of concept model consisting of an anesthetized earthworm in which a commercial diode was implanted. With currently available microelectronic techniques, very thin stimulation capsules (diameter <500 µm) deliverable by injection are easily conceivable. PMID:21850274

  7. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  8. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient. PMID:22319362

  9. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient's discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities. PMID:26770841

  10. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  11. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  12. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  13. Hormonal control of implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, implantation represents a key step of pregnancy and its progression conditions not only the success of pregnancy but health of the offspring. Implantation requires a complex and specific uterine tissue, the endometrium, whose biological functions are tightly regulated by numerous signals, including steroids and polypeptide hormones. Endometrial tissue is endowed with dynamic properties that associate its ability to control the developmental trajectory of the embryo (driver property) and its ability to react to embryos displaying distinct capacities to develop to term (sensor property). Since dynamical properties of the endometrium can be affected by pre- and post-conceptional environment, determining how maternal hormonal signals and their biological actions are affected by environmental factors (e.g. nutrition, stress, infections) is mandatory to reduce or even to prevent their detrimental effects on endometrial physiology in order to preserve the optimal functionality of this tissue. PMID:27172870

  14. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  15. Long-term vascular access ports as a means of sedative administration in a rodent fMRI survival model

    PubMed Central

    Hettinger, Patrick C.; Li, Rupeng; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Rowe, Daniel B.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rodent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) survival model with the use of heparin-coated vascular access devices. Such a model would ease the administration of sedative agents, reduce the number of animals required in a survival experiment, and eliminate animal-to-animal variability seen in previous designs. Seven male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of an MRI-compatible vascular access port, followed by implantable electrode placement on the right median nerve. Functional MRI during nerve stimulation and resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) were performed at times 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively using a 9.4 T scanner. Anesthesia was maintained using intravenous dexmedetomidine and reversed using atipamezole. There were no fatalities or infectious complications during this study. All vascular access ports remained patent. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation by electrical stimulation of the median nerve using implanted electrodes was seen within the forelimb sensory region (S1FL) for all animals at all time points. The number of activated voxels decreased at time points 4 and 8 weeks, returning to a normal level at 12 weeks, which is attributed to scar tissue formation and resolution around the embedded electrode. The applications of this experiment extend far beyond the scope of peripheral nerve experimentation. These vascular access ports can be applied to any survival MRI study requiring repeated medication administration, intravenous contrast, or blood sampling. PMID:21726581

  16. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of osteomyelitis in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Pugmire, Brian S; Shailam, Randheer; Gee, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a significant cause of morbidity in children throughout the world. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to evaluate for suspected osteomyelitis, however magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has distinct advantages over other modalities given its ability to detect early changes related to osteomyelitis, evaluate the true extent of disease, depict extraosseous spread of infection, and help guide surgical management. MRI has assumed a greater role in the evaluation of osteomyelitis with the increase in musculoskeletal infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus which have unique imaging features that are well-demonstrated with MRI. This review focuses primarily on the use of MRI in the evaluation of osteomyelitis in children and will include a discussion of the clinically important and characteristic findings on MRI of acute bacterial osteomyelitis and related conditions. PMID:25170391

  17. Miniature implantable ultrasonic echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A miniature echosonometer adapted for implantation in the interior of an animal for imaging the internal structure of a organ, tissue or vessel is presented. The echosonometer includes a receiver/transmitter circuit which is coupled to an ultrasonic transducer. Power is coupled to the echosonometer by electromagnetic induction through the animal's skin. Imaging signals from the echosonometer are electromagnetically transmitted through the animal's skin to an external readout apparatus.

  18. Hip Resurfacing Implants.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Sambri, Andrea; Mazzotti, Antonio; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the advantages of hip resurfacing. 2. Describe the disadvantages of hip resurfacing. 3. Identify the population in which hip resurfacing is most often indicated. 4. Demonstrate how to properly postoperatively manage patients with metal-on-metal prostheses. Hip resurfacing offers a suitable solution for young patients affected by hip disease who have high function demands and good bone quality. Bone stock preservation, restoration of the normal proximal femur anatomy, the lack of stress shielding, and the possibility of resuming sporting activity are proven advantages of hip resurfacing. However, there are some disadvantages, such as fracture of the femoral neck, onset of neck narrowing, and possible complications due to the metal-on-metal bearings, including pseudotumors, peri-implant osteolysis, and chronic elevation of metal ions in serum levels. Recent data suggest that the ideal candidate for hip resurfacing is an active male, younger than 65 years, with primary or posttraumatic osteoarthritis, and with a femoral head diameter larger than 50 to 54 mm. Based on these selection criteria, the literature reports implant survival to be similar to that of total hip arthroplasty. The current authors' experience confirms a low failure rate and excellent functional outcomes, with metal ion serum levels becoming stable over time in well-functioning implants. Proper surgical technique, correct patient selection, and the right choice of a well-established prosthetic model are essential elements for the long-term success of these implants. PMID:26270748

  19. Method for implantation of high dopant concentrations in wide band gap materials

    DOEpatents

    Usov, Igor; Arendt, Paul N.

    2009-09-15

    A method that combines alternate low/medium ion dose implantation with rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperatures. At least one dopant is implanted in one of a single crystal and an epitaxial film of the wide band gap compound by a plurality of implantation cycles. The number of implantation cycles is sufficient to implant a predetermined concentration of the dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film. Each of the implantation cycles includes the steps of: implanting a portion of the predetermined concentration of the one dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film; annealing one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film and implanted portion at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined time to repair damage to one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film caused by implantation and activates the implanted dopant; and cooling the annealed single crystal and implanted portion to a temperature of less than about 100.degree. C. This combination produces high concentrations of dopants, while minimizing the defect concentration.

  20. Visualization of the intact interface between neural tissue and implanted microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Holecko, Matthew M; Williams, Justin C; Massia, Stephen P

    2005-12-01

    This research presents immunohistochemical strategies for assessing the interactions at the immediate interface between micro-scale implanted devices and the surrounding brain tissue during inflammatory astrogliotic reactions. This includes preparation, microscopy and analysis techniques for obtaining images of the intimate contact between neural cells and the surface of implantable micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. The ability to visualize the intact interface between an implant and the surrounding tissue allows researchers to examine tissue that is unchanged from its native implanted state. Conversely, current popular techniques involve removing the implant. This tends to cause damage to the tissue immediately surrounding the implant and can hinder one's ability to differentiate inflammatory responses to the implant versus physical damage occurring from removal of the implant from the tissue. Due to advances in microscopy and staining techniques, it is now possible to visualize the intact tissue-implant interface. This paper presents the development of imaging techniques for visualizing the intact interface between neural tissue and implanted devices. This is particularly important for understanding both the acute and chronic neuroinflammatory responses to devices intended for long-term use in a prosthetic system. Non-functional, unbonded devices were imaged in vitro and in vivo at different times post-implantation via a range of techniques. Using these techniques, detailed interactions could be seen between delicate cellular processes and the electrode surface, which would have been destroyed using conventional histology processes. PMID:16317233

  1. Ion implantation induced modification of structural and magnetic properties of perpendicular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nikita; Piramanayagam, S. N.; Maurer, S. L.; Nunes, R. W.; Steen, S.; Yang, H.; Bhatia, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    This study reports the effects of implanting various doses of boron (11B+) and argon (40Ar+) ions into the recording layer and the soft underlayer of CoCrPt-SiO2-based perpendicular recording media. Implantation of a lower dose of boron ions (1011 ions cm-2) in the recording layer was found to reduce the out-of-plane coercivity, whereas no changes in the coercivity were observed when they were implanted into the soft underlayer. In the case of argon ions, lower dose implantation did not show any changes in the coercivity, irrespective of the implanted layer. However, higher dose implantations (1016 ions cm-2) of all the species were found to cause a reduction in coercivity, irrespective of the implanted layer. The reduction in coercivity was more significant when the ions were implanted in the recording layer compared with the case of implantation in the soft underlayer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results on samples where argon was implanted in the recording layer showed a strong shift in the position of Co (0 0 .2) peaks, indicating an increase in the 'c' parameter. The shift is explained, on the basis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to be arising from intra-layer mixing at the CoCrPt-SiO2/Ru interface. Magnetic force microscopy images indicated an increase in domain size arising from the ion implantation.

  2. SEM analysis of ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, Johan B.; van der Berg, N. G.; Botha, A. J.; Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Kuhudzai, R. J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.; Chakraborty, P.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2013-11-01

    SiC is a material used in two future energy production technologies, firstly as a photovoltaic layer to harness the UV spectrum in high efficient power solar cells, and secondly as a diffusion barrier material for radioactive fission products in the fuel elements of the next generation of nuclear power plants. For both applications, there is an interest in the implantation of reactive and non-reactive ions into SiC and their effects on the properties of the SiC. In this study 360 keV Ag+, I+ and Xe+ ions were separately implanted into 6H-SiC and in polycrystalline SiC at various substrate temperatures. The implanted samples were also annealed in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1600 °C for various times. In recent years, there had been significant advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the introduction of an in-lens detector combined with field emission electron guns. This allows defects in solids, such as radiation damage created by the implanted ions, to be detected with SEM. Cross-sectional SEM images of 6H-SiC wafers implanted with 360 keV Ag+ ions at room temperature and at 600 °C and then vacuum annealed at different temperatures revealed the implanted layers and their thicknesses. A similar result is shown of 360 keV I+ ions implanted at 600 °C into 6H-SiC and annealed at 1600 °C. The 6H-SiC is not amorphized but remained crystalline when implanting at 600 °C. There are differences in the microstructure of 6H-SiC implanted with silver at the two temperatures as well as with reactive iodine ions. Voids (bubbles) are created in the implanted layers into which the precipitation of silver and iodine can occur after annealing of the samples. The crystallinity of the substrate via implantation temperature caused differences in the distribution and size of the voids. Implantation of xenon ions in polycrystalline SiC at 350 °C does not amorphize the substrate as is the case with room temperature heavy ion bombardment. Subsequent

  3. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology. PMID:25912703

  4. MRI of plants and foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  5. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies. PMID:26703375

  6. Implantation phaeohyphomycosis caused by a non-sporulating Chaetomium species.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, M J; Fata, A; Naseri, A; Keisari, M Saradeghi; Farahyar, S; Ganjbakhsh, M; Ziaee, M; Dolatabadi, S; de Hoog, G S

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a 66-year-old Iranian woman with a phaeohyphomycotic cyst (approximately 3×2.5cm in size) on the right lateral side of the neck. She had dysphagia and hoarseness, without any pain. She complained about discharge of black liquid on the skin and irritation. Histological examination of biopsy fragments from the lesions showed septate, branched brown hyphae. The fungus was cultured, but sporulation remained absent from 4- week-old cultures on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), malt extract agar (MEA), potato dextrose agar (PDA), and water agar with sterile filter paper. Identification with the genus Chaetomium was achieved by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the small subunit (SSU) domains of the rDNA gene and comparison with sequences held at GenBank and at the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS). Sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene reveals this strain as belonging to the genus Chaetomium. The sequence of ITS did not fully match with any sequence of available ex-type strains of Chaetomium, Thielavia, Madurella and Papulaspora and hence might belong to an undescribed species. However, without diagnostic morphological features the taxon cannot be introduced as a novel member of the genus Chaetomium. After local excision of the cyst and antifungal therapy with ketoconazole (200mg twice a day), the lesion regressed and healed completely. PMID:24246716

  7. Orthopedic medical devices: ethical questions, implant recalls and responsibility.

    PubMed

    Racine, Jennifer

    2013-06-01

    The hip replacement is a surgical procedure to replace the femoral head and acetabulum with prosthetic implants to improve function, increase mobility, and relieve pain caused by damage from disorders such as osteoarthritis and fractures. In recent years, we have seen several recalls of poorly functioning implant systems, most recently, the Johnson and Johnson (J&J) Articular Surface Replacement device. Product recalls are often the results of premature failure of implants requiring additional surgery to exchange the failed device. This raises many questions - technical, medical, regulatory, ethical, and legal - that ultimately put patients at risk, compromise confidence in medicine and regulatory agencies, and important relationships including those between the physician-patient and physician-industry. Where do the responsibilities lie for the patients' suffering, morbidity, and costs of removing the failed device? This article discusses the current recall of the J&J implant, the responsibilities of the manufacturer, surgeons, and the regulatory agency. PMID:23741723

  8. Nanocrystal formation via yttrium ion implantation into sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, E.M.; Hampikian, J.M.; Poker, D.B.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation has been used to form nanocrystals in the near surface of single crystal {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The ion fluence was 5 x 10{sup 16} Y{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, and the implant energies investigated were 100, 150, and 170 keV. The morphology of the implanted region was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling. The implantation causes the formation of an amorphous surface layer which contains spherical nanosized crystals with a diameter of {approximately}13 nm. The nanocrystals are randomly oriented and exhibit a face-centered cubic structure with a lattice parameter of {approximately}4.1 A {+-} .02 A. Preliminary chemical analysis shows that these nanocrystals are rich in aluminum and yttrium and poor in oxygen relative to the amorphous matrix.

  9. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  10. Periumbilical fat auto-graft associated to a porous orbital implant for socket reconstruction after enucleation.

    PubMed

    Medel, Ramon; Alonso, Tirso; Pelaez, Francisco; Vasquez, LuzMaria

    2016-08-01

    Having to remove the sclera, fat and the optic nerve in patients undergoing an enucleation, translates in a larger volume that needs to be replaced to achieve good motility and aesthetic results. Using a 20 or 22 mm implant can only partially replace the removed volume. We report the results of our enucleation technique, which includes the use of a porous orbital implant combined with a primary fat graft to replace a higher percentage of the removed volume to achieve a better cosmetic outcome and to avoid implant related complications in high risk patients. Prospective, non-randomized study of enucleated patients for whom porous orbital implantation was performed with anterior placement of a fat auto-graft. The development of implant extrusion or exposure was recorded as well as the presence of conjunctival wound dehiscence and infection. Orbital volume was clinically and radiologically evaluated as well. Twenty-eight patients were included, with a postop follow-up of at least 6 months (6-79 months). No cases of migration or extrusion were found. One case of a large exposure resolved completely. All MRI demonstrated proper implant-graft integration and vascularisation. The aesthetic result and the symmetry were very adequate, with Hertel differences of less than 2 mm in all cases and good motility range. The fat graft is well tolerated, showing low incidence of implant-related complications whilst maintaining good volume and motility. PMID:27322024

  11. Design of radio frequency pulse waveforms for mitigating signal inhomogeneity in magnetic resonance imaging due to metallic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Taeseong; Kim, Dongmin; Someya, Takao; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Metallic implants can result in considerable inhomogeneity in the signal intensity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because the implant generates a shielding effect to the applied radio-frequency (RF) magnetic fields. In this study, we propose an acquisition method to mitigate the signal inhomogeneities using an adaptive RF pulse waveform. The effectiveness of the method was investigated using both numerical simulations and experiments. The RF pulse waveform was calculated based on inverse analyses of the Bloch equation incorporating the measured RF field distribution within the object. A simulation was carried out using a simplified numerical model of RF field inhomogeneity assumed at the center of model. An RF pulse waveform was designed to recover the attenuated signal region in the given model, and we show a significant improvement in the signal homogeneity compared with that obtained using a conventional pulse. We implemented the proposed method on a 7T-MRI system to show the efficacy experimentally. Test samples were fabricated from agarose gel with inserted copper or aluminum implants of different thicknesses. The RF pulse for selective excitation was calculated after mapping the RF field distribution of each imaging object. The acquired images exhibit an improvement in the homogeneity at the region of metallic implants. These results indicate that the proposed method is effective for MRI measurements of objects containing metallic implants.

  12. Short implants: are they a viable option in implant dentistry?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Steven Richard

    2015-04-01

    Short-length implants (<10 mm) can be used effectively in atrophic maxillae or mandibles even with crown/implant ratios that previously would have been considered excessive. Short implants can support either single or multiple units and can be used for fixed prostheses or overdentures. The use of short-length implants may avoid the need for complicated bone augmentation procedures, thus allowing patients who were either unwilling or unable for financial or medical reasons to undergo these advanced grafting techniques to be adequately treated. PMID:25835796

  13. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  14. MRI Meets MPI: a bimodal MPI-MRI tomograph.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Lother, Steffen; Rückert, Martin A; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Fidler, Florian; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic particle imaging (MPI) constitutes a novel biomedical imaging technique for tracking superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vivo, unlike magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it cannot provide anatomical background information. Until now these two modalities have been performed in separate scanners and image co-registration has been hampered by the need to reposition the sample in both systems as similarly as possible. This paper presents a bimodal MPI-MRI-tomograph that combines both modalities in a single system.MPI and MRI images can thus be acquired without moving the sample or replacing any parts in the setup. The images acquired with the presented setup show excellent agreement between the localization of the nanoparticles in MPI and the MRI background data. A combination of two highly complementary imaging modalities has been achieved. PMID:25291350

  15. Breast MRI: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Day, Deborah

    2009-12-01

    In 2007, the American Cancer Society published guidelines for using breast MRI to screen women who were at high risk for breast cancer. Although breast MRI, which is typically used as an adjunctto mammography, is highly sensitive for detecting breast cancers, its use is somewhat controversial for a number of reasons including its cost and lack of specificity. This article describes the indications for breast MRI and discusses the pros and cons of using it to screen women for cancer and evaluate the extent of disease in women who are newly diagnosed. PMID:20092173

  16. Breast implant extrusion related to Herpesviridae

    PubMed Central

    Thayabaran, Darmiga; Saiyed, Abrar; Huws, Anita Maria; Khawaja, Saira; Holt, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of wound dehiscence in a patient with clinical features of herpes zoster. Presentation of case A 44 year old woman, with a history of recurrent herpes zoster infection, presented to the accident and emergency department with the extrusion of a left sided tear-drop shaped euro-silicone breast implant from an old surgical scar. A month prior to admission, this patient had developed unilateral crops of vesicles along the surgical scar which was apposing her left infra-mammary fold. This was preceded by fatigue and neuralgia. Histology revealed acute inflammation related to a probable Herpesviridae infection. Discussion In this report we discuss the first case of a viral infection predisposing to a wound dehiscence occurring in an old surgical scar. Conclusion This case report illustrates the real but rare possibility of recurrent herpes zoster causing gradual thinning of an old surgical scar. This resulted in an extrusion of the underlying breast implant. PMID:26313335

  17. Comparative stress analysis of delayed and immediate loading of a single implant in an edentulous maxilla model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Esaki, Daisuke; Matsuzaki, Tatsuya; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Stress distribution in peri-implant bone in an edentulous maxilla following delayed and immediate loading implant and the effect of implant length on the maximum stress were evaluated by using two kinds of finite element analyses. A threaded implant was loaded with a 100 N vertical force, either immediately or delayed, and examined by finite element analysis with a simple contact relation or a bonding interaction between the implant and the bone, respectively. Higher stresses were observed in cortical bone around the implant neck following delayed loading and in the trabecular bone around the implant threading in the immediate loading model. The maximum stress in the immediate loading model was dramatically higher than in delayed loading. Increased implant length caused decrease in bone stresses in both loading models. Though the stress level was higher, the decrease in the maximum trabecular bone stress in immediate loading was profound. PMID:25342982

  18. Risk Factors Associated With Complication Rates of Becker-Type Expander Implants in Relation to Implant Survival: Review of 314 Implants in 237 Patients.

    PubMed

    Taboada-Suarez, Antonio; Brea-García, Beatriz; Magán-Muñoz, Fernando; Couto-González, Iván; González-Álvarez, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Although autologous tissue reconstruction is the best option for breast reconstruction, using implants is still a reliable and simple method, offering acceptable aesthetic results. Becker-type implants are permanent implants that offer a 1-stage reconstructive option. A retrospective study was carried out in our center reviewing the clinical reports of 237 patients, in whom a total of 314 Becker-type prostheses were implanted. Overall survival was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier estimate. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios. At the end of the study, 214 expanders (68.15%) presented no complications, 40 (12.47%) developed significant capsular contracture, in 27 (8.60%) infection occurred, 24 (7.64%) suffered minor complications, and 9 (2.87%) ruptured. The mean survival time of the expanders was 120.41 months (95% CI: 109.62, 131.19). Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, high Molecular Immunology Borstel, age, mastectomy performed previously to the implant, ductal carcinoma, advanced tumoral stage, experience of the surgeon, and Becker 35-type implants were significantly related to a high number of complications in relation to the survival of the implants. Cox regression analysis revealed that the main risk factors for the survival of expander implants included radiotherapy and surgeon experience. The complication hazard ratio or relative risk caused by these 2 factors was 1.976 and 1.680, respectively. One-stage reconstruction using Becker-type expanders is an appropriate, simple, and reliable option in delayed breast reconstruction in patients who have not received radiotherapy and as long as the procedure is carried out by surgeons skilled in the technique. PMID:25003425

  19. Silicone Implants with Smooth Surfaces Induce Thinner but Denser Fibrotic Capsules Compared to Those with Textured Surfaces in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sebastian; Hirche, Christoph; Reichenberger, Matthias A.; Kiefer, Jurij; Diehm, Yannick; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Alhefzi, Muayyad; Bueno, Ericka M.; Kneser, Ulrich; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Capsular contracture is the most frequent long-term complication after implant-based breast reconstruction or augmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of implant surface properties on fibrotic capsule formation in an animal model. Materials and Methods Twenty-four rats received 1 scaled down silicone implant each; 12 of the rats received implants with textured surfaces, and the other 12 received implants with smooth surfaces. After 60 and 120 days, rats in each group underwent 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and high-resolution ultrasound (HR-US), and specimens of the capsules were acquired and used to measure capsule thickness through histology, collagen density through picro sirius red staining, and analyses of expression of pro-fibrotic and inflammatory genes (Collagen1-4, TGFb1, TGFb3, Smad3, IL4, IL10, IL13, CD68) through qRT-PCR. Furthermore, MRI data were processed to obtain capsule volume and implant surface area. Results On day 60, histology and HR-US showed that fibrotic capsules were significantly thicker in the textured implant group with respect to the smooth implant group (p<0.05). However, this difference did not persist on day 120 (p=0.56). Capsule thickness decreased significantly over the study period in both smooth and textured implant groups (p<0.05). Thickness measurements were substantiated by MRI analysis and volumes changed accordingly. Implant surface area did not vary between study dates, but it was different between implant types. On day 60, the density of collagen in the fibrotic capsules was significantly lower in the textured implant group with respect to the smooth group (p<0.05), but again this difference did not persist on day 120 (p=0.67). Collagen 1 and CD68 were respectively over- and under expressed in the textured implant group on day 60. Significant differences in the expression of other genes were not observed. Conclusion Silicone implants with textured surfaces led to temporarily

  20. Positron Implantation Profile in Kapton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.

    2006-11-01

    The discussion presented in the paper focuses on processes accompanying positron implantation in condensed matter. They finally constitute the positron implantation profile which generally does not exhibit the exponential behavior as it is concluded from the Monte Carlo simulation made using the EGSnrc 4.0 code. The simulation was performed for the kapton and two commonly used positron sources 22Na and 68Ge\\68Ga. New formula for the implantation profile was proposed.

  1. [Pre-implant esthetic study].

    PubMed

    Missika, P; Khayat, P

    1990-09-01

    The first dental prostheses used on Branemark implants were aesthetically disappointing both for the dentists and their patients. Therefore the authors will consider the various aesthetic problems encountered when treating loss of teeth with implant systems. The problems related to resorption are numerous: large bone losses are resolved by adapting removable acrylic, carrying out bone transplants immediately fixed by the implants, using filling materials, or complete dentures fixed with attachments supported by the implants. Periodontal surgery often provides a solution to the problem of gum visibility at the level of the maxillary anterior teeth. The problems related to the site where implants emerge can often be avoided by consultation between the surgeon and the prosthodontist and by flexing a surgical guide compiled from a pre-prosthetic analysis of the clinical situation. The aesthetic problems related to the actual implant systems are dependent on three factors: When the prosthesis is directly screwed onto the implant, the axis of the implant determines the axis of the dental prosthesis and can lead to the emergence of the screw on the buccal surface; With angulated cores, orientated screws provide the required solution. The implant material, when metallic leads to an unsightly border at the gingival level. Ceramic implants, or the "ceraming" of titanium, provide a solution to this problem. In case of diastema the use of an implant system gives the best choice in comparison to the more conventional treatments. In conclusion, the authors point out the importance of pre-implant analysis which must give an evaluation of the aesthetic result. The fragility of the aesthetic evaluation should encourage dentists to obtain the "clear and written consent" of their patients, accepting the risks run by treatment of this kind. PMID:2268774

  2. Infiltrative pattern of carcinomatosis in extremity muscles on MRI.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Fatima; Hwang, Sinchun; Landa, Jonathan; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Panicek, David M

    2016-01-01

    Carcinomas can cause an unusual, infiltrative pattern of metastatic carcinoma in extremity muscles on MRI. To assess this pattern, reports of MRI exams of 907 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of carcinoma were reviewed retrospectively to identify those that mentioned muscle metastasis or myositis in an extremity. Thirty-six (4%) of those reports described muscle metastasis (n=18) or myositis (n=18); based on medical record review and imaging follow-up, 17 cases represented metastases. Metastases manifested as an infiltrative carcinomatosis pattern in five patients, resulted from primary esophageal or gastric adenocarcinomas, and often were misdiagnosed as myositis. PMID:27133685

  3. Intraoperative MRI for optimizing electrode placement for deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Pan, Longsheng; Song, Huifang; Xu, Xin; Xu, Bainan; Yu, Xinguang; Ling, Zhipei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The degree of clinical improvement achieved by deep brain stimulation (DBS) is largely dependent on the accuracy of lead placement. This study reports on the evaluation of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for adjusting deviated electrodes to the accurate anatomical position during DBS surgery and acute intracranial changes. METHODS Two hundred and six DBS electrodes were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 110 patients with Parkinson disease. All patients underwent iMRI after implantation to define the accuracy of lead placement. Fifty-six DBS electrode positions in 35 patients deviated from the center of the STN, according to the result of the initial postplacement iMRI scans. Thus, we adjusted the electrode positions for placement in the center of the STN and verified this by means of second or third iMRI scans. Recording was performed in adjusted parameters in the x-, y-, and z-axes. RESULTS Fifty-six (27%) of 206 DBS electrodes were adjusted as guided by iMRI. Electrode position was adjusted on the basis of iMRI 62 times. The sum of target coordinate adjustment was -0.5 mm in the x-axis, -4 mm in the y-axis, and 15.5 mm in the z-axis; the total of distance adjustment was 74.5 mm in the x-axis, 88 mm in the y-axis, and 42.5 mm in the z-axis. After adjustment with the help of iMRI, all electrodes were located in the center of the STN. Intraoperative MRI revealed 2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages in 2 patients, brain shift in all patients, and leads penetrating the lateral ventricle in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS The iMRI technique can guide surgeons as they adjust deviated electrodes to improve the accuracy of implanting the electrodes into the correct anatomical position. The iMRI technique can also immediately demonstrate acute changes such as hemorrhage and brain shift during DBS surgery. PMID:26274983

  4. Resective surgery for medically refractory epilepsy using intraoperative MRI and functional neuronavigation: the Erlangen experience of 415 patients.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Karl; Hofmann, Andrea; Sommer, Bjoern; Grummich, Peter; Coras, Roland; Kasper, Burkard Sebastian; Hamer, Hajo M; Blumcke, Ingmar; Stefan, Hermann; Nimsky, Christopher; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraoperative overestimation of resection volume in epilepsy surgery is a well-known problem that can lead to an unfavorable seizure outcome. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) combined with neuronavigation may help surgeons avoid this pitfall and facilitate visualization and targeting of sometimes ill-defined heterogeneous lesions or epileptogenic zones and may increase the number of complete resections and improve seizure outcome. METHODS To investigate this hypothesis, the authors conducted a retrospective clinical study of consecutive surgical procedures performed during a 10-year period for epilepsy in which they used neuronavigation combined with iMRI and functional imaging (functional MRI for speech and motor areas; diffusion tensor imaging for pyramidal, speech, and visual tracts; and magnetoencephalography and electrocorticography for spike detection). Altogether, there were 415 patients (192 female and 223 male, mean age 37.2 years; 41% left-sided lesions and 84.9% temporal epileptogenic zones). The mean preoperative duration of epilepsy was 17.5 years. The most common epilepsy-associated pathologies included hippocampal sclerosis (n = 146 [35.2%]), long-term epilepsy-associated tumor (LEAT) (n = 67 [16.1%]), cavernoma (n = 45 [10.8%]), focal cortical dysplasia (n = 31 [7.5%]), and epilepsy caused by scar tissue (n = 23 [5.5%]). RESULTS In 11.8% (n = 49) of the surgeries, an intraoperative second-look surgery (SLS) after incomplete resection verified by iMRI had to be performed. Of those incomplete resections, LEATs were involved most often (40.8% of intraoperative SLSs, 29.9% of patients with LEAT). In addition, 37.5% (6 of 16) of patients in the diffuse glioma group and 12.9% of the patients with focal cortical dysplasia underwent an SLS. Moreover, iMRI provided additional advantages during implantation of grid, strip, and depth electrodes and enabled intraoperative correction of electrode position in 13.0% (3 of 23) of the cases. Altogether, an

  5. International Classification of Reliability for Implanted Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Backous, Douglas D.; Balkany, Thomas J.; Briggs, Robert J. S.; Gantz, Bruce J.; van Hasselt, Andrew; Kim, Chong Sun; Kubo, Takeshi; Lenarz, Thomas; Pillsbury, Harold C.; O’Donoghue, Gerard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To design an international standard to be used when reporting reliability of the implanted components of cochlear implant systems to appropriate governmental authorities, cochlear implant (CI) centers, and for journal editors in evaluating manuscripts involving cochlear implant reliability. Study Design The International Consensus Group for Cochlear Implant Reliability Reporting was assembled to unify ongoing efforts in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia to create a consistent and comprehensive classification system for the implanted components of CI systems across manufacturers. Setting All members of the consensus group are from tertiary referral cochlear implant centers. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure A clinically relevant classification scheme adapted from principles of ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1) originally designed for reporting reliability of cardiac pacemakers, pulse generators, or leads. Results Standard definitions for device failure, survival time, clinical benefit, reduced clinical benefit, and specification were generated. Time intervals for reporting back to implant centers for devices tested to be “out of specification,” categorization of explanted devices, the method of cumulative survival reporting, and content of reliability reports to be issued by manufacturers was agreed upon by all members. The methodology for calculating Cumulative survival was adapted from ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1). Conclusion The International Consensus Group on Cochlear Implant Device Reliability Reporting recommends compliance to this new standard in reporting reliability of implanted CI components by all manufacturers of CIs and the adoption of this standard as a minimal reporting guideline for editors of journals publishing cochlear implant research results. PMID:20864879

  6. Jaundice causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver is unable to properly move into the digestive tract. Conditions that can cause jaundice include: Infections of the liver from a virus ( hepatitis A , hepatitis B , hepatitis C , hepatitis D , ...

  7. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  8. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate.

  9. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J A

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  10. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  11. Scientists attack European MRI rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-08-01

    A report by the European Science Foundation (ESF) has sharply criticized a European Union (EU) directive on electromagnetic fields, arguing that limits on workers' exposure will have "potentially disastrous" consequences for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  12. BOLD MRI of the Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu-Ping; Halter, Sarah; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Oxygenation status plays a major role in renal physiology and pathophysiology and hence has attracted considerable attention in recent years. While much of the early work and a significant amount of present work is based on invasive methods or ex vivo analysis and hence restricted to animal models, BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) MRI has been shown to extend these findings to humans. BOLD MRI is most useful in monitoring effects of physiological or pharmacological maneuvers. Several teams around the world have demonstrated reproducible data and have illustrated several useful applications. Studies supporting the use of renal BOLD MRI in characterizing disease with prognostic value have also been reported. Here, an overview of the current state-of-the art of renal BOLD MRI is provided. PMID:18926426

  13. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  15. An optically coupled system for quantitative monitoring of MRI gradient currents induced into endocardial leads.

    PubMed

    Mattei, E; Calcagnini, G; Triventi, M; Delogu, A; Del Guercio, M; Angeloni, A; Bartolini, P

    2013-01-01

    The time-varying gradient fields generated during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedures have the potential to induce electrical current on implanted endocardial leads. Whether this current can result in undesired cardiac stimulation is unknown. This paper presents an optically coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the currents induced by the gradient fields into endocardial leads during MRI procedures. Our system is based on a microcontroller that works as analog-to-digital (A/D) converter and sends the current signal acquired from the lead to an optical high-speed light-emitting-diode transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light outside the MRI chamber, to a photodiode receiver and then to an acquisition board connected to a PC. The preliminary characterization of the performances of the system is also presented. PMID:24110209

  16. Tissue response to the components of a hydroxyapatite-coated composite femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Pauyo, T; Lim, L; Legoux, J G; Bureau, M N

    2010-09-01

    Bone loss around femoral implants used for THA is a persistent clinical concern. It may be caused by stress shielding, generally attributed to a mismatch in stiffness between the implants and host bone. In this regard, a fatigue resistant, carbon fiber (CF) composite femoral implant with bone-matching stiffness has been developed. This study evaluated the tissue response to the three material components of this implant in normal and textured (blasted with 24 grit alumina) surfaces: the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, the CF composite and the intermediate crystalline HA particulate composite layer to bond to the HA coating (blended). Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral femoral implantation each receiving two rod-like implants. Bone apposition to the HA (37%) and textured Ti (41%) implants was not significantly different. Bone apposition to the untextured CF (14%) and blended (19%) implants and polished Ti (8%) implants was significantly lower. Bone apposition to the textured CF (9%) and blended (11%) implants was lower (but not statistically from the as received or untextured counterparts). Nearly all sections from femurs containing CF implants presented CF debris. There was no evidence of localized bone loss or any strong immune response associated with any of the implant materials. All materials were well tolerated with minimal inflammation despite the presence of particulate debris. The high degree of bone apposition to the HA-coated composite implants and the lack of short-term inflammation and adverse tissue response to the three material implant component support continued evaluation of this composite technology for use in THA. PMID:20730932

  17. Diagnostic imaging and pacemaker implantation in a domestic goat with persistent left cranial vena cava.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Dosdall, Derek; Norlund, Layne; Higuchi, Koji; Silvernagel, Joshua M; Olsen, Aaron L; Davies, Christopher J; MacLeod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir F

    2014-03-01

    Difficulty was encountered with the insertion of a right atrial pacing lead via the left jugular vein during lead and pacemaker implantation in a clinically normal goat as part of an ongoing rapid atrial pacing - induced atrial fibrillation research project. Fluoroscopic visualization of an abnormal lead advancement path prompted angiographic assessment which revealed a persistent left cranial vena cava (PLCVC) and prominent coronary sinus communicating with the right atrium. Angiography facilitated successful advancement and securing of the pacing lead into the right side of the interatrial septum. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography (MRI/MRA) allowed further characterization of this rare venous anomaly. Even though PLCVC has been reported once in a goat, to the authors' knowledge this is the first report to include MRI/MRA characterization of PLCVC and prominent coronary sinus with successful cardiac pacemaker implantation using the PLCVC. PMID:24480717

  18. A Parametric Empirical Bayesian framework for fMRI-constrained MEG/EEG source reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Richard N; Flandin, Guillaume; Friston, Karl J; Mattout, Jérémie

    2010-01-01

    We describe an asymmetric approach to fMRI and MEG/EEG fusion in which fMRI data are treated as empirical priors on electromagnetic sources, such that their influence depends on the MEG/EEG data, by virtue of maximizing the model evidence. This is important if the causes of the MEG/EEG signals differ from those of the fMRI signal. Furthermore, each suprathreshold fMRI cluster is treated as a separate prior, which is important if fMRI data reflect neural activity arising at different times within the EEG/MEG data. We present methodological considerations when mapping from a 3D fMRI Statistical Parametric Map to a 2D cortical surface and thence to the covariance components used within our Parametric Empirical Bayesian framework. Our previous introduction of a canonical (inverse-normalized) cortical mesh also allows deployment of fMRI priors that live in a template space; for example, from a group analysis of different individuals. We evaluate the ensuing scheme with MEG and EEG data recorded simultaneously from 12 participants, using the same face-processing paradigm under which independent fMRI data were obtained. Because the fMRI priors become part of the generative model, we use the model evidence to compare (i) multiple versus single, (ii) valid versus invalid, (iii) binary versus continuous, and (iv) variance versus covariance fMRI priors. For these data, multiple, valid, binary, and variance fMRI priors proved best for a standard Minimum Norm inversion. Interestingly, however, inversion using Multiple Sparse Priors benefited little from additional fMRI priors, suggesting that they already provide a sufficiently flexible generative model. Hum Brain Mapp, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20091791

  19. Quantitative pharmacologic MRI in mice.

    PubMed

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V; Jacobs, Russell E

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) uses functional MRI techniques to provide a noninvasive in vivo measurement of the hemodynamic effects of drugs. The cerebral blood volume change (ΔCBV) serves as a surrogate for neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling mechanisms. By assessing the location and time course of brain activity in mouse mutant studies, phMRI can provide valuable insights into how different behavioral phenotypes are expressed in deferring brain activity response to drug challenge. In this report, we evaluate the utility of three different intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents for phMRI using a gradient-echo technique, with temporal resolution of one min at high magnetic field. The tissue half-life of the USPIOs was studied using a nonlinear detrending model. The three USPIOs are candidates for CBV weighted phMRI experiments, with r(2)/r(1) ratios ≥ 20 and apparent half-lives ≥ 1.5 h at the described doses. An echo-time of about 10 ms or longer results in a functional contrast to noise ratio (fCNR) > 75 after USPIO injection, with negligible decrease between 1.5-2 h. phMRI experiments were conducted at 7 T using cocaine as a psychotropic substance and acetazolamide, a global vasodilator, as a positive control. Cocaine acts as a dopamine-serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increasing extracellular concentrations of these neurotransmitters, and thus increasing dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. phMRI results showed that CBV was reduced in the normal mouse brain after cocaine challenge, with the largest effects in the nucleus accumbens, whereas after acetazolamide, blood volume was increased in both cerebral and extracerebral tissue. PMID:21793079

  20. Split-frame implant prosthesis designed to compensate for mandibular flexure: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Paez, Carmen Yamily; Barco, Thomas; Roushdy, Sally; Andres, Carl

    2003-04-01

    When an edentulous mandible is restored with 4 or more implants connected by a metal bar and retained with screws, mandibular flexure may cause screw loosening and unnecessary stresses and strains on the prosthesis and implants. Separating the prosthesis at the midline can relieve these stresses and strains. This article describes the separation of a hybrid mandibular denture at the midline. PMID:12690344

  1. Imaging Evaluation of Pediatric Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Potential Candidates for Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jallu, Aleena Shafi; Jehangir, Majid; Ul Hamid, Waqar; Pampori, Rafiq Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) are complementary in the imaging of the labyrinth, the internal auditory canal and the brain in children with sensorineural hearing loss who are being evaluated for cochlear implantation. An accurate anatomical description of the inner ear is essential in the preoperative work up. Computerized tomography visualizes the bony structures, whereas MR can discern soft-tissue components including intra labyrinthine fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerves, and vessels within the IAC. This prospective study was conducted in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Government Medical College, Srinagar. 40 children in the age group of 1-16 years with unidentified causes of bilateral SNHL were analysed radiologically over the period of 2 years from Dec 2011 to Jan 2014. Each patient underwent MRI and high resolution CT scanning of temporal bone in axial and coronal planes. Out of the 40 patients 22 were males (55 %) and 18 were females (45 %). 30 patients (72.5 %)in our study had normal radiological scans. Five patients (12.5 %) had B/L large vestibular aqueduct and two patients (5 %) had internal auditory canal stenosis with cochlear nerve hypoplasia on CT and MR imaging. Cochlear dysplasia was present in two patients (5 %) and semicircular canal dysplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %) as an isolated finding on HRCT. In addition isolated cochlear nerve hypoplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %). Hyperintense basal ganglia lesion suggestive of kernicterus was present in one patient (2.5 %) and hyperintense posterior parietal and occipital white matter lesions suggestive of congenital CMV infection was present in one patient (2.5 %) on MR imaging. Arachnoid cysts of middle cranial fossa was an incidental finding present in one patient. Radiological abnormalities of the inner ear are not uncommon. Computerized tomography and MRI are important modalities to analyze the inner ear in

  2. Impact of the MLC on the MRI field distortion of a prototype MRI-linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kolling, Stefan; Keall, Paul; Oborn, Brad

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To cope with intrafraction tumor motion, integrated MRI-linac systems for real-time image guidance are currently under development. The multileaf collimator (MLC) is a key component in every state-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment system, allowing for accurate field shaping and tumor tracking. This work quantifies the magnetic impact of a widely used MLC on the MRI field homogeneity for such a modality.Methods: The finite element method was employed to model a MRI-linac assembly comprised of a 1.0 T split-bore MRI magnet and the key ferromagnetic components of a Varian Millennium 120 MLC, namely, the leaves and motors. Full 3D magnetic field maps of the system were generated. From these field maps, the peak-to-peak distortion within the MRI imaging volume was evaluated over a 30 cm diameter sphere volume (DSV) around the isocenter and compared to a maximum preshim inhomogeneity of 300 μT. Five parametric studies were performed: (1) The source-to-isocenter distance (SID) was varied from 100 to 200 cm, to span the range of a compact system to that with lower magnetic coupling. (2) The MLC model was changed from leaves only to leaves with motors, to determine the contribution to the total distortion caused by MLC leaves and motors separately. (3) The system was configured in the inline or perpendicular orientation, i.e., the linac treatment beam was oriented parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field direction. (4) The treatment field size was varied from 0 × 0 to 20×20 cm{sup 2}, to span the range of clinical treatment fields. (5) The coil currents were scaled linearly to produce magnetic field strengths B{sub 0} of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 T, to estimate how the MLC impact changes with B{sub 0}.Results: (1) The MLC-induced MRI field distortion fell continuously with increasing SID. (2) MLC leaves and motors were found to contribute to the distortion in approximately equal measure. (3) Due to faster falloff of the fringe field, the field

  3. Symptomatic ring-shaped lateral meniscus. MRI findings.

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    Ring-shaped lateral meniscus is a rare clinical entity that is usually asymptomatic. Moreover, diagnosis is always based on arthroscopic exploration of lateral meniscus. MRI has not been proven useful so far because the inner portion of the ring-shaped lateral meniscus is usually misinterpreted as a bucket-handle tear. The authors report a case of a 16-year-old girl with ring-shaped lateral meniscus in combination with a meniscal cyst. MRI demonstrated a cyst arising from lateral meniscus and meniscal tissue into the inner portion of the lateral compartment mimicking displaced meniscal fragment. Bucket-handle tears have not been reported to cause or accompany meniscal cysts. As a result the diagnosis of a ring-shaped lateral meniscus along with meniscal cyst was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated with arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy and intra-articular cyst debridement. PMID:22669990

  4. High-Resolution MRI of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Sung; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Lee, Han Na

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) causes up to 10% of all ischemic strokes, and the rate of recurrent vascular ischemic events is very high. Important predictors of vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques include the degree of stenosis and the underlying plaque morphology. Vascular wall MRI can provide information about wall structures and atherosclerotic plaque components. High-resolution (HR)-MRI in ICAD poses a greater challenge in the neurologic fields, because a high in-plane resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio are required for vessel wall imaging of ICAD. Until now, plaque imaging of ICAD has focused on assessing the presence of a plaque and evaluating the plaque load. Going forward, evaluation of plaque vulnerability through analysis of imaging characteristics will be a critical area of research. This review introduces the acquisition protocol for HR-MRI in ICAD and the current issues associated with imaging. PMID:24644529

  5. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral. PMID:25434563

  6. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  7. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  8. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  9. [Implantation of the zygote].

    PubMed

    Hicks Gómez, J J

    1990-01-01

    In order for implantation to occur, the endometrium must be adequately differentiated, a estate which results from the sequential interaction of progesterone and estrogens, and the local effects of prostaglandins and histamine. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism through which these hormones affect the uterus is not clearly understood. Recently it has been proposed the role of second messengers (cAMP.cGMP, inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol) in this process. All these messengers are related with the intracellular mechanisms of proteic and steroid hormones action. PMID:2177440

  10. Coaxial waveguide MRI.

    PubMed

    Alt, Stefan; Müller, Marco; Umathum, Reiner; Bolz, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-04-01

    As ultrahigh-field MR imaging systems suffer from the standing wave problems of conventional coil designs, the use of antenna systems that generate travelling waves was suggested. As a modification to the original approach, we propose the use of a coaxial waveguide configuration with interrupted inner conductor. This concept can focus the radiofrequency energy to the desired imaging region in the human body and can operate at different Larmor frequencies without hardware modifications, as it is not limited by a lower cut-off frequency. We assessed the potential of the method with a hardware prototype setup that was loaded with a tissue equivalent phantom and operated with imaging areas of different size. Signal and flip angle distributions within the phantom were analyzed, and imaging at different Larmor frequencies was performed. Results were compared to a finite difference time domain simulation of the setup that additionally provides information on the spatial distribution of the specific absorption rate load. Furthermore, simulation results with a human model (virtual family) are presented. It was found that the proposed method can be used for MRI at multiple frequencies, achieving transmission efficiencies similar to other travelling wave approaches but still suffers from several limitations due to the used mode of wave propagation. PMID:22021117

  11. Ten-Year Results From the Natrelle 410 Anatomical Form-Stable Silicone Breast Implant Core Study

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, G. Patrick; Van Natta, Bruce W.; Bengtson, Bradley P.; Murphy, Diane K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Silicone breast implants have long been used for breast augmentation and reconstruction. During this time, these medical devices have gone through a number of modifications to improve their safety, quality, and clinical outcome performance. Objectives The authors conducted a 10-year study to determine the safety and effectiveness of Natrelle 410 silicone breast implants. Methods This prospective, multicenter study enrolled 941 subjects who were undergoing either augmentation, augmentation revision, reconstruction, or reconstruction revision. Data on complications, reoperations, explantations, and subject satisfaction were collected at annual clinic visits, and one-third of subjects underwent biennial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for implant rupture. The authors used the Kaplan-Meier estimator to calculate risk rates for local complications, reoperations, and explantations. Results Capsular contracture rates increased approximately 1% per year from the previously reported 6-year rates. The rates were significantly lower than those from the Natrelle round gel core study. The overall rate of confirmed ruptured implants in subjects who underwent MRI was 5.7%. Eleven late seromas were reported. The most common reason for explantation was a subject requesting a size or style change. Satisfaction rates remained high through 10 years, with most subjects saying they were somewhat or definitely satisfied with their implants. Conclusions This 10-year prospective trial demonstrated the long-term safety and effectiveness of Natrelle 410 anatomical form-stable implants. The complication rates were low and the satisfaction rates were high. Level of Evidence: 1 Therapeutic PMID:25717116

  12. Molecular MRI enables early and sensitive detection of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Hamilton, Alastair; McAteer, Martina A; Carbonell, W Shawn; Robson, Matthew D; Ansorge, Olaf; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Bristow, Claire; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Weissensteiner, Thomas; Anthony, Daniel C; Choudhury, Robin P; Muschel, Ruth J; Sibson, Nicola R

    2012-04-24

    Metastasis to the brain is a leading cause of cancer mortality. The current diagnostic method of gadolinium-enhanced MRI is sensitive only to larger tumors, when therapeutic options are limited. Earlier detection of brain metastases is critical for improved treatment. We have developed a targeted MRI contrast agent based on microparticles of iron oxide that enables imaging of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our objectives here were to determine whether VCAM-1 is up-regulated on vessels associated with brain metastases, and if so, whether VCAM-1-targeted MRI enables early detection of these tumors. Early up-regulation of cerebrovascular VCAM-1 expression was evident on tumor-associated vessels in two separate murine models of brain metastasis. Metastases were detectable in vivo using VCAM-1-targeted MRI 5 d after induction (<1,000 cells). At clinical imaging resolutions, this finding is likely to translate to detection at tumor volumes two to three orders of magnitude smaller (0.3-3 × 10(5) cells) than those volumes detectable clinically (10(7)-10(8) cells). VCAM-1 expression detected by MRI increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with tumor progression, and tumors showed no gadolinium enhancement. Importantly, expression of VCAM-1 was shown in human brain tissue containing both established metastases and micrometastases. Translation of this approach to the clinic could increase therapeutic options and change clinical management in a substantial number of cancer patients. PMID:22451897

  13. Molecular MRI enables early and sensitive detection of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Serres, Sébastien; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Hamilton, Alastair; McAteer, Martina A.; Carbonell, W. Shawn; Robson, Matthew D.; Ansorge, Olaf; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Bristow, Claire; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Weissensteiner, Thomas; Anthony, Daniel C.; Choudhury, Robin P.; Muschel, Ruth J.; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis to the brain is a leading cause of cancer mortality. The current diagnostic method of gadolinium-enhanced MRI is sensitive only to larger tumors, when therapeutic options are limited. Earlier detection of brain metastases is critical for improved treatment. We have developed a targeted MRI contrast agent based on microparticles of iron oxide that enables imaging of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our objectives here were to determine whether VCAM-1 is up-regulated on vessels associated with brain metastases, and if so, whether VCAM-1–targeted MRI enables early detection of these tumors. Early up-regulation of cerebrovascular VCAM-1 expression was evident on tumor-associated vessels in two separate murine models of brain metastasis. Metastases were detectable in vivo using VCAM-1–targeted MRI 5 d after induction (<1,000 cells). At clinical imaging resolutions, this finding is likely to translate to detection at tumor volumes two to three orders of magnitude smaller (0.3–3 × 105 cells) than those volumes detectable clinically (107–108 cells). VCAM-1 expression detected by MRI increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with tumor progression, and tumors showed no gadolinium enhancement. Importantly, expression of VCAM-1 was shown in human brain tissue containing both established metastases and micrometastases. Translation of this approach to the clinic could increase therapeutic options and change clinical management in a substantial number of cancer patients. PMID:22451897

  14. Human brain functional MRI and DTI visualization with virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Moreland, John; Zhang, Jingyu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are two active research areas in neuroimaging. DTI is sensitive to the anisotropic diffusion of water exerted by its macromolecular environment and has been shown useful in characterizing structures of ordered tissues such as the brain white matter, myocardium, and cartilage. The diffusion tensor provides two new types of information of water diffusion: the magnitude and the spatial orientation of water diffusivity inside the tissue. This information has been used for white matter fiber tracking to review physical neuronal pathways inside the brain. Functional MRI measures brain activations using the hemodynamic response. The statistically derived activation map corresponds to human brain functional activities caused by neuronal activities. The combination of these two methods provides a new way to understand human brain from the anatomical neuronal fiber connectivity to functional activities between different brain regions. In this study, virtual reality (VR) based MR DTI and fMRI visualization with high resolution anatomical image segmentation and registration, ROI definition and neuronal white matter fiber tractography visualization and fMRI activation map integration is proposed. Rationale and methods for producing and distributing stereoscopic videos are also discussed. PMID:23256049

  15. Photoelastic stress analysis in screwed and cemented implant-supported dentures with external hexagon implants.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Tonella, Bianca Piccolotto; Ferraço, Renato; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Alves-Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution of the retention systems (screwed and cemented) for implant-supported fixed partial dentures by means of photoelastic method. Two models were made of photoelastic resin PL-2 with 2 implants (phi = 4.00 x 10 mm) located in the second premolar and molar region in each photoelastic model, varying the retention system (screwed and cemented). The implant-supported fixed partial dentures were standardized and made of Ni-Cr alloy. Axial and oblique (45 degrees) forces of 100 N were applied on the occlusal surface by means of a Universal Testing Machine (EMIC-DL 3000; São José dos Pinhais, Paraná, Brazil). The results were observed and photographed in the field of a circular polariscope and qualitatively analyzed with the aid of computer software (Adobe Photoshop, San Jose, CA). The screw retention system presented the highest number of fringes when the loads were applied on the premolar, pontic, and molar and showed this behavior in all load applications, under axial and oblique loads. It was concluded that there was a better stress distribution and lower magnitude of stress on the cemented implant-supported dentures, under axial and oblique loads. Oblique load caused an increase in stress concentrations in all the models. PMID:20613577

  16. MIS diode structure in As/+/ implanted CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Structure made by As implantation of carefully prepared high-conductivity CdS surfaces followed by Pt deposition and 450 C anneal display rectifying, although substantially different, I-V characteristics in the dark and during illumination with subband-gap light. Structures prepared in the same way on an unimplanted portion of the substrate have similar I-V characteristics, except that the forward turnover voltage for an illuminated unimplanted diode is much smaller than that for an implanted diode. It is suggested that the charge conduction in both structures is dominated by hole and/or electron tunneling through a metal-semiconductor potential barrier. The tunneling processes appear to be quite sensitive to subband-gap illumination, which causes the dramatic decreases of turnover voltages and apparent series resistances. The difference in turnover voltage appears to be caused by interface states between the Pt electrode and the implanted layer, which suggests a MIS model.

  17. Dental implants with the periodontium: a new approach for the restoration of missing teeth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Dong, Qing-Shan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jun-Rui; Wu, Li-An; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common occurrence in mankind and damages human health. Osseointegrated dental implants have been successfully used as a popular prosthetic restoration for the missing teeth for many years. However, osseointegration, representing a direct connection between the implant and bone tissue without the periodontium, causes some inevitable problems, such as masticatory force concentration and immobility of the dental implant. Thus, an ideal dental implant should have its own peri-implant periodontium, as do the natural teeth. A number of attempts have been made to reconstruct the periodontium around the implants. Unfortunately, it has been established that a predictable periodontal reconstruction, especially the acellular cementum reconstruction on the surface of the implant, is a very difficult task. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that the cementum may be a special phenotype of the bone tissue, on the basis of its strong similarity in development, structure, and function. In a certain condition, the bone tissue may change to cementum for special functional needs. In accordance with this hypothesis, we consider a novel approach to reconstruct the peri-implant tissues. Unlike previous studies, this approach imitates the tooth re-plantation process. The key point is to convert the implant-surrounding bone tissues to cementum as a result of adaptive changes to the implant-support demands. This hypothesis, if proven to be valid, will not only represent a breakthrough in cementum research, but also will open a new door to the restoration of missing teeth. PMID:18829177

  18. Improving oral implant osseointegration in a murine model via Wnt signal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Mouraret, Sylvain; Hunter, Daniel J.; Bardet, Claire; Popelut, Antoine; Brunski, John B.; Chaussain, Catherine; Bouchard, Philippe; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the key biological events occurring during implant failure and then we use this knowledge to develop new biology-based strategies that improve osseointegration. Materials and Methods Wild-type and Axin2LacZ/LacZ adult male mice underwent oral implant placement, with and without primary stability. Peri-implant tissues were evaluated using histology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and TUNEL staining. In addition, mineralization sites, collagenous matrix organization and the expression of bone markers in the peri-implant tissues were assessed. Results Maxillary implants lacking primary stability show histological evidence of persistent fibrous encapsulation and mobility, which recapitulates the clinical problems of implant failure. Despite histological and molecular evidence of fibrous encapsulation, osteoblasts in the gap interface exhibit robust ALP activity. This mineralization activity is counteracted by osteoclast activity that resorbs any new bony matrix and consequently, the fibrous encapsulation remains. Using a genetic mouse model, we show that implants lacking primary stability undergo osseointegration, provided that Wnt signalling is amplified. Conclusions In a mouse model of oral implant failure caused by a lack of primary stability, we find evidence of active mineralization. This mineralization, however, is outpaced by robust bone resorption, which culminates in persistent fibrous encapsulation of the implant. Fibrous encapsulation can be prevented and osseointegration assured if Wnt signalling is elevated at the time of implant placement. PMID:24164629

  19. A contact mechanics model for ankle implants with inclusion of surface roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, M.; Farhang, K.; Maani, N.

    2014-02-01

    Total ankle replacement is recognized as one of the best procedures to treat painful arthritic ankles. Even though this method can relieve patients from pain and reproduce the physiological functions of the ankle, an improper design can cause an excessive amount of metal debris due to wear, causing toxicity in implant recipient. This paper develops a contact model to treat the interaction of tibia and talus implants in an ankle joint. The contact model describes the interaction of implant rough surfaces including both elastic and plastic deformations. In the model, the tibia and the talus surfaces are viewed as macroscopically conforming cylinders or conforming multi-cylinders containing micrometre-scale roughness. The derived equations relate contact force on the implant and the minimum mean surface separation of the rough surfaces. The force is expressed as a statistical integral function of asperity heights over the possible region of interaction of the roughness of the tibia and the talus implant surfaces. A closed-form approximate equation relating contact force and minimum separation is used to obtain energy loss per cycle in a load-unload sequence applied to the implant. In this way implant surface statistics are related to energy loss in the implant that is responsible for internal void formation and subsequent wear and its harmful toxicity to the implant recipient.

  20. Comparison of radiographic image characteristics of Brånemark and IMZ implants.

    PubMed

    Sewerin, I P

    1991-01-01

    A Brånemark standard titanium implant and an IMZ plasma flame spray-coated implant were radiographed experimentally under standardized circumstances. Angulations in relation to film plane and central X-ray as well as rotations around the implant's longitudinal axis were varied. The influence of implant architecture on image density and image pattern was analyzed and images of the two types of implants were compared. The Brånemark implant is asymmetric and exhibits only radiographic burnout in its apical area. The 4 vertical apical cuts cause very distracting images and leave the impression that the implant is conical. It is possible to evaluate angulations with great accuracy from the thread profile, but there are limited possibilities for estimation of rotational stages. The IMZ implant shows symmetric images in any projection. The 4 vertical slits cause a disturbing burnout in the central part of the implant in certain views, and radiographic images are very inconstant. Possibilities of estimating angulation and rotation are varying. Differences in radiographic image characteristics are supposed to influence diagnostic yield as they affect the possibilities of identifying osseointegration radiographically and of controlling image identity in serial radiography. PMID:1843469

  1. Success and high predictability of intraorally welded titanium bar in the immediate loading implants.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Vaniel; Camerini, Michele; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The implants failure may be caused by micromotion and stress exerted on implants during the phase of bone healing. This concept is especially true in case of implants placed in atrophic ridges. So the primary stabilization and fixation of implants are an important goal that can also allow immediate loading and oral rehabilitation on the same day of surgery. This goal may be achieved thanks to the technique of welding titanium bars on implant abutments. In fact, the procedure can be performed directly in the mouth eliminating possibility of errors or distortions due to impression. This paper describes a case report and the most recent data about long-term success and high predictability of intraorally welded titanium bar in immediate loading implants. PMID:24963419

  2. Success and High Predictability of Intraorally Welded Titanium Bar in the Immediate Loading Implants

    PubMed Central

    Fogli, Vaniel; Camerini, Michele; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The implants failure may be caused by micromotion and stress exerted on implants during the phase of bone healing. This concept is especially true in case of implants placed in atrophic ridges. So the primary stabilization and fixation of implants are an important goal that can also allow immediate loading and oral rehabilitation on the same day of surgery. This goal may be achieved thanks to the technique of welding titanium bars on implant abutments. In fact, the procedure can be performed directly in the mouth eliminating possibility of errors or distortions due to impression. This paper describes a case report and the most recent data about long-term success and high predictability of intraorally welded titanium bar in immediate loading implants. PMID:24963419

  3. PIXE microbeam analysis of the metallic debris release around endosseous implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buso, G. P.; Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Passi, P.; Zadro, A.; Uzunov, N. M.; Doyle, B. L.; Rossi, P.; Provencio, P.

    2005-10-01

    The mechanical friction that occurs during the surgical insertion of endosseous implants, both in dentistry and orthopaedics, may cause the detachment of metal debris which are dislodged into the peri-implant tissues and can lead to adverse clinical effects. This phenomenon more likely happens with coated or roughened implants that are the most widely employed. In the present study were studied dental implants screws made of commercially pure titanium and coated using titanium plasma-spray (TPS) technique. The implants were inserted in the tibia of rabbits, and removed "en bloc" with the surrounding bone after one month. After proper processing and mounting on plastic holders, samples from bones were analysed by EDXRF setup at of National Laboratories of Legnaro, INFN, Italy, and consequently at 3 MeV proton microbeam setup at Sandia National Laboratories. Elemental maps were drawn, showing some occasional presence of metal particles in the peri-implant bone.

  4. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    PubMed

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases. PMID:25877088

  5. Blistering and cracking of LiTaO3 single crystal under helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Ma, Yujie

    2015-03-01

    Blistering and cracking in LiTaO3 surface are investigated after 200-keV helium ion implantation and subsequent post-implantation annealing. Rutherford backscattering/channeling is used to examine the lattice damage caused by ion implantation. Blistering is observed through optical microscopy in a dynamic heating process. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements are used to detect the LiTaO3 surface morphology. Experimental results show that blistering and flaking are dependent on implantation fluence, beam current, and also annealing temperature. We speculate that the surface cracking of He+-implanted LiTaO3 results from the implantation-induced stress and compression.

  6. Lattice modification in KTiOPO4 by hydrogen and helium sequentially implantation in submicrometer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Xu, Bo; Fan, Ranran

    2016-05-01

    We investigated lattice modification and its physical mechanism in H and He co-implanted, z-cut potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO4). The samples were implanted with 110 keV H and 190 keV He, both to a fluence of 4 × 1016 cm-2, at room temperature. Rutherford backscattering/channeling, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the implantation-induced structural changes and strain. Experimental and simulated x-ray diffraction results show that the strain in the implanted KTiOPO4 crystal is caused by interstitial atoms. The strain and stress are anisotropic and depend on the crystal's orientation. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that ion implantation produces many dislocations in the as-implanted samples. Annealing can induce ion aggregation to form nanobubbles, but plastic deformation and ion out-diffusion prevent the KTiOPO4 surface from blistering.

  7. In vitro experiment of the pressure regulating valve for a glaucoma implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Byunghoon; Kee, Hongseok; Kim, Seonho; Lee, Yeon; Sim, Taeseok; Kim, Yongkweon; Park, Kyihwan

    2003-09-01

    Glaucoma is an eye disease which is caused by abnormal high intraocular pressure (IOP) in the eye. If the condition of the patient becomes serious, the use of an implant device is recommended, which decreases the IOP compulsory. Active implants for glaucoma implants are capable of controlling the IOP actively and coping with the personal differences of patients. However, the conventional active valves for the glaucoma implant are not convenient for the patient and feasibility is not shown for the glaucoma treatment. In this paper, we propose, analyze, fabricate and experiment on the pressure regulating valve for the active implant. Based on the analysis, we carry out optimal design of the proposed valve. The in vitro experiments are performed extensively both using and not using a rabbit in open- and closed-loop pressure control. The various experimental results verify the possibility of the proposed valve for a glaucoma implant.

  8. Influence of cochleostomy and cochlear implant insertion on drug gradients following intratympanic application in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    King, EB; Hartsock, JJ; O'Leary, SJ; Salt, AN

    2013-01-01

    Locally-applied drugs can protect residual hearing following cochlear implantation. The influence of cochlear implantation on drug levels in scala tympani (ST) after round window application was investigated in guinea pigs using the marker trimethylphenlyammonium (TMPA) measured in real-time with TMPA-selective microelectrodes. TMPA concentration in the upper basal turn of ST rapidly increased during implantation and then declined due to cerebrospinal fluid entering ST at the cochlear aqueduct and exiting at the cochleostomy. The TMPA increase was found to be caused by the cochleostomy drilling, if the burr tip partially entered ST. TMPA distribution in the second turn was less affected by implantation procedures. These findings show that basal turn drug levels may be changed during implantation and the changes may need to be considered in the interpretation of therapeutic effects of drugs in conjunction with implantation. PMID:24008355

  9. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pathological assessment of periprosthetic tissues is important, not only for diagnosis, but also for understanding the pathobiology of implant failure. The host response to wear particle deposition in periprosthetic tissues is characterised by cell and tissue injury, and a reparative and inflammatory response in which there is an innate and adaptive immune response to the material components of implant wear. Physical and chemical characteristics of implant wear influence the nature of the response in periprosthetic tissues and account for the development of particular complications that lead to implant failure, such as osteolysis which leads to aseptic loosening, and soft-tissue necrosis/inflammation, which can result in pseudotumour formation. The innate response involves phagocytosis of implant-derived wear particles by macrophages; this is determined by pattern recognition receptors and results in expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors promoting inflammation and osteoclastogenesis; phagocytosed particles can also be cytotoxic and cause cell and tissue necrosis. The adaptive immune response to wear debris is characterised by the presence of lymphoid cells and most likely occurs as a result of a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to cell and tissue components altered by interaction with the material components of particulate wear, particularly metal ions released from cobalt-chrome wear particles. Cite this article: Professor N. A. Athanasou. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:162–168. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0086. PMID:27146314

  10. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure.

    PubMed

    Athanasou, N A

    2016-05-01

    Pathological assessment of periprosthetic tissues is important, not only for diagnosis, but also for understanding the pathobiology of implant failure. The host response to wear particle deposition in periprosthetic tissues is characterised by cell and tissue injury, and a reparative and inflammatory response in which there is an innate and adaptive immune response to the material components of implant wear. Physical and chemical characteristics of implant wear influence the nature of the response in periprosthetic tissues and account for the development of particular complications that lead to implant failure, such as osteolysis which leads to aseptic loosening, and soft-tissue necrosis/inflammation, which can result in pseudotumour formation. The innate response involves phagocytosis of implant-derived wear particles by macrophages; this is determined by pattern recognition receptors and results in expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors promoting inflammation and osteoclastogenesis; phagocytosed particles can also be cytotoxic and cause cell and tissue necrosis. The adaptive immune response to wear debris is characterised by the presence of lymphoid cells and most likely occurs as a result of a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to cell and tissue components altered by interaction with the material components of particulate wear, particularly metal ions released from cobalt-chrome wear particles.Cite this article: Professor N. A. Athanasou. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:162-168. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0086. PMID:27146314

  11. The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Today, more than 200years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals. PMID:20172057

  12. Reprint of: The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Today, more than 200 years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals. PMID:26235343

  13. [Occlusal overload--a risk factor in implant based prostheses].

    PubMed

    Dănilă, V; Augustin, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a review of the literature data in regard to the main causes leading to failure of the dental implants and subsequently, of the implant based prostheses. Besides biological risk factors as infection, occlusal overload is considered the main mechanical risk factor being responsible for weakening or fracturing of the fixation screws, fracturing of the prosthesis or even of the implants. Understanding the fundamental differences between the natural dental structures and the implants may lead to a rigorous occlusal control as a key factor to success of implant born prosthesis. Among these, the periodontal ligament is of outmost importance because it allows a physiological-functional adjustment of occlusal stress in the longitudinal axis of the natural teeth and adaptation to the occlusal stress changes. In conclusion, the absence of periodontal ligament may lead to occlusal overload and implant failure due to lack of adjustment of occlusal forces intensity and axial transmission of these forces, as well as the absence of periodontal proprioceptors. PMID:20509305

  14. [BIOLOGICAL IMPLANTS IN ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA REPAIR (REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Abatov, N; Badyrov, R; Abatova, A; Assamidanov, E; Kaukenov, B

    2016-02-01

    The use of synthetic meshes as a material for abdominal wall hernia repair does not always ensure a recurrence-free treatment outcome and full recovery of the abdominal wall functional activity. There are well-known disadvantages such as poor resistance to infection, the infiltrate formation in the place of implantation, expressed adhesive process in cases of introperitoneal fixation, to create certain restrictions on the using of these implants for abdominal wall reconstruction. The search for alternative materials that could minimize the risk of complications, has led to the study of biological grafts. It is known that various methods for the manufacturing biological implants determine endogenous properties for each material separately, and may be cause a variety of biological responses in vivo after implantation. The question has not been resolved, what the fresh raw material is better to use for derive biological implants. In this review we investigated the interaction of different types of biological implants between the abdominal wall and the organs of abdominal cavity of the recipient, their ability to resist infection and the development of relapses, as a leading indicator of the effectiveness of hernioplasty. PMID:27001778

  15. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang, Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods—ion implantation—is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  16. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results. PMID:23220306

  17. [Allergy diagnostics in implant intolerance].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    To clarify a suspected implant allergy, a patch test with implant metals and bone cement components can be used. The (immuno)histology of periimplant tissue may also indicate T-lymphocyte-dominant inflammation. Identification of histological allergy characteristics and evaluation of the lymphocyte transformation test beyond indications of sensitization will be possible only when larger studies are available. PMID:18227997

  18. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  19. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  20. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  1. Transdermal Photopolymerization for Minimally Invasive Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisseeff, J.; Anseth, K.; Sims, D.; McIntosh, W.; Randolph, M.; Langer, R.

    1999-03-01

    Photopolymerizations are widely used in medicine to create polymer networks for use in applications such as bone restorations and coatings for artificial implants. These photopolymerizations occur by directly exposing materials to light in "open" environments such as the oral cavity or during invasive procedures such as surgery. We hypothesized that light, which penetrates tissue including skin, could cause a photopolymerization indirectly. Liquid materials then could be injected s.c. and solidified by exposing the exterior surface of the skin to light. To test this hypothesis, the penetration of UVA and visible light through skin was studied. Modeling predicted the feasibility of transdermal polymerization with only 2 min of light exposure required to photopolymerize an implant underneath human skin. To establish the validity of these modeling studies, transdermal photopolymerization first was applied to tissue engineering by using "injectable" cartilage as a model system. Polymer/chondrocyte constructs were injected s.c. and transdermally photopolymerized. Implants harvested at 2, 4, and 7 weeks demonstrated collagen and proteoglycan production and histology with tissue structure comparable to native neocartilage. To further examine this phenomenon and test the applicability of transdermal photopolymerization for drug release devices, albumin, a model protein, was released for 1 week from photopolymerized hydrogels. With further study, transdermal photpolymerization potentially could be used to create a variety of new, minimally invasive surgical procedures in applications ranging from plastic and orthopedic surgery to tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  2. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further. PMID:23905635

  3. Physics of Heavily Implanted Single Crystal Complex Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofan, Avishai

    Ion implantation is known to result in a significant amount of damage in solid single crystals. In this work a battery of material probes is used to study the effect of a very high-dose He implantation in ferroelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and the implantation-induced formation of defects. In addition, the evolution of these defects with post-implantation annealing is examined. After irradiation, a high concentration of defects is found to collect and create a network of thick prismatic planar defects having typical dimensions of ˜1.5 microm and 200 nm parallel and perpendicular to the Z axis, respectively. Optical microscopy shows that there is strong temperature dependence for forming the network; the density of these defects reaches a maximum value for an annealing temperature of 250 °C. However, annealing to temperatures above 380 °C fully eliminates the defects. High-resolution TEM studies indicate that the defects are likely localized twinning and dislocation pileups due to plastic deformation of the lattice to relieve He-implantation-induced stress. During this deformation He accumulates at the twin boundaries. A second type of implantation induced defects is studied using room temperature, high- resolution electron microscopy; this study shows that implanted He in LiNbO3 nucleates and accumulates as bubbles. These He inclusions are at ˜20 GPa pressure and most probably in the solid phase. In addition, the energetically favored shape of the inclusions in their as-implanted form is spherical and not oblate; this spherical shape is due to the fact their diameter is below a critical radius for balancing the surface and elastics energies as predicted by elastic theory. When annealed, the characteristic length scale of the He inclusions increases, forming faceted bubbles. Annealing also causes the He inclusions to migrate and accumulate into strings due to the preferred {1014}-pyramidal-twinning planes. The ion implantation-induced defects are found to be

  4. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Acikel, Volkan Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and

  5. Functional MRI at the Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the observation of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect on measured MR signal in the brain, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly become the tool of choice for exploring brain function in cognitive neuroscience. Although fMRI is an exciting and powerful means to examining the brain in vivo, the field has sometimes permitted itself to believe that patterns of BOLD activity reveal more than it is possible to measure given the method’s spatial and temporal sampling, while concurrently not fully exploring the amount of information it provides. In this article, we examine some of the constraints on the kinds of inferences that can be supported by fMRI. We critique the concept of reverse inference that is often employed to say some cognitive function must be present given activity in a specific region. We review the consideration of functional and effective connectivity that remain infrequently applied in cognitive neuroimaging, highlighting recent thinking on the ways in which functional imaging can be used to characterize inter-regional communication. Recent advances in neuroimaging that make it possible to assess anatomical connectivity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and we discuss how these may inform interpretation of fMRI results. Descriptions of fMRI studies in the media, in some instances, serve to misrepresent fMRI’s capabilities. We comment on how researchers need to faithfully represent fMRI’s promise and limitations in dealing with the media. Finally, as we stand at the crossroads of fMRI research, where one pathway leads toward a rigorous understanding of cognitive operations using fMRI and another leads us to a predictable collection of observations absent of clear insight, we offer our impressions of a fruitful path for future functional imaging research. PMID:19041348

  6. Effect of Surgical Technique on Corneal Implant Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ljunggren, Monika Kozak; Elizondo, Rodolfo A.; Edin, Joel; Olsen, David; Merrett, Kimberley; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Salerud, Göran; Polarek, James; Fagerholm, Per; Griffith, May

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to determine the effect of a surgical technique on biomaterial implant performance, specifically graft retention. Methods Twelve mini pigs were implanted with cell-free, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) hydrogels as substitutes for donor corneal allografts using overlying sutures with or without human amniotic membrane (HAM) versus interrupted sutures with HAM. The effects of the retention method were compared as well as the effects of collagen concentration (13.7% to 15% RHCIII). Results All implanted corneas showed initial haze that cleared with time, resulting in corneas with optical clarity matching those of untreated controls. Biochemical analysis showed that by 12 months post operation, the initial RHCIII implants had been completely remodeled, as type I collagen, was the major collagenous protein detected, whereas no RHCIII could be detected. Histological analysis showed all implanted corneas exhibited regeneration of epithelial and stromal layers as well as nerves, along with touch sensitivity and tear production. Most neovascularization was seen in corneas stabilized by interrupted sutures. Conclusions This showed that the surgical technique used does have a significant effect on the overall performance of corneal implants, overlying sutures caused less vascularization than interrupted sutures. Translational Relevance Understanding the significance of the suturing technique can aid the selection of the most appropriate procedure when implanting artificial corneal substitutes. The same degree of regeneration, despite a higher collagen content indicates that future material development can progress toward stronger, more resistant implants. PMID:24749003

  7. Materials characteristics of uncoated/ceramic-coated implant materials.

    PubMed

    Lacefield, W R

    1999-06-01

    In this paper, the biocompatibility of dental implant materials is discussed in the context of both the mechanical characteristics of the materials and the type of surface presented to the surrounding tissues. The proper functioning of the implant depends on whether it possesses the strength necessary to withstand loading within the expected range, with other properties such as elongation being of importance in some instances. A suitable modulus of elasticity may be of major importance in situations when optimum load transmission from the implant into the surrounding bone is key to the successful functioning of the device. Dental implants present a wide range of surfaces to the surrounding tissues based on surface composition, texture, charge energy, and cleanliness (sterility). Metallic implants are characterized by protective oxide layers, but ion release is still common with these materials, and is a function of passivation state, composition, and corrosion potential. An effective surface treatment for titanium appears to be passivation or anodization in a suitable solution prior to implantation. Inert ceramic surfaces exhibit minimal ion release, but are similar to metals in that they do not form a high energy bond to the surrounding bone. Some of the newly developed dental implant alloys such as titanium alloys, which contain zirconium and niobium, and high-strength ceramics such as zirconia may offer some advantages (such as lower modulus of elasticity) over the conventional materials. Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings are commonly used to convert metallic surfaces into a more bioactive state and typically cause faster bone apposition. There is a wide range of ceramic coatings containing calcium and phosphorus, with the primary difference in many of these materials being in the rate of ion release. Although their long-term success rate is unknown, the calcium phosphate surfaces seem to have a higher potential for attachment of osteoinductive agents than do

  8. Anatomic consideration for preventive implantation.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W; Veldhuis, H A; van Waas, M A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of preventive implant therapy is to prevent or delay loss of alveolar ridge bone mass. For use in an anatomic study of 60 mandibles, resorption of the alveolar ridge was classified into four preventive stages: (1) after extraction of teeth; (2) after initial resorption; (3) when the ridge has atrophied to a knife-edge shape; and (4) when only basal bone remains. Implantation in stage 3 necessitates removal of the knife-edge ridge to create space for cylindrical implants. Therefore, implantation in stage 2 is advocated to prevent the development of stage 3. The aim of implantation in stage 4 is to prevent total loss of function of the atrophic mandible. PMID:8359876

  9. [Radiological trap and oncological precautions in a patient who has undergone a permanent withdrawal of PIP breast implants].

    PubMed

    Koutsomanis, A; Bruant-Rodier, C; Roedlich, M-N; Bretz-Grenier, M-F; Perrot, P; Bodin, F

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old patient who presented radiological images similar to ruptured breast implants one year after the supposed withdrawal of the latter. This woman had benefited for the first time from cosmetic PIP breast implants in 2000. Early in 2014, she requested the removal of the implants without renewal because she was feeling pain and functional discomfort. A few months after the operation, she consulted for breast swelling in the upper pole of the breast. Radiological assessment showed liquid formations compatible with the presence of implants. At our request, the rereading of the MRI by the radiologist definitively concluded on a bilateral seroma within the persistent fibrous capsule. In the absence of symptoms, clinical monitoring had been decided. But at the recrudescence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases associated with breast implants, a cytological sampling was intended. In case of cytological abnormality or recurrence of the seroma, a surgical procedure should be performed. In conclusion, the removal of a breast implant without capsulectomy may result in the formation of a seroma whose images resemble those of an implant. It is always worthwhile to provide precise clinical data to the radiologist in order to help him to make informed interpretations. Every serous effusion in a breast lodge having contained a silicone implant must evoke the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26232069

  10. Anti-infection activity of nanostructured titanium percutaneous implants with a postoperative infection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Li, Yiting; Liu, Zhiyuan; Qu, Shuxin; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2015-07-01

    The titanium percutaneous implants were widely used in clinic; however, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Lack of complete skin integration with the implants can cause infection and implant removal. In this work, three titania nanotubes (TNT) with different diameters, 50 nm (TNT-50), 100 nm (TNT-100) and 150 nm (TNT-150) arrays were prepared on titanium surfaces by anodization, pure titanium (pTi) was used as control. Samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle analysis. The antibacterial efficiency of TNT was evaluated in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus under the visible light. The results indicated that TNT-100 had the highest antibacterial efficiency under the visible light. Subsequently, TNT implants and pTi implants were placed subcutaneously to the dorsum of New Zealand White rabbits, 108 CFU S. aureus was inoculated into the implant sites 4 h after surgery. The TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha were determined using enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). TNT implants revealed less inflammatory factor release than pTi implants with or without injected S. aureus liquid. According to the histological results, the TNT implants displayed excellent tissue integration. Whereas, pTi implants were surrounded with fibrotic capsule, and the skin tissue was almost separated from the implant surface. Therefore, the TNT significantly inhibited the infection risk and enhanced tissue integration of the percutaneous implants compared to pTi. The immersion test in the culture medium suggested that one of causes be probably more proteins adsorbed on TNT than on pTi.

  11. Differences between conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Baglieri, Annalisa; Marino, Maria Adele; Morabito, Rosa; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an in vivo assessment of cortical and subcortical regions affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review summarizes the most important conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques applied in this field. Standard neuroimaging techniques have played a marginal role in the diagnosis and follow-up of PD, essentially being used only to discriminate atypical syndromes from PD, to exclude secondary causes such as vascular lesions, and to confirm the absence of specific imaging features found in atypical parkinsonisms. However, non-conventional MRI techniques, i.e. new neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI, may allow the detection of structural, functional and metabolic changes useful not only for differential diagnosis, but also for early diagnosis and outcome and treatment monitoring in PD. In addition, we illustrate the advantages of high-field MRI over lower magnetic fields, highlighting the great potential of advanced neuroimaging techniques. PMID:24125556

  12. Combined analysis of sMRI and fMRI imaging data provides accurate disease markers for hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lirong; Chen, Ye; Maloney, Thomas C; Caré, Marguerite M; Holland, Scott K; Lu, Long J

    2013-01-01

    In this research, we developed a robust two-layer classifier that can accurately classify normal hearing (NH) from hearing impaired (HI) infants with congenital sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) based on their Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Unlike traditional methods that examine the intensity of each single voxel, we extracted high-level features to characterize the structural MR images (sMRI) and functional MR images (fMRI). The Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm was employed to detect and describe the local features in sMRI. For fMRI, we constructed contrast maps and detected the most activated/de-activated regions in each individual. Based on those salient regions occurring across individuals, the bag-of-words strategy was introduced to vectorize the contrast maps. We then used a two-layer model to integrate these two types of features together. With the leave-one-out cross-validation approach, this integrated model achieved an AUC score of 0.90. Additionally, our algorithm highlighted several important brain regions that differentiated between NH and HI children. Some of these regions, e.g. planum temporale and angular gyrus, were well known auditory and visual language association regions. Others, e.g. the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), were not necessarily expected to play a role in differentiating HI from NH children and provided a new understanding of brain function and of the disorder itself. These important brain regions provided clues about neuroimaging markers that may be relevant to the future use of functional neuroimaging to guide predictions about speech and language outcomes in HI infants who receive a cochlear implant. This type of prognostic information could be extremely useful and is currently not available to clinicians by any other means. PMID:24363991

  13. Drug release mechanisms of cast lipid implants.

    PubMed

    Kreye, F; Siepmann, F; Willart, J F; Descamps, M; Siepmann, J

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to better understand which physicochemical processes are involved in the control of drug release from lipid implants prepared by melting and casting. Lipid implants gain steadily in importance as controlled parenteral drug delivery systems: In contrast to PLGA-based devices, no acidic microclimates are created, which can inactivate incorporated drugs. The melting and casting method offers various advantages over the commonly used direct compression technique. For example, powder de-mixing during manufacturing and highly challenging scale-up due to poor powder flowability are avoided. Importantly, broad spectra of drug release patterns can be easily provided by varying the type of lipid. The resulting drug release rates are generally lower than those of implants prepared by direct compression. This is probably due to the differences in the microstructure of the pore network of the systems. Drug or water diffusion plays a dominant role for the control of drug release, potentially combined with limited drug solubility effects, caused by the low amounts of water available within the implants. In the case of pure diffusion control, a mechanistic realistic mathematical theory is proposed, which allows for quantitative predictions of the effects of formulation parameters on the resulting drug release kinetics. Importantly, these theoretical predictions could be successfully confirmed by independent experiments. Thus, the obtained new insight into the underlying drug release mechanisms can significantly facilitate the optimization of this type of advanced drug delivery systems. This is particularly helpful if long release periods are targeted, requiring time-consuming experimental studies. PMID:21352913

  14. Finite element analysis of the biomechanical effects of PEEK dental implants on the peri-implant bone.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, A D; Abou-Emara, M; Spintig, T; Lackmann, J; Müller, W D

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are mostly fabricated of titanium. Potential problems associated with these implants are discussed in the literature, for example, overloading of the jawbone during mastication due to the significant difference in the elastic moduli of titanium (110 GPa) and bone (≈1-30 GPa). Therefore poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) could represent an alternative biomaterial (elastic modulus 3-4 GPa). Endolign(®) represents an implantable carbon fiber reinforced (CFR)-PEEK including parallel oriented endless carbon fibers. According to the manufacturer it has an elastic modulus of 150 GPa. PEEK compounds filled with powders show an elastic modulus around 4 GPa. The aim of the present finite element analysis was to point out the differences in the biomechanical behavior of a dental implant of Endolign(®) and a commercial powder-filled PEEK. Titanium served as control. These three materials were used for a platform-switched dental implant-abutment assembly, whereas Type 1 completely consisted of titanium, Type 2 of a powder-filled PEEK and Type 3 of Endolign(®). A force of 100 N was applied vertically and of 30° to the implant axis. All types showed a minimum safety factor regarding the yield strength of cortical bone. However, within the limits of this study the Type 2 implant showed higher stresses within the adjacent cortical bone than Type 1 and Type 3. These implant assemblies showed similar stress distributions. Endless carbon fibers give PEEK a high stability. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate whether there is a distinct amount of endless carbon fibers causing an optimal stress distribution behavior of CFR-PEEK. PMID:25435385

  15. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  16. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  18. Pre-Uterine Artery Embolization MRI: Beyond Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Petra L.; Coote, Jacky M.; Watkinson, Anthony F.

    2011-12-15

    Uterine leiomyomata, or fibroids, although benign, cause debilitating symptoms in many women. Symptoms are often nonspecific and may be the presenting complaint in a number of other conditions. Furthermore, because the presence of fibroids may be coincident with other symptomatic conditions that result in similar complaints, there may be diagnostic difficulty and consequent difficulty in planning therapeutic strategy. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic fibroids and is increasingly being performed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation before and after treatment is routine practice with the potential to significantly alter management in up to a fifth of patients. It is well recognized that significant incidental findings may be demonstrated during imaging investigations, and in particular that abnormalities that are not directly related to the clinical question may be overlooked. Radiologists evaluating pre-UAE MRI studies must be aware of the MRI appearances of gynecological pathologies that may cause similar symptoms or that may affect the success or complication rates of UAE, and they must also be wary of 'satisfaction of search,' reviewing imaging thoroughly so that relevant other pathologies are not missed. We demonstrate the appearances of coincidental pathologies found on pre-UAE MRI, with the potential to change patient management.

  19. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  20. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Micol; Rosignoli, Monica; Castiglione, Alessandro; Minazzi, Federica; Trevisi, Patrizia; Aimoni, Claudia; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations) on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years). Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males) presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children) ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0). Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities, even if central