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Sample records for mrna blotting fluorescence

  1. A Guide to Modern Quantitative Fluorescent Western Blotting with Troubleshooting Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samantha L.; Hurtado, Maica Llavero; Oldknow, Karla J.; Graham, Laura C.; Marchant, Thomas W.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Farquharson, Colin; Wishart, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The late 1970s saw the first publicly reported use of the western blot, a technique for assessing the presence and relative abundance of specific proteins within complex biological samples. Since then, western blotting methodology has become a common component of the molecular biologists experimental repertoire. A cursory search of PubMed using the term “western blot” suggests that in excess of two hundred and twenty thousand published manuscripts have made use of this technique by the year 2014. Importantly, the last ten years have seen technical imaging advances coupled with the development of sensitive fluorescent labels which have improved sensitivity and yielded even greater ranges of linear detection. The result is a now truly Quantifiable Fluorescence based Western Blot (QFWB) that allows biologists to carry out comparative expression analysis with greater sensitivity and accuracy than ever before. Many “optimized” western blotting methodologies exist and are utilized in different laboratories. These often prove difficult to implement due to the requirement of subtle but undocumented procedural amendments. This protocol provides a comprehensive description of an established and robust QFWB method, complete with troubleshooting strategies. PMID:25490604

  2. Fluorescent detection of Southern blots and PCR-based genetic typing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, E.S.; Worley, J.M.; Zimmerman, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Southern blot is used to study gene organization, to identify disease-causing genomic rearrangements, or for typing RFLP markers in forensic, paternity, or prenatal diagnostic testing. Fluorescence offers a much greater dynamic range and a more linear response than film used in radioactive or chemiluminescent detection of RFLPs. We therefore investigated using the Fluorimager{trademark} 575 (Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) for analyzing Southern blots. Using a single-locus probe to D2S44 (YNH24) (Promega Corp.), we detect as little as 100 ng (0.05 attomole) genomic DNA. The alkaline phosphatase-labeled probe is detected using AttoPhos (JBL Scientific), and the developed membrane is scanned with the Fluorimager. Biotinylated hybridization probes can also be developed using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and AttoPhos. The instrument scan parameters can be adjusted to prevent overexposure and accompanying loss of resolution in images of blots, gels, or 96-well microplates. We have used these other sample formats in PCR-based genetic typing assays. We use FluorKit DQS (Molecular Dynamics) to accurately quantify PCR template DNA (1-500 ng) in 96-well microplates scanned using the same instrument. Mutation detection assays run include heteroduplex gels (5% polyacrylamide, 2.7 M urea), short tandem repeat (STR) markers, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AmpFLP), competitive priming PCR, and allele-specific oligotyping. These assays are run using either 1- or 2-color labeling. We detect unlabeled PCR products, such as the AmpFLP marker D1S80 (Perkin-Elmer) by post-staining gels for 10 minutes with SYBR Green 1 (Molecular Probes) and scanning the wet gel. The Fluorimager scans a 20 x 25 cm sample within three minutes, allowing rapid optimization of fluorescent protocols and high sample throughput.

  3. Resolution and identification of major peanut allergens using a combination of fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, western blotting and Q-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergy is triggered by several proteins known as allergens. The matching resolution and identification of major peanut allergens in 2D protein maps, was accomplished by the use of fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE), Western blotting and quadrupole time-of...

  4. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Nanoflares for mRNA Detection in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhou, Ming; Gong, Aihua; Li, Qijun; Wu, Qian; Cheng, Gary J; Yang, Mingyang; Sun, Yaocheng

    2016-02-16

    The expression level of tumor-related mRNA can reveal significant information about tumor progression and prognosis, so specific mRNA in cells provides an important approach for biological and disease studies. Here, fluorescence lifetime imaging of nanoflares in living cells was first employed to detect specific intracellular mRNA. We characterized the lifetime changes of the prepared nanoflares before and after the treatment of target mRNA and also compared the results with those of fluorescence intensity-based measurements both intracellularly and extracellularly. The nanoflares released the cy5-modified oligonucleotides and bound to the targets, resulting in a fluorescence lifetime lengthening. This work puts forward another dimension of detecting specific mRNA in cells and can also open new ways for detection of many other biomolecules. PMID:26813157

  5. Southern blotting.

    PubMed

    Brown, T

    2001-05-01

    Southern blotting is the transfer of DNA fragments from an electrophoresis gel to a membrane support (the properties and advantages of the different types of membrane, transfer buffer, and transfer method are discussed in detail), resulting in immobilization of the DNA fragments, so the membrane carries a semipermanent reproduction of the banding pattern of the gel. After immobilization, the DNA can be subjected to hybridization analysis, enabling bands with sequence similarity to a labeled probe to be identified. This appendix describes Southern blotting via upward capillary transfer of DNA from an agarose gel onto a nylon or nitrocellulose membrane, using a high-salt transfer buffer to promote binding of DNA to the membrane. With the high-salt buffer, the DNA becomes bound to the membrane during transfer but not permanently immobilized. Immobilization is achieved by UV irradiation (for nylon) or baking (for nitrocellulose). A Support Protocol describes how to calibrate a UV transilluminator for optimal UV irradiation of a nylon membrane. An alternate protocol details transfer using nylon membranes and an alkaline buffer, and is primarily used with positively charged nylon membranes. The advantage of this combination is that no post-transfer immobilization step is required, as the positively charged membrane binds DNA irreversibly under alkaline transfer conditions. The method can also be used with neutral nylon membranes but less DNA will be retained. A second alternate protocol describes a transfer method based on a different transfer-stack setup. The traditional method of upward capillary transfer of DNA from gel to membrane described in the first basic and alternate protocols has certain disadvantages, notably the fact that the gel can become crushed by the weighted filter papers and paper towels that are laid on top of it. This slows down the blotting process and may reduce the amount of DNA that can be transferred. The downward capillary method described in

  6. Rapid fluorescent monitoring of total protein patterns on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and western blots before immunodetection and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Alba, F J; Daban, J R

    1998-10-01

    The fluorogenic dye 2-methoxy-2,4-diphenyl-3(2H)-furanone (MDPF) has been used for the detection of total protein patterns on polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes. Fluorescent staining of protein bands on membranes with this covalent dye is completed in 20 min. Wet membranes are translucent, allowing protein visualization by transillumination with ultraviolet light. The resulting images can be recorded using Polaroid film or a charge-coupled device camera. Electrophoretic bands containing 5-10 ng of protein can be detected on the MDPF-stained Western blot. When proteins are directly transferred to the membrane using a slot blotting device, as little as 0.5 ng of protein can be detected. Previous visualization of protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with the noncovalent fluorescent dye Nile red (Alba et al., BioTechniques, 1996, 21, 625-626) does not interfere with further MDPF staining and fluorescent detection of these bands transferred to PVDF membranes. Thus, Nile red and MDPF staining can be performed sequentially, allowing the rapid monitoring of total protein patterns on both the electrophoretic gel and Western blot. Using the conditions described in this study, MDPF staining does not preclude further N-terminal microsequencing and immunodetection of specific bands with polyclonal antibodies. PMID:9820958

  7. Fluorescent Labeling of Plasmid DNA and mRNA: Gains and Losses of Current Labeling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, K; Braeckmans, K; Remaut, K

    2016-02-17

    Live-cell imaging has provided the life sciences with insights into the cell biology and dynamics. Fluorescent labeling of target molecules proves to be indispensable in this regard. In this Review, we focus on the current fluorescent labeling strategies for nucleic acids, and in particular mRNA (mRNA) and plasmid DNA (pDNA), which are of interest to a broad range of scientific fields. By giving a background of the available techniques and an evaluation of the pros and cons, we try to supply scientists with all the information needed to come to an informed choice of nucleic acid labeling strategy aimed at their particular needs. PMID:26670733

  8. IgG western blot for confirmatory diagnosis of equivocal cases of toxoplasmosis by EIA-IgG and fluorescent antibody test.

    PubMed

    Khammari, Imen; Saghrouni, Fatma; Yaacoub, Alia; Gaied Meksi, Sondoss; Ach, Hinda; Garma, Lamia; Fathallah, Akila; Ben Saïd, Moncef

    2013-08-01

    The performance values of available techniques used in serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis are satisfactory but they raise problems of equivocal and discordant results for very low IgG titers. Recently marketed, LDBio-Toxo II IgG Western blot (IB) showed an excellent correlation with the dye test. We estimated the proportion of equivocal and discordant results between the enzyme immunoassay Platelia Toxo IgG (EIA-IgG) and fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and assessed the usefulness of the IB as a confirmatory test. Out of 2,136 sera collected from pregnant women, 1,644 (77.0%) tested unequivocally positive and 407 (19.0%) were negative in both EIA-IgG and FAT. The remaining 85 (4%) sera showed equivocal or discordant results. Among them, 73 (85.9%) were positive and 12 (14.1%) were negative in IB. Forty-one (89.1%) equivocal sera in EIA-IgG and 46 (86.8%) equivocal sera in FAT were positive in IB. Reducing the cut-off values of both screening techniques improved significantly their sensitivity in detecting very low IgG titers at the expense of their specificity. In conclusion, equivocal results in routine-used techniques and their discordance in determination of the immune status in pregnancy women were not uncommon. IB test appeard to be highly useful in these situations as a confirmatory technique. PMID:24039295

  9. IgG Western Blot for Confirmatory Diagnosis of Equivocal Cases of Toxoplasmosis by EIA-IgG and Fluorescent Antibody Test

    PubMed Central

    Saghrouni, Fatma; Yaacoub, Alia; Gaied Meksi, Sondoss; Ach, Hinda; Garma, Lamia; Fathallah, Akila; Ben Saïd, Moncef

    2013-01-01

    The performance values of available techniques used in serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis are satisfactory but they raise problems of equivocal and discordant results for very low IgG titers. Recently marketed, LDBio-Toxo II IgG Western blot (IB) showed an excellent correlation with the dye test. We estimated the proportion of equivocal and discordant results between the enzyme immunoassay Platelia Toxo IgG (EIA-IgG) and fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and assessed the usefulness of the IB as a confirmatory test. Out of 2,136 sera collected from pregnant women, 1,644 (77.0%) tested unequivocally positive and 407 (19.0%) were negative in both EIA-IgG and FAT. The remaining 85 (4%) sera showed equivocal or discordant results. Among them, 73 (85.9%) were positive and 12 (14.1%) were negative in IB. Forty-one (89.1%) equivocal sera in EIA-IgG and 46 (86.8%) equivocal sera in FAT were positive in IB. Reducing the cut-off values of both screening techniques improved significantly their sensitivity in detecting very low IgG titers at the expense of their specificity. In conclusion, equivocal results in routine-used techniques and their discordance in determination of the immune status in pregnancy women were not uncommon. IB test appeard to be highly useful in these situations as a confirmatory technique. PMID:24039295

  10. Comparison of an indirect fluorescent antibody test with Western blot for the detection of serum antibodies against Encephalitozoon cuniculi in cats.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Peschke, Roman; Tichy, Alexander; Joachim, Anja

    2014-12-01

    Current clinical research indicates that Encephalitozoon (E.) cuniculi infections in cats may be underdiagnosed, especially in animals with typical ocular signs (cataract/anterior uveitis). Although molecular detection of the pathogen in tissue appears promising, serology remains the major diagnostic tool in the living animal. While serological tests are established for the main host of E. cuniculi, the rabbit, the routine serological diagnosis for cats still needs validation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the consistency of indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and Western blot (WB) for the detection of IgG antibodies against E. cuniculi in the serum of 84 cats. In addition, PCR of liquefied lens material or intraocular fluid was performed in those of the cats with a suspected ocular E. cuniculi infection. Twenty-one cats with positive PCR results were considered as a positive reference group. Results obtained by IFAT and WB corresponded in 83/84 serum samples, indicating a very good correlation between both serological methods. Using WB as the standard reference, sensitivity and specificity for the detection of antibodies against E. cuniculi by the IFAT were 97.6 and 100%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values for the IFAT were 100 and 97.7%, respectively. The accuracy (correct classified proportion) for the detection of IgG antibodies against E. cuniculi in cats was 98.8%. The comparison of both serological methods with the PCR results also revealed a good agreement as 20 out of 21 PCR-positive samples were seropositive both in IFAT and WB. Both tests can be considered as equally reliable assays to detect IgG antibodies against E. cuniculi in cats. As the IFAT is quicker and easier to perform, it is recommended for routine use in the diagnosis of feline encephalitozoonosis. PMID:25199557

  11. BlotBase: a northern blot database.

    PubMed

    Schlamp, K; Weinmann, A; Krupp, M; Maass, T; Galle, Pr; Teufel, A

    2008-12-31

    With the availability of high-throughput gene expression analysis, multiple public expression databases emerged, mostly based on microarray expression data. Although these databases are of significant biomedical value, they do hold significant drawbacks, especially concerning the reliability of single gene expression profiles obtained by microarray data. Simultaneously, reliable data on an individual gene's expression are often published as single northern blots in individual publications. These data were not yet available for high-throughput screening. To reduce the gap between high-throughput expression data and individual highly reliable expression data, we designed a novel database "BlotBase", a freely and easily accessible database, currently containing approximately 700 published northern blots of human or mouse origin (http://www.medicalgenomics.org/Databases/BlotBase). As the database is open for public data submission, we expect this database to quickly become a large expression profiling resource, eventually providing higher reliability in high-throughput gene expression analysis. Realizing BlotBase, Pubmed was searched manually and by computer based text mining methods to obtain publications containing northern blot results. Subsequently, northern blots were extracted and expression values of different tissues calculated utilizing Image J. All data were made available through a user friendly web front end. The data may be searched by either full text search or list of available northern blots of a specific tissue. Northern blot expression profiles were displayed by three expression states as well as a bar chart, allowing for automated evaluation. Furthermore, we integrated additional features, e.g. instant access to the corresponding RNA sequence or primer design tools making further expression analysis more convenient. Finally, through a semiautomatic submission system this database was opened to the bioinformatics community. PMID:18838116

  12. Expression of fluorescent proteins in Branchiostoma lanceolatum by mRNA injection into unfertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hirsinger, Estelle; Carvalho, João Emanuel; Chevalier, Christine; Lutfalla, Georges; Nicolas, Jean-François; Peyriéras, Nadine; Schubert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report here a robust and efficient protocol for the expression of fluorescent proteins after mRNA injection into unfertilized oocytes of the cephalochordate amphioxus, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. We use constructs for membrane and nuclear targeted mCherry and eGFP that have been modified to accommodate amphioxus codon usage and Kozak consensus sequences. We describe the type of injection needles to be used, the immobilization protocol for the unfertilized oocytes, and the overall injection set-up. This technique generates fluorescently labeled embryos, in which the dynamics of cell behaviors during early development can be analyzed using the latest in vivo imaging strategies. The development of a microinjection technique in this amphioxus species will allow live imaging analyses of cell behaviors in the embryo as well as gene-specific manipulations, including gene overexpression and knockdown. Altogether, this protocol will further consolidate the basal chordate amphioxus as an animal model for addressing questions related to the mechanisms of embryonic development and, more importantly, to their evolution. PMID:25650764

  13. Southwestern Blotting Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yinshan; Nagore, Linda; Jarrett, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Southwestern blotting is a technique used to study DNA-protein interactions. This method detects specific DNA-binding proteins by incubating radiolabeled DNA with a gel blot, washing, and visualizing through autoradiography. A blot resulting from 1-dimensional SDS-PAGE reveals the molecular weight of the binding proteins. To increase separation and determine isoelectric point a 2-dimensional gel can be blotted. Additional dimensions of electrophoresis, such as a gel shift (EMSA), can precede isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE to further improve separation. Combined with other techniques, such as mass spectrometry, the DNA-binding protein can be identified. PMID:26404144

  14. The western blot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western blotting is a technique that involves the separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis, their blotting or transfer to a membrane, and selective immunodetection of an immobilized antigen. This is an important and routine method for protein analysis that depends on the specificity of antibod...

  15. The Dot Blot ELISA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbig, Donald G., Jr.; Fenk, Christopher J.; Goodhart, Amy S.

    2000-01-01

    Uses two laboratory techniques, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western Blot, to demonstrate antibody-antigen binding concepts. Includes a list of required materials and directions for the procedure, and makes suggestions for classroom applications. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  16. Single-cell western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alex J.; Spelke, Dawn P.; Xu, Zhuchen; Kang, Chi-Chih; Schaffer, David V.; Herr, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    To measure cell-to-cell variation in protein-mediated functions — a hallmark of biological processes — we developed an approach to conduct ~103 concurrent single-cell western blots (scWesterns) in ~4 hours. A microscope slide supporting a 30 µm-thick photoactive polyacrylamide gel enables western blotting comprised of: settling of single cells into microwells, lysis in situ, gel electrophoresis, photoinitiated blotting to immobilize proteins, and antibody probing. We apply this scWestern to monitor single rat neural stem cell differentiation and responses to mitogen stimulation. The scWestern quantifies target proteins even with off-target antibody binding, multiplexes to 11 protein targets per single cell with detection thresholds of <30,000 molecules, and supports analyses of low starting cell numbers (~200) when integrated with fluorescence activated cell sorting. The scWestern thus overcomes limitations in single-cell protein analysis (i.e., antibody fidelity, sensitivity, and starting cell number) and constitutes a versatile tool for the study of complex cell populations at single-cell resolution. PMID:24880876

  17. Genomic Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a detailed protocol for genomic Southern blot analysis which can be used to detect transgene or endogenous gene sequences in cereal genomes. The protocol follows a standard approach that has been shown to generate high-quality results: size fractionation of genomic DNA; capillary transfer to a nylon membrane; hybridization with a digoxigenin-labelled probe; and detection using a chemiluminescent-based system. High sensitivity and limited background are key to successful Southern blots. The critical steps in this protocol are complete digestion of the right quantity of DNA, careful handling of the membrane to avoid unnecessary background, and optimization of probe concentration and temperatures during the hybridization step. Detailed instructions on how to successfully master these techniques are provided. PMID:24243203

  18. First observation by fluorescence polarization of complexation between mRNA and the natural polysaccharide schizophyllan.

    PubMed

    Karinaga, Ryouji; Mizu, Masami; Koumoto, Kazuya; Anada, Takahisa; Shinkai, Seiji; Kimura, Taro; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2004-04-01

    Schizophyllan is a natural beta-(1-->3)-D-glucan that exists as a triple helix in H(2)O and as a single chain in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or basic solution (pH >13). As we have already reported, when a homo-polynucleotide (e.g., poly(dA), poly(A), or poly(C)) is added to a schizophyllan/DMSO solution, and, subsequently, DMSO is exchanged for H(2)O, the single chain of schizophyllan forms a complex with the polynucleotide. Since eukaryotic mRNAs have poly(A) tails, we hypothesized that schizophyllan can bind to mRNA by interacting with this tail. However, we have not yet observed complexation between schizophyllan and mRNA after exchanging DMSO for H(2)O. In this report, we show that the complexation can be accelerated when the solution pH is changed from 13 to 7-8 in the presence of schizophyllan and polynucleotides. By this approach, we found that schizophyllan forms a complex with a yeast mRNA. PMID:17191874

  19. Monitoring mRNA Translation in Neuronal Processes Using Fluorescent Non-Canonical Amino Acid Tagging.

    PubMed

    Kos, Aron; Wanke, Kai A; Gioio, Anthony; Martens, Gerard J; Kaplan, Barry B; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2016-05-01

    A steady accumulation of experimental data argues that protein synthesis in neurons is not merely restricted to the somatic compartment, but also occurs in several discrete cellular micro-domains. Local protein synthesis is critical for the establishment of synaptic plasticity in mature dendrites and in directing the growth cones of immature axons, and has been associated with cognitive impairment in mice and humans. Although in recent years a number of important mechanisms governing this process have been described, it remains technically challenging to precisely monitor local protein synthesis in individual neuronal cell parts independent from the soma. This report presents the utility of employing microfluidic chambers for the isolation and treatment of single neuronal cellular compartments. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a protein synthesis assay, based on fluorescent non-canonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT), can be combined with this cell culture system to label nascent proteins within a discrete structural and functional domain of the neuron. Together, these techniques could be employed for the detection of protein synthesis within developing and mature neurites, offering an effective approach to elucidate novel mechanisms controlling synaptic maintenance and plasticity. PMID:27026294

  20. Fluorescence detection of KRAS2 mRNA hybridization in lung cancer cells with PNA-peptides containing an internal thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Mahesh V; Wampole, Matthew E; Jin, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Chang-Po; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2014-09-17

    We previously developed reporter-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptides for sequence-specific radioimaging and fluorescence imaging of particular mRNAs in cells and tumors. However, a direct test for PNA-peptide hybridization with RNA in the cytoplasm would be desirable. Thiazole orange (TO) dye at the 5' end of a hybridization agent shows a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield when stacked upon a 5' terminal base pair, in solution and in cells. We hypothesized that hybridization agents with an internal TO could distinguish a single base mutation in RNA. Thus, we designed KRAS2 PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO adjacent to the middle base of the 12th codon, a frequent site of cancer-initiating mutations. Our molecular dynamics calculations predicted a disordered bulge with weaker hybridization resulting from a single RNA mismatch. We observed that single-stranded PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO showed low fluorescence, but fluorescence escalated 5-6-fold upon hybridization with KRAS2 RNA. Circular dichroism melting curves showed ∼10 °C higher Tm for fully complementary vs single base mismatch TO-PNA-peptide agent duplexes with KRAS2 RNA. Fluorescence measurements of treated human lung cancer cells similarly showed elevated cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity with fully complementary vs single base mismatch agents. Sequence-specific elevation of internal TO fluorescence is consistent with our hypothesis of detecting cytoplasmic PNA-peptide:RNA hybridization if a mutant agent encounters the corresponding mutant mRNA. PMID:25180641

  1. Fluorescence Detection of KRAS2 mRNA Hybridization in Lung Cancer Cells with PNA-Peptides Containing an Internal Thiazole Orange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed reporter-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptides for sequence-specific radioimaging and fluorescence imaging of particular mRNAs in cells and tumors. However, a direct test for PNA-peptide hybridization with RNA in the cytoplasm would be desirable. Thiazole orange (TO) dye at the 5′ end of a hybridization agent shows a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield when stacked upon a 5′ terminal base pair, in solution and in cells. We hypothesized that hybridization agents with an internal TO could distinguish a single base mutation in RNA. Thus, we designed KRAS2 PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO adjacent to the middle base of the 12th codon, a frequent site of cancer-initiating mutations. Our molecular dynamics calculations predicted a disordered bulge with weaker hybridization resulting from a single RNA mismatch. We observed that single-stranded PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO showed low fluorescence, but fluorescence escalated 5–6-fold upon hybridization with KRAS2 RNA. Circular dichroism melting curves showed ∼10 °C higher Tm for fully complementary vs single base mismatch TO-PNA-peptide agent duplexes with KRAS2 RNA. Fluorescence measurements of treated human lung cancer cells similarly showed elevated cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity with fully complementary vs single base mismatch agents. Sequence-specific elevation of internal TO fluorescence is consistent with our hypothesis of detecting cytoplasmic PNA-peptide:RNA hybridization if a mutant agent encounters the corresponding mutant mRNA. PMID:25180641

  2. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  3. BLOT Ver. 1.65

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-03-24

    BLOT is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variablesmore » drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time steps where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. BLOT is written in as portable a form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes have been ported to several Unix systems« less

  4. BLOT Ver. 1.65

    SciTech Connect

    MEYERS, RAY; GLICK, III, JOHN; FORSYTHE, CHRISTI; GILKEY, AMY; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY

    2009-03-24

    BLOT is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time steps where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. BLOT is written in as portable a form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes have been ported to several Unix systems

  5. A fluorescent HTS assay for phosphohydrolases based on nucleoside 5'-fluorophosphates: its application in screening for inhibitors of mRNA decapping scavenger and PDE-I.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M R; Nowicka, A; Jemielity, J; Kowalska, J

    2016-05-18

    Several nucleotide-specific phosphohydrolases can cleave P-F bonds in substrate analogues containing a fluorophosphate moiety to release fluoride ions. In this work, by employing a fluoride-sensitive molecular sensor, we harnessed this cleavage reaction to develop a fluorescence assay to screen for phosphohydrolase inhibitors. The assay is rapid, sensitive, and based on simple and synthetically available reagents. The assay was adapted to the high-throughput screening (HTS) format and its utility was demonstrated by screening an 'in-house' library of small nucleotides against two enzymes: DcpS, a metal-independent mRNA decapping pyrophosphatase of the histidine triad (HIT) family; and PDE-I, a divalent cation-dependent nuclease. Our screening results agreed with the known specificities of DcpS and PDE-I, and led to the selection of several inhibitors featuring low-micromolar IC50 values. For DcpS, we also verified the results by using an alternative method with the natural substrate. Notably, the assay presented here is the first fluorescence-based HTS-adaptable assay for DcpS, an established therapeutic target for spinal muscular atrophy. The assay should be useful for phosphohydrolase specificity profiling and inhibitor discovery, particularly in the context of DcpS and other HIT-family enzymes, which play key roles in maintaining cellular functions and have been linked to disease development. PMID:27031609

  6. Quantification of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA in testicular germ cell tumors by quantitative fluorescence real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Mark; Burger, Angelika M; Müller, Markus; Krause, Hans; Straub, Bernd; Smith, Gilian L; Newlands, Eward S; Miller, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme which is endogenously expressed in germ, stem and tumor cells, but absent in benign somatic cells. The two major telomerase components are human telomerase RNA (hTR) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). It has been shown that hTERT is rate-limiting for telomerase activity and that it plays a central role in human carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated the potential of hTERT and hTR gene expression as diagnostic markers in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). hTERT mRNA and hTR expression were quantified in 55 testicular germ cell tumors comprising 36 primary and 19 germ cell tumors from retroperitonal sides by fluorescence real-time RT-PCR using the LightCycler technology. Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) was used as housekeeping gene and to enable relative quantification. For comparison to TGCTs, 38 benign testicular biopsies from patients with fertility disorders were assayed. hTERT expression was detected in all examined undifferentiated TGCTs and in the benign testicular tissue specimens with germ cell content (N(hTERT) 38-127). In contrast, mature teratomas from primary and post-chemotherapy masses, which are characterized by well-differentiated tissue components showed a nearly complete downregulation of hTERT expression (N(hTERT) 2-4, p<0.001). hTR levels however, were high in all tumors and independently of the presence of germ cells also in the benign tissue control group. hTERT mRNA is expressed in all undifferentiated TGCTs but repressed in mature teratomas. This suggests an inverse correlation between the differentiation status of germ cell tumors and hTERT expression. Thus, detection of hTERT expression in tumors histopathologically classified as mature teratomas enables a molecular-diagnostic confirmation and might aid decision making for treatment of patients presenting with this tumor subtype. PMID:12168080

  7. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A.

    2016-01-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2′OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  8. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  9. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  10. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of mRNA transcripts for highly sensitive gene expression profiling in near real time.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyong; Young, Brandon; Baird, Alison E; Soper, Steven A

    2013-08-20

    Expression analysis of mRNAs transcribed from certain genes can be used as important sources of biomarkers for in vitro diagnostics. While the use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) can provide excellent analytical sensitivity for monitoring transcript numbers, more sensitive approaches for expression analysis that can report results in near real-time are needed for many critical applications. We report a novel assay that can provide exquisite limits-of-quantitation and consists of reverse transcription (RT) followed by a ligase detection reaction (LDR) with single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) to provide digital readout through molecular counting. For this assay, no PCR was employed, which enabled short assay turnaround times. To facilitate implementation of the assay, a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microchip, which was fabricated using hot embossing, was employed to carry out the LDR in a continuous flow format with online single-molecule detection following the LDR. As demonstrators of the assay's utility, MMP-7 mRNA was expression profiled from several colorectal cancer cell lines. It was found that the RT-LDR/spFRET assay produced highly linear calibration plots even in the low copy number regime. Comparison to RT-qPCR indicated a better linearity over the low copy number range investigated (10-10,000 copies) with an R(2) = 0.9995 for RT-LDR/spFRET and R(2) = 0.98 for RT-qPCR. In addition, differentiating between copy numbers of 10 and 50 could be performed with higher confidence using RT-LDR/spFRET. To demonstrate the short assay turnaround times obtainable using the RT-LDR/spFRET assay, a two thermal cycle LDR was carried out on amphiphysin gene transcripts that can serve as important diagnostic markers for ischemic stroke. The ability to supply diagnostic information on possible stroke events in short turnaround times using RT-LDR/spFRET will enable clinicians to treat patients effectively with appropriate time

  11. Streamlined Strategies to Better Visualize Southern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I describe an animated slideshow of Southern blotting that I have made freely available to other instructors. My hope is to provide a clear visualization of the logistics behind the technique so that instructors have a solid basis--as well as time freed up--to discuss its applications with students.

  12. Single cell-resolution western blotting.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Yamauchi, Kevin A; Vlassakis, Julea; Sinkala, Elly; Duncombe, Todd A; Herr, Amy E

    2016-08-01

    This protocol describes how to perform western blotting on individual cells to measure cell-to-cell variation in protein expression levels and protein state. Like conventional western blotting, single-cell western blotting (scWB) is particularly useful for protein targets that lack selective antibodies (e.g., isoforms) and in cases in which background signal from intact cells is confounding. scWB is performed on a microdevice that comprises an array of microwells molded in a thin layer of a polyacrylamide gel (PAG). The gel layer functions as both a molecular sieving matrix during PAGE and a blotting scaffold during immunoprobing. scWB involves five main stages: (i) gravity settling of cells into microwells; (ii) chemical lysis of cells in each microwell; (iii) PAGE of each single-cell lysate; (iv) exposure of the gel to UV light to blot (immobilize) proteins to the gel matrix; and (v) in-gel immunoprobing of immobilized proteins. Multiplexing can be achieved by probing with antibody cocktails and using antibody stripping/reprobing techniques, enabling detection of 10+ proteins in each cell. We also describe microdevice fabrication for both uniform and pore-gradient microgels. To extend in-gel immunoprobing to gels of small pore size, we describe an optional gel de-cross-linking protocol for more effective introduction of antibodies into the gel layer. Once the microdevice has been fabricated, the assay can be completed in 4-6 h by microfluidic novices and it generates high-selectivity, multiplexed data from single cells. The technique is relevant when direct measurement of proteins in single cells is needed, with applications spanning the fundamental biosciences to applied biomedicine. PMID:27466711

  13. Multiplexed Western Blotting Using Microchip Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shi; Furtaw, Michael D; Chen, Huaxian; Lamb, Don T; Ferguson, Stephen A; Arvin, Natalie E; Dawod, Mohamed; Kennedy, Robert T

    2016-07-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used protein assay that combines the selectivity of electrophoretic separation and immunoassay. The technique is limited by long time, manual operation with mediocre reproducibility, and large sample consumption, typically 10-20 μg per assay. Western blots are also usually used to measure only one protein per assay with an additional housekeeping protein for normalization. Measurement of multiple proteins is possible; however, it requires stripping membranes of antibody and then reprobing with a second antibody. Miniaturized alternatives to Western blot based on microfluidic or capillary electrophoresis have been developed that enable higher-throughput, automation, and greater mass sensitivity. In one approach, proteins are separated by electrophoresis on a microchip that is dragged along a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane so that as proteins exit the chip they are captured on the membrane for immunoassay. In this work, we improve this method to allow multiplexed protein detection. Multiple injections made from the same sample can be deposited in separate tracks so that each is probed with a different antibody. To further enhance multiplexing capability, the electrophoresis channel dimensions were optimized for resolution while keeping separation and blotting times to less than 8 min. Using a 15 μm deep × 50 μm wide × 8.6 cm long channel, it is possible to achieve baseline resolution of proteins that differ by 5% in molecular weight, e.g., ERK1 (44 kDa) from ERK2 (42 kDa). This resolution allows similar proteins detected by cross-reactive antibodies in a single track. We demonstrate detection of 11 proteins from 9 injections from a single Jurkat cell lysate sample consisting of 400 ng of total protein using this procedure. Thus, multiplexed Western blots are possible without cumbersome stripping and reprobing steps. PMID:27270033

  14. Real time imaging of mRNA expression dynamics in live cells using protein complementation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Amit

    2009-03-01

    Traditional methods for mRNA quantification in cells, such as northern blots, quantitative PCR or microarrays assays, require cell lysis and therefore do not preserve its dynamics. These methods cannot be used to probe the spatio-temporal localization of mRNA in cells, which provide useful information for a wide range biomolecular process, including RNA metabolizim, expression kinetics and RNA interference. To probe mRNA dynamics in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, we develop a method, which exploit the strong affinity of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) to specific RNA aptamers. Two parts of the eIF4A are fused to a split Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP), and are expressed in the cells at high abundance. However, only when the RNA apatmer is also present, the two protein parts complement and become fluorescent. Thus, the fluorescent background remains low, allowing us to directly image the expression of mRNA molecules in live e-coli cells from its early onset, over hours. We find that the expression kinetics can be classified in one out of at least three forms, which also display distinct spatial distributions. I will discuss the possible biological origin for these distributions and their time evolution.

  15. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysismore » variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.« less

  16. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.

  17. Two-dimensional southwestern blotting and characterization of transcription factors on-blot.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Daifeng; Jia, Yinshan; Zhou, YanWen; Jarrett, Harry W

    2009-07-01

    Two-dimensional Southwestern blotting (2D-SW) described here combines several steps. Proteins are separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose (NC) or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane. The blotted proteins are then partially renatured and probed with a specific radiolabeled oligonucleotide for Southwestern blotting (SW) analysis. The detected proteins are then processed by on-blot digestion and identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. A transcription factor, bound by a specific radiolabeled element, is thus characterized without aligning with protein spots on a gel. In this study, we systematically optimize conditions for 2D-SW and on-blot digestion. By quantifying the SW signal using a scintillation counter, the optimal conditions for SW were determined to be PVDF membrane, 0.5% PVP40 for membrane blocking, serial dilution of guanidine HCl for denaturing and renaturing proteins on the blot, and an SDS stripping buffer to remove radiation from the blot. By the quantification of the peptide yields using nano-ESI-MS analysis, the optimized conditions for on-blot digestions were found to be 0.5% Zwittergent 3-16 and 30% acetonitrile in trypsin digestion buffer. With the use of the optimized 2D-SW technique and on-blot digestion combined with HPLC-nano-ESI-MS/MS, a GFP-C/EBP model protein was successfully characterized from a bacterial extract, and native C/EBP beta was identified from 100 microg of HEK293 nuclear extract without any previous purification. PMID:19388704

  18. Western Blotting Inaccuracies with Unverified Antibodies: Need for a Western Blotting Minimal Reporting Standard (WBMRS)

    PubMed Central

    Gilda, Jennifer E.; Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Cheah, Jenice X.; West, Toni M.; Bodine, Sue C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used technique in biological research. A major problem with Western blotting is not the method itself, but the use of poor quality antibodies as well as the use of different experimental conditions that affect the linearity and sensitivity of the Western blot. Investigation of some conditions that are commonly used and often modified in Western blotting, as well as some commercial antibodies, showed that published articles often fail to report critical parameters needed to reproduce the results. These parameters include the amount of protein loaded, the blocking solution and conditions used, the amount of primary and secondary antibodies used, the antibody incubation solutions, the detection method and the quantification method utilized. In the present study, comparison of ubiquitinated proteins in rat heart and liver samples showed different results depending on the antibody utilized. Validation of five commercial ubiquitin antibodies using purified ubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin chains and free ubiquitin showed that these antibodies differ in their ability to detect free ubiquitin or ubiquitinated proteins. Investigating proteins modified with interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in young and old rat hearts using six commercially available antibodies showed that most antibodies gave different semi-quantitative results, suggesting large variability among antibodies. Evidence showing the importance of the Western blot buffer and the concentration of antibody used is presented. Hence there is a critical need for comprehensive reporting of experimental conditions to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of Western blot analysis. A Western blotting minimal reporting standard (WBMRS) is suggested to improve the reproducibility of Western blot analysis. PMID:26287535

  19. BLOTS AND ALL: A HISTORY OF THE RORSCHACH INK BLOT TEST IN BRITAIN.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katherine; Hegarty, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the easily recognizable nature of the Rorschach ink blot test very little is known about the history of the test in Britain. We attend to the oft-ignored history of the Rorschach test in Britain and compare it to its history in the US. Prior to the Second World War, Rorschach testing in Britain had attracted advocates and critiques. Afterward, the British Rorschach Forum, a network with a high proportion of women, developed around the Tavistock Institute in London and The Rorschach Newsletter. In 1968, the International Rorschach Congress was held in London but soon after the group became less exclusive, and fell into decline. A comparative account of the Rorschach in Britain demonstrates how different national institutions invested in the 'projective hypothesis' according to the influence of psychoanalysis, the adoption of a nationalized health system, and the social positioning of 'others' throughout the twentieth century. In comparing and contrasting the history of the Rorschach in Britain and the US, we decentralize and particularize the history of North American Psychology. PMID:26924673

  20. An automated rotisserie system for processing Western blots.

    PubMed

    Ma, P W K

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus to automate completely the processing of Western blots is described. The prototype is based on a popular rotisserie system design. The incubation chamber consists of an inner cylinder that rotates inside an outer cylinder (incubation chamber). The blot is contained in the inner cylinder. Two magnets are mounted at one end of the inner cylinder, and rotation of the inner cylinder is effected by two magnets mounted on a motor drive outside the incubation chamber. Movement of chemicals into and out of the incubation chamber is driven pneumatically, and the entire process is controlled by a computer. Processing a blot for chemiluminescent detection takes 7 h to complete without human intervention. The quality of the resulting image is comparable to or better than a blot using manual processing. In addition, the prototype is capable of re-collecting all three antisera for future use. PMID:12564602

  1. Quantitative autoradiography of dot blots using a microwell densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.M.; Woodley, K.; Baird, M. )

    1989-07-01

    We have established conditions for the quantitation of DNA hybridization by reading dot blot autoradiographs with a microwell plate densitometer. This method is more convenient, as accurate, and more sensitive than counting the spots in a liquid scintillation counter.

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF IMMUNOGENS OF 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' BY PROTEIN BLOTTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to a nitrocellulose sheet by blotting. Sera obtained from infected hamsters and immunized rabbits were then incubated with the nitrocellulose strips. Proteins which are capa...

  3. Evaluation of immunoglobulin M western blot analysis in the diagnosis of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, L L; Taber, L H; Baughn, R E

    1990-01-01

    Western immunoblots of solubilized Treponema pallidum antigens were reacted with sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and developed with enzyme-conjugated antibodies to immunoglobulin M (IgM). A blot was considered positive if reactions included bands at the 47-, 17-, and 15.5-kilodalton positions along with a variable pattern at other low-molecular-weight positions. Sera from 23 of 25 symptomatic infants diagnosed with congenital syphilis yielded positive reactions. Of 80 asymptomatic infants considered at risk for developing symptomatic infection, 16 exhibited IgM patterns consistent with those seen in congenital syphilis, although 5 of these 16 gave reactions that were equivocal. To exclude false-positive reactions due to IgM rheumatoid factor, sera were fractionated and the IgM fractions were retested. Only the five initially equivocal sera gave nonreactive blots with the IgM fractions, whereas all others gave more prominent reactions that were qualitatively similar to those seen in serum samples. Sera from 18 normal infants failed to show any IgM reactivity to T. pallidum antigens on Western blots. The IgM Western blot was both more sensitive and more specific than the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed (IgM) test using fractionated serum. Of the 17 CSF samples from infants with symptomatic congenital syphilis, 14 showed IgM reactivity in Western blots, whereas only 12 had a reactive CSF in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test. Our results indicate that this technique can be used to identify both symptomatic and asymptomatic infection in infants with T. pallidum, in some cases before standard serologic studies can confirm the diagnosis. Images PMID:2179261

  4. Sequence of human hexokinase III cDNA and assignment of the human hexokinase III gene (HK3) to chromosome band 5q35.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Hiroto; Le Beau, M.M.; Fernald, A.A.

    1996-08-15

    Complementary DNA clones encoding human hexokinase III were isolated from a liver cDNA library. There was 84.7% identity between the amino acid sequences of human and rat hexokinase III. RNA blotting showed the presence of hexokinase III mRNA in liver and lung. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human hexokinase III gene (HK3) to chromosome 5, band q35.2. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Bodkin, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to (5'/sup 32/P)-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 52/sup 0/C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share greater than or equal to 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups.

  6. Western Blot of Stained Proteins from Dried Polyacrylamide Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Claudia; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1996-01-01

    Western blotting of proteins is customarily performed following their separation on polyacrylamide gels, either prior to staining (1) or, as recently reported, following staining (2). We describe here Western blotting with stained gels, which had been dried and some of which had been stored for years. This procedure permits immunological analysis of proteins, to which antisera may have become available only later, or where the application of newly developed sensitive detection methods is desired. Once rehydration of the gels is achieved, proteins can be-transferred to blotting membranes by any appropriate protocol. Proteins stained with Coomassie Blue have to be detected with a non-chromogenic method, such as the film-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL)2) procedure (3). Silver stained proteins, which transfer in the colorless form, may be visualized by any detection method, although, because of the usually very low amounts of proteins, detection by ECL is preferable. Blotting of stained proteins from rehydrated gels is as rapid and as quantitative as from freshly prepared gels, in contrast to blotting from wet stained gels, which requires extensive washing and results in low transfer efficiency (2). Together with a photographic record of the gel pattern, unambiguous identification of immunoreactive proteins from complex mixtures is possible. Some further applications of this work are discussed.

  7. Improved semiquantitative Western blot technique with increased quantification range.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, F; Heidebrecht, A; Schulz, I; Behrens, S-E; Bader, A

    2009-06-30

    With the development of new interdisciplinary fields such as systems biology, the quantitative analysis of protein expression in biological samples gains more and more importance. Although the most common method for this is ELISA, Western blot also has advantages: The separation of proteins by size allows the evaluation of only specifically bound protein. This work examines the Western blot signal chain, determines some of the parameters relevant for quantitative analysis and proposes a mathematical model of the reaction kinetics. Using this model, a semiquantitative Western blot method for simultaneous quantification of different proteins using a hyperbolic calibration curve was developed. A program was written for the purpose of hyperbolic regression that allows quick determination of the calibration curve coefficients. This program can be used also for approximation of calibration curves in other applications such as ELISA, BCA or Bradford assays. PMID:19351538

  8. Detection of Blotted Proteins: Not All Blockers Are Created Equal.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vishal; Mathews, Suresh T

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a standard analytical technique for detection of proteins. It is dependent on a number of components; from the specificity of the primary antibody to the reduction of competing biomolecules present in the assay. Blocking agents are a critical component for western blotting protocols as these diminish nonspecific binding by blocking off-target sites on the membrane. A variety of blocking agents are available and these are selected in an empirical manner, as no single blocker is compatible with every system. The best blocking agent and method for any particular assay will be an optimized but not absolute choice. Here, we describe characteristics of the most common blocking agents used in western blotting and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:26139251

  9. [Contribution of Western blotting to the diagnosis of hydatidosis].

    PubMed

    Makni, F; Hachicha, L; Mseddi, F; Hammami, H; Cheikhrouhou, F; Sellami, H; Sellami, A; Mzali, R; Boujelbène, S; Rebaï, R; Beyrouti, I; Ayadi, A

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution of the immunoWesternblot for the diagnosis and the post surgical follow-up of the hydatidosis. 71 sera from patients with hydatidosis confirmed by surgery were studied. All had a negative hydatic serology by screening tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, hemagglutination, electrosyneresis). 12 patients with sera in pre and post operative were monitored for 2 years. The Echinococcus Western blot IgG permitted to rectify the diagnosis of hydatidosis in 67.6 %. The rate of positivity was 100 % for the multivesicular liver cysts, 60 % for the young cysts and 50 % for the calcified cysts. Western blot permitted to rectify the diagnosis of lung cysts in 62.5 % of cases and in 50 % of cranial-spinal localizations. Analysis of Western Blot evolution in the 12 patients followed in pre and post-surgical revealed the disappearance of the bands 16, 18 and 26-28kDa in 8 month in the 8 patients with complete exeresis. This study proved the value added of Western blot compared to the other traditional techniques for the immunodiagnostic and the post-surgical monitoring of hydatidosis. PMID:17824307

  10. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    PubMed

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders. PMID:26031895

  11. Development of a heat-mediated protein blotting method.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Jack; McMahon, Hilary E M

    2016-04-15

    Western blotting is a significant tool employed for the detection of cell proteins. High-molecular-weight proteins have proven a challenge to detect by western blotting, but proteins even of 100 KDa can still present difficulties in detection. This work reports the development of a heat transfer method that is suitable for both low- and high-molecular-weight proteins. The procedure involves the use of a constant temperature at 78 °C in a dedicated heat transfer module. Through the use of this protocol the neuronal adaptor protein X11α (120 KDa), which prior to this methodology was undetectable endogenously in the neuroblastoma cell line (N2a), was successfully detected in the N2a cell line. The procedure provides a reproducible protocol that can be adapted for other high-molecular-weight proteins, and it provides the advantage that low-molecular-weight proteins are not sacrificed by the methodology. PMID:26869081

  12. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  13. Lipid A binding proteins in macrophages detected by ligand blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, R.Y.; Golenbock, D.T.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Endotoxin (LPS) stimulates a variety of eukaryotic cells. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. The site of action of the LPS toxic moiety, lipid A (LA), is unclear. Their laboratory has previously identified a bioactive LA precursor lipid IV/sub A/, which can be enzymatically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/ (10/sup 9/ dpm/nmole) and purified (99%). They now show that this ligand binds to specific proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (NC) from LPS-sensitive RAW 264.7 cultured macrophages. NC blots were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-IV/sub A/ in a buffer containing BSA, NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and azide. Binding was assessed using autoradiography or scintillation counting. Dot blot binding of the radioligand was inhibited by excess cold IV/sub A/, LA, or ReLPS but not by phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidic acid. Binding was trypsin-sensitive and dependent on protein concentration. Particulate macrophage proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE and then electroblotted onto NC. Several discrete binding proteins were observed. Identical treatment of fetal bovine serum or molecular weight standards revealed no detectable binding. By avoiding high nonspecific binding of intact membranes, this ligand blotting assay may be useful in elucidating the molecular actions of LPS.

  14. RNA Colony Blot Hybridization Method for Enumeration of Culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Zo, Young-Gun; Hasan, Nur A.; Ali, Afsar; Chowdhury, Wasimul B.; Islam, Atiqul; Rashid, Mohammed H.; Alam, Munirul; Morris, J. Glenn; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2009-01-01

    A species-specific RNA colony blot hybridization protocol was developed for enumeration of culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus bacteria in environmental water samples. Bacterial colonies on selective or nonselective plates were lysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate, and the lysates were immobilized on nylon membranes. A fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe targeting a phylogenetic signature sequence of 16S rRNA of V. cholerae and V. mimicus was hybridized to rRNA molecules immobilized on the nylon colony lift blots. The protocol produced strong positive signals for all colonies of the 15 diverse V. cholerae-V. mimicus strains tested, indicating 100% sensitivity of the probe for the targeted species. For visible colonies of 10 nontarget species, the specificity of the probe was calculated to be 90% because of a weak positive signal produced by Grimontia (Vibrio) hollisae, a marine bacterium. When both the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated using lake water samples amended with a bioluminescent V. cholerae strain, no false-negative or false-positive results were found, indicating 100% sensitivity and specificity for culturable bacterial populations in freshwater samples when G. hollisae was not present. When the protocol was applied to laboratory microcosms containing V. cholerae attached to live copepods, copepods were found to carry approximately 10,000 to 50,000 CFU of V. cholerae per copepod. The protocol was also used to analyze pond water samples collected in an area of cholera endemicity in Bangladesh over a 9-month period. Water samples collected from six ponds demonstrated a peak in abundance of total culturable V. cholerae bacteria 1 to 2 months prior to observed increases in pathogenic V. cholerae and in clinical cases recorded by the area health clinic. The method provides a highly specific and sensitive tool for monitoring the dynamics of V. cholerae in the environment. The RNA blot hybridization protocol can also be

  15. Quantitative Northern Blot Analysis of Mammalian rRNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is an elaborate biosynthetic process that begins in the nucleolus and requires hundreds of cellular factors. Analysis of rRNA processing has been instrumental for studying the mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis and effects of stress conditions on the molecular milieu of the nucleolus. Here, we describe the quantitative analysis of the steady-state levels of rRNA precursors, applicable to studies in mammalian cells and other organisms. We include protocols for gel electrophoresis and northern blotting of rRNA precursors using procedures optimized for the large size of these RNAs. We also describe the ratio analysis of multiple precursors, a technique that facilitates the accurate assessment of changes in the efficiency of individual pre-rRNA processing steps. PMID:27576717

  16. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  17. Microfluidic Western blotting of low-molecular-mass proteins.

    PubMed

    Gerver, Rachel E; Herr, Amy E

    2014-11-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5-116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  18. Microfluidic Western Blotting of Low-Molecular-Mass Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5–116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  19. Antibody performance in western blot applications is context-dependent.

    PubMed

    Algenäs, Cajsa; Agaton, Charlotta; Fagerberg, Linn; Asplund, Anna; Björling, Lisa; Björling, Erik; Kampf, Caroline; Lundberg, Emma; Nilsson, Peter; Persson, Anja; Wester, Kenneth; Pontén, Fredrik; Wernérus, Henrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Ottosson Takanen, Jenny; Hober, Sophia

    2014-03-01

    An important concern for the use of antibodies in various applications, such as western blot (WB) or immunohistochemistry (IHC), is specificity. This calls for systematic validations using well-designed conditions. Here, we have analyzed 13 000 antibodies using western blot with lysates from human cell lines, tissues, and plasma. Standardized stratification showed that 45% of the antibodies yielded supportive staining, and the rest either no staining (12%) or protein bands of wrong size (43%). A comparative study of WB and IHC showed that the performance of antibodies is application-specific, although a correlation between no WB staining and weak IHC staining could be seen. To investigate the influence of protein abundance on the apparent specificity of the antibody, new WB analyses were performed for 1369 genes that gave unsupportive WBs in the initial screening using cell lysates with overexpressed full-length proteins. Then, more than 82% of the antibodies yielded a specific band corresponding to the full-length protein. Hence, the vast majority of the antibodies (90%) used in this study specifically recognize the target protein when present at sufficiently high levels. This demonstrates the context- and application-dependence of antibody validation and emphasizes that caution is needed when annotating binding reagents as specific or cross-reactive. WB is one of the most commonly used methods for validation of antibodies. Our data implicate that solely using one platform for antibody validation might give misleading information and therefore at least one additional method should be used to verify the achieved data. PMID:24403002

  20. Blot overlays with 32P-labeled fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Lim, L; Manser, E

    2001-07-01

    Proteins labeled with 32P can be used as sensitive "prime" in blot overlays to detect binding proteins or domains. Small G-protein Ras can bind GTP with extremely high affinity (Kd approximately 10(-11)-10(-12) M) in the presence of Mg2+. We have taken advantage of this property of Ras to develop a vector that expresses proteins of interest such as glutathione S-transferase (GST)/Ras fusion proteins for noncovalent labeling with [gamma-32P]GTP. The labeling efficiency of this method is >60% and involves a single short incubation step. We have previously identified several binding proteins for the second SH3 domain of the adaptor Nck using this method. Here we illustrate the overlay method using the GST/Ras system and compare results with the SH3 domain labeled by phosphorylation with [gamma-32P]ATP. Both methods are similarly specific and sensitive; however, we show that signals are dependent primarily on GST-mediated probe dimerization. These dimeric probes allow a more stable probe-target complex similar to immunoglobulin interactions, thus significantly improving the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:11403569

  1. Characterization of Nora Virus Structural Proteins via Western Blot Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Brad L; Carlson, Darby J; Carlson, Kimberly A

    2016-01-01

    Nora virus is a single stranded RNA picorna-like virus with four open reading frames (ORFs). The coding potentials of the ORFs are not fully characterized, but ORF3 and ORF4 are believed to encode the capsid proteins (VP3, VP4a, VP4b, and VP4c) comprising the virion. To determine the polypeptide composition of Nora virus virions, polypeptides from purified virus were compared to polypeptides detected in Nora virus infected Drosophila melanogaster. Nora virus was purified from infected flies and used to challenge mice for the production of antisera. ORF3, ORF4a, ORF4b, and ORF4c were individually cloned and expressed in E. coli; resultant recombinant proteins purified and were used to make monospecific antisera. Antisera were evaluated via Western blot against whole virus particles and Nora virus infected fly lysates. Viral purification yielded two particle types with densities of ~1.31 g/mL (empty particles) and ~1.33 g/mL (complete virions). Comparison of purified virus polypeptide composition to Nora virus infected D. melanogaster lysate showed the number of proteins in infected cell lysates is less than purified virus. Our results suggest the virion is composed of 6 polypeptides, VP3, VP4a, two forms of VP4b, and two forms of VP4c. This polypeptide composition is similar to other small RNA insect viruses. PMID:27298753

  2. Characterization of Nora Virus Structural Proteins via Western Blot Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Brad L.; Carlson, Darby J.

    2016-01-01

    Nora virus is a single stranded RNA picorna-like virus with four open reading frames (ORFs). The coding potentials of the ORFs are not fully characterized, but ORF3 and ORF4 are believed to encode the capsid proteins (VP3, VP4a, VP4b, and VP4c) comprising the virion. To determine the polypeptide composition of Nora virus virions, polypeptides from purified virus were compared to polypeptides detected in Nora virus infected Drosophila melanogaster. Nora virus was purified from infected flies and used to challenge mice for the production of antisera. ORF3, ORF4a, ORF4b, and ORF4c were individually cloned and expressed in E. coli; resultant recombinant proteins purified and were used to make monospecific antisera. Antisera were evaluated via Western blot against whole virus particles and Nora virus infected fly lysates. Viral purification yielded two particle types with densities of ~1.31 g/mL (empty particles) and ~1.33 g/mL (complete virions). Comparison of purified virus polypeptide composition to Nora virus infected D. melanogaster lysate showed the number of proteins in infected cell lysates is less than purified virus. Our results suggest the virion is composed of 6 polypeptides, VP3, VP4a, two forms of VP4b, and two forms of VP4c. This polypeptide composition is similar to other small RNA insect viruses. PMID:27298753

  3. Seasonal changes in hepatic progesterone receptor mRNA, estrogen receptor mRNA, and vitellogenin mRNA in the painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Custodia-Lora, Noemí; Callard, Ian P

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies using the fresh water turtle Chrysemys picta have demonstrated that progesterone (P) inhibits estradiol (E)-induced vitellogenin (vtg) secretion in this species. Further, there is evidence for the differential expression of the two P receptor isoforms (PRA and PRB) in the liver during the turtle seasonal cycle, correlating with hepatic vitellogenesis. In this study we report changes in the hepatic PR mPNA, ER mRNA, and vitellogenin (vtg) mRNA transcripts during the reproductive cycle of the turtle. Fragments of the turtle hepatic PR and ER cDNAs were cloned and sequenced and a previously cloned turtle vtg cDNA were used as probes in Northern blotting. No 3.7-kb PR mRNA, corresponding to the smaller PR transcript, PRA of other species was found, although, a smaller 1.8-kb transcript (putative PRC mRNA) was present. These observations suggest that the turtle as in the chicken and human, the 4.5-kb PR mRNA transcript encodes both PRA and PRB proteins. Only the larger PR mRNA transcript (4.5-kb), was found to vary significantly during the annual cycle, being highest when vitellogenesis was inhibited in winter and summer. Vtg mRNA could not be detected during the summer or winter, was highest during vitellogenesis in the spring, and reappeared during the fall period of vitellogenesis and ovarian recrudescence. ER mRNA followed a similar pattern, being highest during spring and early fall, when vtg synthesis is high. The data suggest that P/PR, as well as E/ER, may be involved in the seasonal regulation of hepatic vitellogenesis in this species. PMID:12392693

  4. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  5. Pairwise detection of site-specific receptor phosphorylations using single-molecule blotting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Lock; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seongsil; Kim, Su-Jeong; Noh, Jung Eun; Kim, Joung-Hun; Chae, Young Chan; Lee, Jong-Bong; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) at the plasma membrane (PM) determine the signal transduction efficacy alone and in combination. However, current approaches to identify PTMs provide ensemble results, inherently overlooking combinatorial PTMs in a single polypeptide molecule. Here, we describe a single-molecule blotting (SiMBlot) assay that combines biotinylation of cell surface receptors with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. This method enables quantitative measurement of the phosphorylation status of individual membrane receptor molecules and colocalization analysis of multiple immunofluorescence signals to directly visualize pairwise site-specific phosphorylation patterns at the single-molecule level. Strikingly, application of SiMBlot to study ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, which is widely thought to be multi-phosphorylated, reveals that EGFR on cell membranes is hardly multi-phosphorylated, unlike in vitro autophosphorylated EGFR. Therefore, we expect SiMBlot to aid understanding of vast combinatorial PTM patterns, which are concealed in ensemble methods, and to broaden knowledge of RTK signaling. PMID:27009355

  6. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Eikan; Jinno, Daisuke; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism. PMID:26606401

  7. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism. PMID:26606401

  8. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  9. The gene encoding vitamin K-dependent anticoagulant protein S is expressed in multiple rabbit organs as demonstrated by northern blotting, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    He, X; Shen, L; Bjartell, A; Dahlbäck, B

    1995-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent protein S is an anticoagulant plasma protein that functions as a co-factor to activated protein C in the degradation of coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. We investigated the tissue/cellular distribution of protein S synthesis by Northern blotting, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Northern blotting together with in situ hybridization, using specific oligodeoxynucleotide probes, demonstrated protein S mRNA in liver, lung, testis, epididymis, ovary, uterus, and brain. In the reproductive system, protein S mRNA was present in the cytoplasm of Leydig cells, interstitial cells of the ovary, epithelial cells of the epididymis, and in the endometrium, including endometrial mucous glandular membrane in the myometrium. Bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages were positive in the respiratory system. In the central nervous system, pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampal region, and dentate fascia neurons gave strongly positive signals. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies yielded a staining pattern that correlated well with results of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, results from Northern blotting, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry suggested that rabbit protein S is expressed in several extrahepatic tissues. The presence of protein S transcripts in these fully differentiated cells suggests a cell type-specific gene expression which may be related to local anticoagulation or to other as yet unknown protein S functions. PMID:7822769

  10. Modulation of tubulin mRNA levels by interferon in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fellous, A; Ginzburg, I; Littauer, U Z

    1982-01-01

    Blot hybridization with labeled tubulin cDNA showed that treatment of Ramos cells, a human cell line of lymphoblastoid origin, with either alpha or beta interferon (IFN) induced a marked increase in the amount of tubulin mRNA sequences. The level of tubulin mRNA sequences increased rapidly after exposure of cells to IFN-alpha and reached a maximum after 1 h of treatment, which was four times the control level. Treatment with IFN-beta induced a maximal increase after 4 h; the amount of tubulin mRNA sequences was seven times higher than the control level. The mRNA extracted from IFN-treated and nontreated cells was translated in vitro in a reticulocyte lysate cell-free system containing [35S]methionine. Electrophoretic analysis of the labeled cell-free products showed an increase in the amount of translatable tubulin mRNA that parallels the time course of induction of tubulin mRNA sequences. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the labeled protein products directed by mRNA indicates that IFN caused a more pronounced increase in the level of alpha-tubulin than beta-tubulin mRNA. Treatment with colchicine, which disrupts the cell microtubules, caused a marked decrease in the tubulin mRNA content. Concomitant treatment of the cells with colchicine and IFN abolished the interferon-dependent induction of tubulin mRNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6964957

  11. All-in-one detector of circulating mRNA based on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Gumulec, Jaromir; Svoboda, Ondrej; Raudenska, Martina; Hudcova, Kristyna; Sekora, Jiri; Balogh, Jaroslav; Masarik, Michal; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Metallothionein is significantly elevated in various tumors, notably in prostate cancer on both mRNA and protein level. We demonstrated a strong predictive potential of free circulating metallothionein 2A isoform mRNA for patients with this cancer. Circulating mRNA detection relies on expensive equipment and requires high level of expertise. In this work we developed compact "all-in-one" laboratory system which replace microvolume spectrophotometer, thermocycler and realtime PCR machines. We managed to design and construct a microprocessor controlled heating/cooling chamber that ensures required temperature gradient. The chamber includes implemented optical system to enable fluorescence excitation and fluorescence analysis using a smart-phone.

  12. Development of a dot blot assay using gene probes for the detection of enteroviruses in water

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Enteric viruses are viruses which replicate in the intestinal tract of man and animals. One mode of transmission for enteric viruses is the fecal-oral route. Drinking water which has been contaminated with sewage or sewage effluent has been implicated as a means for the spread of enteric viruses. Current methods for the detection of enteric viruses in water requires the use of animal cell culture. This technique has several drawbacks. More rapid techniques, such as fluorescent antibody or radioimmunoassay do not have the needed sensitivity to detect the low levels of virus found in contaminated water. An alternative technique for the detection of viruses in water was sought. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology now makes it possible to detect viruses without the use of cell culture or antibodies. Gene probes that hybridize to the RNA of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus were tested for their ability to detect different enteric viruses. The probes were labeled with /sup 32/P dCTP and /sup 32/P dATP to a specific activity greater then 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cpm/ug DNA. One infectious unit of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus was detected using labeled cDNA probes. Upon comparison, the dot blot assay was as sensitive as tissue culture for the detection of poliovirus in beef extract, secondary effluent, and tap water. Environmental samples, such as secondary effluent, reclaimed wastewater and unchlorinated drinking water were also assayed for poliovirus and hepatitis A virus with the use of gene probes. The results presented here offer an alternative method for screening water samples for the presence of enteric viruses.

  13. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Kreamer, G.L.; Squibb, K.; Gioeli, D.; Garte, S.J.; Wirgin, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, they found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of {beta}-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers.

  14. mRNA redistribution during permanent focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Monique K; Jamison, Jill T; Dunbar, Joseph C; DeGracia, Donald J

    2013-12-01

    Translation arrest occurs in neurons following focal cerebral ischemia and is irreversible in penumbral neurons destined to die. Following global cerebral ischemia, mRNA is sequestered away from 40S ribosomal subunits as mRNA granules, precluding translation. Here, we investigated mRNA granule formation using fluorescence in situ histochemistry out to 8 h permanent focal cerebral ischemia using middle cerebral artery occlusion in Long Evans rats with and without diabetes. Neuronal mRNA granules colocalized with PABP, HuR, and NeuN, but not 40S or 60S ribosomal subunits, or organelle markers. The volume of brain with mRNA granule-containing neurons decreased exponentially with ischemia duration, and was zero after 8 h permanent focal cerebral ischemia or any duration of ischemia in diabetic rats. These results show that neuronal mRNA granule response has a limited range of insult intensity over which it is expressed. Identifying the limits of effective neuronal stress response to ischemia will be important for developing effective stroke therapies. PMID:24323415

  15. Simple and Sensitive Detection of HBsAg by Using a Quantum Dots Nanobeads Based Dot-Blot Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Huiqi; Chen, Jia; Han, Huanxing; Ma, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive detection of infectious disease at an affordable cost is urgently needed in developing nations. In this regard, the dot blot immunoassay has been used as a common protein detection method for detection of disease markers. However, the traditional signal reporting systems, such as those using enzymes or gold nanoparticles lack sensitivity and thus restrict the application of these methods for disease detection. In this study, we report a simple and sensitive detection method for the detection of infectious disease markers that couples the dot-blot immunoassay with quantum dots nanobeads (QDNBs) as a reporter. First, the QDNBs were prepared by an oil-in-water emulsion-evaporation technique. Because of the encapsulation of several QDs in one particle, the fluorescent signal of reporter can be amplified with QDNBs in a one-step test and be read using a UV lamp obviating the need for complicated instruments. Detection of disease-associated markers in complex mixture is possible, which demonstrates the potential of developing QDNBs into a sensitive diagnostic kit. PMID:24505238

  16. Simple and sensitive detection of HBsAg by using a quantum dots nanobeads based dot-blot immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Huiqi; Chen, Jia; Han, Huanxing; Ma, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive detection of infectious disease at an affordable cost is urgently needed in developing nations. In this regard, the dot blot immunoassay has been used as a common protein detection method for detection of disease markers. However, the traditional signal reporting systems, such as those using enzymes or gold nanoparticles lack sensitivity and thus restrict the application of these methods for disease detection. In this study, we report a simple and sensitive detection method for the detection of infectious disease markers that couples the dot-blot immunoassay with quantum dots nanobeads (QDNBs) as a reporter. First, the QDNBs were prepared by an oil-in-water emulsion-evaporation technique. Because of the encapsulation of several QDs in one particle, the fluorescent signal of reporter can be amplified with QDNBs in a one-step test and be read using a UV lamp obviating the need for complicated instruments. Detection of disease-associated markers in complex mixture is possible, which demonstrates the potential of developing QDNBs into a sensitive diagnostic kit. PMID:24505238

  17. A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating the Sensitivity and Specificity of Western Blot Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Lovett, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Western blot analysis, commonly known as "Western blotting," is a standard tool in every laboratory where proteins are analyzed. It involves the separation of polypeptides in polyacrylamide gels followed by the electrophoretic transfer of the separated polypeptides onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. A replica of the…

  18. Preparation of Cell Lysate from Mouse Oocytes for Western Blotting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Western Blotting has been used extensively for the identification of the protein factors that regulate mammalian oocyte meiosis. However, the limitations in collecting sufficient numbers of oocytes can hinder the efficiency of the technique. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the accurate preparation of mouse oocyte samples for Western Blotting analysis. PMID:27557583

  19. The necessity of and strategies for improving confidence in the accuracy of western blots

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Gilda, Jennifer E.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Western blotting is one of the most commonly used laboratory techniques for identifying proteins and semi-quantifying protein amounts, however, several recent findings suggest that western blots may not be as reliable as previously assumed. This is not surprising since many labs are unaware of the limitations of western blotting. In this manuscript we review essential strategies for improving confidence in the accuracy of western blots. These strategies include selecting the best normalization standard, proper sample preparation, determining the linear range for antibodies and protein stains relevant to the sample of interest, confirming the quality of the primary antibody, preventing signal saturation and accurately quantifying the signal intensity of the target protein. Although western blotting is a powerful and indispensable scientific technique that can be used to accurately quantify relative protein levels, it is necessary that proper experimental techniques and strategies are employed. PMID:25059473

  20. The necessity of and strategies for improving confidence in the accuracy of western blots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2014-10-01

    Western blotting is one of the most commonly used laboratory techniques for identifying proteins and semi-quantifying protein amounts; however, several recent findings suggest that western blots may not be as reliable as previously assumed. This is not surprising since many labs are unaware of the limitations of western blotting. In this manuscript, we review essential strategies for improving confidence in the accuracy of western blots. These strategies include selecting the best normalization standard, proper sample preparation, determining the linear range for antibodies and protein stains relevant to the sample of interest, confirming the quality of the primary antibody, preventing signal saturation and accurately quantifying the signal intensity of the target protein. Although western blotting is a powerful and indispensable scientific technique that can be used to accurately quantify relative protein levels, it is necessary that proper experimental techniques and strategies are employed. PMID:25059473

  1. Molecular combing compared to Southern blot for measuring D4Z4 contractions in FSHD.

    PubMed

    Vasale, Jessica; Boyar, Fatih; Jocson, Michael; Sulcova, Vladimira; Chan, Patricia; Liaquat, Khalida; Hoffman, Carol; Meservey, Marc; Chang, Isabell; Tsao, David; Hensley, Kerri; Liu, Yan; Owen, Renius; Braastad, Corey; Sun, Weimin; Walrafen, Pierre; Komatsu, Jun; Wang, Jia-Chi; Bensimon, Aaron; Anguiano, Arturo; Jaremko, Malgorzata; Wang, Zhenyuan; Batish, Sat; Strom, Charles; Higgins, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    We compare molecular combing to Southern blot in the analysis of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 locus (FSHD1) on chromosome 4q35-qter (chr 4q) in genomic DNA specimens sent to a clinical laboratory for FSHD testing. A de-identified set of 87 genomic DNA specimens determined by Southern blot as normal (n = 71), abnormal with D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array contractions (n = 7), indeterminate (n = 6), borderline (n = 2), or mosaic (n = 1) was independently re-analyzed by molecular combing in a blinded fashion. The molecular combing results were identical to the Southern blot results in 75 (86%) of cases. All contractions (n = 7) and mosaics (n = 1) detected by Southern blot were confirmed by molecular combing. Of the 71 samples with normal Southern blot results, 67 (94%) had concordant molecular combing results. The four discrepancies were either mosaic (n = 2), rearranged (n = 1), or borderline by molecular combing (n = 1). All indeterminate Southern blot results (n = 6) were resolved by molecular combing as either normal (n = 4), borderline (n = 1), or rearranged (n = 1). The two borderline Southern blot results showed a D4Z4 contraction on the chr 4qA allele and a normal result by molecular combing. Molecular combing overcomes a number of technical limitations of Southern blot by providing direct visualization of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat arrays on specific chr 4q and chr 10q alleles and more precise D4Z4 repeat sizing. This study suggests that molecular combing has superior analytical validity compared to Southern blot for determining D4Z4 contraction size, detecting mosaicism, and resolving borderline and indeterminate Southern blot results. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical validity and diagnostic accuracy of these findings in FSHD. PMID:26420234

  2. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  3. Regulation of neuronal oxytocin mRNA by ovarian steroids in the mature and developing hypothalamus.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, F D; Ozimek, G; Milner, R J; Bloom, F E

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the changes in neuronal expression of oxytocin mRNA in the perinatal and mature female rat as a function of endogenous gonadal steroids. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a significant developmental increase in the abundance of oxytocin mRNA in the female brain concomitant with puberty. Ovariectomy of adult females decreased total brain oxytocin mRNA to significantly lower levels. In contrast, lactating mothers had increased levels of neuronal oxytocin mRNA. In situ hybridization analysis of neuronal oxytocin mRNA in adolescent, mature virgin, and ovariectomized virgin female brains demonstrated that the location and number of neurons expressing oxytocin mRNA was unchanged and that total brain oxytocin mRNA differences were attributable to amounts expressed per neuron. Differences in mRNA abundance were noted in oxytocin neurons throughout the hypothalamus, including those known to project as magnocellular neurons to the neurohypophysis and those of parvocellular origin thought to make wholly intracerebral connections. This developmental and dynamic regulation of oxytocin mRNA levels during gonadal maturation may coordinate the peripheral and central effects of this peptide on the reproductive biology of the female rat. Images PMID:2928343

  4. OVINE PROGRESSIVE PNEUMONIA VIRUS CAPSID IS B-CELL IMMUNODOMINANT USING WESTERN BLOT ANALYSIS: A COMPARISON OF SENSITIVITY BETWEEN WESTERN BLOT ANALYSIS AND IMMUNOPRECIPITATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A western blot assay (WB) was developed and analyzed against the comparable standard, immunoprecipitation of 35[S] methionine/cysteine-labeled ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) proteins (IP), for its ability to detect anti-OPPV antibodies using endpoint titers. WB is 12-fold more sensitive i...

  5. Calmodulin antagonists increase the amount of mRNA for the low-density-lipoprotein receptor in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, H; Filipovic, I; Hasilik, A; Buddecke, E

    1988-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin antagonists on the amount of LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA in cultured human fibroblasts was examined by hybridization with a fragment of LDL-R cDNA. In a 'Northern' blot the fragment hybridized to a 5.3-kilobase RNA, as expected for LDL-R mRNA. The concentration of this RNA was increased in preparations from cells that were treated with trifluoperazine or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulphonamide]. The selectivity of the increase was established by using a probe for beta-actin mRNA. In dot-blot hybridization it was observed that the calmodulin antagonists cause 2-4-fold relative increase in the amount of LDL-R mRNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3421929

  6. Multiplexed microfluidic blotting of proteins and nucleic acids by parallel, serpentine microchannels.

    PubMed

    He, Sha; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pei; Xu, Xingzhi; Zhu, Kui; Pan, Wenying; Liu, Wenwen; Cai, Kaiyong; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    This work develops a high-throughput, high-efficiency and straightforward microfluidic blotting method for analyzing proteins and nucleic acids. Sample solutions containing antibodies (for protein detection) or hybridization probes (for nucleic acid detection) are introduced into the parallel, serpentine microchannels to specifically recognize the immobilized targets on the substrate, achieving the identification of multiple targets in multiple samples simultaneously. The loading control, molecular weight markers, and antigen/antibody titration are designed and integrated into the microfluidic chip, thus allowing for the quantification of proteins and nucleic acids. Importantly, we could easily distinguish the adjacent blotting bands inside parallel microchannels, which may be difficult to achieve in conventional blotting. The small dimensions of microfluidic channels also help to reduce the amount of probing molecules and to accelerate the biochemical reaction. Our microfluidic blotting could bypass the steps of blocking and washing, further reducing the operation time and complexity. PMID:25342223

  7. SOLID-PHASE ASSAY FOR THE PHOSPHORYLATION OF PROTEINS BLOTTED ON NITROCELLULOSE MEMBRANE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new procedure for the phosphorylation and assay of phosphoproteins is described. Proteins are solubilized from tissue samples, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred onto nitrocellulose membrane filters and the blotted polypeptides are phosphorylated with ...

  8. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in human genomic DNA by using denaturing gradient gel blots

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis can detect sequence differences outside restriction-enzyme recognition sites. DNA sequence polymorphisms can be detected as restriction-fragment melting polymorphisms (RFMPs) in genomic DNA by using blots made from denaturing gradient gels. In contrast to the use of Southern blots to find sequence differences, denaturing gradient gel blots can detect differences almost anywhere, not just at 4-6-bp restriction-enzyme recognition sites. Human genomic DNA was digested with one of several randomly selected 4-bp recognition-site restriction enzymes, electrophoresed in denaturing gradient gels, and transferred to nylon membranes. The blots were hydridized with radioactive probes prepared from the factor VIII, type II collagen, insulin receptor, [beta][sub 2]-adrenergic receptor, and 21-hydroxylase genes; in unrelated individuals, several RFM's were found in fragments from every locus tested. No restriction map or sequence information was used to detect RFMP's.

  9. Identification of immunodiagnostic antigens for cerebrospinal filariasis in horses by western blot analysis

    PubMed Central

    TAKESUE, Masataka; OSAKA, Yuki; MURANAKA, Masanori; KATAYAMA, Yoshinari; IKADAI, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the present study, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of horses diagnosed with Setaria digitata cerebrospinal filariasis were analyzed by western blot. The results revealed S. digitata protein bands measuring 65, 34, 22, and 18 kDa in molecular weight. In particular, the 18 kDa band is a possible candidate for clinical immunodiagnosis on the basis of western blot findings. PMID:27073332

  10. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27065589

  11. State-of-the-art housekeeping proteins for quantitative western blotting: Revisiting the first draft of the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Jo, Jihoon; Hong, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Kee K; Park, Joong-Ki; Cho, Sung-Jin; Park, Chungoo

    2016-07-01

    Western blotting (WB) analysis is the most popular and widely used methodology for protein detection and characterization over recent decades. In accordance with the advancement of the technologies for the acquisition of WB signals, a quantitative value is used to present the abundance of target proteins in a complex sample, thereby requiring the use of specific proteins as internal references that represent total proteins. Heretofore, proteins encoded by housekeeping genes such as GAPDH, β-tubulin and β-actin have been commonly used as loading controls without any hesitation because their mRNA expression levels tend to be high and constant in many different cells and tissues. Experimentally, however, some of the housekeeping reference proteins are often displayed with inconsistent expression levels in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissues, and, in terms of mRNA levels, they have a weak correlation to the abundance of proteins. To estimate accurate, reliable, and reproducible protein quantifications, it is crucial to define appropriate reference controls. For this paper, we explored the recently released large-scale, human proteomic database ProteomicsDB including 16 857 liquid chromatography tandem-mass-spectrometry data from 27 human tissues, and suggest 20 ubiquitously- and constitutively-expressed, putative internal-reference controls for the quantification of differential protein expressions. Intriguingly, the most commonly used, known housekeeping genes were entirely excluded in our newly defined candidates. Although the applications of the candidates under many different biological conditions and in other organisms are yet to be empirically verified, we propose reliable, potential loading controls for a WB analysis in this paper. PMID:27125885

  12. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25536665

  13. Biological activity of mRNA immobilized on nitrocellulose in NaI.

    PubMed Central

    Bresser, J; Hubbell, H R; Gillespie, D

    1983-01-01

    In 12.2 molal NaI and at 25 degrees C or below, mRNA bound to nitrocellulose while DNA and rRNA did not. Neither the poly(A) tract nor the cap were required for binding. The immobilized RNA could be translated, reverse transcribed, hybridized with radioactive probes, or released for further manipulation. mRNA was efficiently transferred from polyacrylamide to nitrocellulose in NaI. Baking was not required to fix NaI-immobilized mRNA to nitrocellulose. When cells dissolved in 12.2 molal NaI were filtered through nitrocellulose, mRNA became selectively bound (quickblot). The quick-blot system utilizing protease and detergents to prepare cells for NaI solubilization was especially suitable in quantitative, rapid screening of cells for expression of specific genes. Expression of highly repeated DNA sequences was detected in human leukemia cells. Images PMID:6579539

  14. Expression of tilapia prepro-melanin-concentrating hormone mRNA in hypothalamic and neurohypophysial cells.

    PubMed

    Gröneveld, D; Eckhardt, E R; Coenen, A J; Martens, G J; Balm, P H; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    1995-04-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide involved in background adaptation in teleost fish, and in multiple regulatory functions in mammals and fish. To study the expression of the MCH preprohormone (ppMCH) in teleosts, we first cloned a hypothalamic cDNA encoding the complete ppMCH of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), and a cRNA probe derived from a 270 bp ppMCH cDNA fragment was used for the expression studies. The level of ppMCH mRNA expression in tilapia hypothalamus, measured by dot blot analysis, was significantly higher in fish adapted to a white background than in black-adapted animals, which is in accordance with the reported MCH plasma and tissue concentrations in fish. Northern blot analysis not only revealed a strong ppMCH mRNA signal in the hypothalamus, but also the presence of ppMCH mRNA in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) of the pituitary. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed that ppMCH mRNA as well as MCH immunoreactivity are located in perikarya of two hypothalamic regions, namely in the nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT) and the nucleus recessus lateralis (NRL). Quantitative analysis by dot blot hybridization revealed about eight times more ppMCH mRNA in the NLT than in the NRL and NIL of mature tilapias. ppMCH mRNA in the NIL could be localized to cell bodies of the neurohypophysis, which were also MCH immunoreactive. PMID:7619209

  15. Genetic organization and mRNA expression of enolase genes of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Postlethwait, P; Sundstrom, P

    1995-04-01

    In previous work, we cloned a Candida albicans cDNA for the glycolytic enzyme enolase and found a single, abundant enolase transcript on Northern (RNA) blots and a single protein on immunoblots, using antiserum raised against a recombinant enolase fusion protein. Because C. albicans enolase is abundantly produced during infection and elicits strong host immune responses, the mechanisms regulating enolase production are important for understanding the growth of C. albicans in vivo. To obtain more information on enolase gene expression by C. albicans, we used the enolase cDNA clone to investigate the genetic organization of enolase genes and the steady-state levels of enolase mRNA under several growth conditions. Gene disruption techniques in combination with Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA showed the presence of two enolase gene loci that could be distinguished by the locations of ClaI and Mn/I sites in their 3' flanking regions. Enolase steady-state mRNA levels were greatest during the middle phase of the logarithmic growth curve and were low during stationary phase. Minimal differences in enolase mRNA levels between yeast cells and hyphae were found. Propagation of C. albicans in glucose did not cause increased enolase mRNA levels compared with growth in a nonfermentable carbon source (pyruvate). It was concluded that two gene loci exist for C. albicans enolase and that enolase mRNA is constitutively produced at high levels during active metabolism. PMID:7896700

  16. mRNA transcription in nuclei isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, J F; Jaehning, J A

    1986-01-01

    We developed an improved method for the isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which allows analysis of specific transcripts. When incubated with alpha-32P-labeled ribonucleoside triphosphates in vitro, nuclei isolated from haploid or diploid cells transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and mRNAs in a strand-specific manner, as shown by slot blot hybridization of the in vitro synthesized RNA to cloned genes encoding 5.8S, 18S and 28S rRNAs, tRNATyr, and GAL7, URA3, TY1 and HIS3 mRNAs. A yeast strain containing a high-copy-number plasmid which overproduced GAL7 mRNA was initially used to facilitate detection of a discrete message. We optimized conditions for the transcription of genes expressed by each of the three yeast nuclear RNA polymerases. Under optimal conditions, labeled transcripts could be detected from single-copy genes normally expressed at low levels in the cells (HIS3 and URA3). We determined that the alpha-amanitin sensitivity of transcript synthesis in the isolated nuclei paralleled the sensitivity of the corresponding purified RNA polymerases; in particular, mRNA synthesis was 50% sensitive to 1 microgram of alpha-amanitin per ml, establishing transcription of mRNA by RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3537708

  17. Telomere length measurement by a novel Luminex-based assay: a blinded comparison to Southern blot.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Zhang, Chenan; Aviv, Abraham; Hunt, Steven C; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is a potential biomarker of aging and age-related disease risk. We recently published a novel Luminex-based method for high-throughput, low-cost TL measurement. Here we describe a blinded comparison of the Luminex method to Southern blot, the most precise TL measurement method. Luminex and Southern blot measurements for the same 50 DNA samples were taken in two independent laboratories; each sample was measured twice, several months apart. The inter-assay CV for Luminex ranged from 5.5 to 9.1 (depending on CV estimation method), and Southern blot CV from 1.0 to 1.7. Both measures were inversely associated with age. The correlation between the repeated measurements was 0.66 for Luminex and 0.97 for Southern blot. The correlation between Southern blot and Luminex was 0.65 in round 1 and 0.75 in round 2, and the relationship showed no evidence of non-linearity. Our results demonstrate that the Luminex assay is a valid and reproducible method for high-throughput TL measurement. The Luminex assay involves no DNA amplification, which may make Luminex an attractive alternative to PCR-based TL measurement. PMID:27186324

  18. Telomere length measurement by a novel Luminex-based assay: a blinded comparison to Southern blot

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Zhang, Chenan; Aviv, Abraham; Hunt, Steven C; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is a potential biomarker of aging and age-related disease risk. We recently published a novel Luminex-based method for high-throughput, low-cost TL measurement. Here we describe a blinded comparison of the Luminex method to Southern blot, the most precise TL measurement method. Luminex and Southern blot measurements for the same 50 DNA samples were taken in two independent laboratories; each sample was measured twice, several months apart. The inter-assay CV for Luminex ranged from 5.5 to 9.1 (depending on CV estimation method), and Southern blot CV from 1.0 to 1.7. Both measures were inversely associated with age. The correlation between the repeated measurements was 0.66 for Luminex and 0.97 for Southern blot. The correlation between Southern blot and Luminex was 0.65 in round 1 and 0.75 in round 2, and the relationship showed no evidence of non-linearity. Our results demonstrate that the Luminex assay is a valid and reproducible method for high-throughput TL measurement. The Luminex assay involves no DNA amplification, which may make Luminex an attractive alternative to PCR-based TL measurement. PMID:27186324

  19. Blot-MS of Carbonylated Proteins: A Tool to Identify Oxidized Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rita; Domingues, Pedro; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of proteostasis regulation declines during aging and the failure of protein homeostasis is common in age-related diseases. Protein oxidation is a major contributor to the loss of proteome homeostasis, also called "proteostasis," precluding protein misfolding and aggregation. So, the identification of the molecular pathways impaired by protein oxidation will increase the understanding of proteostasis and the pathophysiological conditions related to the loss of proteostasis. Sample derivatization with dinitrophenyl hydrazine and western blot immunoassay detection of carbonylated proteins (commonly known as Oxyblot™) coupled to mass spectrometry (blot-MS) is an attractive methodological approach to identify proteins that are more prone to carbonylation, a typical oxidative modification of amino acid residues. The integration of blot-MS data of carbonylated proteins with bioinformatics tools allows the identification of the biological processes more affected by protein oxidation and that, eventually, result in the loss of proteostasis.In this chapter, we describe a blot-MS methodology to identify the proteins more prone to oxidation in biological samples, as cell and tissue extracts, and biofluids. Analysis of mitochondria isolated from cardiac tissue is provided as an example. Bioinformatic strategy to deal with data retrieved from blot-MS experiments are proposed for the identification of relevant biological processes modulated by oxidative stress stimuli. PMID:27613049

  20. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot reactivity in a cohort of patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Soldan, S S; Graf, M D; Waziri, A; Flerlage, A N; Robinson, S M; Kawanishi, T; Leist, T P; Lehky, T J; Levin, M C; Jacobson, S

    1999-09-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with a chronic, progressive neurological disease known as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Screening for HTLV-I involves the detection of virus-specific serum antibodies by EIA and confirmation by Western blot. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot patterns have been described worldwide. However, the significance of this blot pattern is unclear. We identified 8 patients with neurological disease and an HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot pattern, none of whom demonstrated increased spontaneous proliferation and HTLV-I-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. However, HTLV-I tax sequence was amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 4 of them. These data suggest that patients with chronic progressive neurological disease and HTLV-I/II Western blot seroindeterminate reactivity may harbor either defective HTLV-I, novel retrovirus with partial homology to HTLV-I, or HTLV-I in low copy number. PMID:10438355

  1. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Koob, A.O.; Bruns, L.; Prassler, C.; Masliah, E.; Klopstock, T.; Bender, A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. PMID:22402104

  2. Developmentally Regulated Expression of HDNF/NT-3 mRNA in Rat Spinal Cord Motoneurons and Expression of BDNF mRNA in Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Ernfors, Patrik; Persson, Håkan

    1991-01-01

    Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate high levels of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA in the embryonic day (E) 13 - 14 and 15 - 16 spinal cord. The level decreased at E18 - 19 and remained the same until postnatal day (P) 1, after which it decreased further to a level below the detection limit in the adult. In situ hybridization revealed that the NT-3 mRNA detected in the developing spinal cord was derived from motoneurons and the decrease seen at E18 - 19 was caused by a reduction in the number of motoneurons expressing NT-3 mRNA. The distribution of NT-3 mRNA-expressing cells in the E15 spinal cord was very similar to the distribution of cells expressing choline acetyltransferase or nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) mRNA. Moreover, a striking similarity between the developmentally regulated expression of NT-3 and NGFR mRNA was noted in spinal cord motoneurons. A subpopulation of all neurons in the dorsal root ganglia expressed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA from E13, the earliest time examined, to adulthood. These results are consistent with a trophic role of NT-3 for proprioceptive sensory neurons innervating the ventral horn, and imply a local action of BDNF for developing sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia. PMID:12106253

  3. Optimized semi-quantitative blot analysis in infection assays using the Stain-Free technology.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Anna F; Gerrer, Katrin H; Haas, Rainer; Jiménez-Soto, Luisa F

    2016-07-01

    Western blots are a commonly used method for protein detection and quantification in biological samples. Compensation of loading variations is achieved by housekeeping protein (HKP) normalization and/or total protein normalization (TPN). However, under infection conditions, HKP normalization, traditionally used in cell biology for quantification of western blots, can be problematic. Binding of microbes to target cells via specific receptors can induce signal transduction events resulting in drastic changes in the level of expression of HKPs. Additionally, samples collected after infection assays will include cellular and microbial proteins altering the analysis with TPN. Here we demonstrate under experimental infection conditions, how a reliable semi-quantitative analysis of proteins in western blots can be achieved using the Stain-Free technology. PMID:27150675

  4. Western blotting using in-gel protein labeling as a normalization control: stain-free technology.

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used laboratory technique for semi-quantifying protein amounts. It is important when quantifying protein expression to account for differences in the amount of total protein loaded onto the gel using a loading control. Common loading controls include housekeeping proteins, such as β-actin or GAPDH, quantified by Western blot, or total protein, quantified using a stain such as Coomassie Brilliant Blue or Ponceau S. A more recently developed method for total protein quantification utilizes stain-free technology, which has a linear dynamic detection range and allows for protein detection on both gels and membranes. Here, we describe the theory and use of stain-free gels for total protein quantification and normalization of Western blots. PMID:25820735

  5. Quantitative Single-Cell mRNA Analysis in Hydrogel Beads.

    PubMed

    Rakszewska, Agata; Stolper, Rosa J; Kolasa, Anna B; Piruska, Aigars; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, technologies capable of analyzing single cells have emerged that are transforming many fields of biological research. Herein we report how DNA-functionalized hydrogel beads can serve as a matrix to capture mRNA from lysed single cells. mRNA quantification free of pre-amplification bias is ensured by using padlock probes and rolling circle amplification followed by hybridization with fluorescent probes. The number of transcripts in individual cells is assessed by simply counting fluorescent dots inside gel beads. The method extends the potential of existing techniques and provides a general platform for capturing molecules of interest from single cells. PMID:27075637

  6. Total protein or high-abundance protein: Which offers the best loading control for Western blotting?

    PubMed

    Thacker, Jonathan S; Yeung, Derrick H; Staines, W Richard; Mielke, John G

    2016-03-01

    Western blotting routinely involves a control for variability in the amount of protein across immunoblot lanes. Normalizing a target signal to one found for an abundantly expressed protein is widely regarded as a reliable loading control; however, this approach is being increasingly questioned. As a result, we compared blotting for two high-abundance proteins (actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH]) and two total protein membrane staining methods (Ponceau and Coomassie Brilliant Blue) to determine the best control for loading variability. We found that Ponceau staining optimally balanced accuracy and precision, and we suggest that this approach be considered as an alternative to normalizing with a high-abundance protein. PMID:26706797

  7. Visualization of dynamics of single endogenous mRNA labeled in live mouse.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yoon; Lim, Hyungsik; Yoon, Young J; Follenzi, Antonia; Nwokafor, Chiso; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Meng, Xiuhua; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-24

    The transcription and transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) are critical steps in regulating the spatial and temporal components of gene expression, but it has not been possible to observe the dynamics of endogenous mRNA in primary mammalian tissues. We have developed a transgenic mouse in which all β-actin mRNA is fluorescently labeled. We found that β-actin mRNA in primary fibroblasts localizes predominantly by diffusion and trapping as single mRNAs. In cultured neurons and acute brain slices, we found that multiple β-actin mRNAs can assemble together, travel by active transport, and disassemble upon depolarization by potassium chloride. Imaging of brain slices revealed immediate early induction of β-actin transcription after depolarization. Studying endogenous mRNA in live mouse tissues provides insight into its dynamic regulation within the context of the cellular and tissue microenvironment. PMID:24458643

  8. Lectin staining and Western blot data showing differential sialylation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Haitham A.; AlSadek, Dina M.M.; Mathew, Mohit P.; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B.; Yarema, Kevin J.; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-01-01

    This report provides data that are specifically related to the differential sialylation of nutrient deprived breast cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation in support of the research article entitled, “Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation" [1]. Particularly, breast cancer cells, when supplemented with sialic acid under nutrient deprivation, display sialylated glycans at the cell surface, but non-malignant mammary cells show sialylated glycans intracellularly. The impact of sialic acid supplementation under nutrient deprivation was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of two markers, EGFR1 and MUC1. This Data in Brief article complements the main manuscript by providing detailed instructions and representative results for cell-level imaging and Western blot analyses of changes in sialylation during nutrient deprivation and sialic acid supplementation. These methods can be readily generalized for the study of many types of glycosylation and various glycoprotein markers through the appropriate selection of fluorescently-labeled lectins. PMID:26629491

  9. A Streamlined Western Blot Exercise: An Efficient and Greener Approach in the Laboratory Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Traci L.; Robinson, Rebekah L.; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H.

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes…

  10. Ferulic acid enhances IgE binding to peanut allergens in western blots.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds at high concentrations are known to form insoluble complexes with proteins. We hypothesized that this complex formation could interfere with Western blot and ELISA assays for peanut allergens. To verify this, three simple phenolic compounds (ferulic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids...

  11. Ferulic acid enhances IgE binding to peanut allergens in western blots.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because phenolic compounds can precipitate or complex with proteins, we postulated that interactions of phenolics with IgE antibodies help enhance IgE binding to peanut allergens in Western blots. Three different phenolics, such as, ferulic, caffeic and chlorogenic acids were examined. Each was mixe...

  12. Better management of Western blotting results using professional photo management software.

    PubMed

    Iorio-Morin, Christian; Germain, Pascale; Parent, Jean-Luc

    2013-04-01

    Western blotting is a proven technique essential to a significant proportion of molecular biology projects. However, as results accumulate over the years, managing data can become daunting. Recognizing that the needs of a scientist working with Western blotting results are conceptually the same as those of a professional photographer managing a summer's worth of wedding photos, we report here a new workflow for managing Western blotting results using professional photo management software. The workflow involves (i) scanning all film-based results; (ii) importing the scans into the software; (iii) processing the scans; (iv) tagging the files with metadata, and (v) creating appropriate "smart-albums." Advantages of this system include space savings (both on our hard drives and on our desks), safer archival, quicker access, and easier sharing of the results. In addition, metadata-based workflows improve cross-experiment discovery and enable questions like "show me all blots labelled with antibody X" or "show me all experiments featuring protein Y". As project size and breadth increase, workflows delegating results management to the computer will become more and more important so that scientists can keep focussing on science. PMID:23404762

  13. Line scanning system for direct digital chemiluminescence imaging of DNA sequencing blots

    SciTech Connect

    Karger, A.E.; Weiss, R.; Gesteland, R.F. Eccles Inst. of Human Genetics, Salt Lake City, UT )

    1993-07-01

    A cryogenically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with an area CCD array is used in a line scanning system for low-light-level imaging of chemiluminescent DNA sequencing blots. Operating the CCD camera in time-delayed integration (TDI) mode results in continuous data acquisition independent of the length of the CCD array. Scanning is possible with a resolution of 1.4 line pairs/mm at the 50% level of the modulation transfer function. High-sensitivity, low-light-level scanning of chemiluminescent direct-transfer electrophoresis (DTE) DNA sequencing blots is shown. The detection of DNA fragments on the blot involves DNA-DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and 1,2-dioxetane-based chemiluminescence. The width of the scan allows the recording of up to four sequencing reactions (16 lanes) on one scan. The scan speed of 52 cm/h used for the sequencing blots corresponds to a data acquisition rate of 384 pixels/s. The chemiluminescence detection limit on the scanned images is 3.9 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] mol of plasmid DNA. A conditional median filter is described to remove spikes caused by cosmic ray events from the CCD images. 39 refs., 9 refs.

  14. A Study of Rubisco through Western Blotting and Tissue Printing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Zhong; Cooper, Cynthia; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Janick-Buckner, Diane

    2009-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for a cell biology course for second-year undergraduate biology majors. It was designed to introduce undergraduates to the basic molecular biology techniques of Western blotting and immunodetection coupled with the technique of tissue printing in detecting the presence, relative abundance, and…

  15. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  16. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Heda, Ghanshyam D; Omotola, Oluwabukola B; Heda, Rajiv P; Avery, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin's transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting. PMID:27582639

  17. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Omotola, Oluwabukola B.; Heda, Rajiv P.; Avery, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin’s transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting. PMID:27582639

  18. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  19. Creatine kinase and alpha-actin mRNA levels decrease in diabetic rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.; Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac atrophy and isoenzyme redistribution. To determine if tissue specific changes occur in mRNAs coding for ..cap alpha..-actin and creatine kinase (CK), they performed RNA blot analysis. Total ventricular RNA from control (C) and 4 wk old diabetic (D) rats were hybridized with /sup 32/P cDNA probes for ..cap alpha..-actin and CK. A tissue independent cDNA probe, CHOA was also used. Signal intensity was quantified by photodensitometry. D CK mRNA was 47 +/- 16% lower in D vs C. Insulin increases CK mRNA by 20% at 1.5 hs, and completely reverses the deficit after 4 wks. D ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA is 66 +/- 18% lower in D vs C. Insulin normalized ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA by 5 hs. CHOA mRNA is unchanged in D vs C, but D + insulin CHOA mRNA is 30 +/- 2% lower than C. In rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy, muscle specific CK and ..cap alpha..-actin mRNAs are decreased. Insulin treatment reverses these changes.

  20. Detection of Diverse and High Molecular Weight Nesprin-1 and Nesprin-2 Isoforms Using Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Carthew, James; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos

    2016-01-01

    Heavily utilized in cell and molecular biology, western blotting is considered a crucial technique for the detection and quantification of proteins within complex mixtures. In particular, the detection of members of the nesprin (nuclear envelope spectrin repeat protein) family has proven difficult to analyze due to their substantial isoform diversity, molecular weight variation, and the sheer size of both nesprin-1 and nesprin-2 giant protein variants (>800 kDa). Nesprin isoforms contain distinct domain signatures, perform differential cytoskeletal associations, occupy different subcellular compartments, and vary in their tissue expression profiles. This structural and functional variance highlights the need to distinguish between the full range of proteins within the nesprin protein family, allowing for greater understanding of their specific roles in cell biology and disease. Herein, we describe a western blotting protocol modified for the detection of low to high molecular weight (50-1000 kDa) nesprin proteins. PMID:27147045

  1. Optimization of northern analysis by vacuum-blotting, RNA-transfer visualization, and ultraviolet fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Kroczek, R.A.; Siebert, E. )

    1990-01-01

    We have optimized Northern analysis at several steps. Overnight electrophoresis was replaced by short gel runs and overnight capillary transfer by rapid vacuum-blotting adapted to Northern analysis. Short uv irradiation was used as a substitute for the usual RNA fixation by baking. Direct staining of RNA before electrophoresis made it possible to check RNA integrity and to evaluate the quality of the size separation immediately after electrophoresis. In this system, RNA transfer onto the membrane support could also be quickly assessed after the blotting step. The net result of all modifications was a doubling of the autoradiography signal compared with that obtained by modern Northern protocols. At the same time, the duration of the procedure was shortened drastically, allowing an autoradiography signal to be obtained within 24 h.

  2. Solid-phase assay for the phosphorylation of proteins blotted on nitrocellulose membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Valtorta, F.; Schiebler, W.; Jahn, R.; Ceccarelli, B.; Greengard, P.

    1986-10-01

    A new procedure for the phosphorylation and assay of phosphoproteins is described. Proteins are solubilized from tissue samples, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred onto nitrocellulose membrane filters, and the blotted polypeptides are phyosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP (adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate)-dependent protein kinase. The method was developed for the assay of dephosphosynapsin I, but it has also proven suitable for the phosphorylation of other proteins. The patterns of phosphorylation of tissue samples phosphorylated using the new method are similar to those obtained using the conventional test tube assay. Once phosphorylated, the adsorbed proteins can be digested with proteases and subjected to phosphopeptide mapping. The phosphorylated blotted proteins can also be analyzed by overlay techniques for the immunological detection of polypeptides.

  3. Dot Blot Assay for Detection of Antidiacyltrehalose Antibodies in Tuberculous Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Rendon, Adrian; Diaz-Rodriguez, Manuel; Handzel, Vera; Laszlo, Adalbert

    1999-01-01

    A simple dot blot test with diacyltrehalose (DAT) as the antigen was developed to detect anti-DAT antibodies in tuberculous patients. To enhance antigen-antibody reaction detection, rabbit serum raised against human immunoglobulins was used prior to incubation with a protein A-colloidal gold complex. With the dot blot system, it was possible to obtain a sensitivity similar to that of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a specificity of 97.14%, versus a specificity of 94.29% by the ELISA. We conclude that this simple and fast assay could be used in places where ELISA equipment is not easy available and that it might also be applicable with other Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunogenic antigens. PMID:10473518

  4. PCR versus Southern blot detection of somatic mosaicism in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, O.T.; Amar, M.J.A.; Gallardo, L.A.; Kousseff, B.G.

    1994-09-01

    The incidence of somatic mosaicism in males with fragile X syndrome has been reported to be as high as 17% of all clinically affected males. Mosaic cases usually do not show the cytogenetic fragile site at Xq27.3 and generally are fully affected according to the clinical criteria, although some subjects show somewhat milder symptoms. Detection of mosaicism relies on the identification of multiple distinct sizes of the CGG size anomaly in the 5{prime} untranslated exon of the FMR-1 gene. Some alleles identified are of a premutation size with trinucleotides numbering 50 to 80 X CGG. In addition, there is a greatly expanded allele with well over 200 copies of the CGG repeat detected. We screened 314 subjects for fragile X syndrome over a three year period. Cases were routinely screened by Southern blotting using the StB12.3 probe as well as by polymerase chain reaction. The PCR amplification products were electrophoresed in agarose, blotted and hybridized with a (CGG){sub 5} oligonucleotide followed by chemiluminescent detection. Seventeen males and 16 females were identified with a CGG expansion, including two males with premutations with repeat sizes of between 50 and 100 CGG trinucleotides and three cases exhibiting somatic mosaicism. The mosaic cases had both a premutation-sized allele and one or more expanded alleles of over 250 CGG copies. The mosaic cases were usually undetected with Southern blotting but easily identified with this PCR protocol. The relative proportion of the expanded allele as determined by scanning densitometry were 70%, 35%, and 5% in the three cases. All three cases were cytogenetically negative. The clinical severity of the mosaic cases was variable, with symptoms ranging from severe MR with most of the physical stigmata to mild learning disability. In our experience, Southern blotting allows more accurate sizing of the expanded allele; however, PCR is essential to identify cases that exhibit mosaicism.

  5. A slot blot procedure for the measurement of yessotoxins by a functional assay.

    PubMed

    Pierotti, Silvia; Albano, Clara; Milandri, Anna; Callegari, Federica; Poletti, Roberto; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2007-01-01

    We originally developed a functional assay for the detection of yessotoxins (YTX) based on its capacity to induce dose-dependent changes in cellular levels of two marker proteins, consisting of E-cadherin and an E-cadherin fragment (ECRA100) in epithelial cells. The procedure is time-consuming and we have shortened it by a slot blot format, using antibodies recognizing two different epitopes of E-cadherin (HECD-1 and C20820), thereby discriminating those markers. The best performing membrane under our conditions, in terms of binding capacity and even absorption of proteins, was a positively charged nylon membrane. Treatment of the membrane with 0.5mug of Ab/ml was appropriate for maximal detection of antigens by our slot blot procedure with both HECD-1 and C20820 antibodies. The treatment of cells with YTX, resulting in a relative increase in the cellular levels of ECRA100, led to a dose-dependent increase of the signal detected by Ab HECD-1 without a concomitant increase in the signal detected by Ab C20820 in our slot blot format, and the concentrations of YTX were correlated to both the increase of the signal detected through Ab HECD-1 and to the decrease in the ratio of the signals obtained with the two Abs (C20820 over HECD-1). Upon analyses of extracts from cells treated with shellfish samples, we could detect and quantify YTX in naturally contaminated materials. The slot blot format of our functional assay allows a substantial shortening of its analytical step (about seven hr, as compared to the two working days of the original method), providing YTX measurements that are accurate but show large standard deviations. PMID:17055548

  6. A Fast and Inexpensive Western Blot Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Shawn O.; Farrell, Lynn E.

    1995-08-01

    Western blotting is an important, modern technique for transferring proteins from a gel onto nitrocellulose or other suitable support and then detecting a protein of interest using antibodies. We have developed an experiment and optimized the conditions for the undergraduate laboratory. The experiment can be done quickly using an electrophoretic blotter or more cheaply using passive transfer. This experiment allows the student to learn valuable procedures currently used in biochemistry and other biological sciences.

  7. Western Blotting using the Invitrogen NuPage Novex Bis Tris minigels.

    PubMed

    Penna, Aubin; Cahalan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Western Blotting (or immunoblotting) is a standard laboratory procedure allowing investigators to verify the expression of a protein, determine the relative amount of the protein present in different samples, and analyze the results of co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In this method, a target protein is detected with a specific primary antibody in a given sample of tissue homogenate or extract. Protein separation according to molecular weight is achieved using denaturing SDS-PAGE. After transfer to a membrane, the target protein is probed with a specific primary antibody and detected by chemiluminescence. Since its first description, the western-blotting technique has undergone several improvements, including pre-cast gels and user-friendly equipment. In our laboratory, we have chosen to use the commercially available NuPAGE electrophoresis system from Invitrogen. It is an innovative neutral pH, discontinuous SDS-PAGE, pre-cast mini-gel system. This system presents several advantages over the traditional Laemmli technique including: i) a longer shelf life of the pre-cast gels ranging from 8 months to 1 year; ii) a broad separation range of molecular weights from 1 to 400 kDa depending of the type of gel used; and iii) greater versatility (range of acrylamide percentage, the type of gel, and the ionic composition of the running buffer). The procedure described in this video article utilizes the Bis-Tris discontinuous buffer system with 4-12% Bis-Tris gradient gels and MES running buffer, as an illustration of how to perform a western-blot using the Invitrogen NuPAGE electrophoresis system. In our laboratory, we have obtained good and reproducible results for various biochemical applications using this western-blotting method. PMID:18989435

  8. mRNA Translocation Occurs During the Second Step of Ribosomal Intersubunit Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Noller, Harry F.

    2010-01-01

    During protein synthesis, mRNA and tRNA undergo coupled translocation through the ribosome in a process that is catalyzed by elongation factor EF-G. Based on cryo-EM reconstructions, counterclockwise and clockwise rotational movements between the large and small ribosomal subunits have been implicated in a proposed ratcheting mechanism to drive the unidirectional movement of translocation. We have used a combination of two fluorescence-based approaches to study the timing of these events: Intersubunit FRET measurements to observe relative rotational movement of the subunits and a fluorescence quenching assay to monitor translocation of mRNA. Binding of EF-G·GTP first induces rapid counterclockwise intersubunit rotation, followed by a slower, clockwise reversal of the rotational movement. Comparison of the rates of these movements reveals that mRNA translocation occurs during the second, clockwise rotation event, corresponding to the transition from the hybrid state to the classical state. PMID:21399643

  9. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  10. Differentiation of larva migrans caused by Baylisascaris procyonis and Toxocara species by Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2009-11-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis and Toxocara species are two important causes of larva migrans in humans. Larva migrans caused by Toxocara spp. is well known and is diagnosed serologically by enzyme immunoassay. Over a dozen cases of larva migrans and associated eosinophilic encephalitis caused by B. procyonis have also been reported, and at least a dozen additional cases are known. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the excretory-secretory (ES) antigen of B. procyonis larvae is currently being used in our laboratory as an aid in the diagnosis of this infection in humans. Clinically affected individuals show very high reactivity (measured as the optical density) on this ELISA; however, a one-way cross-reactivity with Toxocara spp. has been observed. As an approach to differentiate these two infections based on serology, we performed Western blots, wherein the B. procyonis ES antigen was reacted with serum samples from individuals known to be positive for either Toxocara spp. or B. procyonis larva migrans. Western blot results showed that B. procyonis antigens of between 30 and 45 kDa were specifically identified only by the sera from individuals with Baylisascaris larva migrans, thus allowing for differentiation between the two infections. This included human patient serum samples submitted for serologic testing, as well as sera from rabbits experimentally infected with B. procyonis. When used in conjunction with the ELISA, Western blotting could be an efficient tool for diagnosis of this infection in humans. PMID:19741091

  11. Selection of a Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin producer via dot-blot test.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Luciana A; Lobato, Zélia I P; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Salvarani, Felipe M; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Assis, Ronnie A; Lobato, Francisco C F

    2009-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D produces enterotoxemia, an enteric disease in ruminants, also known as pulpy kidney disease. Caused by epsilon toxin, enterotoxemia is a major exotoxin produced by this microorganism. Epsilon toxin is also the main component of vaccines against this enteric disorder. In this study, a standardized dot-blot was used to choose strains of C. perfringens type D that are producers of epsilon toxin. Clones producing epsilon toxin were chosen by limiting dilution; after three passages, lethal minimum dose titers were determined by soroneutralization test in mice. These clones produced epsilon toxin 240 times more concentrated than the original strain. The presence of the epsilon toxin gene (etx) was verified by polymerase chain reaction. All clones were positive, including those determined to be negative by dot-blot tests, suggesting that mechanisms in addition to the presence of the etx gene can influence toxin production. The dot-blot test was efficient for the selection of toxigenic colonies of C. perfringens type D and demonstrated that homogeneous populations selected from toxigenic cultures produce higher titers of epsilon toxin. PMID:19779698

  12. Applications of Hairpin DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S R; Wong, A C; Travis, A R; Catrina, I E; Bratu, D P; Wright, D W; Jayagopal, A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents are useful for imaging molecular processes in living systems in order to elucidate the function of molecular mediators in health and disease. Here, we demonstrate a technique for the synthesis, characterization, and application of hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (hAuNPs) as fluorescent hybridization probes for imaging mRNA expression and spatiotemporal dynamics in living cells. These imaging probes feature gold colloids linked to fluorophores via engineered oligonucleotides to resemble a molecular beacon in which the gold colloid serves as the fluorescence quencher in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system. Target-specific hybridization of the hairpin oligonucleotide enables fluorescence de-quenching and subsequent emission with high signal to noise ratios. hAuNPs exhibit high specificity without adverse toxicity or the need for transfection reagents. Furthermore, tunability of hAuNP emission profiles by selection of spectrally distinct fluorophores enables multiplexed mRNA imaging applications. Therefore, hAuNPs are promising tools for imaging gene expression in living cells. As a representative application of this technology, we discuss the design and applications of hAuNP targeted against distinct matrix metalloproteinase enzymes for the multiplexed detection of mRNA expression in live breast cancer cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27241751

  13. Synthetic mRNA: Production, Introduction into Cells, and Physiological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have made it possible to synthesize mRNA in vitro that is relatively stable when introduced into mammalian cells, has a diminished ability to activate the innate immune response against exogenous (virus-like) RNA, and can be efficiently translated into protein. Synthetic methods have also been developed to produce mRNA with unique investigational properties such as photo-cross-linking, fluorescence emission, and attachment of ligands through click chemistry. Synthetic mRNA has been proven effective in numerous applications beneficial for human health such as immunizing patients against cancer and infections diseases, alleviating diseases by restoring deficient proteins, converting somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells to use in regenerative medicine therapies, and engineering the genome by making specific alterations in DNA. This introductory chapter provides background information relevant to the following 20 chapters of this volume that present protocols for these applications of synthetic mRNA. PMID:27236789

  14. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  15. Identification of reference proteins for Western blot analyses in mouse model systems of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Prokopec, Stephenie D; Watson, John D; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a well-established, inexpensive and accurate way of measuring protein content. Because of technical variation between wells, normalization is required for valid interpretation of results across multiple samples. Typically this involves the use of one or more endogenous controls to adjust the measured levels of experimental molecules. Although some endogenous controls are widely used, validation is required for each experimental system. This is critical when studying transcriptional-modulators, such as toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).To address this issue, we examined hepatic tissue from 192 mice representing 47 unique combinations of strain, sex, Ahr-genotype, TCDD dose and treatment time. We examined 7 candidate reference proteins in each animal and assessed consistency of protein abundance through: 1) TCDD-induced fold-difference in protein content from basal levels, 2) inter- and intra- animal stability, and 3) the ability of each candidate to reduce instability of the other candidates. Univariate analyses identified HPRT as the most stable protein. Multivariate analysis indicated that stability generally increased with the number of proteins used, but gains from using >3 proteins were small. Lastly, by comparing these new data to our previous studies of mRNA controls on the same animals, we were able to show that the ideal mRNA and protein control-genes are distinct, and use of only 2-3 proteins provides strong stability, unlike in mRNA studies in the same cohort, where larger control-gene batteries were needed. PMID:25329058

  16. Identification of Reference Proteins for Western Blot Analyses in Mouse Model Systems of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin (TCDD) Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a well-established, inexpensive and accurate way of measuring protein content. Because of technical variation between wells, normalization is required for valid interpretation of results across multiple samples. Typically this involves the use of one or more endogenous controls to adjust the measured levels of experimental molecules. Although some endogenous controls are widely used, validation is required for each experimental system. This is critical when studying transcriptional-modulators, such as toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).To address this issue, we examined hepatic tissue from 192 mice representing 47 unique combinations of strain, sex, Ahr-genotype, TCDD dose and treatment time. We examined 7 candidate reference proteins in each animal and assessed consistency of protein abundance through: 1) TCDD-induced fold-difference in protein content from basal levels, 2) inter- and intra- animal stability, and 3) the ability of each candidate to reduce instability of the other candidates. Univariate analyses identified HPRT as the most stable protein. Multivariate analysis indicated that stability generally increased with the number of proteins used, but gains from using >3 proteins were small. Lastly, by comparing these new data to our previous studies of mRNA controls on the same animals, we were able to show that the ideal mRNA and protein control-genes are distinct, and use of only 2–3 proteins provides strong stability, unlike in mRNA studies in the same cohort, where larger control-gene batteries were needed. PMID:25329058

  17. Restricted specificity of the autoantibody response in Goodpasture's syndrome demonstrated by two-dimensional western blotting.

    PubMed

    Derry, C J; Dunn, M J; Rees, A J; Pusey, C D

    1991-12-01

    The autoantigen in Goodpasture's syndrome is known to be contained within the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of type IV collagen. We have examined the specificity of autoantibodies to glomerular basement membrane (GBM) using the technique of 2-D electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. Protein stains of 2-D gels of collagenase-digested human GBM revealed extensive charge and size heterogeneity. Major components were of mol. wt 24-30 kD and 43-56 kD, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric subunits of NCl. Western blotting of 2-D gels with IgG from patients with anti-GBM disease demonstrated that the most antigenic components migrated as cationic 28-kD monomers (pI 10) and similarly charged dimers, although other components were recognized less strongly. The mobility of the strongly antigenic polypeptides was different to that of the known alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of type IV collagen. Autoantibodies from all 20 patients studied showed the same pattern of reactivity, regardless of their clinical features (in particular, the presence or absence of pulmonary haemorrhage) or HLA type. A monoclonal antibody (P1) to human GBM bound in a similar pattern, particularly recognizing the cationic components. 2-D gels of affinity-purified GBM from a P1 column showed enrichment of the 28-kD monomers, which were recognized by human autoantibodies on Western blotting. These results demonstrate that the autoimmune response in Goodpasture's syndrome is of restricted specificity, and support the suggestion that the major autoantigenic determinant is present on the novel alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen. PMID:1747953

  18. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  19. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  20. Blotting Assisted by Heating and Solvent Extraction for DESI-MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Elaine C.; Mirabelli, Mario F.; Perez, Consuelo J.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout ( Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L. ) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. ) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces.

  1. Thyroid hormones regulate levels of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, K.J.; Wolff, R.S.; Warden, M.K.; Zoeller, R.T.

    1987-10-01

    Cellular levels of messenger RNA encoding thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were measured in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the reticular nucleus of the thalamus in male rats after chemical thyroidectomy and thyroid hormone, replacement. TRH mRNA levels were measured by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry using a /sup 35/S-labeled synthetic 48-base oligodeoxynucleotide probe and quantitative autoradiography. Chemical thyroidectomy, produced by the administration of 6-(n-propyl)-2-thiouracil (PrSur), reduced plasma thyroxine below detection limits and significantly increased TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. Treatments with exogenous L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) reduced TRH mRNA to the same level in both hypothyroid and euthyroid animals. Neither PrSur treatment nor T/sub 3/ replacement influenced TRH mRNA levels in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated total RNA from pituitaries of these animals indicated that thyrotropin-..beta.. mRNA levels were elevated after thyroidectomy and reduced by T/sub 3/ treatment, showing that the pituitary-thyroid axis was indeed stimulated by PrSur treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones are involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating the biosynthesis of TRH in the thyrotropic center of the hypothalamus.

  2. Visualization of heparin-binding proteins by ligand blotting with /sup 125/I-heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Cardin, A.D.; Witt, K.R.; Jackson, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    A ligand-blotting procedure which allows detection of heparin-binding proteins is described. Crude commercial heparin was fractionated by chromatography on a column of human plasma low-density lipoproteins immobilized to Sepharose CL-4B. Chromatography yielded an unbound and a bound fraction of heparin, designated URH and HRH, respectively. The HRH fraction was reacted with the N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester of 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid and then labeled with /sup 125/I. Proteins were separated by 3-20% pore-gradient gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose, and then assayed for their ability to bind /sup 125/I-labeled HRH. Human plasma apolipoproteins B-100, B-48, and E of chylomicrons, very low-density lipoproteins, and low-density lipoproteins bound the /sup 125/I-labeled HRH; the radiolabeled haparin did not bind to serum albumin, ferritin, catalase, and lactate dehydrogenase. The ligand-blotting procedure should facilitate the purification of heparin-binding domains from these proteins and, moreover may be applicable to the investigation of heparin-protein interactions in general. 15 references.

  3. Neurofilament dot blot assays: novel means of assessing axon viability in culture.

    PubMed

    Hares, Kelly; Kemp, Kevin; Gray, Elizabeth; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2011-06-15

    Axonal structure and integrity are vital to overall neuronal maintenance and action potential propagation. Neurofilaments (NFs) are one of the main cytoskeletal components of axons and phosphorylation of NF subunits regulates speed of NF transport through axons and determines optimal axonal calibre required for signal propagation. Many previous studies of neuroprotective agents have focussed on neuronal viability in models of neurodegenerative disease, without specifically considering axon function as an indicator of neuronal damage. In this study, we have focused on developing novel assays for determining axon viability by measuring levels of neurofilament phosphorylation in cultured cortical neurons. The nitric oxide donor DETANONOate (NO) was used as an inflammatory insult and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were tested as potential axonal protective agents. Using 'dot blot' methodologies, we show a decrease in NF phosphorylation in cortical neurons exposed to NO-mediated cell toxicity and an attenuation of NO-mediated changes in NF phosphorylation associated with GDNF and SOD treatment. These results correlated well with immunocytochemical counts. We propose therefore that the dot blot assay is a novel method for assessing axonal integrity in vitro and may play a useful role in the future for testing the effects of agents on axonal viability, providing a reliable and reproducible screening method for potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21459112

  4. Validation of Endothelin B Receptor Antibodies Reveals Two Distinct Receptor-related Bands on Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Travis P.; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression, but are often used without full validation. In this study, we use Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N- (NT) or C-termini (CT) and the second (IL2) or third intracellular (IL3) loops of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50kD band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37 kD band, but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT-targeted or IL3-targeted antibodies were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB receptors can be detected at 50 kD or 37 kD on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37 kD band likely reflects ETB receptor processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition. PMID:25232999

  5. Evaluating cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of inflammatory cytokines in cancer cells by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Gatla, Himavanth R; Singha, Bipradeb; Persaud, Valerie; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression and cellular release of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8), and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) are associated with increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis during cancer progression. In prostate and ovarian cancer cells, increased levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 correlate with poor prognosis. We have recently shown that proteasome inhibition by bortezomib (BZ) specifically increases IL-8 release from metastatic prostate and ovarian cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 in prostate and ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. IL-8 is localized in the cytoplasm in both cell types, and its protein levels are significantly increased by BZ. In contrast, HMGB1 is localized in the nucleus, and BZ increases its nuclear levels only in ovarian cancer cells. The protocol includes isolation of cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts, followed by SDS electrophoresis and western blotting, and can be easily modified to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine levels in other cell types. PMID:24908314

  6. Immunodiagnosis of Echinococcus Infections: Confirmatory Testing and Species Differentiation by a New Commercial Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Liance, Martine; Janin, Veronique; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Vuitton, Dominique-Angele; Houin, Rene; Piarroux, Renaud

    2000-01-01

    The Echinococcus Western Blot IgG (LDBIO Diagnostics, Lyon, France), using a whole larval antigen from Echinococcus multilocularis, was evaluated for serodiagnosis and differentiation between two human parasitic infections of worldwide importance: cystic echinococcosis, due to Echinococcus granulosus, and alveolar echinococcosis, due to E. multilocularis. Fifty and 61 serum samples from patients with cystic and alveolar echinococcosis, respectively, were used for assessing diagnostic sensitivity. The sensitivity of the assay was compared with those of screening tests used for these applications. Sera used for assessing cross-reactivities were from 154 patients with other diseases, either parasitic or not. The assay allowed the detection of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies in 97% of Echinococcus-infected patients. It had a higher sensitivity than screening assays for the detection for each echinococcosis. The assay allowed us to correctly distinguish between E. granulosus- and E. multilocularis-infected patients in 76% of cases. It did not allow us to distinguish active from inactive forms of both echinococcoses. The occurrence of cross-reactivities with neurocysticercosis indicates the necessity for retesting sera with species-specific antigens, for rare patients with neurologic disorders. This study shows the usefulness of the commercially available Echinococcus Western Blot IgG for the serological confirmation of human echinococcosis. PMID:11015390

  7. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.G.; Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  8. Western thymomas lack Epstein-Barr virus by Southern blotting analysis and by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Inghirami, G.; Chilosi, M.; Knowles, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors investigated 16 western thymomas, 9 from the United States and 7 from Europe, for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA sequences by both Southern blot hybridization analysis and polymerase chain reaction using EBV-specific DNA probes that detect the long internal repeat and terminal repeat regions and the EBNA-1 gene. None of the 16 thymomas contained evidence of the EBV genome, even though we could detect EBV by Southern blotting when EBV DNA represents less than or equal to 1% of the total DNA and by polymerase chain reaction when a single EBV-positive cell is present among 10(5) EBV-negative cells. These results fail to demonstrate EBV genome in western thymomas and stand in contrast to those of McGuire et al (Am J Pathol 1988, 131:385) who previously reported that the EBV genome is present in thymomas occurring in southern Chinese patients. Therefore EBV does not appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of all thymomas. The presence of EBV in eastern thymomas, regions where EBV is endemic may be due to epidemiologic factors and/or genetic predispositions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2162629

  9. Endonuclease-mediated mRNA Decay Requires Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Polysomal Ribonuclease 1 (PMR1) for the Targeting and Degradation of Polyribosome-bound Substrate mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Peng, Yong; Schoenberg, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    PMR1 is an endonuclease that is activated by estrogen to degrade Xenopus albumin mRNA. A previous report showed that the functional unit of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay is a ~680-kDa polysome-bound complex that contains both PMR1 and substrate mRNA. PMR1 contains two domains involved in endonuclease targeting to polysomes, an N-terminal domain that lies between residues 200 and 250, and a C-terminal domain that lies within the last 100 residues. Loss of either domain inactivated PMR1 targeting to polysomes and stabilized albumin mRNA. The current study identified a phosphorylated tyrosine residue within the C-terminal polysome-targeting domain and showed that this modification is required for PMR1-mediated mRNA decay. Changing this tyrosine to phenylalanine inactivated the targeting of PMR1 to polysomes, blocked binding of PMR1 to the functional complex containing its substrate mRNA, prevented the targeting of a green fluorescent protein fusion protein to this complex, and stabilized albumin mRNA to degradation by PMR1 in vivo. A general tyrosine kinase inhibitor inhibited the phosphorylation of PMR1, which in turn inhibited PMR1-catalyzed degradation of albumin mRNA. These results indicate that one or more tyrosine kinases functions as a regulator of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:15375158

  10. The Formation of the Bicoid Morphogen Gradient Requires Protein Movement from Anteriorly Localized mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kneeland, Thomas B.; Wieschaus, Eric F.; Gregor, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Bicoid morphogen gradient directs the patterning of cell fates along the anterior-posterior axis of the syncytial Drosophila embryo and serves as a paradigm of morphogen-mediated patterning. The simplest models of gradient formation rely on constant protein synthesis and diffusion from anteriorly localized source mRNA, coupled with uniform protein degradation. However, currently such models cannot account for all known gradient characteristics. Recent work has proposed that bicoid mRNA spatial distribution is sufficient to produce the observed protein gradient, minimizing the role of protein transport. Here, we adapt a novel method of fluorescent in situ hybridization to quantify the global spatio-temporal dynamics of bicoid mRNA particles. We determine that >90% of all bicoid mRNA is continuously present within the anterior 20% of the embryo. bicoid mRNA distribution along the body axis remains nearly unchanged despite dynamic mRNA translocation from the embryo core to the cortex. To evaluate the impact of mRNA distribution on protein gradient dynamics, we provide detailed quantitative measurements of nuclear Bicoid levels during the formation of the protein gradient. We find that gradient establishment begins 45 minutes after fertilization and that the gradient requires about 50 minutes to reach peak levels. In numerical simulations of gradient formation, we find that incorporating the actual bicoid mRNA distribution yields a closer prediction of the observed protein dynamics compared to modeling protein production from a point source at the anterior pole. We conclude that the spatial distribution of bicoid mRNA contributes to, but cannot account for, protein gradient formation, and therefore that protein movement, either active or passive, is required for gradient formation. PMID:21390295

  11. Comparative analysis of human papillomavirus detection by dot blot hybridisation and non-isotopic in situ hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Troncone, G; Anderson, S M; Herrington, C S; de Angelis, M L; Noell, H; Chimera, J A; O'D McGee, J

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the relative diagnostic performance of non-isotopic in situ hybridisation (NISH) and a dot-blot assay for detecting human papillomavirus (HPV) on exfoliated cervical cells; and to correlate the results with cytopathological assessment. METHODS: Cervical smears and cytological samples were obtained from 122 patients during the same clinical examination and the presence of HPV sequences determined by NISH and dot-blot analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Dot-blot analysis gave an autoradiographic signal in 15 of 121 (12.4%) cases, while NISH detected viral genomes in 38 of 114 (33.3%) cases. Even in the presence of koilocytosis, where vegetative replication of the virus occurs, NISH was positive in over twice as many cases as dot-blot analysis (NISH 90%, dot-blot 40%), while in smears within normal cytological limits, where the viral copy number is likely to be considerably lower, the differences were more striking (NISH 31%, dot-blot 5%). CONCLUSIONS: These data show that NISH on cytological smears is more sensitive than a standardised dot-blot hybridisation assay for detecting HPV infection in cytological material and is therefore a more appropriate screening tool. Images PMID:1331197

  12. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  13. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  14. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection. PMID:27180586

  15. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F.; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection. PMID:27180586

  16. Simultaneous Detection and Identification of Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus Species by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Playford, E. Geoffrey; Kong, Fanrong; Sun, Ying; Wang, Hui; Halliday, Catriona; Sorrell, Tania C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a reverse line blot (RLB) assay, utilizing fungal species-specific oligonucleotide probes to hybridize with internal transcribed spacer 2 region sequences amplified using a nested panfungal PCR. Reference and clinical strains of 16 Candida species (116 strains), Cryptococcus neoformans (five strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans, five strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, and six strains of Cryptococcus gatti), and five Aspergillus species (68 strains) were all correctly identified by the RLB assay. Additional fungal species (16 species and 26 strains) not represented on the assay did not exhibit cross-hybridization with the oligonucleotide probes. In simulated clinical specimens, the sensitivity of the assay for Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. was 100.5 cells/ml and 102 conidia/ml, respectively. This assay allows sensitive and specific simultaneous detection and identification of a broad range of fungal pathogens. PMID:16517870

  17. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples. PMID:25820736

  18. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  19. Comparative evaluation of western blotting in hepatic and pulmonary cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Akisu, C; Delibas, S B; Bicmen, C; Ozkoc, S; Aksoy, U; Turgay, N

    2006-12-01

    Many serological tests are widely used in the diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. The present study was carried for differentiation between hepatic and pulmonary cystic echinococcosis by Western Blotting (WB). A total of 121 sera from patients with hepatic CE (37), pulmonary CE (31) and controls (53; consisting of six healthy, seven Hymenolepis nana infection, 20 hepatic and 20 pulmonary diseases other than CE) were examined. In all of the CE patients, E. gronulosus infection was confirmed by surgical intervention. Sera were previously tested using IHA and ELISA to detect the E. gronulosus specific antibodies. Sera from hepatic cases of CE reacted with 16 polypeptides of 6-116 kDa and sera from pulmonary cases of CE reacted with 14 polypeptides of 4-130 kDa by Western Blotting. The WB test enabled the detection of antibodies in the hepatic CE samples for proteins of 24, 32 34, 44-46 and 52-54 kDa in molecular weight in 78.4%, 75.7%, 78.4% and 89.2% of the patients, respectively. In the pulmonary CE samples sera WB test enabled the detection of antibodies 24, 44-46, 100, 110, 116 and 120 124 kDa in molecular weight in 81.3%, 75.0%, 87.5%, 71.9%, 84.4% and 65.6% of the patients, respectively. We indicated that the antigenic components of high molecular weight can be good candidates for differentiation of hepatic CE from pulmonary CE. PMID:17285854

  20. Western blot analysis of BK channel β1‐subunit expression should be interpreted cautiously when using commercially available antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fernandes, Roxanne; Kadrofske, Mark M.; Lockwood, Lizbeth R.; Galligan, James J.; Xu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Large conductance Ca2+‐activated K+ (BK) channels consist of pore‐forming α‐ and accessory β‐subunits. There are four β‐subunit subtypes (β1–β4), BK β1‐subunit is specific for smooth muscle cells (SMC). Reduced BK β1‐subunit expression is associated with SMC dysfunction in animal models of human disease, because downregulation of BK β1‐subunit reduces channel activity and increases SMC contractility. Several anti‐BK β1‐subunit antibodies are commercially available; however, the specificity of most antibodies has not been tested or confirmed in the tissues from BK β1‐subunit knockout (KO) mice. In this study, we tested the specificity and sensitivity of six commercially available antibodies from five manufacturers. We performed western blot analysis on BK β1‐subunit enriched tissues (mesenteric arteries and colons) and non‐SM tissue (cortex of kidney) from wild‐type (WT) and BK β1‐KO mice. We found that antibodies either detected protein bands of the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from both WT and BK β1‐KO mice or failed to detect protein bands at the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from WT mice, suggesting that these antibodies may lack specificity for the BK β1‐subunit. The absence of BK β1‐subunit mRNA expression in arteries, colons, and kidneys from BK β1‐KO mice was confirmed by RT‐PCR analysis. We conclude that these commercially available antibodies might not be reliable tools for studying BK β1‐subunit expression in murine tissues under the denaturing conditions that we have used. Data obtained using commercially available antibodies should be interpreted cautiously. Our studies underscore the importance of proper negative controls in western blot analyses. PMID:25355855

  1. mRNA 5'-cap binding activity in purified influenza virus detected by simple, rapid assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kroath, H; Shatkin, A J

    1982-01-01

    Reovirus mRNA 5'-terminal caps were 3'-radiolabeled with pCp and as affinity probes for proteins with cap binding activity. A rapid, simple, and sensitive blot assay was devised that could detect cellular cap binding protein in a complex polypeptide mixture. By using this method, cap binding activity was found in detergent-treated influenza virus but not in reovirus or vaccinia virus. Preincubation of capped reovirus mRNA with purified cellular cap binding protein reduced its primer effect on influenza transcriptase, whereas priming by ApG was not affected. The results indicate that influenza transcriptase complexes include cap-recognizing proteins that are involved in the formation of chimeric mRNAs. Images PMID:7097854

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  4. Detection of oligomers and fibrils of α-synuclein by AIEgen with strong fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Guo, Feng; Hong, Yuning; Zhao, Engui; Kwok, Ryan Tsz Kin; Leung, Nelson Lik Ching; Chen, Sijie; Vaikath, Nishant N; El-Agnaf, Omar Mukhtar; Tang, Youhong; Gai, Wei-Ping; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-02-01

    We report a fluorophore, TPE-TPP, with AIE characteristics which is utilized as a fluorescence probe to monitor the α-synuclein (α-Syn) fibrillation process. Compared with ThT, TPE-TPP shows a higher sensitivity in the detection of α-Syn oligomers as well as fibrils with a stronger fluorescence. The performance of TPE-TPP was evaluated using fluorescence, AFM, dot blot, and SEC. PMID:25526628

  5. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus using the Vira Type "in situ" kit: comparison with a conventional dot blot technique.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner-Jones, B E; Bellomarino, V M; Borg, A J; Orzeszko, K; Garland, S M

    1990-01-01

    A new commercial kit (Vira Type "in situ", Life Technologies, Inc., Molecular Diagnostics Division, Guithersburg, Maryland, USA) for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in routinely processed human anogenital tissue was compared with a conventional dot blot assay for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both systems use double-stranded genomic DNA probes for the detection of type specific HPV DNA. The probes used on the dot blots were labelled with 32P and visualised autoradiographically. The Vira Type probes were labelled with biotin and visualised using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate with NBT-BCIP substrate. Biopsy specimens from the cervix, vagina, and vulva of 46 women were processed by both methods and compared. The histological diagnoses ranged from benign changes, to dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma. Overall, 50% of biopsy specimens were positive for HPV DNA by dot blot hybridisation; only 39% were positive by Vira Type in situ hybridisation. Three of the specimens positive by the Vira Type "in situ" kit showed no cross hybridisation and were the same HPV type as the dot blot. A further 13 showed hybridisation, but the showed cross hybridisation, but the to the dot blot results. One biopsy specimen was positive for different HPV types by the two tests and one was positive by Vira Type and negative by dot blot. Six biopsy specimens were negative by Vira Type but positive by dot blot. It is concluded that the Vira Type "in situ" kit has a similar specificity but lower sensitivity than the dot blot hybridisation method for the detection of HPV DNA. Images PMID:2175755

  6. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  7. Exploring the Foundation of Genomics: A Northern Blot Reference set for the Comparative Analysis of Transcript Profiling Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Kemmer, Danielle; Faxén, Margareta; Hodges, Emily; Lim, Jonathan; Herzog, Elena; Ljungström, Elsebrit; Lundmark, Anders; Olsen, Mary K.; Podowski, Raf; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Nilsson, Peter; Reimers, Mark; Lenhard, Boris; Roberds, Steven L.; Wahlestedt, Claes; Höög, Christer; Agarwal, Pankaj

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we aim to create a reference data collection of Northern blot results and demonstrate how such a collection can enable a quantitative comparison of modern expression profiling techniques, a central component of functional genomics studies. Historically, Northern blots were the de facto standard for determining RNA transcript levels. However, driven by the demand for analysis of large sets of genes in parallel, high-throughput methods, such as microarrays, dominate modern profiling efforts. To facilitate assessment of these methods, in comparison to Northern blots, we created a database of published Northern results obtained with a standardized commercial multiple tissue blot (dbMTN). In order to demonstrate the utility of the dbMTN collection for technology comparison, we also generated expression profiles for genes across a set of human tissues, using multiple profiling techniques. No method produced profiles that were strongly correlated with the Northern blot data. The highest correlations to the Northern blot data were determined with microarrays for the subset of genes observed to be specifically expressed in a single tissue in the Northern analyses. The database and expression profiling data are available via the project website (http://www.cisreg.ca). We believe that emphasis on multitechnique validation of expression profiles is justified, as the correlation results between platforms are not encouraging on the whole. Supplementary material for this article can be found at: http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1531-6912/suppmat PMID:18629180

  8. V3 Stain-free Workflow for a Practical, Convenient, and Reliable Total Protein Loading Control in Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Anton; Kohn, Jonathan; Oh, Kenneth; Hammond, Matt; Liu, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The western blot is a very useful and widely adopted lab technique, but its execution is challenging. The workflow is often characterized as a "black box" because an experimentalist does not know if it has been performed successfully until the last of several steps. Moreover, the quality of western blot data is sometimes challenged due to a lack of effective quality control tools in place throughout the western blotting process. Here we describe the V3 western workflow, which applies stain-free technology to address the major concerns associated with the traditional western blot protocol. This workflow allows researchers: 1) to run a gel in about 20-30 min; 2) to visualize sample separation quality within 5 min after the gel run; 3) to transfer proteins in 3-10 min; 4) to verify transfer efficiency quantitatively; and most importantly 5) to validate changes in the level of the protein of interest using total protein loading control. This novel approach eliminates the need of stripping and reprobing the blot for housekeeping proteins such as β-actin, β-tubulin, GAPDH, etc. The V3 stain-free workflow makes the western blot process faster, transparent, more quantitative and reliable. PMID:24429481

  9. Ascorbate free radical reductase mRNA levels are induced by wounding.

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, A A; Brummell, D A; Bennett, A B

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mRNA levels were analyzed. The cDNA encoded a deduced protein of 433 amino acids and possessed amino acid domains characteristic of flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD(P)H-binding proteins but did not possess typical eukaryotic targeting sequences, suggesting that it encodes a cytosolic form of AFR reductase. Low-stringency genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that a single nuclear gene encoded this enzyme. Total ascorbate contents were greatest in leaves, with decreasing amounts in stems and roots and relatively constant levels in all stages of fruit. AFR reductase activity was inversely correlated with total ascorbate content, whereas the relative abundance of AFR reductase mRNA was directly correlated with enzyme activity in tissues examined. AFR reductase mRNA abundance increased dramatically in response to wounding, a treatment that is known to also induce ascorbate-dependent prolyl hydroxylation required for the accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. In addition, AFR reductase may contribute to maintaining levels of ascorbic acid for protection against wound-induced free radical-mediated damage. Collectively, the results suggest that AFR reductase activity is regulated at the level of mRNA abundance by low ascorbate contents or by factors that promote ascorbate utilization. PMID:7784511

  10. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  11. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Carrazana, E.J.; Pasieka, K.B.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    The authors developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, they studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, --250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was --30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from --250 to --400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation.

  12. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Carrazana, E J; Pasieka, K B; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    We developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, we studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, approximately 250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was approximately 30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from approximately 250 to approximately 400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation. Images PMID:2841576

  13. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  14. Choreography of molecular movements during ribosome progression along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Riccardo; Sharma, Heena; Caliskan, Neva; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-04-01

    During translation elongation, ribosome translocation along an mRNA entails rotations of the ribosomal subunits, swiveling motions of the small subunit (SSU) head and stepwise movements of the tRNAs together with the mRNA. Here, we reconstructed the choreography of the collective motions of the Escherichia coli ribosome during translocation promoted by elongation factor EF-G, by recording the fluorescence signatures of nine different reporters placed on both ribosomal subunits, tRNA and mRNA. We captured an early forward swiveling of the SSU head taking place while the SSU body rotates in the opposite, clockwise direction. Backward swiveling of the SSU head starts upon tRNA translocation and continues until the post-translocation state is reached. This work places structures of translocation intermediates along a time axis and unravels principles of the motions of macromolecular machines. PMID:26999556

  15. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  16. Digital chemiluminescence imaging of DNA sequencing blots using a charge-coupled device camera.

    PubMed Central

    Karger, A E; Weiss, R; Gesteland, R F

    1992-01-01

    Digital chemiluminescence imaging with a cryogenically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is used to visualize DNA sequencing fragments covalently bound to a blotting membrane. The detection is based on DNA hybridization with an alkaline phosphatase(AP) labeled oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe and AP triggered chemiluminescence of the substrate 3-(2'-spiro-adamantane)-4-methoxy-4-(3"-phosphoryloxy)phenyl- 1,2-dioxetane (AMPPD). The detection using a direct AP-oligonucleotide conjugate is compared to the secondary detection of biotinylated oligonucleotides with respect to their sensitivity and nonspecific binding to the nylon membrane by quantitative imaging. Using the direct oligonucleotide-AP conjugate as a hybridization probe, sub-attomol (0.5 pg of 2.7 kb pUC plasmid DNA) quantities of membrane bound DNA are detectable with 30 min CCD exposures. Detection using the biotinylated probe in combination with streptavidin-AP was found to be background limited by nonspecific binding of streptavidin-AP and the oligo(biotin-11-dUTP) label in equal proportions. In contrast, the nonspecific background of AP-labeled oligonucleotide is indistinguishable from that seen with 5'-32P-label, in that respect making AP an ideal enzymatic label. The effect of hybridization time, probe concentration, and presence of luminescence enhancers on the detection of plasmid DNA were investigated. Images PMID:1480487

  17. Retrospective Study of Hemoparasites in Cattle in Southern Italy by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    CECI, Luigi; IARUSSI, Fabrizio; GRECO, Beatrice; LACINIO, Rosanna; FORNELLI, Stefania; CARELLI, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tick-borne diseases are widespread in tropical and temperate regions and are responsible for important economic losses in those areas. In order to assess the presence and prevalence of various pathogens in southern Italy, we retrospectively analyzed cattle blood samples collected for a previous study in 2000 using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization. The study had been carried out in three regions of southern Italy on 1,500 randomly selected and apparently healthy adult cattle. RLB showed that 43.7% of the cattle were positive for nine different species of hemoparasites with either a single infection or a mixed infection. Theileria buffeli was the most common species found, being present in 27.3% of the animals, followed by Anaplasma marginale in 18.1%, Anaplasma centrale in 13.8%, Babesia bigemina and Anaplasma bovis in 4.2%, Anaplasma phagocytophilum in 1.7%, Babesia bovis in 1.6%, Babesia major in 0.2% and Babesia divergens in 0.1%. Complete blood counts showed different degrees of anemia in 363 animals (24.2%) and of these, 169 were RLB-positive for at least one pathogen. Among the ticks that were collected from the cattle, the following species were identified: Rhipicephalus bursa, Ixodes ricinus, Hyalomma marginatum, Boophilus annulatus, Dermacentor marginatus and Haemaphysalis (sulcata, parva, inermis and punctata). The results obtained confirmed the spread of endemic tick-borne pathogens in the regions studied. PMID:24614604

  18. Performance of PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for detection of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Yeun; Bang, Hyeeun; Kim, Jong-Pill; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Tae Ue; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae is a significant problem in countries where leprosy is endemic. A sensitive, specific, and high-throughput reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the detection of genotypic resistance to rifampicin (RIF) was designed and evaluated. It has been shown that resistance to RIF in M. leprae involves mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the -subunit of the RNA polymerase. The PCR-REBA simultaneously detects both 6 wild-type regions and 5 different mutations (507 AGC, 513 GTG, 516 TAT, 531 ATG, and 531 TTC) including the most prevalent mutations at positions 507 and 531. Thirty-one clinical isolates provided by Korea Institute of Hansen-s Disease were analyzed by PCR-REBA with RIF resistance of rpoB gene. As a result, missense mutations at codons 507 AGC and 531 ATG with 2-nucleotide substitutions were found in one sample, and a missense mutation at codon 516 TAT and ΔWT6 (deletion of 530-534) was found in another sample. These cases were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. This rapid, simple, and highly sensitive assay provides a practical alternative to sequencing for genotypic evaluation of RIF resistance in M. leprae. PMID:26428919

  19. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described. PMID:22215554

  20. Easy and Fast Western Blotting by Thin-Film Direct Coating with Suction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Yuan; Lu, De-Chao; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Yen, Yi-Kuang; Chang, Shih-Chung; Wang, An-Bang

    2016-06-21

    Thin-film direct coating (TDC) has been successfully used in Western blotting (WB). In this study, the advanced technique of TDC with suction (TDCS) was developed to reduce the consumption amount of antibody by a factor of up to 10(4) in comparison with the amount consumed by the conventional WB using the capillary tube without any need of special micromachining processes. The operation time for completely finishing a high-quality WB can be reduced from 3 h in conventional WB to about 5 min or even less by TDCS. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio of the immunoblotting by TDCS can be markedly increased. TDCS WB showed a high linearity within a 6-log2 dynamic range for detecting 90-6000 ng of purified recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) proteins and could particularly detect extrinsic GST proteins added in crude Escherichia coli or 293T cell lysates. Moreover, a protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin, GST, and ubiquitin could be specifically probed in parallel with their corresponding antibodies through multichannel TDCS WB. This simple and innovative TDCS WB offers various potential applications in simultaneously finishing multiple antibody-antigen screenings in a fast and single experiment. PMID:27254752

  1. [Evaluation of IHA, ELISA and Western Blot tests in diagnosis of pulmonary cystic hidatidosis].

    PubMed

    Akisu, Ciler; Bayram Delibaş, Songül; Yuncu, Gökhan; Aksoy, Umit; Ozkoç, Soykan; Biçmen, Can; Sevinç, Serpil; Yaldiz, Sadik

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary cystic hidatidosis caused by the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus is a common parasitic disease in Turkey and throughout the world. In this study IHA, ELISA and Western Blot (WB) tests were performed with a panel of 59 sera from 31 surgically confirmed pulmonary cystic hidatidosis patients, 18 patients with pulmonary disease other than cystic hidatidosis and 10 healthy individual. The overall sensitivity of the IHA, ELISA and WB tests used for the serodiagnosis of pulmonary cystic hidatidosis were found as 96.7%, 87.1%, 100% and the specificities were 82.2%, 89.2% and %85.7, respectively. Using the WB test 8-12 kDa, 24 kDa and 124 kDa bands were detected as valuable for surgically confirmed patients' sera. One or more of these bands were also detected in sera of four patients with other pulmonary diseases false-positively. In conclusion conventional serologic test like IHA and ELISA is valuable in diagnosis of pulmonary cystic hidatidosis, also evaluation of some specific bands in WB would contribute to the diagnosis. PMID:16100652

  2. Identification of Yeast V-ATPase Mutants by Western Blots Analysis of Whole Cell Lysates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Belky, Karlett

    2002-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory was designed for an undergraduate course to help students better understand the link between molecular engineering and biochemistry. Students identified unknown yeast strains with high specificity using SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates. This problem-solving exercise is a common application of biochemistry in biotechnology research. Three different strains were used: a wild-type and two mutants for the proton pump vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPases are multisubunit enzymes and the mutants used were deletion mutants; each lacked one structural gene of the complex. After three, three-hour labs, mutant strains were easily identified by the students and distinguished from wild-type cells analyzing the pattern of SDS-PAGE distribution of proteins. Identifying different subunits of one multimeric protein allowed for discussion of the structure and function of this metabolic enzyme, which captured the interest of the students. The experiment can be adapted to other multimeric protein complexes and shows improvement of the described methodology over previous reports, perhaps because the problem and its solution are representative of the type of techniques currently used in research labs.

  3. The blot rolling assay: a method for identifying adhesion molecules mediating binding under shear conditions.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Adhesive interactions of cells with blood vessel walls under flow conditions are critical to a variety of processes, including hemostasis, leukocyte trafficking, tumor metastasis, and atherosclerosis. We have developed a new technique for the observation of binding interactions under shear, which we have termed the "blot rolling assay." In this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis and transferred to a membrane. This membrane can be rendered semitransparent and incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber under controlled flow, and their interactions with individual components of the immobilized substrates can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecules can be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. Thus, this method allows for the identification, within a complex mixture and without previous isolation or purification, of both known and novel adhesion molecules capable of binding under shear conditions. PMID:16799202

  4. Detection of strawberry vein banding virus by polymerase chain reaction and dot blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mráz, I; Petrzik, K; Fránová-Honetslegrová, J; Síp, M

    1997-08-01

    Strawberry vein banding virus (SVBV) is one of seventeen members of the family Caulimoviridae. Natural infection with the virus is known in Fragaria species only. Infections caused by SVBV are often symptomless (1), but their significance increases in mixed infections with strawberry crinkle or strawberry latent C viruses (2,3). This virus has been originally found on strawberries in USA and firstly described by Frazier (4), but it is probably world-wide distributed by planting or breeding materials. SVBV has been observed on cultivated strawberries in North America, Australia, Brazil, Japan (5) and recently in Europe (6,7). The concentration of SVBV in infected plants is usually very low. Its detection by ELISA is impossible because of lack of specific antibodies. Evidence of the caulimovirus nature of SVBV has been confirmed by its circular dsDNA genome, shape and size of viral particles (8), presence of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies typical for caulimoviruses, and distant serological relationship with cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV, 9). In this paper we present detection of SVBV by combination of two detection methods--polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot hybridization with a non-radioactive probe. PMID:9391655

  5. Zinc metallothionein (MT) induction by parenteral iron and endotoxin: A temporal analysis of hepatic MT mRNA changes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to compare the temporal characteristics of iron-induced hepatic MT mRNA accumulation to that effected by endotoxin. Young chicks were given (ip) either endotoxin, ferrous gluconate or an equivalent volume of saline. At various times following injections, liver was obtained from 5 chicks per treatment for total RNA extraction. Equal amounts of total hepatic RNA from each chick were pooled and 10 {mu}g separated by denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Hepatic MT mRNA and albumin mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides. The results indicated little temporal difference in the accumulation of hepatic MT mRNA as affected by either endotoxin or iron. In both treatments, MT mRNA was minimally affected at 3 hours post-injection. Maximum accumulation was achieved during a 6 h period from 6 to 12 hours post-injection. At 24 hours, MT mRNA was considerably higher in liver of endotoxin-injected chicks when compared to that of iron-injection chicks. Albumin expression appeared not to be substantially affected by either treatment. The results suggest that the induction of hepatic MT by iron injection is not substantially different than that observed following endotoxin administration. It would be speculative to suggest that the processes by which MT is induced under these conditions are also similar.

  6. A DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon for tumor-related mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nuli; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Quan, Ke; Wang, He; Ying, Le; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-02-01

    Due to its low cytotoxicity, high resistance to enzymatic degradation, and cellular permeability, a DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon (DTMB) is designed for tumor-related TK1 mRNA detection in living cells, where the target sequence can induce the tetrahedron from contraction to extension, resulting in fluorescence restoration. PMID:26729323

  7. Glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA and activity are increased to the same extent in kidney and liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, G; Vidal, H; Zitoun, C; Bruni, N; Daniele, N; Minassian, C

    1996-07-01

    Using Northern blot with a specific glucose-6-phosphatase (Glc6Pase) cDNA probe and enzymatic activity determination, we studied the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on Glc6Pase in rat gluconeogenic tissues. The Glc6Pase mRNA abundance was increased four to five times in both the liver and kidney of diabetic rats. This was correlated with a concomitant 130% increase in Glc6Pase catalytic subunit in both tissues. The elevated level of Glc6Pase mRNA was significantly corrected in both the liver and kidney of diabetic rats after a 12-h insulin treatment. We also studied Glc6Pase mRNA and activity in gluconeogenic tissues during the fed-fasted and fasted-refed transitions in normal rats. In the liver, the abundance of Glc6Pase mRNA was sharply increased about four times after 24 or 48 h of fasting. In the kidney, the Glc6Pase mRNA level was gradually increased some three and five times after 24 and 48 h of fasting, respectively. The increase of Glc6Pase mRNA in both organs was matched with a doubling of the activity of Glc6Pase catalytic subunit: rapid in the liver and gradual in the kidney. The liver Glc6Pase mRNA abundance in 48-h fasted rats was acutely and importantly decreased upon refeeding. The kidney Glc6Pase mRNA level was also significantly lowered under these conditions, albeit less rapidly. These data demonstrate that efficient control of Glc6Pase takes place in both gluconeogenic organs at the pretranslational level and suggest that insulin might play an important role in this control. In addition, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot, we report that Glc6Pase mRNA is not detectable in several other tissues previously assumed to express the enzyme. PMID:8666139

  8. Immunodot blot assay to detect Helicobacter pylori using monoclonal antibodies against the 26 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Amini Najafabadi, Hossein; Paknejad, Maliheh; Farshad, Shohreh; Mohammadian, Taher; Seyyed Ebrahimi, Shadi Sadat; Amini Najafabadi, Azadeh

    2012-12-01

    Development of a specific immunoassay to detect Helicobacter pylori infection in stool samples requires monoclonal antibody against the specific antigen. The aims of this study were to establish monoclonal antibodies against the 26 kDa protein of H. pylori and develop an immunodot blot for their application to recognize H. pylori infection using stool samples. Mice were immunized intraperitoneally with homogenized gel containing the 26 kDa band of cell surface proteins of H. pylori in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The monoclonal antibodies were produced using the hybridoma technique. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies was tested with the purified 26 kDa antigen and cell surface proteins from cultured H. pylori by ELISA. Furthermore reactivity of monoclonal antibodies was tested on negative and positive stool samples for H. pylori and suspensions of several major bacteria in stool by immunodot blot assay. Five stable hybridoma monoclones were obtained. The concordant reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with H. pylori present in the stool samples, which had been tested previously using an ACON ELISA kit for H. pylori stool antigen testing, and unreactivity with several different major fecal bacteria in immunodot blotting indicates high specificity of the immunodot blot based on the reaction of produced monoclonal antibodies with the H. pylori antigen in stools. The findings indicate that the novel immunodot blot developed based on new monoclonal antibodies for stool antigens would be useful as a noninvasive method of diagnosing H. pylori infection. PMID:23244318

  9. Identification of α1-Antitrypsin as a Potential Candidate for Internal Control for Human Synovial Fluid in Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Li, Pengcui; Li, Kai; Wang, Dongming; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Western blot of synovial fluid has been widely used for osteoarthritis (OA) research and diagnosis, but there is no ideal loading control for this purpose. Although β-actin is extensively used as loading control in western blot, it is not suitable for synovial fluid because it is not required in synovial fluid as a cytoskeletal protein. A good loading control for synovial fluid in OA studies should have unchanged content in synovial fluids from normal and OA groups, because synovial fluid protein content can vary with changes in synovial vascular permeability with OA onset. In this study, we explore the potential of using α1-antitripsin (A1AT) as loading control for OA synovial fluid in western blot. A1AT level is elevated in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Unlike RA, OA is a non-inflammation disease, which does not induce A1AT. In this study, we identified A1AT as an abundant component of synovial fluid by Mass Spectrometry and confirmed that the level of A1AT is relative constant between human OA and normal synovial fluid by western blot and ELISA. Hence, we proposed that A1AT may be a good loading control for western blot in human OA synovial fluid studies provided that pathological conditions such as RA or A1AT deficiency associated liver or lung diseases are excluded. PMID:26594594

  10. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of Simon™, a new CE-based automated Western blot system as applied to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Loughney, John W; Hamm, Melissa; Hamm, Christopher; Lancaster, Catherine; Mach, Anna; Ha, Sha

    2012-09-01

    Many CE-based technologies such as imaged capillary IEF, CE-SDS, CZE, and MEKC are well established for analyzing proteins, viruses, or other biomolecules such as polysaccharides. For example, imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (charge-based protein separation) and CE-SDS (size-based protein separation) are standard replacement methods in biopharmaceutical industries for tedious and labor intensive IEF and SDS-PAGE methods, respectively. Another important analytical tool for protein characterization is a Western blot, where after size-based separation in SDS-PAGE the proteins are transferred to a membrane and blotted with specific monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Western blotting analysis is applied in many areas such as biomarker research, therapeutic target identification, and vaccine development. Currently, the procedure is very manual, laborious, and time consuming. Here, we evaluate a new technology called Simple Western™ (or Simon™) for performing automated Western analysis. This new technology is based on CE-SDS where the separated proteins are attached to the wall of capillary by a proprietary photo activated chemical crosslink. Subsequent blotting is done automatically by incubating and washing the capillary with primary and secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and detected with chemiluminescence. Typically, Western blots are not quantitative, hence we also evaluated the quantitative aspect of this new technology. We demonstrate that Simon™ can quantitate specific components in one of our vaccine candidates and it provides good reproducibility and intermediate precision with CV <10%. PMID:22965727

  11. Multiplex PCR and Reverse Line Blot Hybridization Assay (mPCR/RLB)

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Matthew V. N.; Zhou, Fei; Sintchenko, Vitali; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex PCR/Reverse Line Blot Hybridization assay allows the detection of up to 43 molecular targets in 43 samples using one multiplex PCR reaction followed by probe hybridization on a nylon membrane, which is re-usable. Probes are 5' amine modified to allow fixation to the membrane. Primers are 5' biotin modified which allows detection of hybridized PCR products using streptavidin-peroxidase and a chemiluminescent substrate via photosensitive film. With low setup and consumable costs, this technique is inexpensive (approximately US$2 per sample), high throughput (multiple membranes can be processed simultaneously) and has a short turnaround time (approximately 10 hours). The technique can be utilized in a number of ways. Multiple probes can be designed to detect sequence variation within a single amplified product, or multiple products can be amplified simultaneously, with one (or more) probes used for subsequent detection. A combination of both approaches can also be used within a single assay. The ability to include multiple probes for a single target sequence makes the assay highly specific. Published applications of mPCR/RLB include detection of antibiotic resistance genes1,2, typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus3-5 and Salmonella sp6, molecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae7,8, Streptococcus agalactiae9 and enteroviruses10,11, identification of Mycobacterium sp12, detection of genital13-15 and respiratory tract16 and other17 pathogens and detection and identification of mollicutes18. However, the versatility of the technique means the applications are virtually limitless and not restricted to molecular analysis of micro-organisms. The five steps in mPCR/RLB are a) Primer and Probe design, b) DNA extraction and PCR amplification c) Preparation of the membrane, d) Hybridization and detection, and e) Regeneration of the Membrane. PMID:21847083

  12. Application of reverse dot blot hybridization to simultaneous detection and identification of harmful algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo Fu; Zhang, Chun Yun; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Chen, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Warning and monitoring projects of harmful algal blooms require simple and rapid methods for simultaneous and accurate detection and identification of causative algae present in the environmental samples. Here, reverse dot blot hybridization (RDBH) was employed to simultaneously detect several harmful algae by using five representative bloom-forming microalgae along the Chinese coast. A set of specific probes for RDBH were developed by PCR, cloning, and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), alignment analysis, and probe design. Each probe was oligo (dT)-tailed and spotted onto positively charged nylon membrane to make up a low-density oligonucleotide array. Universal primers designed within the conserved regions were used to amplify the ITS sequences by using genomic DNA of target as templates. The digoxigenin (Dig)-labeled PCR products were denatured and then hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The array produced a unique hybridization pattern for each target species differentiating them from each other. The preparations of oligonucleotide array and hybridization conditions were optimized. The developed RDBH demonstrated a detection limit up to 10 cells. The detection performance of RDBH was relatively stable and not affected by non-target species and the fixation time of target species over at least 30 days. The RDBH could recover all the target species from the simulated field samples and target species confirmed by the subsequent microscopy examination in the environmental samples. These results indicate that RDBH can be a new technical platform for parallel discrimination of harmful algae and is promising for environmental monitoring of these microorganisms. PMID:25731086

  13. Validity of the Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) for naturally acquired porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Silvia; García, Hector H; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2014-01-17

    The Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) has been used widely as a screening test for Taenia solium cysticercosis in swine. However, the relation between seropositivity and infection in pig populations from endemic areas has not been well defined. The aim of this study is to relate EITB seropositivity with infection and infection burden, analyse the trade-off between sensitivity and specificity with various cut-off points for the EITB assay, and finally describe the serology changes in a cohort of rural pigs raised under natural conditions. A group of 107 pigs that were used as controls during a vaccination field trial in Peru was our study population. The prevalence of porcine cysticercosis determined by necropsy examination was 16.82% (18/107) in these animals. Using EITB reactivity to ≥ 1 band as a cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 88.89% (65.29-98.62, 95% CI) and the specificity was 48.31% (37.59-59.16, 95% CI). Comparing other cut-off points, involving up to as many as 7 reactive bands, a reactivity of ≥ 3 bands provided the best trade-offs in sensitivity and specificity. Using this cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 77.77% (52.36-93.59, 95% CI) and the specificity was 76.40% (66.22-84.76, 95% CI). A significant association was found between cyst counts over 100 cysts and reactivity to ≥ 3 bands in the EITB assay (Fisher's exact test, p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that the use of the EITB assay to study porcine cysticercosis may require setting different cut-offs under field and experimental conditions, and depending upon the objective of the screening process. PMID:24183647

  14. Enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test for diagnosis of human hydatid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Verastegui, M; Moro, P; Guevara, A; Rodriguez, T; Miranda, E; Gilman, R H

    1992-01-01

    Sera from 71 patients with surgically confirmed hydatid disease (which is caused by Echinococcus granulosus) were studied by an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay. Sera from patients either with other cestode infections or with another illness were used as controls. Results of the EITB test for hydatidosis were compared with those of the double-diffusion (DD5) test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the EITB assay with bovine lyophilized hydatid fluid, three antigen bands of 8, 16, and 21 kDa were diagnostically important. The sensitivity of the assay by using these antigen bands was 80% for hepatic cysts, 56% for pulmonary cysts, and 56% for cysts located in multiple organs. In sera from controls, the specificity of the EITB assay was 100%. Cross-reactions to the 8-, 16-, and 21-kDa bands occurred, respectively, in 12, 4, and 4% of sera from patients with cysticercosis. No cross-reactions were noted in patients infected with Hymenolepis nana. The ELISA in which swine hydatid fluid was used as the antigen was as sensitive as the EITB test but was less specific (80%) and frequently cross-reacted with sera from patients with other cestode infections. The sensitivity of the DD5 test, which uses sheep hydatid fluid, was low (47%) , but its specificity was as high as that of the EITB assay. However, in patients with cysticercosis, cross-reactions were observed in 23% of sera tested. Despite the higher sensitivity found with the EITB assay, 23% (n = 5) of the serum samples that were positive by the DD5 test were not detected by the EITB assay. The EITB assay offers greater sensitivity and specificity than do the ELISA and the DD5 test. The highest proportion of hydatid cases is detected when the EITB and DD5 tests are run simultaneously. Images PMID:1624574

  15. Evaluation of a Western Blot Test in an Outbreak of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pizzini, Claudia V.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Hajjeh, Rana; Kaufman, Leo; Peralta, José Mauro

    1999-01-01

    A western blot (WB) test was evaluated for detection of antibodies against native glycosylated and chemically deglycosylated M and H antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in serum obtained from patients during the acute phase of pulmonary histoplasmosis that occurred during an outbreak. Of 275 serum samples tested by immunodiffusion and complement fixation (CF) samples from 40 patients affected during this outbreak and from 37 negative controls were tested by WB test. A group of patients whose sera were negative for CF antibodies and precipitins early in the acute stage of histoplasmosis but who all seroconverted during convalescence 6 weeks later were tested with the WB test. Antibodies against untreated H and M antigens were detected at a 1:100 dilution by WB test in 45% of the 20 acute-phase serum samples and in all 20 of the convalescent-phase specimens. The WB test’s sensitivity for acute-phase specimens increased to 90% (18 of 20 specimens) when H and M antigens were treated by periodate oxidation to inactivate susceptible carbohydrate epitopes. When native glycosylated antigens were used in the WB test, positive reactions were observed in negative control serum specimens (3 of 37 specimens; 8%) and in serum specimens obtained from asymptomatic persons screened as part of the outbreak investigation (13 of 20 specimens; 65%). These positive reactions were also attributed to glycosidic epitopes since the specificity of the WB test increased from 78 to 100% when periodate-treated H and M antigens were used. WB test with deglycosylated H and M antigens of histoplasmin provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific test to diagnose acute pulmonary histoplasmosis before precipitins can be detected. PMID:9874658

  16. Experimental procedure for the detection of a rare human mRNA with the DIG System.

    PubMed

    Rueger, B; Thalhammer, J; Obermaier, I; Gruenewald-Janho, S

    1997-02-15

    Newcomers to the DIG System often inquire about the possibility of performing Northern blot hybridizations with nonradioactive techniques. With the following examples, we would like to share our protocol for performing highly sensitive Northern blots. This procedure strictly adheres to the standard procedures detailed in our manuals and pack inserts, and there are no special "tricks" required. As a target, we have used total human skeletal muscle RNA (Clontech). We selected two probes: beta-actin and a probe comprising the cDNA of the transcription factor CTF1, which expresses a low abundant mRNA. We used in vitro transcribed RNAs exclusively as probes because, during the development of the DIG System, we have found that RNA probes exhibit a 10-100-fold higher sensitivity with RNA targets than do DNA probes. They are also less prone to background problems caused by probe concentrations that are too high. For DNA probes, we recommend an optimal probe concentration of 25 ng/ml. Using a probe concentration that is even slightly too high (e.g., 1.5 fold) will dramatically increase the background. For RNA probes, we recommend an optimal probe concentration of 100 ng/ml, which will not lead to background problems. In the following examples, we describe all experimental details, starting from the gel run for the blot. PMID:9159199

  17. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  18. Isolation of mRNA from specific tissues of Drosophila by mRNA tagging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Edenberg, Howard J; Davis, Ronald L

    2005-01-01

    To study the function of specific cells or tissues using genomic tools like microarray analyses, it is highly desirable to obtain mRNA from a homogeneous source. However, this is particularly challenging for small organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We have optimized and applied a new technique, mRNA tagging, to isolate mRNA from specific tissues of D.melanogaster. A FLAG-tagged poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) is expressed in a specific tissue and mRNA from that tissue is thus tagged by the recombinant PABP and separated from mRNA in other tissues by co-immunoprecipitation with a FLAG-tag specific antibody. The fractionated mRNA is then amplified and used as probe in microarray experiments. As a test system, we employed the procedures to identify genes expressed in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. We found that most known photoreceptor cell-specific mRNAs were identified by mRNA tagging. Furthermore, at least 11 novel genes have been identified as enriched in photoreceptor cells. mRNA tagging is a powerful general method for profiling gene expression in specific tissues and for identifying tissue-specific genes. PMID:16204451

  19. [Quantitative Analysis of Immuno-fluorescence of Nuclear Factor-κB Activation].

    PubMed

    Xiu, Min; He, Feng; Lou, Yuanlei; Xu, Lu; Xiong Jieqi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Sisun; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-01

    Immuno-fluorescence technique can qualitatively determine certain nuclear translocation, of which NF-κB/ p65 implicates the activation of NF-κB signal pathways. Immuno-fluorescence analysis software with independent property rights is able to quantitatively analyze dynamic location of NF-κB/p65 by computing relative fluorescence units in nuclei and cytoplasm. We verified the quantitative analysis by Western Blot. When we applied the software to analysis of nuclear translocation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced (0. 5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h) primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) , we found that nuclear translocation peak showed up at 2h as with calculated Western blot verification results, indicating that the inventive immuno-fluorescence analysis software can be applied to the quantitative analysis of immuno-fluorescence. PMID:26485997

  20. IL-2 or IL-4 mRNA as a potential flow cytometric marker molecule for selective collection of living T helper 1 or T helper 2 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kaname; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2003-06-01

    Flow cytometry has been widely used to analyze and sort out particular types of living cells that have specific marker molecules. In many cases, marker proteins are present on the cell surface and are detected by monoclonal antibodies against them. However, there are some cases in which cells do not have specific marker molecules on their surface. In this situation, it would be useful if mRNA that is expressed specifically in the particular cell could be used as a marker molecule. We previously reported that mRNA can be detected in living cells by hybridizing a pair of fluoreophore (donor or acceptor)-labeled oligonucleotides to adjacent locations on the target mRNA in the cytoplasm of cells (Tsuji, A.; Koshimoto, H.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, M.; Sei-Iida, Y.; Kondo, S.; Ishibashi, K. Biophys. J. 2000, 78, 3260-3274). On the formed hybrid of the two fluorescent oligonucleotides with the target mRNA, the distance between the two fluorophores becomes very close, which results in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Combining this fluorescent labeling method for mRNA with flow cytometry, we have examined the isolation of living CD4+ T helper lymphocytes expressing IL-2 mRNA (Th1) or IL-4 mRNA (Th2). A pair of fluorescent oligonucleotides for hybridizing to IL-2 or IL-4 mRNA were introduced into activated CD4+ T lymphocytes by electroporation. The cells were applied to FACS and analyzed by FRET signals. Th1 or Th2 lymphocytes were exclusively sorted from their mixed populations in activated CD4+ T cells. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to use mRNA as marker molecules to analyze and isolate living cells in flow cytometry. PMID:12948141

  1. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  2. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis. PMID:8455155

  3. Dietary copper can regulate the level of mRNA for dopamine B-hydroxylase in rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sabban, E.L.; Failla, M.L.; McMahon, A.; Seidel, K.E. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that Cu deficiency markedly alters the levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in several peripheral tissues of rodents. Conversion of DA to NE is mediated by dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBM). Here the authors examined the effect of dietary Cu deficiency on the levels of DA, NE and DBM mRNA in rat adrenal gland. Severe Cu deficiency was induced by feeding low Cu diet to dams beginning at 17d gestation and weaning pups to the same diet. At 7 wks of age rats fed {minus}Cu diet were characterized by depressed growth, low tissue Cu, enlarged hearts and moderate anemia. Concentrations of DA were higher in adrenals and hearts of {minus}Cu rats compared to +Cu controls. While cardiac level of NE in {minus}Cu rats were reduced to 17% that of controls, adrenal NE was unchanged by Cu deficiency. To investigate possible mechanisms responsible for the response of adrenal gland to Cu deficiency, RNA was isolated and the levels of DBH mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blots. Steady state levels of adrenal DBH mRNA was increased 2-3 fold in {minus}Cu rats, whereas TH mRNA were unchanged by dietary Cu status. Upon feeding the {minus}Cu rats the Cu adequate diet overnight, there was a further increase in DBH mRNA and a slight elevation of TH mRNA levels. The results indicate that dietary copper can markedly affect the level of DBH mRNA in rat adrenal gland.

  4. miR-155 targets Caspase-3 mRNA in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Rebecca; Liepelt, Anke; Mossanen, Jana C; Dueck, Anne; Simons, Nadine; Mohs, Antje; Trautwein, Christian; Meister, Gunter; Marx, Gernot; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H

    2016-01-01

    To secure the functionality of activated macrophages in the innate immune response, efficient life span control is required. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces downstream signaling pathways, which merge to induce the expression of cytokine genes and anti-apoptotic genes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important inflammatory response modulators, but information about their functional impact on apoptosis is scarce. To identify miRNAs differentially expressed in response to LPS, cDNA libraries from untreated and LPS-activated murine macrophages were analyzed by deep sequencing and regulated miRNA expression was verified by Northern blotting and qPCR. Employing TargetScan(TM) we identified CASPASE-3 (CASP-3) mRNA that encodes a key player in apoptosis as potential target of LPS-induced miR-155. LPS-dependent primary macrophage activation revealed TLR4-mediated enhancement of miR-155 expression and CASP-3 mRNA reduction. Endogenous CASP-3 and cleaved CASP-3 protein declined in LPS-activated macrophages. Accumulation of miR-155 and CASP-3 mRNA in miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISC) was demonstrated by ARGONAUTE 2 (AGO2) immunoprecipitation. Importantly, specific antagomir transfection effectively reduced mature miR-155 and resulted in significantly elevated CASP-3 mRNA levels in activated macrophages. In vitro translation assays demonstrated that the target site in the CASP-3 mRNA 3'UTR mediates miR-155-dependent Luciferase reporter mRNA destabilization. Strikingly, Annexin V staining of macrophages transfected with antagomir-155 and stimulated with LPS prior to staurosporine (SSP) treatment implied that LPS-induced miR-155 prevents apoptosis through CASP-3 mRNA down-regulation. In conclusion, we report that miR-155-mediated CASP-3 mRNA destabilization in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages suppresses apoptosis, as a prerequisite to maintain their crucial function in inflammation. PMID:26574931

  5. A Slot Blot Immunoassay for Quantitative Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein in Mosquito Midgut Oocyst

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjai; Zheng, Hong; Deng, Bingbing; Mahajan, Babita; Grabias, Bryan; Kozakai, Yukiko; Morin, Merribeth J.; Locke, Emily; Birkett, Ashley; Miura, Kazutoyo; Long, Carole

    2014-01-01

    There is still a need for sensitive and reproducible immunoassays for quantitative detection of malarial antigens in preclinical and clinical phases of vaccine development and in epidemiology and surveillance studies, particularly in the vector host. Here we report the results of sensitivity and reproducibility studies for a research-grade, quantitative enhanced chemiluminescent-based slot blot assay (ECL-SB) for detection of both recombinant Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (rPfCSP) and native PfCSP from Oocysts (Pf Oocyst) developing in the midguts of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. The ECL-SB detects as little as 1.25 pg of rPfCSP (linear range of quantitation 2.5–20 pg; R2 = 0.9505). We also find the earliest detectable expression of native PfCSP in Pf Oocyst by ECL-SB occurs on day 7 post feeding with infected blood meal. The ECL-SB was able to detect approximately as few as 0.5 day 8 Pf Oocysts (linear quantitation range 1–4, R2 = 0.9795) and determined that one Pf Oocyst expressed approximately 2.0 pg (0.5–3 pg) of native PfCSP, suggesting a similar range of detection for recombinant and native forms of Pf CSP. The ECL-SB is highly reproducible; the Coefficient of Variation (CV) for inter-assay variability for rPf CSP and native PfCSP were 1.74% and 1.32%, respectively. The CVs for intra-assay variability performed on three days for rPf CSP were 2.41%, 0.82% and 2% and for native Pf CSP 1.52%, 0.57%, and 1.86%, respectively. In addition, the ECL-SB was comparable to microscopy in determining the P. falciparum prevalence in mosquito populations that distinctly contained either high and low midgut Pf Oocyst burden. In whole mosquito samples, estimations of positivity for P. falciparum in the high and low burden groups were 83.3% and 23.3% by ECL-SB and 85.7% and 27.6% by microscopy. Based on its performance characteristics, ECL-SB could be valuable in vaccine development and to measure the parasite prevalence in mosquitoes and

  6. Sex Differences in Global mRNA Content of Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Amy C.; Fu, Minghua H.; Isfort, Robert J.; Varbanov, Alex R.; Qu, Xiaoyan A.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Women oxidize more fat as compared to men during endurance exercise and several groups have shown that the mRNA content of selected genes related to fat oxidation are higher in women (e.g. hormone sensitive lipase, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, CD36). One of the possible mechanisms is that women tend to have a higher area percentage of type I skeletal muscle fibers as compared with men. Consequently, we hypothesized that sex would influence the basal mRNA and protein content for genes involved in metabolism and the determination of muscle fiber type. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were collected from healthy men and women. We examined mRNA content globally using Affymetrix GeneChips, and selected genes were examined and/or confirmed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, we examined protein content by Western blot analysis. Stringent gene array analysis revealed 66 differentially expressed genes representing metabolism, mitochondrial function, transport, protein biosynthesis, cell proliferation, signal transduction pathways, transcription and translation. Stringent gene array analysis and RT-PCR confirmed that mRNA for; acyl-coenzyme A acyltransferase 2 (ACAA2), trifunctional protein β (HADHB), catalase, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) were higher in women. Targeted gene analysis revealed that myosin heavy chain I (MHCI), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)δ were higher in women compared with men. Surprisingly, there were no significant sex based differences in protein content for HADHB, ACAA2, catalase, PPARδ, and MHC1. In conclusion, the differences in the basal mRNA content in resting skeletal muscle suggest that men and women are transcriptionally “primed” for known physiological differences in metabolism however the mechanism behind sex differences in fiber type remains to be determined. PMID:19623254

  7. Expression of CCT6A mRNA in chicken granulosa cells is regulated by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingqing; Zhu, Guiyu; Cui, Xinxing; Kang, Li; Cao, Dingguo; Jiang, Yunliang

    2013-08-01

    CCT6A, the zeta subunit of the chaperonin containing TCP1 complex, is the only cytosolic chaperonin in eukaryotes and is estimated to assist in the folding of multiple proteins including actin, tubulin, cyclin E, myosin, transducin and the Von Hippel Lindau tumor suppressor. In this study, we examined the expression of CCT6A and progesterone receptor (PGR) mRNA in various tissues of chickens and the regulation of CCT6A and PGR mRNA in ovarian granulosa cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that CCT6A had one transcript and was highly expressed in the ovary tissues from chickens at both the sexually immature and mature stages. CCT6A mRNA expression was increased maximally from pre-hierarchy follicles to F5 follicles and subsequently declined in pre-ovulatory and post-ovulatory follicles. The expression of PGR mRNA exhibited the similar pattern to CCT6A. In granulosa cells isolated from pre-ovulatory follicles, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) inhibited the expression of CCT6A mRNA, whereas progesterone activated CCT6A and suppressed PGR expression in a time-dependent manner. We further investigated the regulation of CCT6A transcription by progesterone by constructing various progressive deletions and mutants and identified the core promoter element of CCT6A and the binding region of progesterone, which is located from -2056 to -2051. Taken together, our results indicate that CCT6A likely plays an important role in follicle growth, and in granulosa cells, progesterone activates CCT6A transcription via a progesterone response element (PRE) located in the distal promoter of CCT6A. PMID:23644154

  8. Dithranol downregulates expression of Id1 mRNA in human keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ronpirin, C; Tencomnao, T

    2012-01-01

    The precise causes of psoriasis, a chronic skin disorder characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and incomplete keratinization, are unclear. It is known that expression of helix-loop-helix transcription factor Id1, which functions as an inhibitor of differentiation, is upregulated in psoriatic skin. We investigated the effect of the antipsoriatic drug dithranol on mRNA and protein expression levels of Id1 in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line. Cultured HaCaT cells were treated with 0-0.5 μg/mL dithranol for 30 min. After 2 and 4 h, total cellular RNA and total proteins were isolated from HaCaT cells, and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of Id1, respectively. Changes in normalized Id1 mRNA levels were observed only after 4 h of dithranol treatment. There was reduced expression of Id1 mRNA transcripts in the HaCaT cells treated with 0.1 μg/mL dithranol, but the reduction was not significant. The expression of Id1 mRNA was significantly downregulated (almost 50%) when 0.25 or 0.5 μg/mL dithranol was applied to the HaCaT cells. However, the normalized Id1 protein levels were not significantly affected. The molecular mechanisms underlying this finding should be investigated further to help determine the therapeutic action of this drug. PMID:23079823

  9. Comparison of IgE expression at the mRNA and protein levels in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, K J; Creany, J; Coelen, R J; Cameron, K J; Holt, B J; Beilharz, M W

    1991-01-01

    The regulating effects of IL-4 and pokeweed mitogen on IgE synthesis in vitro by human peripheral blood leucocytes has been compared with the corresponding effect of these regulators on the expression of IgE mRNA. The latter was measured by dot blot hybridization with an oligonucleotide coding for a unique six amino acid region of the CH epsilon 2 domain. Specificity of the oligonucleotide probe was established by its inability to hybridize with RNA extracted from HMY-2 (IgG) and XQ-15 (IgM) secreting cell lines whilst producing intense signals with RNA extracted from the IgE secreting cell line U266. Whilst IgE mRNA was detected in RNA extracted from PBL of both atopic and control subjects, spontaneous IgE synthesis was restricted to atopic PBL. IL-4 increased both IgE mRNA and IgE synthesis in all PBL samples but PWM, while significantly increasing IgE mRNA expression either failed to modify IgE synthesis or actively suppressed it. The assay system employed to quantitate IgE synthesis in vitro was shown to be inhibited by both IgE binding factors and IgG anti-IgE autoantibodies which are produced in PBL cultures. IgE mRNA levels might therefore more accurately monitor the regulatory effects of IL-4 and PWM on IgE synthesis than quantitation of the IgE by radioimmunoassay. Images Figure 1 PMID:1783428

  10. Colocalisation of matrix metalloproteinase-9-mRNA and protein in human colorectal cancer stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Z. S.; Guillem, J. G.

    1996-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are perceived as essential for tumour invasion and metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression and cellular localisation of the 92 kDa type IV collagenase (MMP-9) protein and mRNA in human colorectal cancer (CRC). In CRC and matched normal mucosa specimens from 26 CRC patients, Northern blot hybridisation and Western blot analyses provide convincing evidence that MMP-9 is expressed in greater quantities in CRC than in normal tissue. The MMP-9 tumour to normal mucosa fold-increase (T/N) was 9.7 +/- 7.1 (mean +/- s.d.) (P < 0.001) for RNA and 7.1 +/- 3.9 (P < 0.001) for protein. The sites of MMP-9 mRNA and protein synthesis were colocalised in tumour stroma by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry in 26 CRC samples. Both MMP-9 mRNA and protein signals were strongest in the population of stromal cells concentrated at the tumour-stroma interface of an invading tumour. Furthermore, MMP-9-positive cells were identified as macrophages using an antimacrophage antibody (KP1) in serial sections from ten CRC samples. Given the persistent localisation of MMP-9-producing macrophages to the interphase between CRC and surrounding stroma, our observations suggest that MMP-9 production is controlled, in part, by tumour-stroma cell interactions. Further studies are needed to determine the in vivo regulation of MMP-9 production from infiltrating peritumour macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8883399

  11. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  12. GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA: novel splice variants in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum and in human monocytes (THP-1) indicate conservation of mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Heufler, C; Strohmaier, W; Gröbner, P; Werner-Felmayer, G

    2001-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin [(6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin, H(4)-biopterin] in mammals and of folic acid in bacteria. Here we have characterized the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene structure and two mRNA species from Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould that synthesizes H(4)-biopterin and metabolites of the folic acid biosynthetic pathway. Its GTP cyclohydrolase I gene consists of seven exons, and the two GTP cyclohydrolase I cDNA species isolated from Physarum encode for proteins with 228 (25.7 kDa) and 195 (22.1 kDa) amino acids. Furthermore, we identified two previously undescribed mRNA species in interferon-gamma-treated human myelomonocytoma cells (THP-1) in addition to the cDNA coding for the fully functional 250-residue (27.9 kDa) protein, which is identical with that in human phaeochromocytoma cells. One of the new splice variants codes for a 233-residue (25.7 kDa) protein, whereas the other codes for the full-length protein but is alternatively spliced within the 3'-untranslated region. In heterologous expression, the shorter proteins of Physarum as well as of THP-1 cells identified here are degraded by proteolysis. Accordingly, only the 27.9 kDa protein was detectable in Western blots from THP-1 cell extracts. Quantification of GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA species in different human cell types with and without cytokine treatment showed that in addition to the correct mRNA the two splice variants isolated here, as well as the two splice variants known from human liver, are strongly induced by cytokines in cell types with inducible GTP cyclohydrolase I (THP-1, dermal fibroblasts), but not in cell types with constitutive GTP cyclohydrolase I expression (SK-N-SH, Hep-G2). As in human liver, splicing of the new mRNA variant found in THP-1 cells occurs at the boundary of exons 5 and 6. Strikingly, the 195-residue protein from Physarum is alternatively spliced at a homologous position

  13. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export. PMID:26784711

  14. Enrichment of PrPSc in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissues Prior to Analysis by Western Blot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diagnosis of prion disease is primarily through immunodetection of the infectious agent. Typically, 2 distinct procedures are recommended for a definitive diagnosis with immunohistochemistry and Western blot providing the most information as to the specific isolate in question. In the past these app...

  15. Identification of species in tribe Brassiceae by dot-blot hybridization using species-specific ITS1 probes.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K; Nishio, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Simple, reliable methods for identification of species are required for management of many species and lines in a plant gene bank. Species-specific probes were designed from published sequences of the ITS1 region in rDNA of 16 species in Brassica and its related genera, and used as probes for dot-blot hybridization with plant genomic DNA. All the probes detected species-specific signals at dot-blots of genomic DNAs of the 16 species in Brassica, Diplotaxis, Eruca, and Raphanus. Signals of the Brassica digenomic species in the U's triangle, i.e., B. napus, B. juncea, and B. carinata, were detected by the probes of their parental monogenomic species, i.e., B. rapa, B. nigra, and B. oleracea. The probe for B. oleracea showed signals of B. balearica, B. cretica, B. incana, B. insularis, and B. macrocarpa, which have the C genome as B. oleracea. Eruca vesicaria DNA was detected by the probe for E. sativa, which has been classified as a subspecies of E. vescaria. DNA of leaf tissue extracted by an alkaline solution and seed DNA prepared by the NaI method can be used directly for dot-blotting. Misidentification of species was revealed in 20 accessions in the Tohoku University Brassica Seed Bank. These results indicate dot-blot hybridization to be a simple and efficient technique for identification of plant species in a gene bank. PMID:20683723

  16. Kinetic Induction of Oat Shoot Pulvinus Invertase mRNA by Gravistimulation and Partial cDNA Cloning by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom halves of pulvini) induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation was analyzed in oat shoot pulvini. Total RNA and poly(A)(+) RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oli-gonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A partial length cDNA (550 bp) was obtained and characterized. A 62% nucleotide sequence homology and 58% deduced amino acid sequence homology, as compared to beta-fructosidase of carrot cell wall, was found. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obviously transient induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation in the oat pulvinus system. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1 hour after gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The kinetic induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient accumulation of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. This indicates that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional level. Southern blot analysis showed that there were two to three genomic DNA fragments which hybridized with the partial-length invertase cDNA.

  17. Protein and mRNA characterization in high and low metastasis adenoid cystic carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie-lin; Zhu, Nai-shuo; Wang, Ying; Guan, Xiao-feng; Zheng, Zhao-xin

    2004-12-01

    Metastasis and invasion, the important characteristics of malignant tumors, are closely associated with a series of changes in the expression of genes and proteins. In this study, we compare mRNA and protein expression in high and low metastasis adenoid cystic carcinoma cell lines by mRNA suppression subtractive hybridization and two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with peptide mass fingerprint analysis. 34 differentially expressed genes were obtained using suppression subtractive hybridization experiments including 6 highly expressed gene sequences in the high metastasis cell line, and 28 in the low metastasis cell line. RNA dot blot hybridization further confirmed the results after excluding false positives. For protein analysis, ten significantly different protein spots were detected using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI- TOF-MS). The results then compare with the SWISS PROT database. These results suggest that high tumor metastasis of adenoid cystic carcinoma is associated with multiple genes whose function include angiogenesis, protein synthesis, signal transduction, modulation of cell cycle, molecular chaperones, and immune co-stimulating molecule. Moreover, the results of the phenotypic function-related expression mapping analysis at the mRNA and protein level revealed obvious complementarities, providing important clues for further study of the molecular mechanism of metastasis, metastasis control and possible targets for cancer gene therapy. PMID:15663007

  18. Expression of connexin 43 mRNA and protein in developing follicles of prepubertal porcine ovaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melton, C.M.; Zaunbrecher, G.M.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patio, R.; Whisnant, S.; Rendon, A.; Lee, V.H.

    2001-01-01

    A major form of cell-cell communication is mediated by gap junctions, aggregations of intercellular channels composed of connexins (Cxs), which are responsible for exchange of low molecular weight (< 1200 Da) cytosolic materials. These channels are a growing family of related proteins. This study was designed to determine the ontogeny of connexin 43 (Cx43) during early stages of follicular development in prepubertal porcine ovaries. A partial-length (412 base) cDNA clone was obtained from mature porcine ovaries and determined to have 98% identity with published porcine Cx43. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.3-kb mRNA in total RNA isolated from prepubertal and adult porcine ovaries. In-situ hybridization revealed that Cx43 mRNA was detectable in granulosa cells of primary follicles but undetectable in dormant primordial follicles. The intensity of the signal increased with follicular growth and was greatest in the large antral follicles. Immunohistochemical evaluation indicated that Cx43 protein expression correlated with the presence of Cx43 mRNA. These results indicate that substantial amounts of Cx43 are first expressed in granulosa cells following activation of follicular development and that this expression increases throughout follicular growth and maturation. These findings suggest an association between the enhancement of intercellular gap-junctional communication and onset of follicular growth. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elongation factor 1 gamma mRNA expression in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mimori, K; Mori, M; Inoue, H; Ueo, H; Mafune, K; Akiyoshi, T; Sugimachi, K

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 gamma (EF1 gamma) is known to be a subunit of EF1, one of the G proteins that mediate the transport of aminoacyl tRNA to 80S ribosomes during translation. As little is known regarding the expression of EF1 gamma in human oesophageal carcinoma, this study looked at its expression using a northern blot analysis. Thirty six cases of oesophageal carcinoma and 15 oesophageal carcinoma cell lines were studied. The EF1 gamma mRNA overexpression at a level of twofold or more was seen in five (14%) of 36 carcinomatous tissues compared with the normal counterparts. All five overexpressed cases showed severe lymph node metastases compared with the non-overexpressed cases, and the difference was significant (p = 0.028). The stage of the disease of these five cases was far advanced compared with the nonoverexpressed cases (p = 0.012). All 15 oesophageal carcinoma cells expressed EF1 gamma mRNA relatively lower than the gastric or pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, in which EF1 gamma was originally isolated. As the expression of EF1 gamma mRNA could be detected even in the biopsy specimens, its overexpression in tumour tissue may provide preoperative useful information for predicting the aggressiveness of tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8566862

  20. Mucin Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Western Blotting for High-molecular-weight Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Rushton, Zachary L; Ehre, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Mucins, the heavily-glycosylated proteins lining mucosal surfaces, have evolved as a key component of innate defense by protecting the epithelium against invading pathogens. The main role of these macromolecules is to facilitate particle trapping and clearance while promoting lubrication of the mucosa. During protein synthesis, mucins undergo intense O-glycosylation and multimerization, which dramatically increase the mass and size of these molecules. These post-translational modifications are critical for the viscoelastic properties of mucus. As a result of the complex biochemical and biophysical nature of these molecules, working with mucins provides many challenges that cannot be overcome by conventional protein analysis methods. For instance, their high-molecular-weight prevents electrophoretic migration via regular polyacrylamide gels and their sticky nature causes adhesion to experimental tubing. However, investigating the role of mucins in health (e.g., maintaining mucosal integrity) and disease (e.g., hyperconcentration, mucostasis, cancer) has recently gained interest and mucins are being investigated as a therapeutic target. A better understanding of the production and function of mucin macromolecules may lead to novel pharmaceutical approaches, e.g., inhibitors of mucin granule exocytosis and/or mucolytic agents. Therefore, consistent and reliable protocols to investigate mucin biology are critical for scientific advancement. Here, we describe conventional methods to separate mucin macromolecules by electrophoresis using an agarose gel, transfer protein into nitrocellulose membrane, and detect signal with mucin-specific antibodies as well as infrared fluorescent gel reader. These techniques are widely applicable to determine mucin quantitation, multimerization and to test the effects of pharmacological compounds on mucins. PMID:27341489

  1. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  2. Reduced XPC DNA repair gene mRNA levels in clinically normal parents of xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sikandar G; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Shahlavi, Tala; Ueda, Takahiro; Busch, David B; Inui, Hiroki; Emmert, Steffen; Imoto, Kyoko; Muniz-Medina, Vanessa; Baker, Carl C; DiGiovanna, John J; Schmidt, Deborah; Khadavi, Arash; Metin, Ahmet; Gozukara, Engin; Slor, Hanoch; Sarasin, Alain; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Patients with two mutant alleles of the XPC DNA repair gene have sun sensitivity and a 1000-fold increase in skin cancers. Clinically normal parents of XP-C patients have one mutant allele and one normal allele. As a step toward evaluating cancer risk in these XPC heterozygotes we characterized cells from 16 XP families. We identified 15 causative mutations (5 frameshift, 6 nonsense and 4 splicing) in the XPC gene in cells from 16 XP probands. All had premature termination codons (PTC) and absence of normal XPC protein on western blotting. The cell lines from 26 parents were heterozygous for the same mutations. We employed a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR assay as a rapid and sensitive method to measure XPC mRNA levels. The mean XPC mRNA levels in the cell lines from the XP-C probands were 24% (P<10(-7)) of that in 10 normal controls. This reduced XPC mRNA level in cells from XP-C patients was caused by the PTC that induces nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The mean XPC mRNA levels in cell lines from the heterozygous XP-C carriers were intermediate (59%, P=10(-4)) between the values for the XP patients and the normal controls. This study demonstrates reduced XPC mRNA levels in XP-C patients and heterozygotes. Thus, XPC mRNA levels may be evaluated as a marker of cancer susceptibility in carriers of mutations in the XPC gene. PMID:16081512

  3. DDX6 recruits translational silenced human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase mRNA to RNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Naarmann, Isabel S.; Harnisch, Christiane; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Urlaub, Henning; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.

    2010-01-01

    Erythroid precursor cells lose the capacity for mRNA synthesis due to exclusion of the nucleus during maturation. Therefore, the stability and translation of mRNAs that code for specific proteins, which function in late stages of maturation when reticulocytes become erythrocytes, are controlled tightly. Reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase (r15-LOX) initiates the breakdown of mitochondria in mature reticulocytes. Through the temporal restriction of mRNA translation, the synthesis of r15-LOX is prevented in premature cells. The enzyme is synthesized only in mature reticulocytes, although r15-LOX mRNA is already present in erythroid precursor cells. Translation of r15-LOX mRNA is inhibited by hnRNP K and hnRNP E1, which bind to the differentiation control element (DICE) in its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). The hnRNP K/E1-DICE complex interferes with the joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit to the 40S subunit at the AUG. We took advantage of the inducible human erythroid K562 cell system that fully recapitulates this process to identify so far unknown factors, which are critical for DICE-dependent translational regulation. Applying RNA chromatography with the DICE as bait combined with hnRNP K immunoprecipitation, we specifically purified the DEAD-box RNA helicase 6 (DDX6) that interacts with hnRNP K and hnRNP E1 in a DICE-dependent manner. Employing RNA interference and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that DDX6 colocalizes with endogenous human (h)r15-LOX mRNA to P-body–like RNP granules, from which 60S ribosomal subunits are excluded. Our data suggest that in premature erythroid cells translational silencing of hr15-LOX mRNA is maintained by DDX6 mediated storage in these RNP granules. PMID:20884783

  4. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. PMID:23931503

  5. Lifetime fluorescence spectroscopy for in situ investigation of osteogenic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Elbarbary, Amir; Zuk, Patricia; De Ugarte, Daniel A.; Benhaim, Prosper; Kurt, Hamza; Hedrick, Marc H.; Ashjian, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) represents a potential tool for the in-situ characterization of bioengineered tissues. In this study, we evaluate the application of TR-LIFS to non-intrusive monitoring of matrix composition during osteogenetic differentiation. Human adipose-derived stem cells, harvested from 3 patients, were induced in osteogenic media for 3, 5, and 7 weeks. Samples were subsequently collected and probed for time-resolved fluorescence emission with a pulsed nitrogen laser. Fluorescence parameters, derived from both spectral- and time-domain, were used for sample characterization. The samples were further analyzed using Western blot analysis and computer-based densitometry. A significant change in the fluorescence parameters was detected for samples beyond 3 weeks of osteogenic differentiation. The spectroscopic observations: 1) show increase of collagen I when contrasted against the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of commercially available collagens; and 2) are in agreement with Western blot analysis that demonstrated significant increase in collagen I content between 3- vs. 5-weeks and 3- vs. 7-weeks and no changes for collagens III, IV, and V. Our results suggest that TR-LIFS can be used as a non-invasive means for the detection of specific collagens in maturing connective tissues.

  6. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  7. Interferon activity of mitogen-induced chicken splenic lymphocytes which do not express interferon mRNA.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S K; Cloud, S S; Burnside, J

    1996-10-01

    Interferon activity was measured in media from virally infected chicken embryo fibroblasts and Concanavalin A-stimulated splenic lymphocytes using a viral inhibition assay. Both cell types produce interferon activity. A cDNA probe corresponding to a chicken interferon mRNA was used to probe Northern blots of RNA prepared from both cells. A single hybridizing species of 900 bases was detected in virally infected fibroblast RNA, but no hybridizing species was detected in the splenic lymphocytes. These results suggest that the interferon activity produced by lymphocytes is of different molecular origin than the corresponding activity produced by virally infected fibroblasts. PMID:8969047

  8. A western blot assay to measure cyclin dependent kinase activity in cells or in vitro without the use of radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cody W; Taylor, Ryan G; Kubara, Philip M; Marshall, Kris; Meijer, Laurent; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2013-09-17

    We developed a quantitative method to measure the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) by western blotting, without radioisotopes. We prepared a recombinant protein substrate based upon the natural Cdk1 substrate, PP1Cα. By combining this substrate in a western blot method using fluorochrome based antibodies and phospho-imager analysis, we measured the Km of ATP binding to Cdk1 to be 3.5 μM. We then measured Cdk1 activity in cell extracts from interphase or mitotic cells, and demonstrated that previously identified Cdk inhibitors could be detected by this assay. Our data show that we have a safe, reliable assay to identify Cdk1 inhibitors and measure Cdk1 activity. PMID:23954627

  9. Western blot (immunoblot) assay of small, round-structured virus associated with an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in Tokyo.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y; Ando, T; Utagawa, E; Sekine, S; Okada, S; Yabuuchi, K; Miki, T; Ohashi, M

    1989-01-01

    Small, round-structured virus (SRSV) was detected in a stool specimen of a patient during an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in Tokyo and was tentatively named SRSV-9. SRSV-9 was purified by sucrose velocity gradient centrifugation after CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The buoyant density of SRSV-9 appeared to be 1.36 g/ml in CsCl. A Western blot (immunoblot) assay using the biotin-avidin system revealed that SRSV-9 was antigenically related to the Hawaii agent but distinct from the Norwalk agent and contained a single major structural protein with a molecular size of 63.0 +/- 0.6 kilodaltons. The prevalence of SRSV-9 infection in Tokyo was surveyed by the Western blot antibody assay by using a crude virus preparation as the antigen. Seroconversion was observed in 56.5% of the patients involved in the outbreaks from which SRSV was detected by electron microscopy. Images PMID:2504773

  10. Immunological Diagnosis of Human Cystic Echinococcosis: Utility of Discriminant Analysis Applied to the Enzyme-Linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot

    PubMed Central

    Gadea, I.; Ayala, G.; Diago, M. T.; Cuñat, A.; de Lomas, J. García

    1999-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot for the diagnosis of human hydatid disease was performed, and the different antibody responses were analyzed by a discriminant analysis. This multivariate technique gave us, first, a selection of the most important responses against Echinococcus granulosus infection and, second, a procedure for the classification of patients into two groups: patients with hydatid disease and patients without a history of hydatid disease. This method was applied to 67 patients, 25 with active hydatid cysts (24 hepatic and 1 pulmonary) and 42 without a history of hydatid disease and was compared with the results obtained by conventional serology: indirect hemagglutination, latex particle agglutination, and basophil degranulation. An immunoelectrotransfer blot coupled to a discriminant analysis was more sensitive than conventional serological diagnosis and detected 100% of patients with an active hepatic hydatid cyst with a specificity of 100%. This method, however, failed to detect an uncomplicated hyaline pulmonary hydatid cyst. PMID:10391851

  11. Hippocampal damage and kainic acid injection induce a rapid increase in mRNA for BDNF and NGF in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ballarín, M; Ernfors, P; Lindefors, N; Persson, H

    1991-10-01

    In situ hybridization and Northern blots were used to study expression of mRNAs for members of the nerve growth factor family in the rat brain following an excitatory stimulus. One hour after a unilateral needle insertion or saline injection into the dorsal hippocampus, the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA increased markedly in granular neurons of the dentate gyrus and in the piriform cortex ipsilateral to the injection. The same treatment also increased the level of NGF mRNA in granular neurons of the ipsilateral dentate gyrus. The rapid increase in BDNF and NGF mRNA after a needle insertion or injection of saline was transient and preceded by an increase in c-fos mRNA in the same brain regions. In contrast to a needle insertion per se or a saline injection, 7 h after a unilateral injection of kainic acid into the dorsal hippocampus, the level of BDNF mRNA was dramatically increased in the ipsilateral hippocampus, as well as in the ipsilateral frontoparietal, piriform and perihinal cortex, the amygdaloid complex, claustrum, and ventromedial hypothalamus. A less pronounced increase was also seen in these brain areas on the contralateral side. Northern blots revealed that the level of BDNF mRNA increased 5- and 40-fold in the contra- and ipsilateral hippocampus, respectively, compared to sham-operated control animals. In contrast to BDNF and NGF, the level of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrohin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA was not altered by either needle insertion or injection of saline or kainic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1915733

  12. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  13. Cross antigenicity of immunodominant polypeptides of somatic antigen of Oesophagostomum columbianum with other helminths by western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sunita; Prasad, Arvind; Nasir, Abdul; Saini, Vijesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Oesophagostomum columbianum in small ruminants in India is found as mixed infection commonly in sheep and goat. Haemonchus contortus, an abomasal nematode is found as concurrent infection with it. Eggs of Haemonchus and O. columbianum cannot be easily distinguished. Diagnosis of O. columbianum may only be possible if a non-cross antigenic polypeptide was available for immunodiagnosis. Materials and Methods: Somatic antigen (SoAg) of O. columbianum was fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunodominant polypeptides were identified by western blotting with homologous hyperimmune serum (HIS) and experimental sera of sheep or goat infected with other helminths. Results: SoAg of O. columbianum was immunoaffinity purified. Sharp polypeptide bands of 130, 72 and 68 KDa were observed along with several faint bands of lower molecular weight. Western blot of purified SoAg of O. columbianum with homologous HIS showed reaction with all the protein bands of 17, 28, 30, 32, 35, 38, 50, 68, 100, 130, 150, and 170 kDa. For identification of non-cross antigenic polypeptide, immunoaffinity purified SoAg of O. columbianum was reacted to heterologous HIS against H. contortus, Paramphistomum epiclitum, and Fasciola gigantica in western blotting utilizing completely dry method (i-blot). Among high molecular weight polypeptides 100 and 150 kDa were non-cross antigenic and among low molecular weight except 50 kDa polypeptide, 17, 30, 32, 35, and 38 kDa of O. columbianum were not cross antigenic with other helminths. Conclusions: Hence, polypeptides of 17, 30, 32, 35 and 38 kDa as well as 100 and 150 kDa polypeptides of O. columbianum may be exploited for immunodiagnosis of the infection in sheep and goat with extensive studies on cross antigenicity. PMID:27047030

  14. Densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and correlation with clinical status.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1987-01-01

    Western blot assays for antibodies directed against components of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were examined with a densitometer and integrator. Antibody responses to seven HIV proteins were determined from the areas under the peaks of bands on blots from 430 seropositive individuals. Antibody responses corresponded qualitatively and quantitatively with clinical status. The Western blot assays examined were done on single specimens from individuals in one of four clinical states: asymptomatic with no risk factor identified, asymptomatic with risk factor(s) identified, AIDS-related complex, and AIDS. The ratios of gp41 antibody to p24 antibody and of gp41 antibody to total HIV antibodies increased, and the number of total HIV antibodies decreased progressively in these populations. Parameters were assigned to characterize the typical response found in AIDS: gp41 antibody/p24 antibody ratio, greater than or equal to 2.0; gp41 antibody/total HIV antibodies ratio, greater than or equal to 0.30; and number of total HIV antibodies, less than or equal to 25.0 signal units. Parameter match increased with progression of clinical status. These parameters were applied in a brief follow-up study of 34 HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals who developed AIDS-related complex or AIDS. Initial specimens showed a stronger correlation than our population data base had predicted, suggesting that the parameters have prognostic value. Densitometric analysis of antibody responses on Western blot assays of single or serial specimens should prove useful to physicians in staging and monitoring HIV-infected individuals and in predicting which individuals will progress to AIDS. Images PMID:2444624

  15. A Proteomics Approach to the Protein Normalization Problem: Selection of Unvarying Proteins for MS-Based Proteomics and Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Proteomics and other protein-based analysis methods such as Western blotting all face the challenge of discriminating changes in the levels of proteins of interest from inadvertent changes in the amount loaded for analysis. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics can now estimate the relative and absolute amounts of thousands of proteins across diverse biological systems. We reasoned that this new technology could prove useful for selection of very stably expressed proteins that could serve as better loading controls than those traditionally employed. Large-scale proteomic analyses of SDS lysates of cultured cells and tissues revealed deglycase DJ-1 as the protein with the lowest variability in abundance among different cell types in human, mouse, and amphibian cells. The protein constitutes 0.069 ± 0.017% of total cellular protein and occurs at a specific concentration of 34.6 ± 8.7 pmol/mg of total protein. Since DJ-1 is ubiquitous and therefore easily detectable with several peptides, it can be helpful in normalization of proteomic data sets. In addition, DJ-1 appears to be an advantageous loading control for Western blot that is superior to those used commonly used, allowing comparisons between tissues and cells originating from evolutionarily distant vertebrate species. Notably, this is not possible by the detection and quantitation of housekeeping proteins, which are often used in the Western blot technique. The approach introduced here can be applied to select the most appropriate loading controls for MS-based proteomics or Western blotting in any biological system. PMID:27297043

  16. Use of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating lectin in histochemical and blotting techniques: a comparison of digoxigenin- and biotin-labelled lectins.

    PubMed

    Li, W P; Zuber, C; Roth, J

    1993-11-01

    An increase in the number of beta 1,6 branches of the trimannosyl core of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides has been shown to be directly correlated with the metastatic potential of cultured tumour cells. The Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating lectin (PHA-L) binds to beta 1,6 branches of tri- and tetra-antennary oligosaccharides. We have applied digoxigenin- and biotin-conjugated PHA-L to establish a non-radioactive detection system for beta 1,6 branches, which can be used in lectin blotting as well as light and electron microscopic cytochemistry. For this purpose the HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell line and colon carcinoma tissue were investigated. Digoxigenin-conjugated PHA-L in conjunction with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-digoxigenin antibodies was superior to biotin-conjugated PHA-L in lectin blotting with respect to sensitivity and specificity. Similarly, the digoxigenin conjugated PHA-L in conjunction with gold-labelled anti-digoxigenin antibodies resulted in more intense specific staining and lower background compared to biotin-conjugated PHA-L visualized with a streptavidin immunogold complex. The specificity of lectin binding in blotting and cytochemical studies was demonstrated by the absence of staining when the lectin was omitted or preabsorbed with glycoprotein, and following pretreatment of the cellular homogenates or tissue sections by N-glycosidase F. Our results demonstrate that digoxigenin-conjugated PHA-L provides high sensitivity and specificity for histochemical and blotting techniques and is amenable for quantification. The technique should have applications in tumour research. PMID:7508428

  17. Western blot can distinguish natural and acquired antibodies to Mycoplasma agassizii in the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii).

    PubMed

    Hunter, Kenneth W; Dupré, Sally A; Sharp, Tiffanny; Sandmeier, Franziska C; Tracy, C Richard

    2008-12-01

    Mycoplasma agassizi has been identified as a cause of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in the threatened Mojave population of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), and anti-M. agassizii antibodies have been found by ELISA in as many as 15% of these animals across their geographic range. Here we report that a cohort of 16 egg-reared desert tortoises never exposed to M. agassizii had ELISA antibody titers to this organism that overlapped with titers obtained from some M. agassizii-infected tortoises. These natural antibodies were predominantly of the IgM class. Western blots of plasma from these non-infected tortoises produced a characteristic banding pattern against M. agassizii antigens. A group of 38 wild-caught desert tortoises was tested by ELISA, and although some of these tortoises had antibody titers significantly higher than the non-infected tortoises, there was considerable overlap at the lower titer levels. However, Western blot analysis revealed distinct banding patterns that could readily distinguish between the non-infected tortoises and tortoises with acquired antibodies, regardless of ELISA antibody titers. We conclude that desert tortoises have natural antibodies to M. agassizii that can compromise the determination of infection status by ELISA. However, the Western blot technique can distinguish between natural and acquired antibody patterns and can be used to confirm the diagnosis of M. agassizii infections in the desert tortoise. PMID:18708096

  18. The expression and localization of mRNA for colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1 in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, H; Yui, J; Iwai, M; Imai, K; Kariya, M; Hatayama, H; Mori, T; Guilbert, L J; Wegmann, T G

    1992-04-01

    A 4-kb mRNA for colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) was detected in normal human placenta at term by Northern blot analysis. In-situ hybridization revealed that the mRNA for CSF-1 was localized in the mesenchymal cells of the chorionic villous stroma, but not in the trophoblasts or capillary epithelial cells. Because there are significant numbers of tissue macrophages (Hofbauer cells) in the placental stroma and because the receptor for CSF-1 (the c-fms proto-oncogene product) is known to be expressed by trophoblasts, our results suggest that CSF-1 produced by placental stromal cells may act as a growth and survival factor for human placental macrophages and trophoblasts. PMID:1522204

  19. Identification of endonucleolytic cleavage sites involved in decay of Escherichia coli trxA mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arraiano, C; Yancey, S D; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of individual mRNAs in Escherichia coli has been studied through the use of a multiple mutant carrying the pnp-7 (polynucleotide phosphorylase), rnb-500 (RNase II), and rne-1 (RNase E) alleles. In this triple mutant, discrete mRNA breakdown products are stabilized in vivo at the nonpermissive temperature (Arraiano, C. M., S. D. Yancey, and S. R. Kushner, J. Bacteriol. 170:4625-4633, 1988). In the case of thioredoxin (trxA) mRNA decay, degradation fragments accumulated at early times after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. Using Northern (RNA) blots, S1 nuclease analysis, and primer extensions, we identified a series of specific endonucleolytic cleavage sites that occur throughout the transcript in both the triple mutant and a wild-type control. The implications of the complex decay patterns observed are discussed. Images PMID:7679384

  20. Vitellogenin mRNA expression in Cherax quadricarinatus during secondary vitellogenic at first maturation females.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pinto, Vania; Landais, Igor; Ogliastro, Marie-Helene; Gutiérrez-Ayala, Meliza; Mejía-Ruíz, Humberto; Villarreal-Colmenares, Humberto; García-Gasca, Alejandra; Vázquez-Boucard, Celia

    2004-09-01

    PCR products of 1.1 and 0.9 kb were generated using Cherax quadricarinatus genomic DNA in the first case, and hepatopancreas and ovary cDNAs in the second case. These PCR products were cloned and analyzed for nucleotide sequences. The 1.1 kb fragment was used as a probe for Northern hybridization, revealing a transcript of approximately 8 kb in both tissues. Results from both Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that the mRNA enconding the 3' end of the vitellogenin cDNA was present simultaneously in both hepatopancreas and ovary tissues in secondary vitellogenic at first maturation females, but was not detected in male hepatopancreas. The deduced amino acid sequences of Vitellogenin (Vg) cDNAs from ovary and hepatopancreas confirmed the existence at least two different Vg genes, and two different sites of synthesis. PMID:15278899

  1. Higher plant Ca(2+)-ATPase: primary structure and regulation of mRNA abundance by salt.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmers, L E; Ewing, N N; Bennett, A B

    1992-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulatory mechanisms participate in diverse developmentally, hormonally, and environmentally regulated processes, with the precise control of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration being critical to such mechanisms. In plant cells, P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases localized in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum are thought to play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity has been identified in isolated plant cell membranes, but the protein has not been characterized at the molecular level. We have isolated a partial-length cDNA (LCA1) and a complete genomic clone (gLCA13) encoding a putative endoplasmic reticulum-localized Ca(2+)-ATPase in tomato. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a protein (Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase) of 1048 amino acids with a molecular mass of 116 kDa, eight probable transmembrane domains, and all of the highly conserved functional domains common to P-type cation-translocating ATPases. In addition, the protein shares approximately 50% amino acid sequence identify with animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases but less than 30% identity with other P-type ATPases. Genomic DNA blot hybridization analysis indicates that the Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase is encoded by a single gene. RNA blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of three transcript sizes in root tissue and a single, much less abundant, transcript in leaves. Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels increase dramatically upon a 1-day exposure to 50 mM NaCl. Thus this report describes the primary structure of a higher-plant Ca(2+)-ATPase and the regulation of its mRNA abundance by salt stress. Images PMID:1384045

  2. Protein and mRNA characterization in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines with different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Qu, Lijuan; Ding, Yanqing

    2007-09-01

    Metastasis, the important characteristic of malignant tumors, is closely associated with a series of changes in the expressions of genes and proteins. In this study, we compared mRNA and protein expressions in a pair of human colorectal carcinoma cell lines named SW620 and SW480 with different metastatic potentials by suppression subtractive hybridization and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer. After suppression subtractive hybridization and differential screening, 24 differentially expressed gene fragments were obtained, including 9 known genes and 15 novel genes. Nine known genes, such as Cytochrome C, Oxidase II and III, Serum amyloid A, Mitotic Control Protein dis3, Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4A, function in the process of growth and differentiation, transcription, apoptosis, signal transduction. Six novel genes were found to locate in chromosome 5. Northern blot further confirmed the results. For protein analysis, 16 significantly different protein spots were detected using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. The results were confirmed by Western blot. The peptide mass fingerprintings of spots were then compared with the NCBI and SWISS PROT database. The differentially expressed proteins included Galectin-1, Annexin A1, Casein kinase 2, Cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIb, S-100D calcium-binding protein, which may be involved in cell differentiation and proliferation, signal transduction, cell adhesion and migration, and tumor evasion of immune responses. An analysis of these genes and proteins reiterated much of our understanding of the metastatic process and also offered some identified targets without previously characterized functions, especially the novel metastasis associated genes, to be further investigated. Moreover, the results of the phenotypic function-related expression mapping analysis at the mRNA and

  3. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  4. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  5. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  6. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  7. Detection of gastrin mRNA in fresh human colonic carcinomas by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; Chicheportiche, C; Frances, V; Brandini, D; Parc, P; Seitz, J F; Giovannini, M; Sauvan, R

    1993-10-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that gastrin might be synthesized by tumour tissues in cancer of the colon, samples from six human colon tumours, one hepatic metastasis, four normal colonic mucosal samples and two antral and one fundic gastric mucosal samples from nine patients were analysed to determine whether gastrin mRNA was present. RNA was extracted from surgical specimens by ultracentrifugation on a CsCl cushion, purified using the guanidinium thiocyanate method, reverse-transcribed and amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Gastrin mRNA was detected in each colonic carcinoma sample (including the hepatic metastasis), while no such signal was observed in normal colon biopsies. Positive and negative controls (gastric antrum and fundus respectively) gave the expected results. In each of the positive samples, the chemiluminescent revelation of amplified products after Southern blotting corresponded to gastrin mRNA without the intron. These findings demonstrate the ability of primary and metastatic human colonic tumours to produce gastrin mRNA. Since malignant cell lines have been reported to produce gastrin peptide, and since gastrin receptors were present in some cases, our results support the idea that gastrin may be involved in an autocrine mechanism. PMID:7507679

  8. Posttranscriptional regulation of sodium-iodide symporter mRNA expression in the rat thyroid gland by acute iodide administration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Nascimento, Caroline; Calil-Silveira, Jamile; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2010-04-01

    Iodide is an important regulator of thyroid activity. Its excess elicits the Wolff-Chaikoff effect, characterized by an acute suppression of thyroid hormone synthesis, which has been ascribed to serum TSH reduction or TGF-beta increase and production of iodolipids in the thyroid. These alterations take hours/days to occur, contrasting with the promptness of Wolff-Chaikoff effect. We investigated whether acute iodide administration could trigger events that precede those changes, such as reduction of sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) mRNA abundance and adenylation, and if perchlorate treatment could counteract them. Rats subjected or not to methylmercaptoimidazole treatment (0.03%) received NaI (2,000 microg/0.5 ml saline) or saline intraperitoneally and were killed 30 min up to 24 h later. Another set of animals was treated with iodide and perchlorate, in equimolar doses. NIS mRNA content was evaluated by Northern blotting and real-time PCR, and NIS mRNA poly(A) tail length by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-poly(A) test (RACE-PAT). We observed that NIS mRNA abundance and poly(A) tail length were significantly reduced in all periods of iodide treatment. Perchlorate reversed these effects, indicating that iodide was the agent that triggered the modifications observed. Since the poly(A) tail length of mRNAs is directly associated with their stability and translation efficiency, we can assume that the rapid decay of NIS mRNA abundance observed was due to a reduction of its stability, a condition in which its translation could be impaired. Our data show for the first time that iodide regulates NIS mRNA expression at posttranscriptional level, providing a new mechanism by which iodide exerts its autoregulatory effect on thyroid. PMID:20107044

  9. Regulation of lysyl oxidase mRNA in dermal fibroblasts from normal donors and patients with inherited connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Yeowell, H N; Marshall, M K; Walker, L C; Ha, V; Pinnell, S R

    1994-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) is an extracellular copper-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the initial reaction in the formation of lysine or hydroxylysine-derived crosslinks during collagen biosynthesis. We have isolated a cDNA for human LO from skin fibroblast poly(A+)RNA by PCR using primers based on the recently published sequence of human LO. This cDNA probe detects a major mRNA of 4.2 kb on Northern blots of RNA from normal fibroblasts. The level of LO mRNA was not significantly affected by cell density or by ascorbate treatment. Treatment of skin fibroblasts with hydralazine (50 microM), which increases the mRNAs for both the alpha and the beta subunits of prolyl hydroxylase (PH) and the mRNAs for lysyl hydroxylase, also increased LO mRNA by fourfold over a 72-h time course. In contrast, hydralazine dramatically decreased the mRNAs for alpha 1(I) collagen. Administration of minoxidil (500 microM), which specifically decreases LH activity without affecting PH activity or collagen biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts, stimulated the level of LO mRNA. Neither the administration of penicillamine (100 microM), which interferes with collagen cross-linking, nor the administration of beta-aminopropionitrile, which is a strong irreversible inhibitor of LO, to fibroblasts significantly changed the levels of LO mRNA over a 72-h time course. However, bleomycin (0.6 microgram/ml) significantly decreased the 4.2-kb LO mRNA in contrast to the levels of the alpha 1(I) collagen mRNAs, which were unchanged. No significant change was observed in the steady-state levels of LO mRNAs in fibroblasts isolated from patients with certain connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Menkes disease, cutis laxa, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. PMID:7508709

  10. Alteration of Na,K-ATPase subunit mRNA and protein levels in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne, D; Orlowski, J; Oliviero, P; Rannou, F; Sainte Beuve, C; Swynghedauw, B; Lane, L K

    1994-01-14

    To determine if an altered expression of the Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes is responsible for an observed increase in cardiac glycoside sensitivity in compensatory hypertrophy, we performed Northern and slot blot analyses of RNA and specific immunological detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in rat hearts from normal and pressure overload-treated animals induced by abdominal aortic constriction. During the early phase of hypertrophy, the only alteration is a decrease in the alpha 2 mRNA isoform. In the compensated hypertrophied heart, the levels of the predominant alpha 1 isoform (mRNA and protein) and the beta 1 subunit mRNA are unchanged. In contrast, the alpha 2 isoform (mRNA and protein) is decreased by 35% and up to 61-64% in mild (< 55%) and severe (> 55%) hypertrophy, respectively. The alpha 3 isoform (mRNA and protein), which is extremely low in adult heart, is increased up to 2-fold during hypertrophy but accounts for only approximately equal to 5% of the total alpha isoform mRNA. These findings demonstrate that, in cardiac hypertrophy, the three alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are independently regulated and that regulation occurs at a pretranslational level. The pattern of expression in hypertrophied adult heart is similar to that of the neonatal heart where the inverse regulation between the alpha 2 and alpha 3 ouabain high affinity isoforms has been reported. This suggests that distinct regulatory mechanisms controlling Na,K-ATPase isoform expression may, at least in part, be involved in the sensitivity to cardiac glycosides. PMID:8288620